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Sample records for ammonia-oxidizing nitrosomonas europaea

  1. Reductive dehalogenation of the trichloromethyl group of nitrapyrin by the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannelli, T; Hooper, A B

    1993-01-01

    Suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea catalyzed the reductive dehalogenation of the commercial nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin (2-chloro-6-trichloromethylpyridine). The product of the reaction was identified as 2-chloro-6-dichloromethylpyridine by its mass fragmentation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. A small amount of 2-chloro-6-dichloromethylpyridine accumulated during the conversion of nitrapyrin to 6-chloropicolinic acid in an aerated solution in the presence of ammonia (T. Vannelli and A.B. Hooper, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:2321-2325, 1992). Nearly stoichiometric conversion of nitrapyrin to 2-chloro-6-dichloromethylpyridine occurred at very low oxygen concentrations and in the presence of hydrazine as a source of electrons. Under these conditions the turnover rate was 0.37 nmol of nitrapyrin per min per mg of protein. Two specific inhibitors of ammonia oxidation, acetylene and allylthiourea, inhibited the rate of the dehalogenation reaction by 80 and 84%, respectively. In the presence of D2O, all 2-chloro-6-dichloromethylpyridine produced in the reaction was deuterated at the methyl position. In an oxygenated solution and in the presence of ammonia or hydrazine, cells did not catalyze the oxidation of exogenously added 2-chloro-6-dichloromethylpyridine to 6-chloropicolinic acid. Thus, 2-chloro-6-dichloromethylpyridine is apparently not an intermediate in the aerobic production of 6-chloropicolinic acid from nitrapyrin. PMID:8285668

  2. Nitrosomonas communis strain YNSRA, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, isolated from the reed rhizoplane in an aquaponics plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyama, Tatsuaki; Mine, Atsusi; Kamiyama, Kaoru; Yabe, Ryuichi; Satoh, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Reiji; Itonaga, Koji

    2004-01-01

    An ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (strain YNSRA) was isolated from the rhizoplane of the reed (Phragmites communis) used in an aquaponics plant which is a wastewater treatment plant. Strain YNSRA was identified as Nitrosomonas communis by taxonomic studies. The hydroxylamine-cytochrome c reductase (HCR) of strain YNSRA was found to have a higher activity (25.60 u/mg) than that of Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC25978T (8.94 u/mg). Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) activity was detected at very low levels in strain YNSRA, whereas strain ATCC25978T had definite activity.

  3. THE BIOENERGETICS OF AMMONIA AND HYDROXYLAMINE OXIDATION IN NITROSOMONAS-EUROPAEA AT ACID AND ALKALINE PH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRIJLINK, MJ; ABEE, T; LAANBROEK, HJ; DEBOER, W; KONINGS, WN

    1992-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizers depend on alkaline or neutral conditions for optimal activity. Below pH 7 growth and metabolic activity decrease dramatically. Actively oxidizing cells of Nitrosomonas europaea do not maintain a constant internal pH when the external pH is varied from 5 to 8. Studies of

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181, a Phylogenetically Distinct Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Arctic Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Marlen C; Norton, Jeanette M; Stein, Lisa Y; Kozlowski, Jessica; Bollmann, Annette; Klotz, Martin G; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mukherjee, Supratim; Reddy, T B K; Yee Ngan, Chew; Daum, Chris; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja

    2017-03-16

    Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181 is a cold-tolerant marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from seawater collected in the Gulf of Alaska. The high-quality complete genome contains a 2.87-Mbp chromosome and a 56.6-kbp plasmid. Chemolithoautotrophic modules encoding ammonia oxidation and CO2 fixation were identified.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Sedlacek, C.J.; Norton, J.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Suwa, Y.; Stein, L.Y.; Klotz, M.G.; Arp, D.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.; Lu, M.; Bruce, D.; Detter, C.; Tapia, R.; Han, J.; Woyke, T.; Lucas, S.; Pitluck, S.; Pennacchio, L.; Nolan, M.; Land, M.L.; Huntemann, M.; Deshpande, S.; Han, C.; Chen, A.; Kyrpides, N.; Mavromatis, K.; Markowitz, V.; Szeto, E.; Ivanova, N.; Mikhailova, N.; Pagani, I.; Pati, A.; Peters, L.; Ovchinnikova, G.; Goodwin, L.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production o

  6. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollmann, Annette [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Sedlacek, Christopher J [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J [Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW); Suwa, Yuichi [Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan; Stein, Lisa Y [University of California, Riverside; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Arp, D J [Oregon State University; Sayavedra-Soto, LA [Oregon State University; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production of nitrate. Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is an ammonia oxidizer of high interest because it is adapted to low ammonium and can be found in freshwater environments around the world. The 3,783,444-bp chromosome with a total of 3,553 protein coding genes and 44 RNA genes was sequenced by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2006.

  7. Global metabolomic responses of Nitrosomonas europaea 19718 to cold stress and altered ammonia feeding patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Huijie

    2015-11-05

    © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg The model ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea represents one of the environmentally and biotechnologically significant microorganisms. Genome-based studies over the last decade have led to many intriguing discoveries about its cellular biochemistry and physiology. However, knowledge regarding the regulation of overall metabolic routes in response to various environmental stresses is limited due to a lack of comprehensive, time-resolved metabolomic analyses. In this study, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling was performed to characterize the temporal variations of N. europaea 19718 intercellular metabolites in response to varied temperature (23 and 10 °C) and ammonia feeding patterns (shock loading and continuous feeding of 20 mg N/L). Approximately 87 metabolites were successfully identified and mapped to the existing pathways of N. europaea 19718, allowing interpretation of the influence of temperature and feeding pattern on metabolite levels. In general, varied temperature had a more profound influence on the overall metabolism than varied feeding patterns. Total extracellular metabolite concentrations (relative to internal standards and normalized to biomass weight) were lower under cold stress and shock loading conditions compared with the control (continuous feeding at 23 °C). Cold stress caused the widespread downregulation of metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism, amino acid, and lipid synthesis (e.g., malonic acid, succinic acid, putrescine, and phosphonolpyruvate). Metabolites that showed differences under varied feeding patterns were mainly involved in nucleotide acid, amino acid, and lipid metabolism (e.g., adenine, uracil, and spermidine). This study highlighted the roles of central carbon and nitrogen metabolism in countering cold stress and altered ammonia availability. In addition, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data from three

  8. Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J Arp

    2005-06-15

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression. The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression. N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression. Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and

  9. Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Arp

    2005-05-25

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression: The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression: N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression: Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and

  10. Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Biofilters Removing Trihalomethanes Are Related to Nitrosomonas oligotropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrifying biofilters degrading the four regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) trichloromethane (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and tribromomethane (TBM) -were analyzed for the presence and activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Biofilter perfor...

  11. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.; Yeager, Chris; Hyman, Michael R.; Löffler, F. E.

    2016-01-29

    Nitrosomonas europaeais an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4+-dependent O2uptake byN. europaeaby 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, andde novoprotein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and

  12. Nitrosomonas Nm143-like ammonia oxidizers and Nitrospira marina-like nitrite oxidizers dominate the nitrifier community in a marine aquaculture biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foesel, Bärbel U; Gieseke, Armin; Schwermer, Carsten; Stief, Peter; Koch, Liat; Cytryn, Eddie; de la Torré, José R; van Rijn, Jaap; Minz, Dror; Drake, Harold L; Schramm, Andreas

    2008-02-01

    Zero-discharge marine aquaculture systems are an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional aquaculture. In these systems, water is purified and recycled via microbial biofilters. Here, quantitative data on nitrifier community structure of a trickling filter biofilm associated with a recirculating marine aquaculture system are presented. Repeated rounds of the full-cycle rRNA approach were necessary to optimize DNA extraction and the probe set for FISH to obtain a reliable and comprehensive picture of the ammonia-oxidizing community. Analysis of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) confirmed the results. The most abundant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were members of the Nitrosomonas sp. Nm143-lineage (6.7% of the bacterial biovolume), followed by Nitrosomonas marina-like AOB (2.2% of the bacterial biovolume). Both were outnumbered by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the Nitrospira marina-lineage (15.7% of the bacterial biovolume). Although more than eight other nitrifying populations were detected, including Crenarchaeota closely related to the ammonia-oxidizer 'Nitrosopumilus maritimus', their collective abundance was below 1% of the total biofilm volume; their contribution to nitrification in the biofilter is therefore likely to be negligible.

  13. Clarifying the regulation of NO/N2O production in Nitrosomonas europaea during anoxic-oxic transition via flux balance analysis of a metabolic network model.

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    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Swift, Simon; Chandran, Kartik; Singhal, Naresh

    2014-09-01

    The metabolic mechanism regulating the production of nitric and nitrous oxide (NO, N2O) in ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was characterized by flux balance analysis (FBA) of a stoichiometric metabolic network (SMN) model. The SMN model was created using 51 reactions and 44 metabolites of the energy metabolism in Nitrosomonas europaea, a widely studied AOB. FBA of model simulations provided estimates for reaction rates and yield ratios of intermediate metabolites, substrates, and products. These estimates matched well, deviating on average by 15% from values for 17 M yield ratios reported for non-limiting oxygen and ammonium concentrations. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the reactions catalysed by cytochromes aa3 and P460 principally regulate the pathways of NO and N2O production (hydroxylamine oxidoreductase mediated and nitrifier denitrification). FBA of simulated N. europaea exposure to oxic-anoxic-oxic transition indicated that NO and N2O production primarily resulted from an intracellular imbalance between the production and consumption of electron equivalents during NH3 oxidation, and that NO and N2O are emitted when the sum of their production rates is greater than half the rate of NO oxidation by cytochrome P460.

  14. Interaction of the mechanism-based inactivator acetylene with ammonia monooxygenase of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilch, Stefan; Vogel, Manja; Lorenz, Matthias W; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    The ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) of Nitrosomonas europaea is a metalloenzyme that catalyses the oxidation of ammonia to hydroxylamine. We have identified histidine 191 of AmoA as the binding site for the oxidized mechanism-based inactivator acetylene. Binding of acetylene changed the molecular mass of His-191 from 155.15 to 197.2 Da (+42.05), providing evidence that acetylene was oxidized to ketene (CH2CO; 42.04 Da) which binds specifically to His-191. It must be assumed that His-191 is part of the acetylene-activating site in AMO or at least directly neighbours this site.

  15. AAU-Specific RNA Cleavage Mediated by MazF Toxin Endoribonuclease Conserved in Nitrosomonas europaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Miyamoto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrosomonas europaea carries numerous toxin-antitoxin systems. However, despite the abundant representation in its chromosome, studies have not surveyed the underlying molecular functions in detail, and their biological roles remain enigmatic. In the present study, we found that a chromosomally-encoded MazF family member, predicted at the locus NE1181, is a functional toxin endoribonuclease, and constitutes a toxin-antitoxin system, together with its cognate antitoxin, MazE. Massive parallel sequencing provided strong evidence that this toxin endoribonuclease exhibits RNA cleavage activity, primarily against the AAU triplet. This sequence-specificity was supported by the results of fluorometric assays. Our results indicate that N. europaea alters the translation profile and regulates its growth using the MazF family of endoribonuclease under certain stressful conditions.

  16. Quantification of Nitrosomonas oligotropha-Like Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrospira spp. from Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants by Competitive PCR

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    Dionisi, Hebe M.; Layton, Alice C.; Harms, Gerda; Gregory, Igrid R.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2002-01-01

    Utilizing the principle of competitive PCR, we developed two assays to enumerate Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the genus Nitrospira. The specificities of two primer sets, which were designed for two target regions, the amoA gene and Nitrospira 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), were verified by DNA sequencing. Both assays were optimized and applied to full-scale, activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) samples. If it was assumed that there was an average of 3.6 copies of 16S rDNA per cell in the total population and two copies of the amoA gene per ammonia-oxidizing bacterial cell, the ammonia oxidizers examined represented 0.0033% ± 0.0022% of the total bacterial population in a municipal WWTP. N. oligotropha-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were not detected in an industrial WWTP. If it was assumed that there was one copy of the 16S rDNA gene per nitrite-oxidizing bacterial cell, Nitrospira spp. represented 0.39% ± 0.28% of the biosludge population in the municipal WWTP and 0.37% ± 0.23% of the population in the industrial WWTP. The number of Nitrospira sp. cells in the municipal WWTP was more than 62 times greater than the number of N. oligotropha-like cells, based on a competitive PCR analysis. The results of this study extended our knowledge of the comparative compositions of nitrifying bacterial populations in wastewater treatment systems. Importantly, they also demonstrated that we were able to quantify these populations, which ultimately will be required for accurate prediction of process performance and stability for cost-effective design and operation of WWTPs. PMID:11772633

  17. MELiSSA third compartment: Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi axenic cultures in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruvellier, Nelly; Lasseur, Christophe; Poughon, Laurent; Creuly, Catherine; Dussap, Gilles

    Nitrogen is a key element for the life and its balance on Earth is regulated by the nitrogen cycle. This loop includes several steps among which nitrification that permits the transformation of the ammonium into nitrate. The MELiSSA loop is an artificial ecosystem designed for life support systems (LSS). It is based on the carbon and nitrogen cycles and the recycling of the non-edible part of the higher plants and the waste produced by the crew. In this order, all the wastes are collected in the first compartment to degrade them into organic acids and CO2. These compounds are joining the second compartment which is a photoheterotrophic compartment where at the outlet an organic-free medium containing ammonium is produced. This solution will be the substrate of the third compartment where nitrification is done. This compartment has to oxidize the ammonium into nitrate, and this biological reaction needs two steps. In the MELiSSA loop, the nitrification is carried out by two bacteria: Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC® 19718™ which is oxidizing ammonia into nitrite and Nitrobacter winogradskyi ATCC® 25391™ which is producing nitrate from nitrite in the third compartment. These two bacteria are growing in axenic conditions on a fixed bed bioreactor filled with Biostyr® beads. The nitrogen compounds are controlled by Ionic Chromatography and colorimetric titration for each sample. The work presented here deals with the culture of both bacteria in pure cultures and mixed cultures in stirred and aerated bioreactors of different volumes. The first aim of our work is the characterization of the bacteria growth in bioreactors and in the nitrifying fixed-bed column. The experimental results confirm that the growth is slow; the maximal growth rate in suspended cultures is 0.054h-1 for Nitrosomonas europaea and 0.022h-1 for Nitrobacter winogradskyi. Mixed cultures are difficult to control and operate but one could be done for more than 500 hours. The characterization of the

  18. Protective effect of immobilized ammonia oxidizers and phenol-degrading bacteria on nitrification in ammonia- and phenol-containing wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, M.; Watanabe, A. [Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Chiba (Japan); Kudo, N.; Shinozaki, H. [Materials Science Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo (Japan); Uemoto, H.

    2007-12-15

    Phenol present in wastewaters from various industries has an inhibitory effect on nitrification even at low concentrations. Hence, the biological treatment of wastewater containing both phenol and ammonia involves a series of treatment steps. It is difficult to achieve nitrification capability in an activated sludge system that contains phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. Batch treatment of wastewater containing various concentrations of phenol showed that the ammonia oxidation capability of suspended Nitrosomonas europaea cells, an ammonia oxidizer, was completely inhibited in the presence of more than 5.0 mg/L phenol. To protect the ammonia oxidizer from the inhibitory effect of phenol and to achieve ammonia oxidation capability in the wastewater containing phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level, a simple bacterial consortium composed of an ammonia oxidizer (N. europaea) and a phenol-degrading bacterial strain (Acinetobacter sp.) was used. Ammonia oxidation did not occur in the presence of phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level when suspended or immobilized N. europaea and Acinetobacter sp. cells were used in batch treatment. Following the acclimatization of the immobilized cells, accumulation of nitrite was observed, even when the wastewater contained phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. These results showed that immobilization was effective in protecting N. europaea cells from the inhibitory effect of phenol present in the wastewater. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Inhibition of bacterial ammonia oxidation by organohydrazines in soil microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng eWu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylamine oxidation by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO is a key step for energy-yielding in support of the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Organohydrazines have been shown to inactivate HAO from Nitrosomonas europaea, and may serve as selective inhibitors to differentiate bacterial from archaeal ammonia oxidation due to the absence of bacterial HAO gene homologue in known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA. In this study, the effects of three organohydrazines on activity, abundance and composition of AOB and AOA were evaluated in soil microcosms. The results indicate that phenylhydrazine and methylhydrazine at the concentration of 100 mol per gram dry weight soil completely suppressed the activity of soil nitrification. DGGE fingerprinting and sequencing analysis of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA clearly demonstrated that nitrification activity change is well paralleled with the growth of Nitrosomonas europaea-like AOB in soil microcosms. No significant correlation between AOA community structure and nitrification activity was observed among all treatments during the incubation period, although incomplete inhibition of nitrification activity occurred in 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine-amended soil microcosms. These findings show that the HAO-targeted organohydrazines can effectively inhibit bacterial nitrification in soil, and the mechanism of organohydrazine affecting AOA remains unclear.

  20. Comparison of the community structures of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in rhizoplanes of floating aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Shuting; Gu, Li

    2011-09-20

    Some common floating aquatic macrophytes could remove nutrients, such as nitrogen, from eutrophic water. However, the relationship between these macrophytes and the ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms on their rhizoplanes is still unknown. In this study, we examined communities of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) on the rhizoplanes of common floating aquatic macrophytes (Eichhornia crassipes, Pistia stratiotes and Ipomoea aquatic) in a eutrophic reservoir.The results show that AOB were the predominant ammonia-oxidizer on the three rhizoplanes. The principal AOB were Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosomonas ureae clades. The principal group of AOA was most similar to the clone from activated sludge. The ratio of AOB amoA gene copies to AOA varied from 1.36 (on E. crassipes) to 41.90 (on P. stratiotes). Diversity of AOA was much lower than that of AOB in most samples, with the exception of P. stratiotes.

  1. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  2. Application of an integrated statistical design for optimization of culture condition for ammonium removal by Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yingling; Zhengfang, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Statistical methodology was applied to the optimization of the ammonium oxidation by Nitrosomonas europaea for biomass concentration (C(B)), nitrite yield (Y(N)) and ammonium removal (R(A)). Initial screening by Plackett-Burman design was performed to select major variables out of nineteen factors, among which NH4Cl concentration (C(N)), trace element solution (TES), agitation speed (AS), and fermentation time (T) were found to have significant effects. Path of steepest ascent and response surface methodology was applied to optimize the levels of the selected factors. Finally, multi-objective optimization was used to obtain optimal condition by compromise of the three desirable objectives through a combination of weighted coefficient method coupled with entropy measurement methodology. These models enabled us to identify the optimum operation conditions (C(N)= 84.1 mM; TES = 0.74 ml; AS= 100 rpm and T = 78 h), under which C(B)= 3.386×10(8) cells/ml; Y(N)= 1.98 mg/mg and R(A) = 97.76% were simultaneously obtained. The optimized conditions were shown to be feasible through verification tests.

  3. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with a small metal-binding protein from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli is still the preferred organism for large-scale production of recombinant proteins. The use of fusion proteins has helped considerably in enhancing the solubility of heterologous proteins and their purification with affinity chromatography. Here, the use of a small metal-binding protein (SmbP) from Nitrosomonas europaea is described as a new fusion protein for protein expression and purification in E. coli. Fluorescent proteins tagged at the N-terminal with SmbP showed high levels of solubility, compared with those of maltose-binding protein and glutathione S-transferase, and low formation of inclusion bodies. Using commercially available IMAC resins charged with Ni(II), highly pure recombinant proteins were obtained after just one chromatography step. Proteins may be purified from the periplasm of E. coli if SmbP contains the signal sequence at the N-terminal. After removal of the SmbP tag from the protein of interest, high-yields are obtained since SmbP is a protein of just 9.9 kDa. The results here obtained suggest that SmbP is a good alternative as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli.

  4. Nitrosomonas Nm143-like ammonia oxidizers and Nitrospira marina -like nitrite oxidizers dominate the nitrifier community in a marine aquaculture biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foesel, Bärbel U.; Gieseke, Armin; Schwermer, Carsten;

    2008-01-01

    with a recirculating marine aquaculture system are presented. Repeated rounds of the full-cycle rRNA approach were necessary to optimize DNA extraction and the probe set for FISH to obtain a reliable and comprehensive picture of the ammonia-oxidizing community. Analysis of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amo......Zero-discharge marine aquaculture systems are an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional aquaculture. In these systems, water is purified and recycled via microbial biofilters. Here, quantitative data on nitrifier community structure of a trickling filter biofilm associated...

  5. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant. PMID:15691975

  6. Solid-phase contact assay that uses a lux-marked Nitrosomonas europaea reporter strain to estimate toxicity of bioavailable linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Kristian K; Pedersen, Anders; Sørensen, Jan

    2002-07-01

    Information about in situ toxicity of the bioavailable pools of adsorptive soil pollutants is a prerequisite for proper ecological risk assessment in contaminated soils. Such toxicity data may be obtained by assays allowing for direct exposure of introduced test microorganisms to the toxicants, as they appear in solid solution equilibria in the natural soil. We describe a novel sensitive solid-phase contact assay for in situ toxicity testing of soil pollutants based on a recombinant bioluminescent reporter strain of Nitrosomonas europaea. A slurry of the reporter strain and soil sample was shaken for 1 h, after which bioluminescence was measured either directly (soil slurry protocol) or in the supernatant obtained after centrifugation (soil extract protocol). The assay was validated for both protocols by using linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) as a toxic and adsorptive model compound in the soil samples. Interestingly, LAS showed the same toxicity to the reporter strain with either soil incubation (both protocols) or pure culture, suggesting that adsorbed LAS pools contributed to the observed toxicity. The solid-phase contact assay that used the reporter strain of lux-marked N. europaea was slightly more sensitive for the detection of LAS toxicity in soil than activity-based assays targeting indigenous nitrifiers and much more sensitive than assays targeting indigenous heterotrophic microbes. We conclude that the new solid-phase contact assay, which is based on direct interaction of the test microorganisms with bioavailable pools of the toxicants in soil, provides a most sensitive and relevant method for evaluating the in situ toxicity and assessing the risks of soil contaminants.

  7. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  8. Nitrification resilience and community dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with respect to ammonia loading shock in a nitrification reactor treating steel wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyungjin; Shin, Seung Gu; Lee, Joonyeob; Koo, Taewoan; Kim, Woong; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nitrification resilience pattern and examine the key ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) with respect to ammonia loading shocks (ALSs) in a nitrification bioreactor treating steel wastewater. The perturbation experiments were conducted in a 4-L bioreactor operated in continuous mode with a hydraulic retention time of 10 d. Three sequential ALSs were given to the bioreactor (120, 180 and 180 mg total ammonia nitrogen (TAN)/L. When the first shock was given, the nitrification process completely recovered after 14 d of further operation. However, the resilience duration was significantly reduced to ∼1 d after the second and third ALSs. In the bioreactor, Nitrosomonas aestuarii dominated the other AOB species, Nitrosomonas europaea and N. nitrosa, throughout the process. In addition, the population of N. aestuarii increased with ammonia utilization following each ALS; i.e., this species responded to acute ammonia overloadings by contributing to ammonia oxidation. This finding suggests that N. aestuarii could be exploited to achieve stable nitrification in industrial wastewaters that contain high concentrations of ammonia.

  9. A Potentiometric Flow Biosensor Based on Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria for the Detection of Toxicity in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyu Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A flow biosensor for the detection of toxicity in water using the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB Nitrosomonas europaea as a bioreceptor and a polymeric membrane ammonium-selective electrode as a transducer is described. The system is based on the inhibition effects of toxicants on the activity of AOB, which can be evaluated by measuring the ammonium consumption rates with the ammonium-selective membrane electrode. The AOB cells are immobilized on polyethersulfone membranes packed in a holder, while the membrane electrode is placed downstream in the flow cell. Two specific inhibitors of the ammonia oxidation‒allylthiourea and thioacetamide‒have been tested. The IC50 values defined as the concentration of an inhibitor causing a 50% reduction in the ammonia oxidation activity have been measured as 0.17 μM and 0.46 μM for allylthiourea and thioacetamide, respectively. The proposed sensor offers advantages of simplicity, speed and high sensitivity for measuring toxicity in water.

  10. Influence of soil moisture on linear alkylbenzene sulfonate-induced toxicity in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Klaus B; Brandt, Kristian K; Jacobsen, Anne-Marie; Mortensen, Gerda K; Sørensen, Jan

    2004-02-01

    Moisture affects bioavailability and fate of pollutants in soil, but very little is known about moisture-induced effects on pollutant toxicity. We here report on a modifying effect of moisture on degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs) and on their toxicity towards ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in agricultural soil. In soil spiked with two LAS levels (250 or 1,000 mg/kg) and incubated at four different moisture levels (9-100% of water-holding capacity), degradation was strongly affected by both soil moisture and initial LAS concentration, resulting in degradation half-lives ranging from 13 to more than 160 d. Toxicity towards AOB assessed by a novel Nitrosomonas europaea luxAB-reporter assay was correlated to total LAS concentration, indicating that LAS remained bioavailable over time without accumulation of toxic intermediates. Toxicity towards indigenous AOB increased with increasing soil moisture. The results indicate that dry soil conditions inhibit LAS degradation and provide protection against toxicity within the indigenous AOB, thus allowing for a rapid recovery of this population when LAS degradation is resumed and completed after rewetting. We propose that the protection of microbial populations against toxicity in dry soil may be a general phenomenon caused primarily by limited diffusion and thus a low bioavailability of the toxicant.

  11. Activity and population dynamics of heterotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil surrounding sludge bands spiked with linear alkylbenzene sulfonate: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Kristian Koefoed; Krogh, Paul Henning; Sørensen, Jan

    2003-04-01

    Recent research has documented soil microorganisms to be rather sensitive to linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), which may enter the soil environment in considerable quantities following sewage sludge disposal. We here report field effects of LAS on selected microbial populations present in a sandy soil surrounding well-defined sludge bands spiked with high but realistic LAS levels (7.1 or 31.3 g/kg). Surprisingly, LAS had no effect on heterotrophic respiration in the sludge compartment per se but stimulated activity and metabolic quotient (microbial activity per unit of biomass) in the surrounding soil. By contrast, autotrophic ammonia oxidation was initially inhibited in the LAS-spiked sludge. This led to dramatic transient increases of NH4+ availability in the sludge and surrounding soil, subsequently stimulating soil ammonia oxidizers. As judged from a Nitrosomonas europaea bioluminescence toxicity assay, however, LAS or other sludge components never accumulated to toxic levels in the soil compartments and the LAS tolerance of the indigenous microbes further remained unchanged following LAS exposure. LAS effects on the investigated microbial populations largely occurred during the first two months and were confined to soil closer than 30 mm from LAS-spiked sludge. Our results strongly suggest that disposal of LAS-contaminated sludge does not pose a major risk to the function of the soil microbial community under field conditions.

  12. Stable isotope probing and dynamic loading experiments provide insight into the ecophysiology of novel ammonia oxidizers in rapid gravity sand filters

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Jane; Palomo, Alejandro; Gülay, Arda; Tatari, Karolina; Thamdrup, Bo; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Sørensen, Søren; Barth F. Smets

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification is often the dominant microbial process in rapid gravity sand filters (RSF), used to treat aerated groundwater to produce drinking water. RSFs harbor diverse microbial communities including a range of ammonia oxidizing clades; Betaproteobacteria (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira), Archaea, diverse potentially ammonia oxidizing heterotrophs and abundant Nitrospira spp., recently shown to comprise both canonical nitrite oxidizing as well as complete ammonium oxidizing (comammox) types. ...

  13. Effect of free ammonia and free nitrous acid concentration on the anabolic and catabolic processes of an enriched Nitrosomonas culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Vel M; Keller, Jurg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2006-12-05

    The effects of free ammonia (FA; NH(3)) and free nitrous acid (FNA; HNO(2)) concentrations on the metabolisms of an enriched ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) culture were investigated using a method allowing the decoupling of growth and energy generation processes. A lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for the enrichment of an AOB culture. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed that 82% of the bacterial population in the SBR bound to the NEU probe specifically designed for Nitrosomonas europaea. Batch tests were carried out to measure the oxygen and ammonium consumption rates by the culture at various FA and FNA levels, in the presence or absence of inorganic carbon (CO(2), HCO(3) (-), and CO(3) (2-)). It was revealed that FA of up to 16.0 mgNH(3)-N . L(-1), which was the highest concentration used in this study, did not have any inhibitory effect on either the catabolic or anabolic processes of the Nitrosomonas culture. In contrast, FNA inhibited both the growth and energy production capabilities of the Nitrosomonas culture. The inhibition on growth initiated at approximately 0.10 mgHNO(2)-N . L(-1), and the data suggested that the biosynthesis was completely stopped at an FNA concentration of 0.40 mgHNO(2)-N . L(-1). The inhibition on energy generation initiated at a slightly lower level but the Nitrosomonas culture was still oxidizing ammonia at half of the maximum rate at an FNA concentration of 0.50-0.63 mgHNO(2)-N . L(-1). The affinity constant of the Nitrosomonas culture with respect to ammonia was determined to be 0.36 mgNH(3)-N . L(-1), independent of the presence or absence of inorganic carbon.

  14. Ecophysiology and Comparative Genomics of Nitrosomonas mobilis Ms1 Isolated from Autotrophic Nitrifying Granules of Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandar, Soe Myat; Ushiki, Norisuke; Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which oxidize ammonia to nitrite in the first step of nitrification, play an important role in biological wastewater treatment systems. Nitrosomonas mobilis is an important and dominant AOB in various wastewater treatment systems. However, the detailed physiological and genomic properties of N. mobilis have not been thoroughly investigated because of limited success isolating pure cultures. This study investigated the key physiological characteristics of N. mobilis Ms1, which was previously isolated into pure culture from the nitrifying granules of wastewater treatment bioreactor. The pure culture of N. mobilis Ms1 was cultivated in liquid mineral medium with 30 mg-N L(-1) (2.14 mM) of ammonium at room temperature under dark conditions. The optimum growth of N. mobilis Ms1 occurred at 27°C and pH 8, with a maximum growth rate of 0.05-0.07 h(-1), which corresponded to a generation time of 10-14 h. The half saturation constant for ammonium uptake rate and the maximum ammonium uptake rate of N. mobilis Ms1 were 30.70 ± 0.51 μM NH4(+) and 0.01 ± 0.002 pmol NH4(+) cells(-1) h(-1), respectively. N. mobilis Ms1 had higher ammonia oxidation activity than N. europaea in this study. The oxygen uptake activity kinetics of N. mobilis Ms1 were Km(O2) = 21.74 ± 4.01 μM O2 and V max(O2) = 0.06 ± 0.02 pmol O2 cells(-1) h(-1). Ms1 grew well at ammonium and NaCl concentrations of up to 100 and 500 mM, respectively. The nitrite tolerance of N. mobilis Ms1 was extremely high (up to 300 mM) compared to AOB previously isolated from activated sludge and wastewater treatment plants. The average nucleotide identity between the genomes of N. mobilis Ms1 and other Nitrosomonas species indicated that N. mobilis Ms1 was distantly related to other Nitrosomonas species. The organization of the genes encoding protein inventory involved in ammonia oxidation and nitrifier denitrification processes were different from other Nitrosomonas species. The current

  15. Ecophysiology and Comparative Genomics of Nitrosomonas mobilis Ms1 Isolated from Autotrophic Nitrifying Granules of Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SoeMyat Thandar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB, which oxidize ammonia to nitrite in the first step of nitrification, play an important role in biological wastewater treatment systems. Nitrosomonas mobilis is an important and dominant AOB in various wastewater treatment systems. However, the detailed physiological and genomic properties of N. mobilis have not been thoroughly investigated because of limited success isolating pure cultures. This study investigated the key physiological characteristics of N. mobilis Ms1, which was previously isolated into pure culture from the nitrifying granules of wastewater treatment bioreactor. The pure culture of N. mobilis Ms1 was cultivated in liquid mineral medium with 30 mg-N L-1 (2.14 mM of ammonium at room temperature under dark conditions. The optimum growth of N. mobilis Ms1 occurred at 27°C and pH 8, with a maximum growth rate of 0.05–0.07 h-1, which corresponded to a generation time of 10–14 h. The half saturation constant for ammonium uptake rate and the maximum ammonium uptake rate of N. mobilis Ms1 were 30.70±0.51 μM NH4+ and 0.01±0.002 pmol NH4+ cells-1 h-1, respectively. N. mobilis Ms1 had higher ammonia oxidation activity than N. europaea in this study. The oxygen uptake activity kinetics of N. mobilis Ms1 were K_(m(O_2= 21.74±4.01 μM O2 and V_(max⁡(O_2= 0.06±0.02 pmol O2 cells-1 h-1. Ms1 grew well at ammonium and NaCl concentrations of up to 100 mM and 500 mM, respectively. The nitrite tolerance of N. mobilis Ms1 was extremely high (up to 300 mM compared to AOB previously isolated from activated sludge and wastewater treatment plants. The average nucleotide identity between the genomes of N. mobilis Ms1 and other Nitrosomonas species indicated that N. mobilis Ms1 was distantly related to other Nitrosomonas species. The organization of the genes encoding protein inventory involved in ammonia oxidation and nitrifier denitrification processes were different from other Nitrosomonas species. The

  16. Diversity, abundance and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in fine particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing-Feng; Fan, Xiao-Yan; Pan, Kai-Ling; Li, Hong-Yu; Sun, Li-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Increasing ammonia emissions could exacerbate air pollution caused by fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Therefore, it is of great importance to investigate ammonia oxidation in PM2.5. This study investigated the diversity, abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and complete ammonia oxidizers (Comammox) in PM2.5 collected in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei megalopolis, China. Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2 was the most dominant AOA. Nitrosospira multiformis and Nitrosomonas aestuarii were the most dominant AOB. Comammox were present in the atmosphere, as revealed by the occurrence of Candidatus Nitrospira inopinata in PM2.5. The average cell numbers of AOA, AOB and Ca. N. inopinata were 2.82 × 104, 4.65 × 103 and 1.15 × 103 cell m‑3 air, respectively. The average maximum nitrification rate of PM2.5 was 0.14 μg (NH4+-N) [m3 air·h]‑1. AOA might account for most of the ammonia oxidation, followed by Comammox, while AOB were responsible for a small part of ammonia oxidation. Statistical analyses showed that Nitrososphaera subcluster 4.1 was positively correlated with organic carbon concentration, and Nitrosomonas eutropha showed positive correlation with ammonia concentration. Overall, this study expanded our knowledge concerning AOA, AOB and Comammox in PM2.5 and pointed towards an important role of AOA and Comammox in ammonia oxidation in PM2.5.

  17. Toxic effects of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate on metabolic activity, growth rate, and microcolony formation of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, K K; Hesselsøe, M; Roslev, P; Henriksen, K; Sørensen, J

    2001-06-01

    Strong inhibitory effects of the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on four strains of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are reported. Two Nitrosospira strains were considerably more sensitive to LAS than two Nitrosomonas strains were. Interestingly, the two Nitrosospira strains showed a weak capacity to remove LAS from the medium. This could not be attributed to adsorption or any other known physical or chemical process, suggesting that biodegradation of LAS took place. In each strain, the metabolic activity (50% effective concentration [EC(50)], 6 to 38 mg liter(-1)) was affected much less by LAS than the growth rate and viability (EC(50), 3 to 14 mg liter(-1)) were. However, at LAS levels that inhibited growth, metabolic activity took place only for 1 to 5 days, after which metabolic activity also ceased. The potential for adaptation to LAS exposure was investigated with Nitrosomonas europaea grown at a sublethal LAS level (10 mg liter(-1)); compared to control cells, preexposed cells showed severely affected cell functions (cessation of growth, loss of viability, and reduced NH(4)(+) oxidation activity), demonstrating that long-term incubation at sublethal LAS levels was also detrimental. Our data strongly suggest that AOB are more sensitive to LAS than most heterotrophic bacteria are, and we hypothesize that thermodynamic constraints make AOB more susceptible to surfactant-induced stress than heterotrophic bacteria are. We further suggest that AOB may comprise a sensitive indicator group which can be used to determine the impact of LAS on microbial communities.

  18. Community analysis of ammonia oxidizer in the oxygen-limited nitritation stage of OLAND system by DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rDNA Fragments and FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dan; ZHANG De-min; LIU Yao-ping; CAO Wen-wei; CHEN Guan-xiong

    2004-01-01

    OLAND(oxygen limited autotrophic nitrification and denitrification) nitrogen removal system was constructed by coupling with oxygen limited nitritation stage and anaerobic ammonium oxidation stage. Ammonia oxidizer, as a kind of key bacteria in N cycle, plays an important role at the oxygen limited nitritation stage of OLAND nitrogen removal system. In this study, specific amplification of 16S rDNA fragment of ammonia oxidizer by nested PCR, separation of mixed PCR samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE), and the quantification of ammonia oxidizer by Fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH) were combined to investigate the shifts of community composition and quantity of ammonia oxidizer of the oxygen limited nitritation stage in OLAND system. It showed that the community composition of ammonia oxidizer changed drastically when dissolved oxygen was decreased gradually, and the dominant ammonia oxidizer of the steady nitrite accumulation stage were completely different from that of the early stage of oxygen limited nitritation identified by DGGE . It was concluded that the Nitrosomonas may be the dominant genus of ammonia oxidizer at the oxygen limited nitritation stage of OLAND system characterized by nested PCR-DGGE and FISH, and the percentage of Nitrosomonas was 72.5% ( 0.8% of ammonia oxidizer at the steady nitrite accumulation stage detected by FISH.

  19. Stable isotope probing and dynamic loading experiments provide insight into the ecophysiology of novel ammonia oxidizers in rapid gravity sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, Jane; Palomo, Alejandro; Gülay, Arda

    to elucidate the differences in ecophysiology between the ammonia oxidizing clades that enable them to co-exist in this unique environment. Experiments were conducted using sand columns designed and operated to mimic the conditions in the full-scale parent RSF. RNA and DNA stable isotope probing based on 13C......Nitrification is often the dominant microbial process in rapid gravity sand filters (RSF), used to treat aerated groundwater to produce drinking water. RSFs harbor diverse microbial communities including a range of ammonia oxidizing clades; Betaproteobacteria (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira), Archaea......, diverse potentially ammonia oxidizing heterotrophs and abundant Nitrospira spp., recently shown to comprise both canonical nitrite oxidizing as well as complete ammonium oxidizing (comammox) types. We examined the contributions of the different ammonia oxidizers to in situ ammonia oxidation, and aimed...

  20. Effects of copper on the abundance and diversity of ammonia oxidizers during dairy cattle manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanan; Song, Wen; Gu, Jie; Zhang, Kaiyu; Qian, Xun; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Yajun; Li, Yang; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of adding Cu(II) at two exposure levels (50 and 500mgkg(-1), i.e., Cu50 and Cu500 treatments, respectively) on the activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms during dairy cattle manure composting. The results showed that the pH, NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N, and potential ammonia oxidation values were inhibited significantly by the addition of Cu(II). Furthermore, the abundances of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) amoA gene and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene were determined by quantitative PCR, and their compositions were evaluated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). AOA was the dominant ammonia oxidizing microorganism, of which the abundance was much higher than AOB during composting. Cu50 and Cu500 had significant inhibitory effects on the abundance of the amoA gene. The DGGE profile and statistical analysis showed that Cu(II) changed the AOA and AOB community structure and diversity, where Nitrosomonas and Crenarchaeota dominated throughout the composting process.

  1. Community structure of β-Proteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in prawn farm sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Ma; Lin Wang; Lumin Qian

    2008-01-01

    To examine the community structure of β-Proteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in prawn farm sediment, the 16S rRNA gene library was constructed with β-Proteobacterial AOB-specific primers. The library was screened by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and clones with unique RFLP patterns were sequenced. Two groups of β-Proteobacterial AOB, the Nitrosomonas and the Nitrosospira, were detected. The Nitrosomonas occupied an absolute dominant position, accounting for more than 90% of total clones in the clone library, while the Nitrosospira accounting for 5.48%. Nitrosomonas-affiliated clones were grouped into the Nitrosomonas marina and the Nitrosomonas sp. Nm 143 clusters, and Nitrosospira-affiliated clones were grouped into the Nitrosospira cluster 1. No other clusters of β-Proteobacterial AOB were found. The results enriched our knowledge of AOB diversity in the prawn farm sediment and provided important foundational data for further functional studies of these microbes in mariculture environments.

  2. Diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in relation to soil environment in Ebinur Lake Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenge Hu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Ebinur Lake Wetland, the most representative temperate arid zone wetland ecosystem in China, is the centre of oasis and desertification of the northern slope of Tianshan conjugate. Soil samples were collected from three sites (Tamarix ramosissima, Halocnemum strobilaceum and Phragmites australis and different soil layers (0–5, 5–15, 15–25 and 25–35 cm in this wetland in spring, summer and autumn and were used to characterize the diversity of AOB based on the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA gene. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE and bivariate correlation analysis were used to analyse the relationship between the diversity of AOB and soil environment factors. The PCR-DGGE indicated that the diversity of AOB was high in the entire sample and the Shannon diversity index varied from 1.369 to 2.471. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the amoA fragments were grouped into Nitrosospira sp. and Nitrosomonas sp. Most amoA gene sequences fell within the Nitrosospira sp. cluster, and only a few sequences were clustered with Nitrosomonas sp., indicating that Nitrosospira sp. may be more adaptable than Nitrosomonas sp. in this area. Bivariate correlation analysis showed that the diversity of AOB was significantly correlated with soil organic matter, conductivity, total phosphorus and nitrate in the Ebinur Lake Wetland in Xinjiang.

  3. Vertical segregation and phylogenetic characterization of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in the sediment of a freshwater aquaculture pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimin eLu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pond aquaculture is the major freshwater aquaculture method in China. Ammonia-oxidizing communities inhabiting pond sediments play an important role in controlling culture water quality. However, the distribution and activities of ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities along sediment profiles are poorly understood in this specific environment. Vertical variations in the abundance, transcription, potential ammonia oxidizing rate, and community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA in sediment samples (0–50 cm depth collected from a freshwater aquaculture pond were investigated. The concentrations of the AOA amoA gene were higher than those of the AOB by an order of magnitude, which suggested that AOA, as opposed to AOB, were the numerically predominant ammonia-oxidizing organisms in the surface sediment. This could be attributed to the fact that AOA are more resistant to low levels of dissolved oxygen. However, the concentrations of the AOB amoA mRNA were higher than those of the AOA by 2.5–39.9-fold in surface sediments (0–10 cm depth, which suggests that the oxidation of ammonia was mainly performed by AOB in the surface sediments, and by AOA in the deeper sediments, where only AOA could be detected. Clone libraries of AOA and AOB amoA sequences indicated that the diversity of AOA and AOB decreased with increasing depth. The AOB community consisted of two groups: the Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas clusters, and Nitrosomonas were predominant in the freshwater pond sediment. All AOA amoA gene sequences in the 0–2 cm deep sediment were grouped into the Nitrososphaera cluster, while other AOA sequences in deeper sediments (10–15 and 20–25 cm depths were grouped into the Nitrosopumilus cluster.

  4. The abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in activated sludge under autotrophic domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Ma, Chao; Sun, Shifang; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Jun; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-04-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a key role in nitrogen-removal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as they can transform ammonia into nitrite. AOB can be enriched in activated sludge through autotrophic domestication although they are difficult to be isolated. In this study, autotrophic domestication was carried out in a lab-scale sequencing-batch-reactor (SBR) system with two activated sludge samples. The ammonia removal capacity of the sludge samples increased during the domestication, and pH exhibited a negative correlation with the ammonia removal amount, which indicated that it was one important factor of microbial ammonia oxidation. The count of AOB, measured by the most probable number (MPN) method, increased significantly during autotrophic domestication as ammonia oxidation efficiency was enhanced. We investigated the changes in the community structure of AOB before and after domestication by amoA clone library and T-RFLP profile. It showed that AOB had been successfully enriched and the community structure significantly shifted during the domestication. Two groups of AOB were found in sludge samples: Nitrosomonas-like group remained predominant all the time and Nitrosospira-like group changed obviously. Simultaneously, the total heterotrophic bacteria were investigated by MPN and Biolog assay. The metabolic diversity of heterotrophs had changed minutely, although the count of them decreased significantly and lost superiority of microbial communities in the sludge.

  5. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA and AOB in five strongly acidic soils (pHnitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) completely inhibited the nitrification activity and CO(2) fixation by AOA, accompanied by decreasing thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance. Bacterial amoA gene abundance decreased in all microcosms irrespective of DCD addition, and mostly showed no correlation with nitrate concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of thaumarchaeal amoA gene and 16S rRNA gene revealed active (13)CO(2)-labeled AOA belonged to groups 1.1a-associated and 1.1b. Taken together, these results provided strong evidence that AOA have a more important role than AOB in autotrophic ammonia oxidation in strongly acidic soils.

  6. Abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in different types of soil in the Yangtze River estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ran LI; Yi-ping XIAO; Wen-wei REN; Zeng-fu LIU; Jin-huan SHI; Zhe-xue QUAN

    2012-01-01

    Tidal fiats are soil resources of great significance.Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle and is often a critical first step in nitrogen removal from estuarine and coastal environments.We determined the abundance as well as composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in different soils during land reclamation process.The abundance of AOA was higher than that of AOB in farm land and wild land while AOA was not detected in tidal flats using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).The different abundances of AOB and AOA were negatively correlated with the salinity.The diversities of AOB and AOA were also investigated using clone libraries by amplification of amoA gene.Among AOB,nearly all sequences belonged to the Nitrosomonas lineage in the initial land reclamation process,i.e.,tidal flats,while both Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira lineages were detected in later and transition phases of land reclamation process,farm land and wild land.The ratio of the numbers of sequences of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira lineages was positively correlated with the salinity and the net nitrification rate.As for AOA,there was no obvious correlation with the changes in the physicochemical properties of the soil.This study suggests that AOB may be more import than AOA with respect to influencing the different land reclamation process stages.

  7. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter depositi

  8. Community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in rice field soil as affected by nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Ke, Xiubin; Wu, Liqin; Lu, Yahai

    2009-02-01

    Little information is available on the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in flooded rice soils. Consequently, a microcosm experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on the composition of AOB and AOA communities in rice soil by using molecular analyses of ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) fragments. Experimental treatments included three levels of N (urea) fertilizer, i.e. 50, 100 and 150 mgNkg(-1) soil. Soil samples were operationally divided into four fractions: surface soil, bulk soil deep layer, rhizosphere and washed root material. NH(4)(+)-N was the dominant form of N in soil porewater and increased with N fertilization. Cloning and sequencing of amoA gene fragments showed that the AOB community in the rice soil consisted of three major groups, i.e. Nitrosomonas communis cluster, Nitrosospira cluster 3a and cluster 3b. The sequences related to Nitrosomonas were predominant. There was a clear effect of N fertilizer and soil depth on AOB community composition based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting. Nitrosomonas appeared to be more abundant in the potentially oxic or micro-oxic fractions, including surface soil, rhizosphere and washed root material, than the deep layer of anoxic bulk soil. Furthermore, Nitrosomonas increased relatively in the partially oxic fractions and that of Nitrosospira decreased with the increasing application of N fertilizer. However, AOA community composition remained unchanged according to the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses.

  9. Effects of Soil on Ammonia, Ethylene, Chloroethane, and 1,1,1-Trichloroethane Oxidation by Nitrosomonas europaea†

    OpenAIRE

    Hommes, Norman G.; Russell, Sterling A.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    Ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) from Nitrosomonas europaea catalyzes the oxidation of ammonia to hydroxylamine and has been shown to oxidize a variety of halogenated and nonhalogenated hydrocarbons. As part of a program focused upon extending these observations to natural systems, a study was conducted to examine the influence of soil upon the cooxidative abilities of N. europaea. Small quantities of Willamette silt loam (organic carbon content, 1.8%; cation-exchange capacity, 15 cmol/kg of soil)...

  10. Effect of Metasystox-R on marine Nitrosomonas sp. as a nitrification inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeian, Shila; Amirsharifi, Maryam; Esmaeili, Akbar; Salimi, Lida

    2008-02-15

    Metasystox-R is a systemic soluble liquid insecticide for the control of aphids on brassica vegetable crops, cotton and lupins and it is possible enter to the marine environment and may be have a hazard effects for the marine organisms and nitrification processes. Effect of Metasystox-R on ammonia oxidizing activity by marine Nitrosomonas sp. was investigated by determining nitrification inhibitor assay in the cell suspension. Results showed that 8 microg mL(-1) of Metasystox-R with PI50 = 4.48 significantly inhibited nitrite production by marine Nitrosomonas sp. These results suggested marine Nitrosomonas sp. may be one of the target bacteria which was inhibitor and decreasing nitrification in the marine environment.

  11. The effect of outside conditions on anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; WANG Shu-bo

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon, inorganic carbon, temperature, pH and ORP are all to have a certain influence on the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. We can draw some conclusions on the optimum conditions of anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. The optimum temperature of the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction is 30-35℃. And the optimum pH of the anaerobic ammonia reaction is 7.5-8.3. The presence of organic matters can affect the anaerobic ammonia reaction, and different organic matters have different influence on it. The concentration of the inorganic carbon also exist great influence on the reaction. High inorganic carbon concentration also can inhibit anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction.

  12. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and nitrite-oxidizing nitrospiras in the biofilter of a shrimp recirculating aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Monisha N; Briones, Aurelio; Diana, James; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the nitrifier community in the biofilter of a zero discharge, recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for the production of marine shrimp in a low density (low ammonium production) system. The ammonia-oxidizing populations were examined by targeting 16S rRNA and amoA genes of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). The nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were investigated by targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Archaeal amoA genes were more abundant in all compartments of the RAS than bacterial amoA genes. Analysis of bacterial and archaeal amoA gene sequences revealed that most ammonia oxidizers were related to Nitrosomonas marina and Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The NOB detected were related to Nitrospira marina and Nitrospira moscoviensis, and Nitrospira marina-type NOB were more abundant than N. moscoviensis-type NOB. Water quality and biofilm attachment media played a role in the competitiveness of AOA over AOB and Nitrospira marina-over N. moscoviensis-type NOB.

  13. Fauna Europaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pape, Thomas; Beuk, Paul; Pont, Adrian Charles;

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant multicellular European terrestrial and freshwater animals and their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (east of the Urals and excluding th...

  14. Population dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in an aerated submerged biofilm reactor for micropolluted raw water pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Li, Dao-Tang; Yang, Hong

    2008-05-01

    Population dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a full-scale aerated submerged biofilm reactor for micropolluted raw water pretreatment was investigated using molecular techniques for a period of 1 year. The ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene fragments were amplified from DNA and RNA extracts of biofilm samples. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profile based on the amoA messenger RNA approach exhibited a more variable pattern of temporal dynamics of AOB communities than the DNA-derived approach during the study. Phylogenetic analysis of excised DGGE bands revealed three AOB groups affiliated with the Nitrosomonas oligotropha lineage, Nitrosomonas communis lineage, and an unknown Nitrosomonas group. The population size of betaproteobacterial AOB, quantified with 16S ribosomal RNA gene real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, ranged from 6.63 x 10(5) to 2.67 x 10(9) cells per gram of dry biofilm and corresponded to 0.23-1.8% of the total bacterial fraction. Quantitative results of amoA gene of the three specific AOB groups revealed changes in competitive dominance between AOB of the N. oligotropha lineage and N. communis lineage. Water temperature is shown to have major influence on AOB population size in the reactor by the statistic analysis, and a positive correlation between AOB cell numbers and ammonia removal efficiency is suggested (r = 0.628, P < 0.05).

  15. Ecophysiology and Comparative Genomics of Nitrosomonas mobilis Ms1 Isolated from Autotrophic Nitrifying Granules of Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    SoeMyat Thandar; Norisuke Ushiki; Hirotsugu Fujitani; Yuji Sekiguchi; Satoshi Tsuneda

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which oxidize ammonia to nitrite in the first step of nitrification, play an important role in biological wastewater treatment systems. Nitrosomonas mobilis is an important and dominant AOB in various wastewater treatment systems. However, the detailed physiological and genomic properties of N. mobilis have not been thoroughly investigated because of limited success isolating pure cultures. This study investigated the key physiological characteristics of N. m...

  16. Freshwater Recirculating Aquaculture System Operations Drive Biofilter Bacterial Community Shifts around a Stable Nitrifying Consortium of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Comammox Nitrospira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelme, Ryan P.; McLellan, Sandra L.; Newton, Ryan J.

    2017-01-01

    Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) are unique engineered ecosystems that minimize environmental perturbation by reducing nutrient pollution discharge. RAS typically employ a biofilter to control ammonia levels produced as a byproduct of fish protein catabolism. Nitrosomonas (ammonia-oxidizing), Nitrospira, and Nitrobacter (nitrite-oxidizing) species are thought to be the primary nitrifiers present in RAS biofilters. We explored this assertion by characterizing the biofilter bacterial and archaeal community of a commercial scale freshwater RAS that has been in operation for >15 years. We found the biofilter community harbored a diverse array of bacterial taxa (>1000 genus-level taxon assignments) dominated by Chitinophagaceae (~12%) and Acidobacteria (~9%). The bacterial community exhibited significant composition shifts with changes in biofilter depth and in conjunction with operational changes across a fish rearing cycle. Archaea also were abundant, and were comprised solely of a low diversity assemblage of Thaumarchaeota (>95%), thought to be ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) from the presence of AOA ammonia monooxygenase genes. Nitrosomonas were present at all depths and time points. However, their abundance was >3 orders of magnitude less than AOA and exhibited significant depth-time variability not observed for AOA. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrite oxidoreductase beta subunit (nxrB) gene indicated two distinct Nitrospira populations were present, while Nitrobacter were not detected. Subsequent identification of Nitrospira ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit genes in conjunction with the phylogenetic placement and quantification of the nxrB genotypes suggests complete ammonia-oxidizing (comammox) and nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira populations co-exist with relatively equivalent and stable abundances in this system. It appears RAS biofilters harbor complex microbial communities whose composition can be affected directly by typical system operations while

  17. Fauna Europaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pape, Thomas; Beuk, Paul; Pont, Adrian Charles

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant multicellular European terrestrial and freshwater animals and their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (east of the Urals and excluding...... density, and the more fertile habitats are extensively cultivated. This has undoubtedly increased the extinction risk for numerous species of brachyceran flies, yet with the recent re-discovery of Thyreophoracynophila (Panzer), there are no known cases of extinction at a European level. However, few...

  18. [Inhibition of aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity of sediment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-hong; Hu, Hong-ying; Wei, Dong-bin; Huang, Xia; Qian, Yi

    2004-03-01

    The inhibition of 24 aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria in sediment was measured. The effects of the kind, number and position of substituted groups on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria were discussed. The inhibition of mono-substituted benzenes on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria were in order of -OH > -NO2 > -NH2 > -Cl > -CH3 > -H. The position of substituted groups of di-substituted benzenes also affected the inhibition, and the inhibitions of dimethylbenzenes(xylene) were in order of meta-> ortho-> para-. The increase in number of substituted group on benzene-ring enhanced the inhibition of aromatics studied in this study on nitrifying bacteria. There was a linear relationship between inhibition (IC50, mumol.L-1) of aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity and total electronegativity (sigma E) of aromatics: lgIC50 = 14.72 - 0.91 sigma E.

  19. Community shift of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria along an anthropogenic pollution gradient from the Pearl River Delta to the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yiguo; Li, Meng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2012-04-01

    The phylogenetic diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing beta-proteobacteria (beta-AOB) was analyzed along an anthropogenic pollution gradient from the coastal Pearl River Delta to the South China Sea using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Along the gradient from coastal to the open ocean, the phylogenetic diversity of the dominant genus changed from Nitrosomonas to Nitrosospira, indicating the niche specificity by these two genera as both salinity and anthropogenic influence were major factors involved. The diversity of bacterial amoA gene was also variable along the gradient, with the highest in the deep-sea sediments, followed by the marshes sediments and the lowest in the coastal areas. Within the Nitrosomonas-related clade, four distinct lineages were identified including a putative new one (A5-16) from the different sites over the large geographical area. In the Nitrosospira-related clade, the habitat-specific lineages to the deep-sea and coastal sediments were identified. This study also provides strong support that Nitrosomonas genus, especially Nitrosomonas oligotropha lineage (6a) could be a potential bio-indicator species for pollution or freshwater/wastewater input into coastal environments. A suite of statistical analyses used showed that water depth and temperature were major factors shaping the community structure of beta-AOB in this study area.

  20. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in cattle manure compost under various temperatures and ammonia concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Ryu; Tada, Chika; Asano, Ryoki; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Nakai, Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    A recent study showed that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) coexist in the process of cattle manure composting. To investigate their physiological characteristics, liquid cultures seeded with fermenting cattle manure compost were incubated at various temperatures (37°C, 46°C, or 60°C) and ammonium concentrations (0.5, 1, 4, or 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N). The growth rates of the AOB and AOA were monitored using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis targeting the bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A genes. AOB grew at 37°C and 4 or 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N, whereas AOA grew at 46°C and 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N. Incubation with allylthiourea indicated that the AOB and AOA grew by oxidizing ammonia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and subsequent sequencing analyses revealed that a bacterium related to Nitrosomonas halophila and an archaeon related to Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis were the predominant AOB and AOA, respectively, in the seed compost and in cultures after incubation. This is the first report to demonstrate that the predominant AOA in cattle manure compost can grow and can probably oxidize ammonia under moderately thermophilic conditions.

  1. Human settlement as driver of bacterial, but not of archaeal, ammonia oxidizers abundance and community structure in tropical stream sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana De Paula Reis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms.

  2. Spatial distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria across eight freshwater lakes in sediments from Jiangsu of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizingarchaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB play an important role innitrogen transformation in freshwater sediments. However, it is still unclear towhat extent the distribution patterns of these microorganisms are affected bythe freshwater sediment across a large geographical scale. This study wasdesigned to gain insight into the heterogeneity distribution of AOA and AOB in32 freshwater sediments from a wide range of ecologic types. Real-time quantitative polymerasechain reaction PCR(qPCR combined with the terminal restrictionfragment length polymorphism(T-RFLP were employed to characterize the abundance, diversity, and communitystructure of the AOA and AOB in 32 freshwater sediments. AOA and AOB wereubiquitous in all sediments, and archaeal amoA far outnumbered bacterial amoA inmost sediments with lower organic matters. The abundance of AOA and AOB did notvary with the freshwater ecological type (macrophyte dominated region and algaedominated region. Based on  the T-RFLP of an amoA gene, this research found that organicmatters in pore water rather than other factors affect the AOA communitystructure in sediments, while the AOB were not significantly different in thefreshwater sediments. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all archaeal amoAsequences fell within either the Crenarchaeotal Group (CG I.1b or the CGI.1asubgroup, and all AOB clustered with genus Nitrosomonas or Nitrosospira. The data obtained inthis study elucidates the role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea andammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the nitrogen cycle of freshwater ecosystems.

  3. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, R.; Wang, B. Z.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; Jia, Z. J.

    2014-06-01

    Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity 6-fold during a 19-day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly suppressed in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be partially inhibited by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to an equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related type Ia MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. An increase in 13C assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition partially inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, as well as growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. These

  4. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and pmoA genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity by 6-fold during a 19 day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly inhibited in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like type Ia MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be suppressed by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. Strikingly, type Ib MOB did not respond to methane nor to urea. Increase in 13C-assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, in

  5. Ammonia biofiltration and community analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yin; Wenfeng, Xu

    2009-09-01

    Biological removal of ammonia was investigated using compost and sludge as packing materials in laboratory-scale biofilters. The aim of this study is to characterize the composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in two biofilters designed to remove ammonia. Experimental tests and measurements included analysis of removal efficiency and metabolic products. The inlet concentration of ammonia applied was 20-100 mg m(-3). Removal efficiencies of BFC and BFS were in the range of 97-99% and 95-99%, respectively. Periodic analysis of the biofilter packing materials showed ammonia was removed from air stream by nitrification and by the improved absorption of NH(3) in the resultant acidity. Nitrate was the dominant product of NH(3) transformation. Changes in the composition of AOB were examined by using nested PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of DGGE bands. DGGE analysis of biofilter samples revealed that shifts in the community structure of AOB were observed in the experiment; however, the idle phase did not cause the structural shift of AOB. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the population of AOB showed Nitrosospira sp. remains the predominant population in BFC, while Nitrosomonas sp. is the predominant population in BFS.

  6. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have better adaptability in oxygenated/hypoxic alternant conditions compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Hu, Baolan; He, Zhanfei; Zhang, Bin; Tian, Guangming; Zheng, Ping; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Ammonia oxidation is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Few studies compared the adaptability of AOA and AOB for oxygenated/hypoxic alternant conditions in water-level-fluctuating zones. Here, using qPCR and 454 high-throughput sequencing of functional amoA genes of AOA and AOB, we examined the changes of abundances, diversities, and community structures of AOA and AOB in periodically flooded soils compared to the non-flooded soils in Three Gorges Reservoir. The increased AOA operational taxonomic unit (OTU) numbers and the higher ratios of abundance (AOA:AOB) in the periodically flooded soils suggested AOA have better adaptability for oxygenated/hypoxic alternant conditions in the water-level-fluctuating zones in the Three Gorges Reservoir and probably responsible for the ammonia oxidation there. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) had the most significant effect on the community distribution of AOA (p ammonia-oxidizing microbes. ORP was significantly negatively correlated with AOA OTU numbers (p < 0.05), ratio of OTU numbers (AOA:AOB) (p < 0.01), and ratio of amoA gene abundances (AOA:AOB) (p < 0.05). ORP was also significantly positively correlated with AOB abundance (p < 0.05).

  7. Habitat-associated phylogenetic community patterns of microbial ammonia oxidizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Fernàndez-Guerra

    Full Text Available Microorganisms mediating ammonia oxidation play a fundamental role in the connection between biological nitrogen fixation and anaerobic nitrogen losses. Bacteria and Archaea ammonia oxidizers (AOB and AOA, respectively have colonized similar habitats worldwide. Ammonia oxidation is the rate-limiting step in nitrification, and the ammonia monooxygenase (Amo is the key enzyme involved. The molecular ecology of this process has been extensively explored by surveying the gene of the subunit A of the Amo (amoA gene. In the present study, we explored the phylogenetic community ecology of AOB and AOA, analyzing 5776 amoA gene sequences from >300 isolation sources, and clustering habitats by environmental ontologies. As a whole, phylogenetic richness was larger in AOA than in AOB, and sediments contained the highest phylogenetic richness whereas marine plankton the lowest. We also observed that freshwater ammonia oxidizers were phylogenetically richer than their marine counterparts. AOA communities were more dissimilar to each other than those of AOB, and consistent monophyletic lineages were observed for sediments, soils, and marine plankton in AOA but not in AOB. The diversification patterns showed a more constant cladogenesis through time for AOB whereas AOA apparently experienced two fast diversification events separated by a long steady-state episode. The diversification rate (γ statistic for most of the habitats indicated γ(AOA > γ(AOB. Soil and sediment experienced earlier bursts of diversification whereas habitats usually eutrophic and rich in ammonium such as wastewater and sludge showed accelerated diversification rates towards the present. Overall, this work shows for the first time a global picture of the phylogenetic community structure of both AOB and AOA assemblages following the strictest analytical standards, and provides an ecological view on the differential evolutionary paths experienced by widespread ammonia-oxidizing

  8. Isolation and properties of obligately chemolithoautotrophic and extremely alkali-tolerant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from Mongolian soda lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, D; Tourova, T; Schmid, M C; Wagner, M; Koops, H P; Kuenen, J G; Jetten, M

    2001-09-01

    Five mixed samples prepared from the surface sediments of 20 north-east Mongolian soda lakes with total salt contents from 5 to 360 g/l and pH values from 9.7 to 10.5 were used to enrich for alkaliphilic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Successful enrichments at pH 10 were achieved on carbonate mineral medium containing 0.6 M total Na(+) and < or =4 mM NH(4)Cl. Five isolates (ANs1-ANs5) of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria capable of growth at pH 10 were obtained from the colonies developed on bilayered gradient plates. The cells were motile and coccoid, with well-developed intracytoplasmic membranes (ICPM) and carboxysomes. At pH 10.0, ammonia was toxic for growth at concentrations higher than 5 mM NH(4)Cl. The bacteria were able to grow within the salinity range of 0.1-1.0 M of total Na+ (optimum 0.3 M). In media containing 0.3-0.6 M total Na(+), optimal growth in batch cultures occurred in the presence of a bicarbonate/carbonate buffer system within the pH range 8.5-9.5, with the highest pH limit at pH 10.5. At pH lower than 8.0, growth was slower, most probably due to decreasing free ammonia. The pH profile of the respiratory activity was broader, with limits at 6.5-7.0 and 11.0 and an optimum at 9.5-10.0. In pH-controlled, NH(3)-limited continuous culture, isolate ANs5 grew up to pH 11.3, which is the highest pH limit known for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria so far. This showed the existence of extremely alkali-tolerant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the soda lakes. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis of the five isolates demonstrated that they possess identical 16S rDNA genes and that they are closely related to Nitrosomonas halophila (sequence similarity 99.3%), a member of the beta-subclass of the Proteobacteria. This affiliation was confirmed by comparative sequence analysis of the amoA gene, encoding the active-site subunit of the ammonia-monoxygenase, of one of the isolates. DNA-DNA hybridization data further supported that the soda lake isolates are very similar to

  9. Macroecological patterns of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in the Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sintes, E.; Ouillon, N.; Herndl, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Macroecological patterns are found in animals and plants, but also in micro-organisms.Macroecological and biogeographic distribution patterns in marine Archaea, however,have not been studied yet. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) show a bipolar distribution(i.e. similar communities in the northernmost

  10. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, L.E.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.A.; Gallois, N.; Schouten, S.; Stein, L.Y.; Prosser, J.I.; Nicol, G.W.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganismsin soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOBand dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of amm

  11. Diversity, Physiology, and Niche Differentiation of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzenpichler, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding o...

  12. Differential responses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to long-term fertilization in a New England salt marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Yando, Erik; Hildebrand, Erica; Dwyer, Courtney; Kearney, Anne; Waciega, Alex; Valiela, Ivan; Bernhard, Anne E

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), new questions have arisen about population and community dynamics and potential interactions between AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). We investigated the effects of long-term fertilization on AOA and AOB in the Great Sippewissett Marsh, Falmouth, MA, USA to address some of these questions. Sediment samples were collected from low and high marsh habitats in July 2009 from replicate plots that received low (LF), high (HF), and extra high (XF) levels of a mixed NPK fertilizer biweekly during the growing season since 1974. Additional untreated plots were included as controls (C). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the amoA genes revealed distinct shifts in AOB communities related to fertilization treatment, but the response patterns of AOA were less consistent. Four AOB operational taxonomic units (OTUs) predictably and significantly responded to fertilization, but only one AOA OTU showed a significant pattern. Betaproteobacterial amoA gene sequences within the Nitrosospira-like cluster dominated at C and LF sites, while sequences related to Nitrosomonas spp. dominated at HF and XF sites. We identified some clusters of AOA sequences recovered primarily from high fertilization regimes, but other clusters consisted of sequences recovered from all fertilization treatments, suggesting greater physiological diversity. Surprisingly, fertilization appeared to have little impact on abundance of AOA or AOB. In summary, our data reveal striking patterns for AOA and AOB in response to long-term fertilization, and also suggest a missing link between community composition and abundance and nitrogen processing in the marsh.

  13. Differential responses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to long-term fertilization in a New England salt marsh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng ePeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, new questions have arisen about population and community dynamics and potential interactions between AOA and ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB. We investigated the effects of long-term fertilization on AOA and AOB in the Great Sippewissett Marsh, Falmouth, MA, USA to address some of these questions. Sediment samples were collected from low and high marsh habitats in July 2009 from replicate plots that received low (LF, high (HF, and extra high (XF levels of a mixed NPK fertilizer biweekly during the growing season since 1974. Additional untreated plots were included as controls (C. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the amoA genes revealed distinct shifts in AOB communities related to fertilization treatment, but the response patterns of AOA were less consistent. Four AOB operational taxonomic units (OTUs predictably and significantly responded to fertilization, but only one AOA OTU showed a significant pattern. Betaproteobacterial amoA gene sequences within the Nitrosospira-like cluster dominated at C and LF sites, while sequences related to Nitrosomonas spp. dominated at HF and XF sites. We identified some clusters of AOA sequences recovered primarily from high fertilization regimes, but other clusters consisted of sequences recovered from all fertilization treatments, suggesting greater physiological diversity. Surprisingly, fertilization appeared to have little impact on abundance of AOA or AOB. In summary, our data reveal striking patterns for AOA and AOB in response to long-term fertilization, and also suggest a missing link between community composition and abundance and nitrogen processing in the marsh.

  14. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in soil microcosms is inhibited by acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offre, Pierre; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2009-10-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were considered to be responsible for the majority of ammonia oxidation in soil until the recent discovery of the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea. To assess the relative contributions of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil ammonia oxidation, their growth was analysed during active nitrification in soil microcosms incubated for 30 days at 30 degrees C, and the effect of an inhibitor of ammonia oxidation (acetylene) on their growth and soil nitrification kinetics was determined. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of bacterial ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA genes did not detect any change in their community composition during incubation, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of bacterial amoA genes indicated a small decrease in abundance in control and acetylene-containing microcosms. DGGE fingerprints of archaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes demonstrated changes in the relative abundance of specific crenarchaeal phylotypes during active nitrification. Growth was also indicated by increases in crenarchaeal amoA gene copy number, determined by qPCR. In microcosms containing acetylene, nitrification and growth of the crenarchaeal phylotypes were suppressed, suggesting that these crenarchaea are ammonia oxidizers. Growth of only archaeal but not bacterial ammonia oxidizers occurred in microcosms with active nitrification, indicating that ammonia oxidation was mostly due to archaea in the conditions of the present study.

  15. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Kumagai, Asami; Ushiki, Norisuke; Momiuchi, Kengo; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representatives of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member's ecophysiology in a variety of habitats.

  16. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu eFujitani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representative of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member’s ecophysiology in a variety of habitats.

  17. Oxygen availability and distance to surface environments determine community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing prokaroytes in two superimposed pristine limestone aquifers in the Hainich region, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Sebastian; Küsel, Kirsten; Spott, Oliver; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Herrmann, Martina

    2014-10-01

    We followed the abundance and compared the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in the groundwater of two superimposed pristine limestone aquifers located in the Hainich region (Thuringia, Germany) over 22 months. Groundwater obtained from the upper aquifer (12 m depth) was characterized by low oxygen saturation (0-20%) and low nitrate concentrations (0-20 μM), contrasting with 50-80% oxygen saturation and 40-200 μM nitrate in the lower aquifer (48 m and 88 m depth). Quantitative PCR targeting bacterial and archaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes suggested a much higher ammonia oxidizer fraction in the lower aquifer (0.4-7.8%) compared with the upper aquifer (0.01-0.29%). In both aquifers, AOB communities were dominated by one phylotype related to Nitrosomonas ureae, while AOA communities were more diverse. Multivariate analysis of amoA DGGE profiles revealed a stronger temporal variation of AOA and AOB community composition in the upper aquifer, pointing to a stronger influence of surface environments. Parallel fluctuations of AOA, AOB, and total microbial abundance suggested that hydrological factors (heavy rain falls, snow melt) rather than specific physicochemical parameters were responsible for the observed community dynamics.

  18. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Zheng eHe; Ju-Pei eShen; Li-Mei eZhang; Hong J eDi

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N) cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Chi...

  19. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea in Tropical Compost Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya eDe Gannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA has changed the paradigm of nitrification being initiated solely by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In the present study, AOA abundance and diversity was examined in composts produced from combinations of plant waste materials common in tropical agriculture (rice straw, sugar cane bagasse, coffee hulls, which were mixed with either cow- or sheep-manure. The objective was to determine how AOA abundance and diversity varied as a function of compost system and time, the latter being a contrast between the start of the compost process (mesophilic phase and the finished product (mature phase. The results showed that AOA were relatively abundant in composts of tropical agricultural wastes, and significantly more so than were the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, while the AOA communities in the composts were predominatly group I.1b, the communities were diverse and exhibited structures that diverged between compost types and phases. These patterns could be taken as indicators of the ecophysiological diversity in the soil AOA (groub I.1b, in that significantly different AOA communties developed when exposed to varying physico-chemical environments. Nitrification patterns and levels differed in the composts which, for the mature material, could have signifcant effects on its performanc as a plant growth medium. Thus, it will also be important to determine the association of AOA (and diversity in their communities with nitrification in these systems.

  20. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  1. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Loescher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O which occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been described to produce N2O. Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oceans (ETSP. Particularly in the ETNA, maxima in abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes correlated with the N2O maximum and the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved oxygen

  2. Communities of sediment ammonia-oxidizing bacteria along a coastal pollution gradient in the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Manhua; Xiong, Jinbo; Wang, Kai; Ye, Xiansen; Ye, Ran; Wang, Qiong; Hu, Changju; Zhang, Demin

    2014-09-15

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) discharges has caused eutrophication in coastal zones. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) convert ammonia to nitrite and play important roles in N transformation. Here, we used pyrosequencing based on the amoA gene to investigate the response of the sediment AOB community to an N pollution gradient in the East China Sea. The results showed that AOB assemblages were primarily affiliated with Nitrosospira-like lineages, and only 0.4% of those belonged to Nitrosomonas-like lineage. The Nitrosospira-like lineage was separated into four clusters that were most similar to the sediment AOB communities detected in adjacent marine regions. Additionally, one clade was out grouped from the AOB lineages, which shared the high similarities with pmoA gene. The AOB community structures substantially changed along the pollution gradient, which were primarily shaped by NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N, SO4(2)(-)-S, TP and Eh. These results demonstrated that coastal pollution could dramatically influence AOB communities, which, in turn, may change ecosystem function.

  3. The effect of bacterial community members on the proteome of the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. Is79

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedlacek, Christopher J.; Nielsen, Susanne; Greis, Kenneth D.; Haffey, Wendy D.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ticak, Tomislav; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Bollmann, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms in the environment do not exist as the often-studied pure cultures but as members of complex microbial communities. Characterizing the interactions within microbial communities is essential to understand their function in both natural and engineered environments. In this study we inve

  4. Diversity, physiology, and niche differentiation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenpichler, Roland

    2012-11-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding of nitrification. Surprising insights into the physiological distinctiveness of AOA are mirrored by the recognition of the phylogenetic uniqueness of these microbes, which fall within a novel archaeal phylum now known as Thaumarchaeota. The relative importance of AOA in nitrification, compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), is still under debate. This minireview provides a synopsis of our current knowledge of the diversity and physiology of AOA, the factors controlling their ecology, and their role in carbon cycling as well as their potential involvement in the production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. It emphasizes the importance of activity-based analyses in AOA studies and formulates priorities for future research.

  5. Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil Treated with the Insecticide Imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Cycoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to assess the effect of imidacloprid on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB in soil using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approach. Analysis showed that AOA and AOB community members were affected by the insecticide treatment. However, the calculation of the richness (S and the Shannon-Wiener index (H values for soil treated with the field rate (FR dosage of imidacloprid (1 mg/kg soil showed no changes in measured indices for the AOA and AOB community members. In turn, the 10*FR dosage of insecticide (10 mg/kg soil negatively affected the AOA community, which was confirmed by the decrease of the S and H values in comparison with the values obtained for the control soil. In the case of AOB community, an initial decline followed by the increase of the S and H values was obtained. Imidacloprid decreased the nitrification rate while the ammonification process was stimulated by the addition of imidacloprid. Changes in the community structure of AOA and AOB could be due to an increase in the concentration of N-NH4+, known as the most important factor which determines the contribution of these microorganisms to soil nitrification.

  6. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a chloraminated distribution system: seasonal occurrence, distribution and disinfection resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, R L; Lieu, N I; Izaguirre, G; Means, E G

    1990-02-01

    Nitrification in chloraminated drinking water can have a number of adverse effects on water quality, including a loss of total chlorine and ammonia-N and an increase in the concentration of heterotrophic plate count bacteria and nitrite. To understand how nitrification develops, a study was conducted to examine the factors that influence the occurrence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a chloraminated distribution system. Samples were collected over an 18-month period from a raw-water source, a conventional treatment plant effluent, and two covered, finished-water reservoirs that previously experienced nitrification episodes. Sediment and biofilm samples were collected from the interior wall surfaces of two finished-water pipelines and one of the covered reservoirs. The AOB were enumerated by a most-probable-number technique, and isolates were isolated and identified. The resistance of naturally occurring AOB to chloramines and free chlorine was also examined. The results of the monitoring program indicated that the levels of AOB, identified as members of the genus Nitrosomonas, were seasonally dependent in both source and finished waters, with the highest levels observed in the warm summer months. The concentrations of AOB in the two reservoirs, both of which have floating covers made of synthetic rubber (Hypalon; E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.), had most probable numbers that ranged from less than 0.2 to greater than 300/ml and correlated significantly with temperature and levels of heterotrophic plate count bacteria. No AOB were detected in the chloraminated reservoirs when the water temperature was below 16 to 18 degrees C. The study indicated that nitrifiers occur throughout the chloraminated distribution system. Higher concentrations of AOB were found in the reservoir and pipe sediment materials than in the pipe biofilm samples. The AOB were approximately 13 times more resistant to monochloramine than to free chlorine. After 33 min

  7. Drivers of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing communities in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna eZhalnina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are highly abundant and play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. In addition, AOA have a significant impact on soil quality. AOA may cause nitrogen loss from soils, and the nitrate produced by AOA can lead to ground and surface water contamination, water eutrophication, and soil subsidence. The ammonia-oxidizing archaea discovered to date are classified in the phylum Thaumarchaeota. Only a few archaeal genomes are available in databases. As a result, AOA genes are not well annotated, and it is difficult to mine and identify archaeal genes within metagenomic libraries. Nevertheless, 16S rRNA and comparative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase sequences show that soils can vary greatly in the relative abundance of AOA. In some soils, AOA can comprise more than 10% of the total prokaryotic community. In other soils, AOA comprise less than 0.5% of the community. Many approaches have been used to measure the abundance and diversity of this group including DGGE, T-RFLP, q-PCR, and DNA sequencing. AOA have been studied across different soil types and various ecosystems from the Antarctic dry valleys to the tropical forests of South America to the soils near Mount Everest. Different studies have identified multiple soil factors that trigger the abundance of AOA. These factors include pH, concentration of available ammonia, organic matter content, moisture content, nitrogen content, clay content, as well as other triggers. Land use management appears to have a major effect on the abundance of AOA in soil, which may be the result of nitrogen fertilizer used in agricultural soils. This review summarizes the published results on this topic and suggests future work that will increase our understanding of how soil management and edaphoclimatic factors influence AOA.

  8. Biogeochemical controls and isotopic signatures of nitrous oxide production by a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Frame

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is a trace gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion. The N2O yield from nitrification (moles N2O-N produced per mole ammonium-N consumed has been used to estimate marine N2O production rates from measured nitrification rates and global estimates of oceanic export production. However, the N2O yield from nitrification is not constant. Previous culture-based measurements indicate that N2O yield increases as oxygen (O2 concentration decreases and as nitrite (NO2 concentration increases. Here, we have measured yields of N2O from cultures of the marine β-proteobacterium Nitrosomonas marina C-113a as they grew on low-ammonium (50 μM media. These yields, which were typically between 4 × 10−4 and 7 × 10−4 for cultures with cell densities between 2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml−1, were lower than previous reports for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The observed impact of O2 concentration on yield was also smaller than previously reported under all conditions except at high starting cell densities (1.5 × 106 cells ml−1, where 160-fold higher yields were observed at 0.5% O2 (5.1 μM dissolved O2 compared with 20% O2 (203 μM dissolved O2. At lower cell densities (2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml−1, cultures grown under 0.5% O2 had yields that were only 1.25- to 1.73-fold higher than cultures grown under 20% O2. Thus, previously reported many-fold increases in N2O yield with dropping O2 could be reproduced only at cell densities that far exceeded those of ammonia oxidizers in the ocean. The presence of excess NO2 (up to 1 mM in the growth

  9. Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community composition in the nitrifying biofilter of Recirculating Aquaculture System%循环海水养殖系统硝化滤器中氨氧化微生物分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长发; 姚敬元; 袁瑗; 刘卫东

    2012-01-01

    研究循环水养殖硝化滤器裁体上附着生物膜的微生物群落结构可以为提高其处理速率和数率,并为特异性工程菌构建提供依据.采用改良的AFLP方法分析了循环水养殖硝化滤器载体上附着的氨氧化细菌16S rRNA基因和氨单加氧酶amoA基因片段及其系统发育情况.结果表明:分析16S rRNA基因得到的序列片段比分析amoA基因片段得到了更多信息,准确度较高,可作为分析循环水养殖硝化滤器氨氧化茵群组成的有效方法.克隆测序所得序列与网上公布数据比对,可见存在于循环水养殖硝化滤器载体上的氨氧化细菌与Nitrosomonas cryotolerans、Nitrosomonas oligotropha、Nitrosospira tenuis、Nitrosomonasmarina相似度达100%,与Nitrosomornas aestuarii相似度为87%.大部分属于亚硝化单胞茵属(Nitrosomonns),仅少数序列属于亚硝化螺茵属(Nitrosospira).采用16S rRNA基因和amoA片段分析方法得到的附着于封闭循环海水养殖硝化滤器载体上的氨氧化细菌主要为变形茵(Proteobacteria)的β-亚类的亚硝化单胞茵属(Nitrosomonas)和少量的亚硝化螺茵属(Nitrosospira)氨氧化细菌,以及一定数量的y-亚类氨氧化细菌.%Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play an important role in transformation from ammonia nitrogen to nitrite nitrogen in the nitrifying biofilter.Studying community structure of nitrifying organisms adhered on the media of nitrification biofilter in the recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) could provide a basis of improving removal rate and performance of biofilter,and construction of nitrifying engineering bacteria for removal of ammonia from RAS.The PCR-based gene cloning and mapping of 16S rRNA gene and betaproteobacteria ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria isolated from nitrification biofilter were surveyed by using the method of improved amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis.The results showed that

  10. Bacterial domination over Archaea in ammonia oxidation in a monsoon-driven tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vipindas, P.V.; Anas, A.; Jasmin, C.; Lallu, K.R.; Fausia, K.H.; Balachandran, K.K.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Nair, S.

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing microorganisms,which are responsible for the rate-limiting step of nitrification in most aquatic systems, have not been studied in tropical estuaries. Cochin estuary (CE) is one of the largest, productive, and monsoon...

  11. Phylogenetic and functional marker genes to study ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOM) in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junier, Pilar; Molina, Verónica; Dorador, Cristina; Hadas, Ora; Kim, Ok-Sun; Junier, Thomas; Witzel, Jean-Paul; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia plays a significant role in the transformation of fixed nitrogen in the global nitrogen cycle. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation is known in three groups of microorganisms. Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea convert ammonia into nitrite during nitrification. Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (anammox) oxidize ammonia using nitrite as electron acceptor and producing atmospheric dinitrogen. The isolation and cultivation of all three groups in the laboratory are quite problematic due to their slow growth rates, poor growth yields, unpredictable lag phases, and sensitivity to certain organic compounds. Culture-independent approaches have contributed importantly to our understanding of the diversity and distribution of these microorganisms in the environment. In this review, we present an overview of approaches that have been used for the molecular study of ammonia oxidizers and discuss their application in different environments.

  12. Distribution of ammonia oxidizers in relation to vegetation characteristics in the Qilian Mountains, northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, X. S.; Mao, W. L.; Liu, G. X.; Chen, T.; Zhang, W.; Wu, X. K.; Long, H. Z.; Zhang, B. G.; Gao, T. P.

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen is the major limiting nutrient in cold environments, and its availability is strongly dependent on nitrification. However, microbial communities driving this process remain largely uncharacterized in alpine meadow soils in northwestern China, namely those catalyzing the rate-limiting step of ammonia oxidation. In this study, ammonia-oxidizing communities in alpine meadow soils were characterized by real-time PCR and clone sequencing by targeting on amoA genes, which putatively encode ammonia monooxygenase subunit A. The results demonstrated that ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the alpine meadow soils. Most of the AOA phylotypes detected in the study region fell within typical Group I.1b of Thaumarchaeota. Interestingly, a new ammonia-oxidizing archaeal group named "Kobresia meadow soil group" was found. Phylogenetic analysis of AOB communities exhibited a dominance of Nitrosospira-like sequences affiliated to beta-Proteobacteria. Compared with other alpine environments, Qilian Mountains had a great phylogenetic diversity of ammonia oxidizers. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) analysis showed that distinct AOA/AOB phylotype groups were attributed to different meadow types, reflecting an overall distribution of ammonia-oxidizing communities associated with meadow types. Redundancy Analysis (RDA) analysis showed that Axis 1 (90.9%) together with Axis 2 (9.1%) explained all the variables while Axis 1 exhibited a significant explanatory power. So that vegetation coverage mostly correlated to Axis 1 was the most powerful environmental factor in the study region. Characteristics of ammonia-oxidizing communities showed a close association with vegetation coverage.

  13. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopu...

  14. The influence of synthetic sheep urine on ammonia oxidizing bacterial communities in grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Shahid; Prosser, James I

    2006-06-01

    In grazed, grassland soils, sheep urine generates heterogeneity in ammonia concentrations, with potential impact on ammonia oxidizer community structure and soil N cycling. The influence of different levels of synthetic sheep urine on ammonia oxidizers was studied in grassland soil microcosms. 'Total' and active ammonia oxidizers were distinguished by comparing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles following PCR and RT-PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments, targeting DNA and RNA, respectively. The RNA-based approach indicated earlier, more reproducible and finer scale qualitative shifts in ammonia oxidizing communities than DNA-based analysis, but led to amplification of a small number of nonammonia oxidizer sequences. Qualitative changes in RNA-derived DGGE profiles were related to changes in nitrate accumulation. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands revealed that ammonia oxidizing communities in synthetic sheep urine-treated soils consisted mainly of Nitrosospira clusters 2, 3 and 4. Nitrosospira cluster 2 increased in relative abundance in microcosms treated with all levels of synthetic sheep urine. Low levels additionally led to increased relative abundance of Nitrosospira cluster 4 and medium and high levels increased relative abundance of cluster 3. Synthetic sheep urine is therefore likely to influence the spatial distribution and composition of ammonia oxidizer communities, with consequent effects on nitrate accumulation.

  15. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation at low pH through urea hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S A; Prosser, J I

    2001-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation in laboratory liquid batch cultures of autotrophic ammonia oxidizers rarely occurs at pH values less than 7, due to ionization of ammonia and the requirement for ammonium transport rather than diffusion of ammonia. Nevertheless, there is strong evidence for autotrophic nitrification in acid soils, which may be carried out by ammonia oxidizers capable of using urea as a source of ammonia. To determine the mechanism of urea-linked ammonia oxidation, a ureolytic autotrophic ammonia oxidizer, Nitrosospira sp. strain NPAV, was grown in liquid batch culture at a range of pH values with either ammonium or urea as the sole nitrogen source. Growth and nitrite production from ammonium did not occur at pH values below 7. Growth on urea occurred at pH values in the range 4 to 7.5 but ceased when urea hydrolysis was complete, even though ammonia, released during urea hydrolysis, remained in the medium. The results support a mechanism whereby urea enters the cells by diffusion and intracellular urea hydrolysis and ammonia oxidation occur independently of extracellular pH in the range 4 to 7.5. A proportion of the ammonia produced during this process diffuses from the cell and is not subsequently available for growth if the extracellular pH is less than 7. Ureolysis therefore provides a mechanism for nitrification in acid soils, but a proportion of the ammonium produced is likely to be released from the cell and may be used by other soil organisms.

  16. Community structure analysis of soil ammonia oxidizers during vegetation restoration in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yueming; He, Xunyang; Liang, Shichu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiangbi; Feng, Shuzheng; Su, Yirong

    2014-03-01

    Soil ammonia oxidizers play a critical role in nitrogen cycling and ecological restoration. The composition and structure of soil ammonia oxidizers and their impacting factors were studied in four typical ecosystem soils, tussock (T), shrub (S), secondary forest (SF), and primary forest (PF), during vegetation restoration in the Karst region of Southwest China. The composition and structure of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) communities were characterized by sequencing the amoA and arch-amoA genes, respectively. The diversity of soil ammonia oxidizers (except in S) and plant Shannon diversity index gradually increased with vegetation restoration, and the ammonia oxidizer communities differed significantly (p soils. AOB Nitrosospira cluster 3b only appeared in PF and SF soils, while Nitrosospira cluster 3a species were found in all soils. Changes in AOB paralleled the changes in soil ammonium content that occurred with vegetation restoration. Redundancy analysis showed that the distribution of dominant AOB species was linked to pH, soil urease activity, and soil C/N ratio, whereas the distribution of dominant AOA species was mainly influenced by litter nitrogen content and C/N ratio. These results suggested that the composition and structure of the AOB community were more sensitive to changes in vegetation and soil ammonium content, and may be an important indicator of nitrogen availability in Karst ecosystem soils.

  17. Ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in two US Great Basin hot springs with abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Hungate, Bruce A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2011-08-01

    Many thermophiles catalyse free energy-yielding redox reactions involving nitrogenous compounds; however, little is known about these processes in natural thermal environments. Rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in source water and sediments of two ≈ 80°C springs in the US Great Basin. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification occurred mainly in sediments. Ammonia oxidation rates measured using (15)N-NO(3)(-) pool dilution ranged from 5.5 ± 0.8 to 8.6 ± 0.9 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were unaffected or only mildly stimulated by amendment with NH(4) Cl. Denitrification rates measured using acetylene block ranged from 15.8 ± 0.7 to 51 ± 12 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were stimulated by amendment with NO(3)(-) and complex organic compounds. The DNRA rate in one spring sediment measured using an (15)N-NO(3)(-) tracer was 315 ± 48 nmol N g(-1) h(-1). Both springs harboured distinct planktonic and sediment microbial communities. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that 'Ca. N. yellowstonii'amoA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 3.5-3.9 × 10(8) and 6.4-9.0 × 10(8) copies g(-1) sediment. Potential denitrifiers included members of the Aquificales and Thermales. Thermus spp. comprised springs and suggest that ammonia oxidation may be a major source of energy fuelling primary production.

  18. Bioturbation determines the response of benthic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverock, B; Kitidis, V; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA), caused by the dissolution of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in seawater, is projected to cause significant changes to marine ecology and biogeochemistry. Potential impacts on the microbially driven cycling of nitrogen are of particular concern. Specifically, under seawater pH levels approximating future OA scenarios, rates of ammonia oxidation (the rate-limiting first step of the nitrification pathway) have been shown to dramatically decrease in seawater, but not in underlying sediments. However, no prior study has considered the interactive effects of microbial ammonia oxidation and macrofaunal bioturbation activity, which can enhance nitrogen transformation rates. Using experimental mesocosms, we investigated the responses to OA of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms inhabiting surface sediments and sediments within burrow walls of the mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura. Seawater was acidified to one of four target pH values (pHT 7.90, 7.70, 7.35 and 6.80) in comparison with a control (pHT 8.10). At pHT 8.10, ammonia oxidation rates in burrow wall sediments were, on average, fivefold greater than in surface sediments. However, at all acidified pH values (pH ≤ 7.90), ammonia oxidation rates in burrow sediments were significantly inhibited (by 79-97%; p < 0.01), whereas rates in surface sediments were unaffected. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances increased significantly as pHT declined; by contrast, relative abundances of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidation (amoA) genes did not vary. This research suggests that OA could cause substantial reductions in total benthic ammonia oxidation rates in coastal bioturbated sediments, leading to corresponding changes in coupled nitrogen cycling between the benthic and pelagic realms.

  19. [Element Sulfur Autotrophic Denitrification Combined Anaerobic Ammonia Oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Liu, Xin; Yuan, Yi; Li Xiang; Wangyan, De-qing; Ding, Liang; Shao, Jing-wei; Zhao, Rong

    2016-03-15

    A novel element sulfur autotrophic denitrification combined anaerobic ammonia oxidation process, reacted in CSTR, was used to investigate the sulfate production and alkalinity consumption during the whole process. The element sulfur dosage was 50 g · L⁻¹. The inoculation volume of ANAMMOX granular sludge was 100 g · L⁻¹. The agitation rate and environment reaction temperature of the CSTR were set to 120 r · min⁻¹ and 35°C ± 0.5°C, respectively. The pH of influent was maintained in range of 8. 0-8. 4. During the start-up stage of sulfur based autotrophic denitrification, the nitrogen removal loading rate could reach 0.56-0.71 kg · (m³ · d) ⁻¹ in the condition of 5.3 h hydrogen retention time and 200 mg · L⁻¹ nitrate nitrogen. After the addition of 60 mg · L⁻¹ ammonia nitrogen, Δn(SO₄²⁻):Δn(NO₃⁻) decreased from 1.21 ± 0.06 to 1.01 ± 0.10, Δ(IC): Δ(NO₃⁻-N) decreased from 0.72 ± 0.1 to 0.51 ± 0.11, and the effluent pH increased from 6.5 to 7.2. During the combined stage, the ammonia concentration of effluent was 10.1-19.2 mg · L⁻¹, and the nitrate-nitrogen removal loading rate could be maintained in range of 0.66-0.88 kg · (m³ · d)⁻¹. The Δn (NH₄⁺): Δn (NO₃⁻) ratio reached 0.43, and the NO₃⁻ removal rate was increased by 60% in the simultaneous ammonia and nitrate removal reaction under the condition of G(T) = 22-64 s⁻¹ and pH = 8.08, while improper conditions reduced the efficiency of simultaneous reaction.

  20. Transcriptional response of the archaeal ammonia oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to low and environmentally relevant ammonia concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A

    2013-11-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 growing at two ammonia concentrations, as measured by combined ammonia and ammonium, one well above the Km for ammonia oxidation (∼500 μM) and the other well below the Km (ammonia-replete to ammonia-limiting conditions. Transcript levels for ammonia oxidation, CO2 fixation, and one of the ammonia transport genes were approximately the same at high and low ammonia availability. Transcripts for all analyzed genes decreased with time in the complete absence of ammonia, but with various rates of decay. The new steady-state mRNA levels established are presumably more reflective of the natural physiological state of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and offer a reference for interpreting message abundance patterns in the natural environment.

  1. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca - Bivalvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Rafael; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Mollusca-Bivalvia, data from 5 families (Margaritiferidae, Unionidae, Sphaeriidae, Cyrenidae, Dreissenidae) containing 55 species are included in this paper. European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbiculafluminea) and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissenapolymorpha). Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species.

  2. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the link of in situ nitrification activity to taxonomic identities of ammonia oxidizers in high-temperature environments remains poorly understood. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface and bottom sediments were 4.80 and 5.30 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the archaeal 16S rRNA genes and amoA genes were present in the range of 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 and 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 gene copies g-1 sediment, respectively, while bacterial amoA was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, which represented the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU) in both surface and bottom sediments. The archaeal predominance was further supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) visualization. The cell-specific rate of ammonia oxidation was estimated to range from 0.410 to 0.790 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, higher than those in the two US Great Basin hot springs. These results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  3. Benthic Ammonia Oxidizers Differ in Community Structure and Biogeochemical Potential Across a Riverine Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian eDamashek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen pollution in coastal zones is a widespread issue, particularly in ecosystems with urban or agricultural watersheds. California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, at the landward reaches of San Francisco Bay, is highly impacted by both agricultural runoff and sewage effluent, leading to chronically high nutrient loadings. In particular, the massive discharge of ammonium into the Sacramento River has altered this ecosystem by increasing ammonium concentrations and thus changing the stoichiometry of inorganic nitrogen stocks, with potential effects throughout the food web. To date, however, there has been little research examining N biogeochemistry or N-cycling microbial communities in this system. We report the first data on benthic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities and potential nitrification rates for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, focusing on the functional gene amoA (encoding the α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. There were stark regional differences in ammonia-oxidizing communities, with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB outnumbering ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA only in the ammonium-rich Sacramento River. High potential nitrification rates in the Sacramento River suggested these communities may be capable of oxidizing significant amounts of ammonium, compared to the San Joaquin River and the upper reaches of San Francisco Bay. Gene diversity also showed regional patterns, as well as phylogenetically unique ammonia oxidizers in the Sacramento River. The community structure and biogeochemical function of benthic ammonia oxidizers appears related to nutrient loadings. Unraveling the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of N cycling pathways is a critical step toward understanding how such ecosystems respond to the changing environmental conditions wrought by human development and climate change.

  4. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael eBeman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation are active and actively coupled to one another—yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O2, NH4+, NO3- profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock and within Catalina Harbor, oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 x 107 genes g-1 varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in Bird Rock cores, and Catalina Harbor cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated Catalina Harbor sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria.

  5. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J M; Bertics, Victoria J; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another - yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O(2), [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock (BR) and within Catalina Harbor (CH), oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth) and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 × 10(7) genes g(-) (1)) varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in BR cores, and CH cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer) demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated CH sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

  6. Community structure of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes at the dry-up lake in Huitengxile grassland%辉腾锡勒草原干涸湖泊中氨氧化微生物群落结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠丽华; 赵吉; 武琳慧; 邵玉琴; 李靖宇; 朱兵

    2012-01-01

    [目的]以内蒙古辉腾锡勒草原九十九泉湿地为对象,研究湖泊干涸过程中氨氧化微生物的群落结构及其变化.[方法]通过MPN-PCR定量测定氨氧化古菌(AOA)和氨氧化细菌(AOB)的数量;构建amoA基因克隆文库,进行系统发育分析;结合土壤环境因子,探讨湿地退化过程中影响氨氧化微生物的潜在因素.[结果]依湖泊湿地退水梯度的不同样点中,有75%的样点AOB的数量高于AOA,AOB与AOA的数量比率为0.3 -18.1.从湖心到湖岸草原带,AOA和AOB的数量有明显增加,但生物多样性呈降低趋势,二者没有呈现正相关.研究发现,AOB的数量与土壤中NH4+-N的变化存在良好响应.系统发育分析显示,退化湖泊湿地AOA克隆序列均来自于泉古菌门(Crenarchaeota);AOB的amoA基因的克隆序列大部分与亚硝化单胞菌属(Nitrosomonas)有一定同源性,较少部分与亚硝化螺菌属(Nitrosospira)有一定同源性.[结论]湖泊退水过程增加了湿地土壤氨氧化微生物的数量,而氨氧化微生物的种群丰度有所降低.AOA和AOB群落对湖泊湿地的退化过程做出了响应,其中AOB的响应较为明显,氧化条件和土壤铵浓度的改变可能是促成这种响应的重要原因.%[Objective] To investigate the structure of ammonia-oxidation microbial communities in the wetlands to dry-up process at 99 degraded lakes of the Huitengxile grassland in the Inner Mongolia Plateau. [ Methods] The microbial quantity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea ( AOA ) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria ( AOB ) were examined by most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR). The clone libraries of amoA were constructed and phylogenetics were analyzed. With analysis of the soil properties, we evaluated the effects of wetlands degradation on ammonia-oxidation microbes communities. [Results] In 75% of the samples, the quantity of AOB communities was higher than that of AOA; moreover, quantity of bacterial were up to 18. 1

  7. Niche segregation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.; Villanueva, L.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Reichart, G.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria have emerged as significant factors in the marine nitrogen cycle and are responsible for the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and dinitrogen gas, respectively. Potential for an interaction between these groups exists;

  8. A Mesophilic, Autotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Thaumarchaeal Group I.1a Cultivated from a Deep Oligotrophic Soil Horizon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Kim, S.J.; Kim, J.G.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Jeon, C.O.; Rhee, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrification plays an important role in the reduction of soil fertility and in nitrate enrichment of groundwater. Various ammonia- oxidizing archaea (AOA) are considered to be members of the pool of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil. This study reports the discovery of a chemolithoautot

  9. Nitrogen cycling and community structure of proteobacterial ß-subgroup ammonia-oxidizing bacteria within polluted marine fish farm sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaig, A.E.; Phillips, C.B.; Stephen, J.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Harvey, S.M.; Herbert, R.A.; Embley, T.M.; Prosser, J.I.

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to study the effects of pollution from a marine fish farm on nitrification rates and on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the underlying sediment. Organic content, ammonium concentrations, nitrification rates, and ammonia oxidizer most-pro

  10. Monnte Carlo Simulation of Kinetics of Ammonia Oxidative Decomposition over the Commercial Propylene Ammoxidation Catalyst(Mo-Bi)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗正鸿; 詹晓力; 等

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is applied to investigate the kinetics of ammonia oxidative decomposition over the commercial propylene ammoxidation catalyst(Mo-Bi).The simulation is quite in agreement with experimetal results.Monte Carlo simulation proves that the process of ammonia oxidation decomposition is a two-step reaction.

  11. Enrichment and Characterization of an Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Mesophilic Crenarchaeal Group I.1a from an Agricultural Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Min, D.; Kim, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kim, G.J.; Madsen, E.L.; Rhee, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Soil nitrification is an important process for agricultural productivity and environmental pollution. Though one cultivated representative of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea from soil has been described, additional representatives warrant characterization. We describe an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (strain

  12. Crenarchaeol tracks winter blooms of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.; Wuchter, C.; Siedenberg, K.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    We followed the abundance and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in the North Sea from April 2003 to February 2005 and from October 2007 to March 2008 by quantification of archaeal genes and core glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in suspended particulate m

  13. Impact of ocean acidification on benthic and water column ammonia oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitidis, Vassilis; Laverock, Bonnie; McNeill, Louise C.; Beesley, Amanda; Cummings, Denise; Tait, Karen; Osborn, Mark A.; Widdicombe, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    Ammonia oxidation is a key microbial process within the marine N-cycle. Sediment and water column samples from two contrasting sites in the English Channel (mud and sand) were incubated (up to 14 weeks) in CO2-acidified seawater ranging from pH 8.0 to pH 6.1. Additional observations were made off the island of Ischia (Mediterranean Sea), a natural analogue site, where long-term thermogenic CO2 ebullition occurs (from pH 8.2 to pH 7.6). Water column ammonia oxidation rates in English Channel samples decreased under low pH with near-complete inhibition at pH 6.5. Water column Ischia samples showed a similar though not statistically significant trend. However, sediment ammonia oxidation rates at all three locations were not affected by reduced pH. These observations may be explained by buffering within sediments or low-pH adaptation of the microbial ammonia oxidizing communities. Our observations have implications for modeling the future impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems.

  14. Continuous culture enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at low ammonium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Until now enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from natural ammonium-limited environments have been performed mainly in the presence of much higher ammonia concentrations than those present in the natural environment and many have resulted in the enrichment and isolation of environmentally less

  15. Complete genome of Nitrosospira briensis C-128, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from agricultural soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Marlen C.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Valois, Frederica; Bollmann, Annette; Bottomley, Peter J.; Klotz, Martin G.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Suwa, Yuichi; Stein, Lisa Y.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Kyrpides, Nikos; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosospira briensis C-128 is an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acid agricultural soil. N. briensis C-128 was sequenced with PacBio RS technologies at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute through their Community Science Program (2010). The high-quality finished genome contains one chromosom

  16. Start-up of anaerobic ammonia oxidation bioreactor with nitrifying activated sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ping; LIN Feng-mei; HU Bao-lan; CHEN Jian-song

    2004-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonia oxidation(Anammox) bioreactor was successfully started up with the nitrifying activated sludge. After anaerobically operated for 105 d, the bioreactor reached a good performance with removal percentage of both ammonia and nitrite higher high efficiency and stability because it held a large amount of biomass in the bioreactor.

  17. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Zhang, Li-Mei; Di, Hong J; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N) cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Chinese soils with variable soil properties and soil management practices. The niche differentiation of AOB and AOA in contrasting soils have been functionally demonstrated using DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing) methods, which have shown that AOA dominate nitrification processes in acidic soils, while AOB dominated in neutral, alkaline and N-rich soils. Finally, we discuss the composition and activity of ammonia oxidizers in paddy soils, as well as the mitigation of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions and nitrate leaching via inhibition of nitrification by both AOB and AOA.

  18. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Zheng eHe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH3 oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA in Chinese soils with variable soil properties and soil management practices. The niche differentiation of AOB and AOA in contrasting soils have been functionally demonstrated using DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing methods, which have shown that AOA dominate nitrification processes in acidic soils, while AOB dominated in neutral, alkaline and N-rich soils. Finally, we discuss the composition and activity of ammonia oxidizer in paddy soils, as well as the mitigation of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O emissions and nitrate leaching via inhibition of nitrification by both AOB and AOA.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide detoxification is a key mechanism for growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jong-Geol; Park, Soo-Je; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, So-Jeong; Gwak, Joo-Han; Hong, Heeji; Si, Ok-Ja; Lee, Sanghoon; Madsen, Eugene L.; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), that is, members of the Thaumarchaeota phylum, occur ubiquitously in the environment and are of major significance for global nitrogen cycling. However, controls on cell growth and organic carbon assimilation by AOA are poorly understood. We isolated an ammonia-oxidi

  20. Temporal and spatial stability of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in aquarium biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Samik; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Sauder, Laura A; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4-5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥ 81-86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  1. Temporal and spatial stability of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in aquarium biofilters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samik Bagchi

    Full Text Available Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB, were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4-5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥ 81-86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater

  2. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-12-05

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  3. Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizers in Paddy Soil at Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ya-na; LIN Zhi-min

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the ifrst and rate-limiting step of nitriifcation, is carried out by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). However, the relative importance of AOB and AOA to nitriifcation in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the nitrogen input amount on abundance and community composition of AOB and AOA in red paddy soil. Soil samples of 10-20 cm (root layer soil) and 0-5 cm (surface soil) depths were taken from a red paddy. Rice in the paddy was fertilized with different rates of N as urea of N1 (75 kg N ha-1 yr-1), N2 (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1), N3 (225 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and CK (without fertilizers) in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Abundance and community composition of ammonia oxidizers was analyzed by real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) based on amoA (the unit A of ammonia monooxygenase) gene. Archaeal amoA copies in N3 and N2 were signiifcantly (P<0.05) higher than those in CK and N1 in root layer soil or in surface soil under tillering and heading stages of rice, while the enhancement in bacterial amoA gene copies with increasing of N fertilizer rates only took on in root layer soil. N availability and soil NO3--N content increased but soil NH4+-N content didn’t change with increasing of N fertilizer rates. Otherwise, the copy numbers of archaeal amoA gene were higher (P<0.05) than those of bacterial amoA gene in root lary soil or in surface soil. Redundancy discriminate analysis based on DGGE bands showed that there were no obvious differs in composition of AOA or AOB communities in the ifeld among different N fertilizer rates. Results of this study suggested that the abundance of ammonia-oxidizers had active response to N fertilizer rates and the response of AOA was more obvious than that of AOB. Similarity in the community composition of AOA or AOB among different N fertilizer rates indicate that the community composition of ammonia-oxidizers

  4. Moisture and temperature controls on nitrification differ among ammonia oxidizer communities from three alpine soil habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Brooke B.; Baron, Jill S.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2016-03-01

    Climate change is altering the timing and magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes in many highelevation ecosystems. The consequent changes in alpine nitrification rates have the potential to influence ecosystem scale responses. In order to better understand how changing temperature and moisture conditions may influence ammonia oxidizers and nitrification activity, we conducted laboratory incubations on soils collected in a Colorado watershed from three alpine habitats (glacial outwash, talus, and meadow). We found that bacteria, not archaea, dominated all ammonia oxidizer communities. Nitrification increased with moisture in all soils and under all temperature treatments. However, temperature was not correlated with nitrification rates in all soils. Site-specific temperature trends suggest the development of generalist ammonia oxidzer communities in soils with greater in situ temperature fluctuations and specialists in soils with more steady temperature regimes. Rapidly increasing temperatures and changing soil moisture conditions could explain recent observations of increased nitrate production in some alpine soils.

  5. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from...... their roots and thereby stimulate nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification in their rhizosphere. However, oxygen release and inorganic nitrogen concentrations differ markedly between macrophyte species. We therefore propose (i) that the rhizosphere of freshwater macrophytes harbours a species...

  6. Influence of ammonia oxidation rate on thaumarchaeal lipid composition and the TEX86 temperature proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Sarah J; Elling, Felix J; Könneke, Martin; Buchwald, Carolyn; Wankel, Scott D; Santoro, Alyson E; Lipp, Julius Sebastian; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Pearson, Ann

    2016-07-12

    Archaeal membrane lipids known as glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are the basis of the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy. Because GDGTs preserved in marine sediments are thought to originate mainly from planktonic, ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota, the basis of the correlation between TEX86 and sea surface temperature (SST) remains unresolved: How does TEX86 predict surface temperatures, when maximum thaumarchaeal activity occurs below the surface mixed layer and TEX86 does not covary with in situ growth temperatures? Here we used isothermal studies of the model thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 to investigate how GDGT composition changes in response to ammonia oxidation rate. We used continuous culture methods to avoid potential confounding variables that can be associated with experiments in batch cultures. The results show that the ring index scales inversely (R(2) = 0.82) with ammonia oxidation rate (ϕ), indicating that GDGT cyclization depends on available reducing power. Correspondingly, the TEX86 ratio decreases by an equivalent of 5.4 °C of calculated temperature over a 5.5 fmol·cell(-1)·d(-1) increase in ϕ. This finding reconciles other recent experiments that have identified growth stage and oxygen availability as variables affecting TEX86 Depth profiles from the marine water column show minimum TEX86 values at the depth of maximum nitrification rates, consistent with our chemostat results. Our findings suggest that the TEX86 signal exported from the water column is influenced by the dynamics of ammonia oxidation. Thus, the global TEX86-SST calibration potentially represents a composite of regional correlations based on nutrient dynamics and global correlations based on archaeal community composition and temperature.

  7. Carbon isotope fractionation by the marine ammonia-oxidizing archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus

    OpenAIRE

    Könneke, Martin; Lipp, Julius Sebastian; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are abundant and widely distributed microorganisms in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. By catalyzing the first and rate limiting step in nitrification, these chemolithoautotrophs play a significant role in the global nitrogen cycle and contribute to primary production. Here, the carbon isotopic fractionation relative to inorganic carbon source was determined for bulk biomass, biphytanes and polar lipid bound sugars of a marine AOA pure culture. Bu...

  8. Effects of drought on nitrogen turnover and abundances of ammonia-oxidizers in mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchslueger, L.; Kastl, E.-M.; Bauer, F.; Kienzl, S.; Hasibeder, R.; Ladreiter-Knauss, T.; Schmitt, M.; Bahn, M.; Schloter, M.; Richter, A.; Szukics, U.

    2014-11-01

    Future climate scenarios suggest an increased frequency of summer drought periods in the European Alpine Region. Drought can affect soil nitrogen (N) cycling, by altering N transformation rates, as well as the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea. However, the extent to which drought affects N cycling under in situ conditions is still controversial. The goal of this study was to analyse effects of drought on soil N turnover and ammonia-oxidizer abundances in soil without drought history. To this end we conducted rain-exclusion experiments at two differently managed mountain grassland sites, an annually mown and occasionally fertilized meadow and an abandoned grassland. Soils were sampled before, during and after drought and were analysed for potential gross rates of N mineralization, microbial uptake of inorganic N, nitrification, and the abundances of bacterial and archaeal ammonia-oxidizers based on gene copy numbers of the amoA gene (AOB and AOA, respectively). Drought induced different responses at the two studied sites. At the managed meadow drought increased NH4+ immobilization rates and NH4+ concentrations in the soil water solution, but led to a reduction of AOA abundance compared to controls. At the abandoned site gross nitrification and NO3- immobilization rates decreased during drought, while AOB and AOA abundances remained stable. Rewetting had only minor, short-term effects on the parameters that had been affected by drought. Seven weeks after the end of drought no differences to control plots could be detected. Thus, our findings demonstrated that in mountain grasslands drought had distinct transient effects on soil nitrogen cycling and ammonia-oxidizers, which could have been related to a niche differentiation of AOB and AOA with increasing NH4+ levels. However, the effect strength of drought was modulated by grassland management.

  9. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.I. Gibson; R.A. Bray; D. Hunt; B.B. Georgiev; T. Scholz; P.D. Harris; T.A. Bakke; T. Pojmanska; K. Niewiadomska; A. Kostadinova; V. Tkach; O. Bain; M.C. Durette-Desset; L. Gibbons; F. Moravec; A. Petter; Z.M. Dimitrova; K. Buchmann; E.T. Valtonen; Y. de Jong

    2014-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fa

  10. Ammonia transformations and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in a clay soil underlying a manure pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Baram, Shahar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Unlined manure ponds are constructed on clay soil worldwide to manage farm waste. Seepage of ammonia-rich liquor into underlying soil layers contributes to groundwater contamination by nitrate. To identify the possible processes that lead to the production of nitrate from ammonia in this oxygen-limited environment, we studied the diversity and abundance of ammonia-transforming microorganisms under an unlined manure pond. The numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria were most abundant in the top of the soil profile and decreased significantly with depth (0.5 m), correlating with soil pore-water ammonia concentrations and soil ammonia concentrations, respectively. On the other hand, the numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea were relatively constant throughout the soil profile (10(7) amoA copies per g(soil)). Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were detected mainly in the top 0.2 m. The results suggest that nitrate accumulation in the vadose zone under the manure pond could be the result of complete aerobic nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and could exist as a byproduct of anammox activity. While the majority of the nitrogen was removed within the 0.5-m soil section, possibly by combined anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, a fraction of the produced nitrate leached into the groundwater.

  11. Simazine application inhibits nitrification and changes the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities in a fertilized agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Marcela; Jia, Zhongjun; Conrad, Ralf; Seeger, Michael

    2011-12-01

    s-Triazine herbicides are widely used for weed control, and are persistent in soils. Nitrification is an essential process in the global nitrogen cycle in soil, and involves ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA). In this study, we evaluated the effect of the s-triazine herbicide simazine on the nitrification and on the structure of ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in a fertilized agricultural soil. The effect of simazine on AOB and AOA were studied by PCR-amplification of amoA genes of nitrifying Bacteria and Archaea in soil microcosms and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses. Simazine [50 μg g(-1) dry weight soil (d.w.s)] completely inhibited the nitrification processes in the fertilized agricultural soil. The inhibition by simazine of ammonia oxidation observed was similar to the reduction of ammonia oxidation by the nitrification inhibitor acetylene. The application of simazine-affected AOB community DGGE patterns in the agricultural soil amended with ammonium, whereas no significant changes in the AOA community were observed. The DGGE analyses strongly suggest that simazine inhibited Nitrosobacteria and specifically Nitrosospira species. In conclusion, our results suggest that the s-triazine herbicide not only inhibits the target susceptible plants but also inhibits the ammonia oxidation and the AOB in fertilized soils.

  12. Acidification Enhances Hybrid N2O Production Associated with Aquatic Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Caitlin H.; Lau, Evan; Nolan, E. Joseph; Goepfert, Tyler J.; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms are an important source of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in aquatic environments. Identifying the impact of pH on N2O production by ammonia oxidizers is key to understanding how aquatic greenhouse gas fluxes will respond to naturally occurring pH changes, as well as acidification driven by anthropogenic CO2. We assessed N2O production rates and formation mechanisms by communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in a lake and a marine environment, using incubation-based nitrogen (N) stable isotope tracer methods with 15N-labeled ammonium (15NH4+) and nitrite (15NO2−), and also measurements of the natural abundance N and O isotopic composition of dissolved N2O. N2O production during incubations of water from the shallow hypolimnion of Lake Lugano (Switzerland) was significantly higher when the pH was reduced from 7.54 (untreated pH) to 7.20 (reduced pH), while ammonia oxidation rates were similar between treatments. In all incubations, added NH4+ was the source of most of the N incorporated into N2O, suggesting that the main N2O production pathway involved hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and/or NO2− produced by ammonia oxidation during the incubation period. A small but significant amount of N derived from exogenous/added 15NO2− was also incorporated into N2O, but only during the reduced-pH incubations. Mass spectra of this N2O revealed that NH4+ and 15NO2− each contributed N equally to N2O by a “hybrid-N2O” mechanism consistent with a reaction between NH2OH and NO2−, or compounds derived from these two molecules. Nitrifier denitrification was not an important source of N2O. Isotopomeric N2O analyses in Lake Lugano were consistent with incubation results, as 15N enrichment of the internal N vs. external N atoms produced site preferences (25.0–34.4‰) consistent with NH2OH-dependent hybrid-N2O production. Hybrid-N2O formation was also observed during incubations of seawater from coastal Namibia

  13. Active ammonia oxidizers in an acidic soil are phylogenetically closely related to neutrophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu; Jia, Zhongjun

    2014-03-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the "heavy" DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that (13)CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both (13)C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated.

  14. Physiological plasticity of the thermophilic ammonia oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii in response to a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, T.; Johnson, A.; Gelsinger, D.; de la Torre, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Our understanding of nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in high temperature environments underwent a dramatic revision with the discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA). The importance of AOA to the global nitrogen cycle came to light when recent studies of marine AOA demonstrated the dominance of these organisms in the ocean microbiome and their role as producers of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Understanding how AOA respond to fluctuating environments is crucial to fully comprehending their contribution to global biogeochemical cycling and climate change. In this study we use the thermophilic AOA Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii strain HL72 to explore the physiological plasticity of energy metabolism in these organisms. Previous studies have shown that HL72 grows autotrophically by aerobically oxidizing ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-). Unlike studies of marine AOA, we find that HL72 can grow over a wide ammonia concentration range (0.25 - 10 mM NH4Cl) with comparable generation times when in the presence of 0.25 to 4 mM NH4Cl. However, preliminary data indicate that amoA, the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO), is upregulated at low ammonia concentrations (urea transporter. Urea ((NH2)2CO) is an organic compound ubiquitous to aquatic and soil habitats that, when hydrolyzed, forms NH3 and CO2. We examined urea as an alternate source of ammonia for the ammonia oxidation pathway. HL72 grows over a wide range of urea concentrations (0.25 - 10 mM) at rates comparable to growth on ammonia. In a substrate competition experiment HL72 preferentially consumed NH3 from NH4Cl when both substrates were provided in equal molar concentrations. However, the urease alpha subunit ureC was expressed in both the presence and absence of urea. One consequence of urea hydrolysis is consumption of intracellular protons during the reaction. As ammonia oxidation produces H+, leading to a decrease in pH, the hydrolysis of urea prior to ammonia oxidation may help alleviate

  15. Dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in contrasted freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugoni, Mylène; Etien, Sandrine; Bourges, Antoine; Lepère, Cécile; Domaizon, Isabelle; Mallet, Clarisse; Bronner, Gisèle; Debroas, Didier; Mary, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota have been recognized as the main drivers of aerobic ammonia oxidation in many ecosystems. However, little is known about the role of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in lacustrine ecosystems. In this study, the photic zone of three contrasted freshwater ecosystems located in France was sampled during two periods: winter homothermy (H) and summer thermal stratification (TS), to investigate the distribution of planktonic AOA and AOB. We showed that AOB were predominant in nutrient-rich ecosystems, whereas AOA dominated when ammonia concentrations were the lowest and during winter, which could provide a favorable environment for their growth. Moreover, analyses of archaeal libraries revealed the ubiquity of the thaumarchaeal I.1a clade associated with higher diversity of AOA in the most nutrient-poor lake. More generally, this work assesses the presence of AOA in lakes, but also highlights the existence of clades typically associated with lacustrine and hot spring ecosystems and specific ecological niches occupied by these microorganisms.

  16. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea grow under contrasting soil nitrogen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; Shen, Ju-Pei; Winefield, Chris S; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Bowatte, Saman; He, Ji-Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Nitrification is a key process of the nitrogen (N) cycle in soil with major environmental implications. The recent discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) questions the traditional assumption of the dominant role of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrification. We investigated AOB and AOA growth and nitrification rate in two different layers of three grassland soils treated with animal urine substrate and a nitrification inhibitor [dicyandiamide (DCD)]. We show that AOB were more abundant in the topsoils than in the subsoils, whereas AOA were more abundant in one of the subsoils. AOB grew substantially when supplied with a high dose of urine substrate, whereas AOA only grew in the Controls without the urine-N substrate. AOB growth and the amoA gene transcription activity were significantly inhibited by DCD. Nitrification rates were much higher in the topsoils than in the subsoils and were significantly related to AOB abundance, but not to AOA abundance. These results suggest that AOB and AOA prefer different soil N conditions to grow: AOB under high ammonia (NH(3)) substrate and AOA under low NH(3) substrate conditions.

  17. Isolation and characterization of facultative mixotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from constructed wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soulwène Kouki; Neila Saidi; Fadhel M'hiri; Houda Nasr; Hanène Cherif; Hadda Ouzari; Abdermaceur Hassen

    2011-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been widely studied in constructed wetlands systems,while mixotrophic AOB have been less thoroughly examined.Heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from wastewater and rhizospheres of macrophytes of constructed wetlands,and then cultivated in a mixotrophic medium containing ammonium and acetic acid.A molecular characterization was accomplished using ITS-PCR amplification,and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.Results showed the presence of 35 bacteria,among 400 initially heterotrophic isolates,that were able to remove ammonia.These 35 isolates were classified into 10 genetically different groups based on ITS pattern.Then,a collection of 10 isolates were selected because of their relatively high ammonia removal efficiencies (ARE ≥ 80%) and their phylogenetic diversity.In conditions of mixotrophy,these strains were shown to be able to grow (increase of optical density OD660 during incubation with assimilation of nitrogen into cellular biomass) and to oxidize ammonia (important ammonia oxidation efficiencies,AOE between 79% and 87%).Among these facultative mixotrophic AOB,four isolates were genetically related to Firmicutes (Bacillus and Exiguobacterium),three isolates were affiliated to Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) and three other isolates were associated with Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas,Ochrobactrum and Bordetella).

  18. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in groundwater treatment and drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Voost, Stefan; van der Kooij, Dick

    2009-07-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote (AOP) community in three groundwater treatment plants and connected distribution systems was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and sequence analysis targeting the amoA gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Results demonstrated that AOB and AOA numbers increased during biological filtration of ammonia-rich anoxic groundwater, and AOP were responsible for ammonium removal during treatment. In one of the treatment trains at plant C, ammonia removal correlated significantly with AOA numbers but not with AOB numbers. Thus, AOA were responsible for ammonia removal in water treatment at one of the studied plants. Furthermore, an observed negative correlation between the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water and AOA numbers suggests that high DOC levels might reduce growth of AOA. AOP entered the distribution system in numbers ranging from 1.5 x 10(3) to 6.5 x 10(4) AOPs ml(-1). These numbers did not change during transport in the distribution system despite the absence of a disinfectant residual. Thus, inactive AOP biomass does not seem to be degraded by heterotrophic microorganisms in the distribution system. We conclude from our results that AOA can be commonly present in distribution systems and groundwater treatment, where they can be responsible for the removal of ammonia.

  19. Moisture and temperature controls on nitrification differ among ammonia oxidizer communities from three alpine soil habitats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brooke B.OSBORNE; Jill S.BARON; Matthew D.WALLENSTEIN

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing and magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes in many high-elevation ecosystems.The consequent changes in alpine nitrification rates have the potential to influence ecosystem scale responses.In order to better understand how changing temperature and moisture conditions may influence ammonia oxidizers and nitrification activity,we conducted laboratory incubations on soils collected in a Colorado watershed from three alpine habitats (glacial outwash,talus,and meadow).We found that bacteria,not archaea,dominated all ammonia oxidizer communities.Nitrification increased with moisture in all soils and under all temperature treatments.However,temperature was not correlated with nitrification rates in all soils.Site-specific temperature trends suggest the development of generalist ammonia oxidzer communities in soils with greater in situ temperature fluctuations and specialists in soils with more steady temperature regimes.Rapidly increasing temperatures and changing soil moisture conditions could explain recent observations of increased nitrate production in some alpine soils.

  20. Presence of Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Their Influence on Nitrogen Cycling in Ilica Bay, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulecal, Y.; Temel, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recenlty, the processes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and ammonia oxidation within the domain Archaea, have been recognized as two new links in the global nitrogen cycle. The distribution and ubiquity of marine Archaea an important role in global carbon and nitrogen cycling (Ingalls et al., 2006; Leininger et al., 2006; Wuchter et al.,2006a). However, our knowledge on archaeal distribution in aquatic ecosystem was largely confined to the extreme environments for a long time until DeLong (1992, 1998) revealed the ubiquity of archaea in common marine environments. Despite the great progress, more efforts need to be given to the study of archaeal diversity in the vast oceans and of the variations in the ecological environment from coastal to oceanic waters (Massana et al.,2000). Our studying area which Ilica Bay in Izmir (Turkey) has a lot of thermal springs. The aim of study was to investigate the presence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and their roles of nitrogen cycling in marine enviroments.We have not only used the geochemical analyses but also genetic tools. This study will supply knowledge for marine nitrogen cycling to understanding very well, in addition how Archea genes players in the process of anammox in shallow coastal marine environments.

  1. Mimicking the oxygen minimum zones: stimulating interaction of aerobic archaeal and anaerobic bacterial ammonia oxidizers in a laboratory-scale model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, J.; Haaijer, S.C.M.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; van Niftrik, L.; Stahl, D.A.; Könneke, M.; Rush, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hu, Y.Y.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) rather than marine ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) may provide nitrite to anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. Here we demonstrate the cooperation between marine anammox bacteria and nitrifiers in a laboratory-scale

  2. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gibson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region, and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Helminths parasitic in animals represent a large assemblage of worms, representing three phyla, with more than 200 families and almost 4,000 species of parasites from all major vertebrate and many invertebrate groups. A general introduction is given for each of the major groups of parasitic worms, i.e. the Acanthocephala, Monogenea, Trematoda (Aspidogastrea and Digenea, Cestoda and Nematoda. Basic information for each group includes its size, host-range, distribution, morphological features, life-cycle, classification, identification and recent key-works. Tabulations include a complete list of families dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition, a list of additional specialists who helped with particular groups, and a list of higher taxa dealt with down to the family level. A compilation of useful references is appended.

  3. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  4. Complete genome of Nitrosospira briensis C-128, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Marlen C; Norton, Jeanette M; Valois, Frederica; Bollmann, Annette; Bottomley, Peter J; Klotz, Martin G; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Suwa, Yuichi; Stein, Lisa Y; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Kyrpides, Nikos; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosospira briensis C-128 is an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acid agricultural soil. N. briensis C-128 was sequenced with PacBio RS technologies at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute through their Community Science Program (2010). The high-quality finished genome contains one chromosome of 3.21 Mb and no plasmids. We identified 3073 gene models, 3018 of which are protein coding. The two-way average nucleotide identity between the chromosomes of Nitrosospira multiformis ATCC 25196 and Nitrosospira briensis C-128 was found to be 77.2 %. Multiple copies of modules encoding chemolithotrophic metabolism were identified in their genomic context. The gene inventory supports chemolithotrophic metabolism with implications for function in soil environments.

  5. Nitrogen removal from sludge dewatering effluent through anaerobic ammonia oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-hui; ZHENG Ping; HUA Yu-mei

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidation(Anammox) process is a novel and promising wastewater nitrogen removal process. The feasibility of transition of Anammox from denitrification and the performance of lab-scale Anammox biofilm reactor were investigated with sludge dewatering effluent. The results showed that Anammox process could be successfully started up after cultivation of denitrification biofilm and using it as inoculum. The transition of Anammox from denitrification was accomplished within 85 d. Anammox process was found suitable to remove ammonia from sludge dewatering effluent. The effluent ammonia concentration was detected to be 23.11 mgN/L at HRT of 28 h when influent ammonia concentration was fed 245 mgN/L, which was less than that for the national discharge standard Ⅱ (25 mgN/L) of 243.25 mg NH4+ -N/L and 288.31 mg NO2- -N/L.

  6. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Wang, B.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Jia, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable iso

  7. Influence of oxygen partial pressure and salinity on the community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the Schelde estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated in the Schelde estuary. Simultaneously with the increase of oxygen and salinity, a shift of the dominant AOB was observed. Molecular analysis based on 16S rRNA genes showed that the

  8. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Hydrothermal Vent Chimneys of the Juan de Fuca Ridge▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shufang; Xiao, Xiang; Jiang, Lijing; Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Meng, Jun; Wang, Fengping

    2009-01-01

    The abundance and diversity of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes from hydrothermal vent chimneys at the Juan de Fuca Ridge were investigated. The majority of the retrieved archaeal amoA sequences exhibited identities of less than 95% to those in the GenBank database. Novel ammonia-oxidizing archaea may exist in the hydrothermal vent environments. PMID:19395559

  9. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominating in lab-scale bioreactors with high ammonium bicarbonate loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vejmelkova, D.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Abbas, B.; Kovaleva, O.L.; Kleerebezem, R.; Kampschreur, M.J.; Muyzer, G.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community (AOB) was investigated in two types of laboratory-scale bioreactors performing partial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite or nitrate at high (80 mM) to extremely high (428 mM) concentrations of ammonium bicarbonate. At all conditions, the dominant AOB was affil

  10. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominating in lab-scale bioreactors with high ammonium bicarbonate loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Vejmelkova; D.Y. Sorokin; B. Abbas; O.L. Kovaleva; R. Kleerebezem; M.J. Kampschreur; G. Muyzer; M.C.M. van Loosdrecht

    2012-01-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community (AOB) was investigated in two types of laboratory-scale bioreactors performing partial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite or nitrate at high (80 mM) to extremely high (428 mM) concentrations of ammonium bicarbonate. At all conditions, the dominant AOB was affil

  11. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in the Arctic Ocean and Antarctic coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanetra, Karen M; Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2009-09-01

    We compared abundance, distributions and phylogenetic composition of Crenarchaeota and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in samples collected from coastal waters west of the Antarctic Peninsula during the summers of 2005 and 2006, with samples from the central Arctic Ocean collected during the summer of 1997. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Crenarchaeota abundances were estimated from quantitative PCR measurements of amoA and 16S rRNA gene abundances. Crenarchaeota and AOA were approximately fivefold more abundant at comparable depths in the Antarctic versus the Arctic Ocean. Crenarchaeota and AOA were essentially absent from the Antarctic Summer Surface Water (SSW) water mass (0-45 m depth). The ratio of Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA to archaeal amoA gene abundance in the Winter Water (WW) water mass (45-105 m depth) of the Southern Ocean was much lower (0.15) than expected and in sharp contrast to the ratio (2.0) in the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) water mass (105-3500 m depth) immediately below it. We did not observe comparable segregation of this ratio by depth or water mass in Arctic Ocean samples. A ubiquitous, abundant and polar-specific crenarchaeote was the dominant ribotype in the WW and important in the upper halocline of the Arctic Ocean. Our data suggest that this organism does not contain an ammonia monooxygenase gene. In contrast to other studies where Crenarchaeota populations apparently lacking amoA genes are found in bathypelagic waters, this organism appears to dominate in well-defined, ammonium-rich, near-surface water masses in polar oceans.

  12. Aquarium nitrification revisited: Thaumarchaeota are the dominant ammonia oxidizers in freshwater aquarium biofilters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Sauder

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB in many terrestrial and aquatic environments. Although nitrification is the primary function of aquarium biofilters, very few studies have investigated the microorganisms responsible for this process in aquaria. This study used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR to quantify the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA and 16S rRNA genes of Bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in freshwater aquarium biofilters, in addition to assessing the diversity of AOA amoA genes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and clone libraries. AOA were numerically dominant in 23 of 27 freshwater biofilters, and in 12 of these biofilters AOA contributed all detectable amoA genes. Eight saltwater aquaria and two commercial aquarium nitrifier supplements were included for comparison. Both thaumarchaeal and bacterial amoA genes were detected in all saltwater samples, with AOA genes outnumbering AOB genes in five of eight biofilters. Bacterial amoA genes were abundant in both supplements, but thaumarchaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes could not be detected. For freshwater aquaria, the proportion of amoA genes from AOA relative to AOB was inversely correlated with ammonium concentration. DGGE of AOA amoA genes revealed variable diversity across samples, with nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS indicating separation of freshwater and saltwater fingerprints. Composite clone libraries of AOA amoA genes revealed distinct freshwater and saltwater clusters, as well as mixed clusters containing both freshwater and saltwater amoA gene sequences. These results reveal insight into commonplace residential biofilters and suggest that aquarium biofilters may represent valuable biofilm microcosms for future studies of AOA ecology.

  13. Aquarium nitrification revisited: Thaumarchaeota are the dominant ammonia oxidizers in freshwater aquarium biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Laura A; Engel, Katja; Stearns, Jennifer C; Masella, Andre P; Pawliszyn, Richard; Neufeld, Josh D

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in many terrestrial and aquatic environments. Although nitrification is the primary function of aquarium biofilters, very few studies have investigated the microorganisms responsible for this process in aquaria. This study used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to quantify the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and 16S rRNA genes of Bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in freshwater aquarium biofilters, in addition to assessing the diversity of AOA amoA genes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone libraries. AOA were numerically dominant in 23 of 27 freshwater biofilters, and in 12 of these biofilters AOA contributed all detectable amoA genes. Eight saltwater aquaria and two commercial aquarium nitrifier supplements were included for comparison. Both thaumarchaeal and bacterial amoA genes were detected in all saltwater samples, with AOA genes outnumbering AOB genes in five of eight biofilters. Bacterial amoA genes were abundant in both supplements, but thaumarchaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes could not be detected. For freshwater aquaria, the proportion of amoA genes from AOA relative to AOB was inversely correlated with ammonium concentration. DGGE of AOA amoA genes revealed variable diversity across samples, with nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) indicating separation of freshwater and saltwater fingerprints. Composite clone libraries of AOA amoA genes revealed distinct freshwater and saltwater clusters, as well as mixed clusters containing both freshwater and saltwater amoA gene sequences. These results reveal insight into commonplace residential biofilters and suggest that aquarium biofilters may represent valuable biofilm microcosms for future studies of AOA ecology.

  14. A novel ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from wastewater treatment plant: Its enrichment, physiological and genomic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyang; Ding, Kun; Wen, Xianghua; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng

    2016-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are recently found to participate in the ammonia removal processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), similar to their bacterial counterparts. However, due to lack of cultivated AOA strains from WWTPs, their functions and contributions in these systems remain unclear. Here we report a novel AOA strain SAT1 enriched from activated sludge, with its physiological and genomic characteristics investigated. The maximal 16S rRNA gene similarity between SAT1 and other reported AOA strain is 96% (with “Ca. Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis”), and it is affiliated with Wastewater Cluster B (WWC-B) based on amoA gene phylogeny, a cluster within group I.1a and specific for activated sludge. Our strain is autotrophic, mesophilic (25 °C–33 °C) and neutrophilic (pH 5.0–7.0). Its genome size is 1.62 Mb, with a large fragment inversion (accounted for 68% genomic size) inside. The strain could not utilize urea due to truncation of the urea transporter gene. The lack of the pathways to synthesize usual compatible solutes makes it intolerant to high salinity (>0.03%), but could adapt to low salinity (0.005%) environments. This adaptation, together with possibly enhanced cell-biofilm attachment ability, makes it suitable for WWTPs environment. We propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis cloacae” for the strain SAT1.

  15. Genomes of two new ammonia-oxidizing archaea enriched from deep marine sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Je Park

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are ubiquitous and abundant and contribute significantly to the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the ocean. In this study, we assembled AOA draft genomes from two deep marine sediments from Donghae, South Korea, and Svalbard, Arctic region, by sequencing the enriched metagenomes. Three major microorganism clusters belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were deduced from their 16S rRNA genes, GC contents, and oligonucleotide frequencies. Three archaeal genomes were identified, two of which were distinct and were designated Ca. "Nitrosopumilus koreensis" AR1 and "Nitrosopumilus sediminis" AR2. AR1 and AR2 exhibited average nucleotide identities of 85.2% and 79.5% to N. maritimus, respectively. The AR1 and AR2 genomes contained genes pertaining to energy metabolism and carbon fixation as conserved in other AOA, but, conversely, had fewer heme-containing proteins and more copper-containing proteins than other AOA. Most of the distinctive AR1 and AR2 genes were located in genomic islands (GIs that were not present in other AOA genomes or in a reference water-column metagenome from the Sargasso Sea. A putative gene cluster involved in urea utilization was found in the AR2 genome, but not the AR1 genome, suggesting niche specialization in marine AOA. Co-cultured bacterial genome analysis suggested that bacterial sulfur and nitrogen metabolism could be involved in interactions with AOA. Our results provide fundamental information concerning the metabolic potential of deep marine sedimentary AOA.

  16. Genomes of two new ammonia-oxidizing archaea enriched from deep marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Je; Ghai, Rohit; Martín-Cuadrado, Ana-Belén; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Chung, Won-Hyong; Kwon, KaeKyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Madsen, Eugene L; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous and abundant and contribute significantly to the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the ocean. In this study, we assembled AOA draft genomes from two deep marine sediments from Donghae, South Korea, and Svalbard, Arctic region, by sequencing the enriched metagenomes. Three major microorganism clusters belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were deduced from their 16S rRNA genes, GC contents, and oligonucleotide frequencies. Three archaeal genomes were identified, two of which were distinct and were designated Ca. "Nitrosopumilus koreensis" AR1 and "Nitrosopumilus sediminis" AR2. AR1 and AR2 exhibited average nucleotide identities of 85.2% and 79.5% to N. maritimus, respectively. The AR1 and AR2 genomes contained genes pertaining to energy metabolism and carbon fixation as conserved in other AOA, but, conversely, had fewer heme-containing proteins and more copper-containing proteins than other AOA. Most of the distinctive AR1 and AR2 genes were located in genomic islands (GIs) that were not present in other AOA genomes or in a reference water-column metagenome from the Sargasso Sea. A putative gene cluster involved in urea utilization was found in the AR2 genome, but not the AR1 genome, suggesting niche specialization in marine AOA. Co-cultured bacterial genome analysis suggested that bacterial sulfur and nitrogen metabolism could be involved in interactions with AOA. Our results provide fundamental information concerning the metabolic potential of deep marine sedimentary AOA.

  17. Differential response of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to the wetting of salty arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA, AOB) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To examine their differential responses to the wetting of dry and salty arid soil, AOA and AOB amoA genes (encoding subunit A of the ammonia monooxygenase) and transcripts were enumerated in dry (summer) and wet (after the first rainfall) soil under the canopy of halophytic shrubs and between the shrubs. AOA and AOB were more abundant under shrub canopies than between shrubs in both the dry and wetted soil. Soil wetting caused a significant decrease in AOB abundance under the canopy and an increase of AOA between the shrubs. The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene transcript was similar for both the wet and dry soil, and the transcript-to-gene ratios were water content. In contrast, the bacterial amoA transcript-to-gene ratios were between 78 and 514. The lowest ratio was in dry soil under the canopy and the highest in the soil between the shrubs. The results suggest that the AOA are more resilient to stress conditions and maintain a basic activity in arid ecosystems, while the AOB are more responsive to changes in the biotic and abiotic conditions.

  18. Repeated application of composted tannery sludge affects differently soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Lima, Luciano Moura; Santos, Vilma Maria; Schmidt, Radomir

    2016-10-01

    Repeated application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) changes the soil chemical properties and, consequently, can affect the soil microbial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responses of soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms to repeated application of CTS. CTS was applied repeatedly during 6 years, and, at the sixth year, the soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms were determined in the soil. The treatments consisted of 0 (without CTS application), 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 t ha(-1) of CTS (dry basis). Soil pH, EC, SOC, total N, and Cr concentration increased with the increase in CTS rate. Soil microbial biomass did not change significantly with the amendment of 2.5 Mg ha(-1), while it decreased at the higher rates. Total and specific enzymes activity responded differently after CTS application. The abundance of bacteria did not change with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment and decreased after this rate, while the abundance of archaea increased significantly with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment. Repeated application of different CTS rates for 6 years had different effects on the soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms as a response to changes in soil chemical properties.

  19. Seasonal and annual reoccurrence in betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacterial population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskill, Nicholas J; Eveillard, Damien; O'Mullan, Gregory; Jackson, George A; Ward, Bess B

    2011-04-01

    Microbes exhibit remarkably high genetic diversity compared with plant and animal species. Many phylogenetically diverse but apparently functionally redundant microbial taxa are detectable within a cubic centimetre of mud or a millilitre of water, and the significance of this diversity, in terms of ecosystem function, has been difficult to understand. Thus it is not known whether temporal and spatial differences in microbial community composition are linked to particular environmental factors or might modulate ecosystem response to environmental change. Fifty-three water and sediment samples from upper and lower Chesapeake Bay were analysed in triplicate arrays to determine temporal and spatial patterns and relationships between ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) communities and environmental variables. Thirty-three water samples (three depths) collected during April, August and October, 2001-2004, from the oligohaline upper region of the Bay were analysed to investigate temporal patterns in archetype distribution. Using a combination of a non-weighted discrimination analysis and principal components analysis of community composition data obtained from functional gene microarrays, it was found that co-varying AOB assemblages reoccurred seasonally in concert with specific environmental conditions, potentially revealing patterns of niche differentiation. Among the most notable patterns were correlations of AOB archetypes with temperature, DON and ammonium concentrations. Different AOB archetypes were more prevalent at certain times of the year, e.g. some were more abundant every autumn and others every spring. This data set documents the successional return to an indigenous community following massive perturbation (hurricane induced flooding) as well as the seasonal reoccurrence of specific lineages, identified by key functional genes, associated with the biogeochemically important process nitrification.

  20. Impact of acetochlor on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in microcosm soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xinyu; ZHANG Huiwen; WU Minna; SU Zhencheng; ZHANG Chenggang

    2008-01-01

    Acetochlor is an increasingly used herbicide on corn in North China. Currently, the effect of acetochlor on soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) communities is not well documented. Here, we studied the diversity and community composition of AOB in soil amended with three concentrations of acetochlor (50, 150, 250 mg/kg) and the control (0 mg acetochlor/kg soil) in a microcosm experiment by PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and the phylogenetic analysis of excised DGGE bands. DGGE profiles showed that acetochlor had a stimulating effect on AOB at the early stage after acetochlor amended, and the order of intensity and duration is medium-acetochlor amended samples (AM) > low-acetochlor amended samples (AL) > high-acetochlor amended samples (AH). At the end of 60 d microcosm, acetochlor had a negative effect on the diversity of AOB. Cluster analysis of DGGE profiles showed that acetochlor had a greater effect on the community structure of AOB on day 60 than on day 1. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the sequences of excised DGGE bands were closely related to members of the genus Nitrosospira and formed two separate subclusters designated as subcluster 1 and subcluster 2 affiliated respectively with clusters 3 and 4 in Nitrosospira as defined by Stephen. Some dominant AOB had a change from subcluster 2 to subcluster 1 with the incubation. The results showed that acetochlor had an effect on the AOB on a long-term basis and the chronic effect of acetochlor should be paid more attention in future.

  1. Quantitative analyses of the abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea of a Chinese upland red soil under long-term fertilization practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ji-Zheng; Shen, Ju-Pei; Zhang, Li-Mei; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Xu, Ming-Gang; Di, Hongjie

    2007-09-01

    The abundance and composition of soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) were investigated by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches based on amoA genes. The soil, classified as agri-udic ferrosols with pH (H(2)O) ranging from 3.7 to 6.0, was sampled in summer and winter from long-term field experimental plots which had received 16 years continuous fertilization treatments, including fallow (CK0), control without fertilizers (CK) and those with combinations of fertilizer nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K): N, NP, NK, PK, NPK and NPK plus organic manure (OM). Population sizes of AOB and AOA changed greatly in response to the different fertilization treatments. The NPK + OM treatment had the highest copy numbers of AOB and AOA amoA genes among the treatments that received mineral fertilizers, whereas the lowest copy numbers were recorded in the N treatment. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea were more abundant than AOB in all the corresponding treatments, with AOA to AOB ratios ranging from 1.02 to 12.36. Significant positive correlations were observed among the population sizes of AOB and AOA, soil pH and potential nitrification rates, indicating that both AOB and AOA played an important role in ammonia oxidation in the soil. Phylogenetic analyses of the amoA gene fragments showed that all AOB sequences from different treatments were affiliated with Nitrosospira or Nitrosospira-like species and grouped into cluster 3, and little difference in AOB community composition was recorded among different treatments. All AOA sequences fell within cluster S (soil origin) and cluster M (marine and sediment origin). Cluster M dominated exclusively in the N, NP, NK and PK treatments, indicating a pronounced difference in the community composition of AOA in response to the long-term fertilization treatments. These findings could be fundamental to improve our understanding of the importance of

  2. Effects of different fertilizers on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in a yellow clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huaiying; Huang, Sha; Qiu, Qiongfen; Li, Yaying; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Dai, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Yellow clay paddy soil (Oxisols) is a typical soil with low productivity in southern China. Nitrification inhibitors and slow release fertilizers have been used to improve nitrogen fertilizer utilization and reduce environmental impaction of the paddy soil. However, their effects on ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in paddy soil have rarely been investigated. In the present work, we compared the influences of several slow release fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors on the community structure and activities of the ammonia oxidizers in yellow clay soil. The abundances and community compositions of AOA and AOB were determined with qPCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and clone library approaches. Our results indicated that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) of the soil was significantly related to the abundances of both AOA and AOB. Nitrogen fertilizer application stimulated the growth of AOA and AOB, and the combinations of nitrapyrin with urea (NPU) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) inhibited the growth of AOA and AOB, respectively. Compared with other treatments, the applications of NPU and UF also led to significant shifts in the community compositions of AOA and AOB, respectively. NPU showed an inhibitory effect on AOA T-RF 166 bp that belonged to Nitrosotalea. UF had a negative effect on AOB T-RF 62 bp that was assigned to Nitrosospira. These results suggested that NPU inhibited PNR and increased nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by inhibiting the growth of AOA and altering AOA community. UF showed no effect on NUE but decreased AOB abundance and shifted AOB community.

  3. Evaluating primers for profiling anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria within freshwater environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntipar Sonthiphand

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox bacteria play an important role in transforming ammonium to nitrogen gas and contribute to fixed nitrogen losses in freshwater environments. Understanding the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria requires reliable molecular tools, and these are not yet well established for these important Planctomycetes. To help validate PCR primers for the detection of anammox bacteria within freshwater ecosystems, we analyzed representative positive controls and selected samples from Grand River and groundwater sites, both from Ontario, Canada. The objectives of this study were to identify a suitable anammox denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprint method by using GC-clamp modifications to existing primers, and to verify the specificity of anammox-specific primers used for DGGE, cloning and qPCR methods. Six primer combinations were tested from four published primer sets (i.e. A438f/A684r, Amx368f/Amx820r, An7f/An1388r, and Pla46/1392r for both direct and nested PCR amplifications. All PCR products were run subsequently on DGGE gels to compare the resulting patterns. Two anammox-specific primer combinations were also used to generate clone libraries and quantify anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes with qPCR. The primer set A438f/A684r was highly specific to anammox bacteria, provided reliable DGGE fingerprints and generated a high proportion of anammox-related clones. A second primer set (Amx368f/Amx820r was anammox specific, based on clone library analysis, but PCR products from different candidate species of anammox bacteria resolved poorly using DGGE analysis. Both DGGE and cloning results revealed that Ca. Brocadia and an uncharacterized anammox bacterial cluster represented the majority of anammox bacteria found in Grand River sediment and groundwater samples, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that although Amx368f/Amx820r was useful for anammox-specific qPCR and clone library

  4. Evaluating primers for profiling anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria within freshwater environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonthiphand, Puntipar; Neufeld, Josh D

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria play an important role in transforming ammonium to nitrogen gas and contribute to fixed nitrogen losses in freshwater environments. Understanding the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria requires reliable molecular tools, and these are not yet well established for these important Planctomycetes. To help validate PCR primers for the detection of anammox bacteria within freshwater ecosystems, we analyzed representative positive controls and selected samples from Grand River and groundwater sites, both from Ontario, Canada. The objectives of this study were to identify a suitable anammox denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint method by using GC-clamp modifications to existing primers, and to verify the specificity of anammox-specific primers used for DGGE, cloning and qPCR methods. Six primer combinations were tested from four published primer sets (i.e. A438f/A684r, Amx368f/Amx820r, An7f/An1388r, and Pla46/1392r) for both direct and nested PCR amplifications. All PCR products were run subsequently on DGGE gels to compare the resulting patterns. Two anammox-specific primer combinations were also used to generate clone libraries and quantify anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes with qPCR. The primer set A438f/A684r was highly specific to anammox bacteria, provided reliable DGGE fingerprints and generated a high proportion of anammox-related clones. A second primer set (Amx368f/Amx820r) was anammox specific, based on clone library analysis, but PCR products from different candidate species of anammox bacteria resolved poorly using DGGE analysis. Both DGGE and cloning results revealed that Ca. Brocadia and an uncharacterized anammox bacterial cluster represented the majority of anammox bacteria found in Grand River sediment and groundwater samples, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that although Amx368f/Amx820r was useful for anammox-specific qPCR and clone library analysis, A438f/A684r

  5. Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

    2010-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and

  6. Water addition regulates the metabolic activity of ammonia oxidizers responding to environmental perturbations in dry subhumid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Macdonald, Catriona A; Trivedi, Pankaj; Holmes, Bronwyn; Bodrossy, Levente; He, Ji-Zheng; Singh, Brajesh K

    2015-02-01

    Terrestrial arid and semi-arid ecosystems (drylands) constitute about 41% of the Earth's land surface and are predicted to experience increasing fluctuations in water and nitrogen availability. Mounting evidence has confirmed the significant importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in nitrification, plant nitrogen availability and atmospheric N2 O emissions, but their responses to environmental perturbations in drylands remain largely unknown. Here we evaluate how the factorial combinations of irrigation and fertilization in forests and land-use change from grassland to forest affects the dynamics of AOA and AOB following a 6-year dryland field study. Potential nitrification rates and AOA and AOB abundances were significantly higher in the irrigated plots, accompanied by considerable changes in community compositions, but their responses to fertilization alone were not significant. DNA-stable isotope probing results showed increased (13) CO2 incorporation into the amoA gene of AOA, but not of AOB, in plots receiving water addition, coupled with significantly higher net mineralization and nitrification rates. High-throughput microarray analysis revealed that active AOA assemblages belonging to Nitrosopumilus and Nitrosotalea were increasingly labelled by (13) CO2 following irrigation. However, no obvious effects of land-use changes on nitrification rates or metabolic activity of AOA and AOB could be observed under dry conditions. We provide evidence that water addition had more important roles than nitrogen fertilization in influencing the autotrophic nitrification in dryland ecosystems, and AOA are increasingly involved in ammonia oxidation when dry soils become wetted.

  7. Spatial and temporal dynamics of ammonia oxidizers in the sediments of the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterli, Adrien; Hietanen, Susanna; Leskinen, Elina

    2016-02-01

    The diversity and dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) nitrifying communities in the sediments of the eutrophic Gulf of Finland (GoF) were investigated. Using clone libraries of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene fragments and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), we found a low richness of both AOB and AOA. The AOB amoA phylogeny matched that of AOB 16S ribosomal genes from the same samples. AOA communities were characterized by strong spatial variation while AOB communities showed notable temporal patterns. At open sea sites, where transient anoxic conditions prevail, richness of both AOA and AOB was lowest and communities were dominated by organisms with gene signatures unique to the GoF. Given the importance of nitrification as a link between the fixation of nitrogen and its removal from aquatic environments, the low diversity of ammonia-oxidizing microbes across the GoF could be of relevance for ecosystem resilience in the face of rapid global environmental changes.

  8. [Quantitative and qualitative analysis of total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in Buji River in wet season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-mei; Bai, Jiao-jiao; Sun, Wei-ling; Shao, Jun

    2012-08-01

    Microbial community structure and biomass in river water can reflect the situation of water quality in some extent. Nitrogen removal was mainly achieved by the nitrification and denitrification processes, and ammonia oxidation catalyzed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To explore the AOB community structure and biomass in nitrogen polluted river, water samples were collected from Buji River (Shenzhen) in wet season. Quantification of 16S rRNA copy numbers of total bacteria and AOB were performed by real-time PCR, and the microbial community structures were studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that the number of total bacterial 16S rRNA changed from 4.73 x 10(10) - 3.90 x 10(11) copies x L(-1) in the water samples. The copy numbers of AOB varied from 5.44 x 10(6) - 5.96 x 10(8)copies x L(-1). Redundancy discrimination analysis (RDA) showed that the main factors affecting the structure and the numbers of bacteria were different. For total bacteria, nitrate influenced the biomass significantly (P analysis showed that water pollution in downstream resulted in evident difference in microbial community structure between upstream and downstream water samples.

  9. Seasonality and depth distribution of the abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms in marine coastal sediments (North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Antonia Lipsewers

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial processes such as nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox are important for nitrogen cycling in marine sediments. Seasonal variations of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB and anammox bacteria, as well as the environmental factors affecting these groups, are not well studied. We have examined the seasonal and depth distribution of the abundance and potential activity of these microbial groups in coastal marine sediments of the southern North Sea. This was achieved by quantifying specific intact polar lipids (IPLs as well as the abundance and gene expression of their 16S rRNA gene, the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene of AOA and AOB, and the hydrazine synthase (hzsA gene of anammox bacteria. AOA, AOB and anammox bacteria were detected and transcriptionally active down to 12 cm sediment depth. In all seasons, the abundance of AOA was higher compared to the AOB abundance suggesting that AOA play a more dominant role in aerobic ammonia oxidation in these sediments. Anammox bacteria were abundant and active even in oxygenated and bioturbated parts of the sediment. The abundance of AOA and AOB was relatively stable with depth and over the seasonal cycle, while anammox bacteria abundance and transcriptional activity were highest in August. North Sea sediments thus seem to provide a common, stable, ecological niche for AOA, AOB and anammox bacteria.

  10. Nitrous oxide production by lithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and implications for engineered nitrogen-removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Kartik; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) form a crucial component in microbial nitrogen cycling in both natural and engineered systems. Under specific conditions, including transitions from anoxic to oxic conditions and/or excessive ammonia loading, and the presence of high nitrite (NO₂⁻) concentrations, these bacteria are also documented to produce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) gases. Essentially, ammonia oxidation in the presence of non-limiting substrate concentrations (ammonia and O₂) is associated with N₂O production. An exceptional scenario that leads to such conditions is the periodical switch between anoxic and oxic conditions, which is rather common in engineered nitrogen-removal systems. In particular, the recovery from, rather than imposition of, anoxic conditions has been demonstrated to result in N₂O production. However, applied engineering perspectives, so far, have largely ignored the contribution of nitrification to N₂O emissions in greenhouse gas inventories from wastewater-treatment plants. Recent field-scale measurements have revealed that nitrification-related N₂O emissions are generally far higher than emissions assigned to heterotrophic denitrification. In the present paper, the metabolic pathways, which could potentially contribute to NO and N₂O production by AOB have been conceptually reconstructed under conditions especially relevant to engineered nitrogen-removal systems. Taken together, the reconstructed pathways, field- and laboratory-scale results suggest that engineering designs that achieve low effluent aqueous nitrogen concentrations also minimize gaseous nitrogen emissions.

  11. Evaluation of revised polymerase chain reaction primers for more inclusive quantification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kelley A; Bertagnolli, Anthony; Pannu, Manmeet W; Strand, Stuart E; Brown, Sally L; Stahl, David A

    2015-04-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) fill key roles in the nitrogen cycle. Thus, well-vetted methods for characterizing their distribution are essential for framing studies of their significance in natural and managed systems. Quantification of the gene coding for one subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) by polymerase chain reaction is frequently employed to enumerate the two groups. However, variable amplification of sequence variants comprising this conserved genetic marker for ammonia oxidizers potentially compromises within- and between-system comparisons. We compared the performance of newly designed non-degenerate quantitative polymerase chain reaction primer sets to existing primer sets commonly used to quantify the amoA of AOA and AOB using a collection of plasmids and soil DNA samples. The new AOA primer set provided improved quantification of model mixtures of different amoA sequence variants and increased detection of amoA in DNA recovered from soils. Although both primer sets for the AOB provided similar results for many comparisons, the new primers demonstrated increased detection in environmental application. Thus, the new primer sets should provide a useful complement to primers now commonly used to characterize the environmental distribution of AOA and AOB.

  12. Quantitative and compositional responses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to long-term field fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Chen; Zhao, Jun; Zhu, Ping; Peng, Chang; Ling, Ning; Shen, Qirong

    2016-06-01

    Archaeal (AOA) and bacterial (AOB) ammonia-oxidizer responses to long-term field fertilization in a Mollisol soil were assessed through pyrosequencing of amoA genes. Long-term fertilization treatments including chemical fertilizer (NPK), NPK plus manure (NPKM), and no fertilization over 23 years altered soil properties resulting in significant shifts in AOA and AOB community composition and abundance. NPK exhibited a strong influence on AOA and AOB composition while the addition of manure neutralized the community change induced by NPK. NPK also led to significant soil acidification and enrichment of Nitrosotalea. Nitrosospira cluster 9 and 3c were the most abundant AOB populations with opposing responses to fertilization treatments. NPKM had the largest abundance of ammonia-oxidizers and highest potential nitrification activity (PNA), suggesting high N loss potential due to a doubling of nutrient input compared to NPK. PNA was strongly correlated to AOA and AOB community composition indicating that both were important in ammonium oxidization in this Mollisol soil. Total N and organic C were the most important factors driving shifts in AOA and AOB community composition. The AOA community was strongly correlated to the activities of all sugar hydrolysis associated soil enzymes and was more responsive to C and N input than AOB.

  13. Distribution and Abundance of Archaea in South China Sea Sponge Holoxea sp. and the Presence of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Sponge Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with bacterial symbionts, little is known about archaea in sponges especially about their spatial distribution and abundance. Understanding the distribution and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea will help greatly in elucidating the potential function of symbionts in nitrogen cycling in sponges. In this study, gene libraries of 16S rRNA gene and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA genes and quantitative real-time PCR were used to study the spatial distribution and abundance of archaea in the South China Sea sponge Holoxea sp. As a result, Holoxea sp. specific AOA, mainly group C1a (marine group I: Crenarchaeota were identified. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaea was observed for the first time within sponge cells. This study suggested a close relationship between sponge host and its archaeal symbionts as well as the archaeal potential contribution to sponge host in the ammonia-oxidizing process of nitrification.

  14. Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDaebeler

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively to the net oxidation of ammonia varies greatly between terrestrial environments. To better understand, predict and possibly manage terrestrial nitrogen turnover, we need to develop a conceptual understanding of ammonia oxidation as a function of environmental conditions including the ecophysiology of the associated organisms. We examined the discrete and combined effects of mineral nitrogen deposition and geothermal heating on ammonia-oxidizing communities by sampling soils from a long-term fertilisation site along a temperature gradient in Icelandic grasslands. Microarray, clone library and quantitative PCR analyses of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene accompanied by physico-chemical measurements of the soil properties were conducted. In contrast to most other terrestrial environments, the ammonia-oxidizing communities consisted almost exclusively of archaea. Their bacterial counterparts proved to be undetectable by quantitative PCR suggesting AOB are only of minor relevance for ammonia oxidation in these soils. Our results show that fertilization and local, geothermal warming affected detectable ammonia-oxidizing communities, but not soil chemistry: only a subset of the detected AOA phylotypes was present in higher temperature soils and AOA abundance was increased in the fertilized soils, while the measured soil physico-chemical properties remained unchanged. Differences in distribution and structure of AOA communities were best explained by soil pH and clay content irrespective of temperature or fertilizer treatment in these grassland soils, suggesting that these factors have a greater potential for ecological niche-differentiation of AOA in soil than temperature and N fertilization.

  15. The large-scale distribution of ammonia oxidizers in paddy soils is driven by soil pH, geographic distance and climatic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangwei eHu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paddy soils distribute widely from temperate to tropical regions, and are characterized by intensive nitrogen fertilization practices in China. Mounting evidence has confirmed the functional importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in soil nitrification, but little is known about their biogeographic distribution patterns in paddy ecosystems. Here, we used barcoded pyrosequencing to characterize the effects of climatic, geochemical and spatial factors on the distribution of ammonia oxidizers from 11 representative rice-growing regions (75-1945 km apart of China. Potential nitrification rates varied greatly by more than three orders of magnitude, and were significantly correlated with the abundances of AOA and AOB. The community composition of ammonia oxidizer was affected by multiple factors, but changes in relative abundances of the major lineages could be best predicted by soil pH. The alpha diversity of AOA and AOB displayed contrasting trends over the gradients of latitude and atmospheric temperature, indicating a possible niche separation between AOA and AOB along the latitude. The Bray-Curtis dissimilarities in ammonia-oxidizing community structure significantly increased with increasing geographical distance, indicating that more geographically distant paddy fields tend to harbor more dissimilar ammonia oxidizers. Variation partitioning analysis revealed that spatial, geochemical and climatic factors could jointly explain majority of the data variation, and were important drivers defining the ecological niches of AOA and AOB. Our findings suggest that both AOA and AOB are of functional importance in paddy soil nitrification, and ammonia oxidizers in paddy ecosystems exhibit large-scale biogeographic patterns shaped by soil pH, geographic distance, and climatic factors.

  16. Temporal changes in abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities in a drained peat soil in relation to N{sub 2}O emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andert, Janet [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Wessen, Ella; Hallin, Sara [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Boerjesson, Gunnar [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Soil and Environment

    2011-12-15

    Boreal peat soils comprise about 3% of the terrestrial environments, and when drained, they become sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Ammonia oxidation can result in N{sub 2}O emissions, either directly or by fuelling denitrification, but we know little about the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in peat soils. Our aim was to determine temporal alterations in abundance and composition of these communities in a drained and forested peat soil in relation to N{sub 2}O emissions and ammonia oxidation activity. Materials and methods The peat was sampled at three different depths in the upper 0.5 m over a period of 9 months covering two summer and two winter samplings. Community composition and abundance were determined by T-RFLP and quantitative real-time PCR of the bacterial and archaeal amoA genes. Potential ammonia oxidation rates were measured using the chlorate inhibition technique, and in situ N{sub 2}O emission was determined using chambers. Results and discussion The soil parameters displayed little spatial and temporal heterogeneity, which probably explained why there were no depth-related effects on the abundance, composition, or activity of the ammonia oxidizers. In contrast to most terrestrial environments, the AOB dominated numerically over the AOA. Both groups changed in community composition between sampling occasions, although the AOB showed more significant seasonal signatures than the AOA. Temporal changes in abundance were only observed for the AOB, with a decrease in numbers from May to March. Such differences were not reflected by the activity or N{sub 2}O emissions. Conclusions The high ammonium concentrations in the peat soil likely favored the AOB over the AOA, and we hypothesize that they were more active than the AOA and therefore responded to climatic and environmental changes. However, other processes rather than ammonia oxidation were likely responsible for N{sub 2}O emissions at the site.

  17. Fauna Europaea - all European animal species on the web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Yde; Verbeek, Melina; Michelsen, Verner;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea is Europe's main zoological taxonomic index, making the scientific names and distributions of all living, currently known, multicellular, European land and freshwater animals species integrally available in one authoritative database. Fauna Europaea covers about 260,000 ta...

  18. Distribution characteristics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the Typha latifolia constructed wetlands using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Inamori, Ryuhei; Gui, Ping; Xu, Kai-qin; Kong, Hai-nan; Matsumura, Masatoshi; Inamori, Yuhei

    2005-01-01

    A molecular biology method, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), in which the pre-treatment was improved in allusion to the media of the constructed wetlands (CW), e.g. the soil and the grit, was used to investigate the vertical distribution characteristics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) quantity and the relation with oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in the Typha latifolia constructed wetlands under three different loadings in summer from May to September. Results showed that the quantity of the AOB decreased in the Typha latifolia CW with the increase of vertical depth. However, the AOB quantity was 2-4 times the quantity of the control in the root area. Additionally, ORP in the rhizosphere was found to be higher than other areas, which showed that Typha latifolia CW was in an aerobic state in summer when using simulated non-point sewage at the rural area of Taihu Lake in China and small town combined sewage.

  19. Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, A.; Abell, G.C.J.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Bodrossy, L.; Frampton, D.M.; Hefting, M.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively) to the net oxidation of ammonia varies greatly between terrestrial environments. To better understand, predict and possibly manage terrestrial nitrogen turnover, we need to develop a conceptual understanding of am

  20. Combined Flux Chamber and Genomics Approach Links Nitrous Acid Emissions to Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in Urban and Agricultural Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharko, Nicole K; Schütte, Ursel M E; Berke, Andrew E; Banina, Lauren; Peel, Hannah R; Donaldson, Melissa A; Hemmerich, Chris; White, Jeffrey R; Raff, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a photochemical source of hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide in the atmosphere that stems from abiotic and biogenic processes, including the activity of ammonia-oxidizing soil microbes. HONO fluxes were measured from agricultural and urban soil in mesocosm studies aimed at characterizing biogenic sources and linking them to indigenous microbial consortia. Fluxes of HONO from agricultural and urban soil were suppressed by addition of a nitrification inhibitor and enhanced by amendment with ammonium (NH4(+)), with peaks at 19 and 8 ng m(-2) s(-1), respectively. In addition, both agricultural and urban soils were observed to convert (15)NH4(+) to HO(15)NO. Genomic surveys of soil samples revealed that 1.5-6% of total expressed 16S rRNA sequences detected belonged to known ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Peak fluxes of HONO were directly related to the abundance of ammonia-oxidizer sequences, which in turn depended on soil pH. Peak HONO fluxes under fertilized conditions are comparable in magnitude to fluxes reported during field campaigns. The results suggest that biogenic HONO emissions will be important in soil environments that exhibit high nitrification rates (e.g., agricultural soil) although the widespread occurrence of ammonia oxidizers implies that biogenic HONO emissions are also possible in the urban and remote environment.

  1. Enrichment and genome sequence of the group I.1a ammonia-oxidizing Archaeon "Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis" representing a clade globally distributed in thermal habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Lebedeva

    Full Text Available The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called "marine" group I.1a thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as "Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis", is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, "Candidatus N. uzonensis" also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in "Ca. N. uzonensis", which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation.

  2. Dynamics of nitrification and denitrification in root- oxygenated sediments and adaptation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria to low-oxygen or anoxic habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Libochant, J.A.; Blom, C.W.P.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen-releasing plants may provide aerobic niches in anoxic sediments and soils for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, The oxygen- releasing, aerenchymatous emergent macrophyte Glycerin maxima had a strong positive effect on numbers and activities of the nitrifying bacteria in its root zone in spring and

  3. N2O production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge linearly depends on inorganic carbon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-05-01

    The effect of inorganic carbon (IC) on nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated over a concentration range of 0-12 mmol C/L, encompassing typical IC levels in a wastewater treatment reactors. The AOB culture was enriched along with nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to perform complete nitrification. Batch experiments were conducted with continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) stripping or at controlled IC concentrations. The results revealed a linear relationship between N2O production rate (N2OR) and IC concentration (R(2) = 0.97) within the IC range studied, suggesting a substantial effect of IC on N2O production by AOB. Similar results were also obtained with an AOB culture treating anaerobic sludge digestion liquor. The fundamental mechanism responsible for this dependency is unclear; however, in agreement with previous studies, it was observed that the ammonia oxidation rate (AOR) was also influenced by the IC concentration, which could be well described by the Monod kinetics. These resulted in an exponential relationship between N2OR and AOR, as previously observed in experiments where AOR was altered by varying dissolved oxygen and ammonia concentrations. It is therefore possible that IC indirectly affected N2OR by causing a change in AOR. The observation in this study indicates that alkalinity (mostly contributed by IC) could be a significant factor influencing N2O production and should be taken into consideration in estimating and mitigating N2O emissions in wastewater treatment systems.

  4. Coupling Between and Among Ammonia Oxidizers and Nitrite Oxidizers in Grassland Mesocosms Submitted to Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Marie; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Lerondelle, Catherine; Hungate, Bruce A; Nunan, Naoise; Niboyet, Audrey

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have assessed the responses of soil microbial functional groups to increases in atmospheric CO2 or N deposition alone and more rarely in combination. However, the effects of elevated CO2 and N on the (de)coupling between different microbial functional groups (e.g., different groups of nitrifiers) have been barely studied, despite potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigated the short-term combined effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on the abundances of the four main microbial groups involved in soil nitrification: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (belonging to the genera Nitrobacter and Nitrospira) in grassland mesocosms. AOB and AOA abundances responded differently to the treatments: N addition increased AOB abundance, but did not alter AOA abundance. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira abundances also showed contrasted responses to the treatments: N addition increased Nitrobacter abundance, but decreased Nitrospira abundance. Our results support the idea of a niche differentiation between AOB and AOA, and between Nitrobacter and Nitrospira. AOB and Nitrobacter were both promoted at high N and C conditions (and low soil water content for Nitrobacter), while AOA and Nitrospira were favored at low N and C conditions (and high soil water content for Nitrospira). In addition, Nitrobacter abundance was positively correlated to AOB abundance and Nitrospira abundance to AOA abundance. Our results suggest that the couplings between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers are influenced by soil N availability. Multiple environmental changes may thus elicit rapid and contrasted responses between and among the soil ammonia and nitrite oxidizers due to their different ecological requirements.

  5. Spatial interaction of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in an unfertilized grassland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eStempfhuber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interrelated successive transformation steps of nitrification are performed by distinct microbial groups – the ammonia-oxidizers, comprising ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB, and nitrite-oxidizers such as Nitrobacter and Nitrospira, which are the dominant genera in the investigated soils. Hence, not only their presence and activity in the investigated habitat is required for nitrification, but also their temporal and spatial interactions. To demonstrate the interdependence of both groups and to address factors promoting putative niche differentiation within each group, temporal and spatial changes in nitrifying organisms were monitored in an unfertilized grassland site over an entire vegetation period at the plot scale of 10 m². Nitrifying organisms were assessed by measuring the abundance of marker genes (amoA for AOA and AOB, nxrA for Nitrobacter, 16S rRNA gene for Nitrospira selected for the respective sub-processes. A positive correlation between numerically dominant AOA and Nitrospira, and their co-occurrence at the same spatial scale in August and October, suggests that the nitrification process is predominantly performed by these groups and is restricted to a limited timeframe. Amongst nitrite-oxidizers, niche differentiation was evident in observed seasonally varying patterns of co-occurrence and spatial separation. While their distributions were most likely driven by substrate concentrations, oxygen availability may also have played a role under substrate-limited conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed temporal shifts in Nitrospira community composition with an increasing relative abundance of OTU03 assigned to sublineage V from August onwards, indicating its important role in nitrite oxidation.

  6. Environmental factors shaping the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in sugarcane field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tago, Kanako; Okubo, Takashi; Shimomura, Yumi; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hori, Tomoyuki; Nagayama, Atsushi; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The effects of environmental factors such as pH and nutrient content on the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in soil has been extensively studied using experimental fields. However, how these environmental factors intricately influence the community structure of AOB and AOA in soil from farmers' fields is unclear. In the present study, the abundance and diversity of AOB and AOA in soils collected from farmers' sugarcane fields were investigated using quantitative PCR and barcoded pyrosequencing targeting the ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit (amoA) gene. The abundances of AOB and AOA amoA genes were estimated to be in the range of 1.8 × 10(5)-9.2 × 10(6) and 1.7 × 10(6)-5.3 × 10(7) gene copies g dry soil(-1), respectively. The abundance of both AOB and AOA positively correlated with the potential nitrification rate. The dominant sequence reads of AOB and AOA were placed in Nitrosospira-related and Nitrososphaera-related clusters in all soils, respectively, which varied at the level of their sub-clusters in each soil. The relationship between these ammonia-oxidizing community structures and soil pH was shown to be significant by the Mantel test. The relative abundances of the OTU1 of Nitrosospira cluster 3 and Nitrososphaera subcluster 7.1 negatively correlated with soil pH. These results indicated that soil pH was the most important factor shaping the AOB and AOA community structures, and that certain subclusters of AOB and AOA adapted to and dominated the acidic soil of agricultural sugarcane fields.

  7. Relating the Diversity, Abundance, and Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Communities to Nitrification Rates in the Coastal Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, B. B.; Smith, J. M.; Chavez, F.; Francis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting first step of nitrification, is an important link between reduced (ammonia) and oxidized (nitrate) nitrogen, and controls the relative distribution of these forms of inorganic nitrogen. This process is catalyzed via the ammonia monooxygenase enzyme of both ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Archaea (AOA); the α subunit of this enzyme is encoded by the amoA gene and has been used as the molecular marker to detect this process. In the ocean, AOA are typically 10-1000 times more and are likely more active than AOB, and thus are key players in the marine nitrogen cycle. Monterey Bay is a dynamic site to study nitrification, as seasonal upwelling brings deep water and nutrients into surface waters, which can promote phytoplankton blooms and impact biogeochemical processes such as the nitrogen cycle. We have sampled two sites within Monterey Bay bimonthly for two years as part of the ongoing Monterey Bay Time Series (MBTS) to quantify AOA genes, transcripts, and nitrification rates. Two ecotypes of AOA are routinely found in Monterey Bay - the 'shallow' water column A (WCA) and 'deep' water column B (WCB) clades, which are thought to have distinct physiological properties and can be distinguished based on the amoA gene sequence. Previous work has shown a strong relationship between nitrification rates in Monterey Bay with the abundance of WCA amoA genes and transcripts. Additionally, we found a correlation between the relative abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA reads (as % of total) and the absolute abundance of AOA amoA genes (determined via qPCR) in Monterey Bay and the California Current System. AOA 16S rRNA gene abundances in turn correlated significantly with changes in nitrification rate with depth, while the relative abundance of genes and transcripts binned to a single AOA (Nitrosopumilus maritimus) was not significantly correlated to nitrification rate. Further analysis of the sequenced AOA

  8. Proteome Regulation during Olea europaea Fruit Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianco, Linda; Alagna, Fiammetta; Baldoni, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Widespread in the Mediterranean basin, Olea europaea trees are gaining worldwide popularity for the nutritional and cancer-protective properties of the oil, mechanically extracted from ripe fruits. Fruit development is a physiological process with remarkable impact on the modulation...... of the biosynthesis of compounds affecting the quality of the drupes as well as the final composition of the olive oil. Proteomics offers the possibility to dig deeper into the major changes during fruit development, including the important phase of ripening, and to classify temporal patterns of protein accumulation...... occurring during these complex physiological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this work, we started monitoring the proteome variations associated with olive fruit development by using comparative proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry. Proteins extracted from drupes at three different...

  9. Simazine degradation in bioaugmented soil: urea impact and response of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and other soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingwei; Wan, Rui; Xie, Shuguang

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of exogenous urea nitrogen on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and other soil bacterial communities in soil bioaugmented for simazine remediation. The previously isolated simazine-degrading Arthrobacter sp. strain SD1 was used to degrade the herbicide. The effect of urea on the simazine degradation capacity of the soil bioaugmented with Arthrobacter strain SD1 was assessed using quantitative PCR targeting the s-triazine-degrading trzN and atzC genes. Structures of bacterial and AOB communities were characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Urea fertilizer could affect simazine biodegradation and decreased the proportion of its trzN and atzC genes in soil augmented with Arthrobacter strain SD1. Bioaugmentation process could significantly alter the structures of both bacterial and AOB communities, which were strongly affected by urea amendment, depending on the dosage. This study could provide some new insights towards s-triazine bioremediation and microbial ecology in a bioaugmented system. However, further studies are necessary in order to elucidate the impact of different types and levels of nitrogen sources on s-triazine-degraders and bacterial and AOB communities in bioaugmented soil.

  10. Nitrous oxide emission related to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and mitigation options from N fertilization in a tropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Johnny R.; Cassman, Noriko A.; Kielak, Anna M.; Pijl, Agata; Carmo, Janaína B.; Lourenço, Kesia S.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Cantarella, Heitor; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2016-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from nitrogen fertilizers applied to sugarcane has high environmental impact on ethanol production. This study aimed to determine the main microbial processes responsible for the N2O emissions from soil fertilized with different N sources, to identify options to mitigate N2O emissions, and to determine the impacts of the N sources on the soil microbiome. In a field experiment, nitrogen was applied as calcium nitrate, urea, urea with dicyandiamide or 3,4 dimethylpyrazone phosphate nitrification inhibitors (NIs), and urea coated with polymer and sulfur (PSCU). Urea caused the highest N2O emissions (1.7% of N applied) and PSCU did not reduce cumulative N2O emissions compared to urea. NIs reduced N2O emissions (95%) compared to urea and had emissions comparable to those of the control (no N). Similarly, calcium nitrate resulted in very low N2O emissions. Interestingly, N2O emissions were significantly correlated only with bacterial amoA, but not with denitrification gene (nirK, nirS, nosZ) abundances, suggesting that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, via the nitrification pathway, were the main contributors to N2O emissions. Moreover, the treatments had little effect on microbial composition or diversity. We suggest nitrate-based fertilizers or the addition of NIs in NH4+-N based fertilizers as viable options for reducing N2O emissions in tropical soils and lessening the environmental impact of biofuel produced from sugarcane.

  11. Population Dynamics and Community Composition of Ammonia Oxidizers in Salt Marshes after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Anne E; Sheffer, Roberta; Giblin, Anne E; Marton, John M; Roberts, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    The recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico had significant effects on microbial communities in the Gulf, but impacts on nitrifying communities in adjacent salt marshes have not been investigated. We studied persistent effects of oil on ammonia-oxidizing archaeal (AOA) and bacterial (AOB) communities and their relationship to nitrification rates and soil properties in Louisiana marshes impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Soils were collected at oiled and unoiled sites from Louisiana coastal marshes in July 2012, 2 years after the spill, and analyzed for community differences based on ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA). Terminal Restriction Fragment Polymorphism and DNA sequence analyses revealed significantly different AOA and AOB communities between the three regions, but few differences were found between oiled and unoiled sites. Community composition of nitrifiers was best explained by differences in soil moisture and nitrogen content. Despite the lack of significant oil effects on overall community composition, we identified differences in correlations of individual populations with potential nitrification rates between oiled and unoiled sites that help explain previously published correlation patterns. Our results suggest that exposure to oil, even 2 years post-spill, led to subtle changes in population dynamics. How, or if, these changes may impact ecosystem function in the marshes, however, remains uncertain.

  12. Modelling combined effect of chloramine and copper on ammonia-oxidizing microbial activity using a biostability approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Dipok Chandra; Sathasivan, Arumugam; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-11-01

    Continuous and batch laboratory experiments were used to evaluate the combined effects of copper and chloramine on ammonia oxidizing microbes present in otherwise high nitrifying water samples. The experimental data were analyzed using a biostability concept and quantified with the biostable residual concentratrion (BRC) of monochloramine, or the concentration that prevents the onset of nitrification. In the batch experiments, copper dosing ≥0.25 mg-Cu L(-1) resulted in complete inhibition of nitrification, and a lower copper dosing (0.1 mg-Cu L(-1)) delayed nitrification. The BRC was systematically lowered with the addition of copper. For example, a free-ammonium concentration of 0.1 mg-N L(-1) had a BRC of 0.73 mg-Cl2 L(-1) with no Cu, but addition of 0.1 mg-Cu L(-1) lowered the BRC to 0.16 mg-Cl2 L(-1), while addition of 0.25 mg-Cu L(-1) eliminated the need to add chloramine (BRC = 0). A non-competitive inhibition model fit the experimental data well with a copper threshold of 0.044 mg-Cu L(-1) and can be used to estimate Cu doses needed to prevent nitrification based on the chloramine concentration. Full scale systems applications need further study.

  13. Changing roles of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in a continuously acidifying soil caused by over-fertilization with nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, He; Che, Zhao; Cao, Wenchao; Huang, Ting; Wang, Jingguo; Dong, Zhaorong

    2016-06-01

    Nitrification coupled with nitrate leaching contributes to soil acidification. However, little is known about the effect of soil acidification on nitrification, especially on ammonia oxidation that is the rate-limiting step of nitrification and performed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Serious soil acidification occurs in Chinese greenhouses due to the overuse of N-fertilizer. In the present study, greenhouse soils with 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 years of vegetable cultivation showed a consistent pH decline (i.e., 7.0, 6.3, 5.6, 4.9, and 4.3). Across the pH gradient, we analyzed the community structure and abundance of AOB and AOA by pyrosequencing and real-time PCR techniques, respectively. The recovered nitrification potential (RNP) method was used to determine relative contributions of AOA and AOB to nitrification potential. The results revealed that soil acidification shaped the community structures of AOA and AOB. In acidifying soil, soil pH, NH3 concentration, and DOC content were critical factors shaping ammonia oxidizer community structure. AOB abundance, but not AOA, was strongly influenced by soil acidification. When soil pH was below 5.0, AOA rather than AOB were responsible for almost all of the RNP. However, when soil pH ranged from 5.6 to 7.0, AOB were the major contributors to RNP. The group I.1a-associatied AOA had more relative abundance in low pH (pHneutral pH. Clusters 2, 10, and 12 in AOB were more abundant in acidic soil (pH neutral soil and slightly acidic soil (pH, 6.0-6.5), respectively. These results suggested that soil acidification had a profound impact on ammonia oxidation and more specific lineages in AOB occupying different pH-associated niches required further investigation.

  14. Responses of soil hydrolytic enzymes, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea to nitrogen applications in a temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Tang, Yuqian; Shi, Yao; He, Nianpeng; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Qiang; Zheng, Chunyu; Sun, Xiaomin; Qiu, Weiwen

    2016-09-01

    We used a seven-year urea gradient applied field experiment to investigate the effects of nitrogen (N) applications on soil N hydrolytic enzyme activity and ammonia-oxidizing microbial abundance in a typical steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia. The results showed that N additions inhibited the soil N-related hydrolytic enzyme activities, especially in 392 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 treatment. As N additions increased, the amoA gene copy ratios of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased from 1.13 to 0.65. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the AOA gene copies were negatively related with NH4+-N content. However, the AOB gene copies were positively correlated with NO3‑-N content. Moderate N application rates (56–224 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1) accompanied by P additions are beneficial to maintaining the abundance of AOB, as opposed to the inhibition of highest N application rate (392 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1) on the abundance of AOB. This study suggests that the abundance of AOB and AOA would not decrease unless N applications exceed 224 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 in temperate grasslands in Inner Mongolia.

  15. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria on biological activated carbon in a pilot-scale drinking water treatment plant with different treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Ikuro; Nakagaki, Hirotaka; Kurisu, Futoshi; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    The effects of different placements of rapid sand filtration on nitrification performance of BAC treatment in a pilot-scale plant were evaluated. In this plant, rapid sand filtration was placed after ozonation-BAC treatment in Process (A), while it preceded ozonation-BAC treatment in Process (B). Analysis of amoA genes of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) combined with nitrification potential test was conducted. BAC from Process (A) demonstrated slightly higher nitrification potential at every sampling occasion. This might be due to higher abundances of AOB on BAC from Process (A) than those on BAC from Process (B). However, AOA rather than AOB could be predominant ammonia-oxidizers in BAC treatment regardless of the position of rapid sand filtration. The highest nitrification potential was observed for BAC from both processes in February when the highest abundances of AOA-amoA and AOB-amoA genes were detected. Since rapid sand filtration was placed after BAC treatment in Process (A), residual aluminum concentration in BAC influent was higher in Process (A). However, adverse effects of aluminum on nitrification activity were not observed. These results suggest that factors other than aluminum concentration in different treatment processes could possibly have some influence on abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms on BAC.

  16. Evaluation of PCR primer selectivity and phylogenetic specificity by using amplification of 16S rRNA genes from betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junier, Pilar; Kim, Ok-Sun; Hadas, Ora; Imhoff, Johannes F; Witzel, Karl-Paul

    2008-08-01

    The effect of primer specificity for studying the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing betaproteobacteria (betaAOB) was evaluated. betaAOB represent a group of phylogenetically related organisms for which the 16S rRNA gene approach is especially suitable. We used experimental comparisons of primer performance with water samples, together with an in silico analysis of published sequences and a literature review of clone libraries made with four specific PCR primers for the betaAOB 16S rRNA gene. With four aquatic samples, the primers NitA/NitB produced the highest frequency of ammonia-oxidizing-bacterium-like sequences compared to clone libraries with products amplified with the primer combinations betaAMOf/betaAMOr, betaAMOf/Nso1255g, and NitA/Nso1225g. Both the experimental examination of ammonia-oxidizing-bacterium-specific 16S rRNA gene primers and the literature search showed that neither specificity nor sensitivity of primer combinations can be evaluated reliably only by sequence comparison. Apparently, the combination of sequence comparison and experimental data is the best approach to detect possible biases of PCR primers. Although this study focused on betaAOB, the results presented here more generally exemplify the importance of primer selection and potential primer bias when analyzing microbial communities in environmental samples.

  17. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to various habitats in Pearl River Delta of China, a subtropical maritime zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixin Li; Wenbiao Jin; Zhaoyun Liang; Yangyang Yue; Junhong Lv

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are widely considered key to ammonia oxidation in various environments.However,little work has been conducted to simultaneously investigate the abundance and diversity of AOA as well as correlations between archaeal amoA genotypes and environmental parameters of different ecosystems at one district.To understand the abundance,diversity,and distribution of AOA in Pearl River Delta of China in response to various habitats,the archaeal amoA genes in soil,marine,river,lake,hot spring and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) samples were investigated using real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR and clone libraries.Our analyses indicated that the diversity of AOA in various habitats was different and could be clustered into five major clades,i.e.,estuary sediment,marine water/sediment,soil,hot spring and Cluster 1.Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the structure of AOA communities in similar ecological habitats exhibited strong relation.The canonical correspondence method indicated that the AOA community structure was strongly correlated to temperature,pH,total organic carbon,total nitrogen and dissolved oxygen variables.Assessing AOA amoA gene copy numbers,ranging from 6.84 × 106 to 9.45 × 107 copies/g in dry soil/sediment,and 6.06 × 106 to 2.41 × 107 copies/L in water samples,were higher than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) by 1-2 orders of magnitude.However,AOA amoA copy numbers were much lower than AOB in WWTP activated sludge samples.Overall,these studies suggested that AOA may be a major contributor to ammonia oxidation in natural habitats but play a minor role in highly aerated activated sludge.The result also showed the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance was positively correlated with temperature and less correlated with other environmental parameters.New data from our study provide increasing evidence for the relative abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the global nitrogen cycle.

  18. Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, and Pharmacology of Olea europaea (Olive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Hashmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Review. To grasp the fragmented information available on the botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of Olea europaea to explore its therapeutic potential and future research opportunities. Material and Methods. All the available information on O. europaea was collected via electronic search (using Pubmed, Scirus, Google Scholar, and Web of Science and a library search. Results. Ethnomedical uses of O. europaea are recorded throughout the world where it has been used to treat various ailments. Phytochemical research had led to the isolation of flavonoids, secoiridoids, iridoids, flavanones, biophenols, triterpenes, benzoic acid derivatives, isochromans, and other classes of secondary metabolites from O. europaea. The plant materials and isolated components have shown a wide spectrum of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities like antidiabetic, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antiviral, antihypertensive, anticancer, antihyperglycemic, antinociceptive, gastroprotective, and wound healing activities. Conclusions. O. europaea emerged as a good source of traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments. The outcomes of phytochemical and pharmacological studies reported in this review will further expand its existing therapeutic potential and provide a convincing support to its future clinical use in modern medicine.

  19. Activity and Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in an Aquic Brown Soil as Influenced by Land Use and Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wan-Tai; XU Yong-Gang; BI Ming-Li; MA Qiang; ZHOU Hua

    2010-01-01

    The effects of long-term(19 years)different land use and fertilization on activity and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria(AOB)in an aquic brown soil were investigated in a field experiment in Liaoning Province,China.The 19-year experiment conducted from 1990 to 2008 involved seven treatments designed: cropping rotation of soybean-corn-corn with no fertilizer(control,CK),recycled manure(RM),fertilizer nitrogen(N),phosphorous(P)and potassium(K)(NPK),NPK+RM,and no-crop bare land,mowed fallow,and non-mowed fallow.The results showed that the potential nitrification rates of the RM,NPK+RM,mowed fallow,and non-mowed fallow treatments were significantly higher(P < 0.05)than those of the CK and NPK treatments,indicating that the long-term applications of recycled manure and return of plant residues both significantly increased the activity of AOB.Although the application of NPK did not enhance soil potential nitrification because of decreased pH,available K had an important effect on potential nitrification.Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE)fingerprint profiles showed that no-crop treatments had an increase in the diversity of the AOB community compared to the CK,RM,and NPK treatments,implying that agricultural practices,especially tillage,had an adverse effect on the soil AOB community.The NPK+RM treatment had the most diverse DGGE patterns possibly because of the increased available P in this treatment.A phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the DGGE bands derived belonged to Nitrosoxpira cluster 3,not Nitrosospira cluster 2.These demonstrated that different land use and fertilization significantly influenced the activity and composition of the AOB community by altering the soil properties,mainly including pH,total C,available K,and available P.

  20. Empowering a mesophilic inoculum for thermophilic nitrification: Growth mode and temperature pattern as critical proliferation factors for archaeal ammonia oxidizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Vandekerckhove, Tom; Prat, Delphine; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Meerbergen, Ken; Lievens, Bart; Boon, Nico; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2016-04-01

    Cost-efficient biological treatment of warm nitrogenous wastewaters requires the development of thermophilic nitrogen removal processes. Only one thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor was described so far, achieving 200 mg N L(-1) d(-1) after more than 300 days of enrichment from compost samples. From the practical point of view in which existing plants would be upgraded, however, a more time-efficient development strategy based on mesophilic nitrifying sludge is preferred. This study evaluated the adaptive capacities of mesophilic nitrifying sludge for two linear temperature increase patterns (non-oscillating vs. oscillating), two different slopes (0.25 vs. 0.08 °C d(-1)) and two different reactor types (floc vs. biofilm growth). The oscillating temperature pattern (0.25 °C d(-1)) and the moving bed biofilm reactor (0.08 °C d(-1)) could not reach nitrification at temperatures higher than 46 °C. However, nitrification rates up to 800 mg N L(-1) d(-1) and 150 mg N g(-1) volatile suspended solids d(-1) were achieved at a temperature as high as 49 °C by imposing the slowest linear temperature increase to floccular sludge. Microbial community analysis revealed that this successful transition was related with a shift in ammonium oxidizing archaea dominating ammonia oxidizing bacteria, while for nitrite oxidation Nitrospira spp. was constantly more abundant than Nitrobacter spp.. This observation was accompanied with an increase in observed sludge yield and a shift in maximal optimum temperature, determined with ex-situ temperature sensitivity measurements, predicting an upcoming reactor failure at higher temperature. Overall, this study achieved nitrification at 49 °C within 150 days by gradual adaptation of mesophilic sludge, and showed that ex-situ temperature sensitivity screening can be used to monitor and steer the transition process.

  1. Variation of Potential Nitrification and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Community with Plant-Growing Period in Apple Orchard Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling-zhi; QIN Si-jun; L De-guo; WANG Bing-ying; YANG Ze-yuan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential nitriifcation and community structure of soil-based ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in apple orchard soil during different growth periods and explored the effects of environmental factors on nitriifcation activity and AOB community composition in the soil of a Hanfu apple orchard, using a culture-dependent technique and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We observed that nitrification activity and AOB abundance were the highest in November, lower in May, and the lowest in July. The results of statistical analysis indicated that total nitrogen (N) content, NH4+-N content, NO3--N content, and pH showed signiifcant correlations with AOB abundance and nitriifcation activity in soil. The Shannon-Winner diversity, as well as species richness and evenness indices (determined by PCR-DGGE banding patterns) in soil samples were the highest in September, but the lowest in July, when compared to additional sampled dates. The DGGE ifngerprints of soil-based 16S rRNA genes in November were apparently distinct from those observed in May, July, and September, possessing the lowest species richness indices and the highest dominance indices among all four growth periods. Fourteen DGGE bands were excised for sequencing. The resulting analysis indicated that all AOB communities belonged to the β-Proteobacteriaphylum, with the dominant AOB showing high similarity to theNitrosospira genus. Therefore, soil-based environmental factors, such as pH variation and content of NH4+-N and NO3--N, can substantially inlfuence the abundance of AOB communities in soil, and play a critical role in soil-based nitriifcation kinetics.

  2. Comparison of PCR-DGGE and Nested-PCR-DGGE Approach for Ammonia Oxidizers Monitoring in Membrane Bioreactors’ Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziembińska-Buczyńska Aleksandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitritation, the first stage of ammonia removal process is known to be limiting for total process performance. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB which perform this process are obligatory activated sludge habitants, a mixture consisting of Bacteria, Protozoa and Metazoa used for biological wastewater treatment. Due to this fact they are an interesting bacterial group, from both the technological and ecological point of view. AOB changeability and biodiversity analyses both in wastewater treatment plants and lab-scale reactors are performed on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences using PCR-DGGE (Polymerase Chain Reaction – Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis as a molecular biology tool. AOB researches are usually led with nested PCR. Because the application of nested PCR is laborious and time consuming, we have attempted to check the possibility of using only first PCR round to obtain DGGE fingerprinting of microbial communities. In this work we are comparing the nested and non-nested PCR-DGGE monitoring of an AOB community and presenting advantages and disadvantages of both methods used. The experiment revealed that PCR technique is a very sensitive tool for the amplification of even a minute amount of DNA sample. But in the case of nested-PCR, the sensitivity is higher and the template amount could be even smaller. The nested PCR-DGGE seems to be a better tool for AOB community monitoring and complexity research in activated sludge, despite shorter fragments of DNA amplification which seems to be a disadvantage in the case of bacteria identification. It is recommended that the sort of analysis approach should be chosen according to the aim of the study: nested-PCR-DGGE for community complexity analysis, while PCR-DGGE for identification of the dominant bacteria.

  3. Abundance, composition and activity of ammonia oxidizer and denitrifier communities in metal polluted rice paddies from South China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    Full Text Available While microbial nitrogen transformations in soils had been known to be affected by heavy metal pollution, changes in abundance and community structure of the mediating microbial populations had been not yet well characterized in polluted rice soils. Here, by using the prevailing molecular fingerprinting and enzyme activity assays and comparisons to adjacent non-polluted soils, we examined changes in the abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing and denitrifying communities of rice paddies in two sites with different metal accumulation situation under long-term pollution from metal mining and smelter activities. Potential nitrifying activity was significantly reduced in polluted paddies in both sites while potential denitrifying activity reduced only in the soils with high Cu accumulation up to 1300 mg kg-1. Copy numbers of amoA (AOA and AOB genes were lower in both polluted paddies, following the trend with the enzyme assays, whereas that of nirK was not significantly affected. Analysis of the DGGE profiles revealed a shift in the community structure of AOA, and to a lesser extent, differences in the community structure of AOB and denitrifier between soils from the two sites with different pollution intensity and metal composition. All of the retrieved AOB sequences belonged to the genus Nitrosospira, among which species Cluster 4 appeared more sensitive to metal pollution. In contrast, nirK genes were widely distributed among different bacterial genera that were represented differentially between the polluted and unpolluted paddies. This could suggest either a possible non-specific target of the primers conventionally used in soil study or complex interactions between soil properties and metal contents on the observed community and activity changes, and thus on the N transformation in the polluted rice soils.

  4. Fauna Europaea - all European animal species on the web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Yde; Verbeek, Melina; Michelsen, Verner

    2014-01-01

    ,000 taxon names, including 145,000 accepted (sub)species, assembled by a large network of (>400) leading specialists, using advanced electronic tools for data collations with data quality assured through sophisticated validation routines. Fauna Europaea started in 2000 as an EC funded FP5 project...... and provides a unique taxonomic reference for many user-groups such as scientists, governments, industries, nature conservation communities and educational programs. Fauna Europaea was formally accepted as an INSPIRE standard for Europe, as part of the European Taxonomic Backbone established in PESI. Fauna...

  5. 水稻土氨氧化细菌多样性的RFLP分析%RFLP Analysis of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria Diversity in Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惠民; 程林; 王保莉; 曲东

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbes play an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of N element and limit the rate of nitrification.The diversity and composition of the rhizosphere paddy soil and bulk paddy soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were analyzed through constructing its 16S rDNA gene clone library and by PCR-based Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis (RFLP).Total genome DNA of soil microorganism was extracted from the rhizosphere paddy soil(G) and bulk paddy soil(F).16S rDNAs of the extracted DNA were amplified using ammona oxidizing bacteria special primers (Eub338, Nso1225) and relevant clone libraries were constructed.110 and 105 restriction endonuclease types of these samples were detected based on restriction endonuclease Hha Ⅰ and Rsa Ⅰ using PCR-RFLP.The data were analyzed by diversity index and clustering of the dominated bacteria.The results showed that the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria community structure index H', Dg and Jgi of bulk paddy soil were slightly higher than rhizosphere paddy soil, which indicated that the population of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in bulk paddy soil was slightly more than that in rhizosphere paddy soil; the index Hmax and dMax of rhizosphere paddy soil were higher than bulk paddy soil, which meant that the quantity of ammonia- oxidizing bacteria in rhizosphere paddy soil was more than in bulk paddy soil;Sequencing the dominate ammonia-oxidizing bacteria community in rhizosphere paddy soil showed that they mainly belong to Nitrosospira sp., Uncultured Nitrosomonadaceae bacterium, Uncultured Beta proteobacterium , and UncuLtured Alcaligenaceae bacterium.%提取苗期水稻根际土和非根际土土样微生物总DNA,采用氨氧化细菌特异性引物(Eub338,Nso1225)扩增16S rDNA基因片段,分别建立水稻根际土(G)和非根际土(F)氨氧化细菌克隆文库.用限制性内切酶HhaⅠ/RsaⅠ进行PCR-RFLP分型,分别得到110和105个酶切类型.多样性指数和优势细菌聚类比对

  6. Effects of nitrogen application rate and a nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide on ammonia oxidizers and N2O emissions in a grazed pasture soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; He, Ji-Zheng

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia oxidizers, including ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) are important drivers of a key step of the nitrogen cycle - nitrification, which affects the production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen application rates and the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) on the abundance of AOB and AOA and on N2O emissions in a grazed pasture soil. Nitrogen (N) was applied at four different rates, with urea applied at 50 and 100 kg N ha(-1) and animal urine at 300 and 600 kg N ha(-1). DCD was applied to some of the N treatments at 10 kg ha(-1). The results showed that the AOB amoA gene copy numbers were greater than those of AOA. The highest ratio of the AOB to AOA amoA gene copy numbers was 106.6 which occurred in the urine-N 600 treatment. The AOB amoA gene copy numbers increased with increasing nitrogen application rates. DCD had a significant impact in reducing the AOB amoA gene copy numbers especially in the high nitrogen application rates. N2O emissions increased with the N application rates. DCD had the most significant effect in reducing the daily and total N2O emissions in the highest nitrogen application rate. The greatest reduction of total N2O emissions by DCD was 69% in the urine-N 600 treatment. The reduction in the N2O emission factor by DCD ranged from 58% to 83%. The N2O flux and NO3(-)-N concentrations were significantly correlated to the growth of AOB, rather than AOA. This study confirms the importance of AOB in nitrification and the effect of DCD in inhibiting AOB growth and in decreasing N2O emissions in grazed pasture soils under field conditions.

  7. Distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and polyphosphate accumulating organisms in a pumped-flow biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangxue; Nielsen, Michael; Sorensen, Ketil; Zhan, Xinmin; Rodgers, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The spatial distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) were investigated for a novel laboratory-scale sequencing batch pumped-flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) system that was operated for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The PFBR comprised of two 16.5l tanks (Reactors 1 and 2), each with a biofilm module of 2m(2) surface area. To facilitate the growth of AOB and PAOs in the reactor biofilms, the influent wastewater was held in Reactor 1 under stagnant un-aerated conditions for 6 h after feeding, and was then pumped over and back between Reactors 1 and 2 for 12 h, creating aerobic conditions in the two reactors during this period; as a consequence, the biofilm in Reactor 2 was in an aerobic environment for almost all the 18.2 h operating cycle. A combination of micro-sensor measurements, molecular techniques, batch experiments and reactor studies were carried out to analyse the performance of the PFBR system. After 100 days operation at a filtered chemical oxygen demand (COD(f)) loading rate of 3.46 g/m(2) per day, the removal efficiencies were 95% COD(f), 87% TN(f) and 74% TP(f). While the PFBR microbial community structure and function were found to be highly diversified with substantial AOB and PAO populations, about 70% of the phosphorus release potential and almost 100% of the nitrification potential were located in Reactors 1 and 2, respectively. Co-enrichment of AOB and PAOs was realized in the Reactor 2 biofilm, where molecular analyses revealed unexpected microbial distributions at micro-scale, with population peaks of AOB in a 100-250 microm deep sub-surface zone and of PAOs in the 0-150 microm surface zone. The micro-distribution of AOB coincided with the position of the nitrification peak identified during micro-sensor analyses. The study demonstrates that enrichment of PAOs can be realized in a constant or near constant aerobic biofilm environment. Furthermore, the findings suggest

  8. Fluctuations in ammonia oxidizing communities across agricultural soils are driven by soil structure and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele C ePereira e Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The milieu in soil in which microorganisms dwell is never constant. Conditions such as temperature, water availability, pH and nutrients frequently change, impacting the overall functioning of the soil system. To understand the effects of such factors on soil functioning, proxies (indicators of soil function are needed that, in a sensitive manner, reveal normal amplitude of variation. Thus, the so-called normal operating range (NOR of soil can be defined. In this study we determined different components of nitrification by analyzing, in eight agricultural soils, how the community structures and sizes of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively, and their activity, fluctuate over spatial and temporal scales. The results indicated that soil pH and soil type are the main factors that influence the size and structure of the AOA and AOB, as well as their function. The nitrification rates varied between 0.11 ± 0.03 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and 1.68 ± 0.11 µgN.h-1.gdw-1, being higher in soils with higher clay content (1.09 ± 0.12 µgN.h-1.gdw-1 and lower in soils with lower clay percentages (0.27 ± 0.04 µgN.h-1.gdw-1. Nitrifying activity was driven by soil pH, mostly related to its effect on AOA but not on AOB abundance. Regarding the influence of soil parameters, clay content was the main soil factor shaping the structure of both the AOA and AOB communities. Overall, the potential nitrifying activities were higher and more variable over time in the clayey than in the sandy soils. Whereas the structure of AOB fluctuated more (62.7 ± 2.10% the structure of AOA communities showed lower amplitude of variation (53.65 ± 3.37%. Similar trends were observed for the sizes of these communities. The present work represents a first step towards defining a NOR for soil nitrification. Moreover, the clear effect of soil texture established here suggests that the NOR should be defined in a soil-type-specific manner.

  9. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in common moles (Talpa europaea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, I.M.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Wisselink, H.J.; Meerburg, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in common moles, Talpa europaea, was investigated in order to determine whether moles can serve as an indicator species for T. gondii infections in livestock. Findings In total, 86 moles were caught from 25 different sites in the Netherlands. Five diffe

  10. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Total Bacteria and Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria in Buji River in Wet Season%布吉河丰水期总细菌和氨氧化细菌的定性和定量研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海美; 白姣姣; 孙卫玲; 邵军

    2012-01-01

    河流中微生物的数量和群落结构能在一定程度上反映水环境状况.氨氧化细菌驱动的硝化作用是氮素转化的主要机制,为了解氮素污染河流中氨氧化细菌的群落组成及数量,采用变性梯度凝胶电泳(denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis,DGGE)和Real-time PCR技术分析了布吉河丰水期不同断面水样中总细菌和氨氧化细菌的群落结构以及数量变化.结果表明,水样中总细菌(16S rRNA)和氨氧化细菌(16S rRNA)数量变化范围分别为4.73×1010~3.90×1011copies.L-1和5.44×106~5.96×108copies.L-1.冗余度分析表明影响微生物数量和群落结构的水环境因子不同:对于总细菌,与其数量显著相关的环境因子是硝氮(P〈0.05),与其群落结构显著相关的环境因子是氮素(三氮)和金属(Mn和Zn)(P〈0.05);对于氨氧化细菌(ammonia-oxidizing bacteria,AOB),与其数量显著相关的是氨氮和Zn(P〈0.05),与其群落组成显著相关的是氨氮、Mn和Zn(P〈0.05).测序结果表明在布吉河水样中微生物属于变形菌门(Proteobacterium)的Epsilon-Proteobacteria、Gamma-Proteobacteria、Beta-Proteobacteria和Delta-Proteobacteria这4个纲,氨氧化细菌与Nitrosomonas sp.和Nitrosospira sp.属的细菌相似度较高,且Nitrosospira sp.为优势菌属.由于污染影响,布吉河上游和下游微生物群落结构明显不同.%Microbial community structure and biomass in river water can reflect the situation of water quality in some extent.Nitrogen removal was mainly achieved by the nitrification and denitrification processes,and ammonia oxidation catalyzed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria(AOB) is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification.To explore the AOB community structure and biomass in nitrogen polluted river,water samples were collected from Buji River(Shenzhen) in wet season.Quantification of 16S rRNA copy numbers of total bacteria and AOB were performed by

  11. Formation of {open_quotes}metal wool{close_quotes} structures and dynamics of catalytic etching of platinum surfaces during ammonia oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubovsky, M.R.; Barelko, V.V. [Institute of Chemical Physics in Chernogolovka, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    Reconstruction of a clean surface of a platinum catalyst and a platinum surface covered with gold during ammonia oxidation was studied by SEM observations. It was found that the process of catalytic etching had two sequential stages in which different crystal structures with different rates of growth formed on the surface. The first stage was the formation of parallel facets, and the second stage was the formation of individual microcrystals with perfect crystal faces. It was also found that the second state had a threshold character, beginning after some delay from the start of the reaction. A structure resembling metal wool and consisting of interlaced platinum filaments was found to form on the surface of gold-covered platinum catalysts. Characteristic features of this structure`s development are reported. The growth of filaments is attributed to the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism of whisker growth. On the basis of the observed platinum whisker formation and behavior during ammonia oxidation, a mechanism of catalyst surface reconstruction that explains observed characteristic features of the process of catalytic etching is proposed. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  12. High abundances of potentially active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in oligotrophic, high-altitude lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis J Hayden

    Full Text Available Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle by determining the oxidation state of nitrogen and its subsequent bioavailability and cycling. However, relatively little is known about the underlying ecology of the microbial communities that carry out nitrification in freshwater ecosystems--and particularly within high-altitude oligotrophic lakes, where nitrogen is frequently a limiting nutrient. We quantified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in 9 high-altitude lakes (2289-3160 m in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, in relation to spatial and biogeochemical data. Based on their ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected. AOB were present in 88% of samples and were more abundant than AOA in all samples. Both groups showed >100 fold variation in abundance between different lakes, and were also variable through time within individual lakes. Nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate were generally low but also varied across and within lakes, suggestive of active internal nutrient cycling; AOB abundance was significantly correlated with phosphate (r(2 = 0.32, p<0.1, whereas AOA abundance was inversely correlated with lake elevation (r(2 = 0.43, p<0.05. We also measured low rates of ammonia oxidation--indicating that AOB, AOA, or both, may be biogeochemically active in these oligotrophic ecosystems. Our data indicate that dynamic populations of AOB and AOA are found in oligotrophic, high-altitude, freshwater lakes.

  13. A novel control method for nitritation: The domination of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by high concentrations of inorganic carbon in an airlift-fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokutomi, Takaaki; Shibayama, Chizu; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-07-01

    A novel nitritation method based on the addition of inorganic carbon (IC) was verified using an airlift-fluidized bed reactor packed with sponge cubes. A continuous-treatment experiment demonstrated that the type of nitrification-nitrite or nitrate accumulation-could be controlled by the addition of different alkalinity sources (NaHCO(3) or NaOH, respectively). The maximum rate of ammonia oxidation at 30 degrees C was 2.47kg-N/(m(3) d), with nitrate formation of less than 0.5% of the converted ammonia. Nitrite accumulation of over 90% was maintained stably over 250 days at 30 degrees C and was achieved even at 19 degrees C. Qualitative and quantitative shifts of nitrifying bacteria in the biofilm were monitored by real-time PCR and T-RFLP analysis. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were dominant but nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were eliminated in the reactor when NaHCO(3) was used as the alkalinity source. From the kinetic data, we inferred that high IC concentrations drive stable nitritation by promoting a higher growth rate for AOB than for NOB.

  14. Influence of the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in rhizosphere and bulk soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleineidam, Kristina; Košmrlj, Kristina; Kublik, Susanne; Palmer, Iris; Pfab, Helena; Ruser, Reiner; Fiedler, Sabine; Schloter, Michael

    2011-06-01

    In agricultural plant production nitrification inhibitors like 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) are used to retard the microbial nitrification process of fertilized ammonium to enhance the nitrogen supply for cultivated crops and to reduce nitrogen losses from the production system. Besides the well-known ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) it is known for a few years that also ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are able to perform the first step in nitrification, hence being also a target for a nitrification inhibitor. However, so far no information are available concerning the effectiveness of DMPP and its extent towards AOB and AOA, neither in bulk soil nor in the root-rhizosphere complex. We investigated in a field experiment performed according to agricultural practice the effect of DMPP on the abundance of AOB and AOA two, four and eight weeks after fertilization. We observed impaired abundances of AOB but not of AOA in both soil compartments that were still visible eight weeks after application, possibly indicating a reduced effectiveness of the nitrification inhibitor in our study.

  15. Comparative effects of 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) and dicyandiamide (DCD) on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in a vegetable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuhui; Qi, Lingyu; Bi, Qingfang; Dai, Peibin; Sun, Dasheng; Sun, Chengliang; Liu, Wenjing; Lu, Lingli; Ni, Wuzhong; Lin, Xianyong

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification inhibitors (NIs) 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) and dicyandiamide (DCD) have been used extensively to improve nitrogen fertilizer utilization in farmland. However, their comparative effects on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in agricultural soils are still unclear. Here, we compared the impacts of these two inhibitors on soil nitrification, AOA and AOB abundance as well as their community structure in a vegetable soil by using real-time PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Our results showed that urea application significantly increased the net nitrification rates, but were significantly inhibited by both NIs, and the inhibitory effect of DMPP was significantly greater than that of DCD. AOB growth was more greatly inhibited by DMPP than by DCD, and the net nitrification rate was significantly related to AOB abundance, but not to AOA abundance. Application of urea and NIs to soil did not change the diversity of the AOA community, with the T-RFs remaining in proportions that were similar to control soils, while the community structure of AOB exhibited obvious shifts within all different treatments compared to the control. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all AOA sequences fell within group 1.1a and group 1.1b, and the AOB community consisted of Nitrosospira cluster 3, cluster 0, and unidentified species. These results suggest that DMPP exhibited a stronger inhibitory effect on nitrification than DCD by inhibiting AOB rather than AOA.

  16. Screening of electrocatalysts for direct ammonia fuel cell: Ammonia oxidation on PtMe (Me: Ir, Rh, Pd, Ru) and preferentially oriented Pt(1 0 0) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal-Iglesias, F.J.; Solla-Gullon, J.; Montiel, V.; Feliu, J.M.; Aldaz, A. [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2007-09-27

    Ammonia has attracted attention as a possible fuel for direct fuel cells since it is easy to handle and to transport as liquid or as concentrated aqueous solution. However, on noble metal electrodes ammonia oxidation is a sluggish reaction and the electrocatalyst needs to be improved for developing efficient ammonia fuel cells. In this work, ammonia electrooxidation reaction on 3-4-nm bimetallic PtMe (Ir, Rh, Pd, Ru) and on preferentially oriented Pt(1 0 0) nanoparticles is reported. PtMe nanoparticles have been prepared by using water-in-oil microemulsions to obtain a narrow size distribution whereas preferentially oriented Pt nanoparticles have been prepared through colloidal routes. Among all the bimetallic samples tested, only Pt{sub 75}Ir{sub 25} and Pt{sub 75}Rh{sub 25} nanoparticles show, at the low potential range, an enhancement of the oxidation density current with respect to the behaviour found for pure platinum nanoparticles prepared by the same method. In addition, two Pt(1 0 0) preferentially oriented nanoparticles of different particle size (4 and 9 nm) have been also studied. These oriented nanoparticles show higher current densities than polycrystalline Pt nanoparticles due to the sensitivity of ammonia oxidation toward the presence of surface sites with square symmetry. The reactivity of the different 4-nm nanoparticles parallels well with that expected from bulk PtMe alloys and Pt single crystal electrodes. (author)

  17. Nitrosomonas europaea-like bacteria detected as the dominant b-subclass Proteobacteria ammonia oxidisers in reference and limed acid forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnol, M.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; De Boer, W.

    2002-01-01

    Net nitrification in intact soil cores and the community of ammonia-oxidising bacteria were studied in acid Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt. Lieb.)) soils (Haute Ardenne, east Belgium) 18 months after treatment with 5tha1 dolomite lime. Liming caused a s

  18. Mo-Bi系丙烯氨氧化催化剂上氨分解反应动力学的Monte Carlo模拟%Monte Carlo Simulation of Kinetics of Ammonia Oxidative Decomposition over the Commercial Propylene Ammoxidation Catalyst (Mo-Bi)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗正鸿; 詹晓力; 陈丰秋; 阳永荣

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is applied to investigate the kinetics of ammonia oxidative decomposition overthe commercial propylene ammoxidation catalyst(Mo-Bi). The simulation is quite in agreement with experimentalresults. Monte Carlo simulation proves that the process of ammonia oxidation decomposition is a two-step reaction.

  19. 3,4-Dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) reduces activity of ammonia oxidizers without adverse effects on non-target soil microorganisms and functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xianwang; Duan, Yun-Feng (Kevin); Schramm, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    The nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) is widely used within agriculture to reduce nitrate leaching and improve nitrogen use efficiency of fertilizers, but few studies examined effects on non-target soil functions and microorganisms, i.e. other than the intended delay......) and archaea (AOA) were quantified, and cell-specific nitrification rates were estimated. There was a general trend of increasing AOA and AOB abundance towards the end of incubation irrespective of DMPP treatment, whereas cell-specific activity of AOA and/or AOB was reduced in the presence of DMPP. Overall......, this study indicated that DMPP effectively inhibited nitrification activity without effects on ammonia oxidizer populations, as well as non-target soil microorganisms or functions....

  20. Extent of copper tolerance and consequences for functional stability of the ammonia-oxidizing community in long-term copper-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Jelle; Wakelin, Steven A; Broos, Kris; McLaughlin, Mike J; Smolders, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation of soil microbial communities to elevated copper (Cu) concentrations has been well documented. However, effects of long-term Cu exposure on adaptation responses associated with functional stability and structural composition within the nitrifying community are still unknown. Soils were sampled in three field sites (Denmark, Thailand, and Australia) where Cu gradients had been established from 3 to 80 years prior to sampling. In each field site, the potential nitrification rate (PNR) decreased by over 50% with increasing soil Cu, irrespective of a 20 to >200-fold increase in Cu tolerance (at the highest soil Cu) among the nitrifying communities. This increased tolerance was associated with decreasing numbers (15-120-fold) of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), except in the oldest contaminated field site, decreasing numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA; 10-130-fold) and differences in the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) composition of the AOB and, to a lesser extent, AOA communities. The sensitivity of nitrifying communities, previously under long-term Cu exposure, to additional stresses was assessed. Nitrification in soils from the three field sites was measured following acidification, pesticide addition, freeze-thaw cycles, and dry-rewetting cycles. Functional stability of the nitrification process was assessed immediately after stress application (resistance) and after an additional three weeks of incubation (resilience). No indications were found that long-term Cu exposure affected the sensitivity to the selected stressors, suggesting that resistance and resilience were unaffected. It was concluded that the nitrifying community changed structurally in all long-term Cu-exposed field sites and that these changes were associated with increased Cu tolerance but not with a loss of functional stability.

  1. Microbial ecology of á-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers along a concentration gradient of dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the San Bernadino Mountain Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, F. L.; Fenn, M. E.; Stein, L. Y.

    2002-12-01

    The fate of atmospherically-deposited nitrogen from industrial pollution is of major concern in the montane ecosystems bordering the South Coast California Air Basin. Nitrogen deposition rates in the more exposed regions of the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM) are among the highest in North America often exceeding 40 kg ha-1 year-1 in throughfall deposition of nitrate and ammonium (Fenn and Poth, 1999). Forest ecosystems with elevated N deposition generally exhibit elevated accumulation of soil nitrate, leaching and runoff, elevated emissions of nitrogenous gases, increased nitrification, and decreased litter decomposition rates. The role of nitrifying microbial populations, especially those taxonomically associated with the beta-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers (AOB), will provide insight into nitrogen-cycling in these extremely N-saturated environments. Using 16S ribosomal DNA-based molecular techniques (16S rDNA clone library construction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism), we are comparing AOB community diversity at 3 different locations along a natural atmospheric N-deposition concentration gradient in the SBM: from high at Camp Paviaka (CP), medium at Strawberry Peak (SP) to low at Dogwood (DW). As observed for wet N-deposition systems on the east coast, we hypothesized a negative correlation between AOB community diversity, abundance and function with nitrogen loading in the dry N deposition system of SBM. Nitrification potentials determined for the 3 sites along the N-deposition gradient were in the order of CP less than SP less than DW. Preliminary results indicate no correlation between diversity of AOB and increased nitrogen loading. Shannon-Weiner diversity indices calculated for ammonia-oxidizer RFLP group units were 2.22, 2.66 and 1.80 for CP, SP and DW, respectively.

  2. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in sediments of trophic end members of the Laurentian Great Lakes, Erie and Superior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Annette; Bullerjahn, George S; McKay, Robert Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification carried out by ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB). Lake Superior and Erie are part of the Great Lakes system differing in trophic status with Lake Superior being oligotrophic and Lake Erie meso- to eutrophic. Sediment samples were collected from both lakes and used to characterize abundance and diversity of AOA and AOB based on the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene. Diversity was accessed by a pyro-sequencing approach and the obtained sequences were used to determine the phylogeny and alpha and beta diversity of the AOA and AOB populations. In Lake Erie copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes were in the same order of magnitude or even higher than the copy numbers of the archaeal amoA genes, while in Lake Superior up to 4 orders of magnitude more archaeal than bacterial amoA copies were detected. The AOB detected in the samples from Lake Erie belonged to AOB that are frequently detected in freshwater. Differences were detected between the phylogenetic affiliations of the AOA from the two lakes. Most sequences detected in Lake Erie clustered in the Nitrososphaera cluster (Thaumarchaeal soil group I.1b) where as most of the sequences in Lake Superior were found in the Nitrosopumilus cluster (Thaumarchaeal marine group I.1a) and the Nitrosotalea cluster. Pearson correlations and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that the differences in abundance and diversity of AOA are very likely related to the sampling location and thereby to the different trophic states of the lakes.

  3. Vertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeota and methanogens in the epipelagic waters of Lake Kivu (Rwanda-Democratic Republic of the Congo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llirós, Marc; Gich, Frederic; Plasencia, Anna; Auguet, Jean-Christophe; Darchambeau, François; Casamayor, Emilio O; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Borrego, Carles

    2010-10-01

    Four stratified basins in Lake Kivu (Rwanda-Democratic Republic of the Congo) were sampled in March 2007 to investigate the abundance, distribution, and potential biogeochemical role of planktonic archaea. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization with catalyzed-reported deposition microscopic counts (CARD-FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of signature genes for ammonia-oxidizing archaea (16S rRNA for marine Crenarchaeota group 1.1a [MCG1] and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A [amoA]). Abundance of archaea ranged from 1 to 4.5% of total DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) counts with maximal concentrations at the oxic-anoxic transition zone (∼50-m depth). Phylogenetic analysis of the archaeal planktonic community revealed a higher level of richness of crenarchaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences (21 of the 28 operational taxonomic units [OTUs] identified [75%]) over euryarchaeotal ones (7 OTUs). Sequences affiliated with the kingdom Euryarchaeota were mainly recovered from the anoxic water compartment and mostly grouped into methanogenic lineages (Methanosarcinales and Methanocellales). In turn, crenarchaeal phylotypes were recovered throughout the sampled epipelagic waters (0- to 100-m depth), with clear phylogenetic segregation along the transition from oxic to anoxic water masses. Thus, whereas in the anoxic hypolimnion crenarchaeotal OTUs were mainly assigned to the miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group, the OTUs from the oxic-anoxic transition and above belonged to Crenarchaeota groups 1.1a and 1.1b, two lineages containing most of the ammonia-oxidizing representatives known so far. The concomitant vertical distribution of both nitrite and nitrate maxima and the copy numbers of both MCG1 16S rRNA and amoA genes suggest the potential implication of Crenarchaeota in nitrification processes occurring in the epilimnetic waters of the lake.

  4. Land Spreading of Wastewaters from the Fruit-Packaging Industry and Potential Effects on Soil Microbes: Effects of the Antioxidant Ethoxyquin and Its Metabolites on Ammonia Oxidizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Evangelia S.; Tsachidou, Bella; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Menkissoglu-Spiroudi, Urania

    2015-01-01

    Thiabendazole (TBZ), imazalil (IMZ), ortho-phenylphenol (OPP), diphenylamine (DPA), and ethoxyquin (EQ) are used in fruit-packaging plants (FPP) with the stipulation that wastewaters produced by their application would be depurated on site. However, no such treatment systems are currently in place, leading FPP to dispose of their effluents in agricultural land. We investigated the dissipation of those pesticides and their impact on soil microbes known to have a key role on ecosystem functioning. OPP and DPA showed limited persistence (50% dissipation time [DT50], 0.6 and 1.3 days) compared to TBZ and IMZ (DT50, 47.0 and 150.8 days). EQ was rapidly transformed to the short-lived quinone imine (QI) (major metabolite) and the more persistent 2,4-dimethyl-6-ethoxyquinoline (EQNL) (minor metabolite). EQ and OPP exerted significant inhibition of potential nitrification, with the effect of the former being more persistent. This was not reflected in the abundance (determined by quantitative PCR [qPCR]) of the amoA gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Considering the above discrepancy and the metabolic pattern of EQ, we further investigated the hypothesis that its metabolites and not only EQ were toxic to ammonia oxidizers. Potential nitrification, amoA gene abundance, and amoA gene transcripts of AOB and AOA showed that QI was probably responsible for the inhibition of nitrification. Our findings have serious ecological and practical implications for soil productivity and N conservation in agriculturally impacted ecosystems and stress the need to include metabolites and RNA-based methods when the soil microbial toxicity of pesticides is assessed. PMID:26590271

  5. Irrigation water salinity and N fertilization:Effects on ammonia oxidizer abundance, enzyme activity and cotton growth in a drip irrigated cotton ifeld

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Wei; GUO Hui-juan; ZHANG Wen; ZHOU Guang-wei; MA Li-juan; YE Jun; HOU Zhen-an

    2016-01-01

    Use of saline water in irrigated agriculture has become an important means for aleviating water scarcity in arid and semi-arid regions. The objective of this ifeld experiment was to evaluate the effects of irrigation water salinity and N fertilization on soil physicochemical and biological properties related to nitriifcation and denitriifcation. A 3×2 factorial design was used with three levels of irrigation water salinity (0.35, 4.61 and 8.04 dS m–1) and two N rates (0 and 360 kg N ha–1). The results indicated that irrigation water salinity and N fertilization had signiifcant effects on many soil physicochemical properties including water content, salinity, pH, NH4-N concentration, and NO3-N concentration. The abundance (i.e., gene copy number) of ammo-nia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was greater than that of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in al treatments. Irrigation water salinity had no signiifcant effect on the abundance of AOA or AOB in unfertilized plots. However, saline irrigation water (i.e., the 4.61 and 8.04 dS m–1 treatments) reduced AOA abundance, AOB abundance and potential nitriifcation rate in N fertilized plots. Regardless of N application rate, saline irrigation water increased urease activity but reduced the activities of both nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. Irrigation with saline irrigation water signiifcantly reduced cotton biomass, N uptake and yield. Nitrogen application exacerbated the negative effect of saline water. These results suggest that brackish water and saline water irrigation could signiifcantly reduce both the abundance of ammonia oxidizers and potential nitriifcation rates. The AOA may play a more important role than AOB in nitriifcation in desert soil.

  6. The ecological dichotomy of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the hyper-arid soils of the Antarctic Dry Valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Maria Magalhães

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are considered to be one of the most physically and chemically extreme terrestrial environments on the Earth. However, little is known about the organisms involved in nitrogen transformations in these environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in four McMurdo Dry Valleys with highly variable soil geochemical properties and climatic conditions: Miers Valley, Upper Wright Valley, Beacon Valley and Battleship Promontory. The bacterial communities of these four Dry Valleys have been examined previously, and the results suggested that the extremely localized bacterial diversities are likely driven by the disparate physicochemical conditions associated with these locations. Here we showed that AOB and AOA amoA gene diversity was generally low; only four AOA and three AOB operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified from a total of 420 AOA and AOB amoA clones. Quantitative PCR analysis of amoA genes revealed clear differences in the relative abundances of AOA and AOB amoA genes among samples from the four Dry Valleys. Although AOB amoA gene dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in soils from Miers Valley and Battleship Promontory, AOA amoA gene were more abundant in samples from Upper Wright and Beacon Valleys, where the environmental conditions are considerably harsher (e.g., extremely low soil C/N ratios and much higher soil electrical conductivity. Correlations between environmental variables and amoA genes copy numbers, as examined by redundancy analysis (RDA, revealed that higher AOA/AOB ratios were closely related to soils with high salts and Cu contents and low pH. Our findings hint at a dichotomized distribution of AOA and AOB within the Dry Valleys, potentially driven by environmental constraints.

  7. Effects of planting Phragmites australis on nitrogen removal, microbial nitrogen cycling, and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Yuka; Sei, Kazunari; Mori, Kazuhiro; Ike, Michihiko

    2015-10-21

    We examined the effect of planting an emergent aquatic plant (Phragmites australis) on nitrogen removal from sediments using a 42-d pot experiment. The experimental pot systems comprised two types of sediments planted with and without young P. australis. Total nitrogen (total N), total dissolved N, and NH4-N in the sediments decreased markedly after planting. In contrast, those levels decreased only slightly in the unplanted sediments. The decrease in total N in the P. australis-planted sediments was 7-20 times those in the unplanted sediments. Abundances of bacterial 16S rRNA, archaeal 16S rRNA, ammonia-oxidizing bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA), ammonia-oxidizing archaeal amoA, and denitrifying bacterial nitrite reductase (nirK) genes increased significantly in sediments after planting. Phragmites australis appears to have released oxygen and created a repeating cycle of oxidizing and reducing conditions in the sediments. These conditions should promote mineralization of organic N, nitrification, and denitrification in the sediments. Phragmites australis absorbed bioavailable nitrogen generated by microbial nitrogen metabolism. During the 42-d period after planting, 31-44% of total N was removed by microbial nitrogen cycling, and 56-69% was removed via absorption by P. australis. These results suggest that planting P. australis can increase microbial populations and their activities, and that nitrogen removal can be accelerated by the combined functions of P. australis and microorganisms in the sediment. Thus, planting P. australis has considerable potential as an effective remediation technology for eutrophic sediments.

  8. 有机废弃物好氧堆肥系统中氨氧化微生物的研究进展%Advances of Ammonia Oxidizing Microorganisms in Organic Waste Aerobic Composting System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜雪晴; 廖新俤; 吴银宝; 陈伟

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic composting is an economic and efficient organic waste disposal technology ,and am-monia oxidation ,as a limiting step of nitrogen nitrification ,directly or indirectly affects the compost fertil-izer and greenhouse gas emissions in the process of compost .This paper introduced two kinds of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms ,ammonia oxidizing archaea and ammonia oxidizing bacteria ,and described their physiological and ecological characteristics in the aerobic composting systems .It reviewed the impact of temperature ,ammonium concentration ,pH and other physical and chemical properties on the type ,quan-tity and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms during composting process .In addi-tion ,the paper summarize the effects of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms on nitrogen transformation in composting process and the possible control measures ,and finally discussed the future research directions of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms in compost system .%好氧堆肥是一种经济高效的有机废弃物处理技术,在堆肥过程中氨氧化作为氮素硝化作用的限速步骤,直接或间接影响堆肥过程中温室气体的排放和堆肥肥效。论文介绍了有机废弃物好氧堆肥系统中两种氨氧化微生物氨氧化古菌(AOA )和氨氧化细菌(AOB)的生理生态特性,概述了堆温、铵离子浓度、pH 等因素对堆肥过程中氨氧化微生物种类、数量及群落结构的影响,总结了堆肥过程中调控氨氧化微生物对氮素转换作用的相关措施,并展望了氨氧化微生物在有机废弃物堆肥系统中的应用前景。

  9. 甲烷氧化与氨氧化微生物及其耦合功能%Methane-and Ammonia-Oxidation Microorganisms and Their Coupling Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵吉; 李靖宇; 周玉; 白玉涛; 于景丽

    2012-01-01

    甲烷氧化与氨氧化过程分别对控制温室气体甲烷和氧化亚氮方面有着特殊作用,土壤及湿地等环境中的甲烷氧化菌和氨氧化菌在生态系统碳、氮生物循环中扮演着重要的角色。论述了甲烷氧化与氨氧化过程的微生物学机制,甲烷氧化菌和氨氧化菌的群落结构变化,分析了甲烷氧化菌和氨氧化菌在碳、氮循环以及它们在控制重要温室气体排放中的环境功能,阐述了甲烷氧化菌和氨氧化菌的关联作用机制。以期深入揭示甲烷氧化菌与氨氧化菌的空间分异与耦合机制,为深入探讨这类微生物的生态机制和环境功能提供科学线索。%The greenhouse effects of methane and nitrous oxide are significantly higher than carbon dioxide, respectively 23 and 296 times, respectively. Carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide distribute in the atmosphere, and lead the earth' s temperature rising. The wetlands account for more than half of greenhouse gas emis- sions in the atmosphere than that from water bodies. So the wetlands significantly affect the global climate changes. Soil microorganisms play important roles in maintaining ecological functions of the wetlands. Methane-oxidizer can use methane as the sole carbon and energy, and generate the energy for growth during the oxidation of methane to same amount of carbon dioxide. Methane-oxidizer plays an important role not only in methane consuming, but also in carbon, oxygen, nitrogen cycles in the land-water environments. Methane-oxidizer is the key group for controlling the methane emission and involving in the carbon cycle, and play important roles in greenhouse gas methane emission and in the carbon cycle. Ammonia-oxidation is the key and limiting step of the nitrification which is re- sponsible for deep-sea huge library of nitrate formation. Methane- and ammonia-oxidizer have similar substrates methane and ammonia to generate energy respectively. Oxidation of methane and

  10. Landfill Leachate as Enrichment Culture for Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria%利用垃圾渗滤液富集培养氨氧化菌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔荣; 李金玲; 李凤德; 韩京龙

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining a certain amount of active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in activated sludge is essential for the biological nitrogen removal process. The addition of enriched AOB into activated sludge is an effective option to increase AOB population. To economically get enriched AOB and effectively treat landfill leachate, the feasibility of using landfill leachate as a culture for enriching AOB was examined. Leachate from the Yantai municipal landfill site was used as the culture, and returned sludge from the Xin' an River municipal sewage treatment plant A2/O process was used as seed sludge. The AOB were enriched by fed batch cultivation. The results showed that after four cultivation cycles, the population of cells in the enriched AOB was 5. 6 times higher than the original activated sludge. By adding 14.5% of enriched AOB after four cultivation cycles into the activated sludge, the ammonia oxidation rate increased by 65.4%, which confirmed that landfill leachate could be used as a culture for enriching AOB.%确保活性污泥中适当的氨氧化菌(AOB)的数量及活性对污水生物除氮过程至关重要,投加富集AOB是增加活性污泥中AOB浓度的方法之一.为了经济有效地获取富集的AOB并有效处理难降解的垃圾渗滤液,对利用垃圾渗滤液富集培养AOB的可行性进行了研究.采用烟台市生活垃圾填埋场的垃圾渗滤液作为培养基,利用辛安河污水处理厂A2/O工艺二沉池的回流污泥进行接种,通过更代方式富集培养AOB.结果显示:更代4次后,菌液中AOB的浓度增至原来的5.6倍;向活性污泥中投加14.5%的经过4次更代富集培养的AOB,氨氧化速率提高了65.4%,从而验证了利用垃圾渗滤液富集AOB是可行的.

  11. 石墨烯载Ir催化剂对氨氧化的电催化性能%Electrocatalytic Performance of Graphene Supported Ir Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李林儒; 付宏刚; 陆天虹

    2012-01-01

    用石墨烯(G)代替Vulcan XC-72炭(XC)作Ir的载体制备石墨烯载Ir(Ir/G)催化剂.电化学的测量结果表明,Ir/G催化剂对氨氧化的电催化性能优于XC炭载Ir( Ir/XC)催化剂.X射线衍射(XRD)谱测量结果表明,Ir/G和Ir/XC催化剂的Ir粒子平均粒径相似.拉曼光谱的测量结果表明,G的石墨化程度和电导率高于XC.因此,Ir/G催化剂对氨氧化的电催化性能优于Ir/XC催化剂.氨在Ir/G催化剂电极上氧化的电流密度与氨浓度呈很好的线性关系曲线,相关系数R为0.99557.因此,Ir/G催化剂电极可作为电流型电化学氨传感器的工作电极.%Instead Vulcan XC-72 carbon(XC) , grapheme(G) was used as the support to prepare the Ir/G catalyst. The electrochemical measurement indicted that the electrocatalytic performance of the Ir/G catalyst for the ammonia oxidation was better than that of the Ir/XC catalyst. XRD and TEM measurements indicated that the average sizes of Ir particles in Ir/G and Ir/XC catalysts were similar. The measurement of the Raman spectroscopy illustrates the graphitization extent of G is higher than that of XC. Thus, the conductivity of G is higher than that of XC. Therefore, the electrocatalytic performance of the Ir/G catalyst is better than that of the Ir/XC catalyst can be attributed to the high conductivity due to the high graphitization extent of G. The results show that there is the good linear relationship between the current density of the ammonia oxidation at the Ir/G catalyst electrode and the concentration of ammonia. The related coefficient (R) is 0. 99557. Thus, Ir/G catalyst electrode can be used as the working electrode in the current type of electrochemical ammonia sensor.

  12. Abundance and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in response to fertilization and mowing in a temperate steppe in Inner Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Liang; Hu, Hang-Wei; Han, Hong-Yan; Du, Yue; Wan, Shi-Qiang; Xu, Zhu-Wen; Chen, Bao-Dong

    2014-07-01

    Based on a 6-year field trial in a temperate steppe in Inner Mongolia, we investigated the effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization and mowing on the abundance and community compositions of ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Archaea (AOA) upon early (May) and peak (August) plant growth using quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), cloning and sequencing. The results showed that N fertilization changed AOB community composition and increased AOB abundance in both May and August, but significantly decreased AOA abundance in May. By contrast, P fertilization significantly influenced AOB abundance only in August. Mowing significantly decreased AOA abundance and had little effect on AOA community compositions in May, while significantly influencing AOB abundance in both May and August, Moreover, AOA and AOB community structures showed obvious seasonal variations between May and August. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all AOA sequences fell into the Nitrososphaera cluster, and the AOB community was dominated by Nitrosospira Cluster 3. The results suggest that fertilization and mowing play important roles in affecting the abundance and community compositions of AOA and AOB.

  13. Impacts of organic and inorganic fertilizers on nitrification in a cold climate soil are linked to the bacterial ammonia oxidizer community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fenliang; Yang, Qianbao; Li, Zhaojun; Wei, Dan; Cui, Xi'an; Liang, Yongchao

    2011-11-01

    The microbiology underpinning soil nitrogen cycling in northeast China remains poorly understood. These agricultural systems are typified by widely contrasting temperature, ranging from -40 to 38°C. In a long-term site in this region, the impacts of mineral and organic fertilizer amendments on potential nitrification rate (PNR) were determined. PNR was found to be suppressed by long-term mineral fertilizer treatment but enhanced by manure treatment. The abundance and structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) and archaeal (AOA) communities were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis techniques. The abundance of AOA was reduced by all fertilizer treatments, while the opposite response was measured for AOB, leading to a six- to 60-fold reduction in AOA/AOB ratio. The community structure of AOA exhibited little variation across fertilization treatments, whereas the structure of the AOB community was highly responsive. PNR was correlated with community structure of AOB rather than that of AOA. Variation in the community structure of AOB was linked to soil pH, total carbon, and nitrogen contents induced by different long-term fertilization regimes. The results suggest that manure amendment establishes conditions which select for an AOB community type which recovers mineral fertilizer-suppressed soil nitrification.

  14. An overview on the most outstanding Italian endemic moth, Brahmaea (Acanthobrahmaea europaea (Lepidoptera: Brahmaeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Mosconi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The state of knowledge about the European Bramea, Brahmaea (Acanthobrahmaea europaea Hartig, 1963, is briefly summarized in relation to growing concern about the conservation status of the most outstanding Italian endemic moth species.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of commercial Olea europaea (olive) leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudjana, Aurelia N; D'Orazio, Carla; Ryan, Vanessa; Rasool, Nooshin; Ng, Justin; Islam, Nabilah; Riley, Thomas V; Hammer, Katherine A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the activity of a commercial extract derived from the leaves of Olea europaea (olive) against a wide range of microorganisms (n=122). Using agar dilution and broth microdilution techniques, olive leaf extract was found to be most active against Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and Staphylococcus aureus [including meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)], with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) as low as 0.31-0.78% (v/v). In contrast, the extract showed little activity against all other test organisms (n=79), with MICs for most ranging from 6.25% to 50% (v/v). In conclusion, olive leaf extract was not broad-spectrum in action, showing appreciable activity only against H. pylori, C. jejuni, S. aureus and MRSA. Given this specific activity, olive leaf extract may have a role in regulating the composition of the gastric flora by selectively reducing levels of H. pylori and C. jejuni.

  16. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria on granular activated carbon and their fates during drinking water purification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Kasuga, Ikuro; Kurisu, Futoshi; Furumai, Hiroaki; Shigeeda, Takaaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia is a precursor to trichloramine, which causes an undesirable chlorinous odor. Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration is used to biologically oxidize ammonia during drinking water purification; however, little information is available regarding the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) associated with GAC. In addition, their sources and fates in water purification process remain unknown. In this study, six GAC samples were collected from five full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo during summer and winter, and the abundance and community structure of AOA and AOB associated with GAC were studied in these two seasons. In summer, archaeal and bacterial amoA genes on GACs were present at 3.7 × 10(5)-3.9 × 10(8) gene copies/g-dry and 4.5 × 10(6)-4.2 × 10(8) gene copies/g-dry, respectively. In winter, archaeal amoA genes remained at the same level, while bacterial amoA genes decreased significantly for all GACs. No differences were observed in the community diversity of AOA and AOB from summer to winter. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high AOA diversity in group I.1a and group I.1b in raw water. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of processed water samples revealed that AOA diversity decreased dramatically to only two OTUs in group I.1a after ozonation, which were identical to those detected on GAC. It suggests that ozonation plays an important role in determining AOA diversity on GAC. Further study on the cell-specific activity of AOA and AOB is necessary to understand their contributions to in situ nitrification performance.

  17. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna V Zhalnina

    Full Text Available The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group.

  18. Community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria under long-term application of mineral fertilizer and organic manure in a sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haiyan; Fujii, Takeshi; Morimoto, Sho; Lin, Xiangui; Yagi, Kazuyuki; Hu, Junli; Zhang, Jiabao

    2007-01-01

    The effects of mineral fertilizer (NPK) and organic manure on the community structure of soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated in a long-term (16-year) fertilizer experiment. The experiment included seven treatments: organic manure, half organic manure N plus half fertilizer N, fertilizer NPK, fertilizer NP, fertilizer NK, fertilizer PK, and the control (without fertilization). N fertilization greatly increased soil nitrification potential, and mineral N fertilizer had a greater impact than organic manure, while N deficiency treatment (PK) had no significant effect. AOB community structure was analyzed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of the amoA gene, which encodes the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. DGGE profiles showed that the AOB community was more diverse in N-fertilized treatments than in the PK-fertilized treatment or the control, while one dominant band observed in the control could not be detected in any of the fertilized treatments. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the DGGE bands derived from N-fertilized treatments belonged to Nitrosospira cluster 3, indicating that N fertilization resulted in the dominance of Nitrosospira cluster 3 in soil. These results demonstrate that long-term application of N fertilizers could result in increased soil nitrification potential and the AOB community shifts in soil. Our results also showed the different effects of mineral fertilizer N versus organic manure N; the effects of P and K on the soil AOB community; and the importance of balanced fertilization with N, P, and K in promoting nitrification functions in arable soils.

  19. Free nitrous acid and pH determine the predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and amount of N2O in a partial nitrifying reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinh, Co Thi; Ahn, Johwan; Suenaga, Toshikazu; Sittivorakulpong, Nakanya; Noophan, Pongsak; Hori, Tomoyuki; Riya, Shohei; Hosomi, Masaaki; Terada, Akihiko

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effects of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) concentrations on the predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) in a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor for partial nitrification. The reactor was operated with stepwise increases in the NH4(+) loading rate, which resulted in a maximum FA concentration of 29.3 mg-N/L at pH 8.3. Afterwards, FNA was increased by a gradual decrease of pH, reaching its maximum concentration of 4.1 mg-N/L at pH 6.3. Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that AOB remained predominant during the operation, achieving specific nitrification rates of 1.04 and 0.99 g-N/g-VSS/day at the highest accumulations of FA and FNA, respectively. These rates were in conjunction with partial nitrification efficiencies of >84%. The N2O emission factor of oxidized NH4(+) was 0.90% at pH 7.0, which was higher than those at pH 8.3 (0.11%) and 6.3 (0.12%), the pHs with the maximum FA and FNA concentrations, respectively. High-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes showed that increases in FNA drastically changed the predominant AOB species, although increased FA produced no significant changes. This study demonstrates that the FNA concentration and pH are the main drivers that determine the predominant AOB species and N2O-emission in a partial nitrifying bioreactor.

  20. Community Structure and Abundance of Soil Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Ammonia-oxidizing Archea as Influenced by Insect-resistant Bivalent Transgenic Cotton%双价转基因抗虫棉花对土壤氨氧化细菌和氨氧化古菌群落结构及丰度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴元凤; 李刚; 修伟明; 冀国桢; 宋晓龙; 赵建宁; 杨殿林

    2014-01-01

    The cultivation area of genetically modified(GM)crops has expanded significantly in recent years. However, concerns have been raised over impacts of GM crops on soil ecosystem, especially soil microorganisms. Here, we examined the influence of insect-resistant biva-lent transgenic cotton on soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria(AOB)and ammonia-oxidizing archaea(AOA). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism(T-RFLP)was used to evaluate community structure change and qPCR to detect abundance difference. Compared to the control, the population of dominant AOB and AOA did not show significant difference in insect-resistant bivalent transgenic cotton soil, with no changes over the growth season though the ratio of each dominant species population varied in different varieties and at different growth stages of cotton. The Shannon index and Evenness index of AOB had no significant difference between the transgenic cotton soil and its control during the whole growth period. The Shannon index of AOA had similar results, but Evenness index of AOA was significantly low-er in the transgenic cotton soil than in the control at the seedling stage(P<0.05), with no difference found at the other growth stages. The abundance of AOB in the transgenic cotton soil was higher at the blooming stage, whereas lower at the other stages, as compared with the control soil. However, AOA had lower abundance in the GM cotton than in the control soil throughout the growing season. Therefore, the in-sect-resistant bivalent transgenic cotton had no significant impact on the community structure of soil AOB and AOA, but reduced the abun-dance of AOB and AOA, suggesting potential impacts of transgenic cotton on soil ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms.%采用末端片段多态性分析(T-RFLP)和实时定量PCR(Quantitative real-time PCR, qPCR)方法,研究了不同生长时期双价转基因抗虫棉花和亲本非转基因棉花(对照)土壤氨氧化细菌(Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

  1. Possibility of Salicornia europaea use for the human liquid wastes inclusion into BLSS intrasystem mass exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia A.; Ushakova, Sofya A.; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Kalacheva, Galina S.; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    One of the ways of solving the problem of the human liquid wastes utilization in bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) can be the use of halophytic vegetable plant Salicornia europaea capable of accumulating sodium chloride in rather high concentrations. Since the most specific higher plant function in BLSS, which at present cannot be substituted by physicochemical processes, appears to be the biosynthesis of a wide spectrum of nutritive substances necessary for a human, the object of the given work was the investigation of the S. europaea productivity, biochemical and mineral composition when grown under close to optimal BLSS vegetative component conditions. As the use of human urine after its preliminary physicochemical processing is supposed to be the mineral solution basis for the S. europaea cultivation, it is necessary to clear up the effect of reduced nitrogen on plants growth. Ground research was carried out. Biochemical composition of the S. europaea edible part showed that crude protein was contained in the highest degree. At that the content of crude protein (24% per dry weight) and cellulose (4.7% per dry weight) was higher in the plants grown on solutions containing amide nitrogen in comparison with the plants grown on solutions with nitrate nitrogen (15.4%—3.1% correspondingly). The water-soluble sugar contents were not high in the S. europaea edible part and depending on the nitrogen nutrition form they amounted to 1.1% (amide nitrogen) and 1.5% (nitrate nitrogen). The polysaccharide number (except cellulose) was rather higher and varied from 7.7% to 8.2%. Although the lipid content in the S. europaea plants was relatively low (7% per dry weight), it was shown that the plant lipids are characterized by a high nonsaturation degree mainly due to alpha linolenic and linoleic acids. Nitrogen nutrition form did not significantly affect the S. europaea productivity, and dry edible biomass of one plant was 8.6 g. Sodium and its concentrations

  2. Differential responses of dinitrogen fixation, diazotrophic cyanobacteria and ammonia oxidation reveal a potential warming-induced imbalance of the N-cycle in biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Smith, Hilda J.; Giraldo Silva, Ana; Belnap, Jayne; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2017-01-01

    N2 fixation and ammonia oxidation (AO) are the two most important processes in the nitrogen (N) cycle of biological soil crusts (BSCs). We studied the short-term response of acetylene reduction assay (ARA) rates, an indicator of potential N2 fixation, and AO rates to temperature (T, -5°C to 35°C) in BSC of different successional stages along the BSC ecological succession and geographic origin (hot Chihuahuan and cooler Great Basin deserts). ARA in all BSCs increased with T until saturation occurred between 15 and 20°C, and declined at 30–35°C. Culture studies using cyanobacteria isolated from these crusts indicated that the saturating effect was traceable to their inability to grow well diazotrophically within the high temperature range. Below saturation, temperature response was exponential, with Q10 significantly different in the two areas (~ 5 for Great Basin BSCs; 2–3 for Chihuahuan BSCs), but similar between the two successional stages. However, in contrast to ARA, AO showed a steady increase to 30–35°C in Great Basin, and Chihuhuan BSCs showed no inhibition at any tested temperature. The T response of AO also differed significantly between Great Basin (Q10 of 4.5–4.8) and Chihuahuan (Q10 of 2.4–2.6) BSCs, but not between successional stages. Response of ARA rates to T did not differ from that of AO in either desert. Thus, while both processes scaled to T in unison until 20°C, they separated to an increasing degree at higher temperature. As future warming is likely to occur in the regions where BSCs are often the dominant living cover, this predicted decoupling is expected to result in higher proportion of nitrates in soil relative to ammonium. As nitrate is more easily lost as leachate or to be reduced to gaseous forms, this could mean a depletion of soil N over large landscapes globally.

  3. Effects of Transgenic DREB Soybean Dongnong 50 on the Diversity of Soil Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria%转基因大豆东农50对土壤氨氧化细菌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金羽; 曲娟娟; 任广明; 董蕾

    2013-01-01

    [目的]考查转基因大豆东农50对土壤氨氧化细菌的影响.[方法]通过PCR-DGGE及序列分析方法研究盆栽条件下转基因大豆和近等基因的非转基因大豆在正常水分条件下和干旱胁迫下土壤中氨氧化细菌cto基因的多样性.[结果]根际土壤氨氧化细菌多样性分析表明,转基因大豆与非转基因大豆的氨氧化细菌多样性没有区别,但是,在正常水分条件和干旱胁迫下,处于收获期的转基因大豆的土壤氨氧化细菌多样性提高.对DGGE回收的17个条带进行系统发育分析,结果表明,所有的条带均与β-变形亚纲的亚硝化弧菌属(Nitrosovibrio)以及亚硝化螺菌属(Nitrososp ira)相似性较高.[结论]转基因大豆对土壤氨氧化细菌没有影响.%[Objective] The aim was to understand the effects of transgenic DREB soybean on the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.[Method] The diversity of the cto gene in pot-planted transgenic soybean and near-isogenic non-transgenic soybean under normal water condition and drought stress was analyzed by PCR-DGGE and sequence analysis.[Result] Rhizosphere community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria showed no difference between the treatments of transgenic soybean and its non-transgenic isolines,moreover transgenic soybean under normal water condition and drought stress improved the diversity of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the harvest time.The phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the sequences of excised DGGE bands were closely related to members of the genus Nitrosovibrio and Nitrosospira of the β-subclass Proteobacteria.[Conclusion] Transgenic DREB soybean has no adverse impact on soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

  4. Neighboring Deschampsia flexuosa and Trientalis europaea harbor contrasting root fungal endophytic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejesvi, Mysore V; Sauvola, Tiina; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Ruotsalainen, Anna Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Fungal endophytic communities and potential host preference of root-inhabiting fungi of boreal forest understory plants are poorly known. The objective of this study was to find out whether two neighboring plant species, Deschampsia flexuosa (Poaceae) and Trientalis europaea (Primulaceae), share similar root fungal endophytic communities and whether the communities differ between two sites. The study was carried out by analysis of pure culture isolates and root fungal colonization percentages. A total of 84 isolates from D. flexuosa and 27 isolates from T. europaea were obtained. The roots of D. flexuosa harbored 16 different isolate types based on macromorphological characteristics, whereas only 4 isolate types were found in T. europaea. The root colonization by dark septate and hyaline septate hyphae correlated with isolate numbers being higher in D. flexuosa compared to T. europaea. The different isolate types were further identified on the basis of internal transcribed spacer sequence and phylogenetic analysis. An isolate type identified as dark septate endophyte Phialocephala fortinii colonized 50 % of the T. europaea and 21 % of the D. flexuosa specimens. In addition, Meliniomyces variabilis, Phialocephala sphaeroides, and Umbelopsis isabellina were found colonizing the grass, D. flexuosa, for the first time and Mycena sp. was confirmed as an endophyte of D. flexuosa. Site-specific differences were observed in the abundance and diversity of endophytic fungi in the roots of both study plants, but the differences were not as predominant as those between plant species. It is concluded that D. flexuosa harbors both higher amount and more diverse community of endophytic fungi in its roots compared to T. europaea.

  5. Photosynthetic characteristics of olive tree (Olea europaea) bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippou, Manolis; Fasseas, Costas; Karabourniotis, George

    2007-07-01

    Functional and structural characteristics of corticular photosynthesis of sun-exposed bark of olive tree (Olea europaea L.) were examined. Stomata are only sporadically present during stem primary growth. Light transmission through the phellem was age dependent, decreasing rapidly in stems older than five years of age. Light transmission was also low in pubescent 1-year-old stems. Light transmission was about 50% higher in wet phellem than in dry phellem. Photosynthetic capacity on a unit area basis (measured with an oxygen disc electrode at 27 degrees C and about 5% CO(2) on chlorophyllous tissue discs isolated from the stem) was higher in 1-, 20- and 30-year-old stems compared with 2-10-year-old stems. Low chlorophyll a/b ratio and light compensation points were recorded in olive stems with low phellem light transmission, in accordance with the shade acclimation hypothesis. The intrinsic photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of all stems, especially young stems, was less than that of the leaves. Our results show that olive tree bark possesses an efficient photosynthetic mechanism that may significantly contribute not only to the reduction in concentrations of CO(2) in the inner bark, but also to whole-tree carbon balance.

  6. Biological Significance of Seed Oil and Polyphenolic of Olea europaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The olive tree Olea europaea have beneficial properties. Mainly used parts of the olive tree are fruits and seeds. Seeds oil of olive is used as a major component of the “diet.” Chief active components of olive oil include oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, polyphenolics and squalene. These main phenolic components are hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and oleuropein, which occur in highest amounts in virgin olive oil and have antioxidant properties. Olive oil has shown activity in against cancer, mainly in colon and breast cancer prevention, while individual component of olive oil, oleic acid and squalene has also been identified as anticancer agent. The olive oil has effects on coronary heart disease, due to its ability to reduce blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein level. Some components (such as hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and oleuropein of olive oil exhibited antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganism in intestinal and respiratory infections. The oleic acid, polyphenolics, squqlenes are dependable for a number of biological activities as well as whole olive plant also gives health benefits.

  7. Yeast functional screen to identify genes conferring salt stress tolerance in Salicornia europaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki eNakahara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is a critical environmental factor that adversely affects crop productivity. Halophytes have evolved various mechanisms to adapt to saline environments. Salicornia europaea L. is one of the most salt-tolerant plant species. It does not have special salt-secreting structures like a salt gland or salt bladder, and is therefore a good model for studying the common mechanisms underlying plant salt tolerance. To identify candidate genes encoding key proteins in the mediation of salt tolerance in S. europaea, we performed a functional screen of a cDNA library in yeast. The library was screened for genes that allowed the yeast to grow in the presence of 1.3 M NaCl. We obtained three full-length S. europaea genes that confer salt tolerance. The genes are predicted to encode (1 a novel protein highly homologous to thaumatin-like proteins, (2 a novel coiled-coil protein of unknown function, and (3 a novel short peptide of 32 residues. Exogenous application of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 32 residues improved salt tolerance of Arabidopsis. The approach described in this report provides a rapid assay system for large-scale screening of S. europaea genes involved in salt stress tolerance and supports the identification of genes responsible for such mechanisms. These genes may be useful candidates for improving crop salt tolerance by genetic transformation.

  8. Volatile constituents of commercial imported and domestic black-ripe table olives (Olea europaea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile constituents of commercial black-ripe table olives (Olea europaea) from the United States, Spain, Egypt and Morocco were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Dynamic headspace sampling was used to isolate a variety of aldehydes, alcohols, esters, ...

  9. Isolation and identification of radical scavengers in olive tree (Olea europaea) wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Bonilla, M.; Salido, S.; Beek, van T.A.; Linares-Palomino, P.J.; Altarejos, J.; Nogueras, M.; Sánchez, A.

    2006-01-01

    Several extracts of Olea europaea wood (Picual olive cultivar) were obtained with solvents of different polarity and their antioxidant activities determined. The active compounds were detected in fractions of an ethyl acetate extract using HPLC with on-line radical scavenging detection. After applyi

  10. Cycloheximide prevents the de novo polypeptide synthesis required to recover from acetylene inhibition in Nitrosopumilus maritimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajrala, Neeraja; Bottomley, Peter J; Stahl, David A; Arp, Daniel J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2014-06-01

    Developing methods to differentiate the relative contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia (NH3) oxidation has been challenging due to the lack of compounds that selectively inhibit AOA. In this study, we investigated the effects of specific bacteria- and eukaryote-selective protein synthesis inhibitors on the recovery of acetylene (C2H2)-inactivated NH3 oxidation in the marine AOA Nitrosopumilus maritimus and compared the results with recovery of the AOB Nitrosomonas europaea. C2 H2 irreversibly inhibited N. maritimus NH3 oxidation in a similar manner to what was observed previously with N. europaea. However, cycloheximide (CHX), a widely used eukaryotic protein synthesis inhibitor, but not bacteria-specific protein synthesis inhibitors (kanamycin and gentamycin), inhibited the recovery of NH3-oxidizing activity in N. maritimus. CHX prevented the incorporation of (14)CO2 -labeling into cellular proteins, providing further evidence that CHX acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor in N. maritimus. If the effect of CHX on protein synthesis can be confirmed among other isolates of AOA, the combination of C2H2 inactivation followed by recovery of NH3 oxidation either in the presence of bacteria-selective protein synthesis inhibitors or CHX might be used to estimate the relative contributions of AOB and AOA to NH3 oxidation in natural environments.

  11. Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activities of olive (Olea europaea essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Essential oil Olea europaea was investigated for its antibacterial and antifungal activities. Aim: To evaluate antimicrobial activity of O. europaea essential oil against infectious microbial pathogens. Settings and Design: Seeds of O. europaea were grounded by using domestic mixer and powdered material was hydro-distilled in Clevenger apparatus continuously for 5 hrs to yield essential oil. Essential oil was analysed on Gas-Chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC-MS from which 24 components were identified, representing total 99.98% of the oil. Extracted oil was evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. Materials and Methods: Paper disc diffusion and serial micro-dilution assays were performed for the determination of inhibition zone diameters and minimal inhibitory concentration, respectively. Results: The O. europaea essential oil showed the diameter of inhibition zone (DIZ ranging from 19.4 ± 0.07-26.4 ± 0.09 mm at a concentration level of 28 μg/disc (W/V separately in all the ten strains tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration of essential oil against bacterial strains was obtained in a range of 7.0-56.0 μg/ml while in and fungal strains it was in a range of 7.0-28 μg/ml. Statistical analysis: All statistical calculations are expressed as mean ± SE of three replicates. Data were analyzed by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA to locate significant variations in oil activity in various bacterial and fungal strains followed by the Duncan′s multiple range tests. Conclusions: Antibacterial and antifungal activities of O. europaea essential oil are due to the presence of certain secondary plant metabolites such as terpenoids, steroids and flavonoids, esters, and acids, which were identified in the essential oil. The oil components can be further investigated for their biological activities and study to overcome the problem of drug resistance in microbes.

  12. Effect of Transgenic Soybean on Amount and Diversity of Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria in Rhizospheric Soil%转基因大豆对土壤氨氧化细菌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖欣; 张永生; 赵帅; 杨殿林

    2011-01-01

    The genetically modified (GM)crops are more and more concerned by public;meanwhile more and more GM crops are planted in fields globally. Besides the food safety, the ecological risks are also gained focus. In order to deeply understand the effect of transgenic soybean on diversity of rhizoperic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in soil,DGGE-cloning and quantitative PCR were used. Both the DGGE-cloning and qPCR results showed that seasonal changes were observed throughout the soybean growth stages, indicating the impact of crop growth stage overweigh that of exogenous gene insertion and transgenic soybean has not diversely affect on rhizosphere ammonia-oxidizing bacteria abundance and community composition in soil.%采用DGGE-cloning测序技术与定量PCR技术相结合的方法,研究了转基因大豆对土壤中氨氧化细菌群落多样性的影响.定量PCR试验结果表明,相同的生长时期转基因大豆对氨氧化细菌数量没有显著的影响,而与此同时,土壤中的氨氧化细菌的数量呈现出随生长期先增加后减少的趋势;DGGE图谱分析表明,同一生长时期不同大豆土壤中的氨氧化细菌主要条带一致,这表明生长时期的影响明显大于转基因大豆对土壤氨氧化细菌的影响.

  13. 多年蔬菜连作对土壤氨氧化微生物群落组成的影响%Effects of Continuous Cropping of Vegetables on Ammonia Oxidizers Community Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟德龙; 杨扬; 伍延正; 吴敏娜; 秦红灵; 朱亦君; 魏文学

    2012-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on the effects of intensive application of chemical fertilizers in crop production on soil nitrifier communities and the relationship between nitrifier communities and soil nitrification ability.Two series of vegetable soils were selected from Huangxing,Changsha,reflecting continuous vegetable cropping with about 20 years and new vegetable field with only about 2 years vegetable growing history.In each series five independent topsoils(0-20 cm) were sampled and each soil was a mixture of 10 cores randomly taken in the same field.Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism(T-RFLP) and quantity PCR(Q-PCR) were used to determine the composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria(AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea(AOA) communities.Results indicated that long-term and continuous vegetable cropping obviously changed the compositions of both AOB and AOA amoA gene,soil pH and Olsen-P content were the dominant factors affecting the composition of AOB amoA.In the vegetable soils,although the copy number of AOA amoA gene was about 5 times higher than AOB amoA gene,no significant correlation was detected between AOA amoA gene abundance and soil nitrification rate.It was not sure whether long-term and continuous vegetable cropping could shift the abundance of AOB and AOA,but it resulted in the enrichment of some dominant AOB species and increase of soil nitrification potential(PNF).%为揭示农业生产中长期大量施用化学肥料对土壤硝化过程微生物种群的影响及其与土壤硝化能力的偶联关系,本研究通过在长沙黄兴蔬菜基地采集长期连作蔬菜(20 a以上,VL)和短期蔬菜种植地(2 a左右,VS)表层土壤(0~20 cm),利用末端限制性片段多态性(T-RFLP)和实时定量PCR(Q-PCR)等手段系统研究了蔬菜连作对氨氧化细菌(ammonia-oxidizingbacteria,AOB)和氨氧化古菌(ammonia-oxidizing archaea,AOA)的组成和丰度的

  14. Electrocatalytic Performance of Ir Catalyst Supported on Macroporous Carbon for Ammonia Oxidation%大孔炭载Ir催化剂对氨氧化的电催化性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李林儒; 陈冲; 徐斌; 曹高萍; 杨裕生; 陆天虹

    2012-01-01

    Macroporous carbon supported Ir (Ir/MC) and Vulcan XC-72 carbon supported Ir (Ir/XC ) catalysts were prepared respectively. Based on the characterization of the catalysts using the energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, the electrocatalytic performances of the two catalysts for the ammonia oxidation were investigated. It was found that the peak current density of the ammonia oxidation at the Ir/MC catalyst electrode is 38. 7% larger than that at the Ir/XC catalyst electrode and the electrocatalytic stability of the Ir/MC catalyst is better than that of the Ir/XC catalyst. Because the average size and the relative crystallinity of the Ir particles in the Ir/MC catalyst is similar to that in the Ir/XC catalyst, the above results can be attributed to the larger pore size and porosity as well as the higher conductivity due to the high graphitization extent of MC.%分别以大孔炭(MC)和Vulcan XC-72炭黑(XC)为载体,制备了Ir/MC和Ir/XC催化剂.在用X射线能量色散谱(EDS)、X射线衍射(XRD)谱、拉曼光谱对催化剂表征的基础上,用电化学技术研究了2种炭载Ir催化剂对氨氧化的电催化性能,发现氨在Ir/MC催化剂电极上,氧化峰峰电流密度比在Ir/XC催化剂电极上大38.7%左右,而且电催化稳定性明显好于Ir/XC催化剂.由于Ir/MC和Ir/XC催化剂的Ir粒子平均粒径和相对结晶度相似,因此,这只能归结于MC有大的孔径和孔率及高的石墨化程度引起的高电导率.所以MC是一种比XC更好的催化剂的炭载体.

  15. Aromadendrine, a new component of the flavonoid pattern of Olea europaea L. and its anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Alessandro; Serrilli, Anna Maria; Rizza, Luisa; Frasca, Giuseppina; Cardile, Venera; Bonina, Francesco Paolo; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2013-03-01

    Leaves of Olea europaea, cultivar Nocellara del Belice, were examined with respect to the medium-polar fraction, obtained by an ethyl acetate extraction of the whole extract. In the medium polar fraction, we isolated the two hydroxy-phenyl-ethyl alcohols (hydroxyl-tyrosol and tyrosol) that are the main component of olives. In addition, we isolated a flavonoidic compound, aromadendrine, a dihydroflavonol yet known but quite rare in nature. It is the first time that aromadendrine is isolated in O. europaea and we studied the aromadendrine biological activity. In particular, the ability of aromadendrine to reduce the inflammation induced in normal keratinocytes using an in vitro cell model was evaluated. The results of the present research indicate aromadendrine as a novel component in O. europaea with effective activity against skin inflammation.

  16. Aerobiologia do pólen de Olea europaea L. em Portugal Continental

    OpenAIRE

    Caeiro, E.; R.; Ferro; Brandao, R. M.; Trindade, Costa; Lopes, M.L.; Gaspar, A.; Nunes, C.; Todo-Bom, A.; Oliveira, J.F.; Mario Morais-Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Introdução: O pólen de oliveira (Olea europaea L.) constitui uma das fontes de aeroalergenos mais importantes na Europa Mediterrânica e em Portugal. Objectivos: Analisar a aerobiologia do pólen de Olea em Portugal Continental. Métodos: No estudo utilizaram-se os dados horários e diários das monitorizações de pólen de Olea efetuadas entre 2002 e 2012 de cinco estações de monitorização continentais da Rede Portuguesa de Aerobiologia - RPA: Porto, Coimbra, Lisboa, Évora e Portimão. Resu...

  17. Extraction and Characterization of Lipids from Salicornia virginica and Salicornia europaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis,Michael J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Pham, Phong X.; Ribita, Daniela; Bomani, Bilal M. M.; Duraj, Stan A.

    2010-01-01

    The lipid content from Salicornia virginica and Salicornia europaea is investigated. The plants are leafless halophytes with seeds contained in terminal nodes. The lipids, in the form of cell membranes and oil bodies that come directly from the node cells, are observed using fluorescence microscopy. Two extraction methods as well as the results of extracting from the seeds and from the entire nodes are described. Characterization of the fatty acid components of the lipids using Gas Chromatography in tandem with Mass Spectroscopy is also described. Comparisons are made between the two methods and between the two plant materials as lipid sources.

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1308 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1308 ref|NP_840687.1| possible transmembrane protein [Nitrosomonas europa...ea ATCC 19718] emb|CAD84514.1| possible transmembrane protein [Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718] NP_840687.1 7e-43 38% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0172 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0172 ref|NP_841089.1| Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit I [Nitrosomonas europa...ea ATCC 19718] emb|CAD84927.1| Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit I [Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718] NP_841089.1 0.97 27% ...

  20. Investigation on the anti- inflammatory and analgesic effects of Olea europaea L. metanolic extract on male NMRI mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Tekye

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different mediators are involved in pain and edema induction during different stages of inflammation. Then, treatment of them encounters some difficulties. Medicinal plants are an important source of substances which are claimed to induce anti-inflammatory effects. This study was aimed to investigate anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Olea europaea L.methanolic extract on male NMRI mouse. Methods: Methanolic extraction was done for leaf of Olea europaea L. and different doses (200, 300 and 400 mg/kg were intraperitoneally (i.p. adminstered to male NMRI mice. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of extract was measured during both phases of Formalin test, Acetic acid induced visceral pain and xylene inflammation tests. A standard analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug such as indomethacin, dexamethasone and morphine were administered in positive control groups where appropriates. Results: Results indicated significant dose-dependent analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of methanolic extract of Olea europaea L. leaf on pain which induced by formalin (both phase and acetic acid, and inflammation caused by xylene. Conclusion: Our findings Showed that administration of methanolic extract of Olea europaea L.leaf can suppress pain and inflammation dose dependently which, may mediate via different components of extract. However, more investigations need to be done.

  1. Polyphenol deposition in leaf hairs of Olea europaea (Oleaceae) and Quercus ilex (Fagaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabourniotis, G; Kofidis, G; Fasseas, C; Liakoura, V; Drossopoulos, I

    1998-07-01

    The subcellular localization (cytoplasm, vacuoles, cell walls) of polyphenol compounds during the development of the multicellular nonglandular leaf hairs of Olea europaea (scales) and Quercus ilex (stellates), was investigated. Hairs of all developmental stages were treated with specific inducers of polyphenol fluorescence, and the bright yellow-green fluorescence of individual hairs was monitored with epifluorescence microscopy. During the early ontogenetic stages, bright fluorescence was emitted from the cytoplasm of the cells composing the multicellular shield of the scales of O. europaea. Transmission electron micrographs of the same stages showed that these cells possessed poor vacuolation and thin cell walls. The nucleus of these cells may be protected against ultraviolet-B radiation damage. The progressive vacuolation that occurred during maturation was followed by a shifting of the bright green-yellow fluorescence from the perinuclear region and the cytoplasm to the cell walls. The same trends were observed during the development of the nonglandular stellate hairs of Quercus ilex, in which maturation was also accompanied by a considerable secondary thickening of the cell walls. Despite the differences in morphology, high concentrations of polyphenol compounds are initially located mainly in the cytoplasm of the developing nonglandular hairs, and their deposition on the cell walls takes place during the secondary cell wall thickening. These structural changes during the development of the leaf hairs make them a very effective barrier against abiotic (uv-B radiation) and probably biotic (pathogenic) stresses.

  2. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Audisio

    2015-04-01

    Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde.

  3. Phenolic Compounds from Olea europaea L. Possess Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Dekdouk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic composition and biological activities of fruit extracts from Italian and Algerian Olea europaea L. cultivars were studied. Total phenolic and tannin contents were quantified in the extracts. Moreover 14 different phenolic compounds were identified, and their profiles showed remarkable quantitative differences among analysed extracts. Moreover antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition activities were studied. Three complementary assays were used to measure their antioxidant activities and consequently Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index (RACI was used to compare and easily describe obtained results. Results showed that Chemlal, between Algerian cultivars, and Coratina, among Italian ones, had the highest RACI values. On the other hand all extracts and the most abundant phenolics were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Leccino, among all analysed cultivars, and luteolin, among identified phenolic compounds, were found to be the best inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Results demonstrated that Olea europaea fruit extracts can represent an important natural source with high antioxidant potential and significant α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects.

  4. Phenolic Compounds from Olea europaea L. Possess Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekdouk, Nadia; Malafronte, Nicola; Russo, Daniela; Faraone, Immacolata; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Ameddah, Souad; Severino, Lorella; Milella, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic composition and biological activities of fruit extracts from Italian and Algerian Olea europaea L. cultivars were studied. Total phenolic and tannin contents were quantified in the extracts. Moreover 14 different phenolic compounds were identified, and their profiles showed remarkable quantitative differences among analysed extracts. Moreover antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition activities were studied. Three complementary assays were used to measure their antioxidant activities and consequently Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index (RACI) was used to compare and easily describe obtained results. Results showed that Chemlal, between Algerian cultivars, and Coratina, among Italian ones, had the highest RACI values. On the other hand all extracts and the most abundant phenolics were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Leccino, among all analysed cultivars, and luteolin, among identified phenolic compounds, were found to be the best inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Results demonstrated that Olea europaea fruit extracts can represent an important natural source with high antioxidant potential and significant α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects. PMID:26557862

  5. Antimicrobial potential of green synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles from Olea europaea leaf extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Qaisar; Nazar, Mudassar; Naz, Sania; Hussain, Talib; Jabeen, Nyla; Kausar, Rizwan; Anwaar, Sadaf; Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the green fabrication of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) using Olea europaea leaf extract and their applications as effective antimicrobial agents. O. europaea leaf extract functions as a chelating agent for reduction of cerium nitrate. The resulting CeO2 NPs exhibit pure single-face cubic structure, which is examined by X-ray diffraction, with a uniform spherical shape and a mean size 24 nm observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirms the characteristic absorption peak of CeO2 NPs at 315 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflects stretching frequencies at 459 cm−1, showing utilization of natural components for the production of NPs. Thermal gravimetric analysis predicts the successful capping of CeO2 NPs by bioactive molecules present in the plant extract. The antimicrobial studies show significant zone of inhibition against bacterial and fungal strains. The higher activities shown by the green synthesized NPs than the plant extract lead to the conclusion that they can be effectively used in biomedical application. Furthermore, reduction of cerium salt by plant extract will reduce environmental impact over chemical synthesis.

  6. Impact of Long-Term Fertilization on Community Structure of Ammonia Oxidizing and Denitrifying Bacteria Based on amoA and nirK Genes in a Rice Paddy from Tai Lake Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Zhen-jiang; LI Lian-qing; LIU Xiao-yu; PAN Gen-xing; Qaiser Hussein; LIU Yong-zhuo

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidizing (AOB) and denitrifying bacteria (DNB) play an important role in soil nitrogen transformation in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Effects of long-term fertilization on abundance and community composition of AOB and DNB were studied with targeting ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and nitrite reductase (nirK) genes using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR, respectively. A ifeld trial with different fertilization treatments in a rice paddy from Tai Lake region, centre East China was used in this study, including no fertilizer application (NF), balanced chemical fertilizers (CF), combined organic/inorganic fertilizer of balanced chemical fertilizers plus pig manure (CFM), and plus rice straw return (CFS). The abundances and richnesses of amoA and nirK were increased in CF, CFM and CFS compared to NF. Principle component analysis of DGGE proifles showed signiifcant difference in nirK and amoA genes composition between organic amended (CFS and CFM) and the non-organic amended (CF and NF) plots. Number of amoA copies was signiifcantly positively correlated with normalized soil nutrient richness (NSNR) of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (T-N), and that of nirK copies was with NSNR of SOC, T-N plus total phosphorus. Moreover, nitriifcation potential showed a positive correlation with SOC content, while a signiifcantly lower denitriifcation potential was found under CFM compared to under CFS. Therefore, SOC accumulation accompanied with soil nutrient richness under long-term balanced and organic/inorganic combined fertilization promoted abundance and diversity of AOB and DNB in the rice paddy.

  7. RESULTS OF INITIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-30

    This memo presents an experimental survey of aqueous phase chemical processes to remove aqueous ammonia from waste process streams. Ammonia is generated in both the current Hanford waste flowsheet and in future waste processing. Much ammonia will be generated in the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters.i Testing with simulants in glass melters at Catholic University has demonstrated the significant ammonia production.ii The primary reaction there is the reducing action of sugar on nitrate in the melter cold cap. Ammonia has been found to be a problem in secondary waste stabilization. Ammonia vapors are noxious and destruction of ammonia could reduce hazards to waste treatment process personnel. It is easily evolved especially when ammonia-bearing solutions are adjusted to high pH.

  8. Hydrophilic C terminus of Salicornia europaea vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter is necessary for its function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guangxia Wu; Gang Wang; Jing Ji; Xiaowei Tian; Hailing Gao; Qing Zhao; Jing Li; Yurong Wang

    2014-08-01

    Plant vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporters play important roles in cellular ion homeostasis,vacuolar pH regulation and sequestration of Na+ ions into the vacuole. Previous research showed that hydrophilic C-terminal region of Arabidopsis AtNHX1 negatively regulates the Na+/H+ transporting activity. In this study, we truncated the hydrophilic C terminus of a vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene from Salicornia europaea (SeNHX1) to generate its derivative, SeNHX1-C. Expression of SeNHX1 and SeNHX1-C in yeast mutant showed that SeNHX1 significantly improved the tolerance to NaCl; however, the expression of SeNHX1-C enormously decreased the tolerance to NaCl. Overall, these results suggest that the hydrophilic C-terminal region of SeNHX1 is required for Na+/H+ exchanging activity of SeNHX1.

  9. Polyploidy in the olive complex (Olea europaea): Evidence from flow cytometry and nuclear microsatellite analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besnard, G.; Garcia-Verdugo, C.; Rubio de Casas, R.;

    2008-01-01

    putative polyploidization events and their evolutionary significance in the diversification of the olive tree and its relatives. Methods: Representatives of the six olive subspecies were investigated using (a) flow cytometry to estimate genome content, and (b) six highly variable nuclear microsatellites...... to assess the presence of multiple alleles at co-dominant loci. In addition, nine individuals from a controlled cross between two individuals of O. europaea subsp. maroccana were characterized with microsatellites to check for chromosome inheritance. Key Results: Based on flow cytometry and genetic analyses....... Lastly, abnormalities in chromosomes inheritance leading to aneuploid formation were revealed using microsatellite analyses in the offspring from the controlled cross in subsp. maroccana. Conclusions: This study constitutes the first report for multiple polyploidy in olive tree relatives. Formation...

  10. Effect of Olea europaea Extract on Male Rats’ ReproductiveParameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Tabrizi Jafar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Phytoestrogens plant compounds with biologic-estrogenic activity, structurally similar to 17-β estradiol, are first converted to heterocyclic compounds similar to estrogens in structure and then conjugated in the liver. Olive (Olea europaea, from the oleaseae family, is known as a phytoestrogen plant compound since it contains lignans and phenolic compounds. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of O. europaea extract on male rats’ reproductive parameters. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 male Wistar rats with the average weight of 200-250 g and age of 8-10 weeks, divided into 5 groups. Group 1, which called control group, received no treatment. Group 2 received normal saline and Groups 3-5 received extract at a dose of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg/day of the olive leaves extract (1 cc, respectively. Before the administration of the first gavage and 24 h after that of the last one (i.e., in the 49th day, all the rats were weighed, and blood samples were taken from their tail vein. The blood samples were then centrifuged at 1500 rpm for 20 min, then serum was separated and stored at −80 °C for the measurement of estradiol and testosterone, using immunoassay technique. Results: The results show a significant decrease in testosterone and estradiol level among the five groups, which is dependent on the concentration of the extract; the decrease in testosterone and estradiol is positively correlated to the concentration of the extract. Conclusion: In conclusion, olive leaves extract significantly decreased fertility parameters in the male adult rat dose-dependently.

  11. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Olea europaea L. to Identify Genes Involved in the Development of the Pollen Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Domenico Iaria; Adriana Chiappetta; Innocenzo Muzzalupo

    2016-01-01

    In olive (Olea europaea L.), the processes controlling self-incompatibility are still unclear and the molecular basis underlying this process are still not fully characterized. In order to determine compatibility relationships, using next-generation sequencing techniques and a de novo transcriptome assembly strategy, we show that pollen tubes from different olive plants, grown in vitro in a medium containing its own pistil and in combination pollen/pistil from self-sterile and self-fertile cu...

  12. Growth and nitrogen uptake by Salicornia europaea and Aster tripolium in nutrient conditions typical of aquaculture wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintã, R; Santos, R; Thomas, D N; Le Vay, L

    2015-02-01

    The increasing need for environmentally sound aquaculture development can, in part, be addressed by using halophytic plants in integrated multitrophic aquaculture systems (IMTA) to remove waste dissolved nitrogen (N). However, knowledge of plant ability to take up nitrogen is of foremost importance to predict plants performance in such systems. Two species, Salicornia europaea and Aster tripolium, have been identified as potential candidates for IMTA due to their salt tolerance, potential N removal capabilities and their high commercial value as an additional crop. This study investigated the growth and N uptake rates of these two species under different N supply (NH4(+), NO3(-), NH4NO3). S. europaea plants produced a lower biomass when grown in NH4(+) compared to NO3(-) or NH4NO3, while A. tripolium biomass was not affected by the form in which N was supplied. N uptake in plants incubated at different concentrations of (15)N enriched solution (up to 2 mmol l(-1)) fitted the Michaelis-Menten model. While S. europaea NH4-N maximum uptake did not differ between starved and non-starved plants, A. tripolium NH4-N uptake was higher in starved plants when supplied alone. When NO3(-) was supplied alone, NO3-N maximum uptake was lower, for both species, when the plants were not starved. Comparison of starved and non-starved plants N uptake demonstrates the need for cautious interpretation of N uptake rates across different conditions. According to the observed results, both S. europaea and A. tripolium are capable of significantly high biomass production and N removal making them potential species for inclusion in efficient IMTA.

  13. Dynamic changes of ammonia-oxidizing archaea community structure during aerobic composting of chicken manure%鸡粪好氧堆肥过程中氨氧化古菌群落结构的动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解开治; 徐培智; 张发宝; 唐拴虎; 顾文杰; 黄旭; 蒋瑞萍; 卢钰升

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to investigate the community structure and species diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) during poultry species composting. The results show that the AOA community structure and species diversity at different stages of chicken manure composting are markedly changed, and the band b, which shows 96% similarity to the AOA HH - 2 (GU225872. 1 ) and band m, which shows 99% similarity to the uncultured Crenarchaeote NM-152 ( HQ875225.1 ) , represent the major AOA bacterial species during the composting. The bands c, b, f and i, and the bands m, k, ] and n represent the species of the two populations of bacteria, respectively. Shannon-Weiner index (H) and evenness index (EH) of the AOA colonies are different at different stages of the eomposting, and the following order is : day 30 〉 day 5 〉 day 25 ≈ day 45 〉 day 3 ≈ day 12 〉 day 1 ≈ day 15. The redundancy analysis of the AOA colonies at different stages of the composting shows that the AOA colony evolution is all significantly affected by the composting temperature, whole nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen (P 〈0. 05 ), while pH is not affected. The AOA community structure is changed markedly on days 1,5, 15, 30 and 45 of the composting. These results indicate that several parameters could control AOA community structure during composting of chicken manure.%应用聚合酶链式反应-变性梯度凝胶电泳(PCR-DGGE)技术,研究了好氧堆肥过程氨氧化古菌(ammonia-oxidizingarchaea,AOA)的群落结构和多样性变化。结果表明,不同堆肥时期鸡粪好氧堆肥AOA菌群的群落结构发生了明显的变化。与AOAHH-2(GU225872.1)亲缘关系较近的b条带(相似性96%)和未培养泉古菌属[uncuhured crenarchaeoteNM-152(HQ875225.1)]的m条带(相似性99%)是堆肥过程一直存在的AOA菌属。条带C、b、f、i和条带m、k、1

  14. Genetic improvement of olive (Olea europaea L.) by conventional and in vitro biotechnology methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugini, E; Cristofori, V; Silvestri, C

    2016-01-01

    In olive (Olea europaea L.) traditional methods of genetic improvement have up to now produced limited results. Intensification of olive growing requires appropriate new cultivars for fully mechanized groves, but among the large number of the traditional varieties very few are suitable. High-density and super high-density hedge row orchards require genotypes with reduced size, reduced apical dominance, a semi-erect growth habit, easy to propagate, resistant to abiotic and biotic stresses, with reliably high productivity and quality of both fruits and oil. Innovative strategies supported by molecular and biotechnological techniques are required to speed up novel hybridisation methods. Among traditional approaches the Gene Pool Method seems a reasonable option, but it requires availability of widely diverse germplasm from both cultivated and wild genotypes, supported by a detailed knowledge of their genetic relationships. The practice of "gene therapy" for the most important existing cultivars, combined with conventional methods, could accelerate achievement of the main goals, but efforts to overcome some technical and ideological obstacles are needed. The present review describes the benefits that olive and its products may obtain from genetic improvement using state of the art of conventional and unconventional methods, and includes progress made in the field of in vitro techniques. The uses of both traditional and modern technologies are discussed with recommendations.

  15. 454 Pyrosequencing of Olive (Olea europaea L. Transcriptome in Response to Salinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Bazakos

    Full Text Available Olive (Olea europaea L. is one of the most important crops in the Mediterranean region. The expansion of cultivation in areas irrigated with low quality and saline water has negative effects on growth and productivity however the investigation of the molecular basis of salt tolerance in olive trees has been only recently initiated. To this end, we investigated the molecular response of cultivar Kalamon to salinity stress using next-generation sequencing technology to explore the transcriptome profile of olive leaves and roots and identify differentially expressed genes that are related to salt tolerance response. Out of 291,958 obtained trimmed reads, 28,270 unique transcripts were identified of which 35% are annotated, a percentage that is comparable to similar reports on non-model plants. Among the 1,624 clusters in roots that comprise more than one read, 24 were differentially expressed comprising 9 down- and 15 up-regulated genes. Respectively, inleaves, among the 2,642 clusters, 70 were identified as differentially expressed, with 14 down- and 56 up-regulated genes. Using next-generation sequencing technology we were able to identify salt-response-related transcripts. Furthermore we provide an annotated transcriptome of olive as well as expression data, which are both significant tools for further molecular studies in olive.

  16. Allozyme variation of oleaster populations (wild olive tree) (Olea europaea L.) in the Mediterranean Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaret, R; Ouazzani, N; Michaud, H; Vivier, G; Deguilloux, M-F; Di Giusto, F

    2004-04-01

    As a result of the early domestication and extensive cultivation of the olive tree throughout the Mediterranean Basin, the wild-looking forms of olive (oleasters) presently observed constitute a complex, potentially ranging from wild to feral forms. Allozyme variation was analysed at 10 loci in 31 large and 44 small oleaster populations distributed in various habitats of the Mediterranean Basin and in two populations of the wild subspecies Olea europaea subsp (ssp) guanchica, endemic to the Canary islands and closely related to oleasters. At eight polymorphic loci, 25 alleles were identified. Genetic evidence that nondomesticated oleasters still survive locally was provided by the occurrence of four and one alleles shared exclusively by the eight western and two eastern oleaster populations, respectively, which were collected in forests potentially containing genuinely wild forms according to environmental, historical and demographic criteria. As reported previously from cytoplasmic and RAPDs analysis, substantial genetic differentiation was observed between the eastern oleaster populations genetically close to most olive clones cultivated in the Mediterranean Basin, and the western populations that are related to the wild Canarian populations. In addition, the occurrence of significantly lower heterozygosity in cultivated olive than in oleasters, whatever their origin, suggests that intensive selection involving inbreeding has taken place under cultivation to obtain particular characteristics in the olive cultivars.

  17. 454 Pyrosequencing of Olive (Olea europaea L.) Transcriptome in Response to Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazakos, Christos; Manioudaki, Maria E; Sarropoulou, Elena; Spano, Thodhoraq; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) is one of the most important crops in the Mediterranean region. The expansion of cultivation in areas irrigated with low quality and saline water has negative effects on growth and productivity however the investigation of the molecular basis of salt tolerance in olive trees has been only recently initiated. To this end, we investigated the molecular response of cultivar Kalamon to salinity stress using next-generation sequencing technology to explore the transcriptome profile of olive leaves and roots and identify differentially expressed genes that are related to salt tolerance response. Out of 291,958 obtained trimmed reads, 28,270 unique transcripts were identified of which 35% are annotated, a percentage that is comparable to similar reports on non-model plants. Among the 1,624 clusters in roots that comprise more than one read, 24 were differentially expressed comprising 9 down- and 15 up-regulated genes. Respectively, inleaves, among the 2,642 clusters, 70 were identified as differentially expressed, with 14 down- and 56 up-regulated genes. Using next-generation sequencing technology we were able to identify salt-response-related transcripts. Furthermore we provide an annotated transcriptome of olive as well as expression data, which are both significant tools for further molecular studies in olive.

  18. Molecular identification of Greek olive (Olea europaea) cultivars based on microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos, K; Moustakas, M; Aravanopoulos, F A

    2010-01-01

    Olea europaea is one of the oldest species of domesticated trees. We used microsatellite markers for fingerprinting and for evaluation of genetic similarity and structure of 26 Greek olive cultivars, which cover most of the olive cultivation regions of Greece, including previously undescribed denominations from northern Greece. Eighty-one alleles were revealed with six SSR loci that were selected as most informative of 10 SSR primers that were initially investigated. The number of alleles per locus varied from 7 to 20 (mean, 13.5). Heterozygosity ranged from 0.240 at locus DCA-3 to 0.826 at locus UDO99-9, with a mean value of 0.600. Analysis of 104 trees representing 26 denominations (four trees per denomination) revealed 26 distinct SSR profiles, indicating 26 olive cultivars; no intracultivar variability was observed. Genetic and geographic distances were not significantly correlated, based on the Mantel test. These SSR loci allowed unequivocal identification of all the cultivars and will be useful for future breeding and olive germplasm management efforts.

  19. Epicuticular Wax in Developing Olives (Olea europaea) Is Highly Dependent upon Cultivar and Fruit Ripeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Stefania; Cortés-Francisco, Nuria; Caixach, Josep; Barrios, Gonçal; Mateu, Jordi; Ninot, Antonia; Romero, Agustí

    2016-08-01

    The epicuticular wax (EW) layer is located on the surface of most plant organs. It provides the cuticle with most of its properties and is the primary barrier against biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the importance of Olea europaea cultivation, few studies have characterized the EW covering leaves and olives, which could be involved in resistance to both infection and environmental conditions. In the present study, wide-ranging screening was carried out using direct-injection electrospray ionization coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry to analyze EW in developing olives of nine varieties. The proportions of EW fractions [wax esters (WEs), diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols (TAGs), triterpenic acids, and aldehydes] strongly depended upon the olive cultivar and, in only a few cases, were influenced by the sampling date. The specific compositions of the major fractions, WEs and TAGs, were strictly related to the cultivar, while the degree of unsaturation and chain length of the WEs evolved throughout the 4 weeks prior to the olive turning color.

  20. Protective Effect of Salicornia europaea Extracts on High Salt Intake-Induced Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panth, Nisha; Park, Sin-Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Deuk-Hoi; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    High salt intake causes and aggravates arterial hypertension and vascular dysfunction. We investigated the effect of Salicornia europaea extracts (SE) on vascular function and blood pressure. SE constituents were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography, and SE’s effect on vascular function was evaluated in isolated porcine coronary arteries. SE’s vascular protective effect was also evaluated in vivo using normotensive and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). SE mainly contained sodium chloride (55.6%), 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural, p-coumaric acid, and trans-ferulic acid. High sodium (160 mmol/L) induced vascular dysfunction; however, SE containing the same quantity of sodium did not cause vascular dysfunction. Among the compounds in SE, trans-ferulic acid accounts for the vascular protective effect. Normotensive rats fed a high-salt diet showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP), which decreased significantly in the SE-treated groups. In SHRs, high edible salt intake significantly increased SBP, DBP, and MAP, but SE intake was associated with a significantly lower MAP. Thus, SE did not induce vascular dysfunction, and trans-ferulic acid might be at least partly responsible for the vasoprotective effect of SE. Taken together, SE could be used as an alternative to purified salt to prevent and ameliorate hypertension. PMID:27455235

  1. The features of shoots regeneration of European forsythia (Forsythia europaea Degen et Bald. in sterile culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Konstantinov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of several factors such as medium, the source of cutting material and plant growth regulators concentration on in vitro culture and rapid propagation of Forsythia europaea were investigated. The buds from middle part of shoots sprouted in spring were the optimum type of explants, because of the highest shoot growth rate during initiation procedure and biggest amount of formed shoots per microcutting during subsequent multiplication. The best medium during initiation was WPM supplemented with 0.5 mg·l-1 6-BAP and 0.5 mg·l-1 NAA. Multiplication coefficient was up to 4.8±0,9 on MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg·l-1 6-BAP at. Shoots were rooted on the WPM medium without growth regulators and the rate of rooting was 71-84%. The microplants obtained transferred to acclimatization substrate (mixture of peat, sand and perlite in proportions 3:1:2 with up to 96% survival.

  2. Identification and Characterization of the Iridoid Synthase Involved in Oleuropein Biosynthesis in Olive (Olea europaea) Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, Fiammetta; Geu-Flores, Fernando; Kries, Hajo; Panara, Francesco; Baldoni, Luciana; O'Connor, Sarah E; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-03-11

    The secoiridoids are the main class of specialized metabolites present in olive (Olea europaea L.) fruit. In particular, the secoiridoid oleuropein strongly influences olive oil quality because of its bitterness, which is a desirable trait. In addition, oleuropein possesses a wide range of pharmacological properties, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activities. In accordance, obtaining high oleuropein varieties is a main goal of molecular breeding programs. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to identify candidate genes belonging to the secoiridoid pathway in olive. From these candidates, we have functionally characterized the olive homologue of iridoid synthase (OeISY), an unusual terpene cyclase that couples an NAD (P)H-dependent 1,4-reduction step with a subsequent cyclization, and we provide evidence that OeISY likely generates the monoterpene scaffold of oleuropein in olive fruits. OeISY, the first pathway gene characterized for this type of secoiridoid, is a potential target for breeding programs in a high value secoiridoid-accumulating species.

  3. Long-term Fertilization Determining Ammonia-oxidizing Organism Abundance and Distribution in Dry Highland Soil of Loess Plateau%长期施肥对旱地土壤中氨氧化微生物丰度和分布的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛亮; 武传东; 曲东

    2012-01-01

    采用基于氨单加氧酶基因(amoA)的荧光定量PCR技术,以黄土高原旱地土为材料,研究长期施肥对土壤氨氧化细菌和氨氧化古菌丰度的影响,并分析环境因素与氨氧化菌丰度的关系.以不施肥土壤为对照(CK),设置3个施肥处理,分别为单施磷肥(P),氮、磷共施(NP)和氮、磷、有机肥共施(NPM)3个处理.结果表明,不同处理氨氧化菌amoA基因拷贝数为1.326×106~1.886×106 g1,各处理间氨氧化细菌丰度差异不显著;氨氧化古菌的arch-amoA基因拷贝数为1.329×106~4.510×106 g-1,表现为处理NPM> NP>CK>P,NPM处理为对照的3.314倍,二者呈现显著性差异.采用DCCA法对4个处理进行环境相似度分类,结果显示,P和NPM处理、CK和NP处理分别构成了2个相似类群;4个处理和12个环境因子的关联(CCA)分析表明,不同处理中的氨氧化微生物活跃度以及氨氧化过程强度表现为处理NMP>NP>CK>P;不同环境因子和不同施肥处理生境相似度分布存在不同的关系,其中反映氨氧化过程的硝态氮含量、氨氧化细菌和氨氧化古菌丰度,以及代表微生物生长主要环境因素的pH值、含水量、全氮和有机碳含量与不同施肥处理导致的生境相似度的分布关系最为紧密.%Real-time PCR with primers targeting Ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene iamoA) was performed to quantify abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing ar-chaea (AOA) in dry highland soilt long-term fertilized, from Loess Plateau. We also investigated the relationship between environmental factors and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing organism. The treatments were no fertilizer (CK), phosphate (P), nitrogen/phosphate fertilizers (NP), and NP combined with organic fertilizer (NPM). We found that fertilization caused no significant difference on the amoA gene copy numbers of AOB arranging from 1, 326× 106 to 1. 886 × 106 copies · g-1 dry soil. In contrast, abundance of

  4. Role of carbohydrate reserves in yield production of intensively cultivated oil olive (Olea europaea L.) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustan, Amnon; Avni, Avishai; Lavee, Shimon; Zipori, Isaac; Yeselson, Yelena; Schaffer, Arthur A; Riov, Joseph; Dag, Arnon

    2011-05-01

    Olive (Olea europaea) has a very high tendency for year-to-year deviation in yield (alternate bearing), which has a negative economic impact on the olive oil industry. Among possible reasons for alternate bearing, depletion of stored carbohydrates (CHO) during the On-year (high yield) has often been mentioned. The objective of the present study was to verify the role of CHO reserves, as a cause or effect, in the alternate bearing of intensively cultivated olives. A monthly survey of soluble sugar and starch concentrations in the leaves, branches, bark and roots of On- and Off-trees (cv. Barnea) was carried out during a complete reproductive cycle from November 2005 to October 2006. Carbohydrate concentration in the sapwood was determined in January, as well as an estimate of whole-tree biomass. The trunk and limbs possess the largest portion of CHO reserves. The influence of reduced fruit load on CHO reserves was also investigated. Starch, mannitol and sucrose concentrations increased from December to March in all tissues, and then declined along with fruit development. Leaves, branches and bark have a significant role in CHO storage, whereas roots accumulated the lowest CHO concentrations. However, fluctuations in reserve content suggested considerable involvement of roots in the CHO budget. Nevertheless, there were no meaningful differences in the annual pattern of CHO concentration between On- and Off-trees. Even a 75-100% reduction in fruit number brought about only a minor, sluggish increase in CHO content, though this was more pronounced in the roots. Carbohydrate reserves were not depleted, even under maximum demands for fruit and oil production. It is concluded that in olives, the status of CHO reserves is not a yield determinant. However, they may play a significant role in the olive's survival strategy, ensuring tree recovery in the unpredictable semiarid Mediterranean environment. This suggests that CHO reserves in olive act like an active sink

  5. Polyphenols benefits of olive leaf (Olea europaea L) to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Patrícia; Kasper Machado, Isabel; Garavaglia, Juliano; Zani, Valdeni Terezinha; de Souza, Daiana; Morelo Dal Bosco, Simone

    2014-12-17

    Introducción: Los compuestos fenólicos presentes en las hojas del olivo (olea europaea l.) conferir beneficios para la salud humana. Objetivos: Revisar la literatura científica sobre los beneficios de los polifenoles de hojas de olivo para la salud humana. Método: Revisión de la literatura en las bases de datos lilacs-bireme, scielo y medline para publicaciones en inglés, portugués y español con los descriptores “olea europaea”, “hojas de olivo”, “hoja de olivo”, “hojas de olivo extractos”, “los extractos de hoja de olivo”, “compuestos fenólicos”, “polifenoles”, “oleuropeína”, “composición química”, y “salud”. Se identificaron 92 artículos, pero sólo 38 en relación con los objetivos del estudio y 9 artículos citados en las obras se incluyeron debido a su relevancia. Resultados y discusión: Los compuestos fenólicos presentes en las hojas del olivo, especialmente la oleuropeína, se asocian a antioxidante, antihipertensivo, hipoglucemiante, actividad hipocolesterolémico y cardioprotector. además, los estudios asocian la oleuropeína a un efecto anti-inflamatorio en trauma de la médula ósea y como soporte en el tratamiento de la obesidad.

  6. The skeletal organic matrix from Mediterranean coral Balanophyllia europaea influences calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Goffredo

    Full Text Available Scleractinian coral skeletons are made mainly of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite. The mineral deposition occurs in a biological confined environment, but it is still a theme of discussion to what extent the calcification occurs under biological or environmental control. Hence, the shape, size and organization of skeletal crystals from the cellular level through the colony architecture, were attributed to factors as diverse as mineral supersaturation levels and organic mediation of crystal growth. The skeleton contains an intra-skeletal organic matrix (OM of which only the water soluble component was chemically and physically characterized. In this work that OM from the skeleton of the Balanophyllia europaea, a solitary scleractinian coral endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is studied in vitro with the aim of understanding its role in the mineralization of calcium carbonate. Mineralization of calcium carbonate was conducted by overgrowth experiments on coral skeleton and in calcium chloride solutions containing different ratios of water soluble and/or insoluble OM and of magnesium ions. The precipitates were characterized by diffractometric, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The results showed that both soluble and insoluble OM components influence calcium carbonate precipitation and that the effect is enhanced by their co-presence. The role of magnesium ions is also affected by the presence of the OM components. Thus, in vitro, OM influences calcium carbonate crystal morphology, aggregation and polymorphism as a function of its composition and of the content of magnesium ions in the precipitation media. This research, although does not resolve the controversy between environmental or biological control on the deposition of calcium carbonate in corals, sheds a light on the role of OM, which appears mediated by the presence of magnesium ions.

  7. Metabarcoding Analysis of Fungal Diversity in the Phyllosphere and Carposphere of Olive (Olea europaea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Li Destri Nicosia, Maria Giulia; Cacciola, Santa Olga; Droby, Samir; Schena, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The fungal diversity associated with leaves, flowers and fruits of olive (Olea europaea) was investigated in different phenological stages (May, June, October and December) using an implemented metabarcoding approach. It consisted of the 454 pyrosequencing of the fungal ITS2 region and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis of relevant genera along with validated reference sequences. Most sequences were identified up to the species level or were associated with a restricted number of related taxa enabling supported speculations regarding their biological role. Analyses revealed a rich fungal community with 195 different OTUs. Ascomycota was the dominating phyla representing 93.6% of the total number of detected sequences followed by unidentified fungi (3.6%) and Basidiomycota (2.8%). A higher level of diversity was revealed for leaves compared to flowers and fruits. Among plant pathogens the genus Colletotrichum represented by three species (C. godetiae syn. C. clavatum, C. acutatum s.s and C. karstii) was the most abundant on ripe fruits but it was also detected in other organs. Pseudocercospora cladosporioides was detected with a high frequency in all leaf samples and to a less extent in ripe fruits. A much lower relative frequency was revealed for Spilocaea oleagina and for other putative pathogens including Fusarium spp., Neofusicoccum spp., and Alternaria spp. Among non-pathogen taxa, Aureobasidium pullulans, the species complex of Cladosporium cladosporioides and Devriesia spp. were the most represented. This study highlights the existence of a complex fungal consortium including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on olive productions.

  8. Salt stress induces differential regulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Olea europaea cultivars Frantoio (salt-tolerant) and Leccino (salt-sensitive)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, Lorenzo; Borghi, Monica; Francini, Alessandra; Lin, Xiuli; Xie, De Yu; Sebastiani, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is an important crop in the Mediterranean Basin where drought and salinity are two of the main factors affecting plant productivity. Despite several studies have reported different responses of various olive tree cultivars to salt stress, the mechanisms that convey t

  9. Isolation of antioxidative secoiridoids from olive wood (Olea europaea L.) guided by on-line HPLC-DAD-radical scavenging detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Bonilla, M.; Salido, S.; Beek, van T.A.; Waard, de P.; Linares-Palomino, P.J.; Sánchez, A.; Altarejos, J.

    2011-01-01

    The woody portion of olive tree pruning is a source of natural antioxidants of potential interest for the food industry. This work deals with the isolation and identification of further antioxidants present in an ethyl acetate extract of olive (Olea europaea L.) wood. Thus, a new secoiridoid, oleuro

  10. HPTLC Fingerprinting and Cholinesterase Inhibitory and Metal-Chelating Capacity of Various Citrus Cultivars and Olea europaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Sezer Senol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory activity of thirty-one ethanol extracts obtained from albedo, flavedo, seed and leaf parts of 17 cultivars of Citrus species from Turkey, the bark and leaves of Olea europaea L. from two locations (Turkey and Cyprus as well as caff eic acid and hesperidin was tested against acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, using ELISA microtiter assays at 500 μg/mL. Metal-chelating capacity of the extracts was also determined. BChE inhibitory effect of the Citrus sp. extracts was from (7.7±0.7 to (70.3±1.1 %, whereas they did not show any inhibition against AChE. Cholinesterase inhibitory activity of the leaf and bark ethanol extracts of O. europaea was very weak ((10.2±3.1 to (15.0±2.3 %. The extracts had either no or low metal-chelating capacity at 500 μg/mL. HPTLC fingerprinting of the extracts, which indicated a similar phytochemical pattern, was also done using the standards of caffeic acid and hesperidin with weak cholinesterase inhibition. Among the screened extracts, the albedo extract of C. limon ‘Interdonato’, the flavedo extracts of ‘Kara Limon’ and ‘Cyprus’ cultivars and the seed extract of C. maxima appear to be promising as natural BChE inhibitors.

  11. Oil, protein, antioxidants and free radical scavenging activity of stone from wild olive trees (Olea europaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannachi, Hédia; Elfalleh, Walid; Marzouk, Sizaiem

    2013-05-01

    The wild olive trees or oleaster (var. sylvestris) and the cultivated olive trees (var. europaea) constitute the two botanical varieties of Olea europaea L. from Mediterranean. In this study, a partial chemical profile was conducted including the total lipids, the fatty acid profiles, soluble proteins, polyphenols, flavanoids contents and antioxidants activities of stone from six oleaster trees. The comparison was made by two olive cultivars cultivated in the same region. The oleaster and cultivar stones were richer in oil content having an average of 8.99 and 7.38 % dry weight basis (DW), respectively. Qualitatively, all studied oils have the same fatty acids profile with the oleic acid C18:1n-9 as the major fatty acid. The oleaster stone oils were richer in monounsaturated fatty acids having an average of 64.87%. They, also, richer in protein content with an average of 198.86 mg/g DW.The globulin is the major fraction, followed by the albumin, the prolamin and the glutemin fractions. The oleaster stone extracts contain polyphenols, flavonoids with an average of 151.14 and 11.91 mg gallic acid equivalent/100g of DW, respectively. The studied extracts showed antioxidant activity using the free radical scavenging activity determined by DPPH and ABTS. The unexploited oleaster stone seems to be a source of oil with good fatty acids balance, in protein and antioxidants metabolites and would be useful for the formulation of supplements and/or pharmaceutical ingredients.

  12. Plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive tree (Olea europaea L.) with a focus on the Mediterranean Basin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadine; Chapuis, Elodie; Tavoillot, Johannes; Mateille, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The olive tree (Olea europaea ssp. europaea.) is one of the most ancient cultivated trees. It is an emblematic species owing to its ecological, economic and cultural importance, especially in the Mediterranean Basin. Plant-parasitic nematodes are major damaging pests on olive trees, mainly in nurseries. They significantly contribute to economic losses in the top-ten olive-producing countries in the world. However, the damages they induce in orchards and nurseries are specifically documented only in a few countries. This review aims to update knowledge about the olive-nematode pathosystem by: (1) updating the list of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive trees; (2) analysing their diversity (taxonomic level, trophic groups, dominance of taxa), which allowed us (i) to assess the richness observed in each country, and (ii) to exhibit and describe the most important taxa able to induce damages on olive trees such as: Meloidogyne, Pratylenchus, Helicotylenchus, Xiphinema, Tylenchulus, Rotylenchulus, Heterodera (distribution especially in the Mediterranean Basin, pathogenicity and reactions of olive trees); (3) describing some management strategies focusing on alternative control methods; (4) suggesting new approaches for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes based on the management of the diversity of their communities, which are structured by several environmental factors such as olive diversity (due to domestication of wild olive in the past, and to breeding now), cropping systems (from traditional to high-density orchards), irrigation, and terroirs.

  13. Adult neurogenesis in the hedgehog (Erinaceus concolor) and mole (Talpa europaea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska, K; Turlejski, K; Grabiec, M; Ghazaryan, A; Yavruoyan, E; Djavadian, R L

    2010-01-01

    We investigated adult neurogenesis in two species of mammals belonging to the superorder Laurasiatheria, the southern white-breasted hedgehog (order Erinaceomorpha, species Erinaceus concolor) from Armenia and the European mole (order Soricomorpha, species Talpa europaea) from Poland. Neurogenesis in the brain of these species was examined immunohistochemically, using the endogenous markers doublecortin (DCX) and Ki-67, which are highly conserved among species. We found that in both the hedgehog and mole, like in the majority of earlier investigated mammals, neurogenesis continues in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and in the dentate gyrus (DG). In the DG of both species, DCX-expressing cells and Ki-67-labeled cells were present in the subgranular and granular layers. In the mole, a strong bundle of DCX-labeled processes, presumably axons of granule cells, was observed in the center of the hilus. Proliferating cells (expressing Ki-67) were identified in the SVZ of lateral ventricles of both species, but neuronal precursor cells (expressing DCX) were also observed in the olfactory bulb (OB). In both species, the vast majority of cells expressing DCX in the OB were granule cells with radially orientated dendrites, although some periglomerular cells surrounding the glomeruli were also labeled. In addition, this paper is the first to show DCX-labeled fibers in the anterior commissure of the hedgehog and mole. These fibers must be axons of new neurons making interhemispheric connections between the two OB or piriform (olfactory) cortices. DCX-expressing neurons were observed in the striatum and piriform cortex of both hedgehog and mole. We postulate that in both species a fraction of cells newly generated in the SVZ migrates along the rostral migratory stream to the piriform cortex. This pattern of migration resembles that of the 'second-wave neurons' generated during embryonal development of the neocortex rather than the pattern observed during

  14. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant to Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kine...

  15. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant to Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended cultur...

  16. Interactions between nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in gnotobiotic microcosms planted with the emergent macrophyte Glyceria maxima

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Duyts, H.; Blom, C.W.P.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The population dynamics of the chemolithoautotrophic nitrifiers Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were studied in gnotobiotic microcosms fed with ammonium in response to the presence or absence of the emergent macrophyte Glyceria maxima and the heterotrophic denitrifying bacterium P

  17. Synthesis of deuterium-labelled substrates for the study of oleuropein biosynthesis in Olea europaea callus cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrilli, Anna Maria; Maggi, Agnese; Casagrande, Valentina; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2016-01-01

    We propose the cell culture approach to investigate oleuropein (1) biogenesis in Olea europaea L. We suggest employing olive callus cultures to identify the iridoidic precursor of oleuropein. In fact, we confirmed that callus cells from olive shoot explants are able to produce key secoiridoid as 1. To enable this approach, we synthesised and characterised deuterium-labelled iridoidic precursors belonging both to the loganin and the 8-epiloganin series. These iridoids are [7,8-(2)H2]-7-deoxy-8-epi-loganin (2(D)), [8,10-(2)H2]-8-epi-loganin (4(D)) and [7,8-(2)H2]-7-deoxy-loganin (3(D)).

  18. IAA-peroxidase relation in the microsporocytes and anther wall during successive stages of meiosis in Larix europaea L.

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    Alicja Górska-Brylass

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During anther meiosis in Larix europaea considerable variations in the level of peroxidase activity and endogenous auxin content occur both in the microsporocytes and in the anther wall. However, the IAA-peroxidase relations are different in each of these two parts of the anther. In the anther wall characterized by the occurrence of anodic isoperoxidases, the changes in peroxidae activity show a positive correlation with those in endogenous auxin content. In the microsporocytes containing almost only cathodic asoperoxidases the levels of endogenous auxin content and peroxidase activity show a reverse correlation. Thus a preponderance of isoperoxidases showing IAA-oxidase properties occur only in the microsporocytes. These results suggest the important role of the IAA=peroxidase system in the mechanism of differentiation of cells undergoing anther meiosis.

  19. Antioxidant activity and chemical components as potential anticancer agents in the olive leaf (Olea europaea L. cv Leccino.) decoction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marino, Simona; Festa, Carmen; Zollo, Franco; Nini, Antonella; Antenucci, Lina; Raimo, Gennaro; Iorizzi, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that a reduced risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases is correlated with a regular consumption of fruits and vegetable, many of which are rich in polyphenols. The additive and synergistic effect of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables may reduce chronic diseases related to oxidative stress in human body. Olea europaea L. leaf are rich in phenolic components, which have been proposed to play a role in cancer prevention. The purpose of this study was to identify the main components in the Olea europaea L. leaf (cv. Leccino) preserved during the decoction preparation, in order to delineate the antioxidant activities of the crude extracts and its isolated compounds by using different in vitro assays including DPPH radicalscavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory effect and the ability to delay the linoleic acid peroxidation process (ALP). The aqueous decoction was partitioned obtaining four extracts and the n-butanol extract showed the highest antioxidant activity and the highest total phenolic content. Phytochemical investigation leads to the isolation of thirteen secondary metabolites including simple phenolics, flavonoids, secoiridoids whose structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR) and spectrometric techniques. A significant free radical scavenging effect against DPPH has been evidenced in fraxamoside (1) (EC50 62.6 µM) and taxifolin (5) (EC50 50.0 µM), isolated for the first time from the water decoction. The most active compound in the TAC evaluation, was the 3,4 dihydro-phenyl glycol (8) (0.90 caffeic acid equiv.) while taxifolin and fraxamoside resulted as the most efficient inhibitors of XO activity (IC50 2.7 and 5.2 µM, respectively). Secoxyloganin (4), oleuropein (2) and tyrosol (6) showed the highest ALP activity. This study adds to the growing body of data supporting the bioactivities of phytochemicals and their

  20. Dynamique de la conductance hydraulique chez l'olivier de table (Olea europaea L., cv Meski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hechmi, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic Conductance Dynamic in Olive Table Tree (Olea europaea L. cv Meski. Cette étude expose les effets de l'aménagement des pâturages par la digue filtrante sur la dynamique de la végétation. Dans les régions sahéliennes, de nombreuses techniques sont appliquées sur les sols pour la restauration des parcours dégradés. La digue filtrante s'intéresse particulièrement aux axes de drainage ou bas-fonds en dégradation. La méthode d'étude a consisté à évaluer l'impact des digues filtrantes par l'inventaire de la végétation, la mesure de la biomasse produite, et l'analyse chimique d'échantillons de fourrage et de sol. Ces observations ont été faites à la fois sur l'espace aménagé et sur un espace témoin représentatif en deux fois durant cinq ans. Les observations sur l'espace aménagé (stations d'observation d'un ha ont été faites en fonction du gradient par rapport à la digue filtrante tandis que sur le témoin (station d'observation d'un ha, les mesures ont été homogénéisées sur l'ensemble de la parcelle. Les résultats obtenus des inventaires de végétation montrent un effet positif de l'aménagement sur la dynamique de la végétation qui se maintient après cinq années. Les effets concernent la composition floristique pour laquelle certaines espèces connaissent une amélioration. Il s'agit de Panicum laetum (+ 5,9% en 1999 et + 1,9% en 2003, Setaria pallide fusca (+ 2,4 à + 8,6%, Cassia obtusifolia (+ 13,6% à + 9,3% et Zornia glochidiata (- 2,9% à + 1,7 %. Les espèces en régression sont surtout composées de Schoenefeldia gracilis (+ 1,7% à - 12% et Microchloa indica (- 28,9% à - 12,1% entre 1999 et 2003. L'écart de recouvrement du sol entre la parcelle aménagée et le témoin a été de -0,4% en 1999 contre + 14,6% en 2003. La biomasse produite et la capacité de charge ont connu une expansion allant de 3,14 à 4,5 fois par rapport à l'espace non aménagé. Cependant, des suivis doivent

  1. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7, an indigenous root endophyte from olive (Olea europaea L.) and effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium dahliae

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 is a native endophyte of olive roots. Previous studies have shown this motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacterium is an effective biocontrol agent against the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae, the causal agent of one of the most devastating diseases for olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivation. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 consisting of a circular chromosome of 6,136,735 bp that...

  2. Effects of long-term N fertilizer application and liming on nitrification and ammonia oxidizers in acidic soils%长期施加氮肥及氧化钙调节对酸性土壤硝化作用及氨氧化微生物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张苗苗; 王伯仁; 李冬初; 贺纪正; 张丽梅

    2015-01-01

    High levels of N fertilization and acid deposition could cause soil acidification directly and indirectly. The nitrogen cycle, especially nitrification, makes a great contribution to the acidification of agricultural soils across China, which further leads to the mobilization of potentially toxic metals such as aluminum ( Al ) and manganese ( Mn ) and decerases crop yields. Chemicals ( e. g., CaO) are amended as soil conditioners to relieve soil acidification. Ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting step in the nitrification process, is driven by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria ( AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea ( AOA) . Increasing evidence demonstrates that pH is one of the most important factors determining the niche separation of AOA and AOB, and AOA play the more important role in nitrification of acidic soils. However, abundant AOB have been detected in acidic soils but little is known about their ecological function. In this study, the effects of long-term N fertilization practices and liming on nitrification and ammonia oxidizers in acidic soils were investigated using quantitative PCR and DGGE methods combined with soil physiochemical analysis. Compared with a previous study conducted 6 years ago at the same site, N fertilizer application without liming further decreased soil pH (3.35—3.47) and potential nitrification rate (PNR) (0.02—0.14 μg NO-2-N g-1 soil h-1), while 2 years liming alleviated soil acidification (pH 4.10—4.46) and increased PNR (0.22—0.34μg NO-2-N g-1 soil h-1) significantly. There was a significantly positive correlation between soil pH and PNR, indicating the increase in soil pH via liming had positive effects on nitrification in acidic soils. AOA amoA gene copy numbers ( 7. 40 × 107—4. 08 × 108 copies/g ) were significantly higher than their counterpart AOB (1.67 × 106—2.57 × 107 copies/g) in soils that received different chemical N fertilizers. Ratios of AOA and AOB amoA gene abundance ranged between 10. 9 and 44. 3

  3. Isolation of Endophytic Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria Associated with the Halophyte Salicornia europaea and Evaluation of their Promoting Activity Under Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuai; Zhou, Na; Zhao, Zheng-Yong; Zhang, Ke; Wu, Guo-Hua; Tian, Chang-Yan

    2016-10-01

    Several reports have highlighted that many plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria (PGPE) can assist their host plants in coping with various biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information about the PGPE colonizing in the halophytes is still scarce. This study was designed to isolate and characterize PGPE from salt-accumulating halophyte Salicornia europaea grown under extreme salinity and to evaluate in vitro the bacterial mechanisms related to plant growth promotion. A total of 105 isolates were obtained from the surface-sterilized roots, stems, and assimilation twigs of S. europaea. Thirty-two isolates were initially selected for their ability to produce 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase as well as other properties such as production of indole-3-acetic acid and phosphate-solubilizing activities. The 16S rRNA gene-sequencing analysis revealed that these isolates belong to 13 different genera and 19 bacterial species. For these 32 strains, seed germination and seedling growth in axenically grown S. europaea seedlings at different NaCl concentrations (50-500 mM) were quantified. Five isolates possessing significant stimulation of the host plant growth were obtained. The five isolates were identified as Bacillus endophyticus, Bacillus tequilensis, Planococcus rifietoensis, Variovorax paradoxus, and Arthrobacter agilis. All the five strains could colonize and can be reisolated from the host plant interior tissues. These results demonstrate that habitat-adapted PGPE isolated from halophyte could enhance plant growth under saline stress conditions.

  4. Detection of Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata and Juniperus procera in the dry Afromontane forest of northern Ethiopia using subpixel analysis of Landsat imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishe, Hadgu; Giday, Kidane; Neka, Mulugeta; Soromessa, Teshome; Van Orshoven, Jos; Muys, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive and less costly forest inventory approaches are required to monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics of key species in forest ecosystems. Subpixel analysis using the earth resources data analysis system imagine subpixel classification procedure was tested to extract Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata and Juniperus procera canopies from Landsat 7 enhanced thematic mapper plus imagery. Control points with various canopy area fractions of the target species were collected to develop signatures for each of the species. With these signatures, the imagine subpixel classification procedure was run for each species independently. The subpixel process enabled the detection of O. europaea subsp. cuspidata and J. procera trees in pure and mixed pixels. Total of 100 pixels each were field verified for both species. An overall accuracy of 85% was achieved for O. europaea subsp. cuspidata and 89% for J. procera. A high overall accuracy level of detecting species at a natural forest was achieved, which encourages using the algorithm for future species monitoring activities. We recommend that the algorithm has to be validated in similar environment to enrich the knowledge on its capability to ensure its wider usage.

  5. 油橄榄水分的研究进展%A research progress review on water requirement in Olea europaea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩华柏; 罗洪平; 廖明安; 吴佐英

    2011-01-01

    The research results on Olea europaea photosynthesis, leaf nutrient absorption, fruit growth and yield and so on were summarized through collecting the published literatures of Olea europaea.A more systematic introduction and evaluation for Olea europaea field irrigation was given in the hope of achieving the purpose of high-yielding cultivation under the conservation of water resources, and according to China's situation, some suggestions of irrigation were put forward.%通过收集相关文献,从光合生理、叶面营养吸收、果实生长状况和产量等方面的影响综述了国外对油橄榄水分的研究成果,对油橄榄的灌溉研究作一个比较系统的介绍和评价,以期为在节约水资源条件下实现对油橄榄的丰产栽培提供参考.

  6. NaCl and TDZ are Two Key Factors for the Improvement of In Vitro Regeneration Rate of Salicornia europaea L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Ling Shi; He-Ping Han; Wu-Liang Shi; Yin-Xin Li

    2006-01-01

    The present study aimed to find out suitable conditions for the in vitro culture of Salicornla europaea L.and to develop an efficient regeneration system. S. europaea plants were regenerated successfully in vitro from callus derived from mature embryos. Via the method of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)short-treatment on mature seeds, callus was induced from hypocotyls on the MS medium with 4.55μmol/L N-phenyl-N'-1, 2, 3-thiadiazol-5-yl urea (TDZ) 3-4 weeks after the seeds germinated. The callus differentiated into shoots at a rate of 27.6% after subculture for one time on the same medium. When NaCl was included in the medium, shoots were formed in cluster and the shoot differentiation frequency was increased to 55.2%. The shoots were rooted when cultured on 1/2 MS medium supplemented with indole3-butyric acid (IBA), klnetin (KN) and activated charcoal (AC). The results indicated that NaCl and TDZ played an important role in the improvement of the regeneration rate of the halophyte, S. europaea.

  7. Effect of analgesics and their derivatives on antibiotic resistance of environmental microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, L P; Morse, A N

    2009-01-01

    This research is a preliminary study conducted to determine the effects of aspirin (acetyl-salicylic acid) and salicylic acid (analgesics and their derivatives) on the antibiotic resistance of ammonia oxidizing bacterium (AOB) (a non-pathogenic environmental microbe) cultured from the Texas Tech University-Water Recovery System that treats a space related wastewater for NASA. The effect of salicylic acid was investigated by obtaining the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) of antibiotics (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, and nalidixic acid) in the presence of aspirin and salicylic acid. The possibility of transfer of resistance genes between unrelated species was investigated by analyzing the similarity of the AcrA protein (a multi-drug efflux protein) in Nitrosomonas europaea, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. The protein alignment analysis was done using ExPASy, a proteomics tool. The results of this preliminary study indicated that the antibiotic resistance of AOBs increased in the presence of aspirin and salicylic acid and similarities in the AcrA protein of different species indicated the likelihood of possible resistance transfer between the species. This paper high lights the importance of research and further investigation on antibiotic resistance and resistance transfer, highlighting the number of parameters that should be considered while assessing antibiotic resistance in environmental samples.

  8. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties.

  9. Three-dimensional stratification of bacterial biofilm populations in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almstrand, Robert; Persson, Frank; Daims, Holger; Ekenberg, Maria; Christensson, Magnus; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2014-01-29

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers.

  10. Three-Dimensional Stratification of Bacterial Biofilm Populations in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for Nitritation-Anammox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Almstrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers.

  11. Conveyor Cultivation of the Halophytic Plant Salicornia europaea for the Recycling of NaCl from Human Liquid Waste in a Biological Life Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balnokin, Yurii; Myasoedov, Nikolay; Popova, Larissa; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lasseur, Christophe; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    One problem in designing bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) is developing technolo-gies to include human liquid and solid waste in intrasystem recycling. A specific task is recycling of NaCl excreted in urine by humans. We showed recently that this could be achieved through inclusion of the salt accumulating halophyte Salicornia europaea in the autotrophic compart-ment of the BLSS (Balnokin et al., ASR, 2010, in press). A model of NaCl circulation in BLSS with inclusion of S. europaea was based on the NaCl turnover in the human -urine -nutrient solution -S. europaea -human cycle. Mineralized urine was used as a basis for preparation of a nutrient solution for the halophyte cultivation. The shoots of the halophyte cultivated in the mineralized urine and containing NaCl could to be used by the BLSS inhabitants in their diets. In this report we describe cultivation of S. europaea which allows turnover of NaCl and produces daily shoot biomass containing Na+ and Cl- in quantities approximately equal to those excreted in daily human urine. The plants were grown in water culture in a climatic chamber under controlled conditions. A solution simulating mineralized urine (SSMU) was used as a basis for preparation of a nutri-ent solution for S. europaea cultivation. For continuous biomass production, seedlings of S. europaea, germinated preliminary in moist sand, were being transferred to the nutrient solu-tion at regular intervals (every two days). Duration of the conveyor operation was 112 days. During the first 56 days, the seedlings were being planted in SSMU diluted by a factor of 1.5 (2/3 SSMU). The same solution was introduced into the growth vessels as volumes of growth medium decreased due to plant transpiration. Starting from the 56th day as conveyor operation was initiated, the plants were being harvested every two days; the solutions from the discharged vessels were mixed with the fresh SSMU and the mixture was introduced into all other growth vessels of

  12. Real-time PCR quantification of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in short-cut A~2/O process treating domestic wastewater%实时荧光定量PCR对A~2/O短程硝化系统内氨氧化菌的定量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李磊; 张立东; 刘晶茹; 曾薇; 杨莹莹; 王向东

    2012-01-01

    Short-cut nitrification and denitrification was started up and maintained in a lab-scale A2/O process treating low C/N ratio domestic wastewater by controlling DO concentration in low level and decreasing the aerobic actual hydraulic retention time(AHRT).The average nitrite accumulation rate reached about 90% and above 95% of ammonia nitrogen(NH+4-N) could be removed.The genome DNA of the enriched ammonia oxidizing bacteria(AOB) culture was extracted and amplified,and then electrophoresed on agarose gel twice.The DNA fragments in reamplified agarose gel bands were recovered and purified,and then used as standard molecule.A standard curve of real-time fluorescent PCR was set up for AOB quantification.The numbers of the AOB in sludge samples under different operational conditions and nitrite accumulation rates were monitored and compared by using real-time quantitative PCR.The results showed that the numbers of AOB significantly increased with increasing of nitrite accumulation rates.The numbers of AOB in the complete nitrification activated sludge and short-cut nitrification activated sludge were 5.28×109 cells/g MLVSS and 3.95×1010 cells/g MLVSS,respectively.Moreover,the decrease of the nitrite accumulation rates lagged behind the decline of AOB numbers.%通过控制好氧区低DO浓度以及缩短好氧实际水力停留时间(actual hydraulic retention time,AHRT),在处理低C/N比实际生活污水的A2/O工艺中,成功启动并维持了短程硝化反硝化;系统亚硝酸盐积累率稳定维持在90%左右,氨氮去除率在95%以上。通过提取富集氨氧化菌(ammonia oxidizing bacteria,AOB)的基因组DNA,经两次常规PCR扩增和琼脂糖凝胶电泳,以纯化回收的DNA扩增片段作为实时荧光定量PCR检测AOB数量的DNA标准品,建立了检测AOB数量的实时荧光定量PCR标准曲线。利用实时荧光定量PCR技术比较了A2/O系统在不同运行条件及亚硝酸盐积累率情况下AOB菌群数量。结果表明,

  13. Effects of Nitriifcation Inhibitors on Soil N2O Emission and Community Structure and Abundance of Ammonia Oxidation Microorganism in Soil under Extensively ManagedPhyllostachys edulis Stands%硝化抑制剂对毛竹林土壤N2O排放和氨氧化微生物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛新伟; 程敏; 徐秋芳; 陈俊辉; 赵天心; 余晓; 李永春

    2016-01-01

    Abstract[Objective]Combined application of nitrification inhibitors and ammonium-containing fertilizers is considered an effective means for improving N utilization efficiency and reducing pollution risk. To determine effects of the use of two nitrification inhibitors:dicyandiamide(DCD)and 3, 4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate(DMPP),separately,on N2O emission,nitrogen transformation rate, and community structure and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria(AOB)and ammonia-oxidizing archaea(AOA)in soils applied with ammonium-containing fertilizers.[Method]An in-lab incubation test was conducted of soil samples collected from an extensively managedPhyllostachys edulis plantation. The soil samples were subjected to six treatments,separately,that is(1)CK(no fertilizer);(2) Urea(Urea);(3)Urea + 1% DMPP(1% of Urea in quantity);(4)Urea + 1.5% DMPP;(5) Urea + 10% DCD;(6)Urea + 15% DCD. Dynamics of N2O emissionand soil parameters at the time of N2O emissionturning point(10 d,50 d and 90 d)were determined.[Result]Results show that both of the two nitrification inhibitors greatly reduced N2O emission during the 160 days of incubation. The reduction rate in Treatments Urea + DMPP(both 1% and 1.5%),Treatment Urea +10% DCD,and Treatment Urea +15% DCD was 54%,28%,and 41%,respectively. Significant differences were found in cumulative emission of N2O(p<0.05)between the treatments,but not between the two Urea + DMPP treatments. The treatments in which urea was combined with nitrification inhibitors were similar to Treatment CK in N2O emission rate during the first 40 days of incubation,and then the formers began to rise gradually with the incubation going on and exceeded CK. Significantly lower N2O cumulative emission was observed in Treatment Urea +15% DCD than in Treatment Urea +10% DCD. Soil NH4+-N levels due to urea application increased rapidly to a maximum and then decreased gradually,with Treatment Ureabeing lower than all the urea + inhibitor treatments on D50 and D90 of

  14. Freezing avoidance by supercooling in Olea europaea cultivars: the role of apoplastic water, solute content and cell wall rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Nadia S; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    Plants can avoid freezing damage by preventing extracellular ice formation below the equilibrium freezing temperature (supercooling). We used Olea europaea cultivars to assess which traits contribute to avoid ice nucleation at sub-zero temperatures. Seasonal leaf water relations, non-structural carbohydrates, nitrogen and tissue damage and ice nucleation temperatures in different plant parts were determined in five cultivars growing in the Patagonian cold desert. Ice seeding in roots occurred at higher temperatures than in stems and leaves. Leaves of cold acclimated cultivars supercooled down to -13 °C, substantially lower than the minimum air temperatures observed in the study site. During winter, leaf ice nucleation and leaf freezing damage (LT50 ) occurred at similar temperatures, typical of plant tissues that supercool. Higher leaf density and cell wall rigidity were observed during winter, consistent with a substantial acclimation to sub-zero temperatures. Larger supercooling capacity and lower LT50 were observed in cold-acclimated cultivars with higher osmotically active solute content, higher tissue elastic adjustments and lower apoplastic water. Irreversible leaf damage was only observed in laboratory experiments at very low temperatures, but not in the field. A comparative analysis of closely related plants avoids phylogenetic independence bias in a comparative study of adaptations to survive low temperatures.

  15. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Olea europaea L. to Identify Genes Involved in the Development of the Pollen Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Iaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In olive (Olea europaea L., the processes controlling self-incompatibility are still unclear and the molecular basis underlying this process are still not fully characterized. In order to determine compatibility relationships, using next-generation sequencing techniques and a de novo transcriptome assembly strategy, we show that pollen tubes from different olive plants, grown in vitro in a medium containing its own pistil and in combination pollen/pistil from self-sterile and self-fertile cultivars, have a distinct gene expression profile and many of the differentially expressed sequences between the samples fall within gene families involved in the development of the pollen tube, such as lipase, carboxylesterase, pectinesterase, pectin methylesterase, and callose synthase. Moreover, different genes involved in signal transduction, transcription, and growth are overrepresented. The analysis also allowed us to identify members in actin and actin depolymerization factor and fibrin gene family and member of the Ca2+ binding gene family related to the development and polarization of pollen apical tip. The whole transcriptomic analysis, through the identification of the differentially expressed transcripts set and an extended functional annotation analysis, will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of pollen germination and pollen tube growth in the olive.

  16. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Olea europaea L. to Identify Genes Involved in the Development of the Pollen Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, Domenico; Chiappetta, Adriana; Muzzalupo, Innocenzo

    2016-01-01

    In olive (Olea europaea L.), the processes controlling self-incompatibility are still unclear and the molecular basis underlying this process are still not fully characterized. In order to determine compatibility relationships, using next-generation sequencing techniques and a de novo transcriptome assembly strategy, we show that pollen tubes from different olive plants, grown in vitro in a medium containing its own pistil and in combination pollen/pistil from self-sterile and self-fertile cultivars, have a distinct gene expression profile and many of the differentially expressed sequences between the samples fall within gene families involved in the development of the pollen tube, such as lipase, carboxylesterase, pectinesterase, pectin methylesterase, and callose synthase. Moreover, different genes involved in signal transduction, transcription, and growth are overrepresented. The analysis also allowed us to identify members in actin and actin depolymerization factor and fibrin gene family and member of the Ca(2+) binding gene family related to the development and polarization of pollen apical tip. The whole transcriptomic analysis, through the identification of the differentially expressed transcripts set and an extended functional annotation analysis, will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of pollen germination and pollen tube growth in the olive.

  17. Salicornia europaea L. Na⁺/H⁺ antiporter gene improves salt tolerance in transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L Q; Niu, Y D; Huridu, H; Hao, J F; Qi, Z; Hasi, A

    2014-07-24

    In order to obtain a salt-tolerant perennial alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), we transferred the halophyte Salicornia europaea L. Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene, SeNHX1, to alfalfa by using the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. The transformants were confirmed by both PCR and RT-PCR analyses. Of 197 plants that were obtained after transformation, 36 were positive by PCR analysis using 2 primer pairs for the CaMV35S-SeNHX1 and SeNHX1-Nos fragments; 6 plants survived in a greenhouse. RT-PCR analysis revealed that SeNHX1 was expressed in 5 plants. The resultant transgenic alfalfa had better salt tolerance. After stress treatment for 21 days with 0.6% NaCl, the chlorophyll and MDA contents in transgenic plants were lower, but proline content and SOD, POD, and CAT activities were higher than those in wild-type plants. These results suggest that the salt tolerance of transgenic alfalfa was improved by the overexpression of the SeNHX1 gene.

  18. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase from the Manzanilla cultivar (Olea europaea pomiformis) and prevention of browning reactions in bruised olive fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia-Bravo, Kharla A; Jarén-Galan, Manuel; García-García, Pedro; Garrido-Fernandez, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    The crude extract of the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme from the Manzanilla cultivar (Olea europaea pomiformis) was obtained, and its properties were characterized. The browning reaction followed a zero-order kinetic model. Its maximum activity was at pH 6.0. This activity was completely inhibited at a pH below 3.0 regardless of temperature; however, in alkaline conditions, pH inhibition depended on temperature and was observed at values above 9.0 and 11.0 at 8 and 25 degrees C, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of substrate oxidation depended on pH within the range in which activity was observed. The reaction occurred according to an isokinetic system because pH affected the enzymatic reaction rate but not the energy required to carry out the reaction. In the alkaline pH region, browning was due to a combination of enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions that occurred in parallel. These results correlated well with the browning behavior observed in intentionally bruised fruits at different temperatures and in different storage solutions. The use of a low temperature ( approximately 8 degrees C) was very effective for preventing browning regardless of the cover solution used.

  19. Isolation and partial characterization of a highly divergent lineage of hantavirus from the European mole (Talpa europaea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Se Hun; Kumar, Mukesh; Sikorska, Beata; Hejduk, Janusz; Markowski, Janusz; Markowski, Marcin; Liberski, Paweł P; Yanagihara, Richard

    2016-02-19

    Genetically distinct hantaviruses have been identified in five species of fossorial moles (order Eulipotyphla, family Talpidae) from Eurasia and North America. Here, we report the isolation and partial characterization of a highly divergent hantavirus, named Nova virus (NVAV), from lung tissue of a European mole (Talpa europaea), captured in central Poland in August 2013. Typical hantavirus-like particles, measuring 80-120 nm in diameter, were found in NVAV-infected Vero E6 cells by transmission electron microscopy. Whole-genome sequences of the isolate, designated NVAV strain Te34, were identical to that amplified from the original lung tissue, and phylogenetic analysis of the full-length L, M and S segments, using maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods, showed that NVAV was most closely related to hantaviruses harbored by insectivorous bats, consistent with an ancient evolutionary origin. Infant Swiss Webster mice, inoculated with NVAV by the intraperitoneal route, developed weight loss and hyperactivity, beginning at 16 days, followed by hind-limb paralysis and death. High NVAV RNA copies were detected in lung, liver, kidney, spleen and brain by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Neuropathological examination showed astrocytic and microglial activation and neuronal loss. The first mole-borne hantavirus isolate will facilitate long-overdue studies on its infectivity and pathogenic potential in humans.

  20. Nutrition metabolism plays an important role in the alternate bearing of the olive tree (Olea europaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Turktas

    Full Text Available The olive tree (Olea europaea L. is widely known for its strong tendency for alternate bearing, which severely affects the fruit yield from year to year. Microarray based gene expression analysis using RNA from olive samples (on-off years leaves and ripe-unripe fruits are particularly useful to understand the molecular mechanisms influencing the periodicity in the olive tree. Thus, we carried out genome wide transcriptome analyses involving different organs and temporal stages of the olive tree using the NimbleGen Array containing 136,628 oligonucleotide probe sets. Cluster analyses of the genes showed that cDNAs originated from different organs could be sorted into separate groups. The nutritional control had a particularly remarkable impact on the alternate bearing of olive, as shown by the differential expression of transcripts under different temporal phases and organs. Additionally, hormonal control and flowering processes also played important roles in this phenomenon. Our analyses provide further insights into the transcript changes between "on year" and "off year" leaves along with the changes from unrpipe to ripe fruits, which shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the olive tree alternate bearing. These findings have important implications for the breeding and agriculture of the olive tree and other crops showing periodicity. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the development and use of an olive array to document the gene expression profiling associated with the alternate bearing in olive tree.

  1. Valuable Nutrients and Functional Bioactives in Different Parts of Olive (Olea europaea L.—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazamid Saari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Olive tree (Olea europaea L., a native of the Mediterranean basin and parts of Asia, is now widely cultivated in many other parts of the world for production of olive oil and table olives. Olive is a rich source of valuable nutrients and bioactives of medicinal and therapeutic interest. Olive fruit contains appreciable concentration, 1–3% of fresh pulp weight, of hydrophilic (phenolic acids, phenolic alchohols, flavonoids and secoiridoids and lipophilic (cresols phenolic compounds that are known to possess multiple biological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, antidyslipidemic, cardiotonic, laxative, and antiplatelet. Other important compounds present in olive fruit are pectin, organic acids, and pigments. Virgin olive oil (VOO, extracted mechanically from the fruit, is also very popular for its nutritive and health-promoting potential, especially against cardiovascular disorders due to the presence of high levels of monounsaturates and other valuable minor components such as phenolics, phytosterols, tocopherols, carotenoids, chlorophyll and squalene. The cultivar, area of production, harvest time, and the processing techniques employed are some of the factors shown to influence the composition of olive fruit and olive oil. This review focuses comprehensively on the nutrients and high-value bioactives profile as well as medicinal and functional aspects of different parts of olives and its byproducts. Various factors affecting the composition of this food commodity of medicinal value are also discussed.

  2. Caracterización histoquimica de la etapa temprana del desarrollo del fruto del olivo (Olea europaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa Maria José Pinheiro

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia el desarrollo a nivel histoquimico de la etapa temprana del fruto del olivo (Olea europaea L. variedad Picual, vigorosa y elevado rendimiento graso. Para ello, se utilizaron flores de olivo recién fecundadas y también com tres, siete y diez días tras la fecundación. Hemos utilizado tinción com "Sudan Black", para hacer un seguimiento de los lípidos en las diferentes etapas de desarrollo del fruto del olivo. Como resultado se puede decir que en la etapa temprana del desarrollo del fruto, el exocarpo se presenta rico en lípidos en todas las etapas de estudio. El mesocarpo y el embrión presentan tinción no homogénea, o sea, hay algunas regiones de ellos que presentan lipidos, mientras que la zona vascular del mesocarpo y el endocarpo se presentan libre de tinción y la zona vascular del embrión se mantiene rica en lipidos.

  3. Endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria associated with the roots of the halophyte Salicornia europaea L. - community structure and metabolic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Sonia; Płociniczak, Tomasz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of our study was to assess density and diversity of rhizosphere (R) and endophytic (E) microorganisms associated with the halophyte S. europaea. Microorganisms were isolated from two saline sites (S1: 55dSm(-1), anthropogenic origin; S2: 112dSm(-1), natural salinity) located in central Poland and compared with microbial populations in the soil (S) using culture-independent (phospholipid fatty acids analysis, PLFA) and culture-dependent techniques. The endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria were identified and screened for nifH and acdS genes, and their metabolic properties were assessed. Strains with the potential to promote plant growth were selected for further study. PLFA analysis revealed that Gram-negative bacteria were dominant at both saline test sites; the total microbial biomass depended on the site (S1E>S). In contrast, culture-dependent techniques revealed that Gram-positive bacteria (Actinobacteria and Firmicutes) were dominant (S1: E-77.3%, R-86.3% and S2: E-59.1%, R-87.5%). Proteobacteria were observed in the rhizosphere at the lowest frequency (S1: 13.7% and S2: 12.5%). Greater salinity decreased the range and specificity of metabolic activity among the endophytes. These conditions also resulted in a broader spectrum of metabolic abilities in rhizobacteria; however, these metabolic processes were present at lower levels.

  4. Sustainability, Innovation, and Green Chemistry in the Production and Valorization of Phenolic Extracts from Olea europaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Romani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a circular economy process based on environmentally and economically sustainable procedures which was applied to the sector of olive oil processing on an industrial scale. Olea europaea L. tissues and by-products represent a renewable and low-cost source of polyphenols, in particular hydroxytyrosol (HTyr, a naturally occurring compound well known for its biological properties. Specifically, green leaves (GL, dried leaves (DL, and pitted olive pulp were treated with water in a pneumatic extractor to obtain the corresponding polyphenolic extracts. Three standardized fractions, named Soft Extract Olea GL, Soft Extract Olea DL, and Soft Extract Olea HTyr resulted after the following two steps: a separation process carried out by membrane technology, and a concentration step performed under reduced pressure and low temperature. The polyphenolic fractions showed antiradical activity and have potential industrial applications in the food, nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, feed, and agronomic fields. Novel functionalized extracts containing hydroxytyrosol methyl carbonate (HTyr-MC were obtained from Soft Extract Olea HTyr through an innovative approach based on green chemistry procedures, which appear to be a promising tool to increase the applications of the polyphenolic extracts.

  5. 污水处理系统中硝化菌的菌群结构和动态变化%Community structures and population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria in activated sludges of wastewater treatment plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾薇; 张丽敏; 王安其; 张洁; 彭永臻; 段俊岭

    2015-01-01

    Community structures and population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria determine biological nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater. The population structures and dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in four full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were investigated in this study. Quantitative real-time PCR results showed that the abundance of AOB was in a range of 8.56×106~4.46×107cells/gMLSS, while NOB was varying in 3.37×108~1.53×109cells/gMLSS. In each processNitrospira was the dominant species of NOB. Nitrospiraabundance was obviously higher thanNitrobacter, accounting for 88% of total NOB. In the A2O process the abundances of AOB andNitrospira in winter were less than those in summer, leading to decline of biological nitrogen removal. The phylogenetic analysis of AOBamoA genes indicated that all the sequences were affiliated withgenera Nitrosomonas, among whichNitrosomonas oligotropha cluster was the dominant species, accounting for 60% of the clone libraries. The pre-dominant AOB wereNitrosomonas-likecluster andNitrosomonas europaea cluster, accounting for 29.6% and 9.1% of the clone libraries, respectively. N. europaea cluster was only found in A2O process, and reached 44.7% of total AOB in summer sample, which was a main reason causing high nitrite accumulation during summer operation of A2O process. The outcomes verified that the dominant AOB and NOB in WWTPs wasNitrosomonas and Nitrospira, respectively. Nitrifying bacteria accounted for 1%~7% of total bacteria. The abundances, relative distributions and community structures of nitrifying bacteria significantly influence the performance of biological nitrogen removal.%研究分析了4种不同工艺类型的城市污水处理厂中氨氧化细菌(AOB)和亚硝酸盐氧化细菌(NOB)的丰度及菌群结构.实时定量PCR结果表明4种工艺中AOB菌群的丰度范围为8.56×106~4.46×107cells/gMLSS;NOB菌群的丰度为3.37×108~1.53×109cells/g

  6. Boron remobilization at low boron supply in olive (Olea europaea) in relation to leaf and phloem mannitol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakopoulos, Georgios; Stavrianakou, Sotiria; Filippou, Manolis; Fasseas, Costas; Tsadilas, Christos; Drossopoulos, Ioannis; Karabourniotis, George

    2005-02-01

    For plant species in which a considerable portion of the photoassimilates are translocated in the phloem as sugar alcohols, boron is freely translocated from mature organs to growing tissues. However, the effects of decreased plant boron status on boron remobilization are poorly understood. We conducted a growth chamber experiment (CE) and a field experiment (FE) to study the effects of low boron supply on boron remobilization in olive (Olea europaea L.), a species that transports considerable amounts of mannitol in the phloem. For the CE, several physiological parameters were compared between control (B+) and boron-deficient olive plants (B-) during the expansion of new leaves. Boron remobilization was assessed by measuring boron content of selected leaves at the beginning and at the end of the CE. As expected, boron was remobilized from mature leaves to young leaves of B+ plants; however, considerable boron remobilization was also observed in B- plants, suggesting a mechanism whereby olive can sustain a minimum boron supply for growth of new tissues despite an insufficient external boron supply. Boron deficiency caused inhibition of new growth but had no effect on photosynthetic capacity per unit leaf surface area of young and mature leaves, thereby altering the carbon utilization pattern and resulting in carbon allocation to structures within the source leaves and accumulation of soluble carbohydrates. Specifically, in mature B- leaves in the CE and in B- leaves in the FE, mannitol concentration on a leaf water content basis increased by 48 and 27% respectively, compared with controls. Carbon export ability (assessed by both phloem anatomy and phloem exudate composition of FE leaves) was enhanced at low boron supply. We conclude that, at low boron supply, increased mannitol concentrations maintain boron remobilization from source leaves to boron-demanding sink leaves.

  7. Genetic diversity and relationships in olive ( Olea europaea L.) germplasm collections as determined by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaj, A.; Satovic, Z.; Rallo, L.; Trujillo, I.

    2002-09-01

    Genetic diversity studies using the RAPD technique were carried out in a set of 103 olive cultivars from the World Germplasm Bank of the Centro de Investigación y Formación Agraria (CIFA) "Alameda del Obispo" in Cordoba (Spain). A total of 126 polymorphisms (6.0 polymorphic markers per primer) out of 135 reproducible products (6.4 fragments per primer) were obtained from the 21 primers used. The number of bands per primer ranged from 4 to 11, whereas the number of polymorphic bands ranged from 3 to 10, corresponding to 83% of the amplification products. The dendrogram based on unweighted pair-group cluster analysis using Jaccard's index includes three major groups according to their origin: (1) cultivars from the Eastern and Central Mediterranean areas, (2) some Italian and Spanish cultivars, and (3) cultivars from the Western Mediterranean zone. The pattern of genetic variation among olive cultivars from three different Mediterranean zones (West, Centre and East) was analysed by means of the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Although most of the genetic diversity was attributable to differences of cultivars within Mediterranean zones (96.86%) significant phi-values among zones (phi(st) = 0.031; p < 0.001) suggested the existence of phenotypic differentiation. Furthermore, the AMOVA analysis was used to partition the phenotypic variation of Spain, Italy (Western region), Greece and Turkey (Eastern region) into four categories: among regions, among countries (within regions), within countries, and among and within countries of each region. Most of the genetic diversity was attributable to differences among genotypes within a country. These results are consistent with the predominantly allogamous nature of Olea europaea L. species. This paper indicates the importance of the study of the amount and distribution of genetic diversity for a better exploration of olive genetic resources and the design of plant breeding programmes.

  8. Identification of new polymorphic regions and differentiation of cultivated olives (Olea europaea L. through plastome sequence comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldoni Luciana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cultivated olive (Olea europaea L. is the most agriculturally important species of the Oleaceae family. Although many studies have been performed on plastid polymorphisms to evaluate taxonomy, phylogeny and phylogeography of Olea subspecies, only few polymorphic regions discriminating among the agronomically and economically important olive cultivars have been identified. The objective of this study was to sequence the entire plastome of olive and analyze many potential polymorphic regions to develop new inter-cultivar genetic markers. Results The complete plastid genome of the olive cultivar Frantoio was determined by direct sequence analysis using universal and novel PCR primers designed to amplify all overlapping regions. The chloroplast genome of the olive has an organisation and gene order that is conserved among numerous Angiosperm species and do not contain any of the inversions, gene duplications, insertions, inverted repeat expansions and gene/intron losses that have been found in the chloroplast genomes of the genera Jasminum and Menodora, from the same family as Olea. The annotated sequence was used to evaluate the content of coding genes, the extent, and distribution of repeated and long dispersed sequences and the nucleotide composition pattern. These analyses provided essential information for structural, functional and comparative genomic studies in olive plastids. Furthermore, the alignment of the olive plastome sequence to those of other varieties and species identified 30 new organellar polymorphisms within the cultivated olive. Conclusions In addition to identifying mutations that may play a functional role in modifying the metabolism and adaptation of olive cultivars, the new chloroplast markers represent a valuable tool to assess the level of olive intercultivar plastome variation for use in population genetic analysis, phylogenesis, cultivar characterisation and DNA food tracking.

  9. Immunoproteomic tools are used to identify masked allergens: Ole e 12, an allergenic isoflavone reductase from olive (Olea europaea) pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Lourdes; Crespo, Jesús F; Rodríguez, Julia; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Villalba, Mayte

    2015-12-01

    Proteins performing important biochemical activities in the olive tree (Olea europaea) pollen have been identified as allergens. One novel 37-kDa protein seems to be associated to the IgE-binding profile of a group of patients suffering allergy to peach and olive pollen. Three previously described olive pollen allergens exhibit very similar molecular mass. Our objective was to identify this allergen by using immunoproteomic approaches. After 2D-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, peptide sequences from several IgE-binding spots, allowed identifying this new allergen, as well as cloning and DNA sequencing of the corresponding gene. The allergen, named Ole e 12, is a polymorphic isoflavone reductase-like protein of 308 amino acids showing 80% and 74% identity with birch and pear allergens, Bet v 6 and Pyr c 5, respectively. A prevalence of 33% in the selected population is in contrast to 4%-10% in groups of subjects suffering from pollinosis. Recombinant allergen was produced in Escherichia coli, and deeply characterised. Immunoblotting and ELISA detection as well as inhibition experiments were performed with polyclonal antisera and allergic patients' sera. The recombinant allergen retains the IgE reactivity of its natural counterpart. Close structural and immunological relationships between members of this protein family were supported by their IgG recognition in vegetable species. In summary, Ole e 12 is a minor olive pollen allergen, which gains relevance in patients allergic to peach with olive pollinosis. Proteomic approaches used to analyse this allergen provide useful tools to identify hidden allergens, relevant for several allergic populations and thus complete allergenic panels.

  10. Assessing ambient ozone injury in olive (Olea europaea L.) plants by using the antioxidant ethylenediurea (EDU) in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basahi, J M; Ismail, I M; Haiba, N S; Hassan, I A; Lorenzini, G

    2016-06-01

    The antiozonant chemical, ethylenediurea (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)ethyl]-N'-phenylurea, abbreviated as EDU), was applied as stem injections or soil drenches to 5-year-old containerized plants of olive (Olea europaea L. cultivar Kalamata) in growth chambers in order to assess its ameliorative effects against realistic ozone (O3) stress. Visible injury symptoms were reduced greatly in individuals treated with EDU, with injection applications having greater protection than soil drenches. EDU application caused increases in the measured ecophysiological parameters compared to untreated individuals. In particular, the stem injection protected plants against photosynthetic impairment (unchanged net photosynthetic rates and intercellular CO2 concentration, in comparison to plants grown in filtered air). EDU application increased the protection of PSII from ambient O3 oxidative stress, although it did not retain the proportion of redox state of QA, pigment composition of photosynthetic apparatus and size of light-harvesting complex of PSII. However, the stem injection of plants with EDU induced lower non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) values in comparison to ambient air (-2 %), indicating a better photoprotection of PSII in comparison to soil drench application. EDU application caused increases in the morphological and biometric parameters compared to individuals exposed to ambient air. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study highlighting the protection of Kalamata olive trees due to EDU in terms of growth, yield, visible injury, and photosynthetic performance. Furthermore, this study proved that EDU could be a low-cost and a low-technology efficient tool for assessing O3 effects on plant performances in the field in Saudi Arabia.

  11. Isolation of ammonia oxidizing bacteria from near-natural wetland in Tai Lake buffer zones and its performance on ammonia degradation%太湖缓冲带近自然湿地氨氧化细菌的筛选及降解效果比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏伟伟; 叶春; 李春华; 李定龙

    2014-01-01

    以太湖缓冲带近自然湿地底泥为菌源,利用传统的富集、分离纯化等微生物手段,筛选出3株氨氧化细菌BW-1、BW-2、BW-3,检测其在富集培养液中的生长特征.测定3株细菌的16S rRNA基因序列,测序结果提交至Gen Bank进行同源性检索分析,并通过MEGA 5.0软件进行比对和系统发育分析,结果显示菌株BW-1和BW-2皆为Nitrosomonas sp.,BW-3为Nitrobacter sp..缓冲带近自然湿地中的NH4+-N属于低污染范畴,最高为2.11mg/L.以10%(体积分数)接种量接入约5mg/L的NH4+-N废水中培养12d,定量检测结果显示菌株BW-3去除效果最好,NH4+-N去除率为73.86%,菌株BW-1对NH4+-N降解效果略差于BW-3,去除率为73.42%,菌株BW-2对NH4+-N降解效果最差,去除率仅为34.11%.

  12. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea from high artic soils

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Ricardo Jorge Eloy

    2011-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Microbiologia Aplicada). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2011 As regiões árcticas e boreais cobrem 22% da superfície terrestre e englobam toda uma variedade de ecossistemas particularmente sensíveis a alterações ambientais, entre ecossistemas terrestres (Chapin III et al., 2000; Sala et al., 2000). O Árctico está actualmente a sofrer alterações dramáticas, previstas de aumentar drasticamente durante o presente século em resultado do aumento das te...

  13. Formation of hydroxylamine on dust grains via ammonia oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiao; Lemaire, Jean-Louis; Garrod, Robin T

    2015-01-01

    The quest to detect prebiotic molecules in space, notably amino acids, requires an understanding of the chemistry involving nitrogen atoms. Hydroxylamine (NH$_2$OH) is considered a precursor to the amino acid glycine. Although not yet detected, NH$_2$OH is considered a likely target of detection with ALMA. We report on an experimental investigation of the formation of hydroxylamine on an amorphous silicate surface via the oxidation of ammonia. The experimental data are then fed into a simulation of the formation of NH$_2$OH in dense cloud conditions. On ices at 14 K and with a modest activation energy barrier, NH$_2$OH is found to be formed with an abundance that never falls below a factor 10 with respect to NH$_3$. Suggestions of conditions for future observations are provided.

  14. FORMATION OF HYDROXYLAMINE ON DUST GRAINS VIA AMMONIA OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco [Physics Department, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Lemaire, Jean-Louis [Paris Observatory, F-75014 Paris (France); Garrod, Robin T., E-mail: gvidali@syr.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    The quest to detect prebiotic molecules in space, notably amino acids, requires an understanding of the chemistry involving nitrogen atoms. Hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) is considered a precursor to the amino acid glycine. Although not yet detected, NH{sub 2}OH is considered a likely target of detection with ALMA. We report on an experimental investigation of the formation of hydroxylamine on an amorphous silicate surface via the oxidation of ammonia. The experimental data are then fed into a simulation of the formation of NH{sub 2}OH in dense cloud conditions. On ices at 14 K and with a modest activation energy barrier, NH{sub 2}OH is found to be formed with an abundance that never falls below a factor 10 with respect to NH{sub 3}. Suggestions of conditions for future observations are provided.

  15. Hotspots of anaerobic ammonia oxidation in land - freshwater interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Wang, Weidong;

    2013-01-01

    For decades, the conversion of organic nitrogen to dinitrogen gas by heterotrophic bacteria, termed heterotrophic denitrification, was assumed to be the main pathway of nitrogen loss in natural ecosystems. Recently, however, autotrophic bacteria have been shown to oxidize ammonium in the absence...... of oxygen, yielding dinitrogen gas. This process, termed anammox, accounts for over 50% of nitrogen loss in marine ecosystems1–5. However, the significance of anammox in freshwater ecosystems has remained uncertain 6,7. Here, we use molecular and isotopic techniques to monitor anammox activity in sediments...

  16. Anaerobic ammonia oxidation in a fertilized paddy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Wang, Yu;

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a paddy field was obtained in Southern China using an isotope-pairing technique, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil cores. A paddy field with a high load of slurry manure as fertilizer...

  17. Ammonia oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yu; Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt;

    2016-01-01

    were interpreted in terms of a detailed chemical kinetic model. The rate constant for the reaction of the important intermediate H2NO with O2 was determined from ab initio calculations to be 2.3 × 102 T2.994 exp (−9510 K/T) cm3 mol−1 s−1. The agreement between experimental results and model work...

  18. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi mushroom) or Olea europaea (olive) leaves on oxidative stability of rabbit meat fortified with n-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebušak, Tina; Levart, Alenka; Salobir, Janez; Pirman, Tatjana

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi mushroom) or Olea europaea (olive tree) leaves on oxidative stability of rabbit meat fortified with n-3 fatty acids. Forty-eight slovenska kunka (SIKA) rabbits were divided into four homogeneous groups. The control group (CONT-) received diet with 6% palm fat; other groups received diet with 6% linseed oil and were either unsupplemented (CONT+) or supplemented with 1% of G. lucidum (REISHI) or O. europaea leaves (OLIVE). Rabbits were slaughtered and fatty acid composition, concentration of vitamin E and malondialdehyde (MDA) in back muscle were analyzed. The results showed that linseed oil addition improved fatty acid composition by increasing polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) proportion, decreasing proportion of saturated fatty acid (SFA) and reducing n-6/n-3 ratio in rabbit meat. Groups that were supplemented with linseed oil had lower content of α-tocopherol and higher content of γ-tocopherol, compared to the CONT- group. The addition of potential antioxidants did not effectively prevent oxidation of rabbit meat.

  19. Partial Root-Zone Drying of Olive (Olea europaea var. 'Chetoui') Induces Reduced Yield under Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbara, Soumaya; Haworth, Matthew; Emiliani, Giovani; Ben Mimoun, Mehdi; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of olive trees in arid and semi-arid environments is closely linked to irrigation. It is necessary to improve the efficiency of irrigation techniques to optimise the amount of olive fruit produced in relation to the volume of water used. Partial root-zone drying (PRD) is a water saving irrigation technique that theoretically allows the production of a root-to-shoot signal that modifies the physiology of the above-ground parts of the plant; specifically reducing stomatal conductance (gs) and improving water use efficiency (WUE). Partial root-zone drying has been successfully applied under field conditions to woody and non-woody crops; yet the few previous trials with olive trees have produced contrasting results. Thirty year-old olive trees (Olea europaea 'var. Chetoui') in a Tunisian grove were exposed to four treatments from May to October for three-years: 'control' plants received 100% of the potential evapotranspirative demand (ETc) applied to the whole root-zone; 'PRD100' were supplied with an identical volume of water to the control plants alternated between halves of the root-zone every ten-days; 'PRD50' were given 50% of ETc to half of the root-system, and; 'rain-fed' plants received no supplementary irrigation. Allowing part of the root-zone to dry resulted in reduced vegetative growth and lower yield: PRD100 decreased yield by ~47% during productive years. During the less productive years of the alternate bearing cycle, irrigation had no effect on yield; this suggests that withholding of water during 'off-years' may enhance the effectiveness of irrigation over a two-year cycle. The amount and quality of oil within the olive fruit was unaffected by the irrigation treatment. Photosynthesis declined in the PRD50 and rain-fed trees due to greater diffusive limitations and reduced biochemical uptake of CO2. Stomatal conductance and the foliar concentration of abscisic acid (ABA) were not altered by PRD100 irrigation, which may indicate the

  20. Partial Root-Zone Drying of Olive (Olea europaea var. 'Chetoui' Induces Reduced Yield under Field Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Dbara

    Full Text Available The productivity of olive trees in arid and semi-arid environments is closely linked to irrigation. It is necessary to improve the efficiency of irrigation techniques to optimise the amount of olive fruit produced in relation to the volume of water used. Partial root-zone drying (PRD is a water saving irrigation technique that theoretically allows the production of a root-to-shoot signal that modifies the physiology of the above-ground parts of the plant; specifically reducing stomatal conductance (gs and improving water use efficiency (WUE. Partial root-zone drying has been successfully applied under field conditions to woody and non-woody crops; yet the few previous trials with olive trees have produced contrasting results. Thirty year-old olive trees (Olea europaea 'var. Chetoui' in a Tunisian grove were exposed to four treatments from May to October for three-years: 'control' plants received 100% of the potential evapotranspirative demand (ETc applied to the whole root-zone; 'PRD100' were supplied with an identical volume of water to the control plants alternated between halves of the root-zone every ten-days; 'PRD50' were given 50% of ETc to half of the root-system, and; 'rain-fed' plants received no supplementary irrigation. Allowing part of the root-zone to dry resulted in reduced vegetative growth and lower yield: PRD100 decreased yield by ~47% during productive years. During the less productive years of the alternate bearing cycle, irrigation had no effect on yield; this suggests that withholding of water during 'off-years' may enhance the effectiveness of irrigation over a two-year cycle. The amount and quality of oil within the olive fruit was unaffected by the irrigation treatment. Photosynthesis declined in the PRD50 and rain-fed trees due to greater diffusive limitations and reduced biochemical uptake of CO2. Stomatal conductance and the foliar concentration of abscisic acid (ABA were not altered by PRD100 irrigation, which may

  1. Polyphenols from leaves of Olea europaea%油橄榄叶多酚类成分研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓飞; 李辰; 郑媛媛; 邸多隆

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究油橄榄Olea europaea的多酚类成分.方法 利用硅胶柱色谱手段,结合波谱方法分离鉴定油橄榄叶中的多酚类化合物.结果 从油橄榄叶醋酸乙酯部位中分离得到15个多酚类化合物,分别鉴定为:酪醇(1)、羟基酪醇(2)、羟基酪醇乙酰酯(3)、1H-2-苯并吡喃-6,7-二醇(4)、3,4-二羟基苯甲酸(5)、3-羟基-4-甲氧基苯甲酸(6)、异鼠李素(7)、圣草酚(8)、花旗松素(9)、槲皮素(10)、木犀草素(11)、女贞苷(12)、橄榄苦苷(13)、芹菜素-7-O-葡萄糖苷(14)、木犀草素-7-O-葡萄糖苷(15).结论 化合物4~9为首次从该种植物中分离得到.%Objective To study the polyphenols from the leaves of Olea europaea.Methods The polyphenols from ethyl acetate fraction were separated and purified by silica chromatographic method and identified by spectroscopic analysis.Results In combination with the data from literatures, the structure of 15 polyphenols had been elucidated on the basis of various spectroscopic methods, including tyrosol (1), hydroxytyrosol (2), hydroxytyrosol acetate (3), 1H-2-benzopyran-6,7-diol (4), 3,4-dihydroxyl-benzoic acid (5), 3-methoxyl-4-hydroxyl benzoic acid (6), isorhamnetin (7), eriodictyol (8), taxifolin (9), quercetin (10), luteolin (11),ligstroside (12), oleuropein (13), apigenin-7-O-glucoside (14), and luteolin-7-O-glucoside (15).Conclusion Compounds 4-9 are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  2. A review on regulation methods of nitrite oxidizing bacteria in one-stage anaerobic ammonia oxidation process%一段式厌氧氨氧化工艺亚硝酸盐氧化菌抑制方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢丽; 殷紫; 尹志轩; 王悦超; 周琪

    2016-01-01

    近年来,厌氧氨氧化工艺(anaerobic ammonium oxidation, Anammox)作为一种新型的脱氮技术,由于其耗能少、效率高而被应用于高氨氮废水的处理中。然而,实际运行的厌氧氨氧化工程中有时会出现亚硝酸盐氧化菌(nitrite oxidizing bacteria, NOB)大量繁殖的情况,导致硝酸盐积累,脱氮效率下降。在一段式 Anammox 反应器中,通过控制某些影响因素,如调节体系中的溶解氧,控制游离氨和游离亚硝酸的浓度,调控碳源浓度以及外加中间产物(N2H4、NO 和 NH2OH)等方式,能够在维持 Anammox 工艺脱氮效率的同时有效抑制 NOB。除了系统地综述一段式 Anammox 工艺中 NOB 抑制手段以外,将进一步讨论实际 Anammox 工程应用中抑制 NOB 大量繁殖行之有效的手段。%In recent years,anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox), a new technology for nitrogen removal, has been used in the treatment of high-strength ammonia wastewater due to its low energy consumption and high treatment efficiency. Whereas, the accumulation of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) often occurs in full-scale Anammox process, leading to the accumulation of nitrate and deterioration of nitrogen removal effectiveness. In two-stage Anammox processes, NOB accumulation often occurs in partial nitritation stage, the inhibition of which has been discussed in details. While in one-stage Anammox process, NOB accumulation is more common and fatal due to the complexity brought by the coexistence of functional bacteria like ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), NOB, anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) and denitrifiers. It has been reported that NOB could be effectively suppressed in the one-stage Anammox process by some methods, e.g. regulating dissolved oxygen, altering the free ammonia and free nitrous acid concentration, adjusting carbon source and adding externally intermediate products (N2H4, NO, NH2OH), etc. The regulation methods

  3. 抗盐碱转基因大豆对根际与非根际土壤氨氧化古菌多样性的影响%Effects of Salinization Resistence Transgenic Soybeans (SRTS) on the Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea(AOA ) in Rhizosphere Soil and Non-rhizosphere Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋立娟; 王宏燕; 李传宝; 刘佳宾; 刘朴方

    2011-01-01

    采用PCR-DGGE技术,研究了抗盐碱转基因大豆(SRTS)对根际与非根际土壤氨氧化古菌(AOA)群落多样性的影响.结果表明,在非根际土壤中,SRTS的氨氧化古菌DGGE条带数、多样性指数显著高于其受体亲本黑农35和其他两种大豆处理,而均匀度指数较低;在根际土壤中,SRTS的DGGE条带数和多样性指数均高于其受体亲本,但并不显著,其均匀度指数则显著高于其他处理;每种大豆自身根际与非根际比较显示,SRTS非根际氨氧化古菌DGGE条带数、多样性指数明显高于根际,均匀度指数却低于根际,而其受体亲本与其他两个处理反之.聚类分析结果表明,SRTS的DGGE带谱与其他大豆处理差异较大,且自身非根际与根际处理差异显著,与其受体亲本黑农35相似性很低.测序结果表明,在SRTS处理中特有条带12、15和优势条带13、14均属于Uncultured crenarchaeote.在盐碱土壤生态系统中,SRTS提高了非根际土壤氨氧化古菌群落的多样性,但对根际土壤中氨氧化古菌的群落多样性有一定的抑制作用.%The use and development of genetically modified soybeans has been a topic of considerable public debate in recent years. The majority of studies addressing potential risks of soybeans cultivation have addressed only aboveground effects. But, recent methodological advances in soil microbial have allowed research focus to move underground to try to gain knowledge of soybeans-driven effects on the micro-bial communities and processes in soil system. In order to deeply understand the effect of salinization insistence transgenic soybeans( SRTS ) on the diversity of rhizosphere ammonia oxidizing archae( AOA) and non-rhizosphere AOA in saline-alkali soil system, PCR-DGGE cloning was used. The main conclusions were shown as follow:The results of DCGE fingerprint showed that the AOA bands' number and the diversity indexes of SRTS in rhizosphere soil and non-rhizosphere soil were all

  4. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7, an indigenous root endophyte from olive (Olea europaea L.) and effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Pedro Manuel; Ruano-Rosa, David; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Prieto, Pilar; Ramos, Cayo; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 is a native endophyte of olive roots. Previous studies have shown this motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacterium is an effective biocontrol agent against the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae, the causal agent of one of the most devastating diseases for olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivation. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 consisting of a circular chromosome of 6,136,735 bp that encodes 5,567 protein-coding genes and 88 RNA-only encoding genes. Genome analysis revealed genes predicting factors such as secretion systems, siderophores, detoxifying compounds or volatile components. Further analysis of the genome sequence of PICF7 will help in gaining insights into biocontrol and endophytism.

  5. The efficacy of kaolin particle film on oil quality indices of olive trees (Olea europaea L.) cv 'Zard' grown under warm and semi-arid region of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleghi, Esmaeil; Arzani, Kazem; Moallemi, Norollah; Barzegar, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Kaolin particle film (0%, 3% and 6%; w/v), as an antitranspirant treatment, was applied to mature 'Zard' olive trees (Olea europaea L.). Olive oil was extracted from harvested fruit and fatty acid composition and other oil quality indices of the fruit assessed over crop seasons. Kaolin increased chlorophyll and carotenoid contents, but decreased peroxide and iodine values, and UV absorbance extinction coefficients, of the oil. The highest palmitic acid was observed in the oil obtained from untreated trees (17%). Kaolin increased oleic acid up to 65% and 64% in the first and second crop seasons, respectively, but decreased linoleic and linolenic acid contents. Monounsaturated acids (65%) and oleic acid/linoleic acid ratios (4) were higher in oil obtained from kaolin treated than untreated trees. Therefore it can be expected that extracted olive oil from kaolin treated trees has a higher oxidative stability and shelf life than untreated trees.

  6. Trocas gasosas influenciam na morfogênese in vitro de duas cultivares de oliveira (Olea europaea L. Gas exchange affects in vitro morphogenesis of two olive cultivars (Olea europaea L.

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    Marcos Vinícius Marques Pinheiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram estabelecer in vitro as cultivares de oliveira 'Arbequina' e 'Maria da Fé' e avaliar a influência das tampas com membranas permeáveis a gases na morfogênese in vitro dessas cultivares. Inocularam-se segmentos nodais com gemas previamente descontaminadas pelo protocolo aqui desenvolvido. Utilizaram-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado (DIC em esquema fatorial 2³, duas cultivares; dois meios de cultura OM (Olive medium (OM + 20 µM de zeatina [1]; e OM + 20 µM de zeatina + 10 µM de GA3 [2]; dois tipos de vedação (tampa rígida sem orifício e com membrana porosa com cinco repetições/ tratamento; e a unidade experimental constituída por quatro tubos de ensaio. Avaliaram-se: a porcentagem de contaminação total; a porcentagem de contaminação fúngica e bacteriana; o número de gemas intumescidas; o número de brotos; e a porcentagem de oxidação. Aos 30 dias de cultivo, constatou-se a contaminação de 15% e 8,8% dos explantes de 'Arbequina' e 'Maria da Fé', respectivamente. Em 'Arbequina', 33,3% e 66,7% ocorreram por contaminação fúngica e bacteriana, respectivamente. Em 'Maria da Fé', 28,6% e 71,4% decorreram de contaminação fúngica e bacteriana, respectivamente. O número de gemas foi superior (pThe objectives of this work were to establish cultivars of Olea europaea L., namely 'Arbequina' and 'Maria da Fé', and to evaluate the influence of gas exchange on in vitro morphogenesis of these cultivars. Under aseptic conditions, single-bud nodal segments were previously decontaminated using disinfestation protocol developed in this work. The treatments followed a completely randomized design, in a 2³ factorial scheme: two cultivars and two olive (Olive medium culture media (OM (OM + 20 µ M zeatin [1]; and OM + 20 µ M zeatin + 10 µM GA3 [2]; and two types of sealing (rigid lid without orifice and porous membrane in five repetitions/treatment. The experimental unit consisted of four

  7. Partial Root-Zone Drying of Olive (Olea europaea var. 'Chetoui') Induces Reduced Yield under Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbara, Soumaya; Haworth, Matthew; Emiliani, Giovani; Ben Mimoun, Mehdi; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of olive trees in arid and semi-arid environments is closely linked to irrigation. It is necessary to improve the efficiency of irrigation techniques to optimise the amount of olive fruit produced in relation to the volume of water used. Partial root-zone drying (PRD) is a water saving irrigation technique that theoretically allows the production of a root-to-shoot signal that modifies the physiology of the above-ground parts of the plant; specifically reducing stomatal conductance (gs) and improving water use efficiency (WUE). Partial root-zone drying has been successfully applied under field conditions to woody and non-woody crops; yet the few previous trials with olive trees have produced contrasting results. Thirty year-old olive trees (Olea europaea ‘var. Chetoui’) in a Tunisian grove were exposed to four treatments from May to October for three-years: ‘control’ plants received 100% of the potential evapotranspirative demand (ETc) applied to the whole root-zone; ‘PRD100’ were supplied with an identical volume of water to the control plants alternated between halves of the root-zone every ten-days; ‘PRD50’ were given 50% of ETc to half of the root-system, and; ‘rain-fed’ plants received no supplementary irrigation. Allowing part of the root-zone to dry resulted in reduced vegetative growth and lower yield: PRD100 decreased yield by ~47% during productive years. During the less productive years of the alternate bearing cycle, irrigation had no effect on yield; this suggests that withholding of water during ‘off-years’ may enhance the effectiveness of irrigation over a two-year cycle. The amount and quality of oil within the olive fruit was unaffected by the irrigation treatment. Photosynthesis declined in the PRD50 and rain-fed trees due to greater diffusive limitations and reduced biochemical uptake of CO2. Stomatal conductance and the foliar concentration of abscisic acid (ABA) were not altered by PRD100 irrigation

  8. Effects of Withering of Cyanobacteria Bloom on Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizing ;Bacteria in Surface Lake Sediments%蓝藻水华消亡对湖泊表层沉积物中氨氧化细菌丰度和群落结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄睿; 沈烽; 罗娟; 王司辰; 唐启彤; 徐慧敏; 吴燕; 赵大勇

    2015-01-01

    为探索蓝藻水华消亡对湖泊表层沉积物中氨氧化细菌( ammonia⁃oxidizing bacteria,AOB)的影响,设计了室内沉积物-水微宇宙模拟体系,体系中分别添加野外收集蓝藻和室内培养蓝藻,运用荧光定量PCR和克隆建库等分子生物学方法分析氨氧化细菌的丰度、群落结构和多样性。结果表明:(1)添加蓝藻处理组的氨氧化细菌丰度和群落多样性高于未添加蓝藻的空白对照组;(2)属于亚硝化单胞菌属( Nitrosomonas)的N. oligotropha类群在表层沉积物的氨氧化细菌中占有绝对优势,相对丰度达75%;(3)与空白对照组相比,添加蓝藻处理组的氨氧化细菌中新出现了N. communis和Nitrosospira类群。添加蓝藻会提高沉积物中氨氧化细菌的丰度并增加其群落多样性。%A simulation system was constructed to investigate effect of withering of Cyanobacteria bloom on abundance and community composition of ammonia⁃oxidizing bacteria ( AOB) in surface sediments. The system consisted of three treat⁃ments, [i.e. (1) CK, (2) addition of lab⁃cultured Cyanobacteria and (3) addition of wild Cyanobacteria collected from a lake] . Abundance, community composition and diversity of AOB were analyzed with the real⁃time qPCR and molecular bi⁃ological methods, like clone library, etc.. Results show that (1) Treatments 2 and 3 were much higher than Treatment 1 in abundance and community diversity of AOB;( 2) N. oligotropha group of Nitrosomonas was the dominant AOB group, ac⁃counting for approximately 75% of the total AOB community in the surface sediments;and ( 3) Compared to Treatment 1, Treatments 2 and 3 were found to have some new AOB groups, such as N. communis and Nitrosospira. The findings indi⁃cate that N. oligotropha is absolutely the dominant group in all the treatments, and withering of Cyanobacteria bloom may improve AOB in the surface lake sediments in both abundance and

  9. Polen atmosférico de Olea europaea L. en Madrid (Ciudad Universitaria y Aranjuez durante los años 1994-1997

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    Sáenz Laín, Concepción

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of four years of study (1994-1997 of the atmospheric levéis of pollen from Olea europaea L. in Madrid and Aranjuez are presented. The principal pollination period (PPP for each year and each season were calculated, using the mean daily concentrations, and fell between weeks 16 and 26, with maximum daily valúes registered between 3rd May and 7th June. The presence of olive pollen was greater in Aranjuez than in Madrid (mean 3,307 grains of pollen/year and 2,123 grains/year, respectively. The pollen season was similar in each locality. A preliminary comparison of pollen data with temperature and precipitation seems to indicates that accumulated pre-season temperatures, but not rainfall, can have decisive influence on the initiation of pollination. His nuclear what influence rainfall has on the account of pollen collected.Presentamos los resultados obtenidos durante cuatro años de estudio (1994-1997 del contenido atmosférico de polen de Olea europaea L. en Madrid (Ciudad Universitaria y en Aranjuez. A partir de las concentraciones medias diarias, hemos calculado el Período de Polinización Principal (PPP para cada año y cada estación, que se ha producido siempre entre las semanas 16 y 26, con valores máximos diarios registrados entre el 3 de mayo y el 7 de junio. La presencia del polen de olivo ha sido mayor en Aranjuez que en Madrid (media del período, 3.307 granos de polen/año y 2.123, respectivamente. Las estación polínica transcurre de forma similar en ambas localidades. De una primera comparación de los datos polínicos con los datos de temperatura y precipitación, parece deducirse que las temperaturas acumuladas durante el período preestacional pueden tener una influencia decisiva en el inicio de la polinización, no así las precipitaciones. Tampoco parece clara su influencia sobre el total anual de polen recogido.

  10. A De novo Transcriptomic Approach to Identify Flavonoids and Anthocyanins “Switch-Off” in Olive (Olea europaea L.) Drupes at Different Stages of Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, Domenico L.; Chiappetta, Adriana; Muzzalupo, Innocenzo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights A de novo transcriptome reconstruction of olive drupes was performed in two genotypesGene expression was monitored during drupe development in two olive cultivarsTranscripts involved in flavonoid and anthocyanin pathways were analyzed in Cassanese and Leucocarpa cultivarsBoth cultivar and developmental stage impact gene expression in Olea europaea fruits. During ripening, the fruits of the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) undergo a progressive chromatic change characterized by the formation of a red-brown “spot” which gradually extends on the epidermis and in the innermost part of the mesocarp. This event finds an exception in the Leucocarpa cultivar, in which we observe a destabilized equilibrium between the metabolisms of chlorophyll and other pigments, particularly the anthocyanins whose switch-off during maturation promotes the white coloration of fruits. Despite its importance, genomic information on the olive tree is still lacking. Different RNA-seq libraries were generated from drupes of “Leucocarpa” and “Cassanese” olive genotypes, sampled at 100 and 130 days after flowering (DAF), and were used in order to identify transcripts involved in the main phenotypic changes of fruits during maturation and their corresponding expression patterns. A total of 103,359 transcripts were obtained and 3792 and 3064 were differentially expressed in “Leucocarpa” and “Cassanese” genotypes, respectively, during 100–130 DAF transition. Among them flavonoid and anthocyanin related transcripts such as phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), flavonol 3′-hydrogenase (F3′H), flavonol 3′5 ′-hydrogenase (F3′5′H), flavonol synthase (FLS), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), UDP-glucose:anthocianidin: flavonoid glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were identified. These results contribute

  11. Endophytic colonization and biocontrol performance of Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 in olive (Olea europaea L.) are determined neither by pyoverdine production nor swimming motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-González, M Mercedes; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Prieto, Pilar; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 is an indigenous inhabitant of olive (Olea europaea L.) rhizosphere, able to display endophytic lifestyle in roots, to induce a wide range of defence responses upon colonization of this organ and to exert effective biological control against Verticillium wilt of olive (VWO) (Verticillium dahliae). We aimed to evaluate the involvement of specific PICF7 phenotypes in olive root colonization and VWO biocontrol effectiveness by generating mutants impaired in swimming motility (fliI) or siderophore pyoverdine production (pvdI). Besides, the performance of mutants with diminished in vitro growth in potato dextrose agar medium (gltA) and cysteine (Cys) auxotrophy was also assessed. Results showed that olive root colonization and VWO biocontrol ability of the fliI, pvdI and gltA mutants did not significantly differ from that displayed by the parental strain PICF7. Consequently, altered in vitro growth, swimming motility and pyoverdine production contribute neither to PICF7 VWO suppressive effect nor to its colonization ability. In contrast, the Cys auxotroph mutant showed reduced olive root colonization capacity and lost full biocontrol efficacy. Moreover, confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that all mutants tested were able to endophytically colonize root tissue to the same extent as wild-type PICF7, discarding these traits as relevant for its endophytic lifestyle.

  12. Variability of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds in a segregating progeny from a single cross in Olea europaea L. and sensory and nutritional quality implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Ana G; León, Lorenzo; Pascual, Mar; Romero-Segura, Carmen; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; de la Rosa, Raúl; Sanz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Virgin olive oil phenolic compounds are responsible for its nutritional and sensory quality. The synthesis of phenolic compounds occurs when enzymes and substrates meet as olive fruit is crushed during the industrial process to obtain the oil. The genetic variability of the major phenolic compounds of virgin olive oil was studied in a progeny of the cross of Picual x Arbequina olive cultivars (Olea europaea L.). They belong to four different groups: compounds that included tyrosol or hydroxytyrosol in their molecules, lignans, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Data of phenolics in the oils showed that the progeny displayed a large degree of variability, widely transgressing the genitor levels. This high variability can be of interest on breeding programs. Thus, multivariate analysis allowed to identify genotypes within the progeny particularly interesting in terms of phenolic composition and deduced organoleptic and nutritional quality. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to obtain enough degree of variability with a single cross of olive cultivars for compounds related to the nutritional and organoleptic properties of virgin olive oil.

  13. Polyphenol oxidase and its relationship with oleuropein concentration in fruits and leaves of olive (Olea europaea) cv. 'Picual' trees during fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-García, Francisca; Blanco, Santos; Peinado, M Angeles; Peragón, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Oleuropein, the main phenolic compound of olive fruit, has important antioxidant properties that are responsible for some of the nutritional properties of fruits and the defence mechanism of leaves. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity changes during fruit ripening in many plants. We studied the kinetics and molecular properties of PPO in fruits and leaves of olive (Olea europaea L.) cv. 'Picual' trees and the relationship between PPO and oleuropein concentration during fruit ripening. Polyphenol oxidase showed hyperbolic kinetics in fruits and leaves. Significant increases in PPO specific activity, V(max), K(m )and catalytic efficiency occurred during fruit ripening. Based on SDS-PAGE under partially denaturing conditions and in-gel staining with DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, PPO activity was found in one major protein of 55 and 50 kDA in fruits and leaves, respectively. During the last stages of fruit maturation, a second 36 kDa protein was observed in fruits but not in leaves, indicating that this protein could serve as a marker of the final phase of fruit maturation. Under fully denaturing conditions, only one 27.7 kDa immunoreactive band was detected in fruits. Both the amount of PPO activity and the amount of PPO protein increased significantly during fruit maturation. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that PPO is located in the epidermis, parenchyma and companion vascular cells of leaves as well as in the epidermis of fruit. During fruit maturation, oleuropein concentration measured by HPLC significantly decreased in fruits and increased in leaves.

  14. Thermal stability of oils added with avocado (Persea americana cv. Hass) or olive (Olea europaea cv. Arbequina) leaf extracts during the French potatoes frying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Paula; García, Paula; Bustamante, Andrés; Barriga, Andrés; Robert, Paz

    2017-04-15

    Effect of the addition of avocado (Persea americana cv. Hass) or olive (Olea europaea cv. Arbequina) hydroalcoholic leaf extracts (AHE and OHE, respectively) on thermal stability of canola oil (CO) and high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) during French potatoes frying at 180°C was studied. The extracts were characterized by the total phenolic content, phenol chromatographic profiles and antioxidant activity. B-type trimer procyanidins were the major phenolic compounds identified in AHE. OHE showed higher phenol content, antioxidant activity regarding AHE. CO+OHE and HOSO+OHE decreased the formation of polar compounds and showed an anti-polymeric effect with respect to oils without extracts, whereas AHE extract showed a prooxidant effect on HOSO. Therefore, OHE showed an antioxidant effect on HOSO and CO under the studied conditions. In addition, all systems (CO+AHE, HOSO+AHE, CO+OHE and HOSO+OHE) increased the retention of tocopherols. These results demonstrate the potential utility of OHE as natural antioxidant for oils.

  15. Evaluation of RNA extraction methods and identification of putative reference genes for real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction expression studies on olive (Olea europaea L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonis, Alberto; Vezzaro, Alice; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2012-07-11

    Genome wide transcriptomic surveys together with targeted molecular studies are uncovering an ever increasing number of differentially expressed genes in relation to agriculturally relevant processes in olive (Olea europaea L). These data need to be supported by quantitative approaches enabling the precise estimation of transcript abundance. qPCR being the most widely adopted technique for mRNA quantification, preliminary work needs to be done to set up robust methods for extraction of fully functional RNA and for the identification of the best reference genes to obtain reliable quantification of transcripts. In this work, we have assessed different methods for their suitability for RNA extraction from olive fruits and leaves and we have evaluated thirteen potential candidate reference genes on 21 RNA samples belonging to fruit developmental/ripening series and to leaves subjected to wounding. By using two different algorithms, GAPDH2 and PP2A1 were identified as the best reference genes for olive fruit development and ripening, and their effectiveness for normalization of expression of two ripening marker genes was demonstrated.

  16. Correlation between airborne Olea europaea pollen concentrations and levels of the major allergen Ole e 1 in Córdoba, Spain, 2012-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, M. P.; Alcázar, P.; Galán, C.

    2016-12-01

    Olea europaea L. pollen is the second-largest cause of pollinosis in the southern Iberian Peninsula. Airborne-pollen monitoring networks provide essential data on pollen dynamics over a given study area. Recent research, however, has shown that airborne pollen levels alone do not always provide a clear indicator of actual exposure to aeroallergens. This study sought to evaluate correlations between airborne concentrations of olive pollen and Ole e 1 allergen levels in Córdoba (southern Spain), in order to determine whether atmospheric pollen concentrations alone are sufficient to chart changes in hay fever symptoms. The influence of major weather-related variables on local airborne pollen and allergen levels was also examined. Monitoring was carried out from 2012 to 2014. Pollen sampling was performed using a Hirst-type sampler, following the protocol recommended by the Spanish Aerobiology Network. A multi-vial cyclone sampler was used to collect aeroallergens, and allergenic particles were quantified by ELISA assay. Significant positive correlations were found between daily airborne allergen levels and atmospheric pollen concentrations, although there were occasions when allergen was detected before and after the pollen season and in the absence of airborne pollen. The correlation between the two was irregular, and pollen potency displayed year-on-year variations and did not necessarily match pollen-season-intensity.

  17. Variability of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds in a segregating progeny from a single cross in Olea europaea L. and sensory and nutritional quality implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana G Pérez

    Full Text Available Virgin olive oil phenolic compounds are responsible for its nutritional and sensory quality. The synthesis of phenolic compounds occurs when enzymes and substrates meet as olive fruit is crushed during the industrial process to obtain the oil. The genetic variability of the major phenolic compounds of virgin olive oil was studied in a progeny of the cross of Picual x Arbequina olive cultivars (Olea europaea L.. They belong to four different groups: compounds that included tyrosol or hydroxytyrosol in their molecules, lignans, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Data of phenolics in the oils showed that the progeny displayed a large degree of variability, widely transgressing the genitor levels. This high variability can be of interest on breeding programs. Thus, multivariate analysis allowed to identify genotypes within the progeny particularly interesting in terms of phenolic composition and deduced organoleptic and nutritional quality. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to obtain enough degree of variability with a single cross of olive cultivars for compounds related to the nutritional and organoleptic properties of virgin olive oil.

  18. Identifying Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of the Phenolic Extracts and Mineral Contents of Virgin Olive Oils (Olea europaea L. cv. Edincik Su from Different Regions in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan Dağdelen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the phenolic extracts and mineral contents of virgin olive oils (Olea europaea L. cv. Edincik Su obtained from three different locations, Edincik, Gomec, and Izmir, in Turkey. Antioxidant activity was analysed spectrometrically, antimicrobial effect was evaluated by disc diffusion method, and mineral contents were determined by using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES. Total phenolic contents and free radical scavenging activities of Edincik Su olive cultivar were found between 159.99 and 189.64 mg gallic acid equivalent/kg and 21.76 and 31.79% inhibition of DPPH• radical values, respectively. Phenolic composition was also varied according to location and hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol were determined as major phenolic compounds. Fourteen pathogenic bacteria and two fungal strains were used to determine the antimicrobial activity. Phenolic extracts showed antimicrobial effect against a wide range of microorganisms and the descending rank of the antimicrobial activities was Gomec, Izmir, and Edincik samples. The highest antimicrobial activities were determined against Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 and Campylobacter jejuni ATCC  33291 in all samples. Sixteen elements were used as standards (eleven of them were heavy metals to identify mineral contents. Fe, Mg, Sn, K, and Ca were determined in Gomec samples and Mg and K were detected in Edincik samples while no mineral content was detected in Izmir sample.

  19. Impact of Short-Term Acidification on Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacterial Community Dynamics in Soilless Cultivation Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkovitch, Irit; Negreanu, Yael; Dowd, Scot; Frenk, Sammy; Silber, Avner

    2012-01-01

    Soilless medium-based horticulture systems are highly prevalent due to their capacity to optimize growth of high-cash crops. However, these systems are highly dynamic and more sensitive to physiochemical and pH perturbations than traditional soil-based systems, especially during nitrification associated with ammonia-based fertilization. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of nitrification-generated acidification on ammonia oxidation rates and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in soilless growth media. To achieve this goal, perlite soilless growth medium from a commercial bell pepper greenhouse was incubated with ammonium in bench-scale microcosm experiments. Initial quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers were significantly more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and therefore, research focused on this group. Ammonia oxidation rates were highest between 0 and 9 days, when pH values dropped from 7.4 to 4.9. Pyrosequencing of betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing amoA gene fragments indicated that r-strategist-like Nitrosomonas was the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterial genus during this period, seemingly due to the high ammonium concentration and optimal growth conditions in the soilless media. Reduction of pH to levels below 4.8 resulted in a significant decrease in both ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, with increased relative abundance of the r-strategist-like Nitrosospira. Nitrite oxidizers (Nitrospira and Nitrobacter) were on the whole more abundant and less sensitive to acidification than ammonia oxidizers. This study demonstrates that nitrification and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in high-N-load intensive soilless growth media may be significantly different from those in in-terra agricultural systems. PMID:22773643

  20. Differential Contribution of Endoplasmic Reticulum and Chloroplast ω-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes to the Linolenic Acid Content of Olive (Olea europaea) Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M Luisa; Sicardo, M Dolores; Martínez-Rivas, José M

    2016-01-01

    Linolenic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in plant lipids, which plays key roles in plant metabolism as a structural component of storage and membrane lipids, and as a precursor of signaling molecules. The synthesis of linolenic acid is catalyzed by two different ω-3 fatty acid desaturases, which correspond to microsomal- (FAD3) and chloroplast- (FAD7 and FAD8) localized enzymes. We have investigated the specific contribution of each enzyme to the linolenic acid content in olive fruit. With that aim, we isolated two different cDNA clones encoding two ω-3 fatty acid desaturases from olive (Olea europaea cv. Picual). Sequence analysis indicates that they code for microsomal (OepFAD3B) and chloroplast (OepFAD7-2) ω-3 fatty acid desaturase enzymes, different from the previously characterized OekFAD3A and OekFAD7-1 genes. Functional expression in yeast of the corresponding OepFAD3A and OepFAD3B cDNAs confirmed that they encode microsomal ω-3 fatty acid desaturases. The linolenic acid content and transcript levels of olive FAD3 and FAD7 genes were measured in different tissues of Picual and Arbequina cultivars, including mesocarp and seed during development and ripening of olive fruit. Gene expression and lipid analysis indicate that FAD3A is the gene mainly responsible for the linolenic acid present in the seed, while FAD7-1 and FAD7-2 contribute mostly to the linolenic acid present in the mesocarp and, therefore, in the olive oil. These results also indicate the relevance of lipid trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast in determining the linolenic acid content of membrane and storage lipids in oil-accumulating photosynthetic tissues.

  1. On the use of leaf spectral indices to assess water status and photosynthetic limitations in Olea europaea L. during water-stress and recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengsen Sun

    Full Text Available Diffusional limitations to photosynthesis, relative water content (RWC, pigment concentrations and their association with reflectance indices were studied in olive (Olea europaea saplings subjected to water-stress and re-watering. RWC decreased sharply as drought progressed. Following rewatering, RWC gradually increased to pre-stress values. Photosynthesis (A, stomatal conductance (gs, mesophyll conductance (gm, total conductance (gt, photochemical reflectance index (PRI, water index (WI and relative depth index (RDI closely followed RWC. In contrast, carotenoid concentration, the carotenoid to chlorophyll ratio, water content reflectance index (WCRI and structural independent pigment index (SIPI showed an opposite trend to that of RWC. Photosynthesis scaled linearly with leaf conductance to CO2; however, A measured under non-photorespiratory conditions (A1%O2 was approximately two times greater than A measured at 21% [O2], indicating that photorespiration likely increased in response to drought. A1%O2 also significantly correlated with leaf conductance parameters. These relationships were apparent in saturation type curves, indicating that under non-photorespiratory conditions, CO2 conductance was not the major limitations to A. PRI was significant correlated with RWC. PRI was also very sensitive to pigment concentrations and photosynthesis, and significantly tracked all CO2 conductance parameters. WI, RDI and WCRI were all significantly correlated with RWC, and most notably to leaf transpiration. Overall, PRI correlated more closely with carotenoid concentration than SIPI; whereas WI tracked leaf transpiration more effectively than RDI and WCRI. This study clearly demonstrates that PRI and WI can be used for the fast detection of physiological traits of olive trees subjected to water-stress.

  2. A de novo transcriptomic approach to identify flavonoids and anthocyanins switch-off in olive (Olea europaea L. drupes at different stages of maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico eIaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During ripening, the fruits of the olive tree (Olea europaea L. undergo a progressive chromatic change characterized by the formation of a red-brown spot which gradually extends on the epidermis and in the innermost part of the mesocarp. This event finds an exception in the Leucocarpa cultivar, in which we observe a destabilized equilibrium between the metabolisms of chlorophyll and other pigments, particularly the anthocyanins whose switch-off during maturation promotes the white coloration of fruits. Despite its importance, genomic information on the olive tree is still lacking. Different RNA-seq libraries were generated from drupes of ‘Leucocarpa’ and ‘Cassanese’ olive genotypes, sampled at 100 and 130 days after flowering (DAF, and were used in order to identify transcripts involved in the main phenotypic changes of fruits during maturation and their corresponding expression patterns. A total of 103,359 transcripts were obtained and 3792 and 3064 were differentially expressed in ‘Leucocarpa’ and ‘Cassanese’ genotypes, respectively, during 100-130 DAF transition. Among them flavonoid and anthocyanin related transcripts such as phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL, chalcone synthase (CHS, chalcone isomerase (CHI, flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H, flavonol 3’-hydrogenase (F3'H, flavonol 3’5’-hydrogenase (F3'5'H, flavonol synthase (FLS, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS, UDP-glucose:anthocianidin:flavonoid glucosyltransferase (UFGT were identified.These results contribute to reducing the current gap in information regarding metabolic processes, including those linked to fruit pigmentation in the olive.

  3. Assessing Animal Welfare Impacts in the Management of European Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), European Moles (Talpa europaea) and Carrion Crows (Corvus corone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sandra E.; Sharp, Trudy M.; Macdonald, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflict is a global issue. Attempts to manage this conflict impact upon wild animal welfare, an issue receiving little attention until relatively recently. Where human activities harm animal welfare these effects should be minimised where possible. However, little is known about the welfare impacts of different wildlife management interventions, and opinions on impacts vary widely. Welfare impacts therefore need to be assessed objectively. Our objectives were to: 1) establish whether an existing welfare assessment model could differentiate and rank the impacts of different wildlife management interventions (for decision-making purposes); 2) identify and evaluate any additional benefits of making formal welfare assessments; and 3) illustrate issues raised by application of the model. We applied the welfare assessment model to interventions commonly used with rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), moles (Talpa europaea) and crows (Corvus corone) in the UK. The model ranked interventions for rabbits (least impact first: fencing, head shot, chest shot) and crows (shooting, scaring, live trapping with cervical dislocation). For moles, managing molehills and tunnels scored least impact. Both spring trapping, and live trapping followed by translocation, scored greater impacts, but these could not be compared directly as they scored on different axes of the model. Some rankings appeared counter-intuitive, highlighting the need for objective formal welfare assessments. As well as ranking the humaneness of interventions, the model highlighted future research needs and how Standard Operating Procedures might be improved. The model is a milestone in assessing wildlife management welfare impacts, but our research revealed some limitations of the model and we discuss likely challenges in resolving these. In future, the model might be developed to improve its utility, e.g. by refining the time-scales. It might also be used to reach consensus among stakeholders about

  4. Assessing Animal Welfare Impacts in the Management of European Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), European Moles (Talpa europaea) and Carrion Crows (Corvus corone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sandra E; Sharp, Trudy M; Macdonald, David W

    2016-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflict is a global issue. Attempts to manage this conflict impact upon wild animal welfare, an issue receiving little attention until relatively recently. Where human activities harm animal welfare these effects should be minimised where possible. However, little is known about the welfare impacts of different wildlife management interventions, and opinions on impacts vary widely. Welfare impacts therefore need to be assessed objectively. Our objectives were to: 1) establish whether an existing welfare assessment model could differentiate and rank the impacts of different wildlife management interventions (for decision-making purposes); 2) identify and evaluate any additional benefits of making formal welfare assessments; and 3) illustrate issues raised by application of the model. We applied the welfare assessment model to interventions commonly used with rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), moles (Talpa europaea) and crows (Corvus corone) in the UK. The model ranked interventions for rabbits (least impact first: fencing, head shot, chest shot) and crows (shooting, scaring, live trapping with cervical dislocation). For moles, managing molehills and tunnels scored least impact. Both spring trapping, and live trapping followed by translocation, scored greater impacts, but these could not be compared directly as they scored on different axes of the model. Some rankings appeared counter-intuitive, highlighting the need for objective formal welfare assessments. As well as ranking the humaneness of interventions, the model highlighted future research needs and how Standard Operating Procedures might be improved. The model is a milestone in assessing wildlife management welfare impacts, but our research revealed some limitations of the model and we discuss likely challenges in resolving these. In future, the model might be developed to improve its utility, e.g. by refining the time-scales. It might also be used to reach consensus among stakeholders about

  5. Assessing Animal Welfare Impacts in the Management of European Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, European Moles (Talpa europaea and Carrion Crows (Corvus corone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra E Baker

    Full Text Available Human-wildlife conflict is a global issue. Attempts to manage this conflict impact upon wild animal welfare, an issue receiving little attention until relatively recently. Where human activities harm animal welfare these effects should be minimised where possible. However, little is known about the welfare impacts of different wildlife management interventions, and opinions on impacts vary widely. Welfare impacts therefore need to be assessed objectively. Our objectives were to: 1 establish whether an existing welfare assessment model could differentiate and rank the impacts of different wildlife management interventions (for decision-making purposes; 2 identify and evaluate any additional benefits of making formal welfare assessments; and 3 illustrate issues raised by application of the model. We applied the welfare assessment model to interventions commonly used with rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus, moles (Talpa europaea and crows (Corvus corone in the UK. The model ranked interventions for rabbits (least impact first: fencing, head shot, chest shot and crows (shooting, scaring, live trapping with cervical dislocation. For moles, managing molehills and tunnels scored least impact. Both spring trapping, and live trapping followed by translocation, scored greater impacts, but these could not be compared directly as they scored on different axes of the model. Some rankings appeared counter-intuitive, highlighting the need for objective formal welfare assessments. As well as ranking the humaneness of interventions, the model highlighted future research needs and how Standard Operating Procedures might be improved. The model is a milestone in assessing wildlife management welfare impacts, but our research revealed some limitations of the model and we discuss likely challenges in resolving these. In future, the model might be developed to improve its utility, e.g. by refining the time-scales. It might also be used to reach consensus among

  6. Neuroprotection by Combined Administration with Maslinic Acid, a Natural Product from Olea europaea, and MK-801 in the Cerebral Ischemia Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisong Qian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is a major cause of ischemic brain damage. MK-801 confers neuroprotection by attenuating the activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor, but it failed in clinical use due to the short therapeutic window. Here we aim to investigate the effects of maslinic acid, a natural product from Olea europaea, on the therapeutic time window and dose range for the neuroprotection of MK-801. Rats were administered with maslinic acid intracerebroventricularly and cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO followed by reperfusion. MK-801 was administered at 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 4 h after ischemia, respectively. The cerebral infarct volume was determined by 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining, neuronal damage was assessed by Haematoxylin Eosin (H&E staining, and the expression of glial glutamate transporters and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot post-ischemia. Results showed that the presence of maslinic acid extended the therapeutic time window for MK-801 from 1 h to 3 h. Co-treatment of maslinic acid and MK-801 at a subthreshold dosage obviously induced neuroprotection after ischemia. The combination of these two compounds improved the outcome in ischemic rats. Moreover, maslinic acid treatment promoted the expression of GLT-1 and GFAP post-ischemia. These data suggest that the synergistic effect of maslinic acid on neurological protection might be associated with the improvement of glial function, especially with the increased expression of GLT-1. The combination therapy of maslinic acid and MK-801 may prove to be a potential strategy for treating acute ischemic stroke.

  7. The influence of light, temperature and feeding on the growth of the Coras cladocora caespitosa and Balanophyllia europaea; L'influenza di luce, temperatura e alimentazione sulla crescita dei coralli mediterranei Cladocora caespitosa e Balanophyllia europaea. Risultati preliminari di una sperimentazione in ambiente controllato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodolfo-Metalpa, R.; Abbate, M.; Peirano, A. [ENEA, Divisione Ambiente Globale e Mediterraneo, Centro Ricerche S. Teresa, La Spezia (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In the course of the environmental studies, carried out by ENEA-CRAM Center of S. Teresa near La Spezia, research has been performed about bioconstructional organisms in the Mediterranean Sea. To understand how these organisms respond to environmental parameters an experiment has been carried out in aquaria. Specimens of the Mediterranean coral Cladocora caespitosa and Balanophyllia europaea has been maintained in 80 independent aquaria for four months. Growth rates, pigments concentration and asexual reproduction of the corals were compared in experimental procedures with controlled conditions of light, temperature and food. Environmental parameters have been set out to simulate natural (winter and summer) ambient in the Ligurian Sea. Heterotrophic and autotrophic abilities of the corals have been compared. Results show different growth rates between the two species but similar heterotrophic growth patterns. Summer temperature largely influences growth rates and asexual reproduction of the species while light influence is small. [Italian] Nell'ambito delle ricerche svolte dall'ENEA sullo studio degli organismi biocostruttori nell'ambiente marino, e' stata svolta una sperimentazione al fine di valutare l'influenza di alcuni parametri ambientali (luce, temperatura e alimentazione), impostati in modo da simulare la naturale stagionalita' (inverno ed estate), sulla crescita e sulla riproduzione asessuale dei coralli mediterranei Cladocora caespitosa e Balanophyllia europaea. Queste sperimentazioni sono state condotte, per un periodo di circa quattro mesi, in ottanta acquari indipendenti caratterizzati da differenti livelli di luce, temperatura e alimentazione. Le valutazioni degli incrementi di peso e della crescita lineare sono state eseguite utilizzando differenti metodiche note in letteratura. Soprattutto la tecnica del Peso Galleggiante (Buoyant Weight) si e' dimostrata molto sensibile ed efficace. La capacita' (eterotrofia

  8. The impacts of N fertilization and clipping on the growth and salt accumulation of Salicornia europaea%施氮和刈割对盐角草生长及盐分累积的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁飞; 田长彦; 张慧

    2012-01-01

    为了研究施氮与刈割对盐角草盐分累积规律及其生长的影响.本试验在大田种植情况下,研究刈割处理和4个氮水平(0,150,300,450 kg/hm2)对盐角草的生长、钾钠钙镁含量及其累积量的影响.结果表明,施氮能够增加盐角草生物量,提高钾钠钙镁的累积量,但施氮对盐角草体内盐分离子含量的影响与离子种类、生育时期及刈割有关.随施氮量递增,盐角草体内4种阳离子浓度变化趋势发生转变,但方向与拐点存在差异.刈割能够增加鲜物质量,减少干物质累积量.刈割能够提高盐角草体内钾离子浓度及其累积量;钠钙变化与施氮量有关;镁的浓度主要与刈割时期相关.随施氮量增加,刈割处理中钠含量呈先降低后升高的趋势,拐点在150~300 kg/hm2;未刈割相反.刈割盐角草体内钙含量随着施氮量增加呈先增加后降低的趋势,拐点出现在300 kg/hm2处;未刈割反之,但拐点出现在150 kg/hm2处.花果期的镁浓度随着施氮量增加而降低;收获期镁浓度随着施氮量增加呈逻辑斯谛增长模式.本试验条件下,施氮刈割能够促进盐角草生长及提高盐渍土的生物改良效果.%The effects of fertilization and clipping on salt accumulation and growth of Salicornia europaea,were studied in field experiments using clipping and four nitrogen levels (0,150,300,450 kg/ha).Growth,contents and accumulative amounts of K,Na,Ca,Mg of S.europaea were measured.N fertilizer application to S.europaea increased biomass and salt accumulation but the concentration trends of K,Na,Ca and Mg in terms of direction and inflection point were different.The fresh weights were higher with clipping,but the dry weights were less.Clipping led to increased contents and accumulative amounts of K,but not of Na and Ca while Mg differed depending on the timing of clipping.Na and Ca content of S.europaea handling in cutting first increased,but then decreased with nitrogen supply

  9. Ureolytic nitrification at low pH by Nitrosospira spec.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Laanbroek, R.

    1989-01-01

    An ureolytic ammonium-oxidizing chemolithotroph belonging to the genus Nitrosospira was shown to nitrify at pH 4.5 in a pH-stat with urea as a substrate. With ammonium as the sole substrate nitrification did not occur at pH values below 5.5. Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718 and Nitrosospira briensis

  10. New Approaches to Evaluate the Biological Degradation of RDX in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-27

    Preparation of [13C] and [15N]-labeled RDX Custom synthesis of [13C] and [15N]-labeled RDX was completed by Dr. Steve Fallis at the Naval Air Warfare...hydroxide, and [15N]sodium nitrate. From these materials, and using synthesis protocols developed at China Lake, three stable isotope-labeled RDX...C. Layton, G. Harms, I. R. Gregory, K. G. Robinson, and G. S. Sayler. 2002. Quantification of Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like ammonia -oxidizing

  11. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    OpenAIRE

    J. Michael eBeman; Victoria Jean Bertics; Thomas eBraunschweiler; Jesse eWilson

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another—yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly under...

  12. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    OpenAIRE

    Beman, J. M.; Bertics, Victoria J.; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation–reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another – yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly unde...

  13. Quantificação dos níveis endógenos de auxinas e da actividade enzimática das polifenoloxidases em oliveira (Olea europaea L. Quantification of endogenous auxin levels and polyphenoloxidase enzymatic activity in olive (Olea europaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Serra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A actividade enzimática de polifenoloxidases foi avaliada em folhas e na zona apical, média e basal de ramos de duas cultivares de oliveira (Olea europaea L., comuns no Alentejo (‘Galega vulgar’ e ‘Cobrançosa’, mostrando que a actividade enzimática nas folhas foi muito superior à encontrada em tecidos de ramos do ano. Maior actividade enzimática foi também detectada na variedade ‘Cobrançosa’ versus ‘Galega vulgar’. As condições óptimas para a determinação da actividade enzimática foram: pH= 5.5 e T= 40 ºC, com 20 mM de 4-metilcatecol em tampão acetato. Nestas condições o KM determinado foi: 2,60 e 3,48 mM com o método de Michaelis-Menten e Lineweaver-Burk, respectivamente. A melhor recuperação das auxinas AIA (ácido indol-3-acético e AIB (ácido indolbutírico em material vegetal foi conseguida através da extracção das amostras com acetona. A separação, identificação e quantificação do AIA e AIB em padrões, material vegetal dopado (tecidos de oliveira dopados com uma concentração conhecida de padrão e não dopado, foi efectuada por técnicas cromatográficas (HPLC-DAD e LCMS, mostrando os resultados taxas de recuperação superiores a 40% para o AIA e 60% para o AIB.The poliphenoloxidase enzymatic activity was evaluated in two olive cultivars (Olea europaea L. widespread in Alentejo (‘Galega vulgar and ‘Cobrançosa. Leaves and apical, medium and basal regions of the year stems were used as sample material. When compared with the different regions of the year stem, the results have shown that enzymatic activity was significantly higher in the leaves of both cultivars. Between cultivars, it was observed that ‘Cobrançosa’ presented higher enzymatic activity than ‘Galega vulgar’. The pH at 5.5 and 40 ºC temperature, using 20 mM of 4methylcatecol in acetate buffer were the optimized conditions for the enzymatic analysis. Under these conditions, the measured KM was 2,60 and 3,48 m

  14. Influência do número de nós em estacas semilenhosas de oliveira (Olea europaea L. no enraizamento sob câmara de nebulização Influence the number of nodes on semi-woody cuttings of olive tree (Olea europaea L. on the rooting in misty room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelson Francisco de Oliveira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar o enraizamento de estacas semilenhosas de oliveira (Olea europaea L. com diferentes números de nós, foi conduzido no Centro de Investigación y Formación Agraria - CIFA "Alameda del Obispo" de Córdoba - Espanha, experimento sob condições de câmara de nebulização intermitente. As estacas foram tratadas com ácido indolbutítico (AIB na concentração de 3.000 mg.L-1, antes da instalação do ensaio, submergindo durante cinco segundos as suas bases, aproximadamente 2,5 centímetros, em solução contendo o produto. Utilizaram-se estacas medianas, que foram coletadas de plantas em desenvolvimento vegetativo contínuo. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados em fatorial 2 x 5, sendo respectivamente duas variedades, Picual e Arbequina, e cinco tamanhos de estacas: dois nós com duas folhas, três nós com duas folhas, três nós com quatro folhas, quatro nós com quatro folhas e cinco nós com quatro folhas. Utilizaram-se quatro repetições com parcelas experimentais constituídas por trinta estacas plantadas em substrato de perlita, em mesas suspensas, com aquecimento controlado. Avaliaram-se aos 75 dias porcentagem de estacas enraizadas, mortas e número e comprimento médio de raízes. Observou-se que, entre estacas de quatro nós e cinco nós, com quatro folhas, não houve diferença nos parâmetros considerados; estacas com três nós, com duas e quatro folhas também não diferenciaram. Estacas com dois nós e duas folhas, de ambas as variedades, apresentaram maior mortalidade.With the objective of assessing the rooting efficiency of semi-woody cuttings of olive tree (Olea europaea L., with different nodes, an experiment under intermittent misty room conditions and with the use of IBA at the concentration of 3000 mg L-1 was run at the Centro de Investigación y Formación Agraria 'Alameda del Obispo' in Cordoba, Spain. The cuttings were treated before the establishment of the trial

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of 29 Olive (Olea europaea L. Cultivars for Production and Alternate Bearing, in the Huasco Valley, Northern Chile Evaluación Preliminar de la Produción y Añerismo en 29 Variedades de Olivo (Olea europaea L. en el Valle del Huasco, Norte de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Tapia C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the development of intensively managed olive orchards (Olea europaea L. in northern Chile. The selection of specific varieties that perform well on a particular site is considered crucial to maximizing productivity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the productive performance of 29 varieties of olive in the Huasco Valley (28°34' S, 70°47' W, Northern Chile.The traits evaluated were: mean olive production per tree considering a longitudinal (PML analysis over a period of five years, 2003 to 2007, total olive production in the same period (PA03-07 and alternate bearing index (ABI. The effect of variety was highly significant (p En el norte de Chile existe un creciente interés en el desarrollo de huertos de olivo (Olea europaea L. manejados intensivamente. La selección de variedades específicas que han respondido bien en un sitio en particular es considerada clave para la maximización de la productividad. El presente estudio fue realizado para evaluar el desempeño de algunas características agronómicas en 29 variedades de olivo, en el Valle del Huasco (28°34' S, 70°47' O, norte de Chile. Las características analizadas correspondieron a producción de frutos promedio por árbol (PML en un análisis longitudinal durante un período de 5 años, 2003 a 2007, producción acumulada del mismo período (PA03-07 y el índice de alternancia de producción (ABI. El efecto debido a la variedad fue altamente significativo (p < 0,01 para las tres características. El ABI fue moderado (0,52, con una PML de 37,37 kg árbol-1 y PA03-07 de 186 kg árbol-1. Correlaciones de Spearman entre los ranking de cada característica fueron positivas y significativamente diferentes de cero (p < 0,05. ‘Leccino’ tuvo la mejor respuesta considerando únicamente la producción de frutos. ‘Arbequina’, ‘Picholine’, ‘Manzanilla Racimo’, ‘Picual’, ‘Manzanilla de Sevilla’, ‘Frantoio’ y

  16. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds of extra virgin olive oil from Olea europaea L. by HPLC-DAD-SPE-NMR/MS. Identification of a new diastereoisomer of the aldehydic form of oleuropein aglycone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Trujillo, Míriam; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Parella, Teodor

    2010-08-25

    The phenolic fraction of a monovarietal extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) from Olea europaea L. var. Cornezuelo was studied by the hyphenated HPLC-DAD-SPE-NMR/MS techniques. This survey led to the identification of 25 main compounds. One was identified as a new diastereoisomer of the aldehydic form of oleuropein aglycone (AOA) and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. The relative configuration of this new AOA was determined as 5R*,8S*,9S* on the basis of the results obtained from the combination of NOE experiments and Monte Carlo conformational search calculations. Assuming, as for the described diastereoisomers, that the new AOA comes from the natural oleuropein aglycone (OA), the absolute configuration was proposed as 5S,8R,9R.

  17. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca – Bivalvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Araujo

    2015-07-01

    European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha. Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species.

  18. 油橄榄授粉受精和胚胎发育过程观察%Observation on pollination, fertilization and embryo development process in Olea europaea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜成英; 史艳虎; 吴文俊; 朱振家

    2016-01-01

    The present research was undertaken to better understand the reason of the low fruit setting and gather the basic knowledge of reproductive biology of Olea europaea, the structural characteristics of ovules, pollination and fertili-zation process of ovules to master the various stages of time and the completed percentage of ovary pollination and fertili-zation. Fluorescence microscopy was used to observe pollen tube growth, and the paraffin slice technique was used to ob-serve the ovary pollination and fertilization in olive of‘EZhi-8’ . The results showed that the‘EZhi-8’ is one ovary two ovules four ventricles with developed nucellus, orthotropous and crassinucellate ovule. Pollen grains germinated immedi-ately when they were fallen on stigma, then pollen tubes grew in the transmitting tissue of style, entering ovary and grow-ing on the surface of endocuticle of ovary wall, and passing micropore through placenta and funicle. Pollen tube was re-leased two sperms, one entered egg and another in the secondary nucleus, which was a fusion process of male and female. The performance time of pollination and fertilization was as follows:pollen grains germinated very soon on stig-ma, and the pollen tube grew into the ovule micropyle and released sperm for 60 d after flowering. After flowering, with-in 10 d fertilization was finished , 30 d developed omphalos-embryo and within 40 d maturation occurred. A tatol of 612 ovary slices were observed by treating with a series of paraffin treatments, the highly developed ovaries of‘EZhi-8’ ac-counted for 97.53%, the finishment of pollination and fertilization process of ovules accounted for 15.52%. Our results showed that there were about 85% of ovules were not fertilized in the natural conditions, which affected the fruit setting to a certain extent.%该研究以油橄榄“鄂植-8”为材料,应用压片荧光观察花粉在柱头和花柱中的萌发及生长情况,采用石蜡制片法观察油橄榄的胚珠结

  19. 油橄榄扩区栽培不同区试点土壤肥力分析与评价%Analysis and Assessment of Different Pilot Area Soil Fertility in the Olea europaea Expansion Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨斌; 成娟; 周玉燕; 张正武; 赵强宏

    2015-01-01

    在油橄榄扩区驯化栽培的12个区试点采集土样,对土壤的p H值、全氮、全磷和速效钾含量进行测定,并对各点土壤情况进行对比分析。结果表明:所有区试点土壤p H值为中性到弱碱性,平均为7.36,符合油橄榄对土壤酸碱度的要求;全氮含量相对最低,平均为0.0939%,全磷含量相对较高,平均为0.098%;速效钾含量相对最高,平均为211.6mg/kg ;土壤肥力大小与不同流域及土壤类型之间无关联,而与人为活动程度密切相关。在油橄榄扩区驯化栽培土肥管理上,依照各流域不同区试点土壤肥力状况,可采取各种有效措施来改善油橄榄种植地土壤肥力状况。%In order to analyze the soils property of 12 domesticated cultivation areas ,we collected soil samples from each olea europaea expansion area and study pH ,total nitrogen ,total phosphorus and rapidly‐available potassium . The results show that pH of all pilot areas are neutral or weak alkaline ,with an average of 7 .36 .which is suitable for olea europaea .Total nitrogen is relatively low ,with an average of 0 .0939% .Total phosphorus and rapidly‐a‐vailable potassium are relatively high ,with an average of 0 .098% and 211 .6mg/kg respectively .Fertility of soil from different river basin and soil type is similar to each other ,but it is closely related to human activity .To improve the olive gardens soil fertility ,appropriate and effective way should be selected according to the soil fertility conditions of different pilot districts .

  20. Traveling interface modulations and anisotropic front propagation in ammonia oxidation over Rh(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafti, Matías [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquímicas Teóricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Fac. Cs. Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 64 y Diag. 113 (1900), La Plata (Argentina); Institut für Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie, Leibniz-Universität Hannover, Callinstr. 3-3a, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Borkenhagen, Benjamin; Lilienkamp, Gerhard [Institut für Energieforschung und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universität Clausthal, Leibnizstr. 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Lovis, Florian; Smolinsky, Tim; Imbihl, Ronald, E-mail: imbihl@pci.uni-hannvover.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie, Leibniz-Universität Hannover, Callinstr. 3-3a, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-11-14

    The bistable NH{sub 3} + O{sub 2} reaction over a Rh(110) surface was explored in the pressure range 10{sup −6}–10{sup −3} mbar and in the temperature range 300–900 K using photoemission electron microscopy and low energy electron microscopy as spatially resolving methods. We observed a history dependent anisotropy in front propagation, traveling interface modulations, transitions with secondary reaction fronts, and stationary island structures.

  1. Seasonal and vertical distribution of putative ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeotal communities in an oligotrophic lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, E.W.; Blaga, C.I.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Muyzer, G.; Schleper, C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Tourna, M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Archaea carrying an amoA gene coding for the A-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase gave a boost to studies aimed at detecting this gene under diverse conditions. Despite numerous studies describing the archaeal amoA gene abundance and richness in different habitats, the understanding o

  2. Intact polar lipids of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea: Structural diversity anapplication inmolecular ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.

    2011-01-01

    Non-extremophilic Crenarchaeota are ubiquitous, and comprise a major component of the microbial assemblages in many modern-day systems. Several studies have analyzed glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids synthesized by Crenarchaeota to interpret the presence, distribution, and

  3. Intact polar lipids of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea: structural diversity application in molecular ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-extremophilic Crenarchaeota are ubiquitous, and comprise a major component of the microbial assemblages in many modern-day systems. Several studies have analyzed glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids synthesized by non-extremophilic Crenarchaeota to interpret the presence,

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC 19707

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klots, Martin G. [University of Louisville, Louisville; Arp, D J [Oregon State University; Chain, Patrick S [ORNL; El-Sheikh, Amal F. [University of Louisville, Louisville; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Hommes, Norman G. [Oregon State University; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Norton, Jeanette M. [Utah State University (USU); Poret-Peterson, Amisha T. [University of Louisville, Louisville; Vergez, Lisa [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ward, Bess B. [Princeton University

    2006-01-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; G+C content of 50.4%) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3,052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. Contrary to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor, were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance, and ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H+-dependent F0F1 type, one Na+-dependent V type).

  5. QPCR quantification of ammonia oxidizing bacteria: What should the target be?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musovic, Sanin; Palomo, Alejandro; Diwan, Vaibhav

    be carried out by targeting either the 16S rRNA gene or amoA, for which standard primer sets are widely used. Using these two approaches to quantify AOB abundance across three Danish rapid sand filters (RSFs) revealed a significant discrepancy: in two RSFs, the amoA-based qPCR consistently yielded estimate...

  6. Oxygen Distribution and Potential Ammonia Oxidation in Floating, Liquid Manure Crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    Floating, organic crusts on liquid manure, stored as a result of animal production, reduce emission of ammonia (NH3) and other volatile compounds during storage. The occurrence of NO2- and NO3- in the crusts indicate the presence of actively metabolizing NH3 oxidizing bacteria (AOB) which may...... microorganisms, including AOB. The microbial activity may thus contribute to a considerable reduction of ammonia emissions from slurry tanks with well-developed crusts....

  7. Archaeal diversity and a gene for ammonia oxidation are coupled to oceanic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galand, Pierre E; Lovejoy, Connie; Hamilton, Andrew K; Ingram, R Grant; Pedneault, Estelle; Carmack, Eddy C

    2009-04-01

    Evidence of microbial zonation in the open ocean is rapidly accumulating, but while the distribution of communities is often described according to depth, the other physical factors structuring microbial diversity and function remain poorly understood. Here we identify three different water masses in the North Water (eastern Canadian Arctic), defined by distinct temperature and salinity characteristics, and show that they contained distinct archaeal communities. Moreover, we found that one of the water masses contained an increased abundance of the archaeal alpha-subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) and accounted for 70% of the amoA gene detected overall. This indicates likely differences in putative biogeochemical capacities among different water masses. The ensemble of our results strongly suggest that the widely accepted view of depth stratification did not explain microbial diversity, but rather that parent water masses provide the framework for predicting communities and potential microbial function in an Arctic marine system. Our results emphasize that microbial distributions are strongly influenced by oceanic circulation, implying that shifting currents and water mass boundaries resulting from climate change may well impact patterns of microbial diversity by displacing whole biomes from their historic distributions. This relocation could have the potential to establish a substantially different geography of microbial-driven biogeochemical processes and associated oceanic production.

  8. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further research is warranted to ascertain the causality of these correlations and particularly which direct roles (if any) do these prokaryotes play in the observed AM hyphal responses to organic N amendment, organic N utilization by the AM fungus and its (N-unlimited) host plant. Further, possible trophic dependencies between the different players in the AM hyphosphere needs to be elucidated upon decomposing the organic N sources. PMID:27242732

  9. Organic nitrogen-driven stimulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae correlates with abundance of ammonia oxidizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eBukovská

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass, while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further research is warranted to ascertain the causality of these correlations and particularly which direct roles (if any do these prokaryotes play in the observed AM hyphal responses to organic N amendment, organic N utilization by the AM fungus and its (N-unlimited host plant. Further, possible trophic dependencies between the different players in the AM hyphosphere needs to be elucidated upon decomposing the organic N sources.

  10. Comparative study on ammonia oxidation over Ni-based cermet anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Yang, Jun; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    In the current work, we investigate the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with Ni‒yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) and Ni‒gadolinia-dope ceria (Ni-GDC) cermet anodes fueled with H2 or NH3 in terms of the catalytic activity of ammonia decomposition. The cermet of Ni-GDC shows higher catalytic activity for ammonia decomposition than Ni-YSZ. In response to this, the performance of direct NH3-fueled SOFC improved by using Ni-GDC anode. Moreover, we observe further enhancement in the cell performance and the catalytic activity for ammonia decomposition with applying Ni-GDC anode synthesised by the glycine-nitrate combustion process. These results reveal that the high performance of Ni-GDC anode for the direct NH3-fueled SOFC results from its mixed ionic-electronic conductivity as well as high catalytic activity for ammonia decomposition.

  11. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC19707

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, M G; Arp, D J; Chain, P S; El-Sheikh, A F; Hauser, L J; Hommes, N G; Larimer, F W; Malfatti, S A; Norton, J M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Vergez, L M; Ward, B B

    2006-08-03

    The Gammaproteobacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707), is a Gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; 50.4% G+C) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. In contrast to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance and the ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I RuBisCO was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H{sup +}-dependent F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-type, one Na{sup +}-dependent V-type).

  12. Essais de prolifération et d'enracinement de matériel issu de rajeunissement par bouturage d'oliviers adultes (Olea europaea L. et de germination in vitro : effets de cytokinine et d'auxines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walali Loudiyi D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation and rooting of juvenile and adult olive explants (Olea europaea L.: effects of cytokinin and auxins. The micropropagation trials conducted concerned juvenile and adult material from the ‘Moroccan Picholine’ olive cultivar. Zeatin, added to the proliferation medium, was tested at 0, 1, 5, 10 et 20 mg/l. Root induction was performed on media contaning IAA, IBA or NAA tested at 0, 0.5, 1, 2 et 4 mg/l. A significant (P<0.001 interaction exists between the explant type and the cytokinine concentration on one hand and the type and concentration of auxin on the other hand. The highest bud sprouting and shoot development were obtained on medium supplemented with 5 mg/l zeatin. For economical reasons, satisfying results can be obtained with only 1 mg/l. Rooting of microcuttings reached 100% when NAA, which proved to be the best auxin for root induction, was used at 1 mg/l. No rooting was observed in the case of adult plant material. Further investigations are being undertaken to improve the reactivity of this recalcitrant type of material.

  13. The Effects of Olive (Olea europaea L. Leaf and Oil-Bearing Rose (Rosa damascena Mill. Extracts on Shelf Life of Hot Smoked Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Fillets during Refrigerated Storage (4±1°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla MUTLU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of olive (Olea europaea L. leaf and oil-bearing rose (Rosa damascena Mill. extracts on shelf life of hot smoked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss fillets during refrigerated storage (4±1°C were investigated in terms of chemical (pH, TBA, TVB-N, microbiological (TMA, TPA, LAB and ENT and sensory characteristics. Proximate compositions (moisture, crude protein, crude fat, crude ash of fresh and hotsmoked trouts were also determined. The results showed that significant differences were observed in TVB-N and TBA levels (p<0.05 between the control group and the treatment groups. Significant differences (p<0.05. were also observed in total mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and the enterobacteria numbers during storage between the control group and the treatment groups. Shelf life of control group was found as 21 days and 28 days for the treatment groups (except for olive leaf group according to microbiological assessment. The microbiological values exceeded limit on 42 days for the olive leaf group. According to sensory evaluation, samples with oil-bearing rose extracts were not appreciated by panelists while samples with the olive leaf extract were appreciated by panelists. As a result, application of herbal extracts influenced positively shelf life of trout, especially olive leave extracts.

  14. The effect of oleuropein from olive leaf (Olea europaea) extract on Ca²⁺ homeostasis, cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution and ROS signaling in HepG2 human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liu, Yuan-Yuarn; Sun, Wei-Chih; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Jan, Chung-Ren; Liang, Wei-Zhe

    2016-05-01

    Oleuropein, a phenolic compound found in the olive leaf (Olea europaea), has been shown to have biological activities in different models. However, the effects of oleuropein on Ca(2+) homeostasis, cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution and ROS signaling in liver cells have not been analyzed. Oleuropein induced [Ca(2+)]i rises only in HepG2 cells but not in AML12, HA22T or HA59T cells due to the different status of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase expression. In HepG2 cells, this Ca(2+) signaling response was reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+), and was inhibited by the store-operated Ca(2+) channel blockers 2-APB and SKF96365. In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the ER Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin abolished oleuropein-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Oleuropein induced cell cycle arrest which was associated with the regulation of p53, p21, CDK1 and cyclin B1 levels. Furthermore, oleuropein elevated intracellular ROS levels but reduced GSH levels. Treatment with the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM or the antioxidant NAC partially reversed oleuropein-induced cytotoxicity. Together, in HepG2 cells, oleuropein induced [Ca(2+)]i rises by releasing Ca(2+) from the ER and causing Ca(2+) influx through store-operated Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, oleuropein induced Ca(2+)-associated cytotoxicity that involved ROS signaling and cell cycle arrest. This compound may offer a potential therapy for treatment of human hepatoma.

  15. Surviving space flight: case study on MELiSSA's CIII nitrifying compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgrande, Chiara; Lasseur, Christophe; Mastroleo, Felice; Paille, Christel; Leys, Natalie; Morozova, Julia; Ilyin, Vyacheslav; Clauwaert, Peter; Christiaens, Marlies E. R.; Lindeboom, Ralph E. F.; Vlaeminck, Siegfried; Prat, Delphine; Arroyo, Jose M. C.; Conincx, Ilse; Van Hoey, Olivier; Roume, Hugo; Udert, Kai; Sas, Benedikt

    2016-07-01

    Space synthetic biology offers key opportunities for long-term space missions. Planets mining, terraformation, space medicine and Life Support technologies would all benefit from an integrative biological approach. However, space is a harsh environment for life: microgravity, temperature, UV and cosmic radiation can affect the health and functionality of microorganisms and plants, possibly preventing the optimal performance of the systems. The European Space Agency's Life Support System (MELiSSA) has been developed as a model for future long term Space missions and Space habitation. MELiSSA is a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem with microorganisms and higher, that aims at completely recycling gas, liquid and solid waste. In this study, the survival and functional activity after Lower Earth Orbit conditions of microbial nitrogen conversions, relevant for MELiSSA's CIII compartment, was tested. Synthetic communities containing Nitrosomonas europeae, Nitrosomonas ureae, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Nitrospira moscoviensis and Cupriavidus pinatubonensis were exposed to the Lower Earth Orbit conditions of the International Space Station (ISS) for 7 days. Nitrosomonas europeae, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Cupriavidus pinatubonensis, and three mixed communities (a urine nitrification sludge, a sludge containing aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria (OLAND), and an aquaculture sludge containing ammonia oxidizing archaea) were exposed to Lower Earth Orbit conditions for 44 days. Survival after both space flights was demonstrated because nitritation, nitratation, denitrification and anammox activity could be restored at a rate comparable to ground storage conditions. Our results validate the potential survival feasibility and suggest future space applications for N-related microorganisms.

  16. Nitrification inhibitors from the roots of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, A J; Ramsewak, R S; Smucker, A J; Nair, M G

    2000-12-01

    The nitrification inhibition (NI) bioassay guided fractionation of the methanol extract of lyophilized and milled roots of Leuceana leucocephala resulted in the isolation of four compounds, 1-4, as confirmed from their 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. Compound 1, gallocatechin, was the most active NI inhibitor at 12 microg/mL. Epigallocatechin, 2, and epicatechin, 4, isolated as mixtures, were not assayed individually for their NI inhibitory activities against the nitrification bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

  17. Developing and Validating Genetic Catabolic Probes for Monitored Natural Attenuation of 1,4-Dioxane with a One-Year Timeframe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    concentrations were determined by Nanodrop ND-1000 from Nanodrop products Inc. (Wilmington, NE). cDNA was synthesized using High-Capacity cDNA Reverse...ACG CCT ATT - (ZEN) - ACA TCC AGC AGC TCG A - (IABkFQ) -3’. The amplicons were approximately 115 bp in length. All primers and probes were synthesized ...MC09 − + - - - Escherichia coli K12 − + - - - Bacteriophage λ − − amo Ammonia MO - Nitrosomonas europaea Winogradsky − + tod Toluene DO

  18. Nitrification in the Schelde estuary: methodological aspects and factors influencing its activity

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    We present a 15-month dataset on nitrification measurements in the Schelde estuary (Belgium and The Netherlands). Nitrification was estimated using the N-serve sensitive dark 14C-bicarbonate incorporation technique. A peak of nitrification activity was observed in the freshwater part of the estuary. Downstream from this peak, nitrification declined, probably because of ammonium limitation. A range of nitrification inhibitors was tested on both a Nitrosomonas europaea culture and estuarine sam...

  19. Generation of polymerase chain reaction-specific probes for library screening using single degenerate primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, N G; Arp, D J; Sayavedra-Soto, L A

    1995-03-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were made to peptide sequences from hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from Nitrosomonas europaea. The primers were used singly in PCR reactions to amplify portions of the gene for HAO from genomic DNA. Southern hybridizations using fragments amplified with each primer showed that they labeled the same genomic DNA fragments. The PCR-amplified fragments were successfully used to screen a gene library for clones containing the HAO gene. The method of isolating genes by PCR with single primers has general utility.

  20. Nitrification Enhancement through pH Control with Rotating Biological Contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Inst. of Sew. Purif., 130 (1964). 31. Engel, M. S. and M. Alexander, " Growth and Autotrophic Metabolism of Nitrosomonas Europaea ," Jour. Bact., 76, 217...relative effectiveness of four different alkaline chemicals on enhancing the nitrifying process under optimum pH conditions was evaluated in Phase II...111 6.12 Relative RBC Heterotrophic Bacteria Growth Under pH Conditions from pH 7.0 to pH 8.5 ....... ............. .. 112 6.13 Batch Alkalinity

  1. Laboratory-Scale Demonstration Using Dilute Ammonia Gas-Induced Alkaline Hydrolysis of Soil Contaminants (Chlorinated Propanes and Explosives)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    subsurface methanotrophic populations and trichloroethylene degradation. Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology 18(2- 3):204-214. Price...estuary. Environmental Microbiology 17(7):2306-2318. Envirogen, Inc. 2003. In-situ remediation of MTBE-contaminated aquifers using propane...Nitrosomonas europaea at acid and alkaline pH. Archives of Microbiology 157:194-199. Hedengren, D. C., W. B. Barton, S. K. Early, and V. F. Medina. 2000

  2. Nitrogen removal and microbial characteristics in CANON biofilters fed with different ammonia levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Zhuo; Cui, Shaoming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-11-01

    The nitrogen removal performance and microbial characteristics of four completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) biofilters were investigated. These four reactors were simultaneously seeded from a stable CANON biofilter with a seeding ratio of 1:1, which were fed with different ammonia levels. Results suggested that with the ammonia of 200-400 mg L(-1), aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) could perform harmonious work. The bioactivity and population of the two groups of bacteria were both high, which then resulted in excellent nitrogen removal, while too low or too high ammonia would both lead to worse performance. When ammonia was too high, the bioactivity, biodiversity and population of AerAOB all decreased and then resulted in the lowest nitrogen removal. Nitrosomonas and Candidatus Brocadia were detected as predominant functional microbes in all the four reactors. Finally, strategies for treating sewage with different ammonia levels were proposed.

  3. Nitrous oxide emission related to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and mitigation options from N fertilization in a tropical soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soares, Johnny R.; Cassman, N.; Kielak, A.M.; Pijl, A.S.; do Carmo, J.B.; Lourenço, Késia S.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Cantarella, H.; Kuramae, E.E.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from nitrogen fertilizers applied to sugarcane has high environmental impact on ethanol production. This study aimed to determine the main microbial processes responsible for the N2O emissions from soil fertilized with different N sources, to identify options to mitigate N2O emis

  4. Bottom up design of a novel CuRu nanoparticulate catalyst for low temperature ammonia oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Silva, Hugo José Lopes; Conradsen, Christian Nagstrup

    to significantly reduce overall CO2 emission. Ammonia is the second most produced chemicals in the world. It has the lowest cost per GJ of energy among all the conventional fuels[1]. It has been described as an important chemical storage of hydrogen that can transform the world to a low-carbon economy. Ammonia can...... also be produced with no carbon footprint at all using e.g. wind or solar energy. The decentralized small scale ammonia production units developed by Reese et al . and Proton Ventures can be a good way to store electrical energy in liquid chemical. Even though ammonia cracking in combination with low......Ammonia has been considered as a renewable and carbon free energy source. Aside from hydrogen, ammonia is the only carbon-free energy vector for transport application. As 26% of all CO2 is emitted from transport sector, without reducing the emission from the transport sector, it will be impossible...

  5. Underestimation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria abundance by amplification bias in amoA-targeted qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Musovic, Sanin; Palomo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Molecular methods to investigate functional groups in microbial communities rely on the specificity and selectivity of the primer set towards the target. Here, using rapid sand filters for drinking water production as model environment, we investigated the consistency of two commonly used quantit......RNA. In contrast, both approaches performed very similarly at waterworks with high Cluster 7 prevalence. Our results highlight that caution is warranted when comparing AOB abundances obtained using different qPCR primer sets....

  6. Influence of oxygen partial pressure and salinity on the community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the Schelde estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors on the community structure of ammoniaoxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated in the Schelde estuary. Simultaneously with the increase of oxygen and salinity, a shift of the dominant AOB was observed. Molecular analysis based on 16S rRNA genes showed that the

  7. Archaeal ammonia oxidation in volcanic grassland soils of Iceland. Effects of elevated temperature and N availability on processes and organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thaumarchaea are recognized today as the most abundant and ubiquitously dis­tributed archaeal organisms, especially in the oceans and soil. Their phylogenetic placement as a phylum, the capability of all cultivated Thaumarchaea to oxidize ammonia for energy conservation as well as many further aspec

  8. Application of a novel functional gene microarray to probe the functional ecology of ammonia oxidation in nitrifying activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Short

    Full Text Available We report on the first study trialling a newly-developed, functional gene microarray (FGA for characterising bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers in activated sludge. Mixed liquor (ML and media biofilm samples from a full-scale integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS plant were analysed with the FGA to profile the diversity and relative abundance of ammonia-oxidising archaea and bacteria (AOA and AOB respectively. FGA analyses of AOA and AOB communities revealed ubiquitous distribution of AOA across all samples - an important finding for these newly-discovered and poorly characterised organisms. Results also revealed striking differences in the functional ecology of attached versus suspended communities within the IFAS reactor. Quantitative assessment of AOB and AOA functional gene abundance revealed a dominance of AOB in the ML and approximately equal distribution of AOA and AOB in the media-attached biofilm. Subsequent correlations of functional gene abundance data with key water quality parameters suggested an important functional role for media-attached AOB in particular for IFAS reactor nitrification performance and indicate possible functional redundancy in some IFAS ammonia oxidiser communities. Results from this investigation demonstrate the capacity of the FGA to resolve subtle ecological shifts in key microbial communities in nitrifying activated sludge and indicate its value as a tool for better understanding the linkages between the ecology and performance of these engineered systems.

  9. Elucidation of major contributors involved in nitrogen removal and transcription level of nitrogen-cycling genes in activated sludge from WWTPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, You; Liang, Peixin; Gong, Ting; Cao, Xiangyu; Zhao, Ying; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2017-01-01

    We investigated nitrogen-cycle bacterial communities in activated sludge from 8 municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Redundancy analyses (RDA) showed that temperature was the most significant driving force in shaping microbial community structure, followed by influent NH4+ and total nitrogen (TN). The diversity of ammonia oxidizing and nitrite reducing bacteria were investigated by the construction of amoA, nirS and nirK gene clone libraries. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Thauera and Mesorhizobium were the predominant nitrite reducing bacteria, and Nitrosomonas was the only detected ammonia oxidizing bacteria in all samples. Quantification of transcription level of nirS and nirK genes indicated that nirS-type nitrite reducing bacteria played the dominant roles in nitrite reduction process. Transcription level of nirS gene positively correlated with influent NH4+ and TN significantly, whereas inversely linked with hydraulic retention time. Temperature had a strong positive correlation to transcription level of amoA gene. Overall, this study deepened our understanding of the major types of ammonia oxidizing and nitrite reducing bacteria in activated sludge of municipal WWTPs. The relationship between transcription level of nitrogen-cycle genes and operational or environmental variables of WWTPs revealed in this work could provide guidance for optimization of operating parameters and improving the performance of nitrogen removal. PMID:28294196

  10. Cytochromes P460 and c'-beta; a new family of high-spin cytochromes c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Bradley O; Bergmann, David J; Klotz, Martin G; Hooper, Alan B

    2007-03-01

    Cytochromes-P460 of Nitrosomonas europaea and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), and the cytochrome c' of M. capsulatus, believed to be involved in binding or transformation of N-oxides, are shown to represent an evolutionarily related new family of monoheme, approximately 17kDa, cytochromes c found in the genomes of diverse Proteobacteria. All members of this family have a predicted secondary structure predominantly of beta-sheets in contrast to the predominantly alpha-helical cytochromes c' found in photoheterotrophic and denitrifying Proteobacteria.

  11. AcEST: DK944957 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q82Y15|ORN_NITEU Oligoribonuclease OS=Nitrosomonas europaea G... 31 1.7 sp|Q9JLC8|SACS_MOUSE Sacs...in OS=Mus musculus GN=Sacs PE=1 SV=2 29 6.5 >sp|Q82Y15|ORN_N...LVVTDAQLNTLAEAPVLVVHQPDDI 54 >sp|Q9JLC8|SACS_MOUSE Sacsin OS=Mus musculus GN=Sacs PE=1 SV=2 Length = 4582 Sc

  12. Comparison of the Morphology and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Composition of 27 Strains of Nitrifying Bacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stanley W.; Mandel, Manley

    1971-01-01

    The gross morphology, fine structure, and per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) composition of deoxyribonucleic acid of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria were compared. Based on morphological differences, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were separated into four genera. Nitrosomonas species and Nitrosocystis species formed one homogenous group, and Nitrosolobus species and Nitrosospira species formed a second homogenous group in respect to their deoxyribonucleic acid GC compositions. Similarly, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were separated into three genera based on their morphology. The members of two of these nitrite-oxidizing genera, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus, had similar GC compositions, but Nitrospina gracilis had a significantly lower GC composition than the members of the other two genera. Images PMID:4939767

  13. Comparison of the morphology and deoxyribonucleic acid composition of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S W; Mandel, M

    1971-08-01

    The gross morphology, fine structure, and per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) composition of deoxyribonucleic acid of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria were compared. Based on morphological differences, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were separated into four genera. Nitrosomonas species and Nitrosocystis species formed one homogenous group, and Nitrosolobus species and Nitrosospira species formed a second homogenous group in respect to their deoxyribonucleic acid GC compositions. Similarly, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were separated into three genera based on their morphology. The members of two of these nitrite-oxidizing genera, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus, had similar GC compositions, but Nitrospina gracilis had a significantly lower GC composition than the members of the other two genera.

  14. Shifts in the microbial community, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the biofilm in a full-scale rotating biological contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xingxing; Guo, Feng; Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2014-07-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial community shifts, especially nitrifiers and denitrifiers, in the biofilm of two rotating biological contactor (RBC) trains with different running times along the plug flowpath. The microbial consortia were profiled using multiple approaches, including 454 high-throughput sequencing of the V3-V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, clone libraries, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results demonstrated that (1) the overall microbial community at different locations had distinct patterns, that is, there were similar microbial communities at the beginnings of the two RBC trains and completely different populations at the ends of the two RBC trains; (2) nitrifiers, including ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB, Nitrosomonas) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB, Nitrospira), increased in relative abundance in the biofilm along the flowpath, whereas denitrifiers (Rhodanobacter, Paracoccus, Thauera, and Azoarcus) markedly decreased; (3) the AOA were subdominant to the AOB in all sampled sections; and (4) strong ecological associations were shown among different bacteria. Overall, the results of this study provided more comprehensive information regarding the biofilm community composition and assemblies in full-scale RBCs.

  15. Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G V; Nakahara, K; Hurtado, M P; Ono, H; Moreta, D E; Salcedo, A F; Yoshihashi, A T; Ishikawa, T; Ishitani, M; Ohnishi-Kameyama, M; Yoshida, M; Rondon, M; Rao, I M; Lascano, C E; Berry, W L; Ito, O

    2009-10-13

    Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, may enhance losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil-nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of an effective nitrification inhibitor in the root-exudates of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. Named "brachialactone," this inhibitor is a recently discovered cyclic diterpene with a unique 5-8-5-membered ring system and a gamma-lactone ring. It contributed 60-90% of the inhibitory activity released from the roots of this tropical grass. Unlike nitrapyrin (a synthetic nitrification inhibitor), which affects only the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) pathway, brachialactone appears to block both AMO and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzymatic pathways in Nitrosomonas. Release of this inhibitor is a regulated plant function, triggered and sustained by the availability of ammonium (NH(4)(+)) in the root environment. Brachialactone release is restricted to those roots that are directly exposed to NH(4)(+). Within 3 years of establishment, Brachiaria pastures have suppressed soil nitrifier populations (determined as amoA genes; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea), along with nitrification and nitrous oxide emissions. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence and active regulation of a nitrification inhibitor (or inhibitors) release from tropical pasture root systems. Exploiting the BNI function could become a powerful strategy toward the development of low-nitrifying agronomic systems, benefiting both agriculture and the environment.

  16. [Analysis on Diversity of Denitrifying Microorganisms in Sequential Batch Bioreactor Landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Hua; Sun, Ying-Jie; Liu, Zi-Liang; Ma, Qiang; Yang, Qiang

    2016-01-15

    A denitrification functional microorganism gene clone library (amoA, nosZ) and the PCR-RFLP technology was constructed to investigate the microbial diversity of denitrifying microorganisms in the late period of stabilization of sequential batch bioreactor landfill. The results indicated that: the bacterial diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in the aged refuse reactor was very high, and most of them were unknown groups, also, all bacteria were unculturable or had not been isolated. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria were presumably Nitrosomonas of 6-Proteobacteria. The diversity of denitrifying bacteria in fresh refuse reactor was abundant, which mainly included Thauera and Thiobacillus of 6-Proteobacteria. As Thauera sp. has the denitrification characteristics under the condition of aerobic while Thiobacillus denitrificans has the autotrophic denitrification characteristics, it was speculated that aerobic denitrification and autotrophic denitrification might be the main pathways for nitrogen removal in the fresh refuse reactor at the late period of stabilization. Additionally, another group in the gene clone library of denitrifying bacteria may be classified as Bradyrhizobiaceae of alpha-Proteobacteria.

  17. Activity and population dynamics of heterotrophic and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil surrounding sludge bands spiked with linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, K. K.; Sørensen, J.; Krogh, P. H.

    2003-01-01

    bioluminescence toxicity assay, however, LAS or other sludge components never accumulated to toxic levels in the soil compartments and the LAS tolerance of the indigenous microbes further remained unchanged following LAS exposure. LAS effects on the investigated microbial populations largely occurred during...

  18. Impact of Support and Potassium-Poisoning on the V2O5-WO3/ZrO2 Catalyst Performance in Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Kustov, Arkadii; Christensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    A series of WO3-promoted zirconia supports were synthesized and calcined between 400 and 800C. Subsequently vanadium oxide was introduced to obtain 3.5 wt% V2O5. The influence of the calcination temperature and potassium-poisoning (K/V = 0.2, molar ratio) on the catalytic activity in the selective...... catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 was previously studied. Here, we focus on the influence of these parameters on the catalytic activity for the undesirable oxidation of ammonia, which decrease the N2 selectivity of the SCR process. It is found that potassium doping of the catalysts results...... in a considerable decrease in the overall ammonia conversion while selectivity to NO increases....

  19. Nitrate reduction, nitrous oxide formation, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation to nitrite in the gut of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes and Ophiotermes spp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2011-11-28

    Soil-feeding termites play important roles in the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in tropical soils. Through the mineralization of nitrogenous humus components, their intestinal tracts accumulate enormous amounts of ammonia, and nitrate and nitrite concentrations are several orders of magnitude above those in the ingested soil. Here, we studied the metabolism of nitrate in the different gut compartments of two Cubitermes and one Ophiotermes species using 15N isotope tracer analysis. Living termites emitted N 2 at rates ranging from 3.8 to 6.8nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1. However, in homogenates of individual gut sections, denitrification was restricted to the posterior hindgut, whereas nitrate ammonification occurred in all gut compartments and was the prevailing process in the anterior gut. Potential rates of nitrate ammonification for the entire intestinal tract were tenfold higher than those of denitrification, implying that ammonification is the major sink for ingested nitrate in the intestinal tract of soil-feeding termites. Because nitrate is efficiently reduced already in the anterior gut, reductive processes in the posterior gut compartments must be fuelled by an endogenous source of oxidized nitrogen species. Quite unexpectedly, we observed an anaerobic oxidation of 15N-labelled ammonia to nitrite, especially in the P4 section, which is presumably driven by ferric iron; nitrification and anammox activities were not detected. Two of the termite species also emitted substantial amounts of N 2O, ranging from 0.4 to 3.9nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1, providing direct evidence that soil-feeding termites are a hitherto unrecognized source of this greenhouse gas in tropical soils. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Greater Fusarium wilt suppression after complex than after simple organic amendments as affected by soil pH, total carbon and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senechkin, I.V.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to compare effects of four types of organic amendments on soil chemical, microbiological and disease suppression characteristics in an organic farm. The amendments were plant-derived fresh compost (C), steer-derived slurry (S), slurry plus dung (SD) and slurry, compo

  1. Archaea Dominate the Ammonia-Oxidizing Community in the Rhizosphere of the Freshwater Macrophyte Littorella uniflora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Saunders, Aaron M.; Schramm, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA) had similar low relative abundances in freshwater sediment. In the rhizosphere of the submersed macrophyte Littorella uniflora, archaeal amoA was 500- to >8,000-fold enriched compared to bacterial amoA, suggesting that the enhanced...

  2. Communities of archaea and bacteria in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps, and evidence of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidler, Gerhard W; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Gerbl, Friedrich W; Heinen, Wolfgang; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy revealed great morphological diversity in biofilms from several largely unexplored subterranean thermal Alpine springs, which contain radium 226 and radon 222. A culture-independent molecular analysis of microbial communities on rocks and in the water of one spring, the "Franz-Josef-Quelle" in Bad Gastein, Austria, was performed. Four hundred fifteen clones were analyzed. One hundred thirty-two sequences were affiliated with 14 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and 283 with four archaeal OTUs. Rarefaction analysis indicated a high diversity of bacterial sequences, while archaeal sequences were less diverse. The majority of the cloned archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to the soil-freshwater-subsurface (1.1b) crenarchaeotic group; other representatives belonged to the freshwater-wastewater-soil (1.3b) group, except one clone, which was related to a group of uncultivated Euryarchaeota. These findings support recent reports that Crenarchaeota are not restricted to high-temperature environments. Most of the bacterial sequences were related to the Proteobacteria (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta), Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. One OTU was allied with Nitrospina sp. (delta-Proteobacteria) and three others grouped with Nitrospira. Statistical analyses suggested high diversity based on 16S rRNA gene analyses; the rarefaction plot of archaeal clones showed a plateau. Since Crenarchaeota have been implicated recently in the nitrogen cycle, the spring environment was probed for the presence of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Sequences were obtained which were related to crenarchaeotic amoA genes from marine and soil habitats. The data suggested that nitrification processes are occurring in the subterranean environment and that ammonia may possibly be an energy source for the resident communities.

  3. Effect of toxic metals on indigenous soil ß-subgroup proteobacterium ammonia oxidizer community structure and protection against toxicity by inoculated metal-resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephen, J.R.; Chang, Y.J.; MacNaughton, S.J.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Leung, K.T.; Flemming, C.A.; White, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Contamination of soils with toxic metals is a major problem on military, industrial, and mining sites worldwide. Of particular interest to the field of bioremediation is the selection of biological markers for the end point of remediation, In this microcosm study, we focus on the effect of addition

  4. Community Assembly and Ecology of Activated Sludge under Photosynthetic Feast-Famine Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyserman, Ben O; Martirano, Joseph M; Wipperfurth, Spenser; Owen, Brian R; Noguera, Daniel R; McMahon, Katherine D

    2017-03-10

    Here, we demonstrate that photosynthetic oxygen production under light-dark and feast-famine cycles with no mechanical aeration and negligible oxygen diffusion is able to maintain phosphorus cycling activity associated with the enrichment of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). We investigate the ecology of this novel system by conducting a time series analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic biodiversity using the V3-V4 and V4 regions of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences, respectively. In the Eukaryotic community, the initial dominant alga observed was Desmodesmus. During operation, the algal community became a more diverse consortium of Desmodesmus, Parachlorella, Characiopodium, and Bacillariophytina. In the Prokaryotic community, there was an initial enrichment of the PAO Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (Accumulibacter) Acc-SG2, and the dominant ammonia-oxidizing organism was Nitrosomonas oligotropha; however, these populations decreased in relative abundance, becoming dominated by Accumulibacter Acc-SG3 and Nitrosomonas ureae. Furthermore, functional guilds that were not abundant initially became enriched including the putative Cyanobacterial PAOs Obscuribacterales and Leptolyngbya and the H2-oxidizing denitrifying autotroph Sulfuritalea. After a month of operation, the most-abundant prokaryote belonged to an uncharacterized clade of Chlorobi classified as Chlorobiales;SJA-28 Clade III, the first reported enrichment of this lineage. This experiment represents the first investigation into the ecological interactions and community assembly during photosynthetic feast-famine conditions. Our findings suggest that photosynthesis may provide sufficient oxygen to drive polyphosphate cycling.

  5. Process of nitrogen transformation and microbial community structure in the Fe(0)-carbon-based bio-carrier filled in biological aerated filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Shanbin; Li, Jinlong

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen pollutants in low-organic carbon wastewater are difficult to biodegrade. Therefore, the Fe(0)-carbon-based bio-carrier (FCBC) was firstly used as hydrogen producer in a biological-aerated filter (BAF) to make up for the lack of organic carbon in biological nitrogen removal. Physical and chemical properties of FCBC were detected and compared in this study. The nitrogen removal rate for low COD/TN ratio wastewater, nitrogen transformation process, and microbial communities in the FCBC filled in BAF were investigated. Results showed that the nitrogen removal rates was 0.38-0.41 kg N m(-3) day(-1) in the FCBC filled BAF and reached 0.62 kg N m(-3) day(-1) within the filter depth of 60-80 cm, under the conditions of the dissolved oxygen 3.5 ± 0.2 mg L(-1) and the inlet pH 7.2 ± 0.1. Hydrogenophaga (using hydrogen as electron donor), Sphaerotilus (absorbing [Fe(3+)]), Nitrospira (nitrificaion), and Nitrosomonas (ammonia oxidation) were found to be the predominant genera in the reactor. The reaction schemes in the FCBC filled in BAF was calculated: hydrogen and [Fe(3+)] were produced by Fe(0)-C galvanic cells in the FCBC, ammonia was oxidized into nitrate by Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira genera, hydrogen was used as electron donors by Hydrogenophaga genus to reduce nitrate into N2, and [Fe(3+)] was partly absorbed by Sphaerotilus and diverted via sludge discharging.

  6. Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Jennifer L; M'Coy, William S; Gunsch, Claudia K; Deshusses, Marc A

    2012-05-01

    This study examines the use of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) as a tertiary treatment step for ammonia removal in high temperature (35-45°C) effluents, and quantifies different phenotypes of ammonia and nitrite oxidizing bacteria responsible for nitrification at elevated temperatures. Bench scale reactors operating at 35 and 40°C were able to successfully remove greater than 90% of the influent ammonia (up to 19 mg L(-1) NH(3)-N) in both the synthetic and industrial wastewater. No biotreatment was observed at 45°C, although effective nitrification was rapidly recovered when the temperature was lowered to 30°C. Using qPCR, Nitrosomonas oligotropha was found to be the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacterium in the biofilm for the first phases of reactor operation. In the later phases, Nitrosomonas nitrosa was observed and its increased presence may have been responsible for improved ammonia treatment efficiency. Accumulation of nitrite in some instances appeared to correlate with temporary low presence of Nitrospira spp.

  7. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  8. Selective inhibition of ammonium oxidation and nitrification-linked N2O formation by methyl fluoride and dimethyl ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.G.; Coutlakis, M.D.; Oremland, R.S.; Ward, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (CH3F) and dimethyl ether (DME) inhibited nitrification in washed-cell suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea and in a variety of oxygenated soils and sediments. Headspace additions of CH3F (10% [vol/vol]) and DME (25% [vol/vol]) fully inhibited NO2- and N2O production from NH4+ in incubations of N. europaea, while lower concentrations of these gases resulted in partial inhibition. Oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by N. europaea and oxidation of NO2- by a Nitrobacter sp. were unaffected by CH3F or DME. In nitrifying soils, CH3F and DME inhibited N2O production. In field experiments with surface flux chambers and intact cores, CH3F reduced the release of N2O from soils to the atmosphere by 20- to 30-fold. Inhibition by CH3F also resulted in decreased NO3- + NO2- levels and increased NH4+ levels in soils. CH3F did not affect patterns of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia in cell suspensions of a nitrate- respiring bacterium, nor did it affect N2O metabolism in denitrifying soils. CH3F and DME will be useful in discriminating N2O production via nitrification and denitrification when both processes occur and in decoupling these processes by blocking NO2- and NO3- production.

  9. (Lepus europaea capturadas en el Corredor Verde del Guadiamar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Carrascal Moreno

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tras muestrear individuos de liebre en diversas zonas del Corredor Verde del Guadiamar, se procede a procesar muestras de tejidos de hígado y músculo para analizar sus contenidos en As, Cd, Pb, Cu y Zn, elementos químicos de especial significado ambiental, sobre todo en una zona de tradición minera, que además fue afectada por una catástrofe ambiental de gran magnitud por la rotura de una balsa de estériles (donde se acumulaban los restos del procesado del mineral con altas concentraciones de metales pesados en forma de lodos y aguas contaminadas, en abril del año 1998. Los resultados muestran una situación de mejora ambiental y de normalidad si se comparan con los valores encontrados en bibliografía especializada y los animales empleados como control.

  10. Multiplicação in vitro de oliveira (Olea europaea L. Olive (Olea europaea L. in vitro multiplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ferreira Dutra

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de induzir a multiplicação em explantes de oliveira, segmentos nodais oriundos de plântulas mantidas in vitro foram excisados e inoculados em tubos de ensaio contendo meio de cultura MS suplementado com 2 g L-1 de carvão ativado, BAP (0, 1, 2 e 4 mg L-1 e ANA (0; 0,01; 0,1 e 1 mg L-1, solidificado com 6 g L-1 de ágar e pH ajustado para 5,8. Durante 100 dias, os explantes foram mantidos em sala de crescimento a 25±1ºC, intensidade luminosa de 32 µmoles.m-2.s-1 e fotoperíodo de 16 horas. Não houve indução de brotações nos segmentos nodais. O maior comprimento da parte aérea foi obtido com 0,1 mg L-1 de ANA na ausência de BAP. O meio de cultura sem BAP proporcionou maior peso de matéria fresca da parte aérea.This work had the objective to induce olive multiplication. Nodal segments from in vitro plantlets were excised and inoculated in test tubes containing MS culture medium supplemented with activated charcoal (2 g L-1, BAP (0, 1, 2 and 4 mg L-1, NAA (0; 0.01; 0.1 and 1 mg L-1, agar (6 g L-1 and pH adjusted to 5.8. The explant were maintained in growth room to 25±1°C, 32 µmoles.m-2.s-1 light intensity and 16 hours photoperiod for 100 days. There was not shoots induction in the nodal segments. Larger length of aerial part were obtained with ANA 0.1 mg L-1 in the BAP absence. Culture medium without BAP provides larger weight of fresh matter of the aerial part.

  11. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  12. Fluctuation of microbial activities after influent load variations in a full-scale SBR. Recovery of the biomass after starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabezas, Angela; Draper, Patricia; Etchebehere, Claudia [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). Catedra de Microbiologia, Facultad de Quimica y Facultad de Ciencias

    2009-10-15

    Due to variations in the production levels, a full-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for post-treatment of tannery wastewater was exposed to low and high ammonia load periods. In order to study how these changes affected the N-removal capacity, the microbiology of the reactor was studied by a diverse set of techniques including molecular tools, activity tests, and microbial counts in samples taken along 3 years. The recover capacity of the biomass was also studied in a lab-scale reactor operated with intermittent aeration without feeding for 36 days. The results showed that changes in the feeding negatively affected the nitrifying community, but the nitrogen removal efficiencies could be restored after the concentration stress. Species substitution was observed within the nitrifying bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter predominated initially, and after an ammonia overload period, Nitrosomonas nitrosa and Nitrospira became dominant. Some denitrifiers, with nirS related to Alicycliphilus, Azospirillum, and Marinobacter nirS, persisted during long-term reactor operation, but the community fluctuated both in composition and in abundance. This fluctuating community may better resist the continuous changes in the feeding regime. Our results showed that a nitrifying-denitrifying SBR could be operated with low loads or even without feeding during production shut down periods. (orig.)

  13. 污水处理工艺对氨氧化菌及细菌群落的影响%Impacts of wastewater treatment process on AOB and baeteria communities.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓慧; 文湘华; 杨宁宁; 许美兰; 丁鵾

    2009-01-01

    采用针对氨氧化菌(AOB)功能基因氨单加氧酶(amoA)的末端限制性片段长度多态性技术(T-RFLP)、克降测序等方法,研究了北京市2个污水处理厂的4个污水处理系统中AOB的群落结构,同时采用针对16S rRNA基因的T-RFLP技术分析了总细菌的群落结构.T-RFLP指纹图谱分析表明,4个污水处理系统中AOB的优势限制性片段(T-RF)均为291bp和354bp,细菌的优势T-RF为115,117,166,455,465,468,471,482,800,893bp等.说明污水处理工艺对系统中AOB及细菌的群落结构影响很小.对功能基因amoA的系统发育分析表明,4个污水处理系统中优势AOB均属于Nitrosomonas europaea cluster和Nitrosomonas oligotropha culster.

  14. Meso and micro-scale response of post carbon removal nitrifying MBBR biofilm across carrier type and loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bradley; Banihashemi, Bahman; Forrest, Daina; Kennedy, Kevin; Stintzi, Alain; Delatolla, Robert

    2016-03-15

    This study investigates the effects of three specific moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carrier types and two surface area loading rates on biofilm thickness, morphology and bacterial community structure of post carbon removal nitrifying MBBR systems along with the effects of carrier type and loading on ammonia removal rates and effluent solids settleability. The meso and micro analyses show that the AOB kinetics vary based on loading condition, but irrespective of carrier type. The meso-scale response to increases in loading was shown to be an increase in biofilm thickness with higher surface area carriers being more inclined to develop and maintain thicker biofilms. The pore spaces of these higher surface area to volume carriers also demonstrated the potential to become clogged at higher loading conditions. Although the biofilm thickness increased during higher loading conditions, the relative percentages of both the embedded viable and non-viable cells at high and conventional loading conditions remained stable; indicating that the reduced ammonia removal kinetics observed during carrier clogging events is likely due to the observed reduction in the surface area of the attached biofilm. Microbial community analyses demonstrated that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria for all carriers is Nitrosomonas while the dominant nitrite oxidizing bacteria is Nitrospira. The research showed that filamentous species were abundant under high loading conditions, which likely resulted in the observed reduction in effluent solids settleability at high loading conditions as opposed to conventional loading conditions. Although the settleability of the effluent solids was correlated to increases in abundances of filamentous organisms in the biofilm, analyzed using next generation sequencing, the ammonia removal rate was not shown to be directly correlated to specific meso or micro-scale characteristics. Instead post carbon removal MBBR ammonia removal kinetics were shown to be

  15. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of microbial community structure and gene expression of activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yu

    Full Text Available The present study applied both metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches to characterize microbial structure and gene expression of an activated sludge community from a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Hong Kong. DNA and cDNA were sequenced by Illumina Hi-seq2000 at a depth of 2.4 Gbp. Taxonomic analysis by MG-RAST showed bacteria were dominant in both DNA and cDNA datasets. The taxonomic profile obtained by BLAST against SILVA SSUref database and annotation by MEGAN showed that activated sludge was dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobia phyla in both DNA and cDNA datasets. Global gene expression annotation based on KEGG metabolism pathway displayed slight disagreement between the DNA and cDNA datasets. Further gene expression annotation focusing on nitrogen removal revealed that denitrification-related genes sequences dominated in both DNA and cDNA datasets, while nitrifying genes were also expressed in relative high levels. Specially, ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidase demonstrated the high cDNA/DNA ratios in the present study, indicating strong nitrification activity. Enzyme subunits gene sequences annotation discovered that subunits of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA, amoB, amoC and hydroxylamine oxygenase had higher expression levels compared with subunits of the other enzymes genes. Taxonomic profiles of selected enzymes (ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxygenase showed that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria present mainly belonged to Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira species and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea sequences were detected in both DNA and cDNA datasets.

  16. Linking isoprenoidal GDGT membrane lipid distributions with gene abundances of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and uncultured crenarchaeotal groups in the water column of a tropical lake (Lake Challa, East Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, Laura K; Villanueva, Laura; Weijers, Johan W H; Verschuren, Dirk; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2013-09-01

    Stratified lakes are important reservoirs of microbial diversity and provide habitats for niche differentiation of Archaea. In this study, we used a lipid biomarker/DNA-based approach to reveal the diversity and abundance of Archaea in the water column of Lake Challa (East Africa). Concentrations of intact polar lipid (IPL) crenarchaeol, a specific biomarker of Thaumarchaeota, were enhanced (1 ng l(-1) ) at the oxycline/nitrocline. The predominance of the more labile IPL hexose-phosphohexose crenarchaeol indicated the presence of an actively living community of Thaumarchaeota. Archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed the presence of thaumarchaeotal groups 1.1a and 1.1b at and above the oxycline. In the anoxic deep water, amoA gene abundance was an order of magnitude lower than at the oxycline and high abundance (∼90 ng l(-1) ) of an IPL with the acyclic glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT-0) was evident. The predominance of archaeal 16S rRNA sequences affiliated to the uncultured crenarchaeota groups 1.2 and miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group (MCG) points to an origin of GDGT-0 from uncultured crenarchaeota. This study demonstrates the importance of thermal stratification and nutrient availability in the distribution of archaeal groups in lakes, which is relevant to constrain and validate temperature proxies based on archaeal GDGTs (i.e. TEX86 ).

  17. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen metabolism genes in the surface of marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Carolina; Schneider, Dominik; Thürmer, Andrea; Dellwig, Olaf; Lipka, Marko; Daniel, Rolf; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we analysed metagenomes along with biogeochemical profiles from Skagerrak (North Sea) and Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea) sediments, to trace the prevailing nitrogen pathways. NO3- was present in the top 5 cm below the sediment-water interface at both sites. NH4+ increased with depth below 5 cm where it overlapped with the NO3- zone. Steady state modelling of NO3- and NH4+ porewater profiles indicates zones of net nitrogen species transformations. Protease, peptidase, urease and deaminase ammonification genes were detected in metagenomes. Genes involved in ammonia oxidation (amo, hao), nitrite oxidation (nxr), denitrification (nar, nir, nor) and dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ (nap, nfr and otr) were also present. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the nitrifying group Nitrosopumilales and other groups involved in nitrification and denitrification (Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosonomas) appeared less abundant in Skagerrak sediments compared to Bothnian Bay sediments. Beggiatoa and Thiothrix 16S rRNA genes were also present suggesting chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction to NO2- or NH4+ as a possible pathway. Although anammox planctomycetes 16S rRNA genes were present in metagenomes, anammox protein-coding genes were not detected. Our results show the metabolic potential for ammonification, nitrification, NO3- reduction, and denitrification activities in Skagerrak and Bothnian Bay sediments.

  18. Structure and composition of biofilm communities in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Frank; Sultana, Razia; Suarez, Marco; Hermansson, Malte; Plaza, Elzbieta; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2014-02-01

    It is a challenge to apply anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) for nitrogen removal from wastewater at low temperatures. Maintenance of anammox- and aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppression of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are key issues. In this work, a nitritation-anammox moving bed biofilm pilot reactor was operated at 19-10°C for 300 d. Nitrogen removal was decreasing, but stable, at 19-13°C. At 10°C removal became unstable. Quantitative PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene sequencing showed that no major microbial community changes were observed with decreased temperature. Anammox bacteria dominated the biofilm (0.9-1.2 × 10(14) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)). Most anammox bacteria were similar to Brocadia sp. 40, but another smaller Brocadia population was present near the biofilm-water interface, where also the AOB community (Nitrosomonas) was concentrated in thin layers (1.8-5.3 × 10(12) amoA copies m(-2)). NOB (Nitrobacter, Nitrospira) were always present at low concentrations (<1.3 × 10(11) 16S rRNA copies m(-2)).

  19. Association of running manner with bacterial community dynamics in a partial short-term nitrifying bioreactor for treatment of piggery wastewater with high ammonia content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei-Li; Huang, Qiang; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-12-01

    Optimization of running parameters in a bioreactor requires detailed understanding of microbial community dynamics during the startup and running periods. Using a novel piggery wastewater treatment system termed "UASB + SHARON + ANAMMOX" constructed in our laboratory, we investigated microbial community dynamics using the Illumina MiSeq method, taking activated sludge samples at ~2-week intervals during a ~300-day period. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were further investigated by quantification of AOB amoA genes and construction of gene clone libraries. Major changes in bacterial community composition and dynamics occurred when running manner was changed from continuous flow manner (CFM) to sequencing batch manner (SBM), and when effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for practical treatment of real piggery wastewater was used as influent; differences among these three experimental groups were significant (R (2)  = 0.94, p level thereafter. Relative abundance of the genus Nitrosomonas increased from ~0.67 % during the CFM period to 8.0 % by day 220, and thereafter decreased to a near-constant ~1.6 %. Environmental factors such as load ammonia, effluent ammonia, effluent nitrite, UASB effluent, pH, and DO levels collectively drove bacterial community dynamics and contributed to maintenance of effluent NH4 (+)-N/NO2 (-)-N ratio ~1. Theses results might provide useful clues for the control of the startup processes and maintaining high efficiency of such bioreactors.

  20. Start-up and bacterial community compositions of partial nitrification in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Mao, Yan-Jun; Shi, Yan-Ping; Quan, Xie

    2017-03-01

    Partial nitrification (PN) has been considered as one of the promising processes for pretreatment of ammonium-rich wastewater. In this study, a kind of novel carriers with enhanced hydrophilicity and electrophilicity was implemented in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to start up PN process. Results indicated that biofilm formation rate was higher on modified carriers. In comparison with the reactor filled with traditional carriers (start-up period of 21 days), it took only 14 days to start up PN successfully with ammonia removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate of 90 and 91%, respectively, in the reactor filled with modified carriers. Evident changes of spatial distributions and community structures had been detected during the start-up. Free-floating cells existed in planktonic sludge, while these microorganisms trended to form flocs in the biofilm. High-throughput pyrosequencing results indicated that Nitrosomonas was the predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) in the PN system, while Comamonas might also play a vital role for nitrogen oxidation. Additionally, some other bacteria such as Ferruginibacter, Ottowia, Saprospiraceae, and Rhizobacter were selected to establish stable footholds. This study would be potentially significant for better understanding the microbial features and developing efficient strategies accordingly for MBBR-based PN operation.

  1. Nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) biofilm and biomass response to long term exposure to 1 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, V; Delatolla, R; Abujamel, T; Mottawea, W; Gadbois, A; Laflamme, E; Stintzi, A

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to investigate moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) nitrification rates, nitrifying biofilm morphology, biomass viability as well as bacterial community shifts during long-term exposure to 1 °C. Long-term exposure to 1 °C is the key operational condition for potential ammonia removal upgrade units to numerous northern region treatment systems. The average laboratory MBBR ammonia removal rate after long-term exposure to 1 °C was measured to be 18 ± 5.1% as compared to the average removal rate at 20 °C. Biofilm morphology and specifically the thickness along with biomass viability at various depths in the biofilm were investigated using variable pressure electron scanning microscope (VPSEM) imaging and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) imaging in combination with viability live/dead staining. The biofilm thickness along with the number of viable cells showed significant increases after long-term exposure to 1 °C. Hence, this study observed nitrifying bacteria with higher activities at warm temperatures and a slightly greater quantity of nitrifying bacteria with lower activities at cold temperatures in nitrifying MBBR biofilms. Using DNA sequencing analysis, Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira (ammonia oxidizers) as well as Nitrospira (nitrite oxidizer) were identified and no population shift was observed between 20 °C and after long-term exposure to 1 °C.

  2. Investigation of Archaeal and Bacterial community structure of five different small drinking water networks with special regard to the nitrifying microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagymáté, Zsuzsanna; Homonnay, Zalán G; Márialigeti, Károly

    2016-01-01

    Total microbial community structure, and particularly nitrifying communities inhabiting five different small drinking water networks characterized with different water physical and chemical parameters was investigated, using cultivation-based methods and sequence aided Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. Ammonium ion, originated from well water, was only partially oxidized via nitrite to nitrate in the drinking water distribution systems. Nitrification occurred at low ammonium ion concentration (27-46μM), relatively high pH (7.6-8.2) and over a wide range of dissolved oxygen concentrations (0.4-9.0mgL(-1)). The nitrifying communities of the distribution systems were characterized by variable most probable numbers (2×10(2)-7.1×10(4) MPN L(-1)) and probably originated from the non-treated well water. The sequence aided T-RFLP method revealed that ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms and nitrite-oxidizing Bacteria (Nitrosomonas oligotropha, Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and Nitrospira moscoviensis, 'Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii') were present in different ratios in the total microbial communities of the distinct parts of the water network systems. The nitrate generated by nitrification was partly utilized by nitrate-reducing (and denitrifying) Bacteria, present in low MPN and characterized by sequence aided T-RFLP as Comamonas sp. and Pseudomonas spp. Different environmental factors, like pH, chemical oxygen demand, calculated total inorganic nitrogen content (moreover nitrite and nitrate concentration), temperature had important effect on the total bacterial and archaeal community distribution.

  3. Can nitrification bring us to Mars? The role of microbial interactions on nitrogen recovery in life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaens, Marlies E. R.; Lasseur, Christophe; Clauwaert, Peter; Boon, Nico; Ilgrande, Chiara; Vlaeminck, Siegfried

    2016-07-01

    Human habitation in space requires artificial environment recirculating fundamental elements to enable the highest degree of autonomy . The European Space Agency, supported by a large consortoium of European organisationsdevelop the Micro-Ecological Life Support System (MELiSSA) to transform the mission wastes waste (a.o. organic fibers, CO2, and urine) into water, oxygen, and food (Lasseur et al., 2010). Among these wastes, astronauts' urine has a high potential to provide nitrogen as a fertilizer for food production. As higher plant growth in space is typically proposed to be performed in hydroponics, liquid fertilizer containing nitrates is preferred. An Additional Unit for Water Treatment is developed for urine nitrification by means of a synthetic microbial community. The key players in this consortium are ureolytic bacteria to hydrolyse the main nitrogen source in urine, urea, to ammonium and carbon dioxide as well as oxidation of organic compounds present in urine, ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to convert ammonium to nitrite (nitritation), and the nitrate oxidizing bacteria (NOB) to produce nitrate (nitratation). Pure AOB strains Nitrosomonas ureae Nm10 and Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718, pure NOB strains Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255 and Nitrobacter vulgaris Z, and interactions within synthetic consortia of one AOB and one NOB or all together were tested. As the initial salinity of fresh urine can be as high as 30 mS/cm, the functionality of selected pure strains and synthetic consortia was evaluated by means of the nitritation and nitratation activity at varying NaCl salinities (5, 10, and 30 mS/cm). The nitritation activity of pure AOB strains was compared with the synthetic consortia. Both N. ureae and Ns. europaea benefit from the presence of Nb. winogradskyi as the ammonium oxidation rates of 1.7 ± 0.7 and 6.4 ± 0.6 mg N/L.d at 5 mS/cm, respectively, doubled. These results are in line with the findings of Perez et al (2015) observing a lower

  4. Genetic Relationships Among Olive (Olea europaea L.) Cultivars Native to Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakar, Ebru; Unver, Hulya; Bakir, Melike; Ulas, Mehmet; Sakar, Zeynep Mujde

    2016-08-01

    Olive is a widely cultivated, mainly in the Mediterranean region, and economically important fruit species used as both olive oil and table olive consumption. In Turkey, more than 50 olive cultivars have been authorized for commercial plantations, representing the developmental base for the olive industry. The aim of the present study was to identify genetic relationships among the most widely grown 27 olive cultivars in Turkey, using microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers. Nine well-known foreign olive cultivars from different countries are also included in the study to compare the Turkish cultivars. To determine genetic relationship and diversity, 10 SSR loci (DCA3, DCA9, DCA15, DCA18, UDO4, UDO9, UDO11, UDO12, UDO24, UDO28) were used. Jaccard's similarity coefficient and the UPGMA method for cluster analysis were performed using the software NTSYSpc. The results showed that the number of alleles per locus ranging from 4 (UDO4, UDO9, UDO11, UDO12, DCA15) to 12 (DCA9) presenting high polymorphism. There were no identical cultivars. High similarity was shown by cultivars Maviand Adana topağı (0.754). The most genetically divergent cultivars, Domat-Meski (0.240) and Domat-NizipYağlık (0.245), were also identified.

  5. Copa y concierto: variabilidad de caracteres funcionales foliares en "Olea europaea"

    OpenAIRE

    Escribano Rocafort, Adrián Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Una de las premisas adoptadas en la teoría ecológica implica que la variabilidad en la expresión de caracteres funcionales es despreciable entre individuos conespecíficos comparada con la variabilidad existente entre especies. Sin embargo, la evidencia acumulada destaca la variabilidad intraespecífica en el funcionamiento de los ecosistemas y en los procesos de ensamblaje y dinámica de comunidades, especialmente en aquellas dominadas por una o pocas especies. La variabilidad funcional intraes...

  6. Fruit Morphological Changes during Pit Hardening in Autochthonous Istrian Olive (Olea europaea L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Krapac

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocarp lignification is important fruit growth phenophase since after its completion fruit starts with oil accumulation. The information about duration of endocarp lignification is important for timing of management practices, irrigation and pest control in oil cultivars, and fruit thinning in table cultivars to obtain uniform fruit weight and size. In this study, fruit length, width and weight of four Istrian autochthonous olive cultivars (‘Buža’, ‘Puntoža’, ‘Rošinjola’ and ‘Istarska bjelica’ were measured. Samples were taken from olive collection orchard of the Institute of Agriculture and Tourism in Poreč in equal growing conditions. The aim of the research was to define an olive fruit growth dynamics during pit hardening. Fruit weight in all cultivars was increasing during endocarp lignification (from 7th to 28th July. The highest percentage in the weight growth in the first week had cultivars ‘Buža’ (48.5% and ‘Rošinjola’ (44.6% while in the second week maximum was reached by cultivars ‘Puntoža’ (44.2% and ‘Istarska bjelica’ (42%. The highest increase in total fruit mass was detected in ‘Puntoža’ (1.30 g and the least at ‘Rošinjola’ (0.56 g. Maximum increase in length (L and width (W had ‘Puntoža’ (L: 7.13 mm; W: 4.23 mm and the least ‘Istarska bjelica’ (L: 2.48 mm; W: 2.70 mm.

  7. Novel qPCR systems for olive (Olea europaea L.) authentication in oils and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gómez, Sonia; Busto, María D; Albillos, Silvia M; Ortega, Natividad

    2016-03-01

    The traceability of olive oil is an unresolved issue that remains a challenge. In this field, DNA-based techniques are very powerful tools for discrimination that are less negatively influenced by environmental conditions than other techniques. More specifically, quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) achieves a high degree of sensitivity, although the DNA that it can directly isolate from these oils presents drawbacks. Our study reports the analysis of eight systems, in order to determine their suitability for olive detection in oil and oil-derived foodstuffs. The eight systems were analyzed on the basis of their sensitivity and specificity in the qPCR assay, their relative sensitivity to olive DNA detection and DNA mixtures, their sensitivity and specificity to olive in vegetable oils and the detection of olive in commercial products. The results show that the PetN-PsbM system, designed in this study, is a suitable and reliable technique in relation to olive oil and olive ingredients in both food authentication and food safety processes.

  8. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of individual and combined phenolics in Olea europaea leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2010-05-01

    Olive leaves, an agricultural waste, have great potential as a natural antioxidant. The current study was made to assess the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of both the individual and combined phenolics in olive leaf extract. A combined phenolics mixture was prepared by amount ratios of the phenolic compounds in the olive leaf extract. The results showed that both the individual and combined phenolics exhibited good radical scavenging abilities, and also revealed superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity. In terms of antimicrobial activity, both oleuropein and caffeic acid showed inhibition effects against microorganisms. Furthermore, the antimicrobial effect of the combined phenolics was significantly higher than those of the individual phenolics. These results show that the combination of olive leaf extract phenolics possessed antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. This study indicates that olive leaf extract might be a valuable bioactive source, and would seem to be applicable in both the health and medical food.

  9. In vitro antibacterial activity of some aliphatic aldehydes from Olea europaea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisignano, G; Laganà, M G; Trombetta, D; Arena, S; Nostro, A; Uccella, N; Mazzanti, G; Saija, A

    2001-04-20

    In the present paper we report the 'in vitro' activity of eight aliphatic long-chain aldehydes from olive flavor (hexanal, nonanal, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-eptenal, (E)-2-octenal, (E)-2-nonenal, (E)-2-decenal and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal) against a number of standard and freshly isolated bacterial strains that may be causal agents of human intestinal and respiratory tract infections. The saturated aldehydes characterized in the present study do not exhibit significant antibacterial activity, while the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes have a broad antimicrobial spectrum and show similar activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. The effectiveness of the aldehydes under investigation seems to depend not only on the presence of the alpha,beta-double bond, but also on the chain length from the enal group and on the microorganism tested.

  10. De Novo Assembly and Functional Annotation of the Olive (Olea europaea) Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; González-Plaza, Juan José; Cañada, Andrés; Blanco, Ana María; García-López, Maria del Carmen; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Pedrola, Laia; Sicardo, M. Dolores; Hernández, M. Luisa; De la Rosa, Raúl; Belaj, Angjelina; Gil-Borja, Mayte; Luque, Francisco; Martínez-Rivas, José Manuel; Pisano, David G.; Trelles, Oswaldo; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2013-01-01

    Olive breeding programmes are focused on selecting for traits as short juvenile period, plant architecture suited for mechanical harvest, or oil characteristics, including fatty acid composition, phenolic, and volatile compounds to suit new markets. Understanding the molecular basis of these characteristics and improving the efficiency of such breeding programmes require the development of genomic information and tools. However, despite its economic relevance, genomic information on olive or closely related species is still scarce. We have applied Sanger and 454 pyrosequencing technologies to generate close to 2 million reads from 12 cDNA libraries obtained from the Picual, Arbequina, and Lechin de Sevilla cultivars and seedlings from a segregating progeny of a Picual × Arbequina cross. The libraries include fruit mesocarp and seeds at three relevant developmental stages, young stems and leaves, active juvenile and adult buds as well as dormant buds, and juvenile and adult roots. The reads were assembled by library or tissue and then assembled together into 81 020 unigenes with an average size of 496 bases. Here, we report their assembly and their functional annotation. PMID:23297299

  11. Flowers and olive fruits (Olea Europaea l. growth under tropic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco García Molano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available It was relatively easy the olive adaptation in tropical area for its evergreen and rustic condition where there were found trees with a very good development and production according to different studies that show the existence of some varieties of ancient trees located in villa de Leyva, Sáchica and Sutamarchán; however these varieties did not prosper as farming and they were abandoned. In the last ten years the olive farming has taken interest again and now there has been planted new crops through the existent material in the region, the production started three years later, for that reason it was taken the cultural, environmental, economic and scientific interest. This study aimed to know the performance of the development and trees growth planted take into account some edaphoclimatic conditions of the ‘Alto Ricaurte’. There were chosen thirty nine trees which the treatment one corresponded to olives of thirty years in production and the treatment two corresponded to three years plants which they had started their production. This plant material had been identified genetically by means of molecular analysis with a classification from one to ten considering that it did not correspond to the denomination that these varieties had in this region. The study shows that genotype four has trees at both ages, which the analysis of results was made take into account the age of this one, observing different behavior in flowering that it seems to be influenced because of climate conditions meanwhile that the planted development and growth did not show any difference in genotypes neither ages.

  12. Analytical approaches for the characterization and identification of olive (Olea europaea) oil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-10-30

    Proteins in olive oil have been scarcely investigated probably due to the difficulty of working with such a lipidic matrix and the dramatically low abundance of proteins in this biological material. Additionally, this scarce information has generated contradictory results, thus requiring further investigations. This work treats this subject from a comprehensive point of view and proposes the use of different analytical approaches to delve into the characterization and identification of proteins in olive oil. Different extraction methodologies, including capture via combinational hexapeptide ligand libraries (CPLLs), were tried. A sequence of methodologies, starting with off-gel isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using an ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) column, was applied to profile proteins from olive seed, pulp, and oil. Besides this, and for the first time, a tentative identification of oil proteins by mass spectrometry has been attempted.

  13. Olive (Olea europaea L.) tree nitrogen status is a key factor for olive oil quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Ran; Kerem, Zohar; Ben-Gal, Alon; Dag, Arnon; Schwartz, Amnon; Zipori, Isaac; Basheer, Loai; Yermiyahu, Uri

    2013-11-27

    The influence of macronutrient status on olive oil properties was studied for three years. Data were analyzed by a multivariate model considering N, P, K, and fruiting year as explanatory factors. Oil quality parameters were primarily associated with N concentration in leaves and fruits which increased with N in irrigation solution. The effect of P on oil quality was mainly indirect since increased P availability increased N accumulation. The potassium level had negligible effects. The oil phenolic content decreased linearly as a function of increased leaf N, indicating protein-phenol competition in leaves. The overall saturation level of the fatty acids decreased with fruit N, resulting in increased polyunsaturated fatty acids. Free fatty acids increased with increased levels of fruit N. High fruit load tended to reduce fruit N and subsequently improve oil quality. The effect of N on oil properties depended solely on its concentration in leaves or fruits, regardless of the cause.

  14. Phenolic compounds and antimicrobial activity of olive (Olea europaea L. Cv. Cobrançosa) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Marcelino, Filipa; Valentão, Patricia; Andrade, Paula B; Seabra, Rosa; Estevinho, Leticia; Bento, Albino; Pereira, José Alberto

    2007-05-26

    We report the determination of phenolic compounds in olive leaves by reversed-phase HPLC/DAD, and the evaluation of their in vitro activity against several microorganisms that may be causal agents of human intestinal and respiratory tract infections, namely gram positive (Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungi (Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans). Seven phenolic compounds were identified and quantified: caffeic acid, verbascoside, oleuropein, luteolin 7-O-glucoside, rutin, apigenin 7-O-glucoside and luteolin 4'-O-glucoside. At low concentrations olive leaves extracts showed an unusual combined antibacterial and antifungal action, which suggest their great potential as nutraceuticals, particularly as a source of phenolic compounds.

  15. Anti-hyperglycemic activity of a TGR5 agonist isolated from Olea europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Genet, Cédric; Strehle, Axelle; Thomas, Charles; Lobstein, Annelise; Wagner, Alain; Mioskowski, Charles; Auwerx, Johan; Saladin, Régis

    2007-11-03

    Olive tree (Olea europeaea) leaves are well known for their effect on metabolism in particular as a traditional anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive herbal drug. These properties are until now only attributed to oleuropein, the major secoiridoid of olive leaves. Here we describe the isolation and the identification of another constituent implicated in the anti-diabetic effect of this plant, i.e. oleanolic acid. We show that this triterpene is an agonist for TGR5, a member of G-protein coupled receptor activated by bile acids and which mediates some of their various cellular and physiological effect. Oleanolic acid lowers serum glucose and insulin levels in mice fed with a high fat diet and it enhances glucose tolerance. Our data suggest that both oleuropein and oleanolic acid are involved in the anti-diabetic effect of olive leaves and further emphasize the potential role of TGR5 agonists to improve metabolic disorders.

  16. Study of the Rooting Ability of the “Kushan” Olive Cultivar (Olea Europaea L.

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    KOZETA BREGU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The “Kushan” cultivar is an native cultivar which holds very precious qualities; high oil radius, very good stability against the olive fly and a reduced development of the crown, which provides the adaptation for intensive forms of cultivation. But, anyway it has stayed isolated in a narrow area and no studies have been conducted before to evaluate the opportunities of vegetative propagation. It’s propagation and distribution will be very valuable for farmer economies. The tests have been conducted during 2011 and 2012, at the DEE-Valias (Didactic Experimental Economy; property of AUT Tirana. The cuttings have been treated with different concetrations of IBA, in total 6 variants (from 0 to 6000 ppm. Also, 4 different time periods of cuttings collection were tested (from 5th of March until 6th of April. For their propagation, the cuttings were put in a perlite substrate , while the bottom up warming in the working table was maintained on a 22-24oC regime, and air humidity was maintaned at 85-95 by mist irrigation. According to reference classifications of Dettori [19] and Di Vaio [20], Kushan belongs to cultivars with a high rooting ability. The best results were obtained by treatments with 3000, 4000, 5000 ppm IBA. Treatment with higher concentration decreases significantly the rooting ability. The best time frame for collecting of vegetative cuttings seems to be the period from the second week of March up till the first week of April.

  17. Characterization of a caleosin expressed during olive (Olea europaea L. pollen ontogeny

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    Rodríguez-García María

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The olive tree is an oil-storing species, with pollen being the second most active site in storage lipid biosynthesis. Caleosins are proteins involved in storage lipid mobilization during seed germination. Despite the existence of different lipidic structures in the anther, there are no data regarding the presence of caleosins in this organ to date. The purpose of the present work was to characterize a caleosin expressed in the olive anther over different key stages of pollen ontogeny, as a first approach to unravel its biological function in reproduction. Results A 30 kDa caleosin was identified in the anther tissues by Western blot analysis. Using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopic immunolocalization methods, the protein was first localized in the tapetal cells at the free microspore stage. Caleosins were released to the anther locule and further deposited onto the sculptures of the pollen exine. As anthers developed, tapetal cells showed the presence of structures constituted by caleosin-containing lipid droplets closely packed and enclosed by ER-derived cisternae and vesicles. After tapetal cells lost their integrity, the caleosin-containing remnants of the tapetum filled the cavities of the mature pollen exine, forming the pollen coat. In developing microspores, this caleosin was initially detected on the exine sculptures. During pollen maturation, caleosin levels progressively increased in the vegetative cell, concurrently with the number of oil bodies. The olive pollen caleosin was able to bind calcium in vitro. Moreover, PEGylation experiments supported the structural conformation model suggested for caleosins from seed oil bodies. Conclusions In the olive anther, a caleosin is expressed in both the tapetal and germ line cells, with its synthesis independently regulated. The pollen oil body-associated caleosin is synthesized by the vegetative cell, whereas the protein located on the pollen exine and its coating has a sporophytic origin. The biological significance of the caleosin in the reproductive process in species possessing lipid-storing pollen might depend on its subcellular emplacement. The pollen inner caleosin may be involved in OB biogenesis during pollen maturation. The protein located on the outside might rather play a function in pollen-stigma interaction during pollen hydration and germination.

  18. A dynamic model of potential growth of olive (Olea europaea L.) orchards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Sierra, Alejandro; Leffelaar, Peter A.; Testi, Luca; Orgaz, Francisco; Villalobos, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    A model of potential olive oil production is presented, based on a three-dimensional model of canopy photosynthesis and respiration and dynamic distribution of assimilates among organs. The model is used to analyse the effects of planting density (high and super-high density orchards with 408 and

  19. MELiSSA Pilot Plant: A facility for ground demonstration of a closed life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godia, Francesc; Fossen, Arnaud; Peiro, Enrique; Gerbi, Olivier; Dussap, Gilles; Leys, Natalie; Arnau, Carolina; Milian, Ernest

    europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi), edible biomass and oxygen production (Compartment 4a, an axenic co-culture of Arthrospira platensis) and oxygen consumers (Compartment 5, rats isolator). The presentation will focus on all the necessary elements to achieve this integration, particularly in the start-up of continuous operation of the bioreactors and on the key challenges addressed in the integration of the gas phase of two compartments, 4a and 5, one producing O2 and one consuming it. The design of the integration conditions to ensure the functionality of all the elements will also be discussed. Keywords:, MELiSSA, Pilot Plant, Integration, Arthrospira platensis, Nitrosomonas europaea, Nitrobacter winogradskyi

  20. Effect of Malathion on the Microbial Ecology of Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    the 1800s with French organic chemist P. Clermont synthesizing the first cholinesterase inhibitor, TEPP. In 1932, a German chemist first described...nitrogen compounds for energy consumption. These can be further subdivided into ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers. Ammonia oxidizers, including...class). Nitrospira (Nitrospira phylum) is also a nitrite oxidizer. The ammonia oxidizers are lithotrophic bacteria that oxidize ammonia into nitrite

  1. Emergent macrophytes select for nitrifying and denitrifying microorganisms in constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trias, Rosalia; Ramió Pujol, Sara; Bañeras, Lluis

    2014-05-01

    The use of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment is a reliable low-cost alternative that has been widely developed during the last years. Several processes involving plants, sediments, and microbial communities contribute to nitrogen removal in wetlands. Vegetation plays an important role in this process, not only by nutrient assimilation but also by the stimulation of the plant associated microbiota. Plants supply oxygen at the close proximity of the root surface that may favour ammonia oxidizers. At the same time, exudation of organic compounds potentially speeds-up denitrification in the anoxic environment. The aim of this work was to understand the plant-microbe interactions at the root level in the Empuriabrava free water surface constructed wetland (Spain). The roots of the macrophytes Typha latifolia, Typha angustifolia, Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus maritimus were sampled at four dates from January to September 2012, covering all the stages of plant growth. Additionally, sediment surrounding vegetation and non-vegetated sediments were sampled. Microbial community structure was analysed by pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA and functional genes (nirK, nirS, nosZ and amoA). Bacterial communities were significantly different in sediments of the vegetated areas compared to the root surface. Plant roots exhibited a higher proportion of proteobacteria whereas Actinobacteria were dominant in sediments. The nitrifiers Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrosococcus sp. accounted for less than 1% of all sequences. Archaeal communities were dominated by the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Groups C2 and C3 and Methanomicrobia. Higher relative abundances of MCG were found in roots of P. australis, B. maritimus and T. angustifolia. Ammonia oxidizing archaea accounted for less than 0.1% of all sequences but were consistently more abundant in sediment samples compared to roots. NirK and NirS-type bacterial communities showed clearly distinct distribution

  2. Biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification for Aquatic Habitat in International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, H; Shoji, T; Uchida, S

    2014-04-01

    The biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was constructed for aquatic animal experiments in the International Space Station (ISS). The biological filter will be used to remove harmful ammonia excreted from aquatic animals in a closed water circulation system (Aquatic Habitat). The biological filter is a cylindrical tank packed with porous glass beads for nitrification and dual plastic bags for denitrification. The porous beads are supporting media for Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi. The N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells on the porous beads, oxidize the excreted ammonia to nitrate via nitrite. On the other hand, the dual bag is composed of an outer non-woven fabric bag and an inner non-porous polyethylene film bag. The outer bag is supporting media for Paracoccus pantotrophus. The inner bag, in which 99.5% ethanol is packed, releases the ethanol slowly, since ethanol can permeate through the non-porous polyethylene film. The P. pantotrophus cells on the outer bag reduce the produced nitrate to nitrogen gas by using the released ethanol as an electron donor for denitrification. The biological filter constructed in this study consequently removed the ammonia without accumulating nitrate. Most of the excess ethanol was consumed and did not affect the nitrification activity of the N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells severely. In accordance with the aquatic animal experiments in the ISS, small freshwater fish had been bred in the closed water circulation system equipped with the biological filter for 90 days. Ammonia concentration daily excreted from fish is assumed to be 1.7 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Under such conditions, the harmful ammonia and nitrite concentrations were kept below 0.1 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Nitrate and total organic carbon concentrations in the recirculation water were kept below 5 mg-N/L and 3 mg-C/L, respectively. All breeding fish were alive and ate

  3. Molecular Dynamic Study to Determine the Ammonia Conduction Mechanisms in Human RhCG and Bacterial Homoloques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Ugur

    2014-03-01

    The transport of Ammonia is provided by Amt/MEP/Rh protein superfamily. The x-ray structures of AmtB from Escherichia coli, Rh50 from Nitrosomonas europaea, and human RhCG show only few differences on periplasmic vestibules. After more than microsecond simulation on three models, we determined the striking difference on conduction mechanism between bacterial AmtB and Human RhCG proteins. In AmtB the backbone carbonyl groups at the periplasmic vestibule direct charged ammonia to the conserved aromatic cage at the bottom of the vestibule. Furthermore, two partially stacked phenyl rings of F107 and F215, separating the periplasmic vestibule from the hydrophobic lumen, flip open and closed simultaneouslywith a frequency of approximately 108 flipping events per second. During the passage from the phenyl gates charged ammonia releases its proton and becomes gas. However, the absence of an aromatic cage on Rh proteins and a strongly conserved E166 residue in the vicinity hints different conduction mechanism. Our studies confirm the conserved E166 emerges as a strong charged ammonia recruitment site for Human RhCG. The conserved phenyl gate behaves different for Rh proteins and the synchronized motion is not observed. These findings suggest a different deprotonation mechanism than bacterial AmtB.

  4. Effect of salinity on N₂O production during shortcut biological nitrogen removal from landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mu; Liu, Tiantian; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying; Xiao, Han

    2014-05-01

    Three identical SBR adapted to different salinity were applied to investigate the characteristics of the treatment performance and N2O production [Formula: see text] during shortcut biological nitrogen removal from landfill leachate under various operating parameters. Increase of salinity might deteriorate the activity of the microorganisms leading to the increase of [Formula: see text] , however, the system could be gradually adapted to the inhibition and alleviate the detrimental effect to some extent. The system acclimated to high salinity provided better performance under high salinity shock and a lower possibility of [Formula: see text] , while a sudden decrease in salinity can cause a temporary increase in [Formula: see text] . High salinity strengthened the influence of high ammonia nitrogen concentration and low DO concentration on [Formula: see text] while the strengthening effect was unconspicuous at high DO concentration. The anoxic phase did not produce a significant amount of N2O even at the lowest C/N ratio of 0.5 and was less susceptible to salinity. Characterization of the biomass composition using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that the relative proportion of Nitrosomonas europaea was increased with the increase of the salinity, which may be an important factor for the strengthening effect of salinity on [Formula: see text] .

  5. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell O Khunjar

    Full Text Available The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  6. Discrimination of the prochiral hydrogens at the C-2 position of n-alkanes by the methane/ammonia monooxygenase family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Akimitsu; Miyoshi, Teppei; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2015-08-14

    The selectivity of ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea (AMO-Ne) for the oxidation of C4-C8n-alkanes to the corresponding alcohol isomers was examined to show the ability of AMO-Ne to recognize the n-alkane orientation within the catalytic site. AMO-Ne in whole cells produces 1- and 2-alcohols from C4-C8n-alkanes, and the regioselectivity is dependent on the length of the carbon chain. 2-Alcohols produced from C4-C7n-alkanes were predominantly either the R- or S-enantiomers, while 2-octanol produced from n-octane was racemic. These results indicate that AMO-Ne can discriminate between the prochiral hydrogens at the C-2 position, with the degree of discrimination varying according to the n-alkane. Compared to the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and that of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, AMO-Ne showed a distinct ability to discriminate between the orientation of n-butane and n-pentane in the catalytic site.

  7. Start-up and bacterial communities of single-stage nitrogen removal using anammox and partial nitritation (SNAP) for treatment of high strength ammonia wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbing; Zhou, Jian; Han, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a lab-scale sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) was used to start up the single-stage nitrogen removal system using anammox and partial nitritation (SNAP) process seeding from surplus activated sludge. The volumetric nitrogen loading rate (vNLR) was firstly 0.075 kg N m(-3) d(-1) and then gradually increased to 0.60 kg N m(-3) d(-1). A maximal total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 0.54 kg N m(-3) d(-1) was achieved by the SNAP process after 132 days operation with NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiency of 99.4% and 90.5%, respectively. This reactor may have applications for the SNAP process treating high strength ammonia wastewater. And dewatered surplus activated sludge was recommended as the seed sludge for engineering applications. The dominant bacterial strains were Xanthomonas campestris, Nitrosomonas europaea and Ignavibacterium album, corresponding to the percentage of 24%, 22% and 20%, respectively, based on the 16S rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing of the SNAP sludge.

  8. Effect of organic carbon on nitrification efficiency and community composition of nitrifying biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jie; LI Daping; LIU Qiang; TAO Yong; HE Xiaohong; WANG Xiaomei; LI Xudong; GAO Ping

    2009-01-01

    The effects of organic carbon/inorganic nitrogen (C/N) ratio on the nitrification processes and the community shifts of nitrifying biofilms were investigated by kinetic comparison and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The results showed that the nitrification rate decreased with an increasing organic concentration. However, the effect became weak when the carbon concentration reached sufficiently high level. Denitrification was detected after organic carbon was added. The 12 h ammonium removal rate ranged from 85% to 30% at C/N = 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 compare to control (C/N = 0). The loss of nitrogen at C/N = 0.5, 1, 2, 4, (8 and 16 was 31%, 18%, 24%, 65%, 59% and 62% respectively, after 24 h. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the dominant populations changed from nitrifying bacteria (Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter sp.) to denitrifying bacteria (Pseudomonas sp., Acidovorax sp. and Comamonas sp.) with C/N ratio increase. Although at high C/N ratio the denitrifying bacteria were the dominant populations, nitrifying bacteria grew simultaneously. Conrrespondingly, nitrification process coexisted with denitrification.

  9. New methods for analysis of spatial distribution and coaggregation of microbial populations in complex biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almstrand, Robert; Daims, Holger; Persson, Frank; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2013-10-01

    In biofilms, microbial activities form gradients of substrates and electron acceptors, creating a complex landscape of microhabitats, often resulting in structured localization of the microbial populations present. To understand the dynamic interplay between and within these populations, quantitative measurements and statistical analysis of their localization patterns within the biofilms are necessary, and adequate automated tools for such analyses are needed. We have designed and applied new methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital image analysis of directionally dependent (anisotropic) multispecies biofilms. A sequential-FISH approach allowed multiple populations to be detected in a biofilm sample. This was combined with an automated tool for vertical-distribution analysis by generating in silico biofilm slices and the recently developed Inflate algorithm for coaggregation analysis of microbial populations in anisotropic biofilms. As a proof of principle, we show distinct stratification patterns of the ammonia oxidizers Nitrosomonas oligotropha subclusters I and II and the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira sublineage I in three different types of wastewater biofilms, suggesting niche differentiation between the N. oligotropha subclusters, which could explain their coexistence in the same biofilms. Coaggregation analysis showed that N. oligotropha subcluster II aggregated closer to Nitrospira than did N. oligotropha subcluster I in a pilot plant nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) and a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), but not in a full-scale NTF, indicating important ecophysiological differences between these phylogenetically closely related subclusters. By using high-resolution quantitative methods applicable to any multispecies biofilm in general, the ecological interactions of these complex ecosystems can be understood in more detail.

  10. [Analysis of the changes of microbial community structure on bio-carrier of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Geng; Ma, Shao-Sai; Li, Qiu-Fen; Fu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Qu, Ke-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the variation of microbial community structure and the mechanism of denitrification on bio-carrier in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) during the periods of bio-film formation and operation the systems, traditional microbiological methods were applied to count the quantity of heterotrophic bacteria, ammonia oxidize bacteria and nitrite oxidize bacteria. The amplified products of variable V3 region of bacterial 16S rDNA were separated by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). And bacterial community DNA fingerprint was obtained. The sequences retrieved from the DGGE bands were used for homology analysis and construction of phylogenetic tree. It presented a trend that the quantity of the three types of bacteria increased gradually to a top and then fallen slowly to a stable level. The composition of microbial community of bio-carrier was very abundant in all periods, and the Shannon index was 1.53, 1.44, 1.57, 1.08, 1.27 and 1.30, respectively. During different periods, there was a certain shift in the microbial community structure, while the C(s) value (similar index) in two adjacent periods was high, indicating the variation and succession of the microbial community was slow and regular. Several bacteria had an effect on removal of pollutants for farming water and the effluent water quality could meet the requirements of high-density culture. Among them, Proteobacteria and Flavobacteria were main communities. The Nitrosomonas and some other facultative anaerobic bacteria (Flavobacteriaceae bacterium) were identified, which indicated that there may be coexisted pathways of nitrification and denitrification in bio-filter.

  11. Oxicenus maxwelli (Keifer (Acari: Eriophyidae danificando a cultura da oliveira, Olea europaea L., no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul Oxicenus maxwelli (Keifer (Acari: Eriophyidae damaging olive tree, Olea europaea L., in Rio Grande do Sul State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Perrone Ricalde

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available O micro ácaro da oliveira Oxicenus maxwelli (Keifer, 1939 foi identificado em pomares de oliveira nos municípios de Santana do Livramento, Bagé, Candiota, Pelotas e Rio Grande, RS, nos meses de novembro de 2010 a fevereiro de 2011. A espécie foi encontrada nas faces superior e inferior de folhas jovens, em flores e brotos, onde causa deformações, queda de folhas e flores, diminuição da fotossíntese e superbrotação, prejudicando a produção da planta e a comercialização dos frutos deformados. Este é o primeiro registro da espécie atacando a oliveira no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul.The olive bud mite Oxicenus maxwelli (Keifer, 1939 was identified in olive groves in the municipalities of Santana do Livramento, Bagé, Candiota, Pelotas and Rio Grande, RS in November 2010 to February 2011. The specie was found on the upper surface and under surface of young leaves, flowers and buds where it causes deformities, loss of leaves and flowers, decreased photosynthesis and budding, damaging the plant's production and marketing of deformed fruits. This is the first record of the species attacking the olive tree in the state of Rio Grande do Sul.

  12. Enraizamento de diferentes tipos de estacas de oliveira (Olea europaea L. utilizando ácido indolbutírico Rooting of different types of olive (Olea europaea L. tree cuttings using indol butyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pio

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar a influência do número de pares de folhas e testar o efeito de diferentes concentrações de AIB (ácido indolbutírico no enraizamento de estacas semilenhosas de oliveira. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o inteiramente casualizado, em fatorial 4 x 3, sendo quatro concentrações de AIB (0, 1000, 2000, e 3000 mg L-1 e três tipos de estacas (sem folhas, com um par de folhas e com dois pares de folhas. As estacas foram padronizadas com 12 cm de comprimento. Após o preparo inicial, as estacas foram imersas nas soluções de AIB por cinco segundos e, em seguida, colocadas em bandejas de polipropileno contendo o substrato Plantmax® e transportadas para casa-de-vegetação, com umidade e temperatura controladas, onde permaneceram por 90 dias. As variáveis analisadas foram: porcentagem de estacas enraizadas e brotadas, número de folhas, brotos e raízes emitidas por estaca e com primento médio das brotações e das raízes. O AIB apenas promoveu influência ao sistema radicular; a concentração de 2000 mg L-1 de AIB promoveu maior enraizamento e a concentração de 3000 mg L-1 de AIB em estacas com dois pares de folhas promoveu melhores resultados para número de raízes por estacas e comprimento médio das raízes; estacas ausentes de folhas favoreceram maior brotação nas estacas.The present work was developed with the objective to evaluate the influence of the number of leaves and test the effect of different concentrations of IBA (indolbutyric acid in the cutting propagation of olive tree. The experimental design was complete randomized, in a two factors arrangement (4 x 3, with four different concentrations of IBA (0, 1000, 2000 and 3000 mg L-1 and three different types of cuttings (without leaves, one pair of leaves and two pairs of leaves. The cuttings were padronized with 12 cm of length and treated with IBA for five seconds. After that, they were taken to polysty rene trays filled with Plantmax® and stayed under house green conditions for 90 days. Rooting and sprouting percentage, number of leaves, sprouts and roots, sprout and root length were evaluated. IBA only influenced the root system; the concentration of 2000 mg L-1 promoted best results for rooting percentage and the concentration of 3000 mg L-1 IBA in cuttings with two pairs of leaves promoted best results for number of roots and root length; cuttings of absent leaves favored larger sprouting in the cuttings.

  13. Evaluation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi capacity to alleviate abiotic stress of olive (Olea europaea L.) plants at different transplant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompadre, María Josefina; Pérgola, Mariana; Fernández Bidondo, Laura; Colombo, Roxana Paula; Silvani, Vanesa Analía; Pardo, Alejandro Guillermo; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Godeas, Alicia Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of roots to sense soil physicochemical parameters plays an essential role in maintaining plant nutritional and developmental functions under abiotic stress. These conditions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues causing oxidation of proteins and lipids among others. Some plants have developed adaptive mechanisms to counteract such adverse conditions such as symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). AMF enhance plant growth and improve transplant survival by protecting host plants against environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alleviation of transplanting stress by two strains of Rhizophagus irregularis (GC2 and GA5) in olive. Our results show that olive plants have an additional energetic expense in growth due to an adaptative response to the growing stage and to the mycorrhizal colonization at the first transplant. However, at the second transplant the coinoculation improves olive plant growth and protects against oxidative stress followed by the GA5-inoculation. In conclusion, a combination of two AMF strains at the beginning of olive propagation produces vigorous plants successfully protected in field cultivation even with an additional cost at the beginning of growth.

  14. ReprOlive: a database with linked data for the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) reproductive transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Rosario; Zafra, Adoración; Seoane, Pedro; Castro, Antonio J.; Guerrero-Fernández, Darío; Castillo-Castillo, Trinidad; Medina-García, Ana; Cánovas, Francisco M.; Aldana-Montes, José F.; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Alché, Juan de Dios; Claros, M. Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Plant reproductive transcriptomes have been analyzed in different species due to the agronomical and biotechnological importance of plant reproduction. Here we presented an olive tree reproductive transcriptome database with samples from pollen and pistil at different developmental stages, and leaf and root as control vegetative tissues http://reprolive.eez.csic.es). It was developed from 2,077,309 raw reads to 1,549 Sanger sequences. Using a pre-defined workflow based on open-source tools, sequences were pre-processed, assembled, mapped, and annotated with expression data, descriptions, GO terms, InterPro signatures, EC numbers, KEGG pathways, ORFs, and SSRs. Tentative transcripts (TTs) were also annotated with the corresponding orthologs in Arabidopsis thaliana from TAIR and RefSeq databases to enable Linked Data integration. It results in a reproductive transcriptome comprising 72,846 contigs with average length of 686 bp, of which 63,965 (87.8%) included at least one functional annotation, and 55,356 (75.9%) had an ortholog. A minimum of 23,568 different TTs was identified and 5,835 of them contain a complete ORF. The representative reproductive transcriptome can be reduced to 28,972 TTs for further gene expression studies. Partial transcriptomes from pollen, pistil, and vegetative tissues as control were also constructed. ReprOlive provides free access and download capability to these results. Retrieval mechanisms for sequences and transcript annotations are provided. Graphical localization of annotated enzymes into KEGG pathways is also possible. Finally, ReprOlive has included a semantic conceptualisation by means of a Resource Description Framework (RDF) allowing a Linked Data search for extracting the most updated information related to enzymes, interactions, allergens, structures, and reactive oxygen species. PMID:26322066

  15. Evaluation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Capacity to Alleviate Abiotic Stress of Olive (Olea europaea L. Plants at Different Transplant Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Josefina Bompadre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of roots to sense soil physicochemical parameters plays an essential role in maintaining plant nutritional and developmental functions under abiotic stress. These conditions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS in plant tissues causing oxidation of proteins and lipids among others. Some plants have developed adaptive mechanisms to counteract such adverse conditions such as symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. AMF enhance plant growth and improve transplant survival by protecting host plants against environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alleviation of transplanting stress by two strains of Rhizophagus irregularis (GC2 and GA5 in olive. Our results show that olive plants have an additional energetic expense in growth due to an adaptative response to the growing stage and to the