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Sample records for ammonia positron emission

  1. Positron emission tomography of hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, S; Munk, O L; Roelsgaard, K

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic first-pass metabolism plays a key role in metabolic regulation and drug metabolism. Metabolic processes can be quantified in vivo by positron emission tomography scanning (PET). We wished to develop a PET technique to measure hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia. Seven anaesthetised...... pigs were given positron-labelled ammonia, (13)NH(3), into the portal vein and into the vena cava as successive 2-min infusions followed by 22-min dynamic liver scanning. Vena cava infusion data were used to account for recirculation of tracer and metabolites following the portal vein infusion...

  2. Positron emission tomography of hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia in pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiding, S.; Munk, O.L.; Roelsgaard, K.; Bender, D.; Bass, L.

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic first-pass metabolism plays a key role in metabolic regulation and drug metabolism. Metabolic processes can be quantified in vivo by positron emission tomography scanning (PET). We wished to develop a PET technique to measure hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia. Seven anaesthetised pigs were given positron-labelled ammonia, 13 NH 3 , into the portal vein and into the vena cava as successive 2-min infusions followed by 22-min dynamic liver scanning. Vena cava infusion data were used to account for recirculation of tracer and metabolites following the portal vein infusion. The scan data were analysed by a model of sinusoidal zonation of ammonia metabolism with periportal urea formation and perivenous formation of glutamine. The hepatic extraction fraction of 13 NH 3 was 0.73±0.16 (mean±SD, n=7 pigs). Values of clearance of ammonia to urea and to glutamine were obtained, as were rate constants for washout of these two metabolites. Overall, the modelling showed half of the ammonia uptake to be converted to urea and half to glutamine. The washout rate constant for glutamine was about one-tenth of that for urea. We conclude that hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia was successfully assessed by PET. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of the pancreas using positron emission tomography with N-13 ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Tamaki, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Senda, M.; Yonekura, Y.; Saji, H.; Nishizawa, S.; Adachi, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1986-01-01

    A new technique for imaging the pancreas was developed using positron emission tomography (PET) with N-13 ammonia. Four healthy volunteers and 15 patients with pancreatic diseases were studied. After intravenous injection of 10-20 mCi of N-13 ammonia, serial PET scans were obtained every 150 seconds. In the healthy subjects, the pancreas was clearly visualized from the earliest scan. Scans in all ten patients with pancreatic cancer were abnormal. In five patients tumors were visualized as hot spots. When there was severe associated pancreatitis due to pancreatic duct obstruction by tumor, the radionuclide accumulation in the pancreas was remarkably low

  4. Visualization of muscles involved in unilateral tremor using 13N-ammonia and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelstraete, K.; Simons, M.; Deman, J.; Vermeulen, F.L.; Ghent Rijksuniversiteit; Goethals, P.; Bratzlavsky, M.

    1982-01-01

    Using positron emission computerized tomography (PCT), a high uptake of IV injected 13 N-ammonia was observed in the muscles of the right forearm and leg of a patient with a rightsided static tremor. In some mucles the concentration of 13 NH 3 was 8.5 times higher than in the symmetrical normal limb. Confrontation of the clinical, neurological, and electroyographic findings with the results of the PCT proved that the muscles with the high uptake corresponded to the muscles responsible for the tremulous movements. There is strong evidence that the high uptake of 13 NH 3 was related to the increased blood flow produced by the continuous rhythmic exercise of the muscles involved in the tremor. To our knowledge a similar observation has not been described before. It is suggested that the combined use of suitable positron emitters and PCT might provide a valuable tool for the noninvasive study of perfusion of individual skeletal muscles. (orig.)

  5. Imaging of the pancreas using dynamic positron emission tomography with N-13 ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Adachi, H.; Senda, M.; Saji, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new imaging technique of the pancreas. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 3 normal volunteers, 9 patient without the evidence of pancreatic diseases, 2 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head and one patient with islet cell carcinoma. Immediately after the intravenous injection of 10-20mCi of N-13 ammonia, data were obtained every 150 seconds for 30 minutes using a multi-slice whole-body PET scanner. In two cases of adenocarcinoma, the pancreas was not imaged, probably because the nontumorous portion of the pancreas was also suffered from severe pancreatitis due to the duct obstruction at the pancreatic head. In the case with islet cell carcinoma, the radionuclide was accumulated in the tumor and pancreas similarly. Thus, both of them were visualized but not separated. The central necrosis of the tumor showed poor radioactivity. The mechanism of the radionuclide accumulation in the pancreas is not well understood. However, the authors also studied the biodistribution of N-13 ammonia in mice and confirmed that there is an early and high accumulation of the radionuclide in the murine pancreas. These preliminary results of this paper suggest that the dynamic PET study may be useful for the imaging of the pancreas as well as for the further study of the blood supply and metabolism of the pancreas

  6. Regional myocardial perfusion assessed by N-13 labeled ammonia and positron emission computerized axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Huang, S.C.; Selin, C.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The usefulness of 13 NH 3 as an indicator of regional myocardial perfusion suitable for positron emission computerized axial tomography (PCT) has been suggested. However, the relationship between myocardial blood flow and uptake of 13 NH 3 has not been examined quantitatively. It was therefore the purpose of the current investigation to quantitate the relationship of myocardial 13 NH 3 tissue concentration to myocardial blood flow and to examine its suitability for PCT imaging. Twelve open chest dogs were studied. In 8 of the dogs 25 imaging procedures with 13 NH 3 and PCT were performed. In the remaining four dogs the relationship between flow and myocardial 13 NH 3 tissue concentration was assessed by in vitro techniques. The PCT technique provided high quality cross-sectional images of the distribution of 13 NH 3 in left ventricular myocardium. No significant redistribution of 13 NH 3 in myocardium occurred with time. Alterations in regional myocardial blood flow resulted in changes of the regional distribution of 13 NH 3 that were readily appreciated on the PCT images

  7. N-13 ammonia for the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial blood flow by positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics and characteristics of nitrogen-13 labelled ammonia as an indicator of blood flow in the myocardium were evaluated in open-chest dogs. Its utility as an imaging agent was tested in animals and man

  8. Impaired myocardial blood flow reserve in subjects with metabolic syndrome analyzed using positron emission tomography and N-13 labeled ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teragawa, Hiroki; Kihara, Yasuki [Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Morita, Koichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shishido, Hiroki; Otsuka, Nobuaki; Hirokawa, Yutaka [Hiroshima Heiwa Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Chayama, Kazuaki [Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Molecular Science and Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Coronary vasomotor response might be impaired in metabolic syndrome (MS); however, the precise abnormality has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess coronary-vasomotor response in MS subjects using N-13 labeled ammonia and positron emission tomography. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured at rest and during adenosine infusion in MS subjects (n = 13, MS group) with no definite evidence of heart disease and in subjects without MS (n = 14, non-MS group). Coronary vascular resistance (CVR) was calculated by dividing the mean aortic blood pressure by MBF. Myocardial blood flow reserve (MFR) was calculated as the ratio of the MBF during adenosine infusion to that during rest. Blood chemical parameters were measured to evaluate their relationship with MFR. During adenosine infusion, MBF was lower (p = 0.0085) and CVR higher (p = 0.0128) in the MS group than in the non-MS group and MFR was significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group (2.13 {+-} 0.99 vs. 3.38 {+-} 0.95, p = 0.0027). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (p < 0.05) and the presence of hypertension (p < 0.05) were independent determinants of MFR. The results indicate that MFR was impaired in MS subjects, suggesting that an abnormal coronary microvascular response occurred in these subjects. This abnormality may have been partially due to insulin resistance and hypertension. (orig.)

  9. Impaired myocardial blood flow reserve in subjects with metabolic syndrome analyzed using positron emission tomography and N-13 labeled ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teragawa, Hiroki; Kihara, Yasuki; Morita, Koichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Shishido, Hiroki; Otsuka, Nobuaki; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    Coronary vasomotor response might be impaired in metabolic syndrome (MS); however, the precise abnormality has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess coronary-vasomotor response in MS subjects using N-13 labeled ammonia and positron emission tomography. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured at rest and during adenosine infusion in MS subjects (n = 13, MS group) with no definite evidence of heart disease and in subjects without MS (n = 14, non-MS group). Coronary vascular resistance (CVR) was calculated by dividing the mean aortic blood pressure by MBF. Myocardial blood flow reserve (MFR) was calculated as the ratio of the MBF during adenosine infusion to that during rest. Blood chemical parameters were measured to evaluate their relationship with MFR. During adenosine infusion, MBF was lower (p = 0.0085) and CVR higher (p = 0.0128) in the MS group than in the non-MS group and MFR was significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group (2.13 ± 0.99 vs. 3.38 ± 0.95, p = 0.0027). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (p < 0.05) and the presence of hypertension (p < 0.05) were independent determinants of MFR. The results indicate that MFR was impaired in MS subjects, suggesting that an abnormal coronary microvascular response occurred in these subjects. This abnormality may have been partially due to insulin resistance and hypertension. (orig.)

  10. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens D; Rasmussen, Rune; Freiberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the quantitative properties of ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) on kinetic modeling with nitrogen 13 ammonia compared with filtered backprojection (FBP) in healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac N-13 ammonia positron...... emission tomography (PET) studies from 20 normal volunteers at rest and during dipyridamole stimulation were analyzed. Image data were reconstructed with either FBP or OSEM. FBP- and OSEM-derived input functions and tissue curves were compared together with the myocardial blood flow and spillover values...... and OSEM flow values were observed with a flow underestimation of 45% (rest/dipyridamole) in the septum and of 5% (rest) and 15% (dipyridamole) in the lateral myocardial wall. CONCLUSIONS: OSEM reconstruction of myocardial perfusion images with N-13 ammonia and PET produces high-quality images for visual...

  11. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Positron Emission Tomography Instrumentation, Generator Systems for Positron Emitters, Reconstruction Algorithms, Cerebral Glucose Consumption: Methodology and Validation, Cerebral Blood Flow Tomography Using Xenon-133 Inhalation: Methods and Clinical Applications, PET Studies of Stroke, Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography, and Use of PET in Oncology

  12. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    Utilization of positron emission tomography was reviewed in relation to construction and planned construction of small-size medical cyclotrons, planned construction of positron cameras and utilization of short-lived radionuclides. (Chiba, N.)

  13. A quantitative index of regional blood flow in canine myocardium derived noninvasively with N-13 ammonia and dynamic positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nienaber, C.A.; Ratib, O.; Gambhir, S.S.; Krivokapich, J.; Huang, S.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine (USA))

    1991-01-01

    To derive a quantitative index of regional myocardial blood flow, the arterial input function of the flow tracer N-13 ammonia and the regional myocardial N-13 activity concentrations were noninvasively determined in 29 experiments in eight dogs. N-13 ammonia was administered intravenously and cross-sectional images were acquired dynamically using an ECAT III positron emission tomograph with an effective in-plane resolution of 13.46 mm full-width half-maximum. Time-activity curves were derived from the serial images by assigning regions of interest to the left ventricular myocardium and left ventricular blood pool. Tracer net extractions were estimated from the myocardial time-activity concentrations at various times after tracer injection and the integral of the arterial input function. Myocardial blood flow was altered by intravenous dipyridamole, morphine, propranolol and partial or complete occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and ranged from 9 to 860 ml/min per 100 g. Estimates of tracer net extractions were most accurate when determined from the myocardial N-13 activity concentrations at 60 s divided by the integral of the arterial input function to that time. These estimates correlated with regional myocardial blood flows determined independently by the microsphere technique by y = x (1 - 0.64(e-114/x); SEE = 22.9; r = 0.94). First pass extraction fractions of N-13 ammonia determined noninvasively with this approach declined with higher flows in a nonlinear fashion and were similar to those determined invasively by direct intracoronary N-13 ammonia injections. The findings indicate that an accurate index of regional myocardial blood flow can be obtained noninvasively by high temporal sampling of arterial and myocardial tracer activity concentrations with positron emission tomography.

  14. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Ejmalian, G.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an intrinsically tool that provide a unique and unparalleled approach for clinicians and researchers to interrogate the heart noninvasively. The ability to label substances of physiological interest with positron-emitting radioisotopes has permitted insight into normal blood flow and metabolism and the alterations that occur with disease states. Positron emission tomography of the heart has evolved as a unique, noninvasive approach for the assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and function. Because of the intrinsic quantitative nature of positron emission tomography measurements as well as the diverse compounds that can be labeled with positron- emitting radioisotopes, studies with positron emission tomography have provided rich insight into the physiology of the heart under diverse conditions

  15. Ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the la......The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries...

  16. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paans, A.M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals have special applications in in-vivo studies of biochemical processes. The combination of a cyclotron for the production of radionuclides and a positron emission tomograph for the registration of the distribution of radioactivity in the body enables the measurement of local radioactivity concentration in tissues, and opens up new possibilities in the diagnosis and examination of abnormalities in the metabolism. The principles and procedures of positron emission tomography are described and the necessary apparatus considered, with emphasis on the positron camera. The first clinical applications using 55 Co bloemycine for tumor detection are presented. (C.F.)

  17. Positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for determining biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a

  18. Positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regional mycardial blood flow and substrate metabolism can be non-invasively evaluated and quantified with positron emission computed tomography (Positron-CT). Tracers of exogenous glucose utilization and fatty acid metabolism are available and have been extensively tested. Specific tracer kinetic models have been developed or are being tested so that glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be measured quantitatively by Positron-CT. Tracers of amino acid and oxygen metabolism are utilized in Positron-CT studies of the brain and development of such tracers for cardiac studies are in progress. Methods to quantify regional myocardial blood flow are also being developed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of Positron-/CT to document myocardial infarction. Experimental and clinical studies have begun to identify metabolic markers of reversibly ischemic myocardium. The potential of Positron-CT to reliably detect potentially salvageable myocardium and, hence, to identify appropriate therapeutic interventions is one of the most exciting applications of the technique

  19. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, Preethi; Himabindu, Pucha

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive nuclear imaging technique used to study different molecular pathways and anatomical structures. PET has found extensive applications in various fields of medicine viz. cardiology, oncology, psychiatry/psychology, neuro science and pulmonology. This study paper basically deals with the physics, chemistry and biology behind the PET technique. It discusses the methodology for generation of the radiotracers responsible for emission of positrons and the annihilation and detection techniques. (author)

  20. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, O.

    1989-01-01

    The principle is briefly described of positron emission tomography, and its benefits and constraints are listed. It is emphasized that positron emission tomography (PET) provides valuable information on metabolic changes in the organism that are otherwise only very difficult to obtain, such as brain diagnosis including relationships between mental disorders and the physiology and pathophysiology of the brain. A PET machine is to be installed in Czechoslovakia in the near future. (L.O.)

  1. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienhard, K.; Heiss, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The principles and selected clinical applications of positron emission tomography are described. In this technique a chemical compound is labeled with a positron emitting isotope and its biochemical pathway is traced by coincidence detection of the two annihilation photons. The application of the techniques of computed tomography allows to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the radioactivity within a subject. The 18 F-deoxyglucose method for quantitative measurement of local glucose metabolism is discussed in order to illustrate the possibilities of positron emission tomography to record physiological processes in vivo. (orig.) [de

  2. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Diksic, M.; Meyer, E.; Feindel, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. The most recent trends are reviewed in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography. (author)

  3. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavuk, M.

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this project is to provide a simple summary of new trends in positron emission tomography and its basic physical principles. It provides thereby compendious introduction of the trends of the present development in diagnostics using PET systems. A review of available literature was performed. (author)

  4. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  5. Tomography by positrons emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosconi, Sergio L.

    1999-01-01

    The tomography by positrons emission is a technology that allows to measure the concentration of positrons emission in a tri dimensional body through external measurements. Among the isotope emissions have carbon isotopes are ( 11 C), of the oxygen ( 15 O), of the nitrogen ( 13 N) that are three the element that constitute the base of the organic chemistry. Theses have on of the PET's most important advantages, since many biological interesting organic molecules can be tracer with these isotopes for the metabolism studies 'in vivo' through PET, without using organic tracers that modify the metabolism. The mentioned isotopes, also possess the characteristic of having short lifetime, that constitute on of PET's advantages from the dosimetric point of view. Among 11 C, 15 O, and 13 N, other isotopes that can be obtained of a generator as the 68 Ga and 82 Rb

  6. Relationship Between Quantitative Adverse Plaque Features From Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography and Downstream Impaired Myocardial Flow Reserve by 13N-Ammonia Positron Emission Tomography: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Damini; Diaz Zamudio, Mariana; Schuhbaeck, Annika; Juarez Orozco, Luis Eduardo; Otaki, Yuka; Gransar, Heidi; Li, Debiao; Germano, Guido; Achenbach, Stephan; Berman, Daniel S; Meave, Aloha; Alexanderson, Erick; Slomka, Piotr J

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the relationship of quantitative plaque features from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography and coronary vascular dysfunction by impaired myocardial flow reserve (MFR) by (13)N-Ammonia positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-one patients (32 men, 62.4±9.5 years) underwent combined rest-stress (13)N-ammonia PET and CT angiography scans by hybrid PET/CT. Regional MFR was measured from PET. From CT angiography, 153 arteries were evaluated by semiautomated software, computing arterial noncalcified plaque (NCP), low-density NCP (NCP<30 HU), calcified and total plaque volumes, and corresponding plaque burden (plaque volumex100%/vessel volume), stenosis, remodeling index, contrast density difference (maximum difference in luminal attenuation per unit area in the lesion), and plaque length. Quantitative stenosis, plaque burden, and myocardial mass were combined by boosted ensemble machine-learning algorithm into a composite risk score to predict impaired MFR (MFR≤2.0) by PET in each artery. Nineteen patients had impaired regional MFR in at least 1 territory (41/153 vessels). Patients with impaired regional MFR had higher arterial NCP (32.4% versus 17.2%), low-density NCP (7% versus 4%), and total plaque burden (37% versus 19.3%, P<0.02). In multivariable analysis with 10-fold cross-validation, NCP burden was the most significant predictor of impaired MFR (odds ratio, 1.35; P=0.021 for all). For prediction of impaired MFR with 10-fold cross-validation, receiver operating characteristics area under the curve for the composite score was 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.79-0.91) greater than for quantitative stenosis (0.66, 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.76, P=0.005). Compared with stenosis, arterial NCP burden and a composite score combining quantitative stenosis and plaque burden from CT angiography significantly improves identification of downstream regional vascular dysfunction. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Positron emission tomography. Positronemisionstomografi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolwig, T G; Haunsoe, S; Dahlgaard Hove, J; Hesse, B; Hoejgard, L; Jensen, M; Paulson, O B; Hastrup Svendsen, J; Soelvsten Soerensen, S

    1994-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitative imaging of regional physiological and biochemical parameters. Positron emitting radioactive isotopes can be produced by a cyclotron, eg. the biologically important carbon ([sup 11]C), oxygen ([sup 15]O), and nitrogen ([sup 13]N) elements. With the tomographic principles of the PET scanner the quantitative distribution of the administered isotopes can be determined and images can be provided as well as dynamic information on blood flow, metabolism and receptor function. In neurology PET has been used for investigations on numerous physiological processes in the brain: circulation, metabolism and receptor studies. In Parkinson's disease PET studies have been able to localize the pathology specifically, and in early stroke PET technique can outline focal areas with living but non-functioning cells, and this could make it possible to intervene in this early state. With positron emission tomography a quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow, glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be made as well as combined assessments of blood flow and metabolism. Combined studies of blood flow and metabolism can determine whether myocardial segments with abnormal motility consist of necrotic or viable tissue, thereby delineating effects of revascularisation. In the future it will probably be possible to characterize the myocardial receptor status in different cardiac diseases. The PET technique is used in oncology for clinical as well as more basic research on tumor perfusion and metabolism. Further, tumor uptake of positron labelled cytotoxic drugs might predict the clinical benefit of treatment. (au) (19 refs.).

  8. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolwig, T.G.; Haunsoe, S.; Dahlgaard Hove, J.; Hesse, B.; Hoejgard, L.; Jensen, M.; Paulson, O.B.; Hastrup Svendsen, J.; Soelvsten Soerensen, S.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitative imaging of regional physiological and biochemical parameters. Positron emitting radioactive isotopes can be produced by a cyclotron, eg. the biologically important carbon ( 11 C), oxygen ( 15 O), and nitrogen ( 13 N) elements. With the tomographic principles of the PET scanner the quantitative distribution of the administered isotopes can be determined and images can be provided as well as dynamic information on blood flow, metabolism and receptor function. In neurology PET has been used for investigations on numerous physiological processes in the brain: circulation, metabolism and receptor studies. In Parkinson's disease PET studies have been able to localize the pathology specifically, and in early stroke PET technique can outline focal areas with living but non-functioning cells, and this could make it possible to intervene in this early state. With positron emission tomography a quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow, glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be made as well as combined assessments of blood flow and metabolism. Combined studies of blood flow and metabolism can determine whether myocardial segments with abnormal motility consist of necrotic or viable tissue, thereby delineating effects of revascularisation. In the future it will probably be possible to characterize the myocardial receptor status in different cardiac diseases. The PET technique is used in oncology for clinical as well as more basic research on tumor perfusion and metabolism. Further, tumor uptake of positron labelled cytotoxic drugs might predict the clinical benefit of treatment. (au) (19 refs.)

  9. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenkov, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    The foundations of the positron emission tomography (PET), widely used for the medical diagnostics, are considered. The brief description of the cyclotron for production of radionuclides, applied in the PET, the target devices for manufacturing the position emitters, the moduli for the radiopharmaceuticals synthesis (RPS) for the PET is presented. The necessity and concept of complete automation of the RPS for the PET are discussed [ru

  10. Positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindback, Stig [GEMS PET Systems AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1995-07-15

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced nuclear medicine technique used for research at major centres. Unique diagnostic information is obtained from tomographic measurements of the biochemistry and physiology of tissues and organs. In theory, diseases are related to biochemical changes and these can be observed with PET long before any anatomical changes are detectable. In PET the radioactive component is a positron-emitting isotope or 'tracer'. The positrons annihilate with electrons in the body to produce two gamma rays 180° apart; coincidence detection of these gammas provides a very efficient method of determining the spatial distribution of the radioisotope tracer. Because physiological measurements are usually required in a single imaging session, very short-lived isotopes are used to label the tracer molecules; isotope production and labelling is usually carried out in situ. The most commonly used radionuclides are carbon- 11 (half-life 20 minutes), nitrogen-13 (10 minutes), oxygen-15 (2 minutes), and fluorine-18 (110 minutes). A PET system has three major components: - a particle accelerator with targets for production of the positron-emitting isotopes; - chemistry modules for synthesis and labelling of the desired tracers; - and a PET camera for in-vivo measurements of the distribution of the tracer in the body.

  11. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindback, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced nuclear medicine technique used for research at major centres. Unique diagnostic information is obtained from tomographic measurements of the biochemistry and physiology of tissues and organs. In theory, diseases are related to biochemical changes and these can be observed with PET long before any anatomical changes are detectable. In PET the radioactive component is a positron-emitting isotope or 'tracer'. The positrons annihilate with electrons in the body to produce two gamma rays 180° apart; coincidence detection of these gammas provides a very efficient method of determining the spatial distribution of the radioisotope tracer. Because physiological measurements are usually required in a single imaging session, very short-lived isotopes are used to label the tracer molecules; isotope production and labelling is usually carried out in situ. The most commonly used radionuclides are carbon- 11 (half-life 20 minutes), nitrogen-13 (10 minutes), oxygen-15 (2 minutes), and fluorine-18 (110 minutes). A PET system has three major components: - a particle accelerator with targets for production of the positron-emitting isotopes; - chemistry modules for synthesis and labelling of the desired tracers; - and a PET camera for in-vivo measurements of the distribution of the tracer in the body

  12. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each ring contains a plurality of scintillation detectors which are positioned around an inner circumference with a septum ring extending inwardly from the inner circumference along each outer edge of each ring. An additional septum ring is positioned in the middle of each ring of detectors and parallel to the other septa rings, whereby the inward extent of all the septa rings may be reduced by one-half and the number of detectors required in each ring is reduced. The additional septa reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  13. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each detector ring or offset ring includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and a plurality of scintillation crystals are positioned relative to the photomultiplier tubes whereby each tube is responsive to more than one crystal. Each alternate crystal in the ring is offset by one-half or less of the thickness of the crystal such that the staggered crystals are seen by more than one photomultiplier tube. This sharing of crystals and photomultiplier tubes allows identification of the staggered crystal and the use of smaller detectors shared by larger photomultiplier tubes thereby requiring less photomultiplier tubes, creating more scanning slices, providing better data sampling, and reducing the cost of the camera. The offset detector ring geometry reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  17. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector planes positioned side-by-side around a patient area to detect radiation. Each plane includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and at least two rows of scintillation crystals on each photomultiplier tube extend across to adjacent photomultiplier tubes for detecting radiation from the patient area. Each row of crystals on each photomultiplier tube is offset from the other rows of crystals, and the area of each crystal on each tube in each row is different than the area of the crystals on the tube in other rows for detecting which crystal is actuated and allowing the detector to detect more inter-plane slides. The crystals are offset by an amount equal to the length of the crystal divided by the number of rows. The rows of crystals on opposite sides of the patient may be rotated 90 degrees relative to each other

  18. Comparative study of 201Tl reinjection tomography and combined use of 13N-ammonia and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for detection of viable myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lijuan; Qi Guoxian; Hu Jian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical value of 201 Tl reinjection tomography and combined use of 13 N-ammonia (NH 3 ) regional myocardial perfusion and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography transfer function and for the myocardium. Methods: The authors performed exercise 201 Tl SPECT (Tl SPECT) on 20 patients with myocardial infarction and obtained standard 201 Tl exercise-redistribution images. 201 Tl was reinjected immediately after redistribution study, and the images were then acquired as also. The 20 patients also underwent PET imaging with 13 N-NH 3 and 18 F-FDG (NH 3 -FDG PET) within one week of the above study. Vertical and horizontal long axis cuts were divided into nine segments, and uptakes of radioisotope were evaluated into four classes visually (Defect score, DS) (0:normal uptake, 3:severely reduced). Quantitative evaluation was performed on the vertical and horizontal long axis cuts of 201 Tl redistribution, reinjection and FDG PET images using regions of interest. The relative myocardial 201 Tl uptake and 18 F-FDG uptake (% ID) were expressed as the percentage of this reference region accounted for of the maximal counts. Results: In 48 segments identified as viable by the NH 3 -FDG PET images, 45 (93.8%) segments were also identified as viable by the 201 Tl redistribution imaging. Of 24 segments with severe irreversible defects on the 201 Tl redistribution imaging, 87.5% of the segments were concordantly confirmed by 201 Tl reinjection and NH 3 -FDG PET images with 37.5% identified as viable and 50% identified as scar. There was no significant difference in the average % ID, furthermore, regression analysis revealed a high positive correlation in the segmental % ID between 201 Tl reinjection and FDG PET images in the 61 segments with myocardial infarction (r = 0.722). Conclusions: The results show that 201 Tl reinjection tomography is of similar accuracy with NH 3 -FDG PET for detection of viable myocardium and possess important

  19. Positron emission tomography. Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Massardo, Teresa; Gonzalez, Patricio

    2001-01-01

    The basic principles of positron emission tomography (PET) technique are reviewed. lt allows to obtain functional images from gamma rays produced by annihilation of a positron, a positive beta particle. This paper analyzes positron emitters production in a cyclotron, its general mechanisms, and the various detection systems. The most important clinical applications are also mentioned, related to oncological uses of fluor-l8-deoxyglucose

  20. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...

  1. Fundamentals of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostertag, H.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The methods is based on: (1) Radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. (orig.) [de

  2. Instrumentation for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 mm full width at half maximum for quantitation in regions of interest 4 mm in diameter will become possible with the development of detectors that achieve ultrahigh resolution. Improved resolution will be possible using solid-state photodetectors for crystal identification or photomultiplier tubes with many small electron multipliers. Temporal resolution of 2 seconds and gating of cyclic events can be accomplished if statistical requirements are met. The major physical considerations in achieving high-resolution positron emission tomography are the degradation in resolution resulting from positron range, emission angle, parallax error, detector sampling density, the sensitivity of various detector materials and packing schemes, and the tradeoff between temporal resolution and statistical accuracy. The accuracy of data required for physiological models depends primarily on the fidelity of spatial sampling independent of statistical constraints

  3. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the current and potential uses of positron emission tomography in clinical medicine and research related to oncology. Assessment will be possible of metabolism and physiology of tumors and their effects on adjacent tissues. Specific probes are likely to be developed for target sites on tumors, including monoclonal antibodies and specific growth factors that recognize tumors. To date, most oncological applications of positron emission tomography tracers have been qualitative; in the future, quantitative metabolic measurements should aid in the evaluation of tumor biology and response to treatment

  4. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  5. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens Dahlgaard; Rasmussen, R.; Freiberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    emission tomography (PET) studies from 20 normal volunteers at rest and during dipyridamole stimulation were analyzed. Image data were reconstructed with either FBP or OSEM. FBP- and OSEM-derived input functions and tissue curves were compared together with the myocardial blood flow and spillover values...... and OSEM flow values were observed with a flow underestimation of 45% (rest/dipyridamole) in the septum and of 5% (rest) and 15% (dipyridamole) in the lateral myocardial wall. CONCLUSIONS: OSEM reconstruction of myocardial perfusion images with N-13 ammonia and PET produces high-quality images for visual...... interpretation. However, compared with FBP, OSEM is associated with substantial underestimation of perfusion on quantitative imaging. Our findings indicate that OSEM should be used with precaution in clinical PET studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  6. Ammonia Emissions from Agriculture in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, B.

    2016-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important alkaline pollutant in the atmosphere and it has various environmental and climatic effects. We will present an improved bottom-up estimate of ammonia emissions from agriculture in China at 0.5°×0.5° horizontal resolution and monthly variability. Ammonia emissions from fertilizer use are derived using data of crop planting area, fertilizer application time and rate for 18 main crops. Ammonia emission factors from fertilizer use are estimated as a function of soil properties such as soil pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and agricultural activity information such as crop type, fertilizer type, and application mode. We further consider ambient temperature and wind speed to account for the meteorological influences on ammonia emission factors of fertilizer use. We also estimate the ammonia emission from livestock over China using the mass-flow methodology. The derived ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 4.55 Tg NH3 from fertilizer use and 6.96 Tg from livestock. Henan and Jiangsu provinces are the two largest emitting areas for ammonia from fertilizer use (470 Gg NH3 and 365 Gg NH3). Henan (621 Gg NH3) and Shandong (533 Gg NH3) have the largest ammonia emissions from livestock. Both ammonia emissions from fertilizer use and livestock have distinct seasonal variations; peaking in June for fertilizer use (822 Gg NH3) and in July for livestock (1244 Gg NH3), and are both lowest in January (80 Gg and 241 Gg, respectively). Combining with other ammonia source (eg. human waste and transport) estimates from the REAS v2.1 emission inventory, we show that total ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 14.0 Tg NH3 a-1. Comparisons with satellite measurements of ammonia columns will also be presented.

  7. Positron emission tomography takes lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, R.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)'s ability to detect functional abnormalities before they manifest anatomically is examined and some of its most common applications are outlined. It is emphasised that when PET facility and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization's national cyclotron are established at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, the availability of short-lived tracers such as oxygen 15, nitrogen 13 and fluorine 18 would improve the specificity of tests(e.g. for brain tumors or cardiac viability) further. Construction of the cyclotron will start shortly and is due to be completed and operating by the end of 1991

  8. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Mathis, C.A.; Moyer, B.R.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers the opportunity to noninvasively measure heart muscle blood perfusion, oxygen utilization, metabolism of fatty acids, sugars and amino acids. This paper reviews physiological principles which are basic to PET instrumentation for imaging the heart and gives examples of the application of positron emission tomography for measuring myocardial flow and metabolism. 33 references, 11 figures, 1 table

  9. Improved positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of rings of detectors positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom, and a plurality of scintillation crystals positioned relative to the photomultiplier tubes whereby each tube is responsive to more than one crystal. Each alternate crystal in the ring may be offset by one-half or less of the thickness of the crystal such that the staggered crystals are seen by more than one photomultiplier tube. This sharing of crystals and photomultiplier tubes allows identification of the staggered crystal and the use of smaller detectors shared by larger photomultiplier tubes thereby requiring less photomultiplier tubes, creating more scanning slices, providing better data sampling, and reducing the cost of the camera. (author)

  10. Positron emission tomography and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabriat, H.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT 2 serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET

  11. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  12. Positron emission tomography imaging--technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Karp, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Positron imaging instrumentation has improved rapidly in the last few years. Scanners currently under development are beginning to approach fundamental limits set by positron range and noncolinearity effects. This report reviews the latest developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation, emphasizing the development of coding schemes that reduce the complexity and cost of high-resolution scanners. The relative benefits of using time-of-flight (TOF) information is discussed as well. 68 references

  13. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, R.; Bentourkia, M.; Benard, F.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is a sophisticated molecular imaging technique, using a special scanner, that displays the functional status of tissues in the body at the cellular level (their metabolism). It is a diagnostic scan that provides the physician with information not available with traditional anatomic studies such as CT or MRI. PET can detect changes in cell function (disease) long before they are evident as physical (anatomic) changes seen on CT or MRI. In this way PET can add important information about many diseases allowing the physician to make a diagnosis often much earlier than with anatomic imaging techniques such as CT or MRI alone. In addition, in cases where an abnormality is noted on CT or MRI, PET can help differentiate benign changes from changes due to disease. PET scanning also typically images the entire body, unlike CT/MRI which is usually broken up into specific limited body section scans. All cells use glucose as an energy source but cancer cells use much more since they are growing much faster and out of control. This is the basis of imaging with F-18 FDG glucose, the radiotracer agent use in a PET oncology study. The abnormal, accelerated glucose used by cancer cells is detected by the PET scanner that processes the emissions from the F-18 FDG glucose by abnormally high levels of metabolism (tumor)

  14. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ''ultimate'' scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length (≤ 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times ≤ 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so ≤5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ''fully-3D'' cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm

  15. Positron emission tomography in neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, W D; Herholz, K; Pawlik, G; Wagner, R; Wienhard, K

    1986-01-01

    By positron emission tomography (PET) of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMRGl) can be measured in man. Normal values in cerebral cortex and basal ganglia range from 35 to 50 mumol/100 g/min, the values in gray matter structures of the posterior fossa were 25-30 mumol/100 g/min, the lowest LCMRGl was found in the white matter (15-20 mumol/100 g/min). During sensory stimulation by various modalities functional activation increases LCMRGl in the respective special areas, while sleep decreases metabolic rate in all cortical and basal gray matter structures. In many neurological disorders CMRGl is altered in a disease-specific pattern. In dementia of the Alzheimer type CMRGl is impaired even in early stages with accentuation in the parieto-temporal cortex, while in multi-infarct dementia glucose uptake is mainly reduced in the multifocal small infarcts. In Huntington's chorea the most conspicuous changes are found in the caudate nucleus and putamen. In cases of focal lesions (e.g. ischemic infarcts) metabolic disturbances extend far beyond the site of the primary lesion and inactivation of metabolism is found in intact brain structures far away from the anatomical lesion. Additional applications of PET include determination of the metabolism of various substrates, of protein synthesis, of function and distribution of receptors, of tumor growth and of the distribution of drugs as well as the measurement of oxygen consumption, blood flow and blood volume.

  16. Positron emission tomography in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Goto, Ikuo

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed with the 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose method on 29 patients with epilepsy (generalized epilepsy, 4; partial epilepsy, 24; undetermined type, 1). The subjects were restricted to patients with epilepsy without focal abnormality on X-CT. All the patients with generalized epilepsy showed a normal pattern on PET. Fourteen out of the 24 patients with partial epilepsy and the 1 with epilepsy of undermined type showed focal hypometabolism on PET. The hypometabolic zone was localized in areas including the temporal cortex in 11 patients, frontal in 2 and thalamus in 1. The location of hypometabolic zone and that of interictal paroxysmal activity on EEG were well correlated in most patients. The patients with poorly-controlled seizure showed a higher incidence of PET abnormality (12 out of 13) than those with well-controlled seizures (2 out of 11). The incidence of abnormality on PET and MRI and the location of both abnormality were not necessarily coincident. These results indicated that the PET examination in epilepsy provides valuable information about the location of epileptic focus, and that the findings on PET in patients with partial epilepsy may be one of the good indicators about the intractability of partial epilepsy, and that PET and MRI provide complementary information in the diagnosis of epilepsy. (author)

  17. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic

  18. Positron emission tomography studies of brain receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, B.; Maziere, M.

    1991-01-01

    Probing the regional distribution and affinity of receptors in the brain, in vivo, in human and non human primates has become possible with the use of selective ligands labelled with positron emitting radionuclides and positron emission tomography (PET). After describing the techniques used in positron emission tomography to characterize a ligand receptor binding and discussing the choice of the label and the limitations and complexities of the in vivo approach, the results obtained in the PET studies of various neurotransmission systems: dopaminergic, opiate, benzodiazepine, serotonin and cholinergic systems are reviewed

  19. New Possibilities of Positron-Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The reasons for the emergence of the angular distribution of photons generated as a result of annihilation of an electron and a positron in a positron-emission tomograph are investigated. It is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity (i.e., the probability of photon emission at different angles) is a consequence of the Doppler effect in the center-of-mass reference system of the electron and the positron. In the reference frame attached to the electron, the angular distribution of the number of emitted photons does not exists but is replaced by the Doppler shift of the frequency of photons. The results obtained in this study make it possible to extend the potentialities of the positron-emission tomograph in the diagnostics of diseases and to obtain additional mechanical characteristics of human tissues, such as density and viscosity.

  20. Positron emission tomography with Positome, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nukui, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Feindel, W.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with Positome II using 68 Ga-EDTA was performed in cases with brain tumor and cerebral arteriovenous malformation. A significant focal uptake in static study and hemodynamic changes in dynamic study were noted in all cases except one case with intracranial lipoma. Comparing this method with sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image study and computerized axial tomography, the diagnostic rate for detecting brain tumor was almost equal in all of these three methods. However, detecting and localizing was easier and clearer in static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA than in sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image and computerized axial tomography without infusion of contrast medium. Furthermore, static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA was superior to computerized axial tomography without infusion of contrast medium for detecting cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Concerning dynamic positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA, semiquantitative values obtained by this method correlated well with findings of computerized axial tomography and was thought to be more precise and in detail than the findings of sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image study. Summation of the previous studies about dynamic positron emission tomography with 77 Kr in occlusive cerebrovascular disease is also reported. In conclusion, static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA is a very useful diagnostic method for detecting and localizing brain tumor and cerebral arteriovenous malformation without any attendant complications. Furthermore, a good combination of static and dynamic positron emission tomography and computerized axial tomography appear to be outstandingly effective for not only detecting the lesion but also understanding the pathophysiological aspect in cases with various intracranial lesions. (author)

  1. Positron-molecule interactions and corresponding positron attachment to molecules. As a basis for positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Mineo; Pichl, Lukas

    2007-01-01

    Through positron and electron interactions, they annihilate emitting primarily two gamma rays with 180-degree opposite directions. Positron spectroscopy using the characteristics of these gamma rays has been employed for analyzing various properties of material as well as for positron emission tomography (PET). However, its fundamental physics of positron-electron interactions and resulting features of emitting gamma rays are not well understood. By obtaining better understanding of positron interactions, it should become possible to provide the firm bases for positron spectroscopy in finer accuracy and quality. Here, we propose a significant mechanism for positron annihilation through positron attachment process, which may help increase the quality of positron spectroscopy. (author)

  2. Clinical cardiac positron emission tomography: State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved rapidly from a relatively esoteric research tool into clinical applications providing unique, quantitative information on myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and cell membrane function and having a potentially significant impact on cardiovascular medicine. Although there are many different positron radionuclides for imaging diverse myocardial behavior, three radionuclides have reached accepted clinical utility. Cardiac PET using nitrogen-13-ammonia, rubidium-82, and fluoro-18-deoxyglucose has proved accurate and definitive in multiple university and private-practice sites for diagnosing and assessing severity and location of coronary artery disease in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients, for identifying injured but viable myocardium potentially salvageable by revascularization, and for ruling out clinically significant coronary artery stenosis with a high specificity in patients who might otherwise undergo coronary arteriography to document the absence of significant disease. 89 references

  3. Comparison of ammonia emissions determined using different sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamic, flow-through flux chambers are sometimes used to estimate ammonia emissions from livestock operations; however, ammonia emissions from the surfaces are affected by many factors which can be affected by the chamber. Ammonia emissions estimated using environmental flow-through chambers may be...

  4. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  5. Ionization and positron emission in giant quasiatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Reus, T. de; Wietschorke, K.H.; Schaefer, A.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Mueller, U.; Schlueter, P.

    1985-07-01

    Electron excitation processes in superheavy quasiatoms are treated within a relativistic framework. Theoretical results on K-hole production rates as well as delta-electron and positron spectra are compared with experimental data. It is demonstrated that the study of heavy ion collisions with nuclear time delay promises a signature for the spontaneous positron formation in overcritical systems. Corresponding experimental results are confronted with our theoretical hypothesis. Recent speculations on the origin of the observed peak structures in positron spectra are critically reviewed. Atomic excitations are also employed to obtain information on the course of a nuclear reaction. Using a semiclassical picture we calculate the emission of delta-electrons and positrons in deep-inelastic nuclear reactions. Furthermore some consequences of conversion processes in giant systems are investigated. (orig.)

  6. Positron emission tomography in brain function study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hua

    2006-01-01

    Little has been recognized about the advanced brain function. Recent years several new techniques such as event-related potentials, megnetoencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) have been used in the study of brain function. The methodology, application study in normal people and clinical patients of PET in brain function are reviewed. (authors)

  7. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Moyer, B.R.; Mathis, C.A.; Ganz, E.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart can measure blood perfusion, metabolism of fatty acids, metabolism of sugars, uptake of amino acids and can quantitate infarction volume. The principles which are basic to PET instrumentation and procedures for quantitative studies of the heart muscle with examples of measurements of myocardial flow and metabolism, are reviewed

  8. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Moyer, B.R.; Mathis, C.A.; Ganz, E.; Knittel, B.

    1983-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart can measure blood perfusion, metabolism of fatty acids, metabolism of sugars, uptake of amino acids and can quantitate infarction volume. The principles are reviewed which are basic to PET instrumentation and procedures for quantitative studies of human physiology with examples of measurements of myocardial flow and metabolism

  9. Is positron emission tomography useful in stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeReuck, J; Leys, D; DeKeyser, J

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in the study of stroke and related cerebrovascular diseases. It has shown the various stages leading to cerebral infarction and defined the significance of the ischaemic penumbra. PET scan can predict the clinical outcome of patients with acute

  10. Positron emission tomography in malignant haematological disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, Bartholomeus Wilhelmus

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a diagnostic technique with a promising role especially in the haemato-oncology. Although its use in the management ; of malignant lymphoma seems to be established already, much about the true potential and drawbacks of FDG-PET in this disease are still unknown.

  11. Positron emission tomography applied to fluidization engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dechsiri, C; Ghione, A; van de Wiel, F; Dehling, HG; Paans, AMJ; Hoffmann, AC

    The movement of particles in a laboratory fluidized bed has been studied using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). With this non-invasive technique both pulses of various shapes and single tracer particles were followed in 3-D. The equipment and materials used made it possible to label actual bed

  12. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  13. Ammonia emissions from dairy production in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, L A; Flesch, T K; Powell, J M; Coblentz, W K; Jokela, W E; Martin, N P

    2009-05-01

    Ammonia gas is the only significant basic gas that neutralizes atmospheric acid gases produced from combustion of fossil fuels. This reaction produces an aerosol that is a component of atmospheric haze, is implicated in nitrogen (N) deposition, and may be a potential human health hazard. Because of the potential impact of NH3 emissions, environmentally and economically, the objective of this study was to obtain representative and accurate NH3 emissions data from large dairy farms (>800 cows) in Wisconsin. Ammonia concentrations and climatic measurements were made on 3 dairy farms during winter, summer, and autumn to calculate emissions using an inverse-dispersion analysis technique. These study farms were confinement systems utilizing freestall housing with nearby sand separators and lagoons for waste management. Emissions were calculated from the whole farm including the barns and any waste management components (lagoons and sand separators), and from these components alone when possible. During winter, the lagoons' NH3 emissions were very low and not measurable. During autumn and summer, whole-farm emissions were significantly larger than during winter, with about two-thirds of the total emissions originating from the waste management systems. The mean whole-farm NH3 emissions in winter, autumn, and summer were 1.5, 7.5, and 13.7% of feed N inputs emitted as NH3-N, respectively. Average annual emission comparisons on a unit basis between the 3 farms were similar at 7.0, 7.5, and 8.4% of input feed N emitted as NH3-N, with an annual average for all 3 farms of 7.6 +/- 1.5%. These winter, summer, autumn, and average annual NH3 emissions are considerably smaller than currently used estimates for dairy farms, and smaller than emissions from other types of animal-feeding operations.

  14. Positron emission tomography - a new approach to brain chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Positron emission tomography permits examination of the chemistry of the brain in living beings. Until recently, positron emission tomography had been considered a research tool, but it is rapidly moving into clinical practice. This report describes the uses and applications of positron emission tomography in examinations of patients with strokes, epilepsy, malignancies, dementias, and schizophrenia and in basic studies of synaptic neurotransmission

  15. Features and applications of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Mingwu

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography, the so-called world's smartest camera, is based on a NaI or BGO detector and imaging of positron-emitting radioisotopes which are introduced as a tracer into the regional tissue or organ of interest. With the aid of a computer visual images of a series of these distributions can be built into a picture of the functional status of the tissue or organ being imaged. This highly accurate imaging technique is already widely used for clinical diagnostics heart disease, brain disorder, tumors and so on

  16. Electrocardiographic gating in positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.J.; Phelps, M.E.; Wisenberg, G.; Schelbert, H.R.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) synchronized multiple gated data acquisition was employed with positron emission computed tomography (ECT) to obtain images of myocardial blood pool and myocardium. The feasibility and requirements of multiple gated data acquisition in positron ECT were investigated for 13NH3, ( 18 F)-2-fluoro-2-D-deoxyglucose, and ( 11 C)-carboxyhemoglobin. Examples are shown in which image detail is enhanced and image interpretation is facilitated when ECG gating is employed in the data collection. Analysis of count rate data from a series of volunteers indicates that multiple, statistically adequate images can be obtained under a multiple gated data collection format without an increase in administered dose

  17. Study of Ammonia Emissions in a Ventilated Pig Pen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li

    Pig productions cause a wide emission of odors, such as ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Ammonia is one of the most important emissions for evaluating the air quality either in animal buildings or atmospheric environment. In studies of ammonia emission from animal buildings...... emission rate was measured in a wind tunnel under different airflow and ammonium solution temperatures. This investigation provides a general understanding for the influence of velocity, turbulence intensity and temperature on the ammonia emissions. The relationship between ammonia emissions and boundary...... through the air-liquid interface is suggested from vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of ammonia water. Furthermore, the effects of airflow and temperature on ammonia mass transfer coefficient are also analyzed under different concentration boundary conditions determined by various Henry’s law constant...

  18. Ammonia emission factors for UK agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misselbrook, T. H.; Van Der Weerden, T. J.; Pain, B. F.; Jarvis, S. C.; Chambers, B. J.; Smith, K. A.; Phillips, V. R.; Demmers, T. G. M.

    Ammonia (NH 3) emission inventories are required for modelling atmospheric NH 3 transport and estimating downwind deposition. A recent inventory for UK agriculture, estimating emission as 197 kt NH 3-N yr -1, was constructed using 1993 statistical and census data for the UK. This paper describes the derivation of the UK-based emission factors used in the calculation of that emission for a range of livestock classes, farm practices and fertiliser applications to agricultural land. Some emission factors have been updated where more recent information has become available. Some of the largest emission factors derived for each farming practice include 16.9 g NH 3-N dairy cow -1 d -1 for grazing, 148.8 g NH 3-N liveweight unit -1 yr -1 for housed broilers and 4.8 g NH 3-N m -2 d -1 for storage of solid pig and poultry waste as manure heaps. Emissions for land spreading of all livestock waste were 59% of the total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) applied as a high dry matter content slurry and 76% of TAN applied as farm yard manure. An updated estimate of emission from UK agriculture, using updated emission factors together with 1997 statistical and census data, is presented, giving a total of 226 kt NH 3-N per year.

  19. Positron emission tomography of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography enables the distribution of positron emitting isotopes to be imaged in a transverse plane through the body and the regional concentration of the isotope to be measured quantitatively. This thesis reports some applications of positron emission tomography to studies of pulmonary pathophysiology. Measurements in lung phantoms showed that regional lung density could be measured from a transmission tomogram obtained with an external source of positron emitting isotope. The regional, fractional blood volume was measured after labelling the blood with carbon-11-monoxide. Regional extravascular lung density (lung tissue and interstitial water per unit thoracic volume) was obtained by subtracting fractional blood volume from lung density. Measurements in normal subjects revealed large regional variations in lung density and fractional blood volume in the supine posture. Extravascular lung density showed a more uniform distribution. The technique has been used to study patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary oedema, pulmonary sarcoidosis and fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension and patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunt. Tomographic measurements of pulmonary tissue concentration of radionuclides are difficult, since corrections for the blood content and the inflation of the lung must be applied. A simultaneous measurement of lung density and fractional blood volume allows such corrections to be made and the extravascular tracer concentration to be calculated. This has been applied to measurements of the tissue penetration of carbon-11-labelled erythromycin in patients with lobar pneumonia. (author)

  20. Positron emission tomography in movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography provides a method for the quantitation of regional function within the living human brain. Studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow in patients with Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and focal dystonia have revealed functional abnormalities within substructures of the basal ganglia. Recent developments permit assessment of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic function ion dopaminergic pathways. These techniques are now being applied to studies of movement disorders in human subjects

  1. Positron emission tomography in movement disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, W R.W.

    1985-02-01

    Positron emission tomography provides a method for the quantitation of regional function within the living human brain. Studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow in patients with Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and focal dystonia have revealed functional abnormalities within substructures of the basal ganglia. Recent developments permit assessment of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic function in dopaminergic pathways. These techniques are now being applied to studies of movement disorders in human subjects.

  2. Positron emission tomography now and in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaalburg, W.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of positron emission tomography used in nuclear medicine. The production of positron emitting radionuclides is discussed. The development of positron detectors is described. The application of positron emission tomography in cardiology, oncology and neurology is treated. The authors conclude that PET is a unique method to examine metabolic processes, although the method is still in its infancy. 7 refs.; 1 table

  3. In-situ positron emission of CO oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, K.A.; Jonkers, G.; Wal, van der S.W.A.; Santen, van R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a Neuro ECAT positron tomog., the Positron Emission computed Tomog. (PET) was utilized to image the catalytic oxidn. of CO by using CO and CO2, labeled with short lived positron emitting nuclides. Studies were performed over highly dispersed CeO2/g-Al2O3 supported Pt and Rh catalysts. With a

  4. Positron emission tomography of FDG in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T. III; Kusubov, N.

    1986-01-01

    The use of the Donner dynamic positron emission tomograph to study fluorodeoxyglucose labelled 18 F uptake in the brain of six patients with schizophrenia is reported. The glucose metabolic rate and the local cerebral metabolic rate were calculated. The dynamic brain uptake data and the blood input function were used to calculate rate constants by an iterative least squares fitting program for all regions of interest chosen in the brain. Although the number of patients was small, differences in k3 were statistically significant in several brain regions compared with normal controls

  5. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, preclinical and hybrid scanners (i.e., PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  6. Methods and instrumentation for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelkern, M.A.; Phelps, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on positron emission tomography (PET), a technique for the noninvasive measurement of local tissue concentrations of injected radioactive tracers. Tracer kinetics techniques can be applied to this information to quantify physiologic function in human tissue. In the tracer method, a pharmaceutical is labeled by a radioactive atom. When introduced into the subject that molecule follows a physiologic pathway. The space- and time-dependent distribution of the radionuclide is obtained via an imaging technique. If the radiopharmaceutical is sufficiently analogous to a natural substrate or other substance of interest, a quantitative image can be translated into a physiologic measurement

  7. Contribution of positron emission tomography in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, E.; Franck, G.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a scanner technique using tracers labelled with shortlived radioisotopes which allows to study and quantify human metabolic processes or drug pharmacology in vivo. The technique is first applied in physiological studies. Sleep, normal brain metabolism or cerebral activations have been studied. The pharmacological approach concerns both drug distribution in the human brain and blood flow or metabolic variations under treatment. Main neurological applications in pathology are cerebrovascular disorders, diseases leading to dementia, epilepsy, movement disorders, and brain tumors. In each field of application, PET gives unique and frequently early informations. It nicely combines both dynamic informations and measurement precision. (author)

  8. Noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial glucose metabolism by positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    While the results of regional myocardial glucose metabolism measurements using positron emission computed tomography ( 13 N-ammonia) are promising, their utility and value remains to be determined in man. If this technique can be applied to patients with acute myocardial ischemia or infarction it may permit delineation of regional myocardial segments with altered, yet still active metabolism. Further, it may become possible to evaluate the effects of interventions designed to salvage reversibly injured myocardium by this technique

  9. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, Roland; Beer, Ambros J.; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or α v β 3 integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging α v β 3 expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. (orig.)

  10. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerg, L.; Langsteger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled glucose analog F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) is a sensitive diagnostic tool that images tumors based on increased uptake of glucose. Several recent publications have shown that F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is more sensitive than computed-tomography (CT) in detecting colorectal cancer. In patients with increasing CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and no evidence of recurrent disease on CT F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography often detects recurrent cancer. In all, patient management seems to be changed in about 25 % of patients who undergo F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in addition to standard staging procedure. Limited reports to date on both chemotherapy and radiotherapy support the role of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in assessing treatment response. Also regarding preoperative staging of primary colorectal cancer the literature is very limited. (author)

  11. The Positron Emission Tomography. A diagnostic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, P.

    2001-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a new imaging modality, which is able to assess non-invasively the biochemical mechanisms, underlying physiological and pathophysiological processes in vivo in humans. The technique relies on the administration of radioactive tracers labeled with short-lived positron emitters, which need to be produced on site via a particle accelerator (cyclotron). Radionuclides are produced upon request and formulated into biologically active organic molecules having precise pharmacokinetics and specificity. The radiotracer can be detected by the PET scanner and represented as tomographic sections (images of body sections) showing its regional distribution and concentration. This makes it possible to address clinical questions concerning occurrence and evolution of many diseases as well as their response to therapy. The ability to image (measure) biological processes and not only anatomy enables PET to explore diseases in the very early stage, including those diseases which are not related to modifications of organ structure (e.g. psychiatric diseases, metabolic disorders, biochemical disfunction). PET plays a major role, in conjunction with the other imaging modalities, to improve diagnosis capabilities and disease mechanism understanding [it

  12. Positron emission tomography (PET) in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    In the past the approach to the brain has been necessarily indirect, employing peripheral fluids to assess central and regional neurochemical processes. Blood, urine, skin and muscle biopsy, and cerebrospinal fluid are valuable reflectors of the neurochemical and neuropharmacological activity of the brain, but are removed in time and place from disordered thought processes and diluted by the products of both functional and dysfunctional brain systems. Biopsy studies have helped in studying the functional disorders of organs like the liver, but they are destructive to the brain and less useful because unlike these organs, the brain has a regional variation in its chemistry. The experimental insights from animal studies focusing on the pharmacology of individual cell groups - in striatum or locus coeruleus, for example - cannot easily or unambigiously be applied to clinical populations. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a versatile approach utilizing the mathematics of x-ray transmission scanning (CT scanning) to produce slice images of radioisotope distribution. PET makes possible a wide range of metabolic studies. Positron emitters such as carbon-11 or fluorine-18 can be used to label glucose, amino acids, drugs, neurotransmitter precursors, and many other molecules and examine their distribution and fate in discrete cell groups

  13. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  14. Positron emission tomography in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Fischman, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    There are four kinds of measurements that can be carried out with positron emission tomography (PET) that can contribute significantly to the process of drug development: pharmacodynamic measurement of tissue metabolism influenced by a given drug; precise measurements of tissue blood flow; tissue pharmacokinetics of a given drug following administration of a particular dose; and the temporal course of ligand-receptor interaction. One or more of these measurements can greatly improve the decision making involved in determining the appropriate dose of a drug, the clinical situations in which a drug might be useful, and the linkage of pharmacokinetics with pharmacodynamics, which is at the heart of effective drug development. The greater the potential of a particular compound as a therapeutic agent, the greater the potential for PET to contribute to the drug development process

  15. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease

  16. Applications of positron emission tomography to psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkow, N.D.; Brodie, J.D.; Gomez-mont, F.

    1985-01-01

    The brain's inaccessibility has hampered investigation of the metabolic changes underlying the behavioral and psychological symptoms of psychiatric patients. Using positron emission transaxial tomography (PET) to study the functioning human brain opens the possibility of directly investigating the patterns of activity associated with mental illness. A major focus of present-day research in psychiatry has been to identify etiological agents that fit a medical model of psychiatric illness. Experiments seeking pathophysiological indices that would permit objective classification of psychiatric illnesses have failed to reveal consistent abnormalities. The lack of consistency is explained in part by research designs that deal with the brain as if it were a homogeneous organ. PET offers a unique technique for monitoring the regional biochemical activity that is associated with the different ''brain states'' and ''brain traits'' of normal subjects and psychiatric patients

  17. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  18. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1990-05-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs.

  19. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-01-01

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast

  20. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  1. Fundamental limits of positron emission mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2001-01-01

    We explore the causes of performance limitation in positron emission mammography cameras. We compare two basic camera geometries containing the same volume of 511 keV photon detectors, one with a parallel plane geometry and another with a rectangular geometry. We find that both geometries have similar performance for the phantom imaged (in Monte Carlo simulation), even though the solid angle coverage of the rectangular camera is about 50 percent higher than the parallel plane camera. The reconstruction algorithm used significantly affects the resulting image; iterative methods significantly outperform the commonly used focal plane tomography. Finally, the characteristics of the tumor itself, specifically the absolute amount of radiotracer taken up by the tumor, will significantly affect the imaging performance

  2. CO2 emissions and mitigation potential in China's ammonia industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wenji; Zhu Bing; Li Qiang; Ma Tieju; Hu Shanying; Griffy-Brown, Charla

    2010-01-01

    Significant pressure from increasing CO 2 emissions and energy consumption in China's industrialization process has highlighted a need to understand and mitigate the sources of these emissions. Ammonia production, as one of the most important fundamental industries in China, represents those heavy industries that contribute largely to this sharp increasing trend. In the country with the largest population in the world, ammonia output has undergone fast growth spurred by increasing demand for fertilizer of food production since 1950s. However, various types of technologies implemented in the industry make ammonia plants in China operate with huge differences in both energy consumption and CO 2 emissions. With consideration of these unique features, this paper attempts to estimate the amount of CO 2 emission from China's ammonia production, and analyze the potential for carbon mitigation in the industry. Based on the estimation, related policy implications and measures required to realize the potential for mitigation are also discussed.

  3. Application of mathematical removal of positron range blurring in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Uber, D.

    1990-01-01

    The range of positrons in tissue is an important limitation to the ultimate spatial resolution achievable in positron emission tomography. In this work the authors have applied a Fourier deconvolution technique to remove range blurring in images taken by the Donner 600-crystal positron tomograph. Using phantom data, the authors have found significant improvement in the image quality and the FWHM for both 68 Ga and 82 Rb. These were successfully corrected so that the images and FWHM almost matched those of 18 F which has negligible positron range. However, statistical noise was increased by the deconvolution process and it was not practical to recover the full spatial resolution of the tomograph

  4. Ammonia emission from organic pig houses determined with local parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnink, A.J.A.; Hol, J.M.G.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ammonia emissions from houses for growing-finishing pigs with an outside yard. While regular emission measurements are not possible in these open systems another approach was used. Local parameters were measured and used in an existing NH3 emission

  5. Cardiological applications of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.; Czernin, J.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) expands the diagnostic possibilities of nuclear medicine techniques for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and, especially, for the identification of myocardial viability. The presence of coronary artery disease can be detected by evaluation of myocardial blood flow at rest and during pharmacologically induced hyperemia with a sensitivity of 84 to 98% and a specificity of 78 to 100% according to recent studies. Comparative investigations in the same patients have demonstrated a significant gain in the diagnostic accuracy of PET as compared with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). PET has influenced even more profoundly the identification of myocardial viability. Measured against the functional outcome of regional contractile function after successful revascularization, an increase of glucose utilization relative to regional myocardial blood flow is 77 to 85% accurate in identifying reversibly injured myocardium. Conversely, PET is 78 to 92% accurate in identifying myocardium as irreversibly injured when pre-operative glucose uptake was reduced or absent. Recent studies have indicated that it is possible to predict to some extent post-revascularization improvement in left ventricular function as well as in congestive heart failure related symptoms in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, PET can identify patients with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity as a result of ischemic heart disease and, thus, stratify patients to the most appropriate and cost-effective therapeutic approach. (authors)

  6. Simultaneous emission and transmission scanning in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Kazumi; Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Miura, Shuichi

    2001-01-01

    Examination by PET (positron emission tomography) scanning, following the dosage of 2-deoxy- 18 F fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), is positively utilized for the diagnosis of cancers, rather than for the purpose of studies. This is because the examination by FDG-PET (PET scanning following the dosage of FDG) ensures higher efficiency in discrimination of cancers, than conventional CT and PET. The method of whole body scanning by PET scanning following the dosage of FDG is effectively utilized not only for discrimination cancers, but also for determining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of treatment of cancers. In conventional methods for examining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of cancer treatment, it is necessary to correct for the gamma-ray attenuation, which requires a longer time for examination, increasing the physical and psychological pains of the patients. We have installed the simultaneous emission and transmission scanning capability into the HEADTOME-V of the Shimadzu SET-2000W Series positron emission tomographic scanning instruments, to establish an instrument that permits FDG-PET whole body scanning in actual clinical fields, with minimized physical and psychological pains of patients concerned, yet ensuring an outstandingly high examination efficiency. This report also presents some data obtained by this newly developed instrument and those obtained in practical applications. (author)

  7. Positron emission tomography in drug development and drug evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging modality which can determine biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation

  8. Recent developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors. 117 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Recent developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors. 117 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  11. Positron emission particle tracking in pulsatile flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Nitant; Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Cody [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is increasingly used to understand the flow characteristics in complex systems. This research utilizes PEPT to measure pulsatile flow of frequency 2.1 Hz in an elastic Masterkleer PVC tube of 19 mm inner diameter and 3.2 mm wall thickness. Anion exchange resin beads are labeled with {sup 18}F and delivered to a pump driven flow loop with motorized ball valve used to develop the pulsatile flow. Data are collected in the tube with circular cross section, and measurements are also collected with a section of the tube pinched. Nominal flow velocities are near 1 m/s and Reynolds numbers near 20,000. Many thousand PEPT particle traces are collected and synchronized with the flow pulsation. These Lagrangian data are presented as a series of 20 still frames depicting the 3-D velocity field present during each phase of the flow pulsation. Pressure data are also collected to resolve the pressure wave front moving through the open elastic tube at velocity 15.2 m/s. (orig.)

  12. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures

  13. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, M.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters ε 2 τ's are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs

  14. Positron emission tomography for the assessment of myocardial viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of viable myocardium or ischemically injured myocardium with a reversible impairment of contractile function remains clinically important but challenging. Detection of reversible dysfunction and distinction from irreversible tissue injury by positron emission tomography is based on identification of preserved or even enhanced glucose metabolism with F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose. Regional patterns of myocardial glucose utilization and blood flow, defined as perfusion-metabolism mismatches or matches, on positron emission tomography in patients with chronic or even acute ischemic heart disease are highly accurate in predicting the functional outcome after interventional revascularization. Compared with thallium-201 redistribution scintigraphy, positron emission tomography appears to be diagnostically more accurate, especially in patients with severely impaired left ventricular function. While larger clinical trials are needed for further confirmation, positron emission tomography has already proved clinically useful for stratifying patients with poor left ventricular function to the most appropriate therapeutic approach

  15. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  16. Positron computed tomography for myocardial uptake of N-13 ammonia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Katsuya; Himi, Toshiharu; Imai, Hitoshi; Shukuya, Masaki; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Yamasaki, Toshiro; Tateno, Yukio.

    1985-01-01

    In the present study, positron computed tomography (PCT) was used to evaluate the myocardial uptake of N-13 ammonia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Eight subjects including two normal persons, four patients with HCM, and two with old myocardial farction (OMI) were selected for the study. N-13 ammonia was administered intravenously as a bolus and, commencing with the tracer injection, serial 30-second PCT scans were performed. The results were summarized as follows: 1. The first scan exhibiting cardiac blood pool images revealed a reduced left ventricular cavity in the HCM subjects. 2. After clearance of N-13 from the cardiopulmonary vasculature, the left ventricular myocardium was clearly visualized and an increased myocardial mass with characteristic morphology was demonstrated in the HCM subjects. 3. Detailed analysis of the time-activity curves of the blood pool and myocardium derived from these serial scan images disclosed two uptake phases in the uptake mode of N-13 ammonia. In the initial phase within three minutes, the myocardial uptake of N-13 was rapid in the normal and OMI subjects, whereas its significant delay was observed in the HCM subjects. This may reflect an abnormal initial extraction of N-13 ammonia in the HCM patients compared with the other subjects. 4. Subsequently, in the second phase, which was characterized by a gradual increase of N-13 in the myocardium, the HCM subjects revealed higher uptake ratios than did the others. This may indicate an increased extraction of metabolites of N-13 ammonia during the second phase. These preliminary results undersore the usefulness of dynamic PCT with N-13 ammonia for the assessment of HCM. (author)

  17. The practicality of high magnification imaging by positron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Pendyala, S.

    1988-01-01

    The positron emission microscope has the capability of contrasting areas having high concentrations of monatomic vacancies and other defects. Since the positrons traveling through the specimen will have energies of the same magnitude as that of valence electrons, image contrast will be sensitive to the chemistry of the specimen. In the near future resolutions of 10 nm or lower will be achieved. Whether or not optical aberrations will permit one atom resolution is not clear. For one atom resolution to be obtained positron emission fluxes must be brightness enhanced to 10 11 sec/sup/minus/1/cm/sup/minus/2/ or greater. 5 refs., 1 fig

  18. AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM THE EPA'S LIGHT DUTY TEST VEHICLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses measurements of ammonia (NH3) emissions from EPA's light duty test vehicle while operated on a dynamometer. The vehicle's (1993 Chevrolet equipped with a three-way catalyst) emissions were measured for three transient (urban driving, highway fuel economy, and ...

  19. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons; Modelisation de l'emission d'annihilation des positrons Galactiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, W

    2008-01-15

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  20. Shielding design for positron emission tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    With the recent advent of readily available tracer isotopes, there has been marked increase in the number of hospital-based and free-standing positron emission tomography (PET) clinics. PET facilities employ relatively large activities of high-energy photon emitting isotopes, which can be dangerous to the health of humans and animals. This coupled with the current dose limits for radiation worker and members of the public can result in shielding requirements. This research contributes to the calculation of the appropriate shielding to keep the level of radiation within an acceptable recommended limit. Two different methods were used including measurements made at selected points of an operating PET facility and computer simulations by using Monte Carlo Transport Code. The measurements mainly concerned the radiation exposure at different points around facility using the survey meter detectors and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD). Then the set of manual calculation procedures were used to estimate the shielding requirements for a newly built PEF facility. The results from the measurement and the computer simulation were compared to the results obtained from the set manual calculation procedure. In general, the estimated weekly dose at the points of interest is lower than the regulatory limits for the little company of Mary Hospital. Furthermore, the density and the HVL for normal strength concrete and clay bricks are almost similar. In conclusion, PET facilities present somewhat different design requirements and are more likely to require additional radiation shielding. Therefore, existing shields at the little Company of Mary Hospital are in general found to be adequate and satisfactory and additional shielding was found necessary at the new PET facility in the department of Nuclear Medicine of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital. By use of appropriate design, by implying specific shielding requirements and by maintaining good operating practices, radiation doses to

  1. Ammonia emissions in tunnel-ventilated broiler houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAO Lima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas production in broiler houses and their emissions are closely related to the microclimate established inside the house according to air temperature, humidity, and velocity. Therefore, the internal house environment is influenced by building typology and ventilation system. The objective of the present study was to evaluate ammonia emission rates in broiler houses equipped with different ventilation systems (negative or positive pressure and litter conditions (new or built-up. The environment of six commercial broiler houses was evaluated internal and external NH3 concentrations. Ventilation rates were recorded to estimate ammonia emission rates. The efficiency of circulation and exhaust fans was assessed, and higher ventilation rates were determined in negative-pressure houses due to the higher flow of the fans. Houses with new litter increased ammonia emission rates along the rearing period, indicating the relationship between gas emissions, bird age and ventilation rates, and presented a typical curve of NH3 emission increase. Negative-pressure houses with built-up litter presented higher emission rates during the first rearing week due to the high NH3 concentration during the brooding period, when the ventilation rates required to maintain chick thermal comfort are low. Although the results of the present study indicate an advantage of the positive-pressure systems as to gas emissions, further research is needed reduce gas emissions in broiler houses with negative-pressure systems.

  2. Airborne reduced nitrogen: ammonia emissions from agriculture and other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Natalie; Strader, Ross; Davidson, Cliff

    2003-06-01

    Ammonia is a basic gas and one of the most abundant nitrogen-containing compounds in the atmosphere. When emitted, ammonia reacts with oxides of nitrogen and sulfur to form particles, typically in the fine particle size range. Roughly half of the PM(2.5) mass in eastern United States is ammonium sulfate, according to the US EPA. Results from recent studies of PM(2.5) show that these fine particles are typically deposited deep in the lungs and may lead to increased morbidity and/or mortality. Also, these particles are in the size range that will degrade visibility. Ammonia emission inventories are usually constructed by multiplying an activity level by an experimentally determined emission factor for each source category. Typical sources of ammonia include livestock, fertilizer, soils, forest fires and slash burning, industry, vehicles, the oceans, humans, pets, wild animals, and waste disposal and recycling activities. Livestock is the largest source category in the United States, with waste from livestock responsible for about 3x10(9) kg of ammonia in 1995. Volatilization of ammonia from livestock waste is dependent on many parameters, and thus emission factors are difficult to predict. Despite a seasonal variation in these values, the emission factors for general livestock categories are usually annually averaged in current inventories. Activity levels for livestock are from the USDA Census of Agriculture, which does not give information about animal raising practices such as housing types and grazing times, waste handling systems, and approximate animal slurry spreading times or methods. Ammonia emissions in the United States in 1995 from sources other than livestock are much lower; for example, annual emissions are roughly 8x10(8) kg from fertilizer, 7x10(7) kg from industry, 5x10(7) kg from vehicles and 1x10(8) kg from humans. There is considerable uncertainty in the emissions from soil and vegetation, although this category may also be significant

  3. U.S. broiler housing ammonia emissions inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, R. S.; Casey, K. D.; Wheeler, E. F.; Xin, H.; Pescatore, A. J.

    Using recently published baseline ammonia emissions data for U.S. broiler chicken housing, we present a method of estimating their contribution to an annual ammonia budget that is different from that used by USEPA. Emission rate increases in a linear relationship with flock age from near zero at the start of the flock to a maximum at the end of the flock, 28-65 days later. Market weight of chickens raised for meat varies from "broilers" weighing about 2 kg to "roasters" weighing about 3 kg. Multiple flocks of birds are grown in a single house annually, with variable downtime to prepare the house between flocks. The method takes into account weight and number of chickens marketed. Uncertainty in baseline emissions estimates is used so that inventory estimates are provided with error estimates. The method also incorporates the condition of litter that birds are raised upon and the varying market weight of birds grown. Using 2003 USDA data on broiler production numbers, broiler housing is estimated to contribute 8.8-11.7 kT ammonia for new and built-up litter, respectively, in Kentucky and 240-324 kT ammonia for new and built-up litter, respectively, nationally. Results suggest that a 10% uncertainty in annual emission rate is expected for the market weight categories of broilers, heavy broilers, and roasters. A 27-47% reduction in annual housing emission rate is predicted if new rather than built-up litter were used for every flock. The estimating method can be adapted to other meat bird building emissions and future ammonia emission strategies, with suitable insertion of an age-dependent emission factor or slope into a predictive model equation. The method can be readily applied and is an alternative to that used by USEPA.

  4. In-situ positron emission of CO oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Vonkeman, K.A.; Jonkers, G.; Wal, van der, S.W.A.; Santen, van, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a Neuro ECAT positron tomog., the Positron Emission computed Tomog. (PET) was utilized to image the catalytic oxidn. of CO by using CO and CO2, labeled with short lived positron emitting nuclides. Studies were performed over highly dispersed CeO2/g-Al2O3 supported Pt and Rh catalysts. With a math. model of the reaction kinetics, based on the elementary steps of the catalytic reaction and partially on literature surface science data, the effect of CeO2 promotion and the presence of NO we...

  5. A new liquid xenon scintillation detector for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepel, V.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    A new positron-sensitive detector of annihilation photons filled with liquid xenon is proposed for positron emission tomography. Simultaneous detection of both liquid xenon scintillation and ionization current produces a time resolution of < 1 ns and a position resolution in the tangential direction of the tomograph ring is ∼ 1 mm and in the radial direction is ∼ 5 mm. The advantages of a tomograph with new detectors are discussed. New algorithms of Compton scattering can be used. (author)

  6. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  7. N-13 ammonia positron tomography at rest and during exercise for evaluation of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Senda, M.

    1985-01-01

    To assess the value of positron computed tomography (PCT) for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD), N-13 ammonia myocardial PCT was performed at rest and during exercise in 23 cases. PCT imaging was taken with a wholebody multislice PCT device 3 minutes after intravenous injection of 20-20 mCi of N-13 ammonia. The tracer distribution was homogenous in the left ventricular myocardium at rest and during exercise in all 4 normal cases. Among 19 cases with CAD, regional hypoperfusion was observed in 24 cases (74%) at rest and 18 cases (95%) during exercise. Furthermore, 12 cases had regional perfusion abnormalities in stress images not present at rest. Segmental analysis of myocardial perfusion identified 30 of the 34 stenosed vessels (88%) with only one false positive finding (specificity: 97%). In 11 patients who underwent both thallium-201 and N-13 ammonia imaging, PCT detected stenosed vessels more (87%) than the thallium-201 imaging (63%: p<0.05), especially in those with multivessel disease (87% vs 63%: p 0.05). For quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion by PCT, % change in tracer concentration from resting to stress state was calculated. It was mildly increased (14.4+- 5.8%: p<0.001) in normal segments, whereas in CAD, it was significantly decreased (-18.0+- 18.3%: p<0.02) in segments with stenosed vessels. The authors conclude that N-13 ammonia PCT during exercise is a sensitive and effective method for detecting CAD and identifying stenosed vessels, and it permits quantitative assessment of coronary reserve function

  8. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal

  9. New detector developments for high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, S.I.; Pichler, B.; Lorenz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The strength of quantitative, functional imaging using positron emission tomography, specially in small animals, is limited due to the spatial resolution. Therefore, various tomograph designs employing new scintillators, light sensors, or coincidence electronic are investigated to improve resolution without losses in sensitivity. Luminous scintillators with short light decay time in combination with novel readout schemes using photomultipliers or semiconductor detectors are currently tested by several groups and are implemented in tomographs for small animals. This review summarises the state of development in high resolution positron emission tomography with a detailed description of a system incorporating avalanche photodiode arrays and small scintillation crystals. (orig.) [de

  10. Positron emission tomography in oncology. Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the current and potential uses of positron emission tomography in clinical medicine and research related to oncology. Assessment will be possible of metabolism and physiology of tumors and their effects on adjacent tissues. Specific probes are likely to be developed for target sites on tumors, including monoclonal antibodies and specific growth factors that recognize tumors. To date, most oncological applications of positron emission tomography tracers have been qualitative; in the future, quantitative metabolic measurements should aid in the evaluation of tumor biology and response to treatment. 41 references

  11. Physical and technical basis of positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography utilizes the annihilation of positrons, generating pairs of gamma quanta which are emitted in opposing directions. 'Electronic collimation' is performed by coincident detection of both quanta. Thus, there is no need for mechanical collimators and no limiting connection between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Transversal tomograms are reconstructed from the projection data by means of highly sophisticated data processing. The half life of the most positron emitters used in medical applications is short and of the order of some minutes. Therefore, many positron emitters have to be produced on-side by means of a cyclotron. PET is superior to SPECT with respect to physical and technical aspects, but the high costs of PET limit its wide-spread use up to now. (orig.) [de

  12. Positron emission tomographic imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, D.S.; Chang, P.C.; Eisenhofer, G.; Miletich, R.; Finn, R.; Bacher, J.; Kirk, K.L.; Bacharach, S.; Kopin, I.J.

    1990-01-01

    Sites of uptake, storage, and metabolism of [ 18 F]fluorodopamine and excretion of [ 18 F]fluorodopamine and its metabolites were visualized using positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning after intravenous injection of the tracer into anesthetized dogs. Radioactivity was concentrated in the renal pelvis, heart, liver, spleen, salivary glands, and gall bladder. Uptake of 18F by the heart resulted in striking delineation of the left ventricular myocardium. Pretreatment with desipramine markedly decreased cardiac positron emission, consistent with dependence of the heart on neuronal uptake (uptake-1) for removal of circulating catecholamines. In reserpinized animals, cardiac positron emission was absent within 30 minutes after injection of [ 18 F]-6-fluorodopamine, demonstrating that the emission in untreated animals was from radioactive labeling of the sympathetic storage vesicles. Decreased positron emission from denervated salivary glands confirmed that the tracer was concentrated in sympathetic neurons. Radioactivity in the gall bladder and urinary system depicted the hepatic and renal excretion of the tracer and its metabolites. Administration of tyramine or nitroprusside increased and ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan decreased the rate of loss of myocardial radioactivity. The results show that PET scanning after administration of [ 18 F]fluorodopamine can be used to visualize sites of sympathetic innervation, follow the metabolism and renal and hepatic excretion of catecholamines, and examine cardiac sympathetic function

  13. 3D fast reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, M.L.; Scheurer, A. Hermann; Joseph, C.; Morel, C.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of long reconstruction times in positron emission tomography (PET) has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstructions in a few minutes per frame : on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementation of computationally less intensive algorithms

  14. Time-of-flight positron emission tomography and associated detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacher, J.; Allemand, R.; Campagnolo, R.

    1983-04-01

    An analysis of the timing capabilities of the detectors (scintillators and photomultipliers) in time-of-flight positron emission tomography is presented. The advantages of BaF 2 compared with CsF for the futur tomographs are evaluated [fr

  15. Cobalt-55 positron emission tomography in recurrent ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Reuck, J; Santens, P; Keppens, J; De Bleecker, J; Strijckmans, K; Goethals, P; Lemahieu, [No Value; Korf, J

    The present study investigates if Cobalt-55 (Co-55) positron emission tomography (PET) allows us to distinguish and detect recent, recurrent strokes in patients who had already suffered a previous infarct in the same vascular territory. Fourteen patients with recurrent strokes underwent a Co-55 PET

  16. Detectors, sampling, shielding, and electronics for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1981-08-01

    A brief discussion of the important design elements for positron emission tomographs is presented. The conclusions are that the instrumentation can be improved by the use of larger numbers of small, efficient detectors closely packed in many rings, the development of new detector materials, and novel electronic designs to reduce the deadtime and increase maximum event rates

  17. Measurement of absolute bone blood flow by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahmias, C.; Cockshott, W.P.; Garnett, E.S.; Belbeck, L.W.

    1986-03-01

    A method of measuring bone blood flow has been developed using /sup 18/F sodium fluoride and positron emission tomography. The blood flow levels are in line with those obtained experimentally from microsphere embolisation. This investigative method could be applied to elucidate a number of clinical questions involving bone perfusion.

  18. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanning for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although the site of nosocomial sepsis in the critically ill ventilated patient is usually identifiable, it may remain occult, despite numerous investigations. The rapid results and precise anatomical location of the septic source using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, in combination with computed ...

  19. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-11-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using YF-2-deoxyglucose.

  20. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using 18 F-2-deoxyglucose

  1. Positron emission tomography for staging of oesophageal and gastroesophageal malignancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, AC; Plukker, JT; Nieweg, OE; Vaalburg, W

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was prospectively investigated as a means of detecting metastatic disease in patients with oesophageal tumours and compared with computerized tomography (CT), with the surgical findings as a gold standard. Twenty-six

  2. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    , a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available "amyloid specific" positron emission tomography imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate...

  3. Positron emission tomography of incidentally detected small pulmonary nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Dirksen, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging of small pulmonary nodules incidentally detected by spiral computed tomography (CT) in a high-risk population. Ten patients (five females, five males, aged 54-72 years) were recruited...

  4. Positron Emission Tomography : background, possibilities and perspectives in neuroscience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for determining biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way. This includes the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labeled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs and/or therapy on metabolism. Also deviations of

  5. Physiopathology of ischemic strokes: the input of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinling, M.; Samson, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The tomography by positrons emissions has brought essential physiological and pathological knowledge relative to cerebral vascular accidents in the acute phase, because it is possible to measure the cerebral blood flow, the oxygen extraction rate and the local oxygen consumption. (N.C.)

  6. High resolution and high speed positron emission tomography data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgiss, S.G.; Byars, L.G.; Jones, W.F.; Casey, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution positron emission tomography (PET) requires many detectors. Thus, data collection systems for PET must have high data rates, wide data paths, and large memories to histogram the events. This design uses the VMEbus to cost effectively provide these features. It provides for several modes of operation including real time sorting, list mode data storage, and replay of stored list mode data

  7. Positron emission tomography in presurgical diagnosis of partial epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Leenders, K.L.; Wieser, H.G.

    1992-01-01

    We present results of studies in which positron emission tomography was applied to the presurgical evaluation of epileptics. Emphasis is placed on results of PET studies with various tracers in partial epilepsies and on the use of PET in age-related epileptic syndromes in children. (orig.) [de

  8. Serotonin synthesis studied with positron emission tomography, (PET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Per Gustaf Hartvig; Lundquist, Pinelopi

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to study the biosynthesis and release of serotonin (5HT) at brain serotonergic neurons. PET requires probe compounds with specific attributes to enable imaging and quantification of biological processes. This section focuses on probes to measure...

  9. Quantification in dynamic and small-animal positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disselhorst, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers two aspects of positron emission tomography (PET) quantification. The first section addresses the characterization and optimization of a small-animal PET/CT scanner. The sensitivity and resolution as well as various parameters affecting image quality (reconstruction settings, type

  10. 77 FR 21783 - Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ...] Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs... Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' This guidance is intended to help... Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' Most PET drugs are designed for parenteral...

  11. Positron Emission Tomography Particle tracking using cluster analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2004-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking was successfully used in a wide range of industrial applications. This technique primarily uses a single positron emitting tracer particle. However, using multiple particles would provide more comparative information about the physical processes taking place in a system such as mixing or fluidised beds. In this paper, a unique method that enables us to track more than one particle is presented. This method is based on the midpoint of the closest distance between two trajectories or coincidence vectors. The technique presented in this paper employs a clustering method

  12. Positron Emission Tomography Particle tracking using cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk

    2004-12-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking was successfully used in a wide range of industrial applications. This technique primarily uses a single positron emitting tracer particle. However, using multiple particles would provide more comparative information about the physical processes taking place in a system such as mixing or fluidised beds. In this paper, a unique method that enables us to track more than one particle is presented. This method is based on the midpoint of the closest distance between two trajectories or coincidence vectors. The technique presented in this paper employs a clustering method.

  13. Images to visualize the brain. PET: Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Diagnosis instrument and research tool, Positron Emission Tomography permits advanced technological developments on positron camera, on molecule labelling and principally on very complex 3D image processing. Cyceron Centre in Caen-France works on brain diseases and try to understand the mechanism of observed troubles and to assess the treatment efficiency with PET. Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot of CEA-France establishes a mapping of cognitive functions in PET as vision areas, anxiety regions, brain organization of language, different attention forms, voluntary actions and motor functions

  14. Carbon footprint and ammonia emissions of California beef production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse-Lawson, K R; Rotz, C A; Oltjen, J W; Mitloehner, F M

    2012-12-01

    Beef production is a recognized source of greenhouse gas (GHG) and ammonia (NH(3)) emissions; however, little information exists on the net emissions from beef production systems. A partial life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted using the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM) to estimate GHG and NH(3) emissions from representative beef production systems in California. The IFSM is a process-level farm model that simulates crop growth, feed production and use, animal growth, and the return of manure nutrients back to the land to predict the environmental impacts and economics of production systems. Ammonia emissions are determined by summing the emissions from animal housing facilities, manure storage, field applied manure, and direct deposits of manure on pasture and rangeland. All important sources and sinks of methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide are predicted from primary and secondary emission sources. Primary sources include enteric fermentation, manure, cropland used in feed production, and fuel combustion. Secondary emissions occur during the production of resources used on the farm, which include fuel, electricity, machinery, fertilizer, and purchased animals. The carbon footprint is the net exchange of all GHG in carbon dioxide equivalent (CO(2)e) units per kg of HCW produced. Simulated beef production systems included cow-calf, stocker, and feedlot phases for the traditional British beef breeds and calf ranch and feedlot phases for Holstein steers. An evaluation of differing production management strategies resulted in ammonia emissions ranging from 98 ± 13 to 141 ± 27 g/kg HCW and carbon footprints of 10.7 ± 1.4 to 22.6 ± 2.0 kg CO(2)e/kg HCW. Within the British beef production cycle, the cow-calf phase was responsible for 69 to 72% of total GHG emissions with 17 to 27% from feedlot sources. Holstein steers that entered the beef production system as a by-product of dairy production had the lowest carbon footprint because the emissions

  15. Abatement of ammonia emissions from digested manure using gas-permeable membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new strategy to avoid ammonia emissions from anaerobically digested swine manure was tested using the gas-permeable membrane process. Evaluation of the efficiency of ammonia recovery from digestate as well as mitigation of ammonia emissions to the atmosphere were carried out. Digestate was colle...

  16. Positron emission tomography in a national research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreich, R.

    1989-01-01

    The example of the Paul Scherrer Institute shows that positron emission tomography can be implanted successfully as spin-off into an appropriate environment. The adaption to the existing irradiation facilities of the technique of production of the short-lived positron emitters is complex. However, the basic necessities of a tomography programme can be covered. Moreover, the relatively high energy of the institute's injector cyclotron allows additional production of rare-used longer-lived positron emitters. The scanner exceeded the guaranteed specifications. With respect to the somewhat lower availability of beam time compared to a usual baby cyclotron, the research programme must not be very patient-intense. A strong participation of the pharmaceutical industry has directed research priorities into the pharmacological area. (orig.) [de

  17. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  18. Positron emission tomography: a new paradigm in cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez Gutierrez, Diana Isabel; De los Reyes, Amelia; Llamas Olier, Augusto

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is currently building a positron emission tomography facility that will house a cyclotron and a PET fusion scanner. lt should be operational as of december 2007, being a cancer dedicated national referral center, the NCI should provide both positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals and medical services to institutions and patients nationwide. PET technology provides metabolic information that has been documented to be useful in patient care. The properties of positron decay allow accurate imaging of the in vivo distribution of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. a wide array of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals has been used to characterize multiple physiologic and pathologic states. The major clinical PET applications are in cancer patients using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). FDG, an analogue of glucose, accumulates in most tumors in a greater amount than it does in normal tissue. PET is being used in diagnosis and follow-up of several malignancies, and the list of articles supporting its use continues to grow. in this article, the instrumentation aspects of PET are described and most of the clinical applications in oncology are described

  19. Nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, T.J.; Schwarz, S.W.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is the field of medical practice that involves the oral or intravenous administration of radioactive materials for use in diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceutical available are used for diagnostic purposes. These involve the determination of organ function, shape, or position from an image of the radioactivity distribution within an organ or at a location within the body. After administration, the radiopharmaceutical localizes within an organ or target tissue due to its biological or physiologic characteristics. This diagnostic capability is usually the result of the emission of gamma radiation from the radiopharmaceutical localized within an organ. This allows for external detection and imaging using a special type of camera known as a gamma camera. When a positron-emitting radionuclide decays, a positron (positive electron) is emitted from the nucleus. The positron then annihilates with an electron, resulting in the release of energy in the form of two 511-KeV γ-rays at 180 degree to one another. The energy of these photons is sufficient to pass through tissue. Thus, placing a series of detectors around the patient allows technicians to monitor the emission of both of the photons that result from a single positron annihilation. this ultimately allows an accurate quantification of the distribution of radioactivity in the body not possible when only a single γ-ray is emitted

  20. Positron Emission Tomography: Principles, Technology, and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sibylle I.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technique for quantitative measurement of physiologic parameters in vivo (an overview of principles and applications can be found in [P.E. Valk, et al., eds. Positron Emission Tomography. Basic Science and Clinical Practice. 2003, Springer: Heidelberg]), based on the detection of small amounts of posi-tron-emitter-labelled biologic molecules. Various radiotracers are available for neuro-logical, cardiological, and oncological applications in the clinic and in research proto-cols. This overview describes the basic principles, technology, and recent develop-ments in PET, followed by a section on the development of a tomograph with ava-lanche photodiodes dedicated for small animal imaging as an example of efforts in the domain of high resolution tomographs.

  1. Clinical applications of positron emission tomography at Montreal Neurological Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Montreal Neurological Institute occupies a leading position in positron emission tomography (PET) of the brain with the help of the following three techological gains: they have acquired a 'Therascan' positron emission tomograph manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.; also, a 'Baby Cyclotron' manufactured by Japan Steel Works Ltd.; and they have written a computer program to display the results in colour. Four short-lived isotopes are used; 11 C, 15 O, 18 F, 13 N. Studies of the oxygen uptake of tumours, their glucose metabolism (as monitored by 18 F labelled 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose), and their uptake of therapeutic agents, provide valuable research and diagnostic information. PET is also being used to study epilepsy and cerebrovascular disease

  2. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported.

  3. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported

  4. Application of positron emission tomography in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses experimental and clinical applications of positron emission tomography to the heart, including measurements of blood flow to the myocardium and studies of metabolism and experimental injury. Most initial clinical studies have concentrated on ischemic heart disease, but the technique also has potential for investigation of cardiomyopathies, studying the neural control of the heart, and evaluating the effects of drugs on cardiac tissues

  5. Photon emission by electrons and positrons traversing thin single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ol'chak, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation emission by planar channeled particles (electrons, positrons) in a thin single crystal of thickness L is considered. It is shown that for L approximately πb/THETAsub(L) (b is the lattice constant, THETA sub(L) the Lindhard angle) besides the main spontaneous channeling maxima there exist auxiliary interference maxima, the positions of all the maxima depending on L. The dependence of the radiation spectral intensity on crystal thickness is discussed

  6. Contribution of positron emission tomography in pleural disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Duysinx, Bernard; Corhay, Jean-Louis; Larock, Marie-Paule; Withofs, Nadia; Bury, Thierry; Hustinx, Roland; Louis, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Positron emission tomography (PET) now plays a clear role in oncology, especially in chest tumours. We discuss the value of metabolic imaging in characterising pleural pathology in the light of our own experience and review the literature. BACKGROUND: PET is particularly useful in characterising malignant pleural pathologies and is a factor of prognosis in mesothelioma. Metabolic imaging also provides clinical information for staging lung cancer, in researching the primary tumou...

  7. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundermann, E; Lemahieu, I; Desmedt, P [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, University of Ghent, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography–Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography–computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm. PMID:29142368

  9. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm.

  10. Detectors for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tomography is the technique of producing a photographic image of an opaque specimen by transmitting a beam of x-rays or gamma rays through the specimen onto an adjacent photographic film. The image results from variations in thickness, density, and chemical composition, of the specimen. This technique is used to study the metabolism of the human brain. This article examines the design of equipment used for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography. 27 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  11. Measurement of brain pH with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, R.B.; Alpert, N.M.; Ackerman, R.H.; Wechsler, L.R.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Correia, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    With positron emission tomography (PET) it is now possible to measure local brain pH noninvasively in humans. The application of PET to the determination of pH is relatively new, so only a handful of papers on the subject have appeared in print. This chapter reviews the current strategies for measuring brain pH with PET, discuss methodological problems, and present initial results

  12. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, E.; Lemahieu, I.; Desmedt, P.

    1994-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors)

  13. [Study on Ammonia Emission Rules in a Dairy Feedlot Based on Laser Spectroscopy Detection Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Wang, Li-ming; Gao, Yan-wei; Xu, Jin-feng; Gao, Zhi-ling; Ma, Wen-qi

    2016-03-01

    It needs on-line monitoring of ammonia concentration on dairy feedlot to disclose ammonia emissions characteristics accurately for reducing ammonia emissions and improving the ecological environment. The on-line monitoring system for ammonia concentration has been designed based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology combining with long open-path technology, then the study has been carried out with inverse dispersion technique and the system. The ammonia concentration in-situ has been detected and ammonia emission rules have been analyzed on a dairy feedlot in Baoding in autumn and winter of 2013. The monitoring indicated that the peak of ammonia concentration was 6.11 x 10(-6) in autumn, and that was 6.56 x 10(-6) in winter. The concentration results show that the variation of ammonia concentration had an obvious diurnal periodicity, and the general characteristic of diurnal variation was that the concentration was low in the daytime and was high at night. The ammonia emissions characteristic was obtained with inverse dispersion model that the peak of ammonia emissions velocity appeared at noon. The emission velocity was from 1.48 kg/head/hr to 130.6 kg/head/hr in autumn, and it was from 0.004 5 kg/head/hr to 43.32 kg/head/hr in winter which was lower than that in autumn. The results demonstrated ammonia emissions had certain seasonal differences in dairy feedlot scale. In conclusion, the ammonia concentration was detected with optical technology, and the ammonia emissions results were acquired by inverse dispersion model analysis with large range, high sensitivity, quick response without gas sampling. Thus, it's an effective method for ammonia emissions monitoring in dairy feedlot that provides technical support for scientific breeding.

  14. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was 68 Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes

  15. Managing ammonia emissions from livestock production in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.; Menzi, H.; Pain, B.F.; Misselbrook, T.H.; Daemmgen, U.; Hendriks, H.; Doehler, H.

    2005-01-01

    Around 75% of European ammonia (NH 3 ) emissions come from livestock production. Emissions occur at all stages of manure management: from buildings housing livestock; during manure storage; following manure application to land; and from urine deposited by livestock on pastures during grazing. Ammoniacal nitrogen (total ammoniacal-nitrogen, TAN) in livestock excreta is the main source of NH 3 . At each stage of manure management TAN may be lost, mainly as NH 3 , and the remainder passed to the next stage. Hence, measures to reduce NH 3 emissions at the various stages of manure management are interdependent, and the accumulative reduction achieved by combinations of measures is not simply additive. This TAN-flow concept enables rapid and easy estimation of the consequences of NH 3 abatement at one stage of manure management (upstream) on NH 3 emissions at later stages (downstream), and gives unbiased assessment of the most cost-effective measures. We conclude that rapid incorporation of manures into arable land is one of the most cost-effective measures to reduce NH 3 emissions, while covering manure stores and applying slurry by band spreader or injection are more cost-effective than measures to reduce emissions from buildings. These measures are likely to rank highly in most European countries. - Reducing NH 3 emissions following spreading of manures to land ranks highly because of the large abatement potential and relatively small cost

  16. Managing ammonia emissions from livestock production in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, J. [ADAS Research, Woodthorne, Wergs Road, Wolverhampton WV6 8TQ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jim.webb@adas.co.uk; Menzi, H. [Swiss College of Agriculture, Laenggasse 85, CH-3052 Zollikofen (Switzerland); Pain, B.F. [Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, North Wyke, Okehampton, Devon EX20 2SB (United Kingdom); Misselbrook, T.H. [Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, North Wyke, Okehampton, Devon EX20 2SB (United Kingdom); Daemmgen, U. [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Institute of Agroecology, Bundesallee 50, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Hendriks, H. [National Reference Centre, Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, Ede (Netherlands); Doehler, H. [KTBL, Bartningstrasse 49, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Around 75% of European ammonia (NH{sub 3}) emissions come from livestock production. Emissions occur at all stages of manure management: from buildings housing livestock; during manure storage; following manure application to land; and from urine deposited by livestock on pastures during grazing. Ammoniacal nitrogen (total ammoniacal-nitrogen, TAN) in livestock excreta is the main source of NH{sub 3}. At each stage of manure management TAN may be lost, mainly as NH{sub 3}, and the remainder passed to the next stage. Hence, measures to reduce NH{sub 3} emissions at the various stages of manure management are interdependent, and the accumulative reduction achieved by combinations of measures is not simply additive. This TAN-flow concept enables rapid and easy estimation of the consequences of NH{sub 3} abatement at one stage of manure management (upstream) on NH{sub 3} emissions at later stages (downstream), and gives unbiased assessment of the most cost-effective measures. We conclude that rapid incorporation of manures into arable land is one of the most cost-effective measures to reduce NH{sub 3} emissions, while covering manure stores and applying slurry by band spreader or injection are more cost-effective than measures to reduce emissions from buildings. These measures are likely to rank highly in most European countries. - Reducing NH{sub 3} emissions following spreading of manures to land ranks highly because of the large abatement potential and relatively small cost.

  17. The global distribution of ammonia emissions from seabird colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, S. N.; Dragosits, U.; Blackall, T. D.; Daunt, F.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Seabird colonies represent a significant source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote maritime systems, producing a source of nitrogen that may encourage plant growth, alter terrestrial plant community composition and affect the surrounding marine ecosystem. To investigate seabird NH3 emissions on a global scale, we developed a contemporary seabird database including a total seabird population of 261 million breeding pairs. We used this in conjunction with a bioenergetics model to estimate the mass of nitrogen excreted by all seabirds at each breeding colony. The results combined with the findings of mid-latitude field studies of volatilization rates estimate the global distribution of NH3 emissions from seabird colonies on an annual basis. The largest uncertainty in our emission estimate concerns the potential temperature dependence of NH3 emission. To investigate this we calculated and compared temperature independent emission estimates with a maximum feasible temperature dependent emission, based on the thermodynamic dissociation and solubility equilibria. Using the temperature independent approach, we estimate global NH3 emissions from seabird colonies at 404 Gg NH3 per year. By comparison, since most seabirds are located in relatively cold circumpolar locations, the thermodynamically dependent estimate is 136 Gg NH3 per year. Actual global emissions are expected to be within these bounds, as other factors, such as non-linear interactions with water availability and surface infiltration, moderate the theoretical temperature response. Combining sources of error from temperature (±49%), seabird population estimates (±36%), variation in diet composition (±23%) and non-breeder attendance (±13%), gives a mid estimate with an overall uncertainty range of NH3 emission from seabird colonies of 270 [97-442] Gg NH3 per year. These emissions are environmentally relevant as they primarily occur as "hot-spots" in otherwise pristine environments with low anthropogenic

  18. Attenuation Correction Strategies for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and 4-Dimensional Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Tinsu; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses attenuation correction strategies in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and 4 dimensional PET/CT imaging. Average CT scan derived from averaging the high temporal resolution CT images is effective in improving the registration of the CT and the PET images and quantification of the PET data. It underscores list mode data acquisition in 4 dimensional PET and introduces 4 dimensional CT popular in thoracic treatment planning to 4 dimensional PET/CT. ...

  19. Simultaneous cardiac output and regional myocardial perfusion determination with PET and nitrogen 13 ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens D; Kofoed, Klaus F; Wu, Hsiao M

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of measuring cardiac output during positron emission tomography (PET) examination of myocardial perfusion with nitrogen 13 ammonia.......The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of measuring cardiac output during positron emission tomography (PET) examination of myocardial perfusion with nitrogen 13 ammonia....

  20. Survey of current Swiss pig feeding practices and potential for ammonia emission reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Spring, P.; Bracher, A.

    2017-01-01

    Controlling potentially harmful and polluting emissions from farms is important in the developed world, where legislation exists in many countries limiting emissions such as ammonia and controlling how manure is disposed of from intensive farming operations. In Switzerland, there are legal agreements concerning controls of ammonia emissions, most especially from farms. Ammonia production from pig farms can be controlled by dietary intervention, such as reducing protein levels, which in turn r...

  1. Effect of Bedding Material on Dust and Ammonia Emission from Broiler Houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harn, van J.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Mosquera Losada, J.; Riel, van J.W.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia emission, Bedding material, Broilers, Dust emission The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different bedding materials on fine dust (PM10 and PM2.5) and ammonia emissions from broiler houses. The effects on broiler performance and footpad lesions were also studied. The

  2. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Three-Dimensional Positron Emission Mammography versus Whole Body Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D positron emission mammography (PEM versus whole body positron emission tomography (WBPET for breast cancer. Methods. A total of 410 women with normal breast or benign or highly suspicious malignant tumors were randomized at 1 : 1 ratio to undergo 3D-PEM followed by WBPET or WBPET followed by 3D-PEM. Lumpectomy or mastectomy was performed on eligible participants after the scanning. Results. The sensitivity and specificity of 3D-PEM were 92.8% and 54.5%, respectively. WBPET showed a sensitivity of 95.7% and specificity of 56.8%. After exclusion of the patients with lesions beyond the detecting range of the 3D-PEM instrument, 3D-PEM showed higher sensitivity than WBPET (97.0% versus 95.5%, P = 0.913, particularly for small lesions (<1 cm (72.0% versus 60.0%, P = 0.685. Conclusions. The 3D-PEM appears more sensitive to small lesions than WBPET but may fail to detect lesions that are beyond the detecting range. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee (E2012052 at the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital (Tianjin, China. The instrument positron emission mammography (PEMi was approved by China State Food and Drug Administration under the registration number 20153331166.

  3. Positron emission tomography and cerebral metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comar, D.; Maziere, M.; Zarifian, E.; Naquet, R.

    1979-01-01

    The association of new methods of labelling with short lived radioisotopes and of visualisation 'in vivo' of these labelled molecules by emission tomography, provide the possibility of studying brain metabolism at different levels. Two examples will illustrate the possibilities of this methodology. Cerebral metabolism of methionine- 11 C in phenylketonutic patients: The cerebral uptake of methionine was measured in 24 PKU children aged 1 to 40 months on a low protein diet. Ten of them were examined twice at intervals of several months. Stopping the diet for one week leads to an increase in blood phenylalanine and to a significant important decrease in brain uptake of labelled methionine. Futhermore, for children under treatment having a low phenylalanine blood concentration, brain uptake of methionine decreases with age between 1 and 40 months. These results suggest that the treatment of this disease should be started as soon as possible after birth. Cerebral metabolism of psychoactive drugs: The study of the brain distribution and kinetics of psychoactive drugs may help in understanding their mode of action. Chlorpromazine- 11 C was administered i.v. to schyzophrenic patients not previously treated with neuroleptics. In all patients the brain uptake of the drug was high and rapid, and was localized mainly in the grey matter, probably in proportion to the blood flow. Non-specific binding of this drug to brain proteins prevented visualization of specific binding to dopaminergic or αnor-adrenergic receptors. Specific receptor binding of benzodiazepines was however visualized in the brain of baboons after injection of 11 C-flunitrazepam (specific activity = 600 Ci/μmole) and subsequent displacement of this radioactive ligand by a pharmacological dose of Lorazepam

  4. Regional myocardial metabolism in patients with acute myocardial infarction assessed by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaiger, M.; Brunken, R.; Grover-McKay, M.; Krivokapich, J.; Child, J.; Tillisch, J.H.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Positron emission tomography has been shown to distinguish between reversible and irreversible ischemic tissue injury. Using this technique, 13 patients with acute myocardial infarction were studied within 72 hours of onset of symptoms to evaluate regional blood flow and glucose metabolism with nitrogen (N)-13 ammonia and fluorine (F)-18 deoxyglucose, respectively. Serial noninvasive assessment of wall motion was performed to determine the prognostic value of metabolic indexes for functional tissue recovery. Segmental blood flow and glucose utilization were evaluated using a circumferential profile technique and compared with previously established semiquantitative criteria. Relative N-13 ammonia uptake was depressed in 32 left ventricular segments. Sixteen segments demonstrated a concordant decrease in flow and glucose metabolism. Regional function did not change over time in these segments. In contrast, 16 other segments with reduced blood flow revealed maintained F-18 deoxyglucose uptake consistent with remaining viable tissue. The average wall motion score improved significantly in these segments (p less than 0.01), yet the degree of recovery varied considerably among patients. Coronary anatomy was defined in 9 of 13 patients: patent infarct vessels supplied 8 of 10 segments with F-18 deoxyglucose uptake, while 10 of 13 segments in the territory of an occluded vessel showed concordant decreases in flow and metabolism (p less than 0.01). Thus, positron emission tomography reveals a high incidence of residual tissue viability in ventricular segments with reduced flow and impaired function during the subacute phase of myocardial infarction. Absence of residual tissue metabolism is associated with irreversible injury, while preservation of metabolic activity identifies segments with a variable outcome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Positron transaxial emission tomograph with computerized image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatteau, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a positron transaxial emission tomography apparatus with computerized image reconstruction, like those used in nuclear medicine for studying the metabolism of organs, in physiological examinations and as a diagnosis aid. The operation is based on the principle of the detection of photons emitted when the positrons are annihilated by impact with an electron. The appliance is mainly composed of: (a) - a set of gamma ray detectors distributed on a polygonal arrangement around the body area to be examined, (b) - circuits for amplifying the signals delivered by the gamma ray detectors, (c) - computers essentially comprising energy integration and discrimination circuits and provided at the output of the detectors for calculating and delivering, as from the amplified signals, information on the position and energy relative to each occurrence constituted by the detections of photons, (d) - time coincidence circuits for selecting by emission of detector validation signals, only those occurrences, among the ensemble of those detected, which effectively result from the annihilation of positrons inside the area examined, (e) - a data processing system [fr

  6. First image from a combined positron emission tomography and field-cycled MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindseil, Geron A; Gilbert, Kyle M; Scholl, Timothy J; Handler, William B; Chronik, Blaine A

    2011-07-01

    Combining positron emission tomography and MRI modalities typically requires using either conventional MRI with a MR-compatible positron emission tomography system or a modified MR system with conventional positron emission tomography. A feature of field-cycled MRI is that all magnetic fields can be turned off rapidly, enabling the use of conventional positron emission tomography detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. In this demonstration, two photomultiplier tube-based positron emission tomography detectors were integrated with a field-cycled MRI system (0.3 T/4 MHz) by placing them into a 9-cm axial gap. A positron emission tomography-MRI phantom consisting of a triangular arrangement of positron-emitting point sources embedded in an onion was imaged in a repeating interleaved sequence of ∼1 sec MRI then 1 sec positron emission tomography. The first multimodality images from the combined positron emission tomography and field-cycled MRI system show no additional artifacts due to interaction between the systems and demonstrate the potential of this approach to combining positron emission tomography and MRI. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Investigation of granular impact using positron emission particle tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from an experimental study of granular impact using a combination of high-speed video and positron emission particle tracking (PEPT). The PEPT technique exploits the annihilation of photons from positron decay to determine the position of tracer particles either inside a small granular bed or attached to the object which impacts the bed. We use dense spheres as impactors and the granular beds are comprised of glass beads which are fluidised to achieve a range of different initial packing states. For the first time, we have simultaneously investigated both the trajectory of the sphere, the motion of particles in a 3-D granular bed and particles which jump into the resultant jet, which arises from the collapse of the cavity formed by the impacting sphere.

  8. An automated blood sampling system used in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.; Bohm, C.; Kesselberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    Fast dynamic function studies with positron emission tomography (PET), has the potential to give accurate information of physiological functions of the brain. This capability can be realised if the positron camera system accurately quantitates the tracer uptake in the brain with sufficiently high efficiency and in sufficiently short time intervals. However, in addition, the tracer concentration in blood, as a function of time, must be accurately determined. This paper describes and evaluates an automated blood sampling system. Two different detector units are compared. The use of the automated blood sampling system is demonstrated in studies of cerebral blood flow, in studies of the blood-brain barrier transfer of amino acids and of the cerebral oxygen consumption. 5 refs.; 7 figs

  9. Source Attribution of Methane Emissions in Northeastern Colorado Using Ammonia to Methane Emission Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Perring, A. E.; Robinson, E. S.; Holloway, M.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to recent advances in extraction technology, oil and natural gas extraction and processing in the Denver-Julesburg basin has increased substantially in the past decade. Northeastern Colorado is also home to over 250 concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), capable of hosting over 2 million head of ruminant livestock (cattle and sheep). Because of methane's high Global Warming Potential, quantification and attribution of methane emissions from oil and gas development and agricultural activity are important for guiding greenhouse gas emission policy. However, due to the co-location of these different sources, top-down measurements of methane are often unable to attribute emissions to a specific source or sector. In this work, we evaluate the ammonia:methane emission ratio directly downwind of CAFOs using a mobile laboratory. Several CAFOs were chosen for periodic study over a 12-month period to identify diurnal and seasonal variation in the emission ratio as well as differences due to livestock type. Using this knowledge of the agricultural ammonia:methane emission ratio, aircraft measurements of ammonia and methane over oil and gas basins in the western US during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in March and April 2015 can be used for source attribution of methane emissions.

  10. The metabolism of the human brain studied with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greitz, T.; Ingvar, D.H.; Widen, L.

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents coverage of the use of positron emission tomography (PET) to study the human brain. The contributors assess new developments in high-resolution positron emission tomography, cyclotrons, radiochemistry, and tracer kinetic models, and explore the use of PET in brain energy metabolism, blood flow, and protein synthesis measurements, receptor analysis, and pH determinations, In addition, they discuss the relevance and applications of positron emission tomography from the perspectives of physiology, neurology, and psychiatry

  11. Use of positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez E, Patricio; Jofre E, Josefina; Massardo V, Teresa; Humeres, Pamela; Canessa G, Jose; Sierralta C, Paulina

    2002-01-01

    The value of PET (Positron Emission Tomography) in colorectal cancer is presented. PET is a novel technique that uses F-18-FDG (fluorodeoxiglucose) to assess glucose metabolism by whole body imaging. It has been demonstrated that malignant cells have both increase of glucose uptake and utilization. In colorectal cancer, PET is indicated for staging, assess recurrence, liver metastasis and treatment follow-up. PET is more sensitive and specific than CT (Computed Tomography) and is cost effective. In 30% of cases PET may change patient management, avoiding unnecessary procedures (au)

  12. Contribution of positron emission tomography in pleural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duysinx, B; Corhay, J-L; Larock, M-P; Withofs, N; Bury, T; Hustinx, R; Louis, R

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now plays a clear role in oncology, especially in chest tumours. We discuss the value of metabolic imaging in characterising pleural pathology in the light of our own experience and review the literature. PET is particularly useful in characterising malignant pleural pathologies and is a factor of prognosis in mesothelioma. Metabolic imaging also provides clinical information for staging lung cancer, in researching the primary tumour in metastatic pleurisy and in monitoring chronic or recurrent pleural pathologies. PET should therefore be considered as a useful tool in the diagnosis of liquid or solid pleural pathologies. Copyright © 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Positron emission tomography. Present status and Romanian perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Lungu, V.

    1995-01-01

    Basic principles of the positron emission tomography (PET) are summarised. The main PET methods using short-lived radioisotopes (i.e. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O, 18 F) are briefly reviewed. Three types of particle accelerators for radioisotopes production and medical uses (including radiotherapy), corresponding to the proton energy (E p p p < 200 MeV) are presented. PET imaging equipment and procedures are discussed. Main radiopharmaceuticals based on beta decay for PET studies and their role in medicine is also described. Finally, perspectives for a PET program in Romania (Cyclotron + Radiochemistry + Tomograph ) are discussed. (author)

  14. Design of a volume-imaging positron emission tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrop, R.; Rogers, J.G.; Coombes, G.H.; Wilkinson, N.A.; Pate, B.D.; Morrison, K.S.; Stazyk, M.; Dykstra, C.J.; Barney, J.S.; Atkins, M.S.; Doherty, P.W.; Saylor, D.P.

    1988-11-01

    Progress is reported in several areas of design of a positron volume imaging tomograph. As a means of increasing the volume imaged and the detector packing fraction, a lens system of detector light coupling is considered. A prototype layered scintillator detector demonstrates improved spatial resolution due to a unique Compton rejection capability. The conceptual design of a new mechanism for measuring scattered radiation during emission scans has been tested by Monte Carlo simulation. The problem of how to use effectively the resulting sampled scattered radiation projections is presented and discussed

  15. Kinetic modeling in pre-clinical positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntner, Claudia [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Biomedical Systems, Health and Environment Dept.

    2014-07-01

    Pre-clinical positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved in the last few years from pure visualization of radiotracer uptake and distribution towards quantification of the physiological parameters. For reliable and reproducible quantification the kinetic modeling methods used to obtain relevant parameters of radiotracer tissue interaction are important. Here we present different kinetic modeling techniques with a focus on compartmental models including plasma input models and reference tissue input models. The experimental challenges of deriving the plasma input function in rodents and the effect of anesthesia are discussed. Finally, in vivo application of kinetic modeling in various areas of pre-clinical research is presented and compared to human data.

  16. Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography with Radiofrequency Phototube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaryan, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Knyazyan, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper γ-detector, based on the radiofrequency (RF) phototube and recently developed fast and ultrafast scintillators, is considered for Time-of-Flight positron emission tomography applications. Timing characteristics of such a device has been investigated by means of a dedicated Monte Carlo code based on the single photon counting concept. Biexponential timing model for scintillators have been used. The calculations have shown that such a timing model is in a good agreement with recently measured data. The timing resolution of -detectors can be significantly improved by using the RF phototube. (authors)

  17. Low-resource synchronous coincidence processor for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new FPGA-based method for coincidence detection in positron emission tomography. The method requires low device resources and no specific peripherals in order to resolve coincident digital pulses within a time window of a few nanoseconds. This method has been validated with a low-end Xilinx Spartan-3E and provided coincidence resolutions lower than 6 ns. This resolution depends directly on the signal propagation properties of the target device and the maximum available clock frequency, therefore it is expected to improve considerably on higher-end FPGAs.

  18. Functional imaging of the brain with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.; Jones, S.C.; Greenberg, J.H.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive review, with 191 references, of the development and diagnostic use of positron emission tomography (PET) of the brain is presented. An historical overview of functional studies of the brain reviews the use of nitrons oxide, 85 Kr and 133 Xe, [ 14 C]2-deoxyglucose, and [ 18 F]FDG. The [ 18 F]FDG technique allows the investigation of the effects of physiologic stimulation on the brain. Several studies using this technique are reported. The effects of stroke, seizure disorders, aging and dementia, and schizophrenia on cerebral metabolism as demosntrated by PET are explored

  19. The review of myocardial positron emission computed tomography and positron imaging by gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtake, Tohru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    To measure myocardial blood flow, Nitrogen-13 ammonia, Oxygen-15 water, Rubidium-82 and et al. are used. Each has merit and demerit. By measuring myocardial coronary flow reserve, the decrease of flow reserve during dipyridamole in patients with hypercholesterolemia or diabetes mellitus without significant coronary stenosis was observed. The possibility of early detection of atherosclerosis was showed. As to myocardial metabolism, glucose metabolism is measured by Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and it is considered as useful for the evaluation of myocardial viability. We are using FDG to evaluate insulin resistance during insulin clamp in patients with diabetes mellitus by measuring glucose utilization rate of myocardium and skeletal muscle. FFA metabolism has been measured by {sup 11}C-palmitate, but absolute quantification has not been performed. Recently the method for absolute quantification was reported, and new radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}F-FTHA was reported. Oxygen metabolism has been estimated by {sup 11}C-acetate. Myocardial viability, cardiac efficiency was evaluated by oxygen metabolism. As to receptor or sympathetic nerve end, cardiac insufficiency or cardiac transplantation was evaluated. Imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceutical by gamma camera has been performed. Collimator method is clinically useful for cardiac imaging of viability study. (author). 54 refs.

  20. Application of positron emission tomography in industrial research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkers, G.; van den Bergen, E.A.; Vonkeman, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    Positron Emission computed Tomography (PET) is a relatively new imaging technique, exploiting the 511 keV annihilation radiation characteristic of positron emitters. Although exclusively used till now in the field of nuclear medicine, the application of PET for the non-invasive, in-situ visualisation of processes of industrial interest is challenging, because PET can in principle be used to obtain quantitative, 2D/3D images of the flow and distribution of fluids inside process units, whose steel walls may be up to several centimeters thick. With the aid of a NeuroECAT positron tomographer the PET technique has been utilised to image important (model) processes in the petrochemical industry, using physical labelling of the phase to be imaged. First, the displacement of a brine/surfactant phase, labelled with 66 Ga-EDTA, in a piece of reservoir rock was imaged. Secondly, the dehydration of water-in-oil emulsions was monitored dynamically by labelling the water phase with 68 Ga-EDTA. The second study in particular demonstrates that in the presence of noisy data the image reconstruction method utilised strongly influences the results obtained. With the advent of PET in nuclear medicine the availability of short-lived positron emitting nuclides like 11 C (t1/2 = 20 min), 13 N (t1/2 = 10 min) and 15 0 (t1/2 = 2 min) has increased considerably, allowing the investigation of industrially important reactions by chemical labelling. Utilising the NeuroECAT in a special mode, the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide could be imaged in a model tubular reactor by using 11 C-labelled CO, providing information about the kinetics of the individual reaction steps and interactions and about the degree of occupation of catalytically active sites. (author)

  1. Effect of urease inhibitor application rate and rainfall on ammonia emissions from beef manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social, economic, and environmental factors have prompted the desire to reduce global atmospheric ammonia emissions. A research project was conducted to assess the efficacy of the urease inhibitor N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) for reducing ammonia emissions from simulated open-lot beef...

  2. Positron emission CT on post-traumatic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Takashi; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Doi, Nobuyasu; Sato, Kohten; Iio, Masaaki.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients suffering from post-traumatic epilepsy were checked by encephalography (EEG), X-ray CT and cerebral positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 11 C-carbon dioxide ( 11 CO 2 ) and 11 C-glucoses as indicators of the local cerebral circulation and local cerebral glucose utilization, in order to assess the diagnostic value of PECT in post-traumatic epilepsy. In those patients (4 cases) who had focal electrical abnormalities or X-ray CT lesions, PECT clearly revealed localized regions of decreased cerebral circulation and glucose utilization. A focal hypometabolic zone also appeared in the post-traumatic epilepsy (1 case) which had a normal X-ray CT. One case, who had been treated for several years by medication but showed no EEG change and no abnormality on X-ray CT, revealed a normal circulation and metabolism by RECT. This case did not require any further medication for epilepsy. It is concluded that positron emission CT represents a useful diagnostic method for post-traumatic epilepsy which does not demonstrate any abnormality on X-ray CT. (author)

  3. Clinical applications of positron emission tomography in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roemer, W.; Avril, N.; Schwaiger, M.

    1997-01-01

    Increased glucose metabolism by malignant tissue can be visualized with positron emission tomography (PET), using the radiolabeled glucose analogue F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Depending on the criteria of image interpretation FDG-PET allows detection of breast cancer with a sensitivity of 68% to 94 % and a specificity of 84 % to 97 %. However, sensitivity to visualize small tumors (< 1 cm) is limited. Positron emission tomography demonstrates tumor involvement of regional lymph nodes with high accuracy, predominantly in patients with advanced breast cancer. The sensitivity for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases was 79% with a corresponding specificity of 96 %. Lymph node metastases could not be identified in four of six patients with small primary breast cancer (stage pT1), resulting in a sensitivity of only 33% in these patients. By visualizing primary tumors and metastases in one imaging procedure, PET imaging may allow the effective staging of breast cancer patients. Further studies are needed to define the role of scintigraphic techniques for the diagnostic work-up in patients. (author)

  4. Positron Emission Tomography imaging with the SmartPET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cooperrj@ornl.gov; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P.; Mather, A.R. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-21

    The Small Animal Reconstruction Tomograph for Positron Emission Tomography (SmartPET) project is the development of a small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) demonstrator based on the use of High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors and state of the art digital electronics. The experimental results presented demonstrate the current performance of this unique system. By performing high precision measurements of one of the SmartPET HPGe detectors with a range of finely collimated gamma-ray beams the response of the detector as a function of gamma-ray interaction position has been quantified, facilitating the development of parametric Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in detector performance. These algorithms have then been applied to data from PET imaging measurements using two such detectors in conjunction with a specially designed rotating gantry. In this paper we show how the use of parametric PSA approaches allows over 60% of coincident events to be processed and how the nature and complexity of an event has direct implications for the quality of the resulting image.

  5. Positron emission tomography in the management of cervix cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardel, G.; Gontier, E.; Soret, M.; Dechaud, C.; Fayolle, M.; Foehrenbach, H.; Chargari, C.; Bauduceau, O.

    2009-01-01

    Since its introduction in clinical practice in the 1990 s, positron emission tomography (PET), usually with 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-F.D.G.), has become an important imaging modality in patients with cancer. For cervix carcinoma, F.D.G.-PET is significantly more accurate than computed tomography (CT) and is recommended for loco-regional lymph node and extra pelvic staging. The metabolic dimension of the technique provides additional prognostic information. Ongoing studies now concentrate on more advanced clinical applications, such as the planning of radiotherapy, the response evaluation after the induction of therapy, the early detection of recurrence. Technical innovations, such as PET cameras with better spatial resolution and hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT), available now on the whole territory, provide both anatomic and metabolic information in the same procedure. From the point of view of biological metabolism, new radiopharmaceutical probes are being developed. Those hold promise for future refinements in this field. This article reviews the current applications of F.D.G.-PET in patients with cervix cancer. (authors)

  6. Positron emission tomography: Physics, instrumentation, and image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porenta, G.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources. PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and userfriendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center. (author)

  7. Basic principles of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standke, R.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography uses photons to receive regional information about dynamic, physiologic, and biochemical processes in the living body. A positron decay is measured indirectly by the simultaneous registration of both gamma rays created by the annihilation. The event is counted, if two directly opposite located detectors register gamma rays in coincidence. Unfortunately the detectors of a positron emission tomography system do not register only true coincident events. There are also scattered and random coincidences. Different types of positron tomographs are presented and scintillation crystals, which are in use for positron emission tomography are discussed. The 2D- and 3D-acquisition methods are described as well as preprocessing methods, such as correction for attenuation, scatter and dead time. For quantification the relative parameter standard uptake value (SUV) is explained. Finally hybrid systems, such as combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners and the use of computed tomography data for attenuation correction are introduced. (author)

  8. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons; Modelisation de l'emission d'annihilation des positrons Galactiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, W

    2008-01-15

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  9. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended to assist manufacturers of PET drugs... one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in processing your requests. See the... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance summarizes the...

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavayssiere, Robert; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  12. Ammonia emission mitigation in food waste composting: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Zeng, Yang

    2018-01-01

    Composting is a reliable technology to treat food waste (FW) and produce high quality compost. The ammonia (NH 3 ) emission accounts for the largest nitrogen loss and leads to various environmental impacts. This review introduced the recent progresses on NH 3 mitigation in FW composting. The basic characteristics of FW from various sources were given. Seven NH 3 emission strategies proven effective in the literature were presented. The links between these strategies and the mechanisms of NH 3 production were addressed. Application of hydrothermally treated C rich substrates, biochar or struvite salts had a broad prospect in FW composting if these strategies were proven cost-effective enough. Regulation of nitrogen assimilation and nitrification using biological additive had the potential to achieve NH 3 mitigation but the existing evidence was not enough. In the end, the future prospects highlighted four research topics that needed further investigation to improve NH 3 mitigation and nitrogen conservation in FW composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, A.; Kamel, E.

    2002-01-01

    In this review it will be discussed in which neurological disorders positron emission tomography can yield important diagnostic information. Because positron emission tomography is an expensive method indications have to be cleary defined. One important question concerns the differentiation of tumor recurrence and scar due to radiation therapy or an operation. The grading of brain tumors is another application. In HIV patients fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography can separate lymphoma and toxoplasmosis. In the evaluation of dementia positron emission tomography can help to clarify the differential diagnosis. Another important area is the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients and patients with cerebrovascular disease in whom a surgical revascularization procedure is planned. In extrapyramidal disorders, positron emission tomography can often help to establish the final diagnosis. (author)

  14. 4.5 Tesla magnetic field reduces range of high-energy positrons -- Potential implications for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirrwar, A.; Vosberg, H.; Herzog, H.; Halling, H.; Weber, S.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    1997-01-01

    The authors have theoretically and experimentally investigated the extent to which homogeneous magnetic fields up to 7 Tesla reduce the spatial distance positrons travel before annihilation (positron range). Computer simulations of a noncoincident detector design using a Monte Carlo algorithm calculated the positron range as a function of positron energy and magnetic field strength. The simulation predicted improvements in resolution, defined as full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the line-spread function (LSF) for a magnetic field strength up to 7 Tesla: negligible for F-18, from 3.35 mm to 2.73 mm for Ga-68 and from 3.66 mm to 2.68 mm for Rb-82. Also a substantial noise suppression was observed, described by the full-width at tenth-maximum (FWTM) for higher positron energies. The experimental approach confirmed an improvement in resolution for Ga-68 from 3.54 mm at 0 Tesla to 2.99 mm FWHM at 4.5 Tesla and practically no improvement for F-18 (2.97 mm at 0 Tesla and 2.95 mm at 4.5 Tesla). It is concluded that the simulation model is appropriate and that a homogeneous static magnetic field of 4.5 Tesla reduces the range of high-energy positrons to an extent that may improve spatial resolution in positron emission tomography

  15. Analysis of human cerebral functions using positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibasaki, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography has two major advantages to analyse human cerebral functions in vivo. First, we can see the distribution of a variety of substance in the living (and doing something) human brain. Positron emitters, 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F, are made by medical cyclotron and are elements of natural substrates or easily tagged to substrate. Second, the distribution of the tracer is calculated to make a quantitative functional map in a reasonable spatial resolution over the entire brain in the same time. Not only cortical areas but also deeper structures show regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) or local cerebral metabolic rates (LCMRs). Nowadays, PET is put to practical use for determination of mainly rCBF, LCMR for glucose (LCMRsub(glu)), LCMR for oxygen (LCMRsub(o2)) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV). There have been many other pilot studies, such as estimation of distribution of given neurotransmitters or modulators in the brain which also confirms the substances' role in the neuronal function, and observation of protein synthesis relating to memory function. (J.P.N.)

  16. Application of positron emission tomography in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valind, S.O.; Wollmer, P.E.; Rhodes, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    The early application of positron emission tomography in the lung was mainly concerned with the investigation of the regional volume of the vascular and extravascular compartments, using measurements of fractional blood volume and lung density. However, in addition to its passive role in the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide, the lung exerts a number of active, metabolic functions such as the inactivation of circulating vasoactive compounds and the synthesis and release of biologically active substances. Furthermore, many of the pulmonary disorders originate at a cellular or metabolic level, or have metabolic consequences. Many of the substrates of biochemical reactions and the biologically active compounds, or their analogs, can be labeled with positron-emitting radioisotopes without disturbing their biological or biochemical characteristics. In combination with the development of the appropriate physiological and biochemical models, the quantitative measurements possible with PET provide a unique opportunity of regionally studying the metabolic processes of the lung of man in vivo. Hence, a range of different expressions of metabolism and of lung function can be evaluated and their interdependence can be studied regionally

  17. Thermochemical conversion of biomass storage covers to reduce ammonia emissions from dairy manure Thermochemical conversion of biomass storage covers to reduce ammonia emissions from dairy manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manure storages, and in particular those storing digested manure, are a source of ammonia (NH3) emissions. Permeable manure storage covers can reduce NH3 emissions, however performance can decline as they degrade. Thermochemical conversion of biomass through pyrolysis and steam treatment could incre...

  18. Evaluation of scintillators and semiconductor detectors to image three-photon positron annihilation for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuelhia, E.; Spyrou, N.M.; Kacperski, K.; College University, Middlesex Hospital, London

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly becoming the main nuclear imaging modality of the present century. The future of PET instrumentation relies on semiconductor detectors because of their excellent characteristics. Three-photon positron annihilation has been recently investigated as a novel imaging modality, which demands the crucial high energy resolution of semiconductor detector. In this work the evaluation of the NaI(Tl) scintillator and HPGe and CdZTe semiconductor detectors, to construct a simple three-photon positron annihilation scanner has been explored. The effect of detector and scanner size on spatial resolution (FWHM) is discussed. The characteristics: energy resolution versus count rate and point-spread function of the three-photon positron annihilation image profile from triple coincidence measurements were investigated. (author)

  19. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. (National Institute of Aging, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

  20. Evaluation of brain tumours by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, O.; Meyer, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) for the evaluation of brain tumours has proved clinically valuable. Amino acid and FDG-glucose PET provide information on the degree of malignancy and the prognosis during the initial evaluation. After therapy, the residual tumour can be visualized and recurrence can be differentiated from necrosis. Amino acids have advantages over FDG for these clinical applications. Blood flow, oxygen extraction and metabolism and blood-brain barrier permeability are of minor relevance in clinical situations. Comparison of PET with MRI and MRS will provide new data. The quantitative information of the unique information yielded by PET will lead to a more important clinical role, as will the extrapolation of this experience to the SPECT technique. (orig.) [de

  1. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas

  2. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  3. Diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer by positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Xi; Zhu, Zhao-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The diagnosis of gastric cancer has been significantly improved with the broad availability of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Effective technologies for accurate staging and quantitative evaluation are still in demand to merit reasonable treatment and better prognosis for the patients presented with advanced disease. Preoperative staging using conventional imaging tools, such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography, is inadequate. Positron emission tomography (PET), using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer and integrating CT for anatomic localization, holds a promise to detect unsuspected metastasis and has been extensively used in a variety of malignancies. However, the value of FDG PET/CT in diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer is still controversial. This article reviews the current literature in diagnosis, staging, response evaluation, and relapse monitoring of gastric cancer, and discusses the current understanding, improvement, and future prospects in this area. PMID:24782610

  4. Positron Emission Tomography: state of the art and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays a fundamental role in medical imaging, with a wide range of applications covering, among the others, oncology, neurology and cardiology. PET has undergone a steady technological evolution since its introduction in mid 20th century, from the development of 3D PET in the late 1980s, to the invention of PET/CT in the 1990s and more recently with the introduction of PET/MR scanners. The current research topics aiming to develop the next generation of PET scanners are summarized in this paper, focusing on the efforts to increase the sensitivity of the detectors, as long as improving their timing, spatial and energy resolutions, with the final goal of reducing the amount of radioactive dose received by the patients and the duration of the exams while improving at the same time the detectability of lesions.

  5. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available

  6. Positron emission tomography with gamma camera in coincidence mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertel, A.; Hoer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using F-18 FDG has been estbalished in clinical diagnostics with first indications especially in oncology. To install a conventional PET tomography (dedicated PET) is financially costly and restricted to PET examinations only. Increasing demand for PET diagnostics on one hand and restricted financial resources in the health system on the other hand led industry to develop SPECT cameras to be operated in coincidence mode (camera PET) in order to offer nuclear medicine physicians cost-effective devices for PET diagnostic. At the same time camera PET is inferior to conventional PET regarding sensitivity and detection-efficiency for 511 keV photons. Does camera-PET offer a reliable alternative to conventional PET? The first larger comparative studies are now available, so a first apraisal about the technical clinical performance of camera-PET can be done. (orig.) [de

  7. Development of the LBNL positron emission mammography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Wang, Jimmy; Maltz, Jonathon S.; Qi, Jinyi; Mandelli, Emanuele; Moses, William W.

    2002-01-01

    We present the construction status of the LBNL Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera, which utilizes a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement consisting of 64 LSO crystals (3x3x30 mm3) coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PDs). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We have completed construction of all 42 PEM detector modules. All data acquisition electronics have been completed, fully tested and loaded onto the gantry. We have demonstrated that all functions of the custom IC work using the production rigid-flex boards and data acquisition system. Preliminary detector module characterization and coincidence data have been taken using the production system, including initial images

  8. Positron emission tomography (PET) for oncologic applications in oral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozushima, Masanori; Terasaki, Kazunori

    2004-01-01

    A rapidly emerging clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is the detection of cancer with radionuclide tracer, because it provides information unavailable by ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The most commonly used radiotracer for PET oncologic imaging is fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Early studies show PET has potential value in viewing the region of the tumor, detecting, staging, grading, monitoring response to anticancer therapy, and differentiating recurrent or residual disease from post treatment changes. However, limitations of FDG-PET in the head and neck region, namely, physiological FDG uptake in the salivary glands and palatine tonsils, have been reported, increasing the false-positive rates in image interpretation. This review was designed to address these distinctions of oral cancer PET imaging: specialization of PET equipment, cancer cell metabolism, proliferation and tracers, clinical diagnosis of oral cancer with PET, pitfalls in oncologic diagnosis with FDG-PET imaging. (author)

  9. Axial positrons emission tomography: from mouse to human brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brard, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Positrons emission tomography is a nuclear imaging technics using nuclear decays. It is used both in clinical and preclinical studies. The later requires the use of small animals such as the mouse. The objective is to obtain the best signal with the best spatial resolution. Yet, a weight ratio between humans and mice indicates the need of a sub-millimeter resolution. A conventional scanner is based on detection modules surrounding the object to image and arranged perpendicularly. This implies a strong relationship between efficiency and spatial resolution. This work focuses on the axial geometry in which detection modules are arranged parallel to the object. This limits the relationship between the figures of merit, leading to both high spatial resolution and efficiency. The simulations of prototypes showed great perspectives in term of sub-millimeter resolution with efficiencies of 15 or 40% according to the scanner's axial extension. These results indicate great perspectives for both clinical and preclinical imaging. (author)

  10. A Case of Corticobasal Degeneration Studied with Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nagasawa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, glucose utilization, and dopamine metabolism in the brain of a patient with corticobasal degeneration using positron emission tomography (PET. The clinical picture is distinctive, comprising features referable to both cortical and basal ganglionic dysfunction. Brain imagings of glucose and dopamine metabolism can demonstrate greater abnormalities in the cerebral cortex and in the striatum contralateral to the more affected side than those of blood flow and oxygen metabolism. This unique combination study measuring both cerebral glucose utilization and dopamine metabolism in the nigrostriatal system can provide efficient information about the dysfunctions which are correlated with individual clinical symptoms, and this study is essential to diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration.

  11. Differential diagnosis of depression: relevance of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.M.; Baxter, L.R. Jr.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Gerner, R.H.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The proper differential diagnosis of depression is important. A large body of research supports the division of depressive illness into bipolar and unipolar subtypes with respect to demographics, genetics, treatment response, and neurochemical mechanisms. Optimal treatment is different for unipolar and bipolar depressions. Treating a patient with bipolar depression as one would a unipolar patient may precipitate a serious manic episode or possibly even permanent rapid cycling disorder. The clinical distinction between these disorders, while sometimes difficult, can often be achieved through an increased diagnostic suspicion concerning a personal or family history of mania. Positron emission tomography and the FDG method, which allow in vivo study of the glucose metabolic rates for discrete cerebral structures, provide new evidence that bipolar and unipolar depression are two different disorders

  12. Lesion detection and quantitation of positron emission mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-01-01

    A Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) scanner dedicated to breast imaging is being developed at our laboratory. We have developed a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm for this scanner. Here we theoretically study the lesion detection and quantitation. The lesion detectability is studied theoretically using computer observers. We found that for the zero-order quadratic prior, the region of interest observer can achieve the performance of the prewhitening observer with a properly selected smoothing parameter. We also study the lesion quantitation using the test statistic of the region of interest observer. The theoretical expressions for the bias, variance, and ensemble mean squared error of the quantitation are derived. Computer simulations show that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo results for both lesion detection and quantitation

  13. Evaluating patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichle, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in nuclear medicine imaging techniques offer an important alternative for the evaluation of therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular disease. In particular, positron emission tomography (PET), with its capacity to provide quantitative measurements of brain blood flow, metabolism and biochemistry on a truly regional basis, now offers the opportunity to evaluate therapy in terms of specific changes in these parameters. By doing this PET permits one to study the problem on an individual patient basis with each subject serving as his own control. The author has been pursuing this approach in patients considered candidates for superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis to bypass major stenotic or occlusive lesions of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery. The results indicate that PET is of considerable value in establishing much more exactly the pathophysiology of certain forms of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and evaluating a form of therapy designed to correct the basic underlying defect. (Auth./C.F.)

  14. Knowledge-based automated radiopharmaceutical manufacturing for Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexoff, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the application of basic knowledge engineering principles to the design of automated synthesis equipment for radiopharmaceuticals used in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Before discussing knowledge programming, an overview of the development of automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis systems for PET will be presented. Since knowledge systems will rely on information obtained from machine transducers, a discussion of the uses of sensory feedback in today's automated systems follows. Next, the operation of these automated systems is contrasted to radiotracer production carried out by chemists, and the rationale for and basic concepts of knowledge-based programming are explained. Finally, a prototype knowledge-based system supporting automated radiopharmaceutical manufacturing of 18FDG at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is described using 1stClass, a commercially available PC-based expert system shell

  15. Radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography investigations of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naagren, Kjell; Halldin, Christer; Rinne, Juha O.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common degenerative neurological disease that is an increasing medical, economical, and social problem. There is evidence that a long ''asymptomatic'' phase of the disease exists where functional changes in the brain are present, but structural imaging for instance with magnetic resonance imaging remains normal. Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the tools by which it is possible to explore changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism and the functioning of different neurotransmitter systems. More recently, investigation of protein aggregations such as amyloid deposits or neurofibrillary tangles containing tau-protein has become possible. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on various 18 F- and 11 C-labelled PET tracers that could be used to study the pathophysiology of AD, to be used in the early or differential diagnosis or to be used in development of treatment and in monitoring of treatment effects. (orig.)

  16. Data acquisition electronics for positron emission mammography (PEM) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.D.; Sebastia, A.; Cerda, J.; Esteve, R.; Mora, F.J.; Toledo, J.F.; Benlloch, J.M.; Gimenez, N.; Gimenez, M.; Lerche, Ch. W.; Pavon, N.; Sanchez, F.

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is an innovative technique to increase sensitivity and overcome the main drawbacks of conventional X-ray screening. However, dedicated PET imaging systems demand specific hardware solutions for data acquisition and processing that can take advantage of the reduction in the number of channels. Data acquisition issues can affect PEM scanners performance and they should be exhaustively addressed in order to exploit the increment in the event count rate. This is crucial in order to reduce both the scanning time and the total injected dose. This paper presents the electronics for our PEM camera prototype that enables us to achieve very high-count rates and perform comprehensive online processing. Results about acquisition in our detector for a typical clinical setup are studied using Monte Carlo simulation of hot lesion phantoms

  17. Brain abnormalities in murderers indicated by positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, A; Buchsbaum, M; LaCasse, L

    1997-09-15

    Murderers pleading not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) are thought to have brain dysfunction, but there have been no previous studies reporting direct measures of both cortical and subcortical brain functioning in this specific group. Positron emission tomography brain imaging using a continuous performance challenge task was conducted on 41 murderers pleading not guilty by reason of insanity and 41 age- and sex-matched controls. Murderers were characterized by reduced glucose metabolism in the prefrontal cortex, superior parietal gyrus, left angular gyrus, and the corpus callosum, while abnormal asymmetries of activity (left hemisphere lower than right) were also found in the amygdala, thalamus, and medial temporal lobe. These preliminary findings provide initial indications of a network of abnormal cortical and subcortical brain processes that may predispose to violence in murderers pleading NGRI.

  18. Investigation of language lateralization mechanism by Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belin, Pascal

    1997-01-01

    As language lateralization in the brain left hemisphere is one of the most well known but less understood characteristics of the human brain, this research thesis reports the use of brain functional imaging to address some specific aspects of this lateralization. In a first part, the author reports the study of mechanisms of recovery from aphasia after a left hemisphere lesion within a population of aphasic right-handers. Based on a contrast between patients with a persistent aphasia despite usual language therapies, and patients with a significant recovery after a melodic and rhythmic therapy (TMR), a PET-based (positron emission tomography) activation study has been developed, based on the opposition between usual language stimuli and stimuli accentuated by TMR. In the second part, the author explored more systematically on sane patients the influence of some physical characteristics of auditory stimulation on the induced functional asymmetry [fr

  19. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron-emission tomography in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazekas, F.; Payer, F.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG-PET) is an ideal tool for imaging regional cerebral metabolism as glucose is the most important source of energy for neurons. Under physiologic conditions the pattern of metabolism reflects the state of cerebral activation which can be modulated by various stimuli to investigate cerebral organization. Pathologic conditions usually cause a drop in metabolism because of neuronal inactivity or loss. They can, however, also be associated with an increased rate of glucose metabolism such as in case of active epileptic foci or malignant tumors. As a consequence F-18-FDG-PET has become a valuable functional imaging modality especially for the diagnostic clarification of non-contributory or negative morphologic imaging results. Dementia, pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy and neurooncology are currently frequent indications for referral to F-18-FDG-PET in neurology. (author)

  20. Fluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Luxen, Andre; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland

    2004-01-01

    2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18 F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes ''generalist'' tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of ''specific'' tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell

  1. Effects of diurnal emission patterns and sampling frequency on precision of measurement methods for daily ammonia emissions from animal houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estelles, F.; Calvet, S.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia concentrations and airflow rates are the main parameters needed to determine ammonia emissions from animal houses. It is possible to classify their measurement methods into two main groups according to the sampling frequency: semi-continuous and daily average measurements. In the first

  2. Consequences of new scientific findings for future abatement of ammonia emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erisman, J.W.; Monteny, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the estimated decreases in emissions of ammonia in the Netherlands are overestimated. Results obtained from recent research on the so-called compensation point of ammonia in intensive farming areas, research in areas affected with swine fever, and research on

  3. Ammonia emission from aviary housing systems for laying hens : inventory, characteristics and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.

    1998-01-01

    The development and practical application of welfare friendly aviary housing systems for laying hens, that generally emit more ammonia per hen than battery cage housing systems, would conflict with the Dutch policy to substantially reduce the total emission of ammonia from animal

  4. A simulation study of a method to reduce positron annihilation spread distributions using a strong magnetic field in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, H.; Kanno, I.; Miura, S.; Murakami, M.; Takahashi, V.; Kemura, K.

    1986-01-01

    The positron trajectories have been three-dimensionally simulated using a Monte-Carlo method under various strength of the magnetic field. More than 5 tesla of the field confined the positrons effectively, resulting in increase of the probability of the annihilation within a limited small region, hence the higher spatial resolution in positron emission tomography

  5. 76 FR 6143 - Draft Guidance on Positron Emission Tomography Drug Applications-Content and Format for New Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ...; formerly Docket No. 00D-0892] Draft Guidance on Positron Emission Tomography Drug Applications--Content and... Applications for Certain Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products; Availability,'' issued on March 10, 2000... and ANDAs.'' The draft guidance is intended to assist manufacturers of certain positron emission...

  6. Model-predicted ammonia emission from two broiler houses with different rearing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsa Duarte Silva Lima

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH3 emissions from broiler production can affect human and animal health and may cause acidification and eutrophication of the surrounding environment. This study aimed to estimate ammonia emissions from broiler litter in two systems of forced ventilation, the tunnel ventilation (TV and the dark house (DH. The experiment was carried out on eight commercial broiler houses, and the age of the birds (day, d, pH and litter temperature were recorded. Broilers were reared on built-up wood shaving litter using an average flock density of 14 bird m–2. Temperature and relative humidity inside the broiler houses were recorded in the morning during the grow-out period. A factorial experimental design was adopted, with two types of houses, four replicates and two flocks with two replicates each. A deterministic model was used to predict ammonia emissions using the litter pH and temperature, and the day of grow-out. The highest litter temperature and pH were found at 42 d of growth in both housing systems. Mean ambient air temperature and relative humidity did not differ in either system. Mean model predicted ammonia emission was higher in the DH rearing system (5200 mg NH3 m−2h−1 at 42 d than in the TV system (2700 mg NH3m−2 h−1 at 42 d. TV presented the lowest mean litter temperature and pH at 42 d of growth. In the last week of the broilers’ grow-out cycle, estimated ammonia emissions inside DH reached 5700 mg m−2h−1 in one of the flocks. Ammonia emissions were higher inside DH, and they did not differ between flocks. Assuming a broiler market weight in Brazil of close to 2 kg, ammonia emissions were equivalent to 12 g NH3 bird-marketed−1. Model-predicted ammonia emissions provided comprehensible estimations and might be used in abatement strategies for NH3 emission.

  7. Scintillation crystals for positron emission tomography having a non reflecting band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates generally to positron emission tomography, a sub-field of the class of medical imaging techniques using ionizing radiation and image reconstruction techniques; and more particularly to devices which use an array of scintillation detectors to detect the annihilation radiation from positron disintegration and use this information to reconstruct an image of the distribution of positron emitting isotope within a body section. 6 figs

  8. Model-predicted ammonia emission from two broiler houses with different rearing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Nilsa Duarte Silva; Garcia,Rodrigo Garófallo; Nääs,Irenilza Alencar; Caldara,Fabiana Ribeiro; Ponso,Roselaine

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from broiler production can affect human and animal health and may cause acidification and eutrophication of the surrounding environment. This study aimed to estimate ammonia emissions from broiler litter in two systems of forced ventilation, the tunnel ventilation (TV) and the dark house (DH). The experiment was carried out on eight commercial broiler houses, and the age of the birds (day, d), pH and litter temperature were recorded. Broilers were reared on built-up w...

  9. Emission of ammonia from indoor concrete wall and assessment of human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Z; Dong, Y; Wang, Z; Zhu, T

    2006-04-01

    Addition of urea-based antifreeze admixtures during cement mixing can make it possible to produce concrete cement in construction of buildings in cold weather; this, however, has led to increasing indoor air pollution due to continuous transformation and emission from urea to gaseous ammonia in indoor concrete wall. It is believed that ammonia is harmful to human body and exposure to ammonia can cause some serious symptoms such as headaches, burns, and even permanent damage to the eyes and lungs. In order to understand the emission of ammonia from indoor concrete wall in civil building and assess the health risk of people living in these buildings, the experimental pieces of concrete wall were first prepared by concreting cement and urea-based antifreeze admixtures to simulate the indoor wall in civil building in this work. Then environmental chamber was adopted for studying the effect of temperature, relative humility and air exchange rate on emission of ammonia from experimental pieces of concrete wall. Also the field experiment was made at selected rooms in given civil buildings. Exposure and potential dose of adult and children exposed to indoor/outdoor ammonia in summer and in winter are calculated and evaluated by using Scenario Evaluation Approach. The results indicated that high air exchange rate leads to decreased ammonia concentration, and elevation of temperature causes increasing ammonia concentration and volatilizing rate in chamber. The complete emission of ammonia from the wall containing urea-based antifreeze admixtures needs more than 10 years in general. Ventilating or improving air exchange can play a significant role in reducing ammonia concentration in actual rooms in field experiments. Urea-based antifreeze admixtures in concrete wall can give rise to high exposure and potential dose, especially in summer. Generally, adults have a high potential dose than children, while children have personal average dose rate beyond adults in the same

  10. The ALFAM2 database on ammonia emission from field-applied manure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Pacholski, Andreas; Bittman, Shabtai; Burchill, William; Bussink, Wim; Chantigny, Martin; Carozzi, Marco; Génermont, Sophie; Häni, Christoph; Hansen, Martin N.; Huijsmans, Jan; Hunt, Derek; Kupper, Thomas; Lanigan, Gary; Loubet, Benjamin; Misselbrook, Tom; Meisinger, John J.; Neftel, Albrecht; Nyord, Tavs; Pedersen, Simon V.; Sintermann, Jörg; Thompson, Rodney B.; Vermeulen, Bert; Voylokov, Polina; Williams, John R.; Sommer, Sven G.

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from animal manure contributes to air pollution and ecosystem degradation, and the loss of reactive nitrogen (N) from agricultural systems. Estimates of NH3 emission are necessary for national inventories and nutrient management, and NH3 emission from field-applied manure has

  11. Development of radiotracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labas, R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to develop new radioactive tracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography. Several compounds including 4-(4-fluoro-benzyl)piperidine and presenting interesting in vivo biological properties were the object of a labelling with a positrons emitter atom ( 11 C or 18 F)

  12. Novel targets for positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical tracers for visualization of neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetkin, I.; Shvedova, M.; Anfinogenova, Y.; Litvak, M.; Atochin, D.

    2017-08-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging techniques can enhance diagnosis of neurological diseases to achieve their successful treatment. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can identify activated microglia and provide detailed functional information based on molecular biology. This imaging modality is based on detection of isotope labeled tracers, which emit positrons. The review summarizes the developments of various radiolabeled ligands for PET imaging of neuroinflammation.

  13. Effectiveness of lead aprons in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra Fonseca, R.; Amaral, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the last two decades, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has emerged as clinical diagnostic technique, becoming one of the fastest growing imaging tools in modern nuclear medicine. Because 511 keV annihilation photon energy is much higher than the photon with mean energy of 140 keV emitted in Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT), medical staff working in PET studies receive a higher dose than those working only with SPECT tracers do. As a result, special attention must be paid to keep radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA principle). Lead equivalent apron is the principal personal protective equipment for technologists occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in medical procedures and may be an important component in the ALARA program. However, in practices involving PET, 0.5 mm lead equivalent aprons have been used regardless of photon's energy. In this context, this work was designed for evaluating radioprotective effectiveness of such aprons in PET procedures. For this, the operational quantities personal dose equivalent H p (0.07) and H p (10) have been assessed by using MCNP4C code in a model of individual exposure to small source of 511 keV photons, representing the situation of injection of the radiopharmaceutical, in two situations: technologists wearing and not wearing 0.5 mm lead aprons. To represent the technologist a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom was employed, and the simulated source to subject distances varied between 40 to 100 cm, in steps of 10 cm. The results showed no significant differences between the values obtained for H p (10) in the two situations, pointing out that that there is no radioprotective influence of wearing such aprons on PET practices. Compared to simulations without such device, H p (0.07) increased up about 26% when technologist is wearing radioprotective aprons, depending on the source to subject distance. On the basis of this work, 0.5 mm lead equivalent aprons should not be

  14. single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography - Part 1 (October 2012), Part 2 (October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. Part 1 Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, gamma photon emitters, positon emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Gamma cameras; 4 - Quantification in emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion. Part 2 content: 1 - Positon emitters; 2 - Positons detection: Coincidence detection (electronic collimation, PET detectors with gamma cameras, dedicated PET detectors, spectrometry); PET detectors type; time-of-flight PET; 2D PET; 3D PET; 3 - Quantification in emission tomography: detected events, attenuation, scattering, fortuitous coincidences, standardisation; 4 - Common SPECT and PET problems: partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration, dead time; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  15. Relevance of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.A.; Avril, N.; Schwaiger, M.

    1999-01-01

    Background: The clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET) for detection and staging of malignant tumors is rapidly increasing. Furthermore, encouraging results for monitoring the effects of radio- and chemotherapy have been reported. Methods: This review describes the technical principles of PET and the biological characteristics of tracers used in oncological research and patient studies. The results of clinical studies published in peer reviewed journals during the last 5 years are summarized and clinical indications for PET scans in various tumor types are discussed. Results and Conclusions: Numerous studies have documented the high diagnostic accuracy of PET studies using the glucose analogue F-18-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) for detection and staging of malignant tumors. In this field, FDG-PET has been particularly successful in lung cancer, colorectal cancer, malignant lymphoma and melanoma. Furthermore, FDG-PET has often proven to be superior to morphological imaging techniques for differentation of tumor recurrence from scar tissue. Due to the high glucose utilization of normal gray matter radiolabeled amino-acids like C-11-methionine are superior to FDG for detection and delineation of brain tumors by PET. In the future, more specific markers of tumor cell proliferation and gene expression may allow the application of PET not only for dianostic imaging also but for non-invasive biological characterization of malignant tumors and early monitoring of therapeutic interventions. (orig.) [de

  16. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herscovitch, P.; Powers, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The principal advantage of positron emission tomography over other methods for measuring cerebral blood flow stems from the accurate, quantitative three-dimensional measurements of regional brain radioactivity that are possible with this technique. As a result, accurate quantitative measurements of regional cerebral blood flow can be obtained for both superficial and deep cerebral structures. The value of PET for investigating central nervous system physiology and pathology extends far beyond this, however. Through the use of different radiotracers and appropriate mathematical models, PET can be applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. Measurements of rCBF tell only part of the story. Experience with PET and with a variety of other techniques has taught us that rCBF is at times a poor indicator of the metabolic, functional, and biochemical status of cerebral tissue. It is only by understanding the interaction of all of these factors that our understanding of neurologic disease can advance. It is in the investigation of these complex relationships that the real value of PET resides

  17. European health telematics networks for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxakis, George; Pozo, Miguel Angel; Ohl, Roland; Visvikis, Dimitris; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Ortega, Fernando; Guerra, Pedro; Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine; Selby, Peter; Pan, Leyun; Diaz, Javier; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Santos, Andres; Strauss, Ludwig; Sakas, Georgios

    2006-12-01

    A pilot network of positron emission tomography centers across Europe has been setup employing telemedicine services. The primary aim is to bring all PET centers in Europe (and beyond) closer, by integrating advanced medical imaging technology and health telematics networks applications into a single, easy to operate health telematics platform, which allows secure transmission of medical data via a variety of telecommunications channels and fosters the cooperation between professionals in the field. The platform runs on PCs with Windows 2000/XP and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion. The communication between two connected workstations is based on a TCP/IP connection secured by secure socket layers and virtual private network or jabber protocols. A teleconsultation can be online (with both physicians physically present) or offline (via transmission of messages which contain image data and other information). An interface sharing protocol enables online teleconsultations even over low bandwidth connections. This initiative promotes the cooperation and improved communication between nuclear medicine professionals, offering options for second opinion and training. It permits physicians to remotely consult patient data, even if they are away from the physical examination site.

  18. Characterization of time resolved photodetector systems for Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Powolny, François

    The main topic of this work is the study of detector systems composed of a scintillator, a photodetector and readout electronics, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In particular, the timing properties of such detector systems are studied. The first idea is to take advantage of the good timing properties of the NINO chip, which is a fast preamplifier-discriminator developed for the ALICE Time of flight detector at CERN. This chip uses a time over threshold technique that is to be applied for the first time in medical imaging applications. A unique feature of this technique is that it delivers both timing and energy information with a single digital pulse, the time stamp with the rising edge and the energy from the pulse width. This entails substantial simplification of the entire readout architecture of a tomograph. The scintillator chosen in the detector system is LSO. Crystals of 2x2x10mm3 were used. For the photodetector, APDs were first used, and were then replaced by SiPMs to make use of their highe...

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in pancreatic cancer: an unsolved problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takashi; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ito, Kengo; Tadokoro, Masanori; Ota, Toyohiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Isomura, Takayuki; Ito, Shigeki; Nishino, Masanari; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the significance and problems of 2-[fluorine-18]-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in diagnosing pancreatic cancer and mass-forming pancreatitis (MFP). PET, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed in 15 patients with pancreatic cancer and nine patients with MFP. The areas of the PET scan were determined according to the markers drawn on the patients at CT or MR imaging. Regions of interests (ROIs) were placed by reference to the CT or MR images corresponding to the PET images. Tissue metabolism was evaluated by the differential absorption ratio (DAR) at 50 min after intravenous injection of FDG [DAR = tissue tracer concentration/(injected dose/body weight). The DAR value differed significantly in pancreatic cancer (mean±SD, 4.64±1.94) and MFP (mean±SD, 2.84±2.22) (P<0.05). In one false-negative case (mucinous adenocarcinoma), the tumour contained a small number of malignant cells. In one false-positive case, lymphocytes accumulated densely in the mass in the pancreatic head. Further studies are necessary to investigate the histopathological characteristics (especially the cellularity) and other factors affecting the FDG DAR on PET images. (orig.)

  20. Utilisation of spatial and temporal correlations in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureau, F.

    2008-06-01

    In this thesis we propose, implement, and evaluate algorithms improving spatial resolution in reconstructed images and reducing data noise in positron emission tomography imaging. These algorithms have been developed for a high resolution tomograph (HRRT) and applied to brain imaging, but can be used for other tomographs or studies. We first developed an iterative reconstruction algorithm including a stationary and isotropic model of resolution in image space, experimentally measured. We evaluated the impact of such a model of resolution in Monte-Carlo simulations, physical phantom experiments and in two clinical studies by comparing our algorithm with a reference reconstruction algorithm. This study suggests that biases due to partial volume effects are reduced, in particular in the clinical studies. Better spatial and temporal correlations are also found at the voxel level. However, other methods should be developed to further reduce data noise. We then proposed a maximum a posteriori de-noising algorithm that can be used for dynamic data to de-noise temporally raw data (sino-grams) or reconstructed images. The a priori modeled the coefficients in a wavelet basis of all the signals without noise (in an image or sinogram). We compared this technique with a reference de-noising method on replicated simulations. This illustrates the potential benefits of our approach of sinogram de-noising. (author)

  1. Positron emission tomography scans on kanji and kana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa

    2002-01-01

    We reanalyzed our positron emission tomography (PET) study on reading of Japanese kanji (morphogram) words, kana (phonogram) words and kana nonwords, using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). The basal occipital and occipito-temporal areas were activated in common, among which activity was most pronounced in the fusiform/inferior temporal gyri with kanji and in the inferior occipital gyrus with kana. The results were consistent with the clinical observations that damage to the posterior inferior temporal cortex including the fusiform/inferior temporal gyri causes alexia with agraphia for kanji, whereas damage to the posterior occipital area including the inferior occipital gyrus causes pure alexia for kana. Bases on the present results and the lesion studies, a dual-route hypothesis that modifies Iwata's model of reading about the Japanese language was proposed. That is, the middle occipital gyrus, deep perisylvian temporoparietal cortex and posterior temporal gyrus constitute a dorsal route for reading and process phonology for words, whereas the inferior occipital, fusiform and posterior inferior temporal gyri constitute a ventral route for reading and process orthography and lexico-semantics for words. The ventral route may gain dominance in reading, according as a word is repeatedly presented. (author)

  2. Automated identification of the lung contours in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nery, F; Ferreira, N C; Faustino, R; Silva, J Silvestre; Caramelo, F J

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that permits to analyze, in three dimensions, the physiological processes in vivo. One of the areas where PET has demonstrated its advantages is in the staging of lung cancer, where it offers better sensitivity and specificity than other techniques such as CT. On the other hand, accurate segmentation, an important procedure for Computer Aided Diagnostics (CAD) and automated image analysis, is a challenging task given the low spatial resolution and the high noise that are intrinsic characteristics of PET images. This work presents an algorithm for the segmentation of lungs in PET images, to be used in CAD and group analysis in a large patient database. The lung boundaries are automatically extracted from a PET volume through the application of a marker-driven watershed segmentation procedure which is robust to the noise. In order to test the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compared the segmentation results in several slices using our approach with the results obtained from manual delineation. The manual delineation was performed by nuclear medicine physicians that used a software routine that we developed specifically for this task. To quantify the similarity between the contours obtained from the two methods, we used figures of merit based on region and also on contour definitions. Results show that the performance of the algorithm was similar to the performance of human physicians. Additionally, we found that the algorithm-physician agreement is similar (statistically significant) to the inter-physician agreement.

  3. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Cun; Xie, Qiang; Lv, Wei-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a phenotypically heterogeneous, chronic, destructive inflammatory disease of the synovial joints. A number of imaging tools are currently available for evaluation of inflammatory conditions. By targeting the upgraded glucose uptake of infiltrating granulocytes and tissue macrophages, positron emission tomography/computed tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG PET/CT) is available to delineate inflammation with high sensitivity. Recently, several studies have indicated that FDG uptake in affected joints reflects the disease activity of RA. In addition, usage of FDG PET for the sensitive detection and monitoring of the response to treatment has been reported. Combined FDG PET/CT enables the detailed assessment of disease in large joints throughout the whole body. These unique capabilities of FDG PET/CT imaging are also able to detect RA-complicated diseases. Therefore, PET/CT has become an excellent ancillary tool to assess disease activity and prognosis in RA. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner.

  5. Quantifying the limitations of small animal positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, D.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dco@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, WA4 4AD Cheshire (United Kingdom); Beveridge, T.E. [School of Materials and Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2009-06-01

    The application of position sensitive semiconductor detectors in medical imaging is a field of global research interest. The Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit GEANT4 [ (http://geant4.web.cern.ch/geant4/)] was employed to improve the understanding of detailed {gamma}-ray interactions within the small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET), high-purity germanium (HPGe) imaging system, SmartPET [A.J. Boston, et al., Oral contribution, ANL, Chicago, USA, 2006]. This system has shown promising results in the field of PET [R.J. Cooper, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A (2009), accepted for publication] and Compton camera imaging [J.E. Gillam, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 579 (2007) 76]. Images for a selection of single and multiple point, line and phantom sources were successfully reconstructed using both a filtered-back-projection (FBP) [A.R. Mather, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Liverpool, 2007] and an iterative reconstruction algorithm [A.R. Mather, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Liverpool, 2007]. Simulated data were exploited as an alternative route to a reconstructed image allowing full quantification of the image distortions introduced in each phase of the data processing. Quantifying the contribution of uncertainty in all system components from detector to reconstruction algorithm allows the areas in need of most attention on the SmartPET project and semiconductor PET to be addressed.

  6. Positron emission tomography in degenerative disorders of the dopaminergic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karbe, H; Holthoff, V; Huber, M; Herholz, K; Wienhard, K; Wagner, R; Heiss, W D [Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie und Max-Planck-Institut fuer neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1992-01-01

    21 patients who had Parkinson's disease (PD), PD plus dementia of Alzheimer type (PDAT) or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), were studied with positron emission tomography (PET) using ({sup 18}F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). In one patient with strictly unilateral PD side differences in striatal dopa uptake were studied with 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-dopa (F-dopa). In patients with PD PET with FDG did not show any significant change in regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMR(Glu)). In PDAT glucose metabolism was generally reduced, the most severe decrease was found in parietal cortex. The metabolic pattern was similar to that typically found in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the patient with strictly unilateral PD rCMR(Glu) was normal, F-dopa PET, however, revealed a distinct reduction of dopa uptake in the contralateral putamen. In PSP glucose metabolism was significantly decreased in subcortical regions (caudatum, putamen and brainstem) and in frontal cortex. Thus PET demonstrated a clear difference of metabolic pattern between PDAT and PSP. (authors).

  7. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of `mobile pixels`, which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of 'mobile pixels', which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs

  9. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Imaging Cellular Proliferation in Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer remains a major public health problem worldwide. Imaging plays an important role in the assessment of disease at all its clinical phases, including staging, restaging after definitive therapy, evaluation of therapy response, and prognostication. Positron emission tomography with a number of biologically targeted radiotracers has been demonstrated to have potential diagnostic and prognostic utility in the various clinical phases of this prevalent disease. Given the remarkable biological heterogeneity of prostate cancer, one major unmet clinical need that remains is the non-invasive imaging-based characterization of prostate tumors. Accurate tumor characterization allows for image-targeted biopsy and focal therapy as well as facilitates objective assessment of therapy effect. PET in conjunction with radiotracers that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis may be helpful to fulfill this necessity. We review briefly the preclinical and pilot clinical experience with the two major cellular proliferation radiotracers, [18F]-3’-deoxy-3’-fluorothymidine and [18F]-2’-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyluracil in prostate cancer.

  11. Carbon-11-methionine positron emission tomography imaging of chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong [Department of Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Medical Imaging, Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, 263-8555, Chiba (Japan); Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Tamura, Katsumi; Sagou, Kenji; Kandatsu, Susumu [Clinical Diagnosis Section, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tian, Mei; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Tanada, Shuji [Department of Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumor that arises from notochord remnants. This is the first trial to investigate the utility of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of chordoma before and after carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Fifteen patients with chordoma were investigated with MET-PET before and after CIRT and the findings analyzed visually and quantitatively. Tumor MET uptake was evaluated by tumor-to-nontumor ratio (T/N ratio). In 12 (80%) patients chordoma was clearly visible in the baseline MET-PET study with a mean T/N ratio of 3.3{+-}1.7. The MET uptake decreased significantly to 2.3{+-}1.4 after CIRT (P<0.05). A significant reduction in tumor MET uptake of 24% was observed after CIRT. Fourteen (93%) patients showed no local recurrence after CIRT with a median follow-up time of 20 months. This study has demonstrated that MET-PET is feasible for imaging of chordoma. MET-PET could provide important tumor metabolic information for the therapeutic monitoring of chordoma after CIRT. (orig.)

  12. Carbon-11-methionine positron emission tomography imaging of chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Tamura, Katsumi; Sagou, Kenji; Kandatsu, Susumu; Tian, Mei; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Tanada, Shuji; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2004-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumor that arises from notochord remnants. This is the first trial to investigate the utility of 11 C-methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of chordoma before and after carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Fifteen patients with chordoma were investigated with MET-PET before and after CIRT and the findings analyzed visually and quantitatively. Tumor MET uptake was evaluated by tumor-to-nontumor ratio (T/N ratio). In 12 (80%) patients chordoma was clearly visible in the baseline MET-PET study with a mean T/N ratio of 3.3±1.7. The MET uptake decreased significantly to 2.3±1.4 after CIRT (P<0.05). A significant reduction in tumor MET uptake of 24% was observed after CIRT. Fourteen (93%) patients showed no local recurrence after CIRT with a median follow-up time of 20 months. This study has demonstrated that MET-PET is feasible for imaging of chordoma. MET-PET could provide important tumor metabolic information for the therapeutic monitoring of chordoma after CIRT. (orig.)

  13. Hepatic Pseudolymphoma with Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake on Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Suzumura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis B was admitted to our hospital with a hepatic tumor. The levels of 2 tumor markers, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9, were slightly elevated; however, the α-fetoprotein and protein levels induced by vitamin K antagonist II were within the normal limits. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a well-defined peripheral hypoechoic mass that was isoechoic and homogeneous on the inside. Computed tomography showed a poorly enhanced tumor of 13 mm in diameter in the 5th segment of the liver. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed a slight uptake (maximum standard uptake value 3.4 by the hepatic tumor. These findings suggested cholangiocellular carcinoma, and we performed anterior segmentectomy of the liver. A histopathological examination showed a hepatic pseudolymphoma. The patient’s postoperative course was uneventful, and she remains alive without recurrence 5 months after undergoing surgery. In most cases, hepatic pseudolymphoma is preoperatively diagnosed as a malignant tumor and a definite diagnosis is made after resection. It is therefore necessary to consider hepatic pseudolymphoma as a differential diagnosis in patients with hepatic tumors.

  14. European health telematics networks for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontaxakis, George; Pozo, Miguel Angel; Ohl, Roland; Visvikis, Dimitris; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Ortega, Fernando; Guerra, Pedro; Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine; Selby, Peter; Pan, Leyun; Diaz, Javier; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Santos, Andres; Strauss, Ludwig; Sakas, Georgios

    2006-01-01

    A pilot network of positron emission tomography centers across Europe has been setup employing telemedicine services. The primary aim is to bring all PET centers in Europe (and beyond) closer, by integrating advanced medical imaging technology and health telematics networks applications into a single, easy to operate health telematics platform, which allows secure transmission of medical data via a variety of telecommunications channels and fosters the cooperation between professionals in the field. The platform runs on PCs with Windows 2000/XP and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion. The communication between two connected workstations is based on a TCP/IP connection secured by secure socket layers and virtual private network or jabber protocols. A teleconsultation can be online (with both physicians physically present) or offline (via transmission of messages which contain image data and other information). An interface sharing protocol enables online teleconsultations even over low bandwidth connections. This initiative promotes the cooperation and improved communication between nuclear medicine professionals, offering options for second opinion and training. It permits physicians to remotely consult patient data, even if they are away from the physical examination site

  15. Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle, Ursula; Hentschel, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Departments of Radiation Oncology, University of Freiburg, Robert Koch Str. 3, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Weber, Wolfgang [Nuclear Medicine, University of Freiburg, Robert Koch Str. 3, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ursula.nestle@uniklinik-freiburg.de

    2009-01-07

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required. (topical review)

  16. Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Weber, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2009-01-07

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required.

  17. Clinical application of positron emission tomography imaging in urologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua; Wu Guangyuan

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an advanced noninvasive molecular imaging modality that is being investigated for use in the differentiation, diagnosis, and guiding therapy ora variety of cancer types. FDG PET has the unique clinical value in the differentiation, diagnosis, and monitoring therapy of prostate, such as bladder, renal, and testicle cancer. However, high false-positive and false-negative findings are observed in the detection of these tumors with FDG PET. 11 C-Choline (CH) and 11 C-acetate (AC) can overcome the pitfall of FDG, and appear to be more successful than FGD in imaging prostate cancer and bladder cancer. The short half-life of 11 C prevents the widespread use of CH and AC and 18 F-fluorocholine (FCH) and 18 F-fluoroacetate (FAC) seem to be potential tracers. Potential clinical value of the new PET tracers, such as 3'-deoxy-3'- 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT), 18 F-fluorodihydrotestosterone (FDHT), and 9-(4- 18 F-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)-guanine( 18 F-FHBG) in the detection of urologic tumors, can deserve further study. (authors)

  18. European health telematics networks for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxakis, George [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)]. E-mail: g.kontaxakis@upm.es; Pozo, Miguel Angel [Centro PET Complutense, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ohl, Roland [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Visvikis, Dimitris [U650 INSERM, Lab. du Traitement de L' Information Medicale, University of Brest Occidentale, CHU Morvan, Brest 29609 (France); Sachpazidis, Ilias [Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Ortega, Fernando [Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia 46009 (Spain); Guerra, Pedro [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine [Dept. Medicine Nucleaire, CHU Morvan, Brest 29609 (France); Selby, Peter [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Pan, Leyun [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Diaz, Javier [Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia 46009 (Spain); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Strauss, Ludwig [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Sakas, Georgios [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany)

    2006-12-20

    A pilot network of positron emission tomography centers across Europe has been setup employing telemedicine services. The primary aim is to bring all PET centers in Europe (and beyond) closer, by integrating advanced medical imaging technology and health telematics networks applications into a single, easy to operate health telematics platform, which allows secure transmission of medical data via a variety of telecommunications channels and fosters the cooperation between professionals in the field. The platform runs on PCs with Windows 2000/XP and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion. The communication between two connected workstations is based on a TCP/IP connection secured by secure socket layers and virtual private network or jabber protocols. A teleconsultation can be online (with both physicians physically present) or offline (via transmission of messages which contain image data and other information). An interface sharing protocol enables online teleconsultations even over low bandwidth connections. This initiative promotes the cooperation and improved communication between nuclear medicine professionals, offering options for second opinion and training. It permits physicians to remotely consult patient data, even if they are away from the physical examination site.

  19. The natural history of misery perfusion in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Shinji; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Matsushima, Toshio; Fukui, Masashi; Sadoshima, Shouzou; Kuwabara, Yasuo (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-03-01

    This report reviews the natural courses of misery perfusion in 5 patients with atherosclerotic cerebrovascular occlusion diseases. Cases 1 showed partial improvement and Case 2 showed deterioration of misery perfusion on positron emission tomography (PET). These 2 patients did not show any clinical changes during the follow-up periods. Case 3 showed remarkable improvement of misery perfusion during the 2-year follow-ups, but his neurological condition worsened. The EC-IC bypass improved both in PET and clinical symptoms. Case 4 had a stroke at the region of misery perfusion in PET. Case 5 had a lacunar infarction 2 years after the EC-IC bypass on the opposite side. PET taken one month before the stroke did not show any signs of hypoperfusion in the area of the lacunar infarction. Misery perfusion seems not to be a static but a dynamic condition that can develop into cerebral infarction by some hemodynamic stresses. Cerebral cortical or lobar infarction may occur in the region of severe misery perfusion. EC-IC bypass may prevent impending infarction of the cerebral cortex by improving the regional cerebral blood flow. However, EC-CI bypass will not prevent the lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia or internal capsule. (author).

  20. Quality assurance and radiation safety in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmetyuk, Ya.V.; Radosh, H.V.; Bezshyyko, O.A.; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.O.; Kadenko, I.M.; Kazinova, O.A.; Nagai, A.O.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific studies, clinical experience and economic analysis have shown that the positron emission tomography (PET) is clinically and cost effective cancer diagnostics method. Combined PET and computed tomography (PET/CT) has proven clinical utility, particularly in the diagnosis, staging or restaging malignant disease and metastases, surgical planning, radiation therapy planning and evaluation of treatment response. The use of PET/CT has grown substantially in the past few years, with an increasing number of hospitals and installations of PET/CT imaging centers each year. In the same time combination of 2 procedures, each of which impart a radiation dose and, as a result, increases the deleterious influence for health, creates additional radiation safety issues. In these conditions the role of quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programs is getting more and more important. We considered main QA and radiation safety requirements for whole PET technology chain from radio-pharmacy facilities to PET/CT scanning and patient release criteria. All these issues were considered and assessed having the example of PET facilities and technology chain of All-Ukrainian Center for Radiosurgery of the Clinical Hospital 'Feofania'

  1. Variation in positron emission tomography use after colon cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christina E; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D; Chang, George J

    2015-05-01

    Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Image-reconstruction algorithms for positron-emission tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.N.C.

    1982-01-01

    The positional uncertainty in the time-of-flight measurement of a positron-emission tomography system is modelled as a Gaussian distributed random variable and the image is assumed to be piecewise constant on a rectilinear lattice. A reconstruction algorithm using maximum-likelihood estimation is derived for the situation in which time-of-flight data are sorted as the most-likely-position array. The algorithm is formulated as a linear system described by a nonseparable, block-banded, Toeplitz matrix, and a sine-transform technique is used to implement this algorithm efficiently. The reconstruction algorithms for both the most-likely-position array and the confidence-weighted array are described by similar equations, hence similar linear systems can be used to described the reconstruction algorithm for a discrete, confidence-weighted array, when the matrix and the entries in the data array are properly identified. It is found that the mean square-error depends on the ratio of the full width at half the maximum of time-of-flight measurement over the size of a pixel. When other parameters are fixed, the larger the pixel size, the smaller is the mean square-error. In the study of resolution, parameters that affect the impulse response of time-of-flight reconstruction algorithms are identified. It is found that the larger the pixel size, the larger is the standard deviation of the impulse response. This shows that small mean square-error and fine resolution are two contradictory requirements

  3. Estimation of intersubject variability of cerebral blood flow measurements using MRI and positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Larsson, Henrik B W; Hansen, Adam E

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the within and between subject variability of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in normal subjects using various MRI techniques and positron emission tomography (PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Repeated CBF measurements were performed in 17 healthy, young...

  4. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  5. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability with positron emission tomography in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieschi, C.; Pozzilli, C.; Bernardi, S.; Bozzao, L.; Lenzi, G.L.; Picozzi, P.; Iannotti, F.; Conforti, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to elucidate the role of positron emission tomography using 68 Ga-EDTA in the study of blood-brain barrier abnormalities associated with multiple sclerosis. 14 refs.; 1 figure

  6. Readout of scintillator light with avalanche photodiodes for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ruru; Fremout, A.; Tavernier, S.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Clement, D.; Loude, J.-F.; Morel, C.

    1999-01-01

    The noise properties and other relevant characteristics of avalanche photodiodes have been investigated with the perspective of replacing photomultiplier tubes in positron emission tomography. It is clearly demonstrated that they are a valid alternative to photomultiplier tubes in this application

  7. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both...

  8. Measurement of regional cerebral glucose utilization in man by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    The various methods available for the study of regional cerebral glucose consumption in man by positron emission tomography are described and their applications, limitations and principal physiopathological results are presented [fr

  9. Software development for modeling positrons emission tomograph scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner

    2013-01-01

    The Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is an international platform recognized and used to develop Computational Model Exposure (CME) in the context of Nuclear Medicine, although currently there are dedicated modules for applications in Radiotherapy and Computed Tomography (CT). GATE uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and has a scripting language of its own. The writing of scripts for simulation of a PET scanner in GATE involves a number of interrelated steps, and the accuracy of the simulation is dependent on the correct setup of the geometries involved, since the physical processes depend on them, as well as the modeling of electronic detectors in module Digitizer, for example. The manual implementation of this setup can be a source of errors, especially for users without experience in the field of simulations or without any previous knowledge of a programming language, and also due to the the fact that the modeling process in GATE still remains bounded to LINUX / UNIX based systems, an environment only familiar to a few. This becomes an obstacle for beginners and prevents the use of GATE by a larger number of users interested in optimizing their experiments and/or clinical protocols through a more accessible, fast and friendly application. The objective of this work is therefore to develop a user-friendly software for the modeling of Positron Emission Tomography called GUIGATE (Graphical User Interface for GATE), with specific modules dedicated to quality control in PET scanners. The results exhibit the features available in this first version of GUIGATE, present in a set of windows that allow users to create their input files, perform and display in real time the model and analyze its output file in a single environment, allowing so intuitively access the entire architecture of the GATE simulation and to CERN's data analyzer, the ROOT. (author)

  10. Synthesis of the radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biricova, V.; Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper is shown a short overview of the biogenic positron radiopharmaceuticals production and a brief summary of some PET preparation synthesis. At the end the overview of some forward-looking positron radionuclides, which can be used for a preparation of the PET radiopharmaceuticals is said. A short review of diagnostic use of PET radiopharmaceuticals is presented (authors)

  11. RELIABILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN EVALUATION OF TESTICULAR CARCINOMA PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoletić, Katarina; Mihailović, Jasna; Matovina, Emil; Žeravica, Radmila; Srbovan, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the reliability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in evaluation of testicular carcinoma patients. The study sample consisted of 26 scans performed in 23 patients with testicular carcinoma. According to the pathohistological finding, 14 patients had seminomas, 7 had nonseminomas and 2 patients had a mixed histological type. In 17 patients, the initial treatment was orchiectomy+chemotherapy, 2 patients had orchiectomy+chemotherapy+retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, 3 patients had orchiectomy only and one patient was treated with chemotherapy only. Abnormal computed tomography was the main cause for the oncologist to refer the patient to positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan (in 19 scans), magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in 1 scan, high level oftumor markers in 3 and 3 scans were perforned for follow-up. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging results were compared with histological results, other imaging modalities or the clinical follow-up of the patients. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans were positive in 6 and negative in 20 patients. In two patients, positron emission tomography-computed tomography was false positive. There were 20 negative positron emission omography-computed tomography scans perforned in 18 patients, one patient was lost for data analysis. Clinically stable disease was confirmed in 18 follow-up scans performed in 16 patients. The values of sensitivty, specificity, accuracy, and positive- and negative predictive value were 60%, 95%, 75%, 88% and 90.5%, respectively. A hgh negative predictive value obtained in our study (90.5%) suggests that there is a small possibility for a patient to have future relapse after normal positron emission tomography-computed tomography study. However, since the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the study ire rather low, there are limitations of positive

  12. Analysis of solute transport in plants using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partelova, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the work, geometrically and radiochemically characterized standards (phantoms) imitating the plant tissues and allowing the exact quantification of visualised radioindicator in plant tissues were designed and prepared within the study of visual and analytical characteristics of used positron emission tomograph (microPET system) commercially developed for animal objects at visualization of thin objects. Individual experiments carried out by exposure of excised leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in solutions of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with positron emitter 18 F (2-[ 18 F]FDG) containing 10-, 100-, or 1000-times higher concentrations of D-glucose (c glu ) in comparison with the original 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution showed that the significant changes in visualisation of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution as well as in chemical portion of 2-[ 18 F]FDG within the leaf blade were observed as result of increased c glu . In the experiments with the whole plants of tobacco or radish exposed in 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution through the root system, only minimal translocation of 18 F radioactivity into the above-ground parts of plants, also in the case of increased c glu , was observed, which suggest the role of root system as a selective barrier of 2-[ 18 F]FDG transport from roots to the above-ground parts. On the basis of mentioned knowledge and analytical approaches (application of prepared phantoms), the dynamic study of 2-[ 18 F]FDG uptake and transport within the excised leaf of tobacco or whole radish plant was carried out. The description of these processes was realized through the 3D PET images and through the quantification of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution within the chosen regions of interest from the point of view of accumulated 18 F radioactivity (in Bq) or amount of D-glucose (in μg) as well. Application of methods of multivariate analysis allows to found the similarities between studied objects mainly from the point

  13. [Human positron emission tomography with oral 11C-vinpocetine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Adám; Christer, Halldin; Sóvágó, Judit; Johan, Sandell; Cselényi, Zsolt; Kiss, Béla; Kárpáti, Egon; Lars, Farde; Gulyás, Balázs

    2003-11-16

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful tool for the investigation of certain physiological changes and for the evaluation of the distribution, and receptor binding of drugs labelled with positron emitting isotopes. Vinpocetine (ethyl-apovincaminate) is a neuroprotective drug widely used in the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. In the clinical practice vinpocetine is usually administered to the patients in intravenous infusion followed by long-term oral treatment. Until presently human data describing vinpocetine's kinetics and brain distribution came from ex vivo (blood, plasma, liquor) and post mortem (brain autoradiography) measurements. The authors wished to investigate the kinetics and distribution of vinpocetine in the brain and body after oral administration with PET in order to prove, that PET is useful in the non-invasive in vivo determination of these parameters. Vinpocetine was labelled with carbon-11 and the radioactivity was measured by PET in the stomach, liver, brain, colon and kidneys in healthy male volunteers. The radioactivity in the blood and urine was also determined. After oral administration, [11C]vinpocetine appeared immediately in the stomach and within minutes in the liver and the blood. In the blood the level of radioactivity continuously increased until the end of the measurement period, whereas the fraction of the unchanged mother compound decreased. Radioactivity uptake and distribution in the brain were demonstrable from the tenth minute after the oral administration of the labelled drug (average maximum uptake: 0.7% of the administered total dose). Brain distribution was heterogeneous (with preferences in the thalamus, basal ganglia and occipital cortex), similar to the distribution previously reported by the authors after intravenous administration. Vinpocetine, administered orally to human volunteers, readily entered the bloodstream from the stomach and the gastrointestinal tract and thereafter passed the

  14. Positron emission computerized tomography: a potential tool for in vivo quantitation of the distribution of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, K.F.; King, P.; Gibbs, W.D.; Washburn, L.C.; Hayes, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The principles and some of the difficulties in quantitative positron emission computerized tomography have been discussed. We have shown that randoms and scattered events are a major cause of noise and counting errors in positron emission computerized tomography. The noise has been identified as a convoluting process and a mathematical solution has been presented. Examples of phantom studies and in vivo measurements have demonstrated that the distribution of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals can be quantitated with much improved accuracy using the deconvolution equation to remove undesired noise

  15. Positron emission tomography, physical bases and comparaison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Fadhel; Hamza, F; Amouri, W.; Charfeddine, S.; Kallel, S.; Jardak, I.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique that measures the three-dimensional distribution of molecules marked by a positron-emitting particle. PET has grown significantly in clinical fields, particularly in oncology for diagnosis and therapeutic follow purposes. The technical evolutions of this technique are fast. Among the technical improvements, is the coupling of the PET scan with computed tomography (CT). PET is obtained by intravenous injection of a radioactive tracer. The marker is usually fluorine ( 18 F) embedded in a glucose molecule forming the 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-18). This tracer, similar to glucose, binds to tissues that consume large quantities of the sugar such cancerous tissue, cardiac muscle or brain. Detection using scintillation crystals (BGO, LSO, LYSO) suitable for high energy (511keV) recognizes the lines of the gamma photons originating from the annihilation of a positron with an electron. The electronics of detection or coincidence circuit is based on two criteria: a time window, of about 6 to 15 ns, and an energy window. This system measures the true coincidences that correspond to the detection of two photons of 511 kV from the same annihilation. Most PET devices are constituted by a series of elementary detectors distributed annularly around the patient. Each detector comprises a scintillation crystal matrix coupled to a finite number (4 or 6) of photomultipliers. The electronic circuit, or the coincidence circuit, determines the projection point of annihilation by means of two elementary detectors. The processing of such information must be extremely fast, considering the count rates encountered in practice. The information measured by the coincidence circuit is then positioned in a matrix or sinogram, which contains a set of elements of a projection section of the object. Images are obtained by tomographic reconstruction by powerful computer stations equipped with a software tools allowing the analysis and

  16. Acidifier application rate impacts on ammonia emissions from US roaster chicken houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanjay B.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O.; Westerman, Philip W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to its potential environmental and public health impacts, emissions of ammonia (NH3) as well as several other gases from US livestock farms may be regulated. Broiler houses are important sources of NH3 emissions. However, there are no emissions data from roaster (8-12 wk old broilers, ˜4 kg ea.) houses. Producers treat the litter in broiler houses with acidifiers, such as sodium bisulfate (SBS, NaHSO4) to reduce ammonia production and protect bird health. However, there is very little data on the effect of acidifiers, particularly at high application rates on ammonia emissions. The impact of different SBS application rates [High (0.95-1.46 kg m-2, whole house), Medium (0.73 kg m-2, whole house), Low (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, whole house), and Control (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, brood chamber)] on ammonia emissions was evaluated in commercial roaster houses over 22 months spanning eight flocks. Ammonia emission from each fan was measured with an acid scrubber that operated only when the fan operated. Emissions were calculated using >95% measured data with the rest being estimated using robust methods. Exhaust ammonia-N concentrations were inversely correlated with the SBS application rates. Emission rates on animal unit (AU, where 1 AU = 500 kg live-mass) basis (ER, g d-1 AU-1) were reduced by 27, 13, and 5%, respectively, in the High, Medium, and Low treatments vs. the Control treatment (mean: 100 g d-1 AU-1, range: 86-114 g d-1 AU-1). Emission rates for the Control treatment measured in this study on roasters were mostly higher than ERs in the literature. Differences in ERs are not only due to diet, environmental and management conditions, but also due to measurement methods.

  17. The ALFAM2 database on ammonia emission from field-applied manure: description and illustrative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from animal manure contributes to air pollution and ecosystem degradation, and is a loss of reactive nitrogen (N) from agricultural systems. Estimates of NH3 emission are necessary for national inventories and nutrient management. Many studies have made measurements of NH3 emi...

  18. Identification of factors most important for ammonia emission from fertilized soils for potato production using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guodoong Liu; Yuncong Li; Kati W. Migliaccio; Ying Ouyang; Ashok K. Alva

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from fertilized soils are a costly problem that is undermining agricultural and ecological sustainability worldwide. Ammonia emissions from crop production have been reliably documented in recent years. However, insufficient efforts have been made to determine the factors most influential in facilitating NH3 emissions. The goal of this study was...

  19. Ammonia emissions from the composting of different organic wastes : dependency on process temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Pagans i Miró, Estel·la

    2006-01-01

    Ammonia emissions were quantified for the laboratory-scale composting of three typical organic wastes with medium nitrogen content: organic fraction of municipal solid wastes, raw sludge and anaerobically digested sludge; and the composting of two wastes with high nitrogen content: animal by-products from slaughterhouses and partially hydrolysed hair from the leather industry. All the wastes were mixed with the proper amount of bulking agent. Ammonia emitted in the composting of the five wast...

  20. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on quantification in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, G.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Mazoyer, B.; Wienhard, K.

    1995-01-01

    As a result of the limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomographic scanners, the measurements of physiological parameters are compromised by tissue heterogeneity. The effect of tissue heterogeneity on a number of parameters was studied by simulation and an analytical method. Five common tracer models were assessed. The input and tissue response functions were assumed to be free from noise and systematic errors. The kinetic model was assumed to be perfect. Two components with different kinetics were mixed in different proportions and contrast with respect to the model parameters. Different experimental protocols were investigated. Of three methods investigated for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) (steady state, dynamic, integral), the second one was least sensitive to errors caused by tissue heterogeneity and the main effect was an underestimation of the distribution volume. With the steady state method, errors in oxygen extraction fraction caused by tissue heterogeneity were always found to be less than the corresponding errors in CBF. For myocardial blood flow the steady state method was found to perform better than the bolus method. The net accumulation of substrate (i.e. rCMR glc in the case of glucose analogs) was found to be comparatively insensitive to tissue heterogeneity. Individual rate constans such as k 2 and k 3 for efflux and metabolism of the substrate in the pool of unmetabolized substrate in the tissue, respectively, were found to be more sensitive. In studies of radioligand binding, using only tracer doses, the effect of tissue heterogeneity on the parameter k on .B max could be considerable. In studies of radioligand binding using a protocol with two experiments, one with high and one with low specific activity, B max was found to be insensitive while K d was very sensitive to tissue heterogeneity. (orig.)

  1. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in uterine carcinosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Kung-Chu; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Wu, Tzu-I; Chang, Ting-Chang; Huang, Huei-Jean; Ng, Koon-Kwan; Lin, Gigin; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hsueh, Swei

    2008-01-01

    Uterine carcinosarcomas clinically confined to the uterus usually harbor occult metastases. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in uterine carcinosarcoma. Patients with histologically confirmed uterine carcinosarcoma were enrolled. Abdominal and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/whole-body computed tomography (CT) scan, and whole-body 18 F-FDG PET or PET/CT were undertaken for primary staging, evaluating response, and restaging/post-therapy surveillance. The clinical impact of 18 F-FDG PET was determined on a scan basis. A total of 19 patients were recruited and 31 18 F-FDG PET scans (including 8 scans performed on a PET/CT scanner) were performed. Positive impacts of scans were found in 36.8% (7/19) for primary staging, 66.7% (2/3) for monitoring response, and 11.1% (1/9) for restaging/post-therapy surveillance. PET excluded falsely inoperable disease defined by MRI in two patients. Aggressive treatment applying to three patients with PET-defined resectable stage IVB disease seemed futile. Two patients died of disease shortly after salvage therapy restaged by PET. With PET monitoring, one stage IVB patient treated by targeted therapy only was alive with good performance. Using PET did not lead to improvement of overall survival of this series compared with the historical control (n = 35) (P 0.779). The preliminary results suggest that 18 F-FDG PET is beneficial in excluding falsely inoperable disease for curative therapy and in making a decision on palliation for better quality of life instead of aggressive treatment under the guidance of PET. PET seems to have limited value in post-therapy surveillance or restaging after failure. (orig.)

  2. Nonhuman primate positron emission tomography neuroimaging in drug abuse research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Leonard Lee; Murnane, Kevin Sean

    2011-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging in nonhuman primates has led to significant advances in our current understanding of the neurobiology and treatment of stimulant addiction in humans. PET neuroimaging has defined the in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of abused drugs and related these findings to the time course of behavioral effects associated with their addictive properties. With novel radiotracers and enhanced resolution, PET neuroimaging techniques have also characterized in vivo drug interactions with specific protein targets in the brain, including neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. In vivo determinations of cerebral blood flow and metabolism have localized brain circuits implicated in the effects of abused drugs and drug-associated stimuli. Moreover, determinations of the predisposing factors to chronic drug use and long-term neurobiological consequences of chronic drug use, such as potential neurotoxicity, have led to novel insights regarding the pathology and treatment of drug addiction. However, similar approaches clearly need to be extended to drug classes other than stimulants. Although dopaminergic systems have been extensively studied, other neurotransmitter systems known to play a critical role in the pharmacological effects of abused drugs have been largely ignored in nonhuman primate PET neuroimaging. Finally, the study of brain activation with PET neuroimaging has been replaced in humans mostly by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). There has been some success in implementing pharmacological fMRI in awake nonhuman primates. Nevertheless, the unique versatility of PET imaging will continue to complement the systems-level strengths of fMRI, especially in the context of nonhuman primate drug abuse research.

  3. Oxygen-15 labelled water production for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janus, A.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Chan, J.G.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Functional imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) and 15 O-labelled compounds is both scientifically and clinically challenging. The short half-life of oxygen-15 (t 1/2 = 2 min) allows for multiple administration to a patient without exceeding acceptable levels of absorbed radiation dose and without excessive delay between administrations. The clinical usefulness of [ 15 O]-labelled water for cerebral blood flow measurements has been well established. Here we report the development and construction of a [ 15 O]water generator based on an earlier design from Hammersmith Hospital, London. The cyclotron produces a continuous flow of [ 15 O]O 2 gas by the irradiation of a natural nitrogen target (1% O 2 in N 2 ) with a 5 MeV deuteron beam, via the nuclear reaction ( 14 N(d,n) 15 O). The radioactive gas is then mixed with 5% hydrogen in nitrogen and piped to the water generator located in the scanner room. The O 2 /N 2 gas mixture is reacted over a palladium catalyst at 1500 deg C to produce [ 15 O]H 2 O vapour. The vapour passes through an exchanger where it diffuses across a semi-permeable membrane (cellulose acetate) into saline solution. At the optimum gas flow- rate of 500 mL/min, more than 95% of the radioactive oxygen is converted to radioactive water. Waste radioactive gas is piped back to the cyclotron vault to decay before release into the atmosphere. The saline solution (0.9% NaCl) is pumped continuously through the system at 6 mL/min with an infusion pump (3M AVI470). The present system has been in operation for more than a year and has been used for clinical evaluation of stroke patients and for brain activation research studies

  4. Study of brain metabolism using positron emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, W D

    1983-03-21

    Positron emission tomography permits the three-dimensional regional measurement of metabolism and blood flow in the brain. For the determination of cerebral metabolic rates of glucose by PET /sup 18/fluordeoxyglucose is usually applied: cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was found to be 36 to 47 ..mu..mol/100 g/min in the grey matter and 23 to 29 ..mu..mol/100 g/min in the white matter of normal volunteers. During physiologic activation metabolic rate of glucose is increased in the respective brain areas in relation to the strength and complexity of the stimulation. In patients suffering from ischaemic stroke glucose metabolism is markedly decreased within the infarction. Additonally, glucose metabolism is reduced by 20% in morphologically intact areas of the homolateral cortex, in the basal ganglia, in the cortical area contralateral to the infarction and in the contralateral cerebellum. This remote reduction of glucose utilization is probably caused by functional inactivation of these brain structures; it could be responsible for the diffuse organic syndrome in stroke victims not caused by the focal lesion. In patients suffering from dementia of the multi-infarct type and of the Alzheimer type glucose metabolism is reduced; the lesions in Alzheimer cases are most prominent in partietal and frontal cortical areas. In Chorea Huntington cases glucose metabolism is primarily disturbed in the striate, especially in the caudate nucleus; in these cases the metabolic disturbance can be detected earlier than the atrophy in computed tomograms. Disturbances of glucose and oxygen utilization are not necessary causes, but may also be sequelae od functional impairment. Additional information on pathogentic mechanisms may be obtained by the investigation of the protein synthesis.

  5. Diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi; Iio, Masaaki.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography(PET) was performed in 18 temporal lobe epileptics. About 20 mCi of 11 C-glucose was perorally administered to the patients and 30 minutes later scanning was started when the transport of 11 C-glucose from blood to the brain tissue reached equilibrium. At the level of 25mm above orbitomeatal line, the slice image of the temporal lobe shows a relatively high metabolic oval ring involving the amygdala, hippocapal formation and the hippocampal gyrus medially and the T 1 , T 2 and T 3 neocortices laterally in normal subjects. The epileptic focus, when detected on PET images, was observed as a defect in this oval ring. In 15(83.3%) out of 18 cases, the location of epileptic focus was confirmed as a low metabolic defect. This diagnosis rate was higher than that of other focal epilepsy by PET study. The locations of foci were devided into three types: mesial (5 cases), lateral (4 cases) and combined (6 cases). The seizure symptoms of the patients were analyzed in terms of the correspondence to the focus types. The results showed that automatism and pseudoabsence had a close relation to the mesial and combined types and psychical, vertiginous or visual seizures correlated to the combined and lateral types. Visceral or motor seizures were induced equally by any focus types. These facts suggested that automatism and pseudoabsence were correlated with the mesial organs such as the amygdala and hippocampus and psychical, vertiginous or visual seizures had origin in lateral neocortices. Visceral or motor seizures were supposed to be the results of the spread from the temporal focus to the adjacent structures. It was concluded that PET was very useful in localization diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. In surgical treatment of epilepsy, in which the knowledge of the exact extent of epileptic foci is strongly demanded, PET study will offer invaluable data to the strategy of operation and foreseeing its prognosis. (author)

  6. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in pulmonary carcinoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparri, R.; Rezende, G. C.; Brambilla, D.; Petrella, F.; Galetta, D.; Spaggiari, L.; Fazio, N.; Maisonneuve, P.; Travaini, L. L.; Paganelli, G.

    2015-01-01

    The role of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) as an additional investigation to computer tomography for pulmonary carcinoid tumors remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the role of FDG-PET for the diagnosis and staging of pulmonary carcinoid tumors. It has been performed a retrospective mono-institutional analysis of data from 97 patients with pathologically confirmed pulmonary carcinoid tumor who had been operated on between July 1998 and April 2009 and had had a preoperative FDG-PET scan performed. Sixty-five (67%) of the 97 tumors were typical (TC) and 32 (33%) atypical (AC) carcinoid tumors. Overall FDG-PET sensitivity was 67% being lower for TC (60%) than for AC (81%) (P=0.04). FDG-PET negative tumors were smaller than FDG-PET positive tumors, with a respective median size of 15 and 17 mm (P=0.02). Median SUVmax for FDG-PET-positive tumors was 4.0 (2.8-5.1) with no difference between TC and AC tumors. Median Ki-67 expression was respectively 4.7% and 3.1% for FDG-PET positive and FDG-PET negative tumors (P=0.05). During a median follow-up of 49 months (interquartile range 30-63 months), 9 patients (4TC, 5AC) developed recurrent disease. Neither SUVmax nor Ki-67 expression resulted associated with disease-free survival. With an overall sensitivity of 67%, FDG-PET has shown to be useful in the preoperative work-up of patients with suspect lung carcinoid tumors. In particular it could have a role in larger tumors. These results warrant a prospective evaluation of FDG-PET in the staging of lung carcinoid tumor.

  7. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on quantification in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, G [Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Experimental Alcohol and Drug Addiction Research Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Lammertsma, A A [PET Methodology Group, Cyclotron Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Mazoyer, B [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot CEA/Dept. de Biologie, Hopital d` Orsay and Antenne d` Informatique Medicale, Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France); Wienhard, K [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1995-07-01

    As a result of the limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomographic scanners, the measurements of physiological parameters are compromised by tissue heterogeneity. The effect of tissue heterogeneity on a number of parameters was studied by simulation and an analytical method. Five common tracer models were assessed. The input and tissue response functions were assumed to be free from noise and systematic errors. The kinetic model was assumed to be perfect. Two components with different kinetics were mixed in different proportions and contrast with respect to the model parameters. Different experimental protocols were investigated. Of three methods investigated for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) (steady state, dynamic, integral), the second one was least sensitive to errors caused by tissue heterogeneity and the main effect was an underestimation of the distribution volume. With the steady state method, errors in oxygen extraction fraction caused by tissue heterogeneity were always found to be less than the corresponding errors in CBF. For myocardial blood flow the steady state method was found to perform better than the bolus method. The net accumulation of substrate (i.e. rCMR{sub glc} in the case of glucose analogs) was found to be comparatively insensitive to tissue heterogeneity. Individual rate constans such as k{sub 2} and k{sub 3} for efflux and metabolism of the substrate in the pool of unmetabolized substrate in the tissue, respectively, were found to be more sensitive. In studies of radioligand binding, using only tracer doses, the effect of tissue heterogeneity on the parameter k{sub on}.B{sub max} could be considerable. In studies of radioligand binding using a protocol with two experiments, one with high and one with low specific activity, B{sub max} was found to be insensitive while K{sub d} was very sensitive to tissue heterogeneity. (orig.)

  8. Positron emission tomography in urological cancer; Positronenemissionstomographie bei urologischen Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wit, M. de [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. Onkologie/Haematologie, Medizinische Klinik; Kotzerke, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (DE). Radiologie III (Nuklearmedizin)

    2000-09-01

    In staging cancer of the urinary bladder, the kidneys and the prostate and of testicular cancer there is a need for detecting tumor involvement of the lymph nodes to avoid surgical exploration. Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can detect tumorous lymph nodes (sensitivity: 70%, specificity: 85%) which is helpful for several patients. In carcinoma of the prostate, other radiotracers than FDG (e.g. C-11-choline) might be more sensitive to detect tumorous lymph nodes. Up to now no diagnostical benefit of PET in germ cell tumors could be demonstrated in the published small series. In principle FDG-PET is useful in diagnosis of recurrence. In germ cell cancer FDG-PET seems to identify effectively persistent vital tumor tissue after chemotherapy. A multicenter study was initiated to demonstrate the potential of FDG-PET in a sufficient number of patients with germ cell tumor. (orig.) [German] Bei Harnblasen-, Nieren-, Prostata- und Hodenkarzinomen besteht aus klinischer Sicht ein Bedarf an verbessertem Lymphknoten-Staging, um die operative Evaluation zu vermeiden. Die Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) mit Fluordeoxyglukose (FDG) kann daher im Einzelfall bei Harnblasen- und Nierenkarzinomen hilfreich sein (bei Sensitivitaet um 70% und Spezifitaet um 85%). Beim Prostatakarzinom koennten sich andere Radiotracer (z.B. C-11-Cholin) bei der Detektion von tumoroesen Lymphknoten ueberlegen erweisen. Bei Keimzelltumoren konnte ein Nutzen der PET im primaeren Staging bei den bisher publizierten kleinen Studien nicht nachgewiesen werden. Fuer die Rezidivdiagnostik ist bei den genannten Tumoren aus grundsaetzlicher Ueberlegung der Einsatz von DFG-PET sinnvoll. Die Erkennung von vitalem malignen Tumorgewebe nach Chemotherapie erscheint bei Keimzelltumoren mit FDG-PET weitgehend sicher zu gelingen. Eine multizentrische Studie wurde begonnen, die hierueber Aufschluss geben wird. (orig.)

  9. Alcohol ADME in primates studied with positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizhong Li

    Full Text Available The sensitivity to the intoxicating effects of alcohol as well as its adverse medical consequences differ markedly among individuals, which reflects in part differences in alcohol's absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME properties. The ADME of alcohol in the body and its relationship with alcohol's brain bioavailability, however, is not well understood.The ADME of C-11 labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CH(2OH, 1 and C-11 and deuterium dual labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CD(2OH, 2 in baboons was compared based on the principle that C-D bond is stronger than C-H bond, thus the reaction is slower if C-D bond breaking occurs in a rate-determining metabolic step. The following ADME parameters in peripheral organs and brain were derived from time activity curve (TAC of positron emission tomography (PET scans: peak uptake (C(max; peak uptake time (T(max, half-life of peak uptake (T(1/2, the area under the curve (AUC(60 min, and the residue uptake (C(60 min.For 1 the highest uptake occurred in the kidney whereas for 2 it occurred in the liver. A deuterium isotope effect was observed in the kidneys in both animals studied and in the liver of one animal but not the other. The highest uptake for 1 and 2 in the brain was in striatum and cerebellum but 2 had higher uptake than 1 in all brain regions most evidently in thalamus and cingulate. Alcohol's brain uptake was significantly higher when given intravenously than when given orally and also when the animal was pretreated with a pharmacological dose of alcohol.The study shows that alcohol metabolism in peripheral organs had a large effect on alcohol's brain bioavailability. This study sets the stage for clinical investigation on how genetics, gender and alcohol abuse affect alcohol's ADME and its relationship to intoxication and medical consequences.

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals in positron emission tomography: Radioisotope productions and radiolabelling procedures at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Chan, J.G.; Cook, M. [Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Centre for Positron Emission Tomography

    1997-10-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a technique that utilizes positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals to map the physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology of the human body. Positron-emitting radioisotopes produced in a medical cyclotron are incorporated into compounds that are biologically active in the body. A scanner measures radioactivity emitted from a patient`s body and provides cross-sectional images of the distribution of these radiolabelled compounds in the body. It is the purpose of this paper to review the variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals currently produced at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. Radioisotope production, radiolabelling of molecules and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals will be discussed. A few examples of their clinical applications will be shown as well. During the last five years we achieved a reliable routine production of various radiopharmaceuticals labelled with the four most important positron-emitters: oxygen-15 (t,{sub 1/2}=2min), nitrogen-13 (t{sub 1/2}= 10 min), carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2}=20 min) and fluorine-18 (t{sub 1/2}= 110 min). These radiopharmaceuticals include [{sup 15}O]oxygen, [{sup 15}O]carbon monoxide, [{sup 15}O]carbon dioxide, [{sup 15}O]water, [{sup 13}N]ammonia, [{sup 11}C]flumazenil, [{sup 11}C]SCH23390, [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole and [{sup 18}F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG). In addition, since the half life of [{sup 18}F] is almost two hours, regional distribution can be done, and the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre is currently supplying [{sup 18}F]FDG in routine to other hospitals. Future new radiopharmaceuticals development include a [{sup 18}F]thymidine analog to measure cell proliferation and a [{sup 11}C]pyrroloisoquinoline to visualize serotonergic neuron abnormalities. (authors) 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals in positron emission tomography: Radioisotope productions and radiolabelling procedures at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Chan, J.G.; Cook, M.

    1997-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a technique that utilizes positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals to map the physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology of the human body. Positron-emitting radioisotopes produced in a medical cyclotron are incorporated into compounds that are biologically active in the body. A scanner measures radioactivity emitted from a patient's body and provides cross-sectional images of the distribution of these radiolabelled compounds in the body. It is the purpose of this paper to review the variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals currently produced at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. Radioisotope production, radiolabelling of molecules and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals will be discussed. A few examples of their clinical applications will be shown as well. During the last five years we achieved a reliable routine production of various radiopharmaceuticals labelled with the four most important positron-emitters: oxygen-15 (t, 1/2 =2min), nitrogen-13 (t 1/2 = 10 min), carbon-11 (t 1/2 =20 min) and fluorine-18 (t 1/2 = 110 min). These radiopharmaceuticals include [ 15 O]oxygen, [ 15 O]carbon monoxide, [ 15 O]carbon dioxide, [ 15 O]water, [ 13 N]ammonia, [ 11 C]flumazenil, [ 11 C]SCH23390, [ 18 F]fluoromisonidazole and [ 18 F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG). In addition, since the half life of [ 18 F] is almost two hours, regional distribution can be done, and the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre is currently supplying [ 18 F]FDG in routine to other hospitals. Future new radiopharmaceuticals development include a [ 18 F]thymidine analog to measure cell proliferation and a [ 11 C]pyrroloisoquinoline to visualize serotonergic neuron abnormalities. (authors)

  12. Anomalous positron emission in heavy ion-collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienle, P.

    1986-09-01

    In section two we shortly present the experimental methods and first results on positron lines. Section three deals with the dependence of the positron line production on the charge of the collision system, bombarding energy and scattering angle. The results of the first e + -e - -coincidence studies are reviewed in section 4. In the last paragraph we make some remarks on future developments of the experimental methods. (orig./HSI)

  13. A Consortium to Develop the Medical Uses of NMR Imaging, NMR Spectroscopy, and Positron Emission Tomography. Final report, 6/1/92 - 5/31/98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Gary T.

    1998-01-01

    During years one, two and three, this project concentrated on quantifying skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism for assessment of ischemia. The ultimate goal is to provide a non-invasive method of measuring viability of skeletal muscle following traumatic vascular compromise. The technique involves the use of both dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) coupled with compartmental model analysis of the resulting time activity relationships and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS). PET scanning is ideally suited for this project because of the capability to utilize labeled organic compounds. Blood flow was measured with N-13 ammonia. Metabolism was assessed with F-18 deoxyglucose (FDG)

  14. Low-energy positron and electron diffraction and positron-stimulated secondary electron emission from Cu(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two series of experiments are reported. In the first, an electrostatically guided beam of low-energy (40-400 eV) positrons, delta/sub p/ was used to study low-energy positron diffraction (LEPD) from a Cu(100) surface under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) data were obtained from the same sample in the same apparatus. Comparison of LEPD and LEED intensity versus energy data with model calculations made using computer programs developed by C.B. Duke and collaborators indicated that: LEPD data is adequately modeled using potentials with no exchange-correlation term. The inelastic mean free path, lambda/sub ee/, is shorter for positrons than for electrons at low (< approx.80 eV). LEED is better than LEPD at making a determination of the first-layer spacing of Cu(100) for the particular data set reported. In the second set of experiments, the same apparatus and sample were used to compare positron- and electron-stimulated secondary-electron emission (PSSEE and ESSEE). The results were found to be consistent with existing models of secondary-electron production for metals. The energy distributions of secondary-electrons had broad low-energy (<10 eV) peaks for both positron and electron stimulation. But the PSEE distribution showed no elastic peak. Measurements of secondary-electron angular distributions, found to be cosine-like in both the PSSEE and ESSEE case, were used to obtain total secondary yield ratios, delta, at four beam energies ranging from 40-400 eV. The secondary yield ratio for primary positrons and the yield for primary electrons, delta/sub e/, were similar at these energies. For 400-eV primary particles the secondary yields were found to be delta/sub p/ = 0.94 +/- 0.12 and delta/sub e/ = 0.94 +/- 0./12, giving a ratio of unity for positron-stimulated secondary yield to electron-stimulated secondary yield

  15. Evaluation of esophageal cancer by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himeno, Shinji; Yasuda, Seiei; Shimada, Hideo; Tajima, Tomoo; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2002-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine the indications for positron emission tomography (PET) using [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in patients with esophageal cancer, including those with early cancer, and to investigate whether the tumor-to-normal ratio (T/N ratio) could be used as a substitute for the standardized uptake value (SUV). Thirty-six patients were included in the study. Thirty-one patients who had 36 biopsy-proven lesions (35 squamous cell carcinomas and one small cell carcinoma) underwent PET study prior to treatment. PET images were evaluated visually and the relationship between the depth of invasion and the PET findings were examined in 22 lesions of 19 patients from whom specimens were obtained from the primary tumor by surgery or endoscopic mucosal resection. PET results were also compared with computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for detection of regional lymph node metastases in 18 patients who underwent extended lymph node dissection. Five patients underwent PET studies for the detection of recurrence and the PET findings were compared with their CT findings. The T/N ratio and the SUV were calculated for 20 primary tumors. Among the 15 tumors that were pT1b or greater, all 15 were positive on PET and all seven of the lesions confined to the mucosa (Tis or T1a) were negative. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of detecting nodal involvement were, respectively, 37.5, 96.1 and 88.3% by CT, 30.8, 88.5 and 81.0% by EUS and 41.7, 100 and 92.2% by PET. More sites of recurrence were detected by PET than by CT. There was no statistically significant correlation between the SUV and the T/N ratio. PET imaging can detect primary esophageal cancer with a depth of invasion of T1b or greater, but Tis and T1a tumors are undetectable. PET seems to be more accurate than CT or EUS for diagnosing lymph node metastasis. The T/N ratio cannot be used as a substitute for the SUV. (author)

  16. Fabrication of polycrystalline scintillators for the positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, Kamran Said

    2010-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are becoming more and more important for two new types of applications. On the one hand in cases where high mechanical and thermal demands in combination with optical properties are required, on the other hand where the optical properties of transparent materials like glass are not sufficient e.g. in positron-emission-tomography (PET) diagnostics. Most state of the art PET-scanners are using high-priced single crystals as scintillator material. The technological challenge is to replace single crystal by cost-efficient transparent ceramics. Producing transparent ceramics is ordered in synthesis of the powders and in manufacturing of these into transparent ceramics. The aim of this work was to synthesize single phase yttrium-alumina-and Luthetiumalumina-garnet (YAG, LuAG) powders partially doped with neodymium or praseodymium by four different synthesis routes (Pechini-synthesis, sol-gel-route, coprecipitation and solid state reactions). Additionally industrial LuAG and LuPO 4 powders were characterized and manufactured. The powders were processed as submicron- and nanopowders. The compaction of nanopowder greenbodies sintered at high temperatures leads to a ''cross-over'' between both manufacturing route. Newly produced single-phase powders were homogenized with additions of sintering additives like tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and binders like polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Moulding the powders were carried out by uniaxial pressing, cold isostatic pressing and in individual cases also by slip casting. The achieved green densities were in a range of 25-42 %. Examination of calcination behaviour leads to a calcination temperature of 1000 C with 2 hours dwell time in air atmosphere. Only solid state reactions resulted into transparent YAG, YAG:Pr, LuAG, LuAG:Pr ceramics. Solid state reactions of nanopowders resulted in heterogeneously transparent samples. Ceramics made by powders of other synthetic routes gave nontransparent ceramics due to porosity

  17. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Using Radiolabeled Inorganic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolian; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Positron emission tomography (PET) is a radionuclide imaging technology that plays an important role in preclinical and clinical research. With administration of a small amount of radiotracer, PET imaging can provide a noninvasive, highly sensitive, and quantitative readout of its organ/tissue targeting efficiency and pharmacokinetics. Various radiotracers have been designed to target specific molecular events. Compared with antibodies, proteins, peptides, and other biologically relevant molecules, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in molecular imaging probe design, enabling the attachment of different imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads in a single vector. We introduce the radiolabeled nanoparticle platforms that we and others have developed. Due to the fundamental differences in the various nanoparticles and radioisotopes, most radiolabeling methods are designed case-by-case. We focus on some general rules about selecting appropriate isotopes for given types of nanoparticles, as well as adjusting the labeling strategies according to specific applications. We classified these radiolabeling methods into four categories: (1) complexation reaction of radiometal ions with chelators via coordination chemistry; (2) direct bombardment of nanoparticles via hadronic projectiles; (3) synthesis of nanoparticles using a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive precursors; (4) chelator-free postsynthetic radiolabeling. Method 1 is generally applicable to different nanomaterials as long as the surface chemistry is well-designed. However, the addition of chelators brings concerns of possible changes to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and detachment of the radiometal. Methods 2 and 3 have improved radiochemical stability. The applications are, however, limited by the possible damage to the nanocomponent caused by the proton beams (method 2) and harsh synthetic conditions (method 3). Method 4 is still in its infancy

  18. Towards high-resolution positron emission tomography for small volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, B.T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Some arguments are made regarding the medical usefulness of high spatial resolution in positron imaging, even if limited to small imaged volumes. Then the intrinsic limitations to spatial resolution in positron imaging are discussed. The project to build a small-volume, high resolution animal research prototype (SHARP) positron imaging system is described. The components of the system, particularly the detectors, are presented and brief mention is made of data acquisition and image reconstruction methods. Finally, some preliminary imaging results are presented; a pair of isolated point sources and 18 F in the bones of a rabbit. Although the detector system is not fully completed, these first results indicate that the goals of high sensitivity and high resolution (4 mm) have been realized. (Auth.)

  19. Potentials of positron emission tomography for regional cerebral blood flow evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depresseux, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    A general overview of the potentials of positron emission tomography and of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow is proposed and discussed. Specific characteristics of this technique are described, with special stress on conceptual and methodological implications. Four different approaches to the problem of the determination of cerebral blood flow are distinguished: trapping equilibrium methods, steady state equilibrium methods, clearance methods and convoluted kinetic methods [fr

  20. Ammonia emissions from Swine waste lagoons in the Utah great basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lowry A; Weaver, Kim H; Dotson, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    In animal production systems (poultry, beef, and swine), current production, storage, and disposal techniques present a challenge to manage wastes to minimize the emissions of trace gases within relatively small geographical areas. Physical and chemical parameters were measured on primary and secondary lagoons on three different swine farming systems, three replicates each, in the Central Great Basin of the United States to determine ammonia (NH3) emissions. Nutrient concentrations, lagoon water temperature, and micrometeorological data from these measurements were used with a published process model to calculate emissions. Annual cycling of emissions was determined in relation to climatic factors and wind speed was found the predominating factor when the lagoon temperatures were above about 3 degrees C. Total NH3 emissions increased in the order of smallest to largest: nursery, sow, and finisher farms. However, emissions on an animal basis increased from nursery animals being lowest to sow animals being highest. When emissions were compared to the amount of nitrogen (N) fed to the animals, NH3 emissions from sows were lowest with emissions from finisher animals highest. Ammonia emissions were compared to similar farm production systems in the humid East of the United States and found to be similar for finisher animals but had much lower emissions than comparable humid East sow production. Published estimates of NH3 emissions from lagoons ranged from 36 to 70% of feed input (no error range) compared to our emissions determined from a process model of 9.8% with an estimated range of +/-4%.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in ammonia emissions - a freely accessible model code for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla; Berge, H.

    2011-01-01

    demonstrates how local climate and local management can be accounted for in CTMs by applying a modular approach for deriving data as input to a dynamic ammonia emission model for Europe. Default data are obtained from information in the RAINS system, and it is demonstrated how this dynamic emission model based......Deriving a parameterisation of ammonia emissions for use in chemistry-transport models (CTMs) is a complex problem as the emission varies locally as a result of local climate and local agricultural management. In current CTMs such factors are generally not taken into account. This paper...... on these input data improves the NH3 calculations in a CTM model when the results are compared with calculations obtained by traditional methods in emission handling. It is also shown how input data can be modified over a specific target region resulting in even further improvement in performance over...

  2. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions from California high-rise layer houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X.-J.; Cortus, E. L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, S.; Heber, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are hazardous substances that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through community right-to-know legislation (EPCRA, EPA, 2011). The emissions of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide from large commercial layer facilities are of concern to legislators and nearby neighbors. Particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) released from layer houses are two of seven criteria pollutants for which EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards as required by the Clean Air Act. Therefore, it is important to quantify the baseline emissions of these pollutants. The emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and PM from two California high-rise layer houses were monitored for two years from October 2007 to October 2009. Each house had 32,500 caged laying hens. The monitoring site was setup in compliance with a U.S. EPA-approved quality assurance project plan. The results showed the average daily mean emission rates of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide were 0.95 ± 0.67 (standard deviation) g d -1 bird -1, 1.27 ± 0.78 mg d -1 bird -1 and 91.4 ± 16.5 g d -1 bird -1, respectively. The average daily mean emission rates of PM 2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) were 5.9 ± 12.6, 33.4 ± 27.4, and 78.0 ± 42.7 mg d -1 bird -1, respectively. It was observed that ammonia emission rates in summer were lower than in winter because the high airflow stabilized the manure by drying it. The reductions due to lower moisture content were greater than the increases due to higher temperature. However, PM 10 emission rates in summer were higher than in winter because the drier conditions coupled with higher internal air velocities increased PM 10 release from feathers, feed and manure.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of a positron emitting progestin ([18F]fluoro-16 alpha-methyl-19-norprogesterone) for imaging progesterone receptor positive tumours with positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Aalt; Luurtsema, Gert; PESSER, JW; DEGROOT, TJ; OOSTERHUIS, JW; Vaalburg, Willem; Wouda, S.

    Three 21-fluoro-progestins were investigated as potential imaging agents for the in vivo assessment of human progesterone receptor positive neoplasms with positron emission tomography. In competitive binding assays these compounds demonstrated high specificity, competing only for progesterone

  4. Positron emission tomography of malignant tumours at head and neck. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of positron emission tomography by comparison with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettler, Nele

    2011-01-01

    Imaging methods for early, accurate diagnosis and aftercare of malignant growths is currently one of the most important research topics. The objective of this thesis is to evaluate the diagnostic value of FDG-positron emission tomography by comparison with computed tomography for patients with squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma or sarcoma at head and neck. Measurement criteria are sensitivity and specificity. A retrospective evaluation of 100 examinations on 85 patients of University clinic Aachen was performed. The examination reports were supported by reports from histology, positron emission tomography and computed tomography. In each case, the histological results were assumed to provide a reliable benchmark. Sensitivity and specificity for the primary tumour site, metastatic lymphatic nodes and defined anatomic structures were compared across all patients. Comparisons were also performed on sub groups separated by gender, cancer type and the time and frequency at which tumours arose. The statistic analysis was done with MedCalc. Results: The results for sensitivity and specificity of the primary tumour site were 86.42% and 42.86%, and 64.71% and 66.07%, for positron emission tomography and computed tomography respectively. The results for the lymphatic nodes were 51.52% and 92.86% and 64.71% and 66.07%. When the constituent anatomic structures were evaluated separately, the specificity was significantly higher. The separation by gender showed no difference. Because the classification by tumor type resulted in samples that were of varying size, a comparison was difficult. For the diagnosis of primary tumours, the examination with positron emission tomography was superior, whereas computed tomography proved more effective for the diagnosis of recurrent tumours. For the diagnosis of the main tumour site, both methods were shown to be equally suitable. For the assessment of lymphatic nodes, positron emission tomography was superior to computed tomography

  5. Laparoscopic Scar: a mimicker of Sister Mary Joseph's nodule on positron emission tomography/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setty, B.; Blake, M.A.; Holalkere, N.S.; Blaszkowsky, L.S.; Fischman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/CT is an established imaging method in the diagnosis and staging of cancers. 18 F -fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most commonly used radiotracer in positron emission tomography/CT. It is a tumour viability agent and usually its uptake within a lesion reflects the presence of a viable tumour tissue. However, false-positive FDG uptake is known to occur in benign processes of either inflammatory or infectious aetiology. We describe FDG uptake at the site of laparoscopic scar that mimicked Sister Mary Joseph's nodule in a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, the knowledge of the patient's history and subtle imaging findings helped in accurate staging of the patient. In this case report, we emphasize the value of the knowledge of the patient history and awareness of different pitfalls of FDG to achieve a correct diagnosis on positron emission tomography/CT

  6. Homotopic non-local regularized reconstruction from sparse positron emission tomography measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Liu, Chenyi; Wang, Xiao Yu; Fieguth, Paul; Bie, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography scanners collect measurements of a patient’s in vivo radiotracer distribution. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (tracer), which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule, and the tomograms must be reconstructed from projections. The reconstruction of tomograms from the acquired PET data is an inverse problem that requires regularization. The use of tightly packed discrete detector rings, although improves signal-to-noise ratio, are often associated with high costs of positron emission tomography systems. Thus a sparse reconstruction, which would be capable of overcoming the noise effect while allowing for a reduced number of detectors, would have a great deal to offer. In this study, we introduce and investigate the potential of a homotopic non-local regularization reconstruction framework for effectively reconstructing positron emission tomograms from such sparse measurements. Results obtained using the proposed approach are compared with traditional filtered back-projection as well as expectation maximization reconstruction with total variation regularization. A new reconstruction method was developed for the purpose of improving the quality of positron emission tomography reconstruction from sparse measurements. We illustrate that promising reconstruction performance can be achieved for the proposed approach even at low sampling fractions, which allows for the use of significantly fewer detectors and have the potential to reduce scanner costs

  7. Use of positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer; Uso de la tomografia de emision de positrones en el cancer colorrectal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez E, Patricio; Jofre E, Josefina; Massardo V, Teresa; Humeres, Pamela; Canessa G, Jose; Sierralta C, Paulina [Hospital Militar de Santiago, Medicina Nuclear, Centro PET de Imagenes Moleculares, Santiago (Chile)

    2002-07-01

    The value of PET (Positron Emission Tomography) in colorectal cancer is presented. PET is a novel technique that uses F-18-FDG (fluorodeoxiglucose) to assess glucose metabolism by whole body imaging. It has been demonstrated that malignant cells have both increase of glucose uptake and utilization. In colorectal cancer, PET is indicated for staging, assess recurrence, liver metastasis and treatment follow-up. PET is more sensitive and specific than CT (Computed Tomography) and is cost effective. In 30% of cases PET may change patient management, avoiding unnecessary procedures (au)

  8. Dynamic positron emission tomography for study of cerebral hemodynamics in a cross section of the head using positron-emitting 68Ga-EDTA and 77Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Meyer, E.; Robertson, J.S.; Feindel, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomographic studies were performed on over 120 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease, arteriovenous malformations, and brain tumors, using the positron section scanner, consisting of a ring of 32 scintillation detectors. The radiopharmaceuticals were nondiffusible 68 Ga-EDTA for transit time and uptake studies and the diffusible tracer, 77 Kr, for quantitative regional cerebral blood flow studies in every square centimeter of the cross section of the head. The results of dynamic positron emission tomography in correlation with the results from the gamma scintillation camera dynamic studies and computed tomography (CT) scans are discussed

  9. Analysis of Saturn's Thermal Emission at 2.2-cm Wavelength: Spatial Distribution of Ammonia Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraia, A. L.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Janssen, Michael A.; Gulkis, Samuel; Oyafuso, Fabiano A.; Allison, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on determining the latitudinal structure of ammonia vapor in Saturn's cloud layer near 1.5 bars using the brightness temperature maps derived from the Cassini RADAR (Elachi et al., 2004) instrument, which works in a passive mode to measure thermal emission from Saturn at 2.2-cm wavelength. We perform an analysis of five brightness temperature maps that span epochs from 2005 to 2011, which are presented in a companion paper by Janssen et al. (2013a, this issue). The brightness temperature maps are representative of the spatial distribution of ammonia vapor, since ammonia gas is the only effective opacity source in Saturn's atmosphere at 2.2-cm wavelength. Relatively high brightness temperatures indicate relatively low ammonia relative humidity (RH), and vice versa. We compare the observed brightness temperatures to brightness temperatures computed using the Juno atmospheric microwave radiative transfer (JAMRT) program which includes both the means to calculate a tropospheric atmosphere model for Saturn and the means to carry out radiative transfer calculations at microwave frequencies. The reference atmosphere to which we compare has a 3x solar deep mixing ratio of ammonia (we use 1.352x10(exp -4) for the solar mixing ratio of ammonia vapor relative to H2; see Atreya, 2010) and is fully saturated above its cloud base. The maps are comprised of residual brightness temperatures-observed brightness temperature minus the model brightness temperature of the saturated atmosphere.

  10. Agricultural ammonia emissions inventory and spatial distribution in the North China Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: zhangying0928@hotmail.co [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Dore, A.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Ma, L. [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding 071001 (China); Liu, X.J., E-mail: liu310@cau.edu.c [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Ma, W.Q. [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding 071001 (China); Cape, J.N. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Zhang, F.S. [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2010-02-15

    An agricultural ammonia (NH{sub 3}) emission inventory in the North China Plain (NCP) on a prefecture level for the year 2004, and a 5 x 5 km{sup 2} resolution spatial distribution map, has been calculated for the first time. The census database from China's statistics datasets, and emission factors re-calculated by the RAINS model supported total emissions of 3071 kt NH{sub 3}-N yr{sup -1} for the NCP, accounting for 27% of the total emissions in China. NH{sub 3} emission from mineral fertilizer application contributed 1620 kt NH{sub 3}-N yr{sup -1}, 54% of the total emission, while livestock emissions accounted for the remaining 46% of the total emissions, including 7%, 27%, 7% and 5% from cattle, pigs, sheep and goats, and poultry, respectively. A high-resolution spatial NH{sub 3} emissions map was developed based on 1 x 1 km land use database and aggregated to a 5 x 5 km grid resolution. The highest emission density value was 198 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. - The first high-resolution spatial distribution of ammonia emissions for the North China Plain showed rates up to 200 kg NH{sub 3}-N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}.

  11. Agricultural ammonia emissions inventory and spatial distribution in the North China Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Dore, A.J.; Ma, L.; Liu, X.J.; Ma, W.Q.; Cape, J.N.; Zhang, F.S.

    2010-01-01

    An agricultural ammonia (NH 3 ) emission inventory in the North China Plain (NCP) on a prefecture level for the year 2004, and a 5 x 5 km 2 resolution spatial distribution map, has been calculated for the first time. The census database from China's statistics datasets, and emission factors re-calculated by the RAINS model supported total emissions of 3071 kt NH 3 -N yr -1 for the NCP, accounting for 27% of the total emissions in China. NH 3 emission from mineral fertilizer application contributed 1620 kt NH 3 -N yr -1 , 54% of the total emission, while livestock emissions accounted for the remaining 46% of the total emissions, including 7%, 27%, 7% and 5% from cattle, pigs, sheep and goats, and poultry, respectively. A high-resolution spatial NH 3 emissions map was developed based on 1 x 1 km land use database and aggregated to a 5 x 5 km grid resolution. The highest emission density value was 198 kg N ha -1 yr -1 . - The first high-resolution spatial distribution of ammonia emissions for the North China Plain showed rates up to 200 kg NH 3 -N ha -1 yr -1 .

  12. Improved passive flux samplers for measuring ammonia emissions from animal houses, part 1: Basic principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, R.; Hol, J.M.G.; Wagemans, M.J.M.; Phillips, V.R.

    2003-01-01

    At present, precise, expensive and laborious methods with a high resolution in time are needed, to determine ammonia emission rates from animal houses. The high costs for equipment, maintenance and labour limit the number of sites that can be measured. This study examines a new, simpler concept for

  13. Grooved floor system for cattle housing: ammonia emission reduction and good slip resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swierstra, D.; Braam, C.R.; Smits, M.C.J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve the slip resistance of solid floors in dairy cow houses and to achieve the ammonia emission reduction prescribed by the Dutch government, precast concrete floors with grooves and a dung scraper were investigated. The grooves parallel to the alley had 160 mm center-to-center spacing and

  14. Milk urea concentration as an indicator of ammonia emission from dairy cow barn under restricted grazing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duinkerken, van G.; Smits, M.C.J.; Andre, G.; Sebek, L.B.J.; Dijkstra, J.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk milk urea concentration was evaluated to assess its potential as an indicator of ammonia emission from a dairy cow barn in a situation with restricted grazing. An experiment was carried out with a herd of, on average, 52 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. The cows were housed in a naturally

  15. Biochar type and factors affecting N transformation, ammonia volatilization, and nitrous oxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil amendment with biochar has shown the potential to improve nitrogen (N) availability for plant uptake and reduce environmental losses via ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. There are still many unknowns on how biochar type and soil conditions affect N dynamics and processes associa...

  16. Effects of manure storage additivies on manure composition and greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Storage of dairy manure slurry allows for flexibility in the timing of land application of manure to reduce environmental impacts related to water quality. Yet, manure storage can increase greenhouse gas (GHG) and ammonia emissions and cause operational issues due to the buildup of slurry ...

  17. Dietary protein affects nitrogen excretion and ammonia emission from slurry of growing-finishing pigs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canh, T.T.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Schutte, J.B.; Sutton, A.L.; Langhout, D.J.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of dietary protein on nitrogen excretion and ammonia emission from slurry of growing–finishing pigs were studied both in vitro and in a pig house. The three diets had similar contents of NE, minerals, vitamins and ileal digestible lysine, methionine cystine, threonine and tryptophan, but

  18. Dietary protein affects nitrogen excretion and ammonia emission from slurry of growing-finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canh, T.T.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Schutte, J.B.; Sutton, A.; Langhout, D.J.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of dietary protein on nitrogen excretion and ammonia emission from slurry of growing-finishing pigs were studied both in vitro and in a pig house. The three diets had similar contents of NE, minerals, vitamins and ileal digestible lysine, methionine + cystine, threonine and tryptophan,

  19. Nitrogen efficiency of dairy cattle : from protein evaluation to ammonia emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duinkerken, van G.

    2011-01-01

    Diet optimization contributes considerably to increased nitrogen efficiency of dairy cattle, resulting in reduced nitrogen losses. This thesis focuses on three themes: the potential advances in protein evaluation systems for ruminants, the relationship between dairy cow diet and ammonia emission

  20. Nutritional and environmental effects on ammonia emissions from dairy cattle housing: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) excreted in urine by dairy cows can be potentially transformed to ammonia (NH3) and emitted to the atmosphere. Dairy production contributes to NH3 emission, which can create human respiratory problems and odor issues, reduces manure quality, and is an indirect source of nitrous oxide (N...

  1. Prevention of unorganized emissions of ammonia in installations of dewaxing of oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehovskaya, E. O.; Nagibina, I. Yu; Ivanov, A. Yu

    2018-01-01

    The problem of lack of automation devices in oil dewaxing units is considered in this work. As a result, fugitive ammonia emissions that exceed the maximum permissible concentration, which adversely affect the health of personnel and the environment, can occur in the atmospheric air. The device and the operating principle of the automatic air separator are shown.

  2. Distinguishing tumor recurrence from irradiation sequelae with positron emission tomography in patients treated for larynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greven, K.M.; Williams, D.W. III; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; McGuirt, W.F.; Harkness, B.A.; Watson, N.E. Jr.; Raben, M.; Frazier, L.C.; Geisinger, K.R.; Capellari, J.O.

    1994-01-01

    Distinguishing persistent or recurrent tumor from postradiation edema, or soft tissue/cartilage necrosis in patients treated for carcinoma of the larynx can be difficult. Because recurrent tumor is often submucosal, multiple deep biopsies may be necessary before a diagnosis can be established. Positron emission tomography with 18F-2-fluro-2-deoxglucose (FDG) was studied for its ability to aid in this problem. Positron emission tomography (18FDG) scans were performed on 11 patients who were suspected of having persistent or recurrent tumor after radiation treatment for carcinoma of the larynx. Patients underwent thorough history and physical examinations, scans with computerized tomography, and pathologic evaluation when indicated. Standard uptake values were used to quantitate the FDG uptake in the larynx. The time between completion of radiation treatment and positron emission tomography examination ranged from 2 to 26 months with a median of 6 months. Ten patients underwent computed tomography (CT) of the larynx, which revealed edema of the larynx (six patients), glottic mass (four patients), and cervical nodes (one patient). Positron emission tomography scans revealed increased FDG uptake in the larynx in five patients and laryngectomy confirmed the presence of carcinoma in these patients. Five patients had positron emission tomography results consistent with normal tissue changes in the larynx, and one patient had increased FDG uptake in neck nodes. This patient underwent laryngectomy, and no cancer was found in the primary site, but nodes were pathologically positive. One patient had slightly elevated FDG uptake and negative biopsy results. The remaining patients have been followed for 11 to 14 months since their positron emission studies and their examinations have remained stable. In patients without tumor, average standard uptake values of the larynx ranged from 2.4 to 4.7, and in patients with tumor, the range was 4.9 to 10.7. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA MASS EMISSION FLUX FROM HOG WASTE EFFLUENT SPRAYING OPERATION USING OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY WITH VERTICAL RADIAL PLUME MAPPING ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission of ammonia from concentrated animal feeding operations represents an increasingly important environmental issue. Determination of total ammonia mass emission flux from extended area sources such as waste lagoons and waste effluent spraying operations can be evaluated usi...

  4. The effect of climate and climate change on ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We present here a dynamical method for modelling temporal and geographical variations in ammonia emissions in regional-scale chemistry transport models (CTMs) and chemistry climate models (CCMs). The method is based on the meteorology in the models and gridded inventories. We use...... to a standard Danish pig stable with 1000 animals and display how emissions from this source would vary geographically throughout central and northern Europe and from year to year. In view of future climate changes, we also evaluate the potential future changes in emission by including temperature projections....... Finally, the climate penalty on ammonia emissions should be taken into account at the policy level such as the NEC and IPPC directives....

  5. Positron emission tomography and migraine. Tomographie par emission de positons et migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabriat, H. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1992-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT{sub 2} serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET.

  6. Defining a radiotherapy target with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, Quinten C.; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; Wong, Ching-Yee O.; Wong, John W.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Yan Di

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is now considered the most accurate clinical staging study for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is also important in the staging of multiple other malignancies. Gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for radiotherapy, however, is typically based entirely on computed tomographic data. We performed a series of phantom studies to determine an accurate and uniformly applicable method for defining a GTV with FDG-PET. Methods and materials: A model-based method was tested by a phantom study to determine a threshold, or unique cutoff of standardized uptake value based on body weight (standardized uptake value [SUV]) for FDG-PET based GTV definition. The degree to which mean target SUV, background FDG concentration, and target volume influenced that GTV definition were evaluated. A phantom was constructed consisting of a 9.0-L cylindrical tank. Glass spheres with volumes ranging from 12.2 to 291.0 cc were suspended within the tank, with a minimum separation of 4 cm between the edges of the spheres. The sphere volumes were selected based on the range of NSCLC patient tumor volumes seen in our clinic. The tank and spheres were filled with a variety of known concentrations of FDG in several experiments and then scanned using a General Electric Advance PET scanner. In the initial experiment, six spheres with identical volumes were filled with varying concentrations of FDG (mean SUV 1.85 ∼ 9.68) and suspended within a background bath of FDG at a similar concentration to that used in clinical practice (0.144 μCi/mL). The second experiment was identical to the first, but was performed at 0.144 and 0.036 μCi/mL background concentrations to determine the effect of background FDG concentration on sphere definition. In the third experiment, six spheres with volumes of 12.2 to 291.0 cc were filled with equal concentrations of FDG and suspended in a standard background FDG concentration of 0.144

  7. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  8. Role and impact of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahek, D.; Montravers, F.; Aide, N.; Kerrou, K.; Talbot, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is widely used in oncology to detect malignant tissue, assess the extent of the disease and follow up treatment. In breast cancer, recurrence detection seems to be the leading indication of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. This review, including recent publications, aims to evaluate its role to detect the recurrent malignant. tissue when tumour marker levels are isolatedly rising and to evaluate the extent of-the disease. The first impact studies reveal its important role in the management of the patients suspected of breast cancer recurrence. (author)

  9. Environmental consequences from emission of nitrogen oxides and ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverfeldt, Aa.; Pleijel, H.; Klemedtsson, L.; Loevblad, G.; Omstedt, G.

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study have been to compare environmental problems pertaining to nitrogen containing pollutants from power generation from biomass fuels. Local effects of NO x and NH 3 in air are normally small. Emission of NO x add plant toxic ozone, which is not the case at emission of NH 3 and N 2 O. The problem is slightly greater when siting in southern Sweden. The total emission of ammonium and nitrates are of major importance for acidification and nitrogen saturation. The largest contribution to the greenhouse effect comes from direct emission of nitrous oxide. The emission of N 2 O does not influence the siting aspects of the power plant, because of the global implications of this substance. 21 refs, 9 figs, 14 tabs

  10. A BGO detector for Positron Emission Profiling in catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangnus, A.V.G.; Cunningham, R.H.; Santen, R.A. van; Voigt, M.J.A. de

    1995-01-01

    As part of a project to study the reaction kinetics in catalysts, a detector system has been designed and built. The detector will measure in one dimension the activity distribution of positron emitters in catalyst reactors under operational conditions as a function of time. The detector consists of two arrays of ten BGO crystals each and has the flexibility to measure with high sensitivity the activity profile in various reactor sizes; the position resolution that can be reached is 3 mm. (orig.)

  11. Fluorodeoxyglucose and C-Choline positron emission tomography for distinction of metastatic plexopathy and neuritis : a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Anna L.; Zeebregts, Clark J; Enting, Roeline; Slart, Riemer Hja

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning has an established role in the diagnostic work-up of many malignant diseases and also in the evaluation of cancer treatment response. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography may, however be non-specific as infectious

  12. The effect of climate and climate change on ammonia emissions in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Skjøth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a dynamical method for modelling temporal and geographical variations in ammonia emissions in regional-scale chemistry transport models (CTMs and chemistry climate models (CCMs. The method is based on the meteorology in the models and gridded inventories. We use the dynamical method to investigate the spatiotemporal variability of ammonia emissions across part of Europe and study how these emissions are related to geographical and year-to-year variations in atmospheric temperature alone. For simplicity we focus on the emission from a storage facility related to a standard Danish pig stable with 1000 animals and display how emissions from this source would vary geographically throughout central and northern Europe and from year to year. In view of future climate changes, we also evaluate the potential future changes in emission by including temperature projections from an ensemble of climate models. The results point towards four overall issues. (1 Emissions can easily vary by 20% for different geographical locations within a country due to overall variations in climate. The largest uncertainties are seen for large countries such as the UK, Germany and France. (2 Annual variations in overall climate can at specific locations cause uncertainties in the range of 20%. (3 Climate change may increase emissions by 0–40% in central to northern Europe. (4 Gradients in existing emission inventories that are seen between neighbour countries (e.g. between the UK and France can be reduced by using a dynamical methodology for calculating emissions. Acting together these four factors can cause substantial uncertainties in emission. Emissions are generally considered among the largest uncertainties in the model calculations made with CTM and CCM models. Efforts to reduce uncertainties are therefore highly relevant. It is therefore recommended that both CCMs and CTMs implement a dynamical methodology for simulating ammonia emissions in a

  13. Intrinsic spatial resolution limitations due to differences between positron emission position and annihilation detection localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Pedro; Malano, Francisco; Valente, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Since its successful implementation for clinical diagnostic, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the most promising medical imaging technique. The recent major growth of PET imaging is mainly due to its ability to trace the biologic pathways of different compounds in the patient's body, assuming the patient can be labeled with some PET isotope. Regardless of the type of isotope, the PET imaging method is based on the detection of two 511-keV gamma photons being emitted in opposite directions, with almost 180 deg between them, as a consequence of electron-positron annihilation. Therefore, this imaging method is intrinsically limited by random uncertainties in spatial resolutions, related with differences between the actual position of positron emission and the location of the detected annihilation. This study presents an approach with the Monte Carlo method to analyze the influence of this effect on different isotopes of potential implementation in PET. (author)

  14. Cerebral metabolic data obtained by positron emission tomography in physiological aging. A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellat, J; Hommel, M

    1987-06-18

    Following a summary of the general principles and limitations of metabolic measurements by positron emission tomography and of the different indices used to interpret the data, the authors review the results of published studies on physiological aging. Globally, with strict inclusion criteria absolute metabolic values at rest and under partial sensorial deprivation are little or not modified by age. In contrast, functional interactions between regions, as deduced from metabolic intercorrelations, are perhaps different in elderly people. In any case, positron emission tomography seems to discriminate between normal aging and different patterns of pathological aging. Technical improvements, more refined neuropsychological correlations and the use of dynamic activation paradigms will no doubt provide, in the future, a better definition of normal and pathological aging as positron tomography.

  15. Cerebral metabolic data obtained by positron emission tomography in physiological aging. A review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, J.; Hommel, M.

    1987-01-01

    Following a summary of the general principles and limitations of metabolic measurements by positron emission tomography and of the different indices used to interpret the data, the authors review the results of published studies on physiological aging. Globally, with strict inclusion criteria absolute metabolic values at rest and under partial sensorial deprivation are little or not modified by age. In contrast, functional interactions between regions, as deduced from metabolic intercorrelations, are perhaps different in elderly people. In any case, positron emission tomography seems to discriminate between normal aging and different patterns of pathological aging. Technical improvements, more refined neuropsychological correlations and the use of dynamic activation paradigms will no doubt provide, in the future, a better definition of normal and pathological aging as positron tomography [fr

  16. Measuring ammonia concentrations and emissions from agricultural land and liquid surfaces: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanjay B; Westerman, Philip W; Arogo, Jactone

    2006-07-01

    Aerial ammonia concentrations (Cg) are measured using acid scrubbers, filter packs, denuders, or optical methods. Using Cg and wind speed or airflow rate, ammonia emission rate or flux can be directly estimated using enclosures or micrometeorological methods. Using nitrogen (N) recovery is not recommended, mainly because the different gaseous N components cannot be separated. Although low cost and replicable, chambers modify environmental conditions and are suitable only for comparing treatments. Wind tunnels do not modify environmental conditions as much as chambers, but they may not be appropriate for determining ammonia fluxes; however, they can be used to compare emissions and test models. Larger wind tunnels that also simulate natural wind profiles may be more useful for comparing treatments than micrometeorological methods because the latter require larger plots and are, thus, difficult to replicate. For determining absolute ammonia flux, the micrometeorological methods are the most suitable because they are nonintrusive. For use with micrometeorological methods, both the passive denuders and optical methods give comparable accuracies, although the latter give real-time Cg but at a higher cost. The passive denuder is wind weighted and also costs less than forced-air Cg measurement methods, but it requires calibration. When ammonia contamination during sample preparation and handling is a concern and separating the gas-phase ammonia and aerosol ammonium is not required, the scrubber is preferred over the passive denuder. The photothermal interferometer, because of its low detection limit and robustness, may hold potential for use in agriculture, but it requires evaluation. With its simpler theoretical basis and fewer restrictions, the integrated horizontal flux (IHF) method is preferable over other micrometeorological methods, particularly for lagoons, where berms and land-lagoon boundaries modify wind flow and flux gradients. With uniform wind flow, the ZINST

  17. Time resolution in scintillator based detectors for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundacker, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the domain of medical photon detectors L(Y)SO scintillators are used for positron emission tomography (PET). The interest for time of flight (TOF) in PET is increasing since measurements have shown that new crystals like L(Y)SO coupled to state of the art photodetectors, e.g. silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), can reach coincidence time resolutions (CTRs) of far below 500ps FWHM. To achieve these goals it is important to study the processe in the whole detection chain, i.e. the high energy particle or gamma interaction in the crystal, the scintillation process itself, the light propagation in the crystal with the light transfer to the photodetector, and the electronic readout. In this thesis time resolution measurements for a PET like system are performed in a coincidence setup utilizing the ultra fast amplifier discriminator NINO. We found that the time-over-threshold energy information provided by NINO shows a degradation in energy resolution for higher SiPM bias voltages. This is a consequence of the increasing dark count rate (DCR) of the SiPM with higher bias voltages together with the exponential decay of the signal. To overcome this problem and to operate the SiPM at its optimum voltage in terms of timing we developed a new electronic board that employs NINO only as a low noise leading edge discriminator together with an analog amplifier which delivers the energy information. With this new electronic board we indeed improved the measured CTR by about 15%. To study the limits of time resolution in more depth we measured the CTR with 2x2x3mm3 LSO:Ce codoped 0.4%Ca crystals coupled to commercially available SiPMs (Hamamatsu S10931-50P MPPC) and achieved a CTR of 108±5ps FWHM at an energy of 511keV. We determined the influence of the data acquisition system and the electronics on the CTR to be 27±2ps FWHM and thus negligible. To quantitatively understand the measured values, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation tool in MATLAB that incorporates the timing

  18. MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in hemimegalencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, K.T.; Liebig, T.; Hosten, N. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Amthauer, H.; Farahati, J.; Felix, R. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Berlin (Germany); PET-Centre Berlin, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Etou, A.; Lehmann, T.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    We report hemimegalencephaly in a 44-year-old woman with mental retardation, epilepsy and a mild hemiparesis. In addition to typical findings on MRI, 2-deoxy-2[{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (PET) demonstrated glucose hypometabolism of the affected hemisphere. The results of PET have been coregistered with morphological information from the MRI studies by image fusion. (orig.)

  19. Synthesis and biodistribution of [C-11]procaterol, a beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, TJ; van der Wouden, EA; van Waarde, A; Doze, P; Elsinga, PH; Vaalburg, W

    The potent, subtype-selective radioligand (+/-)-erythro-5-(1-hydroxy-2-[C-11]isopropyl-aminobutyl)-8-hydroxy-carbostyril ([C-11]procaterol) was synthesized and evaluated for visualization of pulmonary beta(2)-adrenoceptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Procaterol was labelled by reductive

  20. Positron emission CT and X-ray CT findings in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yoshikazu; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ito, Harumi; Senda, Michio; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Konishi, Junji; Nishimura, Koichi; Izumi, Takahide; Oshima, Shunsaku

    1987-08-01

    Positron emission CT and X-ray CT were performed in fifteen patients with emphysema confirmed SAB and twelve patients with clinical DPB. In patients with emphysema, 20 of 36 areas showed a central pattern and their perfusion scintigrams showed stripe-signs. On the other hand, the patients with DPB showed outer layer progression of the disease.

  1. Characterization of positron emission tomography hypoxia tracer uptake and tissue oxygenation via electrochemical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowen, S.R.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Nordsmark, M.; Bentzen, S.M.; Jeraj, R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Unique uptake and retention mechanisms of positron emission tomography (PET) hypoxia tracers make in vivo comparison between them challenging. Differences in imaged uptake of two common hypoxia radiotracers, [(61)Cu]Cu-ATSM and [(18)F]FMISO, were characterized via computational modeling to

  2. 77 FR 8262 - Draft Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0081] Draft Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  3. Monitoring variables affecting positron emission tomography measurements of cerebral blood flow in anaesthetized pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Simonsen, Mette

    Background: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of anaesthetised pig brains is a useful tool in neuroscience. Stable cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential for PET, since variations can affect the kinetics of several radiotracers. However, the impact of physiological factors regulating CBF...

  4. Early positron emission tomography response-adapted treatment in stage I and II hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    André, Marc P.E.; Girinsky, Théodore; Federico, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Patients who receive combined modality treatment for stage I and II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have an excellent outcome. Early response evaluation with positron emission tomography (PET) scan may improve selection of patients who need reduced or more intensive treatments. Methods We performed...

  5. A positron emission tomography study of wind-up pain in chronic postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Lonsdale, Markus Georg; Aasvang, Eske Kvanner

    2011-01-01

    -induced wind-up pain in neuropathic pain patients. We therefore used positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the cerebral response pattern of mechanical wind-up pain in a homogenous group of 10 neuropathic pain patients with long-standing postherniotomy pain in the groin area. Patients were scanned...

  6. Positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    positron emission tomography (PET) and gamma-camera PET in the diagnostic investigation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A systematic literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. We identified 55 original works on the diagnostic...

  7. Hypoxia positron emission tomography imaging: combining information on perfusion and tracer retention to improve hypoxia specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Morten; Munk, Ole L; Jakobsen, Steen S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Static positron emission tomography (PET) allows mapping of tumor hypoxia, but low resolution and slow tracer retention/clearance results in poor image contrast and the risk of missing areas where hypoxic cells and necrosis are intermixed. Fully dynamic PET may improve accuracy but scan...

  8. Positron emission tomography in the follow-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Maria; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    node involvement and distant metastases, accentuating the importance of close surveillance to identify disease progression at an early stage, and thereby detect recurrences amenable to treatment. Positron emission tomography (PET) has already been proven useful in the staging of CMM, but the utility...

  9. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography predicts survival of patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich; Loft, Annika

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is currently not used on a routine basis for imaging of neuroendocrine (NE) tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of FDG-PET in patients with NE tumors. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Ninety...

  10. Monitoring of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase enzyme activity using positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, GAP; Calogero, Anna; van Waarde, A; Doze, P; Vaalburg, W; Mulder, NH; de Vries, EFJ

    2000-01-01

    9-[(1-[F-18]Fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine ([F-18]FHPG) wasevaluated as a tracer for noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene expression. C6 rat glioma cells with and without the HSV-tk gene were incubated with

  11. Activity-based costing evaluation of a [F-18]-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krug, Bruno; Van Zanten, Annie; Pirson, Anne-Sophie; Crott, Ralph; Vander Borght, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to use the activity-based costing approach to give a better insight in the actual cost structure of a positron emission tomography procedure (FDG-PET) by defining the constituting components and by simulating the impact of possible resource or practice changes.

  12. Recurrent ovarian endodermal sinus tumor: demonstration by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.A.; Kim, E.E.; Tresukosol, D.; Kudelka, A.P.; Edwards, C.L.; Kavanagh, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor of the ovary that was identified and/or clearly depicted by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. The potential roles of various imaging modalities in the detection of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Tomography by positrons emission: integral unit to the service of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez D, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    The applications of the Positron emission tomography (PET) together with the one radiopharmaceutical 2 - [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in the area of the medical imaging is expanding quickly and it possesses a bigger impact at the moment in favor of those patient to who suffers an oncological, cardiac or neurological illness in Mexico. (Author)

  14. Cobalt-55 positron emission tomography in traumatic brain injury : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, HML; vanderNaalt, J; vanZomeren, AH; Paans, AMJ; VeenmavanderDuin, L; Hew, JM; Pruim, J; Minderhoud, JM; Korf, J

    Traumatic brain injury is usually assessed with the Glasgow coma scale (GCS), CT, or MRI. After such injury, the injured brain tissue is characterised by calcium mediated neuronal damage and inflammation. Positron emission tomography with the isotope cobalt-55 (Go-PET) as a calcium tracer enables

  15. Statistical properties of compartmental model parameters extracted from dynamic positron emission tomography experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazoyer, B.M.; Huesman, R.H.; Budinger, T.F.; Knittel, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years a major focus of research in physiologic studies employing tracers has been the computer implementation of mathematical methods of kinetic modeling for extracting the desired physiological parameters from tomographically derived data. A study is reported of factors that affect the statistical properties of compartmental model parameters extracted from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) experiments

  16. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in evaluation of residual intramuscular myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zade, Anand; Ahire, Archana; Shetty, Shishir; Rai, Sujith; Bokka, Rajashekharrao; Velumani, Arokiaswamy; Kabnurkar, Rasika

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma (IM) is a rare benign neoplasm. In a patient diagnosed with IM of left thigh, we report the utility of a postoperative fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in assessing the efficacy of surgical excision

  17. Characterization of hepatic tumors using [11C]metomidate through positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roivainen, Anne; Naum, Alexandru; Nuutinen, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Using positron emission tomography (PET), we compared two tracers, [11C]metomidate ([11C]MTO) and [11C]acetate ([11C]ACE), for the characterization of hepatic tumors. METHODS: Thirty-three patients underwent PET with [11C]MTO and [11C]ACE and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  18. Investigating Serotonergic Function Using Positron Emission Tomography: Overview and Recent Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, D.J.; Ruhe, H.G.; Booij, J.

    2010-01-01

    Mono-aminergic neurotransmitters, in particular serotonin (5-HT), are involved in regulating a large number of psychological and physiological functions, and abnormal 5-HT transmission has been implicated in a wide variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a

  19. A Monte Carlo simulation of the possible use of Positron Emission Tomography in proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Gambaccini, Mauro; Marziani, Michele

    1994-01-01

    We have used the Monte Carlo technique to evaluate the applicability of Positron Emission Tomography to in vivo dosimetry for proton radiotherapy. A fair agreement has been found between Monte Carlo results and experimental data. The simulation shows that PET can be useful especially for in vivo Bragg's peak localization. ((orig.))

  20. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging and in vivo studies of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a growing health challenge globally, and despite our knowledge of the disease has increased over the last couple of decades, many unanswered questions remain. As molecular imaging can be used to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellu...... knowledge obtained from in vivo positron emission tomography studies of atherosclerosis performed in small animals....

  1. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  2. Diffuse nesidioblastosis diagnosed on a Ga-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, Sasikumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Shukla, Jaya; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a 50 days old pre-term infant with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in whom 68 Ga DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography scan showed diffusely increased tracer uptake in the entire pancreas with no abnormal tracer uptake anywhere else in the body, suggestive of a diffuse variant of nesidioblastosis. (author)

  3. Fluorodeoxyglucose-based positron emission tomography imaging to monitor drug responses in hematological tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P.; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor the uptake of the labeled glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG), a process that is generally believed to reflect viable tumor cell mass. The use of ¹⁸F-FDG PET can be helpful in documenting over time the reduction in tumor mass volume

  4. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide emissions from five passenger vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Hua Lu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, three unregulated components, ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, emitted from five passenger vehicles are investigated. With focus upon emission factors from existing production technology, vehicles produced between 1989 and 1998 with considerable mileage (7000 to 280,000) are chosen. Among the five vehicles, four were sold in the European market, whereas one was sold in the US market. The vehicles are tested on a chassis dynamometer. An EU2000 Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a US Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) of the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) are used in the study. The regulated emissions are measured using a Horiba Mexa series. Unregulated emissions, ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are analysed by mass spectrometer, gas chromatography and CNT-NA, TIM315-74W method, respectively. Both the unregulated emissions and the regulated emissions show driving cycle dependency; and they are also improved with newer vehicle and emission control technology. However, a gasoline direct injection vehicle (relatively new technology in this study) has rather high regulated emissions, whereas the NH 3 , N 2 O and HCN emissions are low

  5. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide emissions from five passenger vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hua Lu

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, three unregulated components, ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, emitted from five passenger vehicles are investigated. With focus upon emission factors from existing production technology, vehicles produced between 1989 and 1998 with considerable mileage (7000 to 280,000) are chosen. Among the five vehicles, four were sold in the European market, whereas one was sold in the US market. The vehicles are tested on a chassis dynamometer. An EU2000 Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a US Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) of the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) are used in the study. The regulated emissions are measured using a Horiba Mexa series. Unregulated emissions, ammonia (NH(3)), nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are analysed by mass spectrometer, gas chromatography and CNT-NA, TIM315-74W method, respectively. Both the unregulated emissions and the regulated emissions show driving cycle dependency; and they are also improved with newer vehicle and emission control technology. However, a gasoline direct injection vehicle (relatively new technology in this study) has rather high regulated emissions, whereas the NH(3), N(2)O and HCN emissions are low.

  6. Positron emission medical measurements with accelerated radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews in some detail the process by which a heavy ion accelerator can be used to inject positron emitting radioactive particles into a human body for a range of possible medical measurements. The process of radioactive beam generation and injection is described, followed by a study of the relationship between activity that can be injected versus dose to the patient as a function of which of the positron emitting ions is used. It is found that 6 C 10 and 10 Ne 19 are the two isotopes that appear more promising for injection into humans. The design considerations for a non-tomographic instrument to obtain images from beam injections are outlined and the results of 10 Ne 19 preliminary measurements with human phantoms and actual patients for the determination of end-of-range of cancer therapy ion beams is reported. Accuracies in the order of ±1 mm in the measurements of stopping point of a therapy beam with safe doses to the patient are reported. The paper concludes with a simple analysis of requirements to extend the technique to on-line verification of cancer treatment and to nuclear medicine research and diagnostics measurements. 17 refs.; 16 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Emissions from Different Stages of Liquid Manure Management Chains: Abatement Options and Emission Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohankumar Sajeev, Erangu Purath; Winiwarter, Wilfried; Amon, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Farm livestock manure is an important source of ammonia and greenhouse gases. Concerns over the environmental impact of emissions from manure management have resulted in research efforts focusing on emission abatement. However, questions regarding the successful abatement of manure-related emissions remain. This study uses a meta-analytical approach comprising 89 peer-reviewed studies to quantify emission reduction potentials of abatement options for liquid manure management chains from cattle and pigs. Analyses of emission reductions highlight the importance of accounting for interactions between emissions. Only three out of the eight abatement options considered (frequent removal of manure, anaerobic digesters, and manure acidification) reduced ammonia (3-60%), nitrous oxide (21-55%), and methane (29-74%) emissions simultaneously, whereas in all other cases, tradeoffs were identified. The results demonstrate that a shift from single-stage emission abatement options towards a whole-chain perspective is vital in reducing overall emissions along the manure management chain. The study also identifies some key elements like proper clustering, reporting of influencing factors, and explicitly describing assumptions associated with abatement options that can reduce variability in emission reduction estimates. Prioritization of abatement options according to their functioning can help to determine low-risk emission reduction options, specifically options that alter manure characteristics (e.g., reduced protein diets, anaerobic digestion, or slurry acidification). These insights supported by comprehensive emission measurement studies can help improve the effectiveness of emission abatement and harmonize strategies aimed at reducing air pollution and climate change simultaneously. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Positron emission tomography - a new technique for observing fluid behaviour in engineering systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, P.A.E.; Rogers, J.D.; Skelton, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    Positron emission tomography promises to become a powerful new technique for flow tracing and measurement within metal structures in general and operating engines in particular. The principles involved are outlined, and a mobile positron camera system being developed jointly by Rolls-Royce, Castrol, the University of Birmingham and the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory of the SERC is described. Finally, illustrative examples of the camera's capability are presented drawn from its use to study lubricating fluid flow in the bearings of a Viper gas turbine engine on test up to 100% full power. (author)

  9. Three-dimensional imaging of hidden objects using positron emission backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dongwon; Cowee, Misa; Fenimore, Ed; Galassi, Mark; Looker, Quinn; Mcneil, Wendy V.; Stonehill, Laura; Wallace, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission backscatter imaging is a technique for interrogation and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of hidden objects when we only have access to the objects from one side. Using time-of-flight differences in detected direct and backscattered positron-emitted photons, we construct 3-D images of target objects. Recently at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a fully three-dimensional imaging system has been built and the experimental results are discussed in this paper. Quantitative analysis of images reconstructed in both two- and three-dimensions are also presented.

  10. Positron emission intensities in the decay of 64Cu, 76Br and 124I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaim, S.M.; Bisinger, T.; Hilgers, K.; Nayak, D.; Coenen, H.H.

    2007-01-01

    The relatively long-lived positron emitters 64 Cu (t 1/2 = 12.7 h), 76 Br (t 1/2 = 16.2 h) and 124 I (t 1/2 = 4.18 d) are finding increasing applications in positron emission tomography (PET). For precise determination of their positron emission intensities, each radionuclide was prepared via a charged particle induced reaction in a ''no-carrier-added'' form and with high radionuclidic purity. It was then subjected to γ-ray and X-ray spectroscopy as well as to anticoincidence beta and γγ-coincidence counting. The positron emission intensities measured were: 64 Cu (17.8 ± 0.4)%, 76 Br (58.2 ± 1.9)% and 124 I (22.0 ± 0.5)%. The intensity of the weak 1346 keV γ-ray emitted in the decay of 64 Cu was determined as (0.54 ± 0.03)%. Some implications of the precisely determined nuclear data are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges. PMID:26643024

  12. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges.

  13. A new method of detection for a positron emission tomograph using a time of flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gresset, Christian.

    1981-05-01

    In the first chapter, it is shown the advantages of positron radioemitters (β + ) of low period, and the essential characteristics of positron tomographs realized at the present time. The second chapter presents the interest of an original technique of image reconstruction: the time of flight technique. The third chapter describes the characterization methods which were set for verifying the feasibility of cesium fluoride in tomography. Chapter four presents the results obtained by these methods. It appears that the cesium fluoride constitute presently the best positron emission associated to time of flight technique. The hypotheses made on eventual performances of such machines are validated by experiments with phantom. The results obtained with a detector (bismuth germanate) conserves all its interest in skull tomography [fr

  14. Emission tomography with positrons principle, physical performances of a ring detector and quantitative possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, F.; Plummer, D.; Todd Pokropek, A.E.; Loc'h, C.; Comar, D.

    1979-01-01

    Satisfactory qualitative and quantitative data in positron emission tomography requires the use of a well adapted tomographic system. A number of parameters have been identified which can be considered as the critical characteristics for evaluation and intercomparison of such systems. Using these the choice of a single slice ring positron camera could be justified by its physical performance, which is presented and discussed. Series of physical and mathematical simulations allow an appropriate knowledge of such a system, which has been in use for more than a year in a clinical environment. These studies aid to the interpretation of very interesting physiopathologic studies. In principle, a positron tomographic system permits measurement of absolute quantitative concentration values, which are essential for precise metabolic studies. The main sources of error comprising the calibration of the system, the tail effects and the precision for attenuation correction are analysed. When taking in account these errors, a precision of the order of 10% should be obtainable [fr

  15. Ammonia emission factors from broiler litter in barns, in storage, and after land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philip A; Miles, Dana; Burns, Robert; Pote, Dan; Berg, Kess; Choi, In Hag

    2011-01-01

    We measured NH₃ emissions from litter in broiler houses, during storage, and after land application and conducted a mass balance of N in poultry houses. Four state-of-the-art tunnel-ventilated broiler houses in northwest Arkansas were equipped with NH₃ sensors, anemometers, and data loggers to continuously record NH₃ concentrations and ventilation for 1 yr. Gaseous fluxes of NH₃, N₂O, CH₄, and CO₂ from litter were measured. Nitrogen (N) inputs and outputs were quantified. Ammonia emissions during storage and after land application were measured. Ammonia emissions during the flock averaged approximately 15.2 kg per day-house (equivalent to 28.3 g NH₃per bird marketed). Emissions between flocks equaled 9.09 g NH₃ per bird. Hence, in-house NH₃ emissions were 37.5 g NH₃ per bird, or 14.5 g kg(-1) bird marketed (50-d-old birds). The mass balance study showed N inputs for the year to the four houses totaled 71,340 kg N, with inputs from bedding, chicks, and feed equal to 303, 602, and 70,435 kg, respectively (equivalent to 0.60, 1.19, and 139.56 g N per bird). Nitrogen outputs totaled 70,396 kg N. Annual N output from birds marketed, NH₃ emissions, litter or cake, mortality, and NO₂ emissions was 39,485, 15,571, 14,464, 635, and 241 kg N, respectively (equivalent to 78.2, 30.8, 28.7, 1.3, and 0.5 g N per bird). The percent N recovery for the N mass balance study was 98.8%. Ammonia emissions from stacked litter during a 16-d storage period were 172 g Mg(-1) litter, which is equivalent to 0.18 g NH₃ per bird. Ammonia losses from poultry litter broadcast to pastures were 34 kg N ha (equivalent to 15% of total N applied or 7.91 g NH₃ per bird). When the litter was incorporated into the pasture using a new knifing technique, NH₃ losses were virtually zero. The total NH₃ emission factor for broilers measured in this study, which includes losses in-house, during storage, and after land application, was 45.6 g NH₃ per bird marketed. by the

  16. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be helpful in the case of ductal variant prostate cancer when prostate specific membrane antigen ligand positron emission tomography scan is negative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, Louise M.; Wong, David; Yaxley, John

    2017-01-01

    Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen ligand (Ga-68 PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning is emerging as a useful imaging modality for the staging of suspected and known recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer and in staging of newly diagnosed higher grade prostate cancer. However, we have observed at our institution that in some cases of the more aggressive ductal variant, Ga-68 PSMA uptake has sometimes been poor compared with prominent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) avidity seen in F-18 FDG PET/CT, which would suggest that FDG PET/CT scans are important in staging of ductal pattern prostate cancer.

  17. Ammonia emissions from livestock industries in Canada: Feasibility of abatement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carew, Richard

    2010-01-01

    An updated national ammonia (NH 3 ) emissions inventory was employed to study the relationship between NH 3 emissions and livestock industries in Canada. Emissions from animal agriculture accounted for 322 kilotonnes (kt) or 64% of Canadian NH 3 emissions in 2002. Cattle and swine accounted for the bulk of livestock emissions. The provinces of Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan accounted for 28.1%, 22.0%, 18.7%, and 13.1% of total livestock emissions, respectively. Emissions from Ontario and Quebec were attributed to the intensive production of dairy, hogs and poultry. Dairy cattle emissions per hectolitre of milk were higher in Ontario and Quebec than in other provinces, while swine emissions per livestock unit were higher than either beef or dairy cattle. A review of the abatement literature indicated diet manipulation to improve N efficiency and land spreading methods are very effective techniques to lower NH 3 emissions. Future research is required to evaluate the feasibility of biofilters and feces/urine separation methods. - Livestock NH 3 emissions are higher in areas characterized by intensive livestock production with diet manipulation and land spreading offering the greatest potential for NH 3 abatement options.

  18. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Móring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; M. Doherty, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    content of the soil under a urine patch and also soil pH dynamics. The model tests suggest that ammonia volatilization from a urine patch can be affected by the possible restart of urea hydrolysis after a rain event as well as CO2 emission from the soil. The vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange...

  19. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and residue management practices on ammonia emissions from subtropical sugarcane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    mudi, Sanku Datta; Wang, Jim J.; Dodla, Syam Kumar; Arceneaux, Allen; Viator, H. P.

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from soil is a loss of nitrogen (N) nutrient for plant production as well as an issue of air quality, due to the fact that it is an active precursor of airborne particulate matters. Ammonia also acts as a secondary source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission when present in the soil. In this study, the impacts of different sources of N fertilizers and harvest residue management schemes on NH3 emissions from sugarcane production were evaluated based on an active chamber method. The field experiment plots consisting of two sources of N fertilizer (urea and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN)) and two common residue management practices, namely residue retained (RR) and residue burned (RB), were established on a Commerce silt loam. The NH3 volatilized following N fertilizer application was collected in an impinger containing diluted citric acid and was subsequently analyzed using ion chromatography. The NH3 loss was primarily found within 3-4 weeks after N application. Average seasonal soil NH3 flux was significantly greater in urea plots with NH3-N emission factor (EF) twice or more than in UAN plots (2.4-5.6% vs. 1.2-1.7%). The RR residue management scheme had much higher NH3 volatilization than the RB treatment regardless of N fertilizer sources, corresponding to generally higher soil moisture levels in the former. Ammonia-N emissions in N fertilizer-treated sugarcane fields increased with increasing soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) up to 45-55% observed in the field. Both N fertilizer sources and residue management approaches significantly affected NH3 emissions.

  20. Positron emission tomography studies of central receptors in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.; Maziere, B.

    1986-01-01

    Central neurotransmitter systems and receptors are intimately involved in the mechanism of several neurologic and psychiatric disorders. One well-known example is the nigro-striatal dopaminergic system in akinesia of Parkinson's disease. Although neurotransmitter concentration and receptor function can be measured regionally post-mortem, positron tomography (PET) studies can be performed during life and therefore may provide insight into changes at early stages of the disease as well as follow-up data on, and pharmacological modification of, such changes. PET allows to monitor non-invasively the time-course of regional tissue tracer concentration following administration of a radioactive drug. If the latter is known to interact selectively with specific binding sites, it can be used to probe in vivo the regional distribution and affinity of the receptors involved. This principle was first pioneered using 3 H or 14 C-labeled ligands injected intravenously to laboratory animal, but necessitated brain tissue sampling for determination of regional radioactive concentration. The feasibility of the PET paradigm to characterize specific binding in vivo showed that trace amounts of 11 C-labeled flunitrazepam could be displaced specifically from the baboon's brain by a therapeutic load of the unlabeled competitor Lorazepam, indicating that specific in vivo binding of the radioligand to the benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors has taken place

  1. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer: value in primary staging and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerg, L.; Heinisch, M.; Rechberger, E.; Kurz, F.; Klug, R.; Aufschnaiter, M; Hammer, J.; Langsteger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is a encouraging imaging techniques allowing a highly sensitive whole-body search for malignant foci detected by their increased glucose metabolism compared with benign tissues. Several studies are now available that indicate its added value for diagnosis and staging of colorectal cancer. In all, patient management seems to be changed in 20-30 % of patients who undergo fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in addition to standard staging procedures. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is also useful in monitoring radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Regarding preoperative staging of primary colorectal cancer the literature is very limited. (author)

  2. Quantification of absolute myocardial perfusion at rest and during exercise with positron emission tomography after human cardiac transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivokapich, J.; Stevenson, L.W.; Kobashigawa, J.; Huang, S.C.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    The maximal exercise capacity of cardiac transplant recipients is reduced compared with that of normal subjects. To determine if this reduced exercise capacity is related to inadequate myocardial perfusion during exercise, myocardial perfusion was measured noninvasively with use of positron emission tomography and nitrogen (N)-13 ammonia. Twelve transplant recipients with no angiographic evidence of accelerated coronary atherosclerosis were studied. Serial N-13 ammonia imaging was performed at rest and during supine bicycle exercise. The results were compared with those from 10 normal volunteers with a low probability of having cardiac disease. A two-compartment kinetic model for estimating myocardial perfusion was applied to the data. Transplant recipients achieved a significant lower exercise work load than did the volunteers (42 ± 16 vs. 128 ± 22 W), but a higher venous lactate concentration (31.3 ± 14.9 vs. 13.7 ± 4.1 mg/100 ml). Despite the difference in exercise work load, there was no significant difference in the cardiac work achieved by transplant recipients and normal subjects as evidenced by similar rate-pressure products of 24,000 ± 3,400 versus 21,300 ± 2,800 betas/min per mm Hg, respectively. In addition, myocardial blood flow during exercise was not significantly different between the two groups (1.70 ± 0.60 vs. 1.56 ± 0.71 ml/min per g, respectively). This study demonstrates that the myocardial flow response to the physiologic stress of exercise is appropriate in transplant recipients and does not appear to explain the decreased exercise capacity in these patients

  3. Refining a model-based assessment strategy to estimate the ammonia emission from floors in dairy cow houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, Dennis J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission is still high, and agriculture is still the dominant contributor. In The Netherlands, the NH3 emission from dairy cow houses is one of the most important sources. A lot of research has been conducted to understand and model NH3 emission, to measure it, and to reduce it

  4. Characteristics of atmospheric ammonia and its relationship with vehicle emissions in a megacity in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruyu; Ye, Xingnan; Liu, Yuxuan; Li, Haowen; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin; Gao, Wei; Yin, Zi

    2018-06-01

    Atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in haze formation in East China. In this study, long-term measurements of NH3 concentrations were implemented at urban, suburban, and tunnel sites in Shanghai, the largest city in East China. The average monthly ammonia concentrations at the urban site varied from 3.7 ppb to 14.5 ppb and exhibited the highest levels in summer and lowest levels in winter, indicating that the biological emissions and agriculture in the surrounding areas are important contributors. The suburban NH3 levels were significantly higher in autumn compared to those at the urban site, indicating the important contribution of agricultural activities. Regardless of the season, the difference of NH3 concentrations between the tunnel and urban sites remained almost constant. On average, the tunnel NH3 level was three times higher than that of the nearby urban site, indicating strong vehicle NH3 emissions in the tunnel. The tunnel NH3 levels on weekdays were comparable to those on weekends, a result that was in agreement with the daily average traffic volume. It was estimated that the vehicle emissions contributed 12.6-24.6% of the atmospheric NH3 in the urban area and 3.8-7.5% for the whole area of Shanghai. Our results suggest that vehicle NH3 emissions should be considered, although agricultural emissions are still more important for mitigating severe haze pollution during wintertime in the megacities of China.

  5. Assessment of the magnitude of ammonia emissions in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, M. A.; Place, C. J.; Eager, M.; Fowler, D.; Smith, R. I.

    Estimates of ammonia emission in the U.K. have been critically reviewed with the aim of establishing the magnitude and uncertainty of each of the sources. European studies are also reviewed, with the U.K. providing a useful case study to highlight the uncertainties common to all ammonia emission inventories. This analysis of the emission factors and their application to U.K. sources supports an emission of 450 (231-715) Gg NH 3 yr -1. Agricultural activities are confirmed as the major source, providing 406 (215-630) Gg NH 3yr -1 (90% of the total), and therefore dominate uncertainties. Non-agricultural sources include sewage, pets, horses, humans, combustion and wild animals, though these contribute only 44 (16-85) Gg yr -1. Cattle represent the largest single uncertainty, accounting for 245 (119-389) Gg yr -1. The major uncertainties for cattle derive from estimation of the amount of nitrogen (N) excreted, the % N volatilized from land spreading of wastes, and the % N volatilized from stored farm-yard manure. Similar relative uncertainties apply to each of sheep, pigs and poultry, as well as fertilized crops, though these are quantitatively less important. Accounting; for regional differences in livestock demography, emission of 347, 63 and 40 Gg yr -1 are estimated for England & Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, respectively. Though very uncertain, the total is in good agreement with estimates required to balance the U.K. atmospheric NH. budget.

  6. Short-term emissions of ammonia and carbon dioxide from cattle urine contaminated tropical grassland microcosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Deepanjan; Patel, Manoj; Drabar, Reena; Vyas, Manish

    2006-11-01

    The study was designed to understand the emissions of ammonia (NH(3)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from a single cattle urination event on a tropical grassland and underline the significance of the emissions in the context of huge animal population grazing on large pasture areas in some countries. Emissions of ammonia (NH(3)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) were monitored for three weeks from a tropical grassland (dominated by Cynodon dactylon Pers.) microcosm contaminated with cow and buffalo urine. The grassland microcosms were treated with urine (50 and 100 ml of each) only once and irrigated with water once every week. Ammonia was sampled by an automatic sampling system comprising of a vacuum pump, three-way stopcocks and rubber tubing and an impinger containing suitable absorbing solution (H(2)SO(4)), connected to the tubing suitably. The sampled gas, after sucked by the vacuum pump and absorbed in H(2)SO(4), was allowed to enter the closed microcosm again maintaining internal pressure of the microcosm. Carbon dioxide was sampled by absorption in an alkali (NaOH) trap inside the microcosm. Both NH(3) and CO(2) emissions were highly variable temporally and there was no continuous increasing or decreasing emission trend with time. Respectively, 45 and 46% of total NH(3)-N were emitted within first 48 h from 50 and 100 ml cow urine application while the corresponding values for buffalo urine were 34 and 32%. Total NH(3)-N emissions, integrated for sampling days (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 15, 18 and 21st) were 11 and 6% in cow and 8 and 5% in buffalo urine, of the total-N added through 50 and 100 ml urine samples. Carbon dioxide emissions were standardized at 25 degrees C by using a suitable formula which were lower than actual emissions at actual soil temperature (> 25 degrees C). Carbon dioxide emission rates were classified on the basis of soil repiratory classification and classes ranged from moderately low soil activity up to unusually high soil activity, the latter

  7. Unregulated greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions from current technology heavy-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Arvind; Besch, Marc; Carder, Daniel; Oshinuga, Adewale; Pasek, Randall; Hogo, Henry; Gautam, Mridul

    2016-11-01

    The study presents the measurement of carbonyl, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene), ammonia, elemental/organic carbon (EC/OC), and greenhouse gas emissions from modern heavy-duty diesel and natural gas vehicles. Vehicles from different vocations that included goods movement, refuse trucks, and transit buses were tested on driving cycles representative of their duty cycle. The natural gas vehicle technologies included the stoichiometric engine platform equipped with a three-way catalyst and a diesel-like dual-fuel high-pressure direct-injection technology equipped with a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The diesel vehicles were equipped with a DPF and SCR. Results of the study show that the BTEX emissions were below detection limits for both diesel and natural gas vehicles, while carbonyl emissions were observed during cold start and low-temperature operations of the natural gas vehicles. Ammonia emissions of about 1 g/mile were observed from the stoichiometric natural gas vehicles equipped with TWC over all the driving cycles. The tailpipe GWP of the stoichiometric natural gas goods movement application was 7% lower than DPF and SCR equipped diesel. In the case of a refuse truck application the stoichiometric natural gas engine exhibited 22% lower GWP than a diesel vehicle. Tailpipe methane emissions contribute to less than 6% of the total GHG emissions. Modern heavy-duty diesel and natural gas engines are equipped with multiple after-treatment systems and complex control strategies aimed at meeting both the performance standards for the end user and meeting stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emissions regulation. Compared to older technology diesel and natural gas engines, modern engines and after-treatment technology have reduced unregulated emissions to levels close to detection limits. However, brief periods of inefficiencies related to low exhaust thermal energy have been shown to

  8. Basal ganglia disorders studied by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi

    1994-01-01

    Recent development of positron emitting radioligands has made it possible to investigate the alterations of neurotransmitter systems associated with basal ganglia disorders in vivo. The functional integrity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic terminals may be studied with [ 18 F]6-fluoro-L-dopa ([ 18 F]dopa), and striatal dopamine receptor density with suitable PET ligands. [ 18 F]dopa uptake in the striatum (putamen) is markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). [ 18 F]dopa-PET is capable of detecting sub-clinical nigral dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with familial PD and those who become Parkinsonian on conventional doses of dopamine receptor antagonists. While putamen [ 18 F]dopa uptake is reduced to a similar level in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and PD, caudate [ 18 F] dopa uptake is lower in MSA than PD. However, [ 18 F]dopa PET cannot consistently distinguish MSA from PD because individual ranges of caudate [ 18 F]dopa uptake overlap. D 1 and D 2 receptor binding is markedly reduced in the striatum (posterior putamen) of MSA patients. Therefore, dopamine receptor imaging is useful for the differential diagnosis of MSA and PD. Similar marked reductions in putamen and caudate [ 18 F]dopa uptake have been observed in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Moderate reductions in D 2 receptor binding have been reported in the striatum of PSP patients. The reduction in D 2 receptor binding is more prominent in the caudate than putamen. Striatal [ 18 F]dopa uptake is normal or only mildly reduced in patients with dopa responsive dystonia (DRD). D 2 receptor binding is markedly reduced in patients with Huntington's disease, while striatal [ 18 F]dopa uptake is normal or mildly reduced. In summary, PET can demonstrate characteristic patterns of disruption of dopaminergic systems associated with basal ganglia disorders. These PET findings are useful in the differential diagnosis of basal ganglia disorders. (J.P.N.) 55 refs

  9. The environmental risk prediction for Odessa city in the case of ammonia emissions from Odessa Port Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy V. Melnik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the environmental risk prediction for Odessa's citizens in the case of ammonia emissions from Odessa Port Plant. The potential risk of ammonia emission can be calculated by multiplying the probability of an accident and the probability of human health damage. One of the steps in the quantitative risk assessment is the analysis of weather conditions such as wind direction. From 1899 wind-rose analysis shows an increasing the frequency of winds direction which is dangerous for the city. The ammonia concentration in the city can be calculated by the TOXI ver.2.2 method, based on the Gaussian dispersion model for pollutants in the atmosphere. The magnitude of risk was assessed by two methods: the US EPA method, and Integrated Hygienic Method, based on normal probability distribution. The results of the risk assessment for the two methods showed an acceptable risk for Odessa's citizens in the case of ammonia emissions into the atmosphere.

  10. Regional myocardial blood flow, metabolism and function assessed noninvasively by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.; Huang, S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography is a new technique for the noninvasive measure of myocardial blood flow, mechanical function and, in particular, metabolism. The capability of this new study means is due to the technological innovations of the imaging device and the availability of radioactive tracers that are specific for blood flow and metabolism. The device permits recording of cross-sectional images of the left ventricular myocardium that reflect quantitatively regional tracer tissue concentrations. By employing tracer kinetic models this new technique permits the measurement of regional glucose and fatty acid metabolism of the heart. While already an important new tool for investigative studies into cardiac physiology and pathophysiology, the clinical utility of positron emission tomography remains to be defined.

  11. Persistence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities in chronic schizophrenia as determined by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolkin, A.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.; Rotrosen, J.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Cancro, R.

    1985-01-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined by positron emission tomography and the deoxyglucose method in a group of 10 chronic schizophrenic subjects before and after somatic treatment and in eight normal subjects. Before treatment, schizophrenic subjects had markedly lower absolute metabolic activity than did normal controls in both frontal and temporal regions and a trend toward relative hyperactivity in the basal ganglia area. After treatment, their metabolic rates approached those seen in normal subjects in nearly all regions except frontal. Persistence of diminished frontal metabolism was manifested as significant relative hypofrontality. These findings suggest specific loci of aberrant cerebral functioning in chronic schizophrenia and the utility of positron emission tomography in characterizing these abnormalities

  12. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  13. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions

  14. A positron emission tomography study of cardiac sequelae in children with Kawasaki disease, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmochi, Yutaka

    1994-01-01

    This study quantitatively measured regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) and perfusable tissue fraction (pTF) in 25 children (mean age: 17.2±2.7) with Kawasaki disease using positron emission tomography and H 2 15 O. Patients were divided into three groups based on coronary angiographic findings. Group 1 consisted of 11 patients with normal coronary angiograms; Group 2, 7 patients with stenotic coronary lesions. There were no significant differences in MBF and pTF among 5 divided regions on the left ventricular wall. Average MBF at rest in Group 1 was 0.91±0.19 ml/min/g. There was a poor correlation between MBF estimated positron emission tomography and patient's age in Group 1. (r=-0.374, Y=-0.0234X + 1.254: p 2 15 O, to determine the functional capacity of coronary artery lesions and myocardial damage in children with Kawasaki disease. (author)

  15. Performance evaluation of BGO block detectors used in positron emission tomography and a coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Choi, Y.; Lim, K. C.; Lee, M. Y.; Woo, S. K.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, S. E.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the basic performances of the BGO block detectors, which is used in the GE Advance positron emission tomography. The block detector is composed of 36 small BGO crystals coupled to two 2-channel photomultiplier tubes. In this study, we measured the crystal map and the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector. The coincidence signals between the detectors were also obtained using F-18. The intrinsic energy resolution of the block detector was 69% FWHM at 140 keV and 33% FWHM at 511 keV. High quality crystal map and the coincidence signals between the detectors were successfully obtained. The timing resolution of the detectors are being measured. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of developing high performance positron emission tomography

  16. Derisking the Cu-Mediated 18F-Fluorination of Heterocyclic Positron Emission Tomography Radioligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Emer, Enrico; Preshlock, Sean; Schedler, Michael; Tredwell, Matthew; Verhoog, Stefan; Mercier, Joel; Genicot, Christophe; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2017-06-21

    Molecules labeled with fluorine-18 ( 18 F) are used in positron emission tomography to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes in the body. Despite recent advances in the incorporation of 18 F onto arenes, the development of general and efficient approaches to label radioligands necessary for drug discovery programs remains a significant task. This full account describes a derisking approach toward the radiosynthesis of heterocyclic positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands using the copper-mediated 18 F-fluorination of aryl boron reagents with 18 F-fluoride as a model reaction. This approach is based on a study examining how the presence of heterocycles commonly used in drug development affects the efficiency of 18 F-fluorination for a representative aryl boron reagent, and on the labeling of more than 50 (hetero)aryl boronic esters. This set of data allows for the application of this derisking strategy to the successful radiosynthesis of seven structurally complex pharmaceutically relevant heterocycle-containing molecules.

  17. The electronics system for the LBNL positron emission mammography (PEM) camera

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, W W; Baker, K; Jones, W; Lenox, M; Ho, M H; Weng, M

    2001-01-01

    Describes the electronics for a high-performance positron emission mammography (PEM) camera. It is based on the electronics for a human brain positron emission tomography (PET) camera (the Siemens/CTI HRRT), modified to use a detector module that incorporates a photodiode (PD) array. An application-specified integrated circuit (ASIC) services the photodetector (PD) array, amplifying its signal and identifying the crystal of interaction. Another ASIC services the photomultiplier tube (PMT), measuring its output and providing a timing signal. Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and lookup RAMs are used to apply crystal-by-crystal correction factors and measure the energy deposit and the interaction depth (based on the PD/PMT ratio). Additional FPGAs provide event multiplexing, derandomization, coincidence detection, and real-time rebinning. Embedded PC/104 microprocessors provide communication, real-time control, and configure the system. Extensive use of FPGAs make the overall design extremely flexible, all...

  18. A feature point identification method for positron emission particle tracking with multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Cody, E-mail: cwiggin2@vols.utk.edu [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1408 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Santos, Roque [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States); Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Departamento de Ciencias Nucleares (Ecuador); Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States)

    2017-01-21

    A novel detection algorithm for Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) with multiple tracers based on optical feature point identification (FPI) methods is presented. This new method, the FPI method, is compared to a previous multiple PEPT method via analyses of experimental and simulated data. The FPI method outperforms the older method in cases of large particle numbers and fine time resolution. Simulated data show the FPI method to be capable of identifying 100 particles at 0.5 mm average spatial error. Detection error is seen to vary with the inverse square root of the number of lines of response (LORs) used for detection and increases as particle separation decreases. - Highlights: • A new approach to positron emission particle tracking is presented. • Using optical feature point identification analogs, multiple particle tracking is achieved. • Method is compared to previous multiple particle method. • Accuracy and applicability of method is explored.

  19. Regional myocardial blood flow, metabolism and function assessed noninvasively by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.; Huang, S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography is a new technique for the noninvasive measure of myocardial blood flow, mechanical function and, in particular, metabolism. The capability of this new study means is due to the technological innovations of the imaging device and the availability of radioactive tracers that are specific for blood flow and metabolism. The device permits recording of cross-sectional images of the left ventricular myocardium that reflect quantitatively regional tracer tissue concentrations. By employing tracer kinetic models this new technique permits the measurement of regional glucose and fatty acid metabolism of the heart. While already an important new tool for investigative studies into cardiac physiology and pathophysiology, the clinical utility of positron emission tomography remains to be defined

  20. Basal ganglia disorders studied by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-04-01

    Recent development of positron emitting radioligands has made it possible to investigate the alterations of neurotransmitter systems associated with basal ganglia disorders in vivo. The functional integrity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic terminals may be studied with [[sup 18]F]6-fluoro-L-dopa ([[sup 18]F]dopa), and striatal dopamine receptor density with suitable PET ligands. [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake in the striatum (putamen) is markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). [[sup 18]F]dopa-PET is capable of detecting sub-clinical nigral dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with familial PD and those who become Parkinsonian on conventional doses of dopamine receptor antagonists. While putamen [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake is reduced to a similar level in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and PD, caudate [[sup 18]F] dopa uptake is lower in MSA than PD. However, [[sup 18]F]dopa PET cannot consistently distinguish MSA from PD because individual ranges of caudate [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake overlap. D[sub 1] and D[sub 2] receptor binding is markedly reduced in the striatum (posterior putamen) of MSA patients. Therefore, dopamine receptor imaging is useful for the differential diagnosis of MSA and PD. Similar marked reductions in putamen and caudate [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake have been observed in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Moderate reductions in D[sub 2] receptor binding have been reported in the striatum of PSP patients. The reduction in D[sub 2] receptor binding is more prominent in the caudate than putamen. Striatal [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake is normal or only mildly reduced in patients with dopa responsive dystonia (DRD). D[sub 2] receptor binding is markedly reduced in patients with Huntington's disease, while striatal [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake is normal or mildly reduced. In summary, PET can demonstrate characteristic patterns of disruption of dopaminergic systems associated with basal ganglia disorders. (J.P.N.) 55 refs.

  1. Reducing ammonia emission from agriculture using the BATNEEC approach in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    give more cost effective solutions, but it increases the administrative costs and delays the acceptance procedure. The article shows that the BATNEEC implementation approach is successful, although it requires some political and administrative choices to be able to push new technology in a cost......This article looks at how the Best Available Technology Not Entailing Excessive Costs (BATNEEC) can be implemented in practice using the ammonia regulation in Denmark as an example. The reductions of ammonia emissions in Denmark have been achieved mainly through command and control measures....... The analysis in this paper shows how cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) and analysis of the cost for the farmers (affordability) can be used to point out relevant BAT (Best Available Technology) technologies. The article discusses how the cut-off values are to some extent political as it can be difficult to set...

  2. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism during sevoflurane anaesthesia in healthy subjects studied with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlünzen, L; Juul, N; Hansen, K V

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism by which sevoflurane exerts its effects in the human brain remains unknown. In the present study, we quantified the effects of sevoflurane on regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rGMR) in the human brain measured with positron emission tomography. METHODS: Eight...... areas by 48-71% of the baseline (Pbrain metabolic reduction of GMR in all regions...... of the human brain, with the most marked metabolic suppression in the lingual gyrus, thalamus and occipital lobe....

  3. Dynamic positron emission tomography in man using small bismuth germanate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives

  4. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Tuberculosis: Spectrum of Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Behera, Abhishek; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the utility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) imaging to detect spectrum of manifestations in patients with tuberculosis (TB). FDG-PET/CT is a powerful tool for early diagnosis, measuring the extent of disease (staging), and consequently for evaluation of response to therapy in patients with TB.

  5. Positron-emission tomography as a new direction in radiation medicine development (scientometric analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonova, N.O.; Masyich, O.V.; Pavlyichenko, Yu.V.; Shepeljev, A.G.; Kuryilo, Yu.P.; Ponomarenko, T.O.

    2009-01-01

    The contemporary state and prospects of positron-emission tomography (PET) application in diagnosis of cancer diseases are investigated. The comparative analysis of the image of the topical field in Medline and INIS allowed to allocate the zones of intensive investigation of PET efficacy at cancer diseases, investigations of the brain, lungs, heart as well as to establish the peculiarities of the search depending on the features of their search interfaces

  6. Molecular pathology in vulnerable carotid plaques: correlation with [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, M; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Borgwardt, L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Atherosclerosis is recognised as an inflammatory disease, and new diagnostic tools are warranted to evaluate plaque inflammatory activity and risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in vulnerable carotid plaques visualised by positron emission...... tomography (PET). Uptake was correlated to quantitative gene expression of known markers of inflammation and plaque vulnerability. METHODS: Ten patients with recent transient ischaemic attack and carotid artery stenosis (>50%) underwent combined FDG-PET and computed tomography angiography (CTA) the day...

  7. A tumor-targeted polymer theranostics platform for positron emission tomography and fluorescence imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koziolová, Eva; Goel, S.; Chytil, Petr; Janoušková, Olga; Barnhart, T. E.; Cai, W.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 30 (2017), s. 10906-10918 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers * positron emission tomography ( PET ) * fluorescence imaging Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  8. Transcutaneous measurement of the arterial input function in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litton, J.E.; Eriksson, L.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful tool in medical research. Biochemical function can be both precisely localized and quantitatively measured. To achieve reliable quantitation it is necessary to know the time course of activity concentration in the arterial blood during the measurement. In this study the arterial blood curve from the brachial artery is compared to the activity measured in the internal carotid artery with a new transcutaneous detector

  9. Positron Emission Tomography in Prostate Cancer: Summary of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent public health problem worldwide. Over the past decade, there has been tremendous research activity in the potential use of positron emission tomography with a number of radiotracers targeted to various biological aspects of this complex tumor. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis are important contributions to the relevant literature that summarize the evidence while reducing the effect of various sources of bias in the published data. The accumulation of releva...

  10. A promising new mechanism of ionizing radiation detection for positron emission tomography: Modulation of optical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Using conventional scintillation detection, the fundamental limit in positron emission tomography (PET) time resolution is strongly dependent on the inherent temporal variances generated during the scintillation process, yielding an intrinsic physical limit for the coincidence time resolution of around 100 ps. On the other hand, modulation mechanisms of the optical properties of a material exploited in the optical telecommunications industry can be orders of magnitude faster. In this paper we...

  11. A statistical analysis of count normalization methods used in positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, T.J.; Ficke, D.C.; Snyder, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) reconstruction process, annihilation counts are normalized for photon absorption, detector efficiency and detector-pair duty-cycle. Several normalization methods of time-of-flight and conventional systems are analyzed mathematically for count bias and variance. The results of the study have some implications on hardware and software complexity and on image noise and distortion

  12. Positron-emission tomography imaging of long-term shape recognition challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Rosier, A.; Cornette, L.; Dupont, P.; Bormans, G.; Michiels, J.; Mortelmans, L.; Orban, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Long-term visual memory performance was impaired by two types of challenges: a diazepam challenge on acquisition and a sensory challenge on recognition. Using positron-emission tomography regional cerebral blood flow imaging, we studied the effect of these challenges on regional brain activation during the delayed recognition of abstract visual shapes as compared with a baseline fixation task. Both challenges induced a significant decrease in differential activation in the left fusiform gyrus...

  13. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography [PET] in Man Using Small Bismuth Germanate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.; Huesman, R. H.; Cahoon, J. L.

    1982-04-01

    Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives.

  14. A multicrystal two dimensional BGO detector system for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M.E.; Nutt, R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of a new multicrystal detector system as it is implemented in Positron Emission Tomography. The system consists of a 32 x 8 matrix of BGO crystals, a tuned light pipe, and four photomultipliers. The electronics that decodes the position consists of fast preamps, gated integrators, and level comparators. This detector represents a major development toward reducing the cost of PET

  15. Alternative positron emission tomography with non-conventional positron emitters: effects of their physical properties on image quality and potential clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, M.; Stone-Elander, S.; Larsson, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    The increasing amount of clinically relevant information obtained by positron emission tomography (PET), primarily with fluorine-18 labelled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose, has generated a demand for new routes for the widespread and cost-efficient use of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. New dual-head single-photon emission tomography (SPET) cameras are being developed which offer coincidence detection with camera heads lacking a collimator or SPET imaging with specially designed collimators and additional photon shielding. Thus, not only satellite PET imaging units but also nuclear medicine units investing in these new SPET/PET systems need to examine all available alternatives for rational radionuclide supplies from host cyclotrons. This article examines 25 ''alternative'' positron-emitting radionuclides, discusses the impact of their decay properties on image quality and reviews methods for their production as well as for their application in imaging techniques. (orig.)

  16. Emissions of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane during composting of organic household waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsdotter Beck-Friis, Barbro

    2001-01-01

    In Sweden, composting of source-separated organic household waste is increasing, both domestically at the small-scale, and in larger municipal plants. Composting means a microbial decomposition of organic material, which results in the production of environmentally undesirable gases, such as ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and methane (CH 4 ). The aim of this thesis was to study the emissions of NH 3 , N 2 O and CH 4 to the atmosphere during composting of source-separated organic household waste. The studies were conducted in an experimental reactor under constant and controlled conditions and in municipal compost heaps. Emissions of NH 3 , N 2 O and CH 4 occurred at different phases during composting. Ammonia started to volatilise during the shift from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions when short-chained fatty acids were decomposed. Nitrous oxide was only emitted during the first days of composting and later during the cooling phase when nitrate was formed. Methane was only produced during the thermophilic phase. Large municipal compost heaps are a significant source for the production and emission of the greenhouse gases N 2 O and CH 4 . To avoid unwanted gaseous emissions to the atmosphere during composting, gaseous exchange with the atmosphere should be controlled in future composting plants

  17. Positron Emission Tomography in Prostate Cancer: Summary of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent public health problem worldwide. Over the past decade, there has been tremendous research activity in the potential use of positron emission tomography with a number of radiotracers targeted to various biological aspects of this complex tumor. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis are important contributions to the relevant literature that summarize the evidence while reducing the effect of various sources of bias in the published data. The accumulation of relevant data in this clinical setting has recently provided the opportunity for systematic reviews. In this brief article, I summarize the published systematic reviews and meta-analysis of positron emission tomography in prostate cancer. Most robust evidence suggests a probable role for first-line use of positron emission tomography with radiolabeled choline in restating patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer with the diagnostic performance that appears to be positively associated with the serum prostate specific antigen level and velocity. Future systematic reviews will be needed for other emerging radiotracers such as those based on prostate specific membrane antigen and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor.

  18. 2-¹⁸fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for postchemotherapy seminoma residual lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachner, M; Loriot, Y; Gross-Goupil, M

    2012-01-01

    2-¹⁸fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been recommended in international guidelines in the evaluation of postchemotherapy seminoma residuals. Our trial was designed to validate these recommendations in a larger group of patients.......2-¹⁸fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been recommended in international guidelines in the evaluation of postchemotherapy seminoma residuals. Our trial was designed to validate these recommendations in a larger group of patients....

  19. The role of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Stefano; Salgarello, Matteo; Laiti, Silvia; Partelli, Stefano; Castelli, Paola; Spinelli, Antonello E; Tamburrino, Domenico; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    The role of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is debated. We retrospectively assessed the value of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in addition to conventional imaging as a staging modality in pancreatic cancer. (18)Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed in 72 patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma after multi-detector computed tomography positron emission tomography was considered positive for a maximum standardized uptake value >3. Overall, 21% of patients had a maximum standardized uptake value ≤ 3, and 60% of those had undergone neoadjuvant treatment (P=0.0001). Furthermore, 11% of patients were spared unwarranted surgery since positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected metastatic disease. All liver metastases were subsequently identified with contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Sensitivity and specificity of positron emission tomography/computed tomography for distant metastases were 78% and 100%. The median CA19.9 concentration was 48.8 U/mL for the entire cohort and 292 U/mL for metastatic patients (P=0.112). The widespread application of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma seems not justified. It should be considered in selected patients at higher risk of metastatic disease (i.e. CA19.9>200 U/mL) after undergoing other imaging tests. Neoadjuvant treatment is significantly associated with low metabolic activity, limiting the value of positron emission tomography in this setting. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules.......In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  1. Tomography by positrons emission: integral unit to the service of Mexico; Tomografia por emision de positrones: unidad integral al servicio de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez D, F A [Unidad PET-Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The applications of the Positron emission tomography (PET) together with the one radiopharmaceutical 2 - [{sup 18} F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in the area of the medical imaging is expanding quickly and it possesses a bigger impact at the moment in favor of those patient to who suffers an oncological, cardiac or neurological illness in Mexico. (Author)

  2. High-resolution PET [Positron Emission Tomography] for Medical Science Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F.; Derenzo, S. E.; Huesman, R. H.; Jagust, W. J.; Valk, P. E.

    1989-09-01

    One of the unexpected fruits of basic physics research and the computer revolution is the noninvasive imaging power available to today's physician. Technologies that were strictly the province of research scientists only a decade or two ago now serve as the foundations for such standard diagnostic tools as x-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), ultrasound, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, prompted by the needs of both the practicing physician and the clinical researcher, efforts to improve these technologies continue. This booklet endeavors to describe the advantages of achieving high resolution in PET imaging.

  3. Time-of-flight positron emission tomography using optical fiber circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamawaki, Masato; Katsumura, Yousuke; Suzuki, Takenori

    2008-01-01

    The measurement method and system architecture of a new time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) system are proposed. This system collects scintillation light using optical fibers connected directly to scintillators and measures the position of positron annihilation. Many scintillators are placed cylindrically whereby a pair of scintillators detects a pair of γ-rays generated at the positron annihilation point. Optical fiber circuits, most of which are bundles of optical fibers bound clockwise or counterclockwise around the cylinder of scintillators, collect light signals generated by γ-rays. These light signals are amplified by several photomultiplier tubes and processed using a single digital oscilloscope to determine the TOF of the positron annihilation γ-rays. One of the most important factors in the performance of the TOF-PET system is the TOF resolution. When fiber circuits are used for transmitting light signals, the dispersion of light signals and the decrease in light intensity are the major factors in the deterioration of the TOF resolution. The result of the preliminary experiment leads to the conclusion that the use of optical fibers degrades the intensity of light but does not severely degrade the TOF resolution. (author)

  4. Comparison of models used for national agricultural ammonia emission inventories in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidy, B; Webb, J; Misselbrook, T H

    2009-01-01

    Six N-flow models, used to calculate national ammonia (NH3) emissions from agriculture in different European countries, were compared using standard data sets. Scenarios for litter-based systems were run separately for beef cattle and for broilers, with three different levels of model...... of total ammoniacal-N (TAN) (±6% of the mean total), but large differences in NH3 emissions (±24% of the mean). These differences arose from the different approaches to TAN immobilization in litter, other N losses and mineralization in the models. As a result of those differences estimates of TAN available...... at spreading differed by a factor of almost 3. Results of the FF scenario for broilers produced a range of estimates of total changes in TAN (±9% of the mean total), and larger differences in the estimate of NH3 emissions (±17% of the mean). The different approaches among the models to TAN immobilization...

  5. X-ray-based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Paul E; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Beyer, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    A synergy of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners is the use of the CT data for x-ray-based attenuation correction of the PET emission data. Current methods of measuring transmission use positron sources, gamma-ray sources, or x-ray sources. Each of the types of transmission scans involves different trade-offs of noise versus bias, with positron transmission scans having the highest noise but lowest bias, whereas x-ray scans have negligible noise but the potential for increased quantitative errors. The use of x-ray-based attenuation correction, however, has other advantages, including a lack of bias introduced from post-injection transmission scanning, which is an important practical consideration for clinical scanners, as well as reduced scan times. The sensitivity of x-ray-based attenuation correction to artifacts and quantitative errors depends on the method of translating the CT image from the effective x-ray energy of approximately 70 keV to attenuation coefficients at the PET energy of 511 keV. These translation methods are usually based on segmentation and/or scaling techniques. Errors in the PET emission image arise from positional mismatches caused by patient motion or respiration differences between the PET and CT scans; incorrect calculation of attenuation coefficients for CT contrast agents or metallic implants; or keeping the patient's arms in the field of view, which leads to truncation and/or beam-hardening (or x-ray scatter) artifacts. Proper interpretation of PET emission images corrected for attenuation by using the CT image relies on an understanding of the potential artifacts. In cases where an artifact or bias is suspected, careful inspection of all three available images (CT and PET emission with and without attenuation correction) is recommended. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Towards a climate-dependent paradigm of ammonia emission and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M.A.; Reis, S.; Riddick, S.N.; Dragosits, U.; Nemitz, E.; Tang, Y.S.; Braban, C.F.; Vieno, M.; Dore, A.J.; Mitchell, R.F.; Wanless, S.; Daunt, F.; Fowler, D. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Blackall, T.D. [Department of Geography, Strand Campus, Kings College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Theobald, M.R. [Higher Technical School of Agricultural Engineering, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Milford, C. [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Meteorological State Agency of Spain (AEMET), Santa Cruz de Tenerife 38071 (Spain); Flechard, C.R. [INRA, Agrocampus Ouest, UMR 1069 SAS, 65 rue de St. Brieuc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Loubet, B.; Massad, R.; Cellier, P.; Personne, E. [UMR INRA-AgroParisTech Environnement et Grandes Cultures, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Coheur, P.F.; Clarisse, L.; Van Damme, M.; Ngadi, Y. [Spectroscopie de l' atmosphere, Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 50 avenue F. D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Clerbaux, C. [Universite Paris 06, Universite Versailles-St. Quentin, UMR8190, CNRS/INSU, LATMOS-IPSL, Paris (France); Geels, C.; Hertel, O. [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, P.O. Box 358, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Ambelas Skjoeth, C. [National Pollen and Aerobiology Research Unit, University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester WR2 6AJ (United Kingdom); Wichink Kruit, R.J. [TNO, Climate, Air and Sustainability, P.O. Box 80015, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Pinder, R.W.; Bash, J.O.; Walker, J.T. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Durham, NC 27711 (United States); Simpson, D. [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, EMEP MSC-W, P.O. Box 43-Blindern, 0313 Oslo (Norway); Horvath, L. [Plant Ecology Research Group of Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Botany and Ecophysiology, Szent Istvan University, Pater K. utca 1, 2100 Goedoello (Hungary); Misselbrook, T.H. [Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems, North Wyke, Okehampton EX20 2SB (United Kingdom); Bleeker, A. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Dentener, F. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, via Enrico Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); De Vries, W. [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Droevendaalsesteeg 4, 6708 PB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Existing descriptions of bi-directional ammonia (NH3) land-atmosphere exchange incorporate temperature and moisture controls, and are beginning to be used in regional chemical transport models. However, such models have typically applied simpler emission factors to upscale the main NH3 emission terms. While this approach has successfully simulated the main spatial patterns on local to global scales, it fails to address the environment- and climate-dependence of emissions. To handle these issues, we outline the basis for a new modelling paradigm where both NH3 emissions and deposition are calculated online according to diurnal, seasonal and spatial differences in meteorology. We show how measurements reveal a strong, but complex pattern of climatic dependence, which is increasingly being characterized using ground-based NH3 monitoring and satellite observations, while advances in process-based modelling are illustrated for agricultural and natural sources, including a global application for seabird colonies. A future architecture for NH3 emission-deposition modelling is proposed that integrates the spatio-temporal interactions, and provides the necessary foundation to assess the consequences of climate change. Based on available measurements, a first empirical estimate suggests that 5{sup o}C warming would increase emissions by 42 per cent (28-67%). Together with increased anthropogenic activity, global NH3 emissions may increase from 65 (45-85) Tg N in 2008 to reach 132 (89-179) Tg by 2100.

  7. Secondary emission from a CuBe target due to bombardment with parent and fragment ions of ammonia and phosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.D.

    1977-01-01

    The secondary electron emission of the first dynode of a CuBe alloy sixteen dynode electron multiplier has been studied in the course of electron impact ionization studies of ammonia and phosphine. Relative secondary electron emission coefficients have been obtained for the singly and doubly charged parent and fragment ions of ammonia, ammonia-d 3 , phosphine and phosphine-d 3 for kinetic energies of 5,25 and 10,5 keV. It has been found, that in general deuterated ions have smaller γ coefficients, that ammonia ions have larger γ coefficients than corresponding phosphine ions, and that the γ coefficients increase with the complexity of the ion under study. (Auth.)

  8. Ammonia Emissions from agricultural fertilizer in China: From 1978 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, P.

    2015-12-01

    The quantification of ammonia (NH3) emissions is essential to the more accurate quantification of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, improved air quality and the assessment of ammonia-related agricultural policy and climate mitigation strategies. Chinese agricultural fertilizer (CAF), which is widely used in China, is the nation's largest source of NH3 emissions. The quantity, geographic distribution and historical trends of these emissions remain largely uncertain. In this paper, a new CAF NH3 (CAF_NH3) emissions inventory has been compiled that exhibits the following improvements: (1) a 1 ´1 km gridded map on the county level was developed for 2008; (2) a combined bottom-up and top-down method was used for the local correction of emission factors (EFs) and parameters; (3) time trends were derived for 1978-2008 in which the spatial and temporal patterns and the uncertainties associated with the inventory were quantified; and (4) a sensitivity test was performed in which a province-level disaggregated map was compared with CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008. The total CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008 were 8.4 TgNH3·yr-1 (a 6.6-9.8 Tg interquartile range). From 1978 to 2008, annual NH3 emissions fluctuated with three peaks (1987, 1996 and 2005), and total emissions increased from 3.2 to 8.4 Tg at an annual rate of 3.0%. During the study period, the contribution of livestock manure spreading increased from 37.0% to 45.5% because of changing fertilization practices and the rapid increase in egg, milk and meat consumption. The average contribution of synthetic fertilizer, which has a positive effect on crop yields, was approximately 38.3% (minimum: 33.4%; maximum: 42.7%). With rapid urbanization causing a decline in the rural population, the contribution of the rural excrement sector varied widely between 20.3% and 8.5%. The average contributions of cake fertilizer and straw returning were approximately 3.8% and 4.5%, respectively, thus small and stable. Collectively, the CAF NH3

  9. Ammonia emission model for whole farm evaluation of dairy production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotz, C Alan; Montes, Felipe; Hafner, Sasha D; Heber, Albert J; Grant, Richard H

    2014-07-01

    Ammonia (NH) emissions vary considerably among farms as influenced by climate and management. Because emission measurement is difficult and expensive, process-based models provide an alternative for estimating whole farm emissions. A model that simulates the processes of NH formation, speciation, aqueous-gas partitioning, and mass transfer was developed and incorporated in a whole farm simulation model (the Integrated Farm System Model). Farm sources included manure on the floor of the housing facility, manure in storage (if used), field-applied manure, and deposits on pasture (if grazing is used). In a comprehensive evaluation of the model, simulated daily, seasonal, and annual emissions compared well with data measured over 2 yr for five free stall barns and two manure storages on dairy farms in the eastern United States. In a further comparison with published data, simulated and measured barn emissions were similar over differing barn designs, protein feeding levels, and seasons of the year. Simulated emissions from manure storage were also highly correlated with published emission data across locations, seasons, and different storage covers. For field applied manure, the range in simulated annual emissions normally bounded reported mean values for different manure dry matter contents and application methods. Emissions from pastures measured in northern Europe across seasons and fertilization levels were also represented well by the model. After this evaluation, simulations of a representative dairy farm in Pennsylvania illustrated the effects of animal housing and manure management on whole farm emissions and their interactions with greenhouse gas emissions, nitrate leaching, production costs, and farm profitability. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Software development for modeling positrons emission tomograph scanners; Desenvolvimento de um software para modelagem de tomografos por emissao de positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner

    2013-08-01

    The Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is an international platform recognized and used to develop Computational Model Exposure (CME) in the context of Nuclear Medicine, although currently there are dedicated modules for applications in Radiotherapy and Computed Tomography (CT). GATE uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and has a scripting language of its own. The writing of scripts for simulation of a PET scanner in GATE involves a number of interrelated steps, and the accuracy of the simulation is dependent on the correct setup of the geometries involved, since the physical processes depend on them, as well as the modeling of electronic detectors in module Digitizer, for example. The manual implementation of this setup can be a source of errors, especially for users without experience in the field of simulations or without any previous knowledge of a programming language, and also due to the the fact that the modeling process in GATE still remains bounded to LINUX / UNIX based systems, an environment only familiar to a few. This becomes an obstacle for beginners and prevents the use of GATE by a larger number of users interested in optimizing their experiments and/or clinical protocols through a more accessible, fast and friendly application. The objective of this work is therefore to develop a user-friendly software for the modeling of Positron Emission Tomography called GUIGATE (Graphical User Interface for GATE), with specific modules dedicated to quality control in PET scanners. The results exhibit the features available in this first version of GUIGATE, present in a set of windows that allow users to create their input files, perform and display in real time the model and analyze its output file in a single environment, allowing so intuitively access the entire architecture of the GATE simulation and to CERN's data analyzer, the ROOT. (author)

  11. Geneva University - The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    Geneva University École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 14 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11.15 a.m. - Science II, Auditoire 1S081, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography Dr Chiara CASELLA   ETH Zurich   PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is a tool for in-vivo functional imaging, successfully used since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. It is based on the detection of the two coincident 511 keV photons from the annihilation of a positron, emitted from a radiotracer injected into the body. Tomographic analysis of the coincidence data allows for a 3D reconstructed image of the source distribution. The AX-PET experiment proposes a novel geometrical approach for a PET scanner, in which l...

  12. Urease inhibitor for reducing ammonia emissions from an open-lot beef cattle feedyard in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduction of ammonia (NH3) emissions from animal feeding operations is important from the perspective of environmental policy and its impact on agriculture. In laboratory studies, urease inhibitors have been effective in reducing NH3 emissions from beef cattle manure, however there has been little t...

  13. Renewable biocatalyst for swine manure treatment and mitigation of odorous VOCs, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprehensive control of odors, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with swine production is a critical need. The objective of this paper is to review the use of soybean peroxidase (SBP) and peroxides as a manure additive to mitigate emissions of odor...

  14. Validation of CFD simulation for ammonia emissions from an aqueous solution Submitted to Computers and Electronics in Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Elhadidi, B; Khalifa, H E

    2011-01-01

    In order to model and predict ammonia emissions from animal houses, it is important to determine the concentration on the emission surface correctly. In the current literature, Henry’s law is usually used to model the mass transfer through the gas–liquid surface (e.g. manure or aqueous solution)....

  15. Effect of rumen degradable protein balance and forage type on bulk milk urea concentration and emission of ammonia from dairy cow houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duinkerken, van G.; Andre, G.; Smits, M.C.J.; Monteny, G.J.; Sebek, L.B.J.

    2005-01-01

    As the Dutch government and dairy farming sector have given priority to reducing ammonia emission, the effect of diet on the ammonia emission from dairy cow barns was studied. In addition, the usefulness of milk urea content as an indicator of emission reduction was evaluated. An experiment was

  16. High-resolution inventory of ammonia emissions from agricultural fertilizer in China from 1978 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, P.; Liao, Y. J.; Lin, Y. H.; Zhao, C. X.; Yan, C. H.; Cao, M. N.; Wang, G. S.; Luan, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    The quantification of ammonia (NH3) emissions is essential to the more accurate quantification of atmospheric nitrogen deposition, improved air quality and the assessment of ammonia-related agricultural policy and climate mitigation strategies. The quantity, geographic distribution and historical trends of these emissions remain largely uncertain. In this paper, a new Chinese agricultural fertilizer NH3 (CAF_NH3) emissions inventory has been compiled that exhibits the following improvements: (1) a 1 × 1 km gridded map on the county level was developed for 2008; (2) a combined bottom-up and top-down method was used for the local correction of emission factors (EFs) and parameters; (3) the temporal patterns of historical time trends for 1978-2008 were estimated and the uncertainties were quantified for the inventories; and (4) a sensitivity test was performed in which a province-level disaggregated map was compared with CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008. The total CAF_NH3 emissions for 2008 were 8.4 TgNH3 yr-1 (a 6.6-9.8 Tg interquartile range). From 1978 to 2008, annual NH3 emissions fluctuated with three peaks (1987, 1996 and 2005), and total emissions increased from 3.2 to 8.4 Tg at an annual rate of 3.0 %. During the study period, the contribution of livestock manure spreading increased from 37.0 to 45.5 % because of changing fertilization practices and the rapid increase in egg, milk, and meat consumption. The average contribution of synthetic fertilizer, which has a positive effect on crop yields, was approximately 38.3 % (minimum: 33.4 %; maximum: 42.7 %). With rapid urbanization causing a decline in the rural population, the contribution of the rural excrement sector varied widely between 20.3 % and 8.5 %. The average contributions of cake fertilizer and straw returning were approximately 3.8 and 4.5 %, respectively, thus small and stable. Collectively, the CAF_NH3 emissions reflect the nation's agricultural policy to a certain extent. An effective approach to

  17. Carbon-11 and Fluorine-18 Labeled Amino Acid Tracers for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aixia; Liu, Xiang; Tang, Ganghua

    2017-12-01

    Tumor cells have an increased nutritional demand for amino acids(AAs) to satisfy their rapid proliferation. Positron-emitting nuclide labeled AAs are interesting probes and are of great importance for imaging tumors using positron emission tomography (PET). Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled AAs include the [1-11C] amino acids, labeling alpha-C- amino acids, the branched-chain of amino acids and N-substituted carbon-11 labeled amino acids. These tracers target protein synthesis or amino acid(AA) transport, and their uptake mechanism mainly involves AA transport. AA PET tracers have been widely used in clinical settings to image brain tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer, breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review focuses on the fundamental concepts and the uptake mechanism of AAs, AA PET tracers and their clinical applications.

  18. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  19. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed

  20. Brain energy metabolism and dopaminergic function in Huntington's disease measured in vivo using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Quinn, N.; Marsden, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with typical Huntington's disease was investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography. Regional cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction, oxygen and glucose utilization, L-Dopa uptake, and dopamine (D2) receptor binding were measured using several positron-labelled tracers. CT showed slight atrophy of the head of caudate but no cortical atrophy, although distinct frontal lobe dysfunction was present on psychometric testing. Oxygen and glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow were decreased in the striata and to a lesser extent in frontal cortex. Cerebral blood flow was in the low normal range throughout the remainder of the brain. A normal metabolic ratio was found in all regions, since the changes in glucose utilization paralleled those in oxygen consumption. The capacity of the striatum to store dopamine as assessed by L-[ 18 F]-fluorodopa uptake was normal, but dopamine (D2) receptor binding was decreased when compared to normal subjects

  1. Towards a climate-dependent paradigm of ammonia emission and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Mark A.; Reis, Stefan; Riddick, Stuart N.; Dragosits, Ulrike; Nemitz, Eiko; Theobald, Mark R.; Tang, Y. Sim; Braban, Christine F.; Vieno, Massimo; Dore, Anthony J.; Mitchell, Robert F.; Wanless, Sarah; Daunt, Francis; Fowler, David; Blackall, Trevor D.; Milford, Celia; Flechard, Chris R.; Loubet, Benjamin; Massad, Raia; Cellier, Pierre; Personne, Erwan; Coheur, Pierre F.; Clarisse, Lieven; Van Damme, Martin; Ngadi, Yasmine; Clerbaux, Cathy; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla; Hertel, Ole; Wichink Kruit, Roy J.; Pinder, Robert W.; Bash, Jesse O.; Walker, John T.; Simpson, David; Horváth, László; Misselbrook, Tom H.; Bleeker, Albert; Dentener, Frank; de Vries, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Existing descriptions of bi-directional ammonia (NH3) land–atmosphere exchange incorporate temperature and moisture controls, and are beginning to be used in regional chemical transport models. However, such models have typically applied simpler emission factors to upscale the main NH3 emission terms. While this approach has successfully simulated the main spatial patterns on local to global scales, it fails to address the environment- and climate-dependence of emissions. To handle these issues, we outline the basis for a new modelling paradigm where both NH3 emissions and deposition are calculated online according to diurnal, seasonal and spatial differences in meteorology. We show how measurements reveal a strong, but complex pattern of climatic dependence, which is increasingly being characterized using ground-based NH3 monitoring and satellite observations, while advances in process-based modelling are illustrated for agricultural and natural sources, including a global application for seabird colonies. A future architecture for NH3 emission–deposition modelling is proposed that integrates the spatio-temporal interactions, and provides the necessary foundation to assess the consequences of climate change. Based on available measurements, a first empirical estimate suggests that 5°C warming would increase emissions by 42 per cent (28–67%). Together with increased anthropogenic activity, global NH3 emissions may increase from 65 (45–85) Tg N in 2008 to reach 132 (89–179) Tg by 2100. PMID:23713128

  2. Agricultural ammonia emissions in China: reconciling bottom-up and top-down estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Current estimates of agricultural ammonia (NH3 emissions in China differ by more than a factor of 2, hindering our understanding of their environmental consequences. Here we apply both bottom-up statistical and top-down inversion methods to quantify NH3 emissions from agriculture in China for the year 2008. We first assimilate satellite observations of NH3 column concentration from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES using the GEOS-Chem adjoint model to optimize Chinese anthropogenic NH3 emissions at the 1∕2°  ×  2∕3° horizontal resolution for March–October 2008. Optimized emissions show a strong summer peak, with emissions about 50 % higher in summer than spring and fall, which is underestimated in current bottom-up NH3 emission estimates. To reconcile the latter with the top-down results, we revisit the processes of agricultural NH3 emissions and develop an improved bottom-up inventory of Chinese NH3 emissions from fertilizer application and livestock waste at the 1∕2°  ×  2∕3° resolution. Our bottom-up emission inventory includes more detailed information on crop-specific fertilizer application practices and better accounts for meteorological modulation of NH3 emission factors in China. We find that annual anthropogenic NH3 emissions are 11.7 Tg for 2008, with 5.05 Tg from fertilizer application and 5.31 Tg from livestock waste. The two sources together account for 88 % of total anthropogenic NH3 emissions in China. Our bottom-up emission estimates also show a distinct seasonality peaking in summer, consistent with top-down results from the satellite-based inversion. Further evaluations using surface network measurements show that the model driven by our bottom-up emissions reproduces the observed spatial and seasonal variations of NH3 gas concentrations and ammonium (NH4+ wet deposition fluxes over China well, providing additional credibility to the improvements we have made to our

  3. Assessment of frequent litter amendment application on ammonia emission from broilers operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Lin, Chongyang; Collier, Stephen; Brown, William; White-Hansen, Susan

    2013-04-01

    Litter amendments have been used to control the ammonia (NH3) emission from the broiler litter during the brooding period. One of the commercially available litter amendments, sodium bisulfate, was frequently applied on the litter with two different rates on weekly basis in a laboratory setup and with a single rate on biweekly basis under field conditions. Repeated application ofsodium bisulfate led to significant reduction in NH3 emissions from broilers. The magnitude of NH3 emission reduction increases with the application rate of sodium bisulfate. The reduction rates of cumulative emissions with 366 g/wk-m2 (75 lb/wk-1000 ft) rate (from 14% to 64.5%) were higher than the reduction rate of 183 g/wk-m2 (37.5 lb/wk-1000 ft2) rate (from 0% to 55%) from 28 to 61 days of age. The cumulative NH3 emission was reduced by 51.7% with 244 g/2 wk-m2 (50 lb/2 wk-1000 ft2) rate over a three-flockperiod (8-wk average grow-out per flock) under field production conditions. Sodium bisulfate application showed no significant difference on body weight and feed conversion efficiency. However, footpad quality was significantly improved by sodium bisulfate application. Litter pH and ammonia nitrogen level of the litter were decreased by sodium bisulfate application with both rates. Organic and total nitrogen contents in the litter were higher, whereas less nitrogen was emitted as NH3. The laboratory-scale findings of emission reduction by the additives should be considered to be preliminary if the additives are to be applied under commercial production settings. This work demonstrated that frequent litter amendment application can be used to reduce NH3 emissions from broiler houses, with no adverse effect on the animal production performances. The NH3 reduction rates could vary with different application frequencies and rates. Using litter amendment during broiler grow-out to lower NH3 emissions should be applicable to boiler production systems. The results of this study also

  4. Low frequency aeration of pig slurry affects slurry characteristics and emissions of greenhouse gases and ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Salvador; Hunt, John; Misselbrook, Tom H

    2017-07-01

    Low frequency aeration of slurries may reduce ammonia (NH 3 ) and methane (CH 4 ) emissions without increasing nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions. The aim of this study was to quantify this potential reduction and to establish the underlying mechanisms. A batch experiment was designed with 6 tanks with 1 m 3 of pig slurry each. After an initial phase of 7 days when none of the tanks were aerated, a second phase of 4 weeks subjected three of the tanks to aeration (2 min every 6 h, airflow 10 m 3  h -1 ), whereas the other three tanks remained as a control. A final phase of 9 days was established with no aeration in any tank. Emissions of NH 3 , CH 4 , carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and N 2 O were measured. In the initial phase no differences in emissions were detected, but during the second phase aeration increased NH 3 emissions by 20% with respect to the controls (8.48 vs. 7.07 g m -3  [slurry] d -1 , P emissions were 40% lower in the aerated tanks (2.04 vs. 3.39 g m -3  [slurry] d -1 , P emissions remained after the aeration phase had finished. No effect was detected for CO 2 , and no relevant N 2 O emissions were detected during the experiment. Our results demonstrate that low frequency aeration of stored pig slurry increases slurry pH and increases NH 3 emissions.

  5. Air emissions of ammonia and methane from livestock operations: valuation and policy options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Burtraw, Dallas; Palmer, Karen; Siikamäki, Juha

    2008-09-01

    The animal husbandry industry is a major emitter of ammonia (NH3), which is a precursor of fine particulate matter (PM2.5)--arguably, the number-one environment-related public health threat facing the nation. The industry is also a major emitter of methane (CH4), which is an important greenhouse gas (GHG). We present an integrated process model of the engineering economics of technologies to reduce NH3 and CH4 emissions at dairy operations in California. Three policy options are explored: PM offset credits for NH3 control, GHG offset credits for CH4 control, and expanded net metering policies to provide revenue for the sale of electricity generated from captured methane (CH4) gas. Individually these policies vary substantially in the economic incentives they provide for farm operators to reduce emissions. We report on initial steps to fully develop the integrated process model that will provide guidance for policy-makers.

  6. Ammonia Emission and Deposition in Scotland and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sutton

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3 in Scotland is livestock agriculture, which accounts for 85% of emissions. The local magnitude of emissions therefore depends on livestock density, type, and management, with major differences occurring in various parts of Scotland. Local differences in agricultural activities therefore result in a wide range of NH3 emissions, ranging from less than 0.2 kg N ha−1 year−1 in remote areas of the Scottish Highlands to over 100 kg N ha−1 year−1 in areas with intensive poultry farming. Scotland can be divided loosely into upland and lowland areas, with NH3 emission being less than and more than 5 kg N ha−1 year−1, respectively.Many semi-natural ecosystems in Scotland are vulnerable to nitrogen deposition, including bogs, moorlands, and the woodland ground flora. Because NH3 emissions occur in the rural environment, the local deposition to sensitive ecosystems may be large, making it essential to assess the spatial distribution of NH3 emissions and deposition. A spatial model is applied here to map NH3 emissions and these estimates are applied in atmospheric dispersion and deposition models to estimate atmospheric concentrations of NH3 and NH4+, dry deposition of NH3, and wet deposition of NHx. Although there is a high level of local variability, modelled NH3 concentrations show good agreement with the National Ammonia Monitoring Network, while wet deposition is largest at high altitude sites in the south and west of Scotland. Comparison of the modelled NHx deposition fields with estimated thresholds for environmental effects (“critical loads” shows that thresholds are exceeded across most of lowland Scotland and the Southern Uplands. Only in the cleanest parts of the north and west is nitrogen deposition not a cause for concern. Given that the most intense effects occur within a few kilometres of sources, it is suggested that local spatial abatement policies would be a useful complement to

  7. High-resolution ammonia emissions inventories in Fujian, China, 2009-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Yin-Ju; Schwab, James J.; Li, Yang-Fan; Liu, Yuan-Long; Yuan, Chung-Shin

    2017-08-01

    A high-resolution NH3 emission inventory was developed based on the corrected emission factors and county-level activity data. To provide model-ready emission input, the NH3 emission inventory was gridded for the modeling domain at 1 × 1 km resolution using source-based spatial surrogates and a GIS system. The best estimate of total NH3 emission for the province was 228.02 kt in 2015 with a percentage uncertainty of ±16.3%. Four major contributors were farmland ecosystem, livestock wastes, humans and waste treatment, which contributed 39.4%, 43.1%, 4.9%, and 4.2% of the total emissions, respectively. The averaged NH3 emission density for the whole region was 1.88 t km-2 yr-1 and the higher values were found in coastal areas with higher dense populations. The seasonal patterns, with higher emissions in summer, were consistent with the patterns of temperature and planting practices. From 2009 to 2015, annual NH3 emissions increased from 218.49 kt to 228.02 kt. All of these changes are insignificant compared to the estimated overall uncertainties in the analysis, but indicative of changes in the source categories over this period. Between 2009 and 2015, the largest changes occurred in human emissions and waste treatment plants, which were consistent with the process of rapid urbanization. Meanwhile, the decrease of emissions from pigs was slightly higher than the increased emissions from broilers and the increased emissions from meat goats and beef cattle due to the combine effects of increasingly stringent environmental requirements for pig farms and shift away from pork consumption to beef, chicken and mutton. The validity of the estimates was further evaluated using uncertainty analysis, comparison with previous studies, and correlation analysis between emission density and observed ground ammonia. The inventories reflect the changes in economic progress and environmental protection and can provide scientific basis for the establishment of effective PM2.5 control

  8. Modeling Spatial and Temporal Variability in Ammonia Emissions from Agricultural Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Koloutsou-Vakakis, S.; Rood, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3), is an important component of the reactive nitrogen cycle and a precursor to formation of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). Predicting regional PM concentrations and deposition of nitrogen species to ecosystems requires representative emission inventories. Emission inventories have traditionally been developed using top down approaches and more recently from data assimilation based on satellite and ground based ambient concentrations and wet deposition data. The National Emission Inventory (NEI) indicates agricultural fertilization as the predominant contributor (56%) to NH3 emissions in Midwest USA, in 2002. However, due to limited understanding of the complex interactions between fertilizer usage, farm practices, soil and meteorological conditions and absence of detailed statistical data, such emission estimates are currently based on generic emission factors, time-averaged temporal factors and coarse spatial resolution. Given the significance of this source, our study focuses on developing an improved NH3 emission inventory for agricultural fertilization at finer spatial and temporal scales for air quality modeling studies. Firstly, a high-spatial resolution 4 km x 4 km NH3 emission inventory for agricultural fertilization has been developed for Illinois by modifying spatial allocation of emissions based on combining crop-specific fertilization rates with cropland distribution in the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions model. Net emission estimates of our method are within 2% of NEI, since both methods are constrained by fertilizer sales data. However, we identified localized crop-specific NH3 emission hotspots at sub-county resolutions absent in NEI. Secondly, we have adopted the use of the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) Biogeochemistry model to simulate the physical and chemical processes that control volatilization of nitrogen as NH3 to the atmosphere after fertilizer application and resolve the variability at the hourly scale

  9. Ammonia emissions from urea application to permanent pasture on a volcanic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, F.; Martínez-Lagos, J.; Alfaro, M.; Misselbrook, T.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture is the largest source of ammonia (NH3) emission to the atmosphere, deriving mainly from livestock urine and manures, but fertilizer applications to pastures and crops also represent an important source. In Chile, where agriculture and cattle production are important activities (accounting for 4.5% of GDP along with the forestry sector), there are very few published data regarding NH3 emissions from pasture and crop fertilization. This study aimed to provide the first empirical field data for Chile on N losses due to NH3 volatilization following urea application to permanent pasture on a volcanic soil and to assess the influence of environmental conditions on emissions. Four field experiments were carried out on a volcanic acid soil using the micrometeorological integrated horizontal flux (IHF) mass balance method. Measurements were made in winter 2005 and 2007, and spring 2007 and 2008 following urea N fertilization to a permanent pasture at a rate equivalent to 100 kg N ha-1. Cumulative NH3 emissions over the measurement period were 1.4 and 7.7 kg N ha-1 for winter applications, and 12.2 and 26.7 kg N ha-1 for spring dressings. These N losses due to NH3 volatilization are within the range of emissions reported elsewhere. Consideration of urea application timing in Chile, with regards to weather and soil conditions, could have important consequences on minimising potential N losses via volatilization with associated financial benefits to farmers.

  10. Noninvasive assessment of canine myocardial oxidative metabolism with carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.A.; Myears, D.W.; Bergmann, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Noninvasive quantification of regional myocardial metabolism would be highly desirable to evaluate pathogenetic mechanisms of heart disease and their response to therapy. It was previously demonstrated that the metabolism of radiolabeled acetate, a readily utilized myocardial substrate predominantly metabolized to carbon dioxide (CO2) by way of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, provides a good index of oxidative metabolism in isolated perfused rabbit hearts because of tight coupling between the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In the present study, in a prelude to human studies, the relation between myocardial clearance of carbon-11 (11C)-labeled acetate and myocardial oxygen consumption was characterized in eight intact dogs using positron emission tomography. Anesthetized dogs were studied during baseline conditions and again during either high or low work states induced pharmacologically. High myocardial extraction and rapid blood clearance of tracer yielded myocardial images of excellent quality. The turnover (clearance) of 11C radioactivity from the myocardium was biexponential with the mean half-time of the dominant rapid phase averaging 5.4 +/- 2.2, 2.8 +/- 1.3 and 11.1 +/- 1.3 min in control, high and low work load studies, respectively. No significant difference was found between the rate of clearance of 11C radioactivity from the myocardium measured noninvasively with positron emission tomography and the myocardial efflux of 11CO2 measured directly from the coronary sinus. The rate of clearance of the 11C radioactivity from the heart correlated closely with myocardial oxygen consumption (r = 0.90, p less than 0.001) as well as with the rate-pressure product (r = 0.95, p less than 0.001). Hence, the rate of oxidation of 11C-acetate can be determined noninvasively with positron emission tomography, providing a quantitative index of oxidative metabolism under diverse conditions

  11. Biochar to reduce ammonia emissions in gaseous and liquid phase during composting of poultry manure with wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczak, Damian; Malińska, Krystyna; Czekała, Wojciech; Cáceres, Rafaela; Lewicki, Andrzej; Dach, Jacek

    2017-08-01

    Composting of poultry manure which is high in N and dense in structure can cause several problems including significant N losses in the form of NH 3 through volatilization. Biochar due to its recalcitrance and sorption properties can be used in composting as a bulking agent and/or amendment. The addition of a bulking agent to high moisture raw materials can assure optimal moisture content and enough air-filled porosity but not necessarily the C/N ratio. Therefore, amendment of low C/N composting mixtures with biochar at low rates can have a positive effect on composting dynamics. This work aimed at evaluating the effect of selected doses of wood derived biochar amendment (0%, 5% and 10%, wet weight) to poultry manure (P) mixed with wheat straw (S) (in the ratio of 1:0.4 on wet weight) on the total ammonia emissions (including gaseous emissions of ammonia and liquid emissions of ammonium in the collected condensate and leachate) during composting. The process was performed in 165L laboratory scale composting reactors for 42days. The addition of 5% and 10% of biochar reduced gaseous ammonia emission by 30% and 44%, respectively. According to the obtained results, the measure of emission through the condensate would be necessary to assess the impact of the total ammonia emission during the composting process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. FEASIBILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF DOSE DISTRIBUTION IN PROTON BEAM CANCER THERAPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEEBE-WANG, J.J.; DILMANIAN, F.A.; PEGGS, S.G.; SCHLYEER, D.J.; VASKA, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proton therapy is a treatment modality of increasing utility in clinical radiation oncology mostly because its dose distribution conforms more tightly to the target volume than x-ray radiation therapy. One important feature of proton therapy is that it produces a small amount of positron-emitting isotopes along the beam-path through the non-elastic nuclear interaction of protons with target nuclei such as 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O. These radioisotopes, mainly 11 C, 13 N and 15 O, allow imaging the therapy dose distribution using positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting PET images provide a powerful tool for quality assurance of the treatment, especially when treating inhomogeneous organs such as the lungs or the head-and-neck, where the calculation of the dose distribution for treatment planning is more difficult. This paper uses Monte Carlo simulations to predict the yield of positron emitters produced by a 250 MeV proton beam, and to simulate the productions of the image in a clinical PET scanner

  13. Basic concepts on positron emission tomography in oncology and pediatric peculiarities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giammarile, F.; Pellet, O.

    2002-01-01

    (Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an old functional imaging method, pertaining to the nuclear medicine field, based on the utilisation of positrons emitting nuclei, fixed on targeted molecules. Available since the Seventies, the clinical impact of PET grows daily, particularly in oncology. This method rests on the coincidence detection of the photons issued by the annihilation of the positron. It can be carried out on dedicated scans, equipped with a crown of detectors (PET camera) or on classical cameras whose crystal and electronic system has been adapted CDET camera). The 2-deoxy-2 fluoro-D-glucose marked with fluorine 18 [18FDG or FDG is a glucose analogue. Its cellular uptake uses the facilitated transport of glucose but its metabolism is partial because, contrary to this one, it remains within the cell. This allows functional studies (evaluation of glucose metabolism) on the cell. FDG uptake is thus increased under the pathological conditions comprising an increase in the consumption of glucose either by increase in glycolysis (malignant tumoral tissue) or by increase in the only anaerobic cycle (ischaemia). Consequently, this diagnostic method identifies in vivo the hyper-metabolism of malignant cells and provides a quantification of the tumoral glycolysis, during and after treatment. In Paediatrics, its diffusion and its use in clinical routine, are currently limited, because of the limited availability of the equipment. It is probable that with the awaited rise of PET in France, the paediatric applications will also see their place increasing in the diagnostic strategy of cancer. (authors)

  14. Hard photon emission from high energy electrons and positrons in single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajer, V.N.; Katkov, V.M.; Strakhovenko, V.M.

    1991-01-01

    A radiation of electrons and positrons in single crystals in coherent bremsstrahlung (CBS) region has been considered for the case when CBS has the most hard spectrum. Under this condition a particle moves near a crystalline plane (in fcc(d) crystal for axis (001) this is the plane (110)) and influence of the continuous plane potential should be taken into account. This potential gives additional contribution in soft part of the spectrum and affects on hard photon emission. Observation of this phenomena at high energy is discussed. 14 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Caffeine and human cerebral blood flow: A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, O.G.; Modell, J.G.; Hariharan, M.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify the effect of caffeine on whole brain and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans. A mean dose of 250 mg of caffeine produced approximately a 30% decrease in whole brain CBF; regional differences in caffeine effect were not observed. Pre-caffeine CBF strongly influenced the magnitude of the caffeine-induced decrease. Caffeine decreased p a CO 2 and increased systolic blood pressure significantly; the change in p a CO 2 did not account for the change in CBF. Smaller increases in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine, and subjectively reported anxiety were also observed

  16. Human hemispheric infarction studied by positron emission tomography and the 150 continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.-C.; Bousser, M.G.; Comar, D.; Kellershohn, C.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers an entirely new approach to the study of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemic disorders. This is so because for the first time it is possible to obtain functional tomographic images that represent cerebral perfusion and metabolism in a regional basis. We report here a study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction by means of the 15 O inhalation technique in a large number of human hemispheric infarctions. PET imaging with this non-invasive technique has permitted the description of hitherto unreported focal patterns of changes in the CBF/EO2 couple that may have important pathophysiologic and prognostic implications

  17. The potential application of silver and positron emission tomography for in vivo dosimetry during radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders T; Hansen, Søren B; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2007-01-01

    of absorbed dose per gram of silver. This demonstrates that it is possible to derive absorbed doses from the radioactivity induced in silver by radiation when measured with the PET scanner. Even though the physical basis for this method is found to be sound, its application, for instance to perform quality......The possible use of silver as a material for in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy was investigated. The investigation was carried out using a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, two clinical accelerators and a phantom with silver implants. The phantom was irradiated several times to doses...

  18. Metabolic and hemodynamic evaluation of brain metastases from small cell lung cancer with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Andersen, P; Daugaard, G

    1998-01-01

    for studies of metabolic and hemodynamic features. This study was performed to determine regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglu), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in brain metastases from small cell lung cancer and the surrounding brain. Tumor r......Brain metastases from small cell lung cancer respond to chemotherapy, but response duration is short and the intracerebral concentration of chemotherapy may be too low because of the characteristics of the blood-brain barrier. Positron emission tomography has been applied in a variety of tumors...

  19. Positron emission mammography in breast cancer presurgical planning: comparisons with magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Schilling, Kathy; Narayanan, Deepa; Kalinyak, Judith E.; The, Juliette; Velasquez, Maria Victoria; Kahn, Simone; Saady, Matthew; Mahal, Ravinder; Chrystal, Larraine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission mammography (PEM) with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a presurgical imaging and planning option for index and ipsilateral lesions in patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven breast cancer. Methods Two hundred and eight women >25 years of age (median age = 59.7 ± 14.1 years) with biopsy-proven primary breast cancer enrolled in this prospective, si...

  20. Recommendations for measurement of tumour vascularity with positron emission tomography in early phase clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboagye, Eric O.; Kenny, Laura M.; Myers, Melvyn; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Fleming, Ian N.; Beer, Ambros J.; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Visvikis, Dimitris; Gee, Antony D.; Groves, Ashley M.; Cook, Gary J.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Clarke, Larry

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of drug pharmacodynamics and early tumour response are integral to current clinical trials of novel cancer therapeutics to explain or predict long term clinical benefit or to confirm dose selection. Tumour vascularity assessment by positron emission tomography could be viewed as a generic pharmacodynamic endpoint or tool for monitoring response to treatment. This review discusses methods for semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of tumour vascularity. The radioligands and radiotracers range from direct physiological functional tracers like [ 15 O]-water to macromolecular probes targeting integrin receptors expressed on neovasculature. Finally we make recommendations on ways to incorporate such measurements of tumour vascularity into early clinical trials of novel therapeutics. (orig.)

  1. Distributed Microprocessor Automation Network for Synthesizing Radiotracers Used in Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. A. G.; Alexoff, D. L.; Wolf, A. P.

    1984-09-01

    This presentation describes an evolving distributed microprocessor network for automating the routine production synthesis of radiotracers used in Positron Emission Tomography. We first present a brief overview of the PET method for measuring biological function, and then outline the general procedure for producing a radiotracer. The paper identifies several reasons for our automating the syntheses of these compounds. There is a description of the distributed microprocessor network architecture chosen and the rationale for that choice. Finally, we speculate about how this network may be exploited to extend the power of the PET method from the large university or National Laboratory to the biomedical research and clinical community at large. (DT)

  2. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylam, Karen Juul; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Pedersen, Lars Møller

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive and potentially curable type of lymphoma. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is part of clinical routine for DLBCL in most hospitals and also recommended for staging and end-of-therapy evaluation. FDG......-PET/computed tomography (CT) is able to identify nodal and extranodal sites with greater accuracy than CT alone. Little evidence supports the use of surveillance FDG-PET imaging in the follow-up setting because of high rates of false-positive scans and because most studies are retrospective. This article discusses FDG...

  3. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography findings in a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram; Shah, Hardik

    2013-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGNP) is an uncommon condition characterized by chronic suppurative renal inflammation that leads to progressive parenchymal destruction. This condition can clinically present as recurrent urinary tract infections, flank pain, hematuria, and occasionally sepsis, and weight loss. This condition is usually associated with obstructing renal calculus. We present 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18-FDG PET/CT) findings in an elderly male suffering from pyrexia and weight loss and suspected urinary tract infection. PET/CT findings in this case lead to diagnosis of XGNP. This diagnosis should be kept in mind while evaluating similar symptoms and PET/CT scan findings. PMID:24019680

  4. Time stamp generation with inverse FIR filters for Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namias, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Photon coincidence detection is the process by which Positron Emission Tomography (PET) works. This requires the determination of the time of impact of each coincident photon at the detector system, also known as time stamp. In this work, the timestamp was generated by means of digital time-domain deconvolution with FIR filters for a INa(Tl) based system. The detector deadtime was reduced from 350 ns to 175 ns while preserving the system's energy resolution and a direct relation between the amount of light collected and the temporal resolution was found.(author)

  5. Positron Emission Tomography-Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0795, to support the DOE decision to provide a grant of $7,953,600 to be used in support of a proposed Positron Emission Tomography Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan. Based upon the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affected the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  6. Risk of malignancy in thyroid incidentalomas detected by (18)f-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Brix, Thomas Heiberg

    2012-01-01

    Background: The expanding use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) has led to the identification of increasing numbers of patients with an incidentaloma in the thyroid gland. We aimed to review the proportion of incidental thyroid cancers found by (18)F-FDG PET...... uptake, 7 of whom (4.4%) had thyroid malignancy. In the eight studies reporting individual maximum standardized uptake values (SUV(max)), the mean SUV(max) was 4.8 (standard deviation [SD] 3.1) and 6.9 (SD 4.7) in benign and malignant lesions, respectively (p...

  7. Clinical correlates of decreased anteroposterior metabolic gradients in positron emission tomography (PET) of schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLisi, L.E.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Holcomb, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The finding in schizophrenic patients of a reversal of the normal frontal to posterior pattern of brain metabolic activity with positron emission tomography (PET) is of interest, but its relevance to psychopathology is unknown. Using PET, the authors studied 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Although eight of the 21 patients and only one of the control subjects showed a relatively lower anteroposterior metabolic gradient, no clinical correlates of this finding were noted. In addition, cerebral atrophy, as determined by CAT scan, was not associated with this aberrant metabolic pattern

  8. Implementation of sum-peak method for standardization of positron emission radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Oliveira, Mercia Liane de; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is being increasingly recognized as an important quantitative imaging tool for diagnosis and assessing response to therapy. As correct dose administration plays a crucial part in nuclear medicine, it is important that the instruments used to assay the activity of the short-lived radionuclides are calibrated accurately, with traceability to the national or international standards. The sum-peak method has been widely used for radionuclide standardization. The purpose of this study was to implement the methodology for standardization of PET radiopharmaceuticals at the Regional Center for Nuclear Sciences of the Northeast (CRCN-NE). (author)

  9. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    We continue our focus to develop more cost effective and efficient means for producing new functionally specific tracers and more simple, less expensive, means for acquiring and interpreting quantitative data. These improved processes are required for the future growth of positron emission tomography (PET) as a sophisticated research meeting and for the transfer of this technology to clinical use. Our approach concentrates on two separate yet related areas, radiosynthesis and data analysis. The program is divided into four subprojects, the first pair related to radiosynthesis, and the second pair related to data analysis. Progress during the past project year has been excellent in both accomplishment and publication record. 26 refs

  10. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography ? computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Biz, Aline Navega; Caetano, Ros?ngela

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer.METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazi...

  11. Positron emission tomography - a new technique for studies of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Lars; Dahlbom, Magnus; Widen, Lennart

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important tool to study the central nervous system. Examples of such studies are cerebral blood flow and metabolism and determination of receptor characteristics of the brain. In the following the basic principles and the physics behind PET are given. Different aspects are discussed such as detector design, image reconstruction and data analyses. Since quantification is essential in PET, data have to be corrected for absorption, scatter and random coincidences. These corrections and their influence on image data are discussed. A review of state-of-the-art PET research of the brain is given. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction of positron emission tomography data in PET/MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-01-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view (FoV). MR-AC methods can be divided into three main categories: segmentation-, atlas- and PET-based. This review aims to...

  13. Positron Emission Tomography-Scanner at Children's Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0795, to support the DOE decision to provide a grant of $7,953,600 to be used in support of a proposed Positron Emission Tomography Scanner at Children's Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan. Based upon the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affected the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  14. New developments in molecular imaging: positron emission tomography time-of-flight (TOF-PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, P.; Couce, B.; Iglesias, A.; Lois, C.

    2011-01-01

    Positron Emission tomography (PET) in increasingly being used in oncology for the diagnosis and staging of disease, as well as in monitoring response to therapy. One of the last advances in PET is the incorporation of Time-of-Flight (TOF) information, which improves the tomographic reconstruction process and subsequently the quality of the final image. In this work, we explain the principles of PET and the fundamentals of TOF-PET. Clinical images are shown in order to illustrate how TOF-PET improves the detectability of small lesions, particularly in patients with high body mass index. (Author) 20 refs

  15. Positron emission tomography with 68Ga-EDTA in the diagnosis and localization of CSF fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrand, G.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.; Edner, G.; Widen, L.

    1982-01-01

    Five patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea were investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) to localize the site of a CSF fistula. After intrathecal injection of 10 MBq of 68 Ga-EDTA, radioactivity was demonstrated in the basal cisterns. In three cases, the site of the fistula was visualized with PET. It is not always possible to demonstrate a CSF leakage with CT cisternography (CTC) using metrizamide, particularly in cases with minute fistulas or intermittent CSF rhinorrhea. With further experience and improved PET techniques, it may be possible to detect even very small fistulas

  16. Evidence for a dopaminergic deficit in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis on positron emission scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hirohide; Snow, B.J.; Bhatt, M.H.; Peppard, R.; Eisen, A.; Calne, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Although rare, the chronic neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and idiopathic parkinsonism coexist to a greater degree than expected by chance. This suggests that patients with ALS may have subclinical lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. To study this hypothesis, the authors did positron emission tomography with 6-fluorodopa on 16 patients with sporadic ALS and without extrapyramidal disease, and compared the results with age-matched controls. They found a significant progressive fall in 6-fluorodopa uptake with time since diagnosis, and reduced dopaminergic function in 3 patients with ALS of long duration. This supports the hypothesis that ALS and IP may share pathogenesis, and, perhaps, etiology

  17. A High-Performance VME-Based Acquisition System for Positron Emission Mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, D.J.; Weisenberger, A.; Majewski, S.; Kieper, D.; Kross, B.; Popov, V.; Wojcik, R.; Raylman, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    A prototype for a practical and economical breast imaging system for cancer detection is currently under development at Jefferson Lab. The latest advances in bright, fast, crystal scintillators, compact position-sensitive photomultipliers (PSPMT), and high-performance digitizing and readout electronics are being used to develop a compact imager based on Positron Emission Tomography (PET). To facilitate the performance demands of the detector as well as the high number of readout channels, the data acquisition system is built around an intelligent, self-contained, VME form-factor

  18. Positron emission tomographic images and expectation maximization: A VLSI architecture for multiple iterations per second

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.F.; Byars, L.G.; Casey, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    A digital electronic architecture for parallel processing of the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm for Positron Emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction is proposed. Rapid (0.2 second) EM iterations on high resolution (256 x 256) images are supported. Arrays of two very large scale integration (VLSI) chips perform forward and back projection calculations. A description of the architecture is given, including data flow and partitioning relevant to EM and parallel processing. EM images shown are produced with software simulating the proposed hardware reconstruction algorithm. Projected cost of the system is estimated to be small in comparison to the cost of current PET scanners

  19. Distributed microprocessor automation network for synthesizing radiotracers used in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.A.G.; Alexoff, D.L.; Wolf, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    This presentation describes an evolving distributed microprocessor network for automating the routine production synthesis of radiotracers used in Positron Emission Tomography. We first present a brief overview of the PET method for measuring biological function, and then outline the general procedure for producing a radiotracer. The paper identifies several reasons for our automating the syntheses of these compounds. There is a description of the distributed microprocessor network architecture chosen and the rationale for that choice. Finally, we speculate about how this network may be exploited to extend the power of the PET method from the large university or National Laboratory to the biomedical research and clinical community at large. 20 refs. (DT)

  20. 18 F-Labeling of Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hema S; Ma, Longle; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2017-11-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study of fluorine-18 labeled biomolecules is an emerging and rapidly growing area for preclinical and clinical research. The present review focuses on recent advances in radiochemical methods for incorporating fluorine-18 into biomolecules via "direct" or "indirect" bioconjugation. Recently developed prosthetic groups and pre-targeting strategies, as well as representative examples in 18 F-labeling of biomolecules in PET imaging research studies are highlighted. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.