WorldWideScience

Sample records for ammonia oxidizer 16s

  1. Ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in two US Great Basin hot springs with abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Hungate, Bruce A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2011-08-01

    Many thermophiles catalyse free energy-yielding redox reactions involving nitrogenous compounds; however, little is known about these processes in natural thermal environments. Rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in source water and sediments of two ≈ 80°C springs in the US Great Basin. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification occurred mainly in sediments. Ammonia oxidation rates measured using (15)N-NO(3)(-) pool dilution ranged from 5.5 ± 0.8 to 8.6 ± 0.9 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were unaffected or only mildly stimulated by amendment with NH(4) Cl. Denitrification rates measured using acetylene block ranged from 15.8 ± 0.7 to 51 ± 12 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were stimulated by amendment with NO(3)(-) and complex organic compounds. The DNRA rate in one spring sediment measured using an (15)N-NO(3)(-) tracer was 315 ± 48 nmol N g(-1) h(-1). Both springs harboured distinct planktonic and sediment microbial communities. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that 'Ca. N. yellowstonii'amoA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 3.5-3.9 × 10(8) and 6.4-9.0 × 10(8) copies g(-1) sediment. Potential denitrifiers included members of the Aquificales and Thermales. Thermus spp. comprised <1% of 16S rRNA gene pyrotags in both sediments and qPCR for T. thermophilus narG revealed sediment populations of 1.3-1.7 × 10(6) copies g(-1) sediment. These data indicate a highly active nitrogen cycle (N-cycle) in these springs and suggest that ammonia oxidation may be a major source of energy fuelling primary production. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the link of in situ nitrification activity to taxonomic identities of ammonia oxidizers in high-temperature environments remains poorly understood. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface and bottom sediments were 4.80 and 5.30 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the archaeal 16S rRNA genes and amoA genes were present in the range of 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 and 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 gene copies g-1 sediment, respectively, while bacterial amoA was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, which represented the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU) in both surface and bottom sediments. The archaeal predominance was further supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) visualization. The cell-specific rate of ammonia oxidation was estimated to range from 0.410 to 0.790 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, higher than those in the two US Great Basin hot springs. These results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  3. Anodic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen gas catalyzed by mixed biofilms in bioelectrochemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lixia; Tao, Yong; Wang, Yujian; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Li, Daping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report ammonia oxidation to nitrogen gas using microbes as biocatalyst on the anode, with polarized electrode (+600 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) as electron acceptor. In batch experiments, the maximal rate of ammonia-N oxidation by the mixed culture was ∼ 60 mg L −1 d −1 , and nitrogen gas was the main products in anode compartment. Cyclic voltammetry for testing the electroactivity of the anodic biofilms revealed that an oxidation peak appeared at +600 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl), whereas the electrode without biofilms didn’t appear oxidation peak, indicating that the bioanode had good electroactivities for ammonia oxidation. Microbial community analysis of 16S rRNA genes based on high throughput sequencing indicated that the combination of the dominant genera of Nitrosomonas, Comamonas and Paracocus could be important for the electron transfer from ammonia oxidation to anode

  4. Development of a 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization probe for quantification of the ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosotalea devanaterra and its relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Ortiz, C X; Merbt, S N; Barrero-Canossa, J; Fuchs, B M; Casamayor, E O

    2018-04-28

    The Thaumarchaeota SAGMCG-1 group and, in particular, members of the genus Nitrosotalea have high occurrence in acidic soils, the rhizosphere, groundwater and oligotrophic lakes, and play a potential role in nitrogen cycling. In this study, the specific oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization probe SAG357 was designed for this Thaumarchaeota group based on the available 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases, and included the ammonia-oxidizing species Nitrosotalea devanaterra. Cell permeabilization for catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ detection and the hybridization conditions were optimized on enrichment cultures of the target species N. devanaterra, as well as the non-target ammonia-oxidizing archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. Probe specificity was improved with a competitor oligonucleotide, and fluorescence intensity and cell visualization were enhanced by the design and application of two adjacent helpers. Probe performance was tested in soil samples along a pH gradient, and counting results matched the expected in situ distributions. Probe SAG357 and the CARD-FISH protocol developed in the present study will help to improve the current understanding of the ecology and physiology of N. devanaterra and its relatives in natural environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Analysis of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria of the β Subdivision of the Class Proteobacteria in Compost and Composted Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalchuk, George A.; Naoumenko, Zinaida S.; Derikx, Piet J. L.; Felske, Andreas; Stephen, John R.; Arkhipchenko, Irina A.

    1999-01-01

    Although the practice of composting animal wastes for use as biofertilizers has increased in recent years, little is known about the microorganisms responsible for the nitrogen transformations which occur in compost and during the composting process. Ammonia is the principle available nitrogenous compound in composting material, and the conversion of this compound to nitrite in the environment by chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria is an essential step in nitrogen cycling. Therefore, the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing members of the β subdivision of the class Proteobacteria in a variety of composting materials was assessed by amplifying 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 16S rRNA by PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), respectively. The PCR and RT-PCR products were separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and were identified by hybridization with a hierarchical set of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect ammonia oxidizer-like sequence clusters in the genera Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas. Ammonia oxidizer-like 16S rDNA was detected in almost all of the materials tested, including industrial and experimental composts, manure, and commercial biofertilizers. A comparison of the DGGE and hybridization results after specific PCR and RT-PCR suggested that not all of the different ammonia oxidizer groups detected in compost are equally active. amoA, the gene encoding the active-site-containing subunit of ammonia monooxygenase, was also targeted by PCR, and template concentrations were estimated by competitive PCR. Detection of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the composts tested suggested that such materials may not be biologically inert with respect to nitrification and that the fate of nitrogen during composting and compost storage may be affected by the presence of these organisms. PMID:9925559

  6. Ammonia oxidation driven by archaea rather than bacteria in the hot spring at Tengchong geothermal field, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Li, Jiwei; Ta, Kaiwen

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of microbial mediated ammonia oxidation and these organisms are present in large numbers in natural environments indicated a potential biogeochemical role for them in the global nitrogen cycle. However, very little is understood about their role and contribution to nitrification in the high temperature extreme environments. Here we explore the ammonia oxidation rates and abundance of potential ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in upper and bottom sediments from Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The 15N-incorporating AOA cells and cell aggregated were detected with Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (Nano-SIMS). Ammonia oxidation rates measured using 15N-NO3- pool dilution in upper and bottom sediments (without NH4+ stimulated) were 4.8 and 5.3 nmol N g-1h-1, respectively. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both of the two spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Furthermore, it should be noted that no ammonia-oxidizing bacterial clones detected in this study. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that AOA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 2.75-9.80×105 and 0.128-1.96×108 gene copies g-1 sediment. Based on the reaction rates and AOA abundance, we estimated the cell-specific nitrification rates were 0.41 to 0.79 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, which are comparable to those observed in estuary environment. We suggest that AOA have the responsibility in nitrification in this hot spring, and these archaea rather than bacteria may be considered as a driver in nitrogen cycling in terrestrial hot ecosystems. Key words: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA); nitrification; ammonia-oxidizing rate; hot spring;

  7. Hydrothermal oxidation of ammonia/organic waste mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, Li; Proesmans, P.I.; Buelow, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrothermal oxidation is a promising new technology for the treatment of radioactive contaminated hazardous organic wastes. Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently evaluating this technology for the U. S. Department of Energy. In this paper, we present experimental results from the study of the hydrothermal oxidation of an ammonia/alcohol/uranium waste mixture. The use of a co-oxidant system consisting of hydrogen peroxide combined with nitrate is discussed. Experiments demonstrate near complete destruction of ammonia and organic compounds at 500 degrees C, 38 MPa, and 50 seconds reaction time. The ammonia and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in a waste simulant is reduced from 8,500 mg/L of ammonia and 12,500 mg/L TOC to 30 mg/L ammonia and less than 10 mg/L TOC. The major reaction products are CO 2 , N 2 , and a small amount of N 2 O. Comparison experiments with nitrate and hydrogen peroxide used individually show the advantage of the co-oxidant system

  8. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E.; Sauder, Laura A.; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D.; Boon, Nico; Poulain, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  9. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-12-05

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  10. Comparative diversity of ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA gene sequences in native, tilled, and successional soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, M.A.; Stephen, J.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Prosser, J.I.; Paul, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizer (AAO) populations in soils from native, tilled, and successional treatments at the Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research site in southwestern Michigan were compared to assess effects of disturbance on these bacteria. N fertilization effects on AAO

  11. Composition of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and their contribution to nitrification in a high-temperature hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Peng, X.-T.; Xu, H.-C.; Ta, K.-W.

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes and associated organisms has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrification in high-temperature environments remains unclear. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface sinter and bottom sediments were 4.8 and 5.3 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Relative abundances of Crenarchaea in both samples were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii", which represented the most abundant operation taxonomic units (OTU) in both sediments. Furthermore, bacterial amoA was not detected in this study. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that AOA and 16S rRNA genes were present in the range of 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 and 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 gene copies g-1 sediment. The cell-specific nitrification rates were estimated to be in the range of 0.41 to 0.79 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, which is consistent with earlier estimates in estuary environments. This study demonstrated that AOA were widely involved in nitrification in this hot spring. It further indicated the importance of archaea rather than bacteria in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  12. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  13. Differential contributions of ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers to nitrification in four paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baozhan; Zhao, Jun; Guo, Zhiying; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Jia, Zhongjun

    2015-01-01

    Rice paddy fields are characterized by regular flooding and nitrogen fertilization, but the functional importance of aerobic ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers under unique agricultural management is poorly understood. In this study, we report the differential contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) to nitrification in four paddy soils from different geographic regions (Zi-Yang (ZY), Jiang-Du (JD), Lei-Zhou (LZ) and Jia-Xing (JX)) that are representative of the rice ecosystems in China. In urea-amended microcosms, nitrification activity varied greatly with 11.9, 9.46, 3.03 and 1.43 μg NO3−-N g−1 dry weight of soil per day in the ZY, JD, LZ and JX soils, respectively, over the course of a 56-day incubation period. Real-time quantitative PCR of amoA genes and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed significant increases in the AOA population to various extents, suggesting that their relative contributions to ammonia oxidation activity decreased from ZY to JD to LZ. The opposite trend was observed for AOB, and the JX soil stimulated only the AOB populations. DNA-based stable-isotope probing further demonstrated that active AOA numerically outcompeted their bacterial counterparts by 37.0-, 10.5- and 1.91-fold in 13C-DNA from ZY, JD and LZ soils, respectively, whereas AOB, but not AOA, were labeled in the JX soil during active nitrification. NOB were labeled to a much greater extent than AOA and AOB, and the addition of acetylene completely abolished the assimilation of 13CO2 by nitrifying populations. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that archaeal ammonia oxidation was predominantly catalyzed by soil fosmid 29i4-related AOA within the soil group 1.1b lineage. Nitrosospira cluster 3-like AOB performed most bacterial ammonia oxidation in the ZY, LZ and JX soils, whereas the majority of the 13C-AOB in the JD soil was affiliated with the Nitrosomona communis lineage. The 13C-NOB was overwhelmingly

  14. Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacterial communities in a pilot-scale chloraminated drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, John M; Harrington, Gregory W; Noguera, Daniel R

    2002-01-01

    Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is a common operational problem for many utilities that use chloramines for secondary disinfection. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the distribution systems of a pilot-scale chloraminated drinking water treatment system was characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and 16S rRNA gene (ribosomal DNA [rDNA]) cloning and sequencing. For ammonia oxidizers, 16S rDNA-targeted T-RFLP indicated the presence of Nitrosomonas in each of the distribution systems, with a considerably smaller peak attributable to Nitrosospira-like AOB. Sequences of AOB amplification products aligned within the Nitrosomonas oligotropha cluster and were closely related to N. oligotropha and Nitrosomonas ureae. The nitrite-oxidizing communities were comprised primarily of Nitrospira, although Nitrobacter was detected in some samples. These results suggest a possible selection of AOB related to N. oligotropha and N. ureae in chloraminated systems and demonstrate the presence of NOB, indicating a biological mechanism for nitrite loss that contributes to a reduction in nitrite-associated chloramine decay.

  15. The inhibitory effects of free ammonia on ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrite oxidizing bacteria under anaerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenting; Peng, Yongzhen; Li, Xiyao; Zhang, Qiong; Ma, Bin

    2017-11-01

    The free ammonia (FA) inhibition on ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) under anaerobic condition was investigated in this study. The results indicated that NOB was more sensitive to the FA anaerobic treatment than AOB. The FA anaerobic inhibition on nitrifier gradually heightened with the increase of FA concentration. Accompanied with FA concentration increase from 0 to 16.82mgNH 3 -N·L -1 (the highest concentration adopted in this study), the activity of AOB reduced by 15.9%, while NOB decreased by 29.2%. After FA anaerobic treatment, nitrite was accumulated during nitrification. However, the nitrite accumulation disappeared on the sixth cycle of activity recovery tests with excessive aeration. Based on this result, a novel strategy for achieving nitritation is proposed, which involves recirculating a portion of the activated sludge through a side-line sludge treatment unit, where the sludge is subjected to treatment with FA under anaerobic condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 growing at two ammonia concentrations, as measured by combined ammonia and ammonium, one well above the Km for ammonia oxidation (∼500 μM) and the other well below the Km (ammonia-replete to ammonia-limiting conditions. Transcript levels for ammonia oxidation, CO2 fixation, and one of the ammonia transport genes were approximately the same at high and low ammonia availability. Transcripts for all analyzed genes decreased with time in the complete absence of ammonia, but with various rates of decay. The new steady-state mRNA levels established are presumably more reflective of the natural physiological state of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and offer a reference for interpreting message abundance patterns in the natural environment. PMID:23995944

  17. Ammonia- and Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in a Pilot-Scale Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System

    OpenAIRE

    Regan, John M.; Harrington, Gregory W.; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is a common operational problem for many utilities that use chloramines for secondary disinfection. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the distribution systems of a pilot-scale chloraminated drinking water treatment system was characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and 16S rRNA gene (ribosomal DNA [rDNA]) cloning and sequencing. For ammon...

  18. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  19. Nitrogen metabolism and kinetics of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens-Habbena, Willm; Stahl, David A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing mesophilic and thermophilic Group I archaea changed the century-old paradigm that aerobic ammonia oxidation is solely mediated by two small clades of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. Group I archaea are extremely diverse and ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial environments, accounting for 20-30% of the microbial plankton in the global oceans. Recent studies indicated that many of these organisms carry putative ammonia monooxygenase genes and are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in most natural environments suggesting a potentially significant role in the nitrogen cycle. The isolation of Nitrosopumilus maritimus strain SCM1 provided the first direct evidence that Group I archaea indeed gain energy from ammonia oxidation. To characterize the physiology of this archaeal nitrifier, we developed a respirometry setup particularly suited for activity measurements in dilute microbial cultures with extremely low oxygen uptake rates. Here, we describe the setup and review the kinetic experiments conducted with N. maritimus and other nitrifying microorganisms. These experiments demonstrated that N. maritimus is adapted to grow on ammonia concentrations found in oligotrophic open ocean environments, far below the survival threshold of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The described setup and experimental procedures should facilitate physiological studies on other nitrifying archaea and oligotrophic microorganisms in general. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ammonia removal in electrochemical oxidation: Mechanism and pseudo-kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liang; Liu Yan

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the mechanism and pseudo-kinetics for removal of ammonia by electrochemical oxidation with RuO 2 /Ti anode using batch tests. The results show that the ammonia oxidation rates resulted from direct oxidation at electrode-liquid interfaces of the anode by stepwise dehydrogenation, and from indirect oxidation by hydroxyl radicals were so slow that their contribution to ammonia removal was negligible under the condition with Cl - . The oxidation rates of ammonia ranged from 1.0 to 12.3 mg N L -1 h -1 and efficiency reached nearly 100%, primarily due to the indirect oxidation of HOCl, and followed pseudo zero-order kinetics in electrochemical oxidation with Cl - . About 88% ammonia was removed from the solution. The removed one was subsequently found in the form of N 2 in the produced gas. The rate at which Cl - lost electrons at the anode was a major factor in the overall ammonia oxidation. Current density and Cl - concentration affected the constant of the pseudo zero-order kinetics, expressed by k = 0.0024[Cl - ] x j. The ammonia was reduced to less than 0.5 mg N L -1 after 2 h of electrochemical oxidation for the effluent from aerobic or anaerobic reactors which treated municipal wastewater. This result was in line with the strict discharge requirements

  1. Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxides as Catalysts for Ammonia Oxidation to N2O.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ludvíková, Jana; Jablońska, M.; Jirátová, Květa; Chmielarz, L.; Balabánová, Jana; Kovanda, F.; Obalová, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2016), s. 2669-2690 ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Co-Mn-Al mixed oxide s * catalytic ammonia oxidation * N2O production * mechanochemical production Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.369, year: 2016

  2. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopu...

  3. Community structure analysis of soil ammonia oxidizers during vegetation restoration in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yueming; He, Xunyang; Liang, Shichu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiangbi; Feng, Shuzheng; Su, Yirong

    2014-03-01

    Soil ammonia oxidizers play a critical role in nitrogen cycling and ecological restoration. The composition and structure of soil ammonia oxidizers and their impacting factors were studied in four typical ecosystem soils, tussock (T), shrub (S), secondary forest (SF), and primary forest (PF), during vegetation restoration in the Karst region of Southwest China. The composition and structure of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) communities were characterized by sequencing the amoA and arch-amoA genes, respectively. The diversity of soil ammonia oxidizers (except in S) and plant Shannon diversity index gradually increased with vegetation restoration, and the ammonia oxidizer communities differed significantly (p soils. AOB Nitrosospira cluster 3b only appeared in PF and SF soils, while Nitrosospira cluster 3a species were found in all soils. Changes in AOB paralleled the changes in soil ammonium content that occurred with vegetation restoration. Redundancy analysis showed that the distribution of dominant AOB species was linked to pH, soil urease activity, and soil C/N ratio, whereas the distribution of dominant AOA species was mainly influenced by litter nitrogen content and C/N ratio. These results suggested that the composition and structure of the AOB community were more sensitive to changes in vegetation and soil ammonium content, and may be an important indicator of nitrogen availability in Karst ecosystem soils. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Immobilization of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by polyvinyl alcohol and sodium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuwei; Zhang, Yanqiu; Tu, Baojun

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were immobilized by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate. The immobilization conditions and ammonia oxidation ability of the immobilized bacteria were investigated. The following immobilization conditions were observed to be optimal: PVA, 12%; sodium alginate, 1.1%; calcium chloride, 1.0%; inoculum concentration, 1.3 immobilized balls/mL of immobilized medium; pH, 10; and temperature, 30°C. The immobilized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria exhibited strong ammonia oxidation ability even after being recycled four times. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate of the immobilized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria reached 90.30% under the optimal immobilization conditions. When compared with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria immobilized by sodium alginate alone, the bacteria immobilized by PVA and sodium alginate were superior with respect to pH resistance, the number of reuses, material cost, heat resistance, and ammonia oxidation ability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of oxygen partial pressure and salinity on the community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the Schelde estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was investigated in the Schelde estuary. Simultaneously with the increase of oxygen and salinity, a shift of the dominant AOB was observed. Molecular analysis based on 16S rRNA genes showed that the

  6. Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil Treated with the Insecticide Imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Cycoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to assess the effect of imidacloprid on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB in soil using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approach. Analysis showed that AOA and AOB community members were affected by the insecticide treatment. However, the calculation of the richness (S and the Shannon-Wiener index (H values for soil treated with the field rate (FR dosage of imidacloprid (1 mg/kg soil showed no changes in measured indices for the AOA and AOB community members. In turn, the 10*FR dosage of insecticide (10 mg/kg soil negatively affected the AOA community, which was confirmed by the decrease of the S and H values in comparison with the values obtained for the control soil. In the case of AOB community, an initial decline followed by the increase of the S and H values was obtained. Imidacloprid decreased the nitrification rate while the ammonification process was stimulated by the addition of imidacloprid. Changes in the community structure of AOA and AOB could be due to an increase in the concentration of N-NH4+, known as the most important factor which determines the contribution of these microorganisms to soil nitrification.

  7. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  8. Spatial interaction of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in an unfertilized grassland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eStempfhuber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interrelated successive transformation steps of nitrification are performed by distinct microbial groups – the ammonia-oxidizers, comprising ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB, and nitrite-oxidizers such as Nitrobacter and Nitrospira, which are the dominant genera in the investigated soils. Hence, not only their presence and activity in the investigated habitat is required for nitrification, but also their temporal and spatial interactions. To demonstrate the interdependence of both groups and to address factors promoting putative niche differentiation within each group, temporal and spatial changes in nitrifying organisms were monitored in an unfertilized grassland site over an entire vegetation period at the plot scale of 10 m². Nitrifying organisms were assessed by measuring the abundance of marker genes (amoA for AOA and AOB, nxrA for Nitrobacter, 16S rRNA gene for Nitrospira selected for the respective sub-processes. A positive correlation between numerically dominant AOA and Nitrospira, and their co-occurrence at the same spatial scale in August and October, suggests that the nitrification process is predominantly performed by these groups and is restricted to a limited timeframe. Amongst nitrite-oxidizers, niche differentiation was evident in observed seasonally varying patterns of co-occurrence and spatial separation. While their distributions were most likely driven by substrate concentrations, oxygen availability may also have played a role under substrate-limited conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed temporal shifts in Nitrospira community composition with an increasing relative abundance of OTU03 assigned to sublineage V from August onwards, indicating its important role in nitrite oxidation.

  9. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  10. Direct electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on graphite as a treatment option for stored source-separated urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Fritzsche, Cristina; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2015-02-01

    Electrolysis can be a viable technology for ammonia removal from source-separated urine. Compared to biological nitrogen removal, electrolysis is more robust and is highly amenable to automation, which makes it especially attractive for on-site reactors. In electrolytic wastewater treatment, ammonia is usually removed by indirect oxidation through active chlorine which is produced in-situ at elevated anode potentials. However, the evolution of chlorine can lead to the formation of chlorate, perchlorate, chlorinated organic by-products and chloramines that are toxic. This study focuses on using direct ammonia oxidation on graphite at low anode potentials in order to overcome the formation of toxic by-products. With the aid of cyclic voltammetry, we demonstrated that graphite is active for direct ammonia oxidation without concomitant chlorine formation if the anode potential is between 1.1 and 1.6 V vs. SHE (standard hydrogen electrode). A comparison of potentiostatic bulk electrolysis experiments in synthetic stored urine with and without chloride confirmed that ammonia was removed exclusively by continuous direct oxidation. Direct oxidation required high pH values (pH > 9) because free ammonia was the actual reactant. In real stored urine (pH = 9.0), an ammonia removal rate of 2.9 ± 0.3 gN·m(-2)·d(-1) was achieved and the specific energy demand was 42 Wh·gN(-1) at an anode potential of 1.31 V vs. SHE. The measurements of chlorate and perchlorate as well as selected chlorinated organic by-products confirmed that no chlorinated by-products were formed in real urine. Electrode corrosion through graphite exfoliation was prevented and the surface was not poisoned by intermediate oxidation products. We conclude that direct ammonia oxidation on graphite electrodes is a treatment option for source-separated urine with three major advantages: The formation of chlorinated by-products is prevented, less energy is consumed than in indirect ammonia oxidation and

  11. Benthic Ammonia Oxidizers Differ in Community Structure and Biogeochemical Potential Across a Riverine Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian eDamashek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen pollution in coastal zones is a widespread issue, particularly in ecosystems with urban or agricultural watersheds. California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, at the landward reaches of San Francisco Bay, is highly impacted by both agricultural runoff and sewage effluent, leading to chronically high nutrient loadings. In particular, the massive discharge of ammonium into the Sacramento River has altered this ecosystem by increasing ammonium concentrations and thus changing the stoichiometry of inorganic nitrogen stocks, with potential effects throughout the food web. To date, however, there has been little research examining N biogeochemistry or N-cycling microbial communities in this system. We report the first data on benthic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities and potential nitrification rates for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, focusing on the functional gene amoA (encoding the α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. There were stark regional differences in ammonia-oxidizing communities, with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB outnumbering ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA only in the ammonium-rich Sacramento River. High potential nitrification rates in the Sacramento River suggested these communities may be capable of oxidizing significant amounts of ammonium, compared to the San Joaquin River and the upper reaches of San Francisco Bay. Gene diversity also showed regional patterns, as well as phylogenetically unique ammonia oxidizers in the Sacramento River. The community structure and biogeochemical function of benthic ammonia oxidizers appears related to nutrient loadings. Unraveling the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of N cycling pathways is a critical step toward understanding how such ecosystems respond to the changing environmental conditions wrought by human development and climate change.

  12. Ammonia oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yu; Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation experiments were conducted at high pressure (30 bar and 100 bar) under oxidizing and stoichiometric conditions, respectively, and temperatures ranging from 450 to 925 K. The oxidation of ammonia was slow under stoichiometric conditions in the temperature range investigated. Under...... oxidizing conditions the onset temperature for reaction was 850–875 K at 30 bar, while at 100 bar it was about 800 K, with complete consumption of NH3 at 875 K. The products of reaction were N2 and N2O, while NO and NO2 concentrations were below the detection limit even under oxidizing conditions. The data...... was satisfactory. The main oxidation path for NH3 at high pressure under oxidizing conditions is NH3⟶+OH NH2⟶+HO2,NO2 H2NO⟶+O2 HNO⟶+O2 NO ⟶+NH2 N2. The modeling predictions are most sensitive to the reactions NH2 + NO = NNH + OH and NH2 + HO2 = H2NO + OH, which promote the ammonia consumption by forming OH...

  13. The Bacterial Communities of Full-Scale Biologically Active, Granular Activated Carbon Filters Are Stable and Diverse and Potentially Contain Novel Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope Wilkinson, Katheryn; Strait, Jacqueline M.; Hozalski, Raymond M.; Sadowksy, Michael J.; Hamilton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of the full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon (BAC) filters operated at the St. Paul Regional Water Services (SPRWS) was investigated using Illumina MiSeq analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These bacterial communities were consistently diverse (Shannon index, >4.4; richness estimates, >1,500 unique operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) throughout the duration of the 12-month study period. In addition, only modest shifts in the quantities of individual bacterial populations were observed; of the 15 most prominent OTUs, the most highly variable population (a Variovorax sp.) modulated less than 13-fold over time and less than 8-fold from filter to filter. The most prominent population in the profiles was a Nitrospira sp., representing 13 to 21% of the community. Interestingly, very few of the known ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB; <0.07%) and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were detected in the profiles. Quantitative PCR of amoA genes, however, suggested that AOB were prominent in the bacterial communities (amoA/16S rRNA gene ratio, 1 to 10%). We conclude, therefore, that the BAC filters at the SPRWS potentially contained significant numbers of unidentified and novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms that possess amoA genes similar to those of previously described AOB. PMID:26209671

  14. Ammonia oxidation kinetics and temperature sensitivity of a natural marine community dominated by Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Rachel E A; Qin, Wei; Schauer, Andy J; Armbrust, E Virginia; Ingalls, Anitra E; Moffett, James W; Stahl, David A; Devol, Allan H

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal ammonia oxidizers (AOAs) are increasingly recognized as prominent members of natural microbial assemblages. Evidence that links the presence of AOA with in situ ammonia oxidation activity is limited, and the abiotic factors that regulate the distribution of AOA natural assemblages are not well defined. We used quantitative PCR to enumerate amoA (encodes α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) abundances; AOA amoA gene copies greatly outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and amoA transcripts were derived primarily from AOA throughout the water column of Hood Canal, Puget Sound, WA, USA. We generated a Michaelis–Menten kinetics curve for ammonia oxidation by the natural community and found that the measured Km of 98±14 nmol l−1 was close to that for cultivated AOA representative Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. Temperature did not have a significant effect on ammonia oxidation rates for incubation temperatures ranging from 8 to 20 °C, which is within the temperature range for depths of measurable ammonia oxidation at the site. This study provides substantial evidence, through both amoA gene copies and transcript abundances and the kinetics response, that AOA are the dominant active ammonia oxidizers in this marine environment. We propose that future ammonia oxidation experiments use a Km for the natural community to better constrain ammonia oxidation rates determined with the commonly used 15NH4+ dilution technique. PMID:23657360

  15. SOIL NITROUS OXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE, AND AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM A RECOVERING RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents two years of seasonal nitric oxide, ammonia, and nitrous oxide trace gas fluxes measured in a recovering riparian zone with cattle excluded and in an adjacent riparian zone grazed by cattle. In the recovering riparian zone, average nitric oxide, ammonia, and ni...

  16. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, C.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H 2 PtCl 6 , Pd(NO 3 ) 3 and Rh(NO 3 ) 3 . Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h -1 in the wet catalytic processes

  17. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, C.-M. [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, Pd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Rh(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h{sup -1} in the wet catalytic processes.

  18. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes.

  19. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in cattle manure compost under various temperatures and ammonia concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Ryu; Tada, Chika; Asano, Ryoki; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Nakai, Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    A recent study showed that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) coexist in the process of cattle manure composting. To investigate their physiological characteristics, liquid cultures seeded with fermenting cattle manure compost were incubated at various temperatures (37°C, 46°C, or 60°C) and ammonium concentrations (0.5, 1, 4, or 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N). The growth rates of the AOB and AOA were monitored using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis targeting the bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A genes. AOB grew at 37°C and 4 or 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N, whereas AOA grew at 46°C and 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N. Incubation with allylthiourea indicated that the AOB and AOA grew by oxidizing ammonia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and subsequent sequencing analyses revealed that a bacterium related to Nitrosomonas halophila and an archaeon related to Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis were the predominant AOB and AOA, respectively, in the seed compost and in cultures after incubation. This is the first report to demonstrate that the predominant AOA in cattle manure compost can grow and can probably oxidize ammonia under moderately thermophilic conditions.

  20. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ(15)NNO2- and δ(18)ONO2-, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus." The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ(18)O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ(18)O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ(18)ONO2- in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying the regulation of

  1. The history of aerobic ammonia oxidizers: from the first discoveries to today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Maria; Séneca, Joana; Magalhães, Catarina

    2014-07-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, has long been considered a central biological process in the global nitrogen cycle, with its first description dated 133 years ago. Until 2005, bacteria were considered the only organisms capable of nitrification. However, the recent discovery of a chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, Nitrosopumilus maritimus, changed our concept of the range of organisms involved in nitrification, highlighting the importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as potential players in global biogeochemical nitrogen transformations. The uniqueness of these archaea justified the creation of a novel archaeal phylum, Thaumarchaeota. These recent discoveries increased the global scientific interest within the microbial ecology society and have triggered an analysis of the importance of bacterial vs archaeal ammonia oxidation in a wide range of natural ecosystems. In this mini review we provide a chronological perspective of the current knowledge on the ammonia oxidation pathway of nitrification, based on the main physiological, ecological and genomic discoveries.

  2. Amperometric detection and electrochemical oxidation of aliphatic amines and ammonia on silver-lead oxide thin-film electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Jisheng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-08

    This thesis comprises three parts: Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions: aliphatic amines at mixed Ag-Pb oxide thin-film electrodes; oxidation of ammonia at anodized Ag-Pb eutectic alloy electrodes; and temperature effects on oxidation of ethylamine, alanine, and aquated ammonia.

  3. Application of hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension (HOPE) to assess relative abundances of ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Scarascia, Giantommaso

    2017-04-04

    Background: Establishing an optimal proportion of nitrifying microbial populations, including ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), complete nitrite oxidizers (comammox) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), is important for ensuring the efficiency of nitrification in water treatment systems. Hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension (HOPE), previously developed to rapidly quantify relative abundances of specific microbial groups of interest, was applied in this study to track the abundances of the important nitrifying bacterial populations. Results: The method was tested against biomass obtained from a laboratory-scale biofilm-based trickling reactor, and the findings were validated against those obtained by 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequencing. Our findings indicated a good correlation between the relative abundance of nitrifying bacterial populations obtained using both HOPE and amplicon sequencing. HOPE showed a significant increase in the relative abundance of AOB, specifically Nitrosomonas, with increasing ammonium content and shock loading (p < 0.001). In contrast, Nitrosospira remained stable in its relative abundance against the total community throughout the operational phases. There was a corresponding significant decrease in the relative abundance of NOB, specifically Nitrospira and those affiliated to comammox, during the shock loading. Based on the relative abundance of AOB and NOB (including commamox) obtained from HOPE, it was determined that the optimal ratio of AOB against NOB ranged from 0.2 to 2.5 during stable reactor performance. Conclusions: Overall, the HOPE method was developed and validated against 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon sequencing for the purpose of performing simultaneous monitoring of relative abundance of nitrifying populations. Quantitative measurements of these nitrifying populations obtained via HOPE would be indicative of reactor performance and nitrification functionality.

  4. Revisiting the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on carbon-supported metal nanoparticle catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhe-Fei; Wang, Yuxuan; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A procedure to pretreat electrocatalysts to study the ammonia oxidation is provided. • N ads and O/OH ads were identified as the major deactivation species that prevent ammonia oxidatoin. • The electrocatalytic activity, thermodynamics, and possible deactivation mechanisms for ammonia oxidation were elucidated. • The onset potential for ammonia oxidation is related to the hydrogen binding energy of the catalyst. • Ammonia electro-oxidation involves a complex decoupled electron and proton transfer process. - Abstract: The ammonia electro-oxidation reaction (AOR) has been studied due to its promising applications in ammonia electrolysis, wastewater remediation, direct ammonia fuel cells, and sensors. However, it is difficult to compare and analyze the reported electrocatalytic activity of AOR reliably, likely due to the variation in catalyst synthesis, electrode composition, electrode morphology, and testing protocol. In this paper, the electro-oxidation of ammonia on different carbon-supported precious metal nanoparticle catalysts was revisited. The effect of experimental conditions, electrochemical test parameters, electrocatalytic activity, thermodynamics, and possible deactivation mechanism of the catalysts were investigated. Pt/C catalyst possesses the highest electrocatalytic activity, while Ir/C and Rh/C show lower overpotential. The onset potential of the AOR is related to the hydrogen binding energy of the catalyst. N ads is one major cause of deactivation accompanied with the formation of surface O/OH ads at high potentials. The coulombic efficiency of N ads formation on Pt is about 1% initially and gradually decreases with reaction time. Increase in ammonia concentration leads to increase in current density, while increase in hydroxyl ions concentration can enhance the current density and reduce the overpotential simultaneously. The slopes of AOR onset potential and hydrogen adsorption/desorption potential of Pt/C as a function of p

  5. Controls of nitrite oxidation in ammonia-removing biological air filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler, Susanne; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    in accumulation of nitrate rather than nitrite and a significant decline in pH. As a consequence, ammonia is removed more efficiently, but heterotrophic oxidation of odorous compounds might be inhibited.  To identify the controlling mechanisms of nitrite oxidation, full-scale biological air filters were...... activity resulting in a lowered pH and thus a decreased FA concentration, promoting further growth of NOB. Yet, in some cases a situation with a nitrate-to-nitrite ratio of 1 and moderate pH remained stable even under varying air load and water supply, suggesting that additional mechanisms were involved......In biological air filters ammonia is removed due to the action of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) resulting in nitrite accumulation exceeding 100 mM. Among filters treating exhaust air from pig facilities successful establishment of Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) sometimes occurs, resulting...

  6. Bioturbation determines the response of benthic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverock, B.; Kitidis, V.; Tait, K.; Gilbert, J. A.; Osborn, A. M.; Widdicombe, S.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA), caused by the dissolution of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in seawater, is projected to cause significant changes to marine ecology and biogeochemistry. Potential impacts on the microbially driven cycling of nitrogen are of particular concern. Specifically, under seawater pH levels approximating future OA scenarios, rates of ammonia oxidation (the rate-limiting first step of the nitrification pathway) have been shown to dramatically decrease in seawater, but not in underlying sediments. However, no prior study has considered the interactive effects of microbial ammonia oxidation and macrofaunal bioturbation activity, which can enhance nitrogen transformation rates. Using experimental mesocosms, we investigated the responses to OA of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms inhabiting surface sediments and sediments within burrow walls of the mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura. Seawater was acidified to one of four target pH values (pHT 7.90, 7.70, 7.35 and 6.80) in comparison with a control (pHT 8.10). At pHT 8.10, ammonia oxidation rates in burrow wall sediments were, on average, fivefold greater than in surface sediments. However, at all acidified pH values (pH ≤ 7.90), ammonia oxidation rates in burrow sediments were significantly inhibited (by 79–97%; p < 0.01), whereas rates in surface sediments were unaffected. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances increased significantly as pHT declined; by contrast, relative abundances of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidation (amoA) genes did not vary. This research suggests that OA could cause substantial reductions in total benthic ammonia oxidation rates in coastal bioturbated sediments, leading to corresponding changes in coupled nitrogen cycling between the benthic and pelagic realms. PMID:23980243

  7. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1993-12-31

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  8. Substrate and nutrient limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in temperate forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Norman; J.E. Barrett

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbes control the rate-limiting step of nitrification, a critical ecosystem process, which affects retention and mobility of nitrogen in soil ecosystems. This study investigated substrate (NH4þ) and nutrient (K and P) limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in temperate forest soils at Coweeta Hydrologic...

  9. Inhibition of Direct Electrolytic Ammonia Oxidation Due to a Change in Local pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zöllig, Hanspeter; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical ammonia oxidation has gained a lot of attention recently as an efficient method for ammonia removal from wastewater, for the use in ammonia-based fuel cells and the production of high purity hydrogen. Thermally decomposed iridium oxide films (TDIROF) have been shown to be catalytically active for direct ammonia oxidation in aqueous solutions if NH 3 is present. However, the process was reported to be rapidly inhibited on TDIROF. Herein, we show that this fast inhibition of direct ammonia oxidation does not result from surface poisoning by adsorbed elemental nitrogen (N ads ). Instead, we propose that direct ammonia oxidation and oxygen evolution can lead to a drop of the local pH at the electrode resulting in a low availability of the actual reactant, NH 3 . The hypothesis was tested with cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments on stagnant and rotating disk electrodes (RDE). The CV experiments on the stagnant electrode revealed that the decrease of the ammonia oxidation peaks was considerably reduced by introducing an idle phase at open circuit potential between subsequent scans. Furthermore, the polarization of the TDIROF electrode into the hydrogen evolution region (HER) resulted in increased ammonia oxidation peaks in the following anodic scans which can be explained with an increased local pH after the consumption of protons in the HER. On the RDE, the ammonia oxidation peaks did not decrease in immediately consecutive scans. These findings would not be expected if surface poisoning was responsible for the fast inhibition but they are in good agreement with the proposed mechanism of pH induced limitation by the reactant, NH 3 . The plausibility of the mechanism was also supported by our numerical simulations of the processes in the Nernstian diffusion layer. The knowledge about this inhibition mechanism of direct ammonia oxidation is especially important for the design of electrochemical cells for wastewater treatment. The mechanism is not only

  10. [Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and their important roles in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Wu, Wei-Xiang; Ding, Ying; Shi, De-Zhi; Chen, Ying-Xu

    2010-08-01

    As the first step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation is the key process in global nitrogen biogeochemical cycling. So far, the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the beta- and gamma-subgroups of proteobacteria have been considered as the most important contributors to ammonia oxidation, but the recent researches indicated that ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are widely distributed in various kinds of ecosystems and quantitatively predominant, playing important roles in the global nitrogen biogeochemical cycling. This paper reviewed the morphological, physiological, and ecological characteristics and the molecular phylogenies of AOA, and compared and analyzed the differences and similarities of the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and its encoding genes between AOA and AOB. In addition, the potential significant roles of AOA in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems were summarized, and the future research directions of AOA in applied ecology and environmental protection were put forward.

  11. Quantitative analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a combined system of MBR and worm reactors treating synthetic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Tian, Yu; Wang, Dezhen; Lu, Yaobin; Zhang, Jun; Zuo, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The Static Sequencing Batch Worm Reactor (SSBWR) followed by the MBR (S-MBR) is one of the advanced excess sludge treatments. In this paper, the control MBR (C-MBR) and the SSBWR-MBR were operated in parallel to study the changes of NH3-N removal and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The results showed that the capacity of NH3-N removal of the S-MBR was improved by the worm reactors along with the operation. The S-MBR was favorable because it selected for the higher activity of the ammonia oxidization and better cells appearance of the sludge. The five species (Nitrosomonas, Betaproteobacteria, Clostridium, Dechloromonas and Bacteria) were found to be significantly correlate with the ammonia oxidization functions and performance of NH3-N removal in the C-MBR and S-MBR. The Nitrosomonas, Betaproteobacteria and Dechloromonas remained and eventually enriched in the S-MBR played a primary role in the NH3-N removal of the S-MBR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter

  13. Inhibition of bacterial ammonia oxidation by organohydrazines in soil microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng eWu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylamine oxidation by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO is a key step for energy-yielding in support of the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Organohydrazines have been shown to inactivate HAO from Nitrosomonas europaea, and may serve as selective inhibitors to differentiate bacterial from archaeal ammonia oxidation due to the absence of bacterial HAO gene homologue in known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA. In this study, the effects of three organohydrazines on activity, abundance and composition of AOB and AOA were evaluated in soil microcosms. The results indicate that phenylhydrazine and methylhydrazine at the concentration of 100 mol per gram dry weight soil completely suppressed the activity of soil nitrification. DGGE fingerprinting and sequencing analysis of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA clearly demonstrated that nitrification activity change is well paralleled with the growth of Nitrosomonas europaea-like AOB in soil microcosms. No significant correlation between AOA community structure and nitrification activity was observed among all treatments during the incubation period, although incomplete inhibition of nitrification activity occurred in 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine-amended soil microcosms. These findings show that the HAO-targeted organohydrazines can effectively inhibit bacterial nitrification in soil, and the mechanism of organohydrazine affecting AOA remains unclear.

  14. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  15. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h -1 .

  16. Novel Syntrophic Populations Dominate an Ammonia-Tolerant Methanogenic Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, J A; Arntzen, M Ø; Sun, L; Hagen, L H; McHardy, A C; Horn, S J; Eijsink, V G H; Schnürer, A; Pope, P B

    2016-01-01

    Biogas reactors operating with protein-rich substrates have high methane potential and industrial value; however, they are highly susceptible to process failure because of the accumulation of ammonia. High ammonia levels cause a decline in acetate-utilizing methanogens and instead promote the conversion of acetate via a two-step mechanism involving syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) to H 2 and CO 2 , followed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Despite the key role of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB), only a few culturable representatives have been characterized. Here we show that the microbiome of a commercial, ammonia-tolerant biogas reactor harbors a deeply branched, uncultured phylotype (unFirm_1) accounting for approximately 5% of the 16S rRNA gene inventory and sharing 88% 16S rRNA gene identity with its closest characterized relative. Reconstructed genome and quantitative metaproteomic analyses imply unFirm_1's metabolic dominance and SAO capabilities, whereby the key enzymes required for acetate oxidation are among the most highly detected in the reactor microbiome. While culturable SAOB were identified in genomic analyses of the reactor, their limited proteomic representation suggests that unFirm_1 plays an important role in channeling acetate toward methane. Notably, unFirm_1-like populations were found in other high-ammonia biogas installations, conjecturing a broader importance for this novel clade of SAOB in anaerobic fermentations. IMPORTANCE The microbial production of methane or "biogas" is an attractive renewable energy technology that can recycle organic waste into biofuel. Biogas reactors operating with protein-rich substrates such as household municipal or agricultural wastes have significant industrial and societal value; however, they are highly unstable and frequently collapse due to the accumulation of ammonia. We report the discovery of a novel uncultured phylotype (unFirm_1) that is highly detectable in metaproteomic data

  17. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Chang-Mao, E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h{sup -1}.

  18. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  19. Nitrification and the ammonia-oxidizing communities in the central Baltic Sea water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, Helena; Ward, Bess B.; Dippner, Joachim W.; Hietanen, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    The redoxclines that form between the oxic and anoxic water layers in the central Baltic Sea are sites of intensive nitrogen cycling. To gain better understanding of nitrification, we measured the biogeochemical properties along with potential nitrification rates and analyzed the assemblages of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea using functional gene microarrays. To estimate nitrification in the entire water column, we constructed a regression model for the nitrification rates and applied it to the conditions prevailing in the area in 2008-2012. The highest ammonia oxidation rates were found in a thin layer at the top of the redoxcline and the rates quickly decreased below detection limit when oxygen was exhausted. This is probably because extensive suboxic layers, which are known to harbor pelagic nitrification, are formed only for short periods after inflows in the Baltic Sea. The nitrification rates were some of the highest measured in the water columns, but the thickness of the layer where conditions were favorable for nitrification, was very small and it remained fairly stable between years. However, the depth of the nitrification layer varied substantially between years, particularly in the eastern Gotland Basin (EGB) due to turbulence in the water column. The ammonia oxidizer communities clustered differently between the eastern and western Gotland Basin (WGB) and the composition of ammonia-oxidizing assemblages correlated with the environmental variables. The ammonia oxidizer community composition was more even in the EGB, which may be related to physical instability of the redoxcline that does not allow predominance of a single archetype, whereas in the WGB, where the position of the redoxcline is more constant, the ammonia-oxidizing community was less even. Overall the ammonia-oxidizing communities in the Baltic Sea redoxclines were very evenly distributed compared to other marine environments where microarrays have been applied previously.

  20. Bacteria dominate ammonia oxidation in soils used for outdoor cattle overwintering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radl, V.; Chroňáková, Alica; Čuhel, Jiří; Šimek, Miloslav; Elhottová, Dana; Welzl, G.; Schloter, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, May (2014), s. 68-71 ISSN 0929-1393 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066 Grant - others:Akademie věd ČR(CZ) D-CZ 45:05/06 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : ammonia oxidation * bacteria * archaea * amoA diversity * urea * pasture Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.644, year: 2014

  1. Archaea produce lower yields of N2 O than bacteria during aerobic ammonia oxidation in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hink, Linda; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen fertilisation of agricultural soil contributes significantly to emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N 2 O), which is generated during denitrification and, in oxic soils, mainly by ammonia oxidisers. Although laboratory cultures of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) produce N 2 O, their relative activities in soil are unknown. This work tested the hypothesis that AOB dominate ammonia oxidation and N 2 O production under conditions of high inorganic ammonia (NH 3 ) input, but result mainly from the activity of AOA when NH 3 is derived from mineralisation. 1-octyne, a recently discovered inhibitor of AOB, was used to distinguish N 2 O production resulting from archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation in soil microcosms, and specifically inhibited AOB growth, activity and N 2 O production. In unamended soils, ammonia oxidation and N 2 O production were lower and resulted mainly from ammonia oxidation by AOA. The AOA N 2 O yield relative to nitrite produced was half that of AOB, likely due to additional enzymatic mechanisms in the latter, but ammonia oxidation and N 2 O production were directly linked in all treatments. Relative contributions of AOA and AOB to N 2 O production, therefore, reflect their respective contributions to ammonia oxidation. These results suggest potential mitigation strategies for N 2 O emissions from fertilised agricultural soils. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Ammonia-Oxidizing β-Proteobacteria from the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Northern Chile▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Verónica; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Farías, Laura; Urrutia, Homero; Ramírez, Salvador; Junier, Pilar; Witzel, Karl-Paul

    2007-01-01

    The composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from the β-Proteobacteria subclass (βAOB) was studied in the surface and upper-oxycline oxic waters (2- to 50-m depth, ∼200 to 44 μM O2) and within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) suboxic waters (50- to 400-m depth, ≤10 μM O2) of the eastern South Pacific off northern Chile. This study was carried out through cloning and sequencing of genes coding for 16S rRNA and the ammonia monooxygenase enzyme active subunit (amoA). Sequences affiliated with Nitrosospira-like cluster 1 dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from both oxic and suboxic waters. Cluster 1 consists exclusively of yet-uncultivated βAOB from marine environments. However, a single clone, out of 224 obtained from the OMZ, was found to belong to Nitrosospira lineage cluster 0. To our knowledge, cluster 0 sequences have been derived from βAOB isolated only from sand, soil, and freshwater environments. Sequences in clone libraries of the amoA gene from the surface and upper oxycline could be grouped in a marine subcluster, also containing no cultured representatives. In contrast, all 74 amoA sequences originating from the OMZ were either closely affiliated with cultured Nitrosospira spp. from clusters 0 and 2 or with other yet-uncultured βAOB from soil and an aerated-anoxic Orbal process waste treatment plant. Our results reveal the presence of Nitrosospira-like βAOB in both oxic and suboxic waters associated with the OMZ but with a clear community shift at the functional level (amoA) along the strong oxygen gradient. PMID:17416686

  3. Weakened activity of starved ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by the presence of pre-activated Nitrobacter winogradskyi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are able to maintain a high oxidizing potential during starvation. nitrite has a short-lasting stimulatory effect on the oxidation of ammonia after starvation when supplied simultaneously with fresh ammonium. To examine whether nitrite-oxidizing bacteria as partners in

  4. Weakened activity of starved ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by the presence of pre-activated Nitrobacter winogradskyi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are able to maintain a high oxidizing potential during starvation. Nitrite has a short-lasting stimulatory effect on the oxidation of ammonia after starvation when supplied simultaneously with fresh ammonium9). To examine whether nitrite-oxidizing bacteria as partners in

  5. A Zinc Oxide Nanorod Ammonia Microsensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit on-a-Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyan-Chyi Wu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A zinc oxide nanorod ammonia microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip fabricated using the commercial 0.35 mm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process was investigated. The structure of the ammonia sensor is composed of a sensitive film and polysilicon electrodes. The ammonia sensor requires a post-process to etch the sacrificial layer, and to coat the sensitive film on the polysilicon electrodes. The sensitive film that is prepared by a hydrothermal method is made of zinc oxide. The sensor resistance changes when the sensitive film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. Experiments show that the ammonia sensor has a sensitivity of about 1.5 mV/ppm at room temperature.

  6. Nitrous oxide production by lithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and implications for engineered nitrogen-removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Kartik; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) form a crucial component in microbial nitrogen cycling in both natural and engineered systems. Under specific conditions, including transitions from anoxic to oxic conditions and/or excessive ammonia loading, and the presence of high nitrite (NO₂⁻) concentrations, these bacteria are also documented to produce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) gases. Essentially, ammonia oxidation in the presence of non-limiting substrate concentrations (ammonia and O₂) is associated with N₂O production. An exceptional scenario that leads to such conditions is the periodical switch between anoxic and oxic conditions, which is rather common in engineered nitrogen-removal systems. In particular, the recovery from, rather than imposition of, anoxic conditions has been demonstrated to result in N₂O production. However, applied engineering perspectives, so far, have largely ignored the contribution of nitrification to N₂O emissions in greenhouse gas inventories from wastewater-treatment plants. Recent field-scale measurements have revealed that nitrification-related N₂O emissions are generally far higher than emissions assigned to heterotrophic denitrification. In the present paper, the metabolic pathways, which could potentially contribute to NO and N₂O production by AOB have been conceptually reconstructed under conditions especially relevant to engineered nitrogen-removal systems. Taken together, the reconstructed pathways, field- and laboratory-scale results suggest that engineering designs that achieve low effluent aqueous nitrogen concentrations also minimize gaseous nitrogen emissions.

  7. Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Bradley B; Herrmann, Jonathan; Bargar, John R; van den Bedem, Henry; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Francis, Christopher A

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the molecular ecology and environmental determinants of ammonia-oxidizing organisms is critical to understanding and predicting the global nitrogen (N) and carbon cycles, but an incomplete biochemical picture hinders in vitro studies of N-cycling enzymes. Although an integrative structural and dynamic characterization at the atomic scale would advance our understanding of function tremendously, structural knowledge of key N-cycling enzymes from ecologically relevant ammonia oxidizers is unfortunately extremely limited. Here, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for examining the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing organisms, particularly uncultivated Thaumarchaeota, through (meta)genome-driven structural biology of the enzymes ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and nitrite reductase (NirK). © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Emergent macrophytes modify the abundance and community composition of ammonia oxidizers in their rhizosphere sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dayong; He, Xiaowei; Huang, Rui; Yan, Wenming; Yu, Zhongbo

    2017-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation is a crucial process in global nitrogen cycling, which is catalyzed by the ammonia oxidizers. Emergent plants play important roles in the freshwater ecosystem. Therefore, it is meaningful to investigate the effects of emergent macrophytes on the abundance and community composition of ammonia oxidizers. In the present study, two commonly found emergent macrophytes (Zizania caduciflora and Phragmitas communis) were obtained from freshwater lakes and the abundance and community composition of the ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in the rhizosphere sediments of these emergent macrophytes were investigated. The abundance of the bacterial amoA gene was higher in the rhizosphere sediments of the emergent macrophytes than those of bulk sediments. Significant positive correlation was found between the potential nitrification rates (PNRs) and the abundance of bacterial amoA gene, suggesting that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) might play an important role in the nitrification process of the rhizosphere sediments of emergent macrophytes. The Nitrosotalea cluster is the dominant ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) group in all the sediment samples. Analysis of AOB group showed that the N. europaeal cluster dominated the rhizosphere sediments of Z. caduciflora and the bulk sediments, whereas the Nitrosospira cluster was the dominant AOB group in the rhizosphere sediments of P. communis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Continuous culture enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at low ammonium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Until now enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from natural ammonium-limited environments have been performed mainly in the presence of much higher ammonia concentrations than those present in the natural environment and many have resulted in the enrichment and isolation of environmentally less

  10. Continuous culture enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at low ammonium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Until now enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from natural ammonium-limited environments have been performed mainly in the presence of much higher ammonia concentrations than those present in the natural environment and many have resulted in the enrichment and isolation of environmentally

  11. Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Show More Distinct Biogeographic Distribution Patterns than Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria across the Black Soil Zone of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Yu, Zhenhua; Yao, Qin; Sui, Yueyu; Shi, Yu; Chu, Haiyan; Tang, Caixian; Franks, Ashley E; Jin, Jian; Liu, Xiaobing; Wang, Guanghua

    2018-01-01

    Black soils (Mollisols) of northeast China are highly productive and agriculturally important for food production. Ammonia-oxidizing microbes play an important role in N cycling in the black soils. However, the information related to the composition and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing microbes in the black soils has not yet been addressed. In this study, we used the amoA gene to quantify the abundance and community composition of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) across the black soil zone. The amoA abundance of AOA was remarkably larger than that of AOB, with ratios of AOA/AOB in the range from 3.1 to 91.0 across all soil samples. The abundance of AOA amoA was positively correlated with total soil C content ( p 0.05). In contrast, the abundance of AOB amoA positively correlated with soil pH ( p = 0.009) but not with total soil C. Alpha diversity of AOA did not correlate with any soil parameter, however, alpha diversity of AOB was affected by multiple soil factors, such as soil pH, total P, N, and C, available K content, and soil water content. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the AOA community was mainly affected by the sampling latitude, followed by soil pH, total P and C; while the AOB community was mainly determined by soil pH, as well as total P, C and N, water content, and sampling latitude, which highlighted that the AOA community was more geographically distributed in the black soil zone of northeast China than AOB community. In addition, the pairwise analyses showed that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) was not correlated with alpha diversity but weakly positively with the abundance of the AOA community ( p = 0.048), whereas PNR significantly correlated positively with the richness ( p = 0.003), diversity ( p = 0.001) and abundance ( p < 0.001) of the AOB community, which suggested that AOB community might make a greater contribution to nitrification than AOA community in the black soils when

  12. Contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to nitrification in Oregon forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinda Lu; Peter J. Bottomley; David D. Myrold

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the first step of nitrification, is mediated by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB); however, the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to soil nitrification are not well understood. In this study we used 1-octyne to discriminate between AOA-and AOB-supported nitrifi-cation determined both in soil-water slurries and in unsaturated...

  13. Adaptation of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to environment shift of paddy field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiubin; Lu, Yahai

    2012-04-01

    Adaptation of microorganisms to the environment is a central theme in microbial ecology. The objective of this study was to investigate the response of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to a soil medium shift. We employed two rice field soils collected from Beijing and Hangzhou, China. These soils contained distinct AOB communities dominated by Nitrosomonas in Beijing rice soil and Nitrosospira in Hangzhou rice soil. Three mixtures were generated by mixing equal quantities of Beijing soil and Hangzhou soil (BH), Beijing soil with sterilized Hangzhou soil (BSH), and Hangzhou soil with sterilized Beijing soil (HSB). Pure and mixed soils were permanently flooded, and the surface-layer soil where ammonia oxidation occurred was collected to determine the response of AOB and AOA to the soil medium shift. AOB populations increased during the incubation, and the rates were initially faster in Beijing soil than in Hangzhou soil. Nitrosospira (cluster 3a) and Nitrosomonas (communis cluster) increased with time in correspondence with ammonia oxidation in the Hangzhou and Beijing soils, respectively. The 'BH' mixture exhibited a shift from Nitrosomonas at day 0 to Nitrosospira at days 21 and 60 when ammonia oxidation became most active. In 'HSB' and 'BSH' mixtures, Nitrosospira showed greater stimulation than Nitrosomonas, both with and without N amendment. These results suggest that Nitrosospira spp. were better adapted to soil environment shifts than Nitrosomonas. Analysis of the AOA community revealed that the composition of AOA community was not responsive to the soil environment shifts or to nitrogen amendment. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process

  15. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-02-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process.

  16. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process.

  17. Interactions between ammonia and nitrite oxidizing bacteria in co-cultures: Is there evidence for mutualism, commensalism, or competition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayavedra-Soto, Luis [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Arp, Daniel [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Nitrification is a two-step environmental microbial process in the nitrogen cycle in which ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea oxidize ammonia to nitrite and nitrite is oxidized to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. These microorganisms, which likely act in concert in a microbial community, play critical roles in the movement of inorganic N in soils, sediments and waters and are essential to the balance of the nitrogen cycle. Anthropogenic activity has altered the balance of the nitrogen cycle through agriculture practices and organic waste byproducts. Through their influence on available N for plant growth, nitrifying microorganisms influence plant productivity for food and fiber production and the associated carbon sequestration. N Fertilizer production, primarily as ammonia, requires large inputs of natural gas and hydrogen. In croplands fertilized with ammonia-based fertilizers, nitrifiers contribute to the mobilization of this N by producing nitrate (NO3-), wasting the energy used in the production and application of ammonia-based fertilizer. The resulting nitrate is readily leached from these soils, oxidized to gaseous N oxides (greenhouse gases), and denitrified to N2 (which is no longer available as a plant N source). Still, ammonia oxidizers are beneficial in the treatment of wastewater and they also show potential to contribute to microbial bioremediation strategies for clean up of environments contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. Mitigation of the negative effects and exploitation of the beneficial effects of nitrifiers will be facilitated by a systems-level understanding of the interactions of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria with the environment and with each other.

  18. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    Substrates that contain high ammonia levels can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process and unstable biogas production. The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of different ammonia levels on pure strains of (syntrophic acetate oxidizing) SAO bacteria and hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens. Two pure strains of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e: Methanoculleus bourgensis and Methanoculleus thermophiles) and two pure strains of SAO bacteria (i.e: Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) were inoculated under four different ammonia (0.26, 3, 5 and 7g NH4+-N......, the total incubation periods of hydrogenotrophic methanogens were significantly shorter compared to the SAO bacteria incubation periods. Thus, it seems that hydrogenotrophic methanogens could be equally, if not more, tolerant to high ammonia levels compared to SAO bacteria....

  19. Shifts in the pelagic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities along the eutrophic estuary of Yong River in Ningbo City, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Qiufang; Tang, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Yang-Jing; Xu, Jirong; Chen, Heping; Wang, Ming-Juang; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aerobic ammonia oxidation plays a key role in the nitrogen cycle, and the diversity of the responsible microorganisms is regulated by environmental factors. Abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were investigated in the surface

  20. The effect of antimony-tin and indium-tin oxide supports on the catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles for ammonia electro-oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Júlio César M. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation (CCRI), University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitária, CEP 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Piasentin, Ricardo M.; Spinacé, Estevam V.; Neto, Almir O. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitária, CEP 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baranova, Elena A., E-mail: elena.baranova@uottawa.ca [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation (CCRI), University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon (Pt/C) and carbon with addition of ITO (Pt/C-ITO (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 9}·(SnO{sub 2}){sub 1}) and ATO (Pt/C-ATO (SnO{sub 2}){sub 9}·(Sb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 1}) oxides were prepared by sodium borohydride reduction method and used for ammonia electro-oxidation reaction (AmER) in alkaline media. The effect of the supports on the catalytic activity of Pt for AmER was investigated using electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry) and direct ammonia fuel cell (DAFC) experiments. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed Pt peaks attributed to the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, as well as peaks characteristic of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} in ITO support and cassiterite SnO{sub 2} phase of ATO support. According to transmission electron micrographs the mean particles sizes of Pt over carbon were 5.4, 4.9 and 4.7 nm for Pt/C, Pt/C-ATO and Pt/C-ITO, respectively. Pt/C-ITO catalysts showed the highest catalytic activity for ammonia electrooxidation in both electrochemical and fuel cell experiments. We attributed this to the presence of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase in ITO, which provides oxygenated or hydroxide species at lower potentials resulting in the removal of poisonous intermediate, i.e., atomic nitrogen (N{sub ads}) and promotion of ammonia electro-oxidation. - Highlights: • Oxide support effect on the catalytic activity of Pt towards ammonia electro-oxidation. • Direct ammonia fuel cell (DAFC) performance using Pt over different supports as anode. • Pt/C-ITO shows better catalytic activity for ammonia oxidation than Pt/C and Pt/C-ATO.

  1. Resveratrol prevents ammonia toxicity in astroglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Daniele Bobermin

    Full Text Available Ammonia is implicated as a neurotoxin in brain metabolic disorders associated with hyperammonemia. Acute ammonia toxicity can be mediated by an excitotoxic mechanism, oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO production. Astrocytes interact with neurons, providing metabolic support and protecting against oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Astrocytes also convert excess ammonia and glutamate into glutamine via glutamine synthetase (GS. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and red wines, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and modulates glial functions, such as glutamate metabolism. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, GS activity, S100B secretion, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in astroglial cells exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced oxidative stress, decreased GS activity and increased cytokines release, probably by a mechanism dependent on protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathways. Resveratrol prevented ammonia toxicity by modulating oxidative stress, glial and inflammatory responses. The ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB are involved in the protective effect of resveratrol on cytokines proinflammatory release. In contrast, other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid and trolox were not effective against hyperammonemia. Thus, resveratrol could be used to protect against ammonia-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. Resveratrol Prevents Ammonia Toxicity in Astroglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Gottfried, Carmem

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is implicated as a neurotoxin in brain metabolic disorders associated with hyperammonemia. Acute ammonia toxicity can be mediated by an excitotoxic mechanism, oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) production. Astrocytes interact with neurons, providing metabolic support and protecting against oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Astrocytes also convert excess ammonia and glutamate into glutamine via glutamine synthetase (GS). Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and red wines, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and modulates glial functions, such as glutamate metabolism. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), GS activity, S100B secretion, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in astroglial cells exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced oxidative stress, decreased GS activity and increased cytokines release, probably by a mechanism dependent on protein kinase A (PKA) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Resveratrol prevented ammonia toxicity by modulating oxidative stress, glial and inflammatory responses. The ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) are involved in the protective effect of resveratrol on cytokines proinflammatory release. In contrast, other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid and trolox) were not effective against hyperammonemia. Thus, resveratrol could be used to protect against ammonia-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:23284918

  3. Investigation of Pristine Graphite Oxide as Room-Temperature Chemiresistive Ammonia Gas Sensing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Bannov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphite oxide has been investigated as a possible room-temperature chemiresistive sensor of ammonia in a gas phase. Graphite oxide was synthesized from high purity graphite using the modified Hummers method. The graphite oxide sample was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Sensing properties were tested in a wide range of ammonia concentrations in air (10–1000 ppm and under different relative humidity levels (3%–65%. It was concluded that the graphite oxide–based sensor possessed a good response to NH3 in dry synthetic air (ΔR/R0 ranged from 2.5% to 7.4% for concentrations of 100–500 ppm and 3% relative humidity with negligible cross-sensitivity towards H2 and CH4. It was determined that the sensor recovery rate was improved with ammonia concentration growth. Increasing the ambient relative humidity led to an increase of the sensor response. The highest response of 22.2% for 100 ppm of ammonia was achieved at a 65% relative humidity level.

  4. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria community dynamics in a pilot-scale wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemoautotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB have the metabolic ability to oxidize ammonia to nitrite aerobically. This metabolic feature has been widely used, in combination with denitrification, to remove nitrogen from wastewater in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. However, the relative influence of specific deterministic environmental factors to AOB community dynamics in WWTP is uncertain. The ecological principles underlying AOB community dynamics and nitrification stability and how they are related are also poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The community dynamics of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB in a pilot-scale WWTP were monitored over a one-year period by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP. During the study period, the effluent ammonia concentrations were almost below 2 mg/L, except for the first 60 days, indicting stable nitrification. T-RFLP results showed that, during the test period with stable nitrification, the AOB community structures were not stable, and the average change rate (every 15 days of AOB community structures was 10% ± 8%. The correlations between T-RFLP profiles and 10 operational and environmental parameters were tested by Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA and Mantel test. The results indicated that the dynamics of AOB community correlated most strongly with Dissolved Oxygen (DO, effluent ammonia, effluent Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD and temperature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that nitrification stability is not necessarily accompanied by a stable AOB community, and provides insight into parameters controlling the AOB community dynamics within bioreactors with stable nitrification.

  5. Low-temperature conversion of ammonia to nitrogen in water with ozone over composite metal oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunnen; Wu, Ye; Liu, Chen; Guo, Lin; Nie, Jinxia; Chen, Yu; Qiu, Tingsheng

    2018-04-01

    As one of the most important water pollutants, ammonia nitrogen emissions have increased year by year, which has attracted people's attention. Catalytic ozonation technology, which involves production of ·OH radical with strong oxidation ability, is widely used in the treatment of organic-containing wastewater. In this work, MgO-Co 3 O 4 composite metal oxide catalysts prepared with different fabrication conditions have been systematically evaluated and compared in the catalytic ozonation of ammonia (50mg/L) in water. In terms of high catalytic activity in ammonia decomposition and high selectivity for gaseous nitrogen, the catalyst with MgO-Co 3 O 4 molar ratio 8:2, calcined at 500°C for 3hr, was the best one among the catalysts we tested, with an ammonia nitrogen removal rate of 85.2% and gaseous nitrogen selectivity of 44.8%. In addition, the reaction mechanism of ozonation oxidative decomposition of ammonia nitrogen in water with the metal oxide catalysts was discussed. Moreover, the effect of coexisting anions on the degradation of ammonia was studied, finding that SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - could inhibit the catalytic activity while CO 3 2- and Br - could promote it. The presence of coexisting cations had very little effect on the catalytic ozonation of ammonia nitrogen. After five successive reuses, the catalyst remained stable in the catalytic ozonation of ammonia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Inhibitory effects of C2 to C10 1-alkynes on ammonia oxidation in two Nitrososphaera species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A E; Taylor, K; Tennigkeit, B; Palatinszky, M; Stieglmeier, M; Myrold, D D; Schleper, C; Wagner, M; Bottomley, P J

    2015-03-01

    A previous study showed that ammonia oxidation by the Thaumarchaeota Nitrosopumilus maritimus (group 1.1a) was resistant to concentrations of the C8 1-alkyne, octyne, which completely inhibits activity by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. In this study, the inhibitory effects of octyne and other C2 to C10 1-alkynes were evaluated on the nitrite production activity of two pure culture isolates from Thaumarchaeota group 1.1b, Nitrososphaera viennensis strain EN76 and Nitrososphaera gargensis. Both N. viennensis and N. gargensis were insensitive to concentrations of octyne that cause complete and irreversible inactivation of nitrite production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. However, octyne concentrations (≥20 μM) that did not inhibit N. maritimus partially inhibited nitrite production in N. viennensis and N. gargensis in a manner that did not show the characteristics of irreversible inactivation. In contrast to previous studies with an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea, octyne inhibition of N. viennensis was: (i) fully and immediately reversible, (ii) not competitive with NH4 (+), and (iii) without effect on the competitive interaction between NH4 (+) and acetylene. Both N. viennensis and N. gargensis demonstrated the same overall trend in regard to 1-alkyne inhibition as previously observed for N. maritimus, being highly sensitive to ≤C5 alkynes and more resistant to longer-chain length alkynes. Reproducible differences were observed among N. maritimus, N. viennensis, and N. gargensis in regard to the extent of their resistance/sensitivity to C6 and C7 1-alkynes, which may indicate differences in the ammonia monooxygenase binding and catalytic site(s) among the Thaumarchaeota. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Coupling Solid Oxide Electrolyser (SOE) and ammonia production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinti, Giovanni; Frattini, Domenico; Jannelli, Elio; Desideri, Umberto; Bidini, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative NH 3 production plant was designed. • CO 2 emissions and energy consumption are studied in three different designs. • High temperature electrolysis allows to achieve high efficiency and heat recovery. • The coupling permits storage of electricity into a liquid carbon free chemical. - Abstract: Ammonia is one of the most produced chemicals worldwide and is currently synthesized using nitrogen separated from air and hydrogen from natural gas reforming with consequent high consumption of fossil fuel and high emission of CO 2 . A renewable path for ammonia production is desirable considering the potential development of ammonia as energy carrier. This study reports design and analysis of an innovative system for the production of green ammonia using electricity from renewable energy sources. This concept couples Solid Oxide Electrolysis (SOE), for the production of hydrogen, with an improved Haber Bosch Reactor (HBR), for ammonia synthesis. An air separator is also introduced to supply pure nitrogen. SOE operates with extremely high efficiency recovering high temperature heat from the Haber-Bosch reactor. Aspen was used to develop a model to study the performance of the plant. Both the SOE and the HBR operate at 650 °C. Ammonia production with zero emission of CO 2 can be obtained with a reduction of 40% of power input compared to equivalent plants.

  8. Simultaneous Fe(III) reduction and ammonia oxidation process in Anammox sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Huang, Yong; Liu, Heng-Wei; Wu, Chuan; Bi, Wei; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, there have been a number of reports on the phenomenon in which ferric iron (Fe(III)) is reduced to ferrous iron [Fe(II)] in anaerobic environments, accompanied by simultaneous oxidation of ammonia to NO 2 - , NO 3 - , or N 2. However, studies on the relevant reaction characteristics and mechanisms are rare. Recently, in research on the effect of Fe(III) on the activity of Anammox sludge, excess ammonia oxidization has also been found. Hence, in the present study, Fe(III) was used to serve as the electron acceptor instead of NO 2 - , and the feasibility and characteristics of Anammox coupled to Fe(III) reduction (termed Feammox) were investigated. After 160days of cultivation, the conversion rate of ammonia in the reactor was above 80%, accompanied by the production of a large amount of NO 3 - and a small amount of NO 2 - . The total nitrogen removal rate was up to 71.8%. Furthermore, quantities of Fe(II) were detected in the sludge fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and denaturated gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses further revealed that in the sludge, some Anammox bacteria were retained, and some microbes were enriched during the acclimatization process. We thus deduced that in Anammox sludge, Fe(III) reduction takes place together with ammonia oxidation to NO 2 - and NO 3 - along with the Anammox process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Cultivation and characterization of Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus exaquare, an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from a municipal wastewater treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Laura A; Albertsen, Mads; Engel, Katja; Schwarz, Jasmin; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Neufeld, Josh D

    2017-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota have been detected in several industrial and municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), despite the fact that ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are thought to be adapted to low ammonia environments. However, the activity, physiology and metabolism of WWTP-associated AOA remain poorly understood. We report the cultivation and complete genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus exaquare, a novel AOA representative from a municipal WWTP in Guelph, Ontario (Canada). In enrichment culture, Ca. N. exaquare oxidizes ammonia to nitrite stoichiometrically, is mesophilic, and tolerates at least 15 mm of ammonium chloride or sodium nitrite. Microautoradiography (MAR) for enrichment cultures demonstrates that Ca. N. exaquare assimilates bicarbonate in association with ammonia oxidation. However, despite using inorganic carbon, the ammonia-oxidizing activity of Ca. N. exaquare is greatly stimulated in enrichment culture by the addition of organic compounds, especially malate and succinate. Ca. N. exaquare cells are coccoid with a diameter of ~1-2 μm. Phylogenetically, Ca. N. exaquare belongs to the Nitrososphaera sister cluster within the Group I.1b Thaumarchaeota, a lineage which includes most other reported AOA sequences from municipal and industrial WWTPs. The 2.99 Mbp genome of Ca. N. exaquare encodes pathways for ammonia oxidation, bicarbonate fixation, and urea transport and breakdown. In addition, this genome encodes several key genes for dealing with oxidative stress, including peroxidase and catalase. Incubations of WWTP biofilm demonstrate partial inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing activity by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO), suggesting that Ca. N. exaquare-like AOA may contribute to nitrification in situ. However, CARD-FISH-MAR showed no incorporation of bicarbonate by detected Thaumarchaeaota, suggesting that detected AOA may incorporate non-bicarbonate carbon sources or rely on an alternative and yet unknown

  10. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria: A model for molecular microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; Stephen, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The eutrophication of many ecosystems in recent decades has led to an increased interest in the ecology of nitrogen transformation. Chemolitho-autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are responsible for the rate-limiting step of nitrification in a wide variety of environments, making them important

  11. Application of a Chemiluminescence Detector for the Measurement of Total Oxides of Nitrogen and Ammonia in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgeson, J. A.; Bell, J. P.; Rehme, K. A.; Krost, K. J.; Stevens, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    By means of the thermal conversion of nitrogen dioxide to the nitric oxide, the chemiluminescent nitric oxide monitor, based on the nitric oxide plus ozone reaction, may be used for monitoring nitrogen dioxide plus nitric oxide (NO(x)). Under conditions previously described, ammonia is also converted to nitric oxide and therefore interferes. A metal surface, gold wool or stainless steel, operated at two different temperatures has been used to convert only nitrogen dioxide or nitrogen dioxide plus ammonia. Quantitative conversion of nitrogen dioxide to nitric oxide has been obtained at temperatures as low as 200 C. Conversion of ammonia is effected at temperatures of 300 C or higher. By the addition of a converter the basic nitric oxide monitor may be used for measuring NO(x) or NO(x) plus ammonia. As an alternate mode, for a fixed high temperature, a specific scrubber is described for removing NH3 without affecting NO2 concentrations.

  12. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V 2 O 5 ), and iron chloride (FeCl 3 ). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V 2 O 5 , respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100–110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl 3 as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response (ΔR/Rx100) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is ∼4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl 3 and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from ∼4.5 to 11 % and ∼10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Sedlacek, C.J.; Norton, J.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Suwa, Y.; Stein, L.Y.; Klotz, M.G.; Arp, D.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.; Lu, M.; Bruce, D.; Detter, C.; Tapia, R.; Han, J.; Woyke, T.; Lucas, S.; Pitluck, S.; Pennacchio, L.; Nolan, M.; Land, M.L.; Huntemann, M.; Deshpande, S.; Han, C.; Chen, A.; Kyrpides, N.; Mavromatis, K.; Markowitz, V.; Szeto, E.; Ivanova, N.; Mikhailova, N.; Pagani, I.; Pati, A.; Peters, L.; Ovchinnikova, G.; Goodwin, L.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production

  14. Physiological plasticity of the thermophilic ammonia oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii in response to a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, T.; Johnson, A.; Gelsinger, D.; de la Torre, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Our understanding of nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in high temperature environments underwent a dramatic revision with the discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA). The importance of AOA to the global nitrogen cycle came to light when recent studies of marine AOA demonstrated the dominance of these organisms in the ocean microbiome and their role as producers of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Understanding how AOA respond to fluctuating environments is crucial to fully comprehending their contribution to global biogeochemical cycling and climate change. In this study we use the thermophilic AOA Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii strain HL72 to explore the physiological plasticity of energy metabolism in these organisms. Previous studies have shown that HL72 grows autotrophically by aerobically oxidizing ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-). Unlike studies of marine AOA, we find that HL72 can grow over a wide ammonia concentration range (0.25 - 10 mM NH4Cl) with comparable generation times when in the presence of 0.25 to 4 mM NH4Cl. However, preliminary data indicate that amoA, the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO), is upregulated at low ammonia concentrations (<50 μM) compared to growth at 1 mM. Although the ammonia oxidation pathway has not been fully elucidated, we have shown that nitric oxide (NO) appears to be a key intermediate: exponentially growing HL72 produces significant NO and the removal of NO using a scavenger reversibly inhibits growth. In addition to AMO, the HL72 genome also contains sequences for a urease encoded by subunits ureABC and an active urea transporter. Urea ((NH2)2CO) is an organic compound ubiquitous to aquatic and soil habitats that, when hydrolyzed, forms NH3 and CO2. We examined urea as an alternate source of ammonia for the ammonia oxidation pathway. HL72 grows over a wide range of urea concentrations (0.25 - 10 mM) at rates comparable to growth on ammonia. In a substrate competition experiment HL72 preferentially

  15. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollmann, Annette [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Sedlacek, Christopher J [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J [Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW); Suwa, Yuichi [Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan; Stein, Lisa Y [University of California, Riverside; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Arp, D J [Oregon State University; Sayavedra-Soto, LA [Oregon State University; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production of nitrate. Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is an ammonia oxidizer of high interest because it is adapted to low ammonium and can be found in freshwater environments around the world. The 3,783,444-bp chromosome with a total of 3,553 protein coding genes and 44 RNA genes was sequenced by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2006.

  16. Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Abell, Guy C. J.; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Bodrossy, Levente; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Hefting, Mariet M.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively) to the net oxidation of ammonia varies greatly between terrestrial environments. To better understand, predict and possibly manage terrestrial nitrogen turnover, we need to develop a conceptual understanding of ammonia oxidation as a function of environmental conditions including the ecophysiology of associated organisms. We examined the discrete and combined effects of mineral nitrogen deposition and geothermal heating on ammonia-oxidizing communities by sampling soils from a long-term fertilization site along a temperature gradient in Icelandic grasslands. Microarray, clone library and quantitative PCR analyses of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene accompanied by physico-chemical measurements of the soil properties were conducted. In contrast to most other terrestrial environments, the ammonia-oxidizing communities consisted almost exclusively of archaea. Their bacterial counterparts proved to be undetectable by quantitative polymerase chain reaction suggesting AOB are only of minor relevance for ammonia oxidation in these soils. Our results show that fertilization and local, geothermal warming affected detectable ammonia-oxidizing communities, but not soil chemistry: only a subset of the detected AOA phylotypes was present in higher temperature soils and AOA abundance was increased in the fertilized soils, while soil physio-chemical properties remained unchanged. Differences in distribution and structure of AOA communities were best explained by soil pH and clay content irrespective of temperature or fertilizer treatment in these grassland soils, suggesting that these factors have a greater potential for ecological niche-differentiation of AOA in soil than temperature and N fertilization. PMID:23060870

  17. Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDaebeler

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively to the net oxidation of ammonia varies greatly between terrestrial environments. To better understand, predict and possibly manage terrestrial nitrogen turnover, we need to develop a conceptual understanding of ammonia oxidation as a function of environmental conditions including the ecophysiology of the associated organisms. We examined the discrete and combined effects of mineral nitrogen deposition and geothermal heating on ammonia-oxidizing communities by sampling soils from a long-term fertilisation site along a temperature gradient in Icelandic grasslands. Microarray, clone library and quantitative PCR analyses of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene accompanied by physico-chemical measurements of the soil properties were conducted. In contrast to most other terrestrial environments, the ammonia-oxidizing communities consisted almost exclusively of archaea. Their bacterial counterparts proved to be undetectable by quantitative PCR suggesting AOB are only of minor relevance for ammonia oxidation in these soils. Our results show that fertilization and local, geothermal warming affected detectable ammonia-oxidizing communities, but not soil chemistry: only a subset of the detected AOA phylotypes was present in higher temperature soils and AOA abundance was increased in the fertilized soils, while the measured soil physico-chemical properties remained unchanged. Differences in distribution and structure of AOA communities were best explained by soil pH and clay content irrespective of temperature or fertilizer treatment in these grassland soils, suggesting that these factors have a greater potential for ecological niche-differentiation of AOA in soil than temperature and N fertilization.

  18. Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Abell, Guy C J; Bodelier, Paul L E; Bodrossy, Levente; Frampton, Dion M F; Hefting, Mariet M; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively) to the net oxidation of ammonia varies greatly between terrestrial environments. To better understand, predict and possibly manage terrestrial nitrogen turnover, we need to develop a conceptual understanding of ammonia oxidation as a function of environmental conditions including the ecophysiology of associated organisms. We examined the discrete and combined effects of mineral nitrogen deposition and geothermal heating on ammonia-oxidizing communities by sampling soils from a long-term fertilization site along a temperature gradient in Icelandic grasslands. Microarray, clone library and quantitative PCR analyses of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene accompanied by physico-chemical measurements of the soil properties were conducted. In contrast to most other terrestrial environments, the ammonia-oxidizing communities consisted almost exclusively of archaea. Their bacterial counterparts proved to be undetectable by quantitative polymerase chain reaction suggesting AOB are only of minor relevance for ammonia oxidation in these soils. Our results show that fertilization and local, geothermal warming affected detectable ammonia-oxidizing communities, but not soil chemistry: only a subset of the detected AOA phylotypes was present in higher temperature soils and AOA abundance was increased in the fertilized soils, while soil physio-chemical properties remained unchanged. Differences in distribution and structure of AOA communities were best explained by soil pH and clay content irrespective of temperature or fertilizer treatment in these grassland soils, suggesting that these factors have a greater potential for ecological niche-differentiation of AOA in soil than temperature and N fertilization.

  19. RESULTS OF INITIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-30

    This memo presents an experimental survey of aqueous phase chemical processes to remove aqueous ammonia from waste process streams. Ammonia is generated in both the current Hanford waste flowsheet and in future waste processing. Much ammonia will be generated in the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters.i Testing with simulants in glass melters at Catholic University has demonstrated the significant ammonia production.ii The primary reaction there is the reducing action of sugar on nitrate in the melter cold cap. Ammonia has been found to be a problem in secondary waste stabilization. Ammonia vapors are noxious and destruction of ammonia could reduce hazards to waste treatment process personnel. It is easily evolved especially when ammonia-bearing solutions are adjusted to high pH.

  20. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, Nitric Oxide and Ammonia by Gut Bacteria under Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  1. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tiso

    Full Text Available The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in

  2. Ammonium supply rate influences archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers in a wetland soil vertical profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfferle, Špela; Nicol, Graeme W; Pal, Levin; Hacin, Janez; Prosser, James I; Mandić-Mulec, Ines

    2010-11-01

    Oxidation of ammonia, the first step in nitrification, is carried out in soil by bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers and recent studies suggest possible selection for the latter in low-ammonium environments. In this study, we investigated the selection of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in wetland soil vertical profiles at two sites differing in terms of the ammonium supply rate, but not significantly in terms of the groundwater level. One site received ammonium through decomposition of organic matter, while the second, polluted site received a greater supply, through constant leakage of an underground septic tank. Soil nitrification potential was significantly greater at the polluted site. Quantification of amoA genes demonstrated greater abundance of bacterial than archaeal amoA genes throughout the soil profile at the polluted site, whereas bacterial amoA genes at the unpolluted site were below the detection limit. At both sites, archaeal, but not the bacterial community structure was clearly stratified with depth, with regard to the soil redox potential imposed by groundwater level. However, depth-related changes in the archaeal community structure may also be associated with physiological functions other than ammonia oxidation. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea in Tropical Compost Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya eDe Gannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA has changed the paradigm of nitrification being initiated solely by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In the present study, AOA abundance and diversity was examined in composts produced from combinations of plant waste materials common in tropical agriculture (rice straw, sugar cane bagasse, coffee hulls, which were mixed with either cow- or sheep-manure. The objective was to determine how AOA abundance and diversity varied as a function of compost system and time, the latter being a contrast between the start of the compost process (mesophilic phase and the finished product (mature phase. The results showed that AOA were relatively abundant in composts of tropical agricultural wastes, and significantly more so than were the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, while the AOA communities in the composts were predominatly group I.1b, the communities were diverse and exhibited structures that diverged between compost types and phases. These patterns could be taken as indicators of the ecophysiological diversity in the soil AOA (groub I.1b, in that significantly different AOA communties developed when exposed to varying physico-chemical environments. Nitrification patterns and levels differed in the composts which, for the mature material, could have signifcant effects on its performanc as a plant growth medium. Thus, it will also be important to determine the association of AOA (and diversity in their communities with nitrification in these systems.

  4. Cultivation and genomic analysis of Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus, a novel obligately thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeon

    OpenAIRE

    De La Torre, Jose; Kirkegaard, Rasmus; Daebeler, Anne; Sedlacek, Christopher; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger; Pjevac, Petra; Albersten, Mads; Vierheilig, Julia; Herbold, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaea are the only known aerobic ammonia oxidizers in geothermal environments. Although molecular data indicate the presence of phylogenetically diverse AOA from the Nitrosocaldus clade, group 1.1b and group 1.1a Thaumarchaea in terrestrial high-temperature habitats, only one enrichment culture of an AOA thriving above 50 C has been reported and functionally analyzed. In this study, we physiologically and genomically characterized a nov...

  5. Adsorption of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} on an activated carbon cloth modified by ammonia treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudou, J.P.; Chehimi, M.; Broniek, E.; Siemieniewska, T.; Bimer, J. [University of Paris, Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate how ammonia treatment of the surface can influence the activity of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth (ACC) for the oxidative retention of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} in humid air at 25{sup o}C. Surface basic nitrogen groups were introduced either by treatment with ammonia/air at 300{sup o}C or with ammonia/steam at 800{sup o}C. The pore structure of the samples so prepared was examined by adsorption measurements. Changes in the surface chemistry were assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The change of ACC activity could not be merely attributed to surface nitrogen groups but to other changes in the support. Ammonia/steam treatment improved ACC performance the most, not only by introducing nitrogen surface groups, but also by extending the microporosity and by modifying the distribution of surface oxygen groups. Successive adsorption-regeneration cycles showed important differences between oxidative retention of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} and the subsequent catalyst/support regeneration process.

  6. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  7. Potato cultivar type affects the structure of ammonia oxidizer communities in field soil under potato beyond the rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalcante Franco Dias, A.; Hoogwout, E.F.; de Cassia Pereira e Silva, M.; Falcão Salles, J.; van Overbeek, L.S.; van Elsas, J.D.

    The effects of plants on the microbiota involved in the oxidation of ammonia in soils have been controversial. Here, we investigated the dynamics in the abundances and community structures of the bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers (AOB and AOA, respectively) in two fields that were cropped

  8. Relative contributions of archaea and bacteria to microbial ammonia oxidation differ under different conditions during agricultural waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Jiachao; Chen, Yaoning; Yu, Zhen; Yu, Man; Li, Hui; Liu, Zhifeng; Chen, Ming; Lu, Lunhui; Hu, Chunxiao

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the relative contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) to nitrification during agricultural waste composting. The AOA and AOB amoA gene abundance and composition were determined by quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), respectively. The results showed that the archaeal amoA gene was abundant throughout the composting process, while the bacterial amoA gene abundance decreased to undetectable level during the thermophilic and cooling stages. DGGE showed more diverse archaeal amoA gene composition when the potential ammonia oxidation (PAO) rate reached peak values. A significant positive relationship was observed between the PAO rate and the archaeal amoA gene abundance (R²=0.554; Parchaea dominated ammonia oxidation during the thermophilic and cooling stages. Bacteria were also related to ammonia oxidation activity (R²=0.503; P=0.03) especially during the mesophilic and maturation stages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential nitrous oxide yield of AOA vs. AOB and utilization of carbon and nitrogen in the ammonia oxidizing process in the Pearl River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Dai, M.; Tan, S.; Xia, X.; Liu, H.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas, is a by-product during ammonia oxidation process, the production of which is often stimulated under low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the estuarine environment. The potential yield of N2O has been considered to be driven by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) of Betaproteobacteria & Gammaproteobacteria and/or ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of Thaumarchaeota. In order to examine the relative importance of AOA and AOB in producing N2O and in modulating the potential N2O yield, arch-amoA, beta-amoA, gamma-amoA encoding for the alpha subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) are used as biomarkers to identify the distributions and bioactivities of AOA and AOB in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE). Size fractionation experiments were conducted to distinguish AOA and AOB on particles in different size-fractions of > 3 μm, 0.45-3 μm, and 0.22-0.45 μm. Pure culture of N. maritimusSCM1 was studied as a model organism to identify the organic carbon production during ammonia oxidation by SCM1 strains. Our results show that AOA distributes largely in the free-living state and could adapt to very limited ammonia substrate and low saturation of DO; AOB mainly distributes at the particle-attached state under relative richer ammonia and high DO conditions; however, the RNA/DNA ratio of AOB was higher than that of AOA under the same conditions suggesting AOB is relatively more actively expressed. In the upper reach of PRE, the dominant microorganism in the water column was AOB and the in situ N2O/NH3 therein ranged 0.73-3.74 ‰. In the lower PRE, AOA was dominated, and the in situ N2O/NH3 was of 1.17- 7.32‰. At selected sites, we estimated isotope effect (e) of AOA (eDIC/bulk) as -23.94‰ and AOB (eDIC/bulk) as -56.6‰ to -44.8‰, which is consistent with the studies of pure cultures. The coefficient of C sequestration "k", defined as (C biomass / DIC in situ) / (N biomass / ammonia in situ) to differ the utilization of carbon and nitrogen, of

  10. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Ammonia-Oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in Distinct Arctic Water Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Müller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most abundant archaeal groups on Earth is the Thaumarchaeota. They are recognized as major contributors to marine ammonia oxidation, a crucial step in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. Their universal success is attributed to a high genomic flexibility and niche adaptability. Based on differences in the gene coding for ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA, two different ecotypes with distinct distribution patterns in the water column have been identified. We used high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes combined with archaeal amoA functional gene clone libraries to investigate which environmental factors are driving the distribution of Thaumarchaeota ecotypes in the Atlantic gateway to the Arctic Ocean through an annual cycle in 2014. We observed the characteristic vertical pattern of Thaumarchaeota abundance with high values in the mesopelagic (>200 m water throughout the entire year, but also in the epipelagic (<200 m water during the dark winter months (January, March and November. The Thaumarchaeota community was dominated by three OTUs which on average comprised 76% ± 11 and varied in relative abundance according to water mass characteristics and not to depth or ammonium concentration, as suggested in previous studies. The ratios of the abundance of the different OTU types were similar to that of the functional amoA water cluster types. Together, this suggests a strong selection of ecotypes within different water masses, supporting the general idea of water mass characteristics as an important factor in defining microbial community structure. If indeed, as suggested in this study, Thaumarchaeota population dynamics are controlled by a set of factors, described here as water mass characteristics and not just depth alone, then changes in water mass flow will inevitably affect the distribution of the different ecotypes.

  11. Enrichment and Characterization of an Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Mesophilic Crenarchaeal Group I.1a from an Agricultural Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Min, D.; Kim, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kim, G.J.; Madsen, E.L.; Rhee, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Soil nitrification is an important process for agricultural productivity and environmental pollution. Though one cultivated representative of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea from soil has been described, additional representatives warrant characterization. We describe an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (strain

  12. Optimization of Pt-Ir on carbon fiber paper for the electro-oxidation of ammonia in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, Bryan K.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2010-01-01

    Plating bath concentrations of Pt(IV) and Ir(III) have been optimized as well as the total catalytic loading of bimetallic Pt-Ir alloy for the electro-oxidation of ammonia in alkaline media at standard conditions. This was accomplished using cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and statistical optimization tools. Concentrations of Pt(IV) and Ir(III) of the plating bath strongly influence electrode surface atomic compositions of the Pt-Ir alloy directly affecting the electro-oxidation behavior of ammonia. Several anode materials were studied using cyclic voltammetry, which demonstrated that Pt-Ir was the most active catalyst for the electro-oxidation of ammonia. Criteria for optimization were minimizing the climatic oxidation overpotential for ammonia and maximizing the exchange current density. Optimized bath composition was found to be 8.844 ± 0.001 g L -1 Pt(IV) and 4.112 ± 0.001 g L -1 Ir(III) based on electrochemical techniques. Physical characterization of the electrodes by SEM indicates that the plating bath concentrations of Pt and Ir influence the growth and deposition behavior of the alloy.

  13. Continuous measurements of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from air scrubbers at pig housing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heyden, C; Brusselman, E; Volcke, E I P; Demeyer, P

    2016-10-01

    Ammonia, largely emitted by agriculture, involves a great risk for eutrophication and acidification leading to biodiversity loss. Air scrubbers are widely applied to reduce ammonia emission from pig and poultry housing facilities, but it is not always clear whether their performance meets the requirements. Besides, there is a growing international concern for the livestock related greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide but hardly any data concerning their fate in air scrubbers are available. This contribution presents the results from measurement campaigns conducted at a chemical, a biological and a two-stage biological air scrubber installed at pig housing facilities in Flanders. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane at the inlet and outlet of the air scrubbers were monitored on-line during one week using a photoacoustic gas monitor, which allowed to investigate diurnal fluctuations in the removal performance of air scrubbers. Additionally, the homogeneity of the air scrubbers, normally checked by gas detection tubes, was investigated in more detail using the continuous data. The biological air scrubber with extra nitrification tank performed well in terms of ammonia removal (86 ± 6%), while the two-stage air scrubber suffered from nitrifying bacteria inhibition. In the chemical air scrubber the pH was not kept constant, lowering the ammonia removal efficiency. A lower ammonia removal efficiency was found during the day, when the ventilation rate was the highest. Nitrous oxide was produced inside the biological and two-stage scrubber, resulting in an increased outlet concentration of more than 200%. Methane could not be removed in the different air scrubbers because of its low water solubility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Indium oxide thin film based ammonia gas and ethanol vapour sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    acetone and dried under an electric lamp (100 W). Thin films of indium oxide ... A λ-19, UV–VIS Spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer, USA) was used for measuring .... tion of ammonia is observed through glowing of LED. LM3914, LED driver is ...

  15. Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, A.; Abell, G.C.J.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Bodrossy, L.; Frampton, D.M.; Hefting, M.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA, respectively) to the net oxidation of ammonia varies greatly between terrestrial environments. To better understand, predict and possibly manage terrestrial nitrogen turnover, we need to develop a conceptual understanding of

  16. Different Recovery Processes of Soil Ammonia Oxidizers from Flooding Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Ma, Mao-Hua; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Li, Lei; Lv, Ming-Quan; Wu, Sheng-Jun; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-11

    Understanding how microorganisms respond to environmental disturbance is one of the key focuses in microbial ecology. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) are responsible for ammonia oxidation which is a crucial step in the nitrogen cycle. Although the physiology, distribution, and activity of AOA and AOB in soil have been extensively investigated, their recovery from a natural disturbance remains largely unknown. To assess the recovery capacities, including resistance and resilience, of AOA and AOB, soil samples were taken from a reservoir riparian zone which experienced periodically water flooding. The samples were classified into three groups (flooding, recovery, and control) for a high-throughput sequencing and quantitative PCR analysis. We used a relative quantitative index of both the resistance (RS) and resilience (RL) to assess the variation of gene abundance, alpha-diversity, and community composition. The AOA generally demonstrated a better recovery capability after the flooding disturbance compared to AOB. In particular, AOA were more resilient after the flooding disturbance. Taxa within the AOA and AOB showed different RS and RL values, with the most abundant taxa showing in general the highest RS indices. Soil NH 4 + and Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ were the main variables controlling the key taxa of AOA and AOB and probably influenced the resistance and resilience properties of AOA and AOB communities. The distinct mechanisms of AOA and AOB in maintaining community stability against the flooding disturbance might be linked to the different life-history strategies: the AOA community was more likely to represent r-strategists in contrast to the AOB community following a K-life strategy. Our results indicated that the AOA may play a vital role in ammonia oxidation in a fluctuating habitat and contribute to the stability of riparian ecosystem.

  17. Comparison of the Effects of Phenylhydrazine Hydrochloride and Dicyandiamide on Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in Andosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dicyandiamide, a routinely used commercial nitrification inhibitor (NI, inhibits ammonia oxidation catalyzed by ammonia monooxygenase (AMO. Phenylhydrazine hydrochloride has shown considerable potential for the development of next-generation NIs targeting hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO. The effects of the AMO inhibitor and the HAO inhibitor on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA present in agricultural soils have not been compared thus far. In the present study, the effects of the two inhibitors on soil nitrification and the abundance of AOA and AOB as well as their community structure were investigated in a soil microcosm using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. The net nitrification rates and the growth of AOA and AOB in this soil microcosm were inhibited by both NIs. Both NIs had limited effect on the community structure of AOB and no effect on that of AOA in this soil microcosm. The effects of phenylhydrazine hydrochloride were similar to those of dicyandiamide. These results indicated that organohydrazine-based NIs have potential for the development of next-generation NIs targeting HAO in the future.

  18. Effect of communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria on degradation of 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol by nitrifying activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpiyakorn, T.; Sermwaraphan, P.; Kurisu, F.

    2009-07-01

    An endocrine disrupting compound, 17-alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), is a synthetic estrogen used as a key ingredient in oral contraceptives pill. this persistent organic pollutant, no biodegradable by most microorganisms, is discharged via municipal waste streams to natural receiving waters. Recently, it was found that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) enriched with high ammonium loads can degrade EE2 via co-metabolism during ammonia oxidation. (Author)

  19. Ammonia modification of activated carbon to enhance carbon dioxide adsorption: Effect of pre-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafeeyan, Mohammad Saleh; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan; Houshmand, Amirhossein; Arami-Niya, Arash

    2011-02-01

    A commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) was subjected to thermal treatment with ammonia for obtaining an efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent. In general, CO2 adsorption capacity of activated carbon can be increased by introduction of basic nitrogen functionalities onto the carbon surface. In this work, the effect of oxygen surface groups before introduction of basic nitrogen functionalities to the carbon surface on CO2 adsorption capacity was investigated. For this purpose two different approaches of ammonia treatment without preliminary oxidation and amination of oxidized samples were studied. Modified carbons were characterized by elemental analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to study the impact of changes in surface chemistry and formation of specific surface groups on adsorption properties. The texture of the samples was characterized by conducting N2 adsorption/desorption at -196 °C. CO2 capture performance of the samples was investigated using a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in both modification techniques, the presence of nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface generally increased the CO2 adsorption capacity. The results indicated that oxidation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment (800 °C) considerably enhanced the CO2 uptake at higher temperatures.

  20. 3,4-Dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) reduces activity of ammonia oxidizers without adverse effects on non-target soil microorganisms and functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xianwang; Duan, Yun-Feng (Kevin); Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    , dehydrogenase activity, phospholipid fatty acid composition and potential ammonia oxidation. DMPP showed no significant nontarget effects (p > 0.05), but a possible stress response in HD was indicated by a factor analysis of phospholipid fatty acid composition. There was a strong DMPP inhibition on potential...... of ammonia oxidation. We investigated effects of DMPP amendment equivalent to 0 (Control), 1 (regular dose, RD) or 10 (high dose, HD) kg ha1 in a sandy loam grassland soil at 50% water-filled pore space. Following incubation for 1, 7 or 14 d, soil was analyzed for fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis...... ammonia oxidation which was still significant (p HD after 14 d. In separate treatments receiving 50 mg NH4 +-N kg1 dry soil in addition to DMPP, the inhibition of nitrate accumulation was similar in RD and HD at around 75%. Abundances of the gene amoA from ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB...

  1. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea in Tropical Compost Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vidya eDe Gannes; Gaius eEudoxie; David H Dyer; William James Hickey

    2012-01-01

    Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) has changed the p...

  2. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide.

  3. Cultivation and Genomic Analysis of "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus," an Obligately Thermophilic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Thaumarchaeon from a Hot Spring Biofilm in Graendalur Valley, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Herbold, Craig W; Vierheilig, Julia; Sedlacek, Christopher J; Pjevac, Petra; Albertsen, Mads; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H; de la Torre, José R; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota are the only known aerobic ammonia oxidizers in geothermal environments. Although molecular data indicate the presence of phylogenetically diverse AOA from the Nitrosocaldus clade, group 1.1b and group 1.1a Thaumarchaeota in terrestrial high-temperature habitats, only one enrichment culture of an AOA thriving above 50°C has been reported and functionally analyzed. In this study, we physiologically and genomically characterized a newly discovered thaumarchaeon from the deep-branching Nitrosocaldaceae family of which we have obtained a high (∼85%) enrichment from biofilm of an Icelandic hot spring (73°C). This AOA, which we provisionally refer to as " Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus," is an obligately thermophilic, aerobic chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer, which stoichiometrically converts ammonia to nitrite at temperatures between 50 and 70°C. " Ca. N. islandicus" encodes the expected repertoire of enzymes proposed to be required for archaeal ammonia oxidation, but unexpectedly lacks a nirK gene and also possesses no identifiable other enzyme for nitric oxide (NO) generation. Nevertheless, ammonia oxidation by this AOA appears to be NO-dependent as " Ca. N. islandicus" is, like all other tested AOA, inhibited by the addition of an NO scavenger. Furthermore, comparative genomics revealed that " Ca. N. islandicus" has the potential for aromatic amino acid fermentation as its genome encodes an indolepyruvate oxidoreductase ( iorAB ) as well as a type 3b hydrogenase, which are not present in any other sequenced AOA. A further surprising genomic feature of this thermophilic ammonia oxidizer is the absence of DNA polymerase D genes - one of the predominant replicative DNA polymerases in all other ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota. Collectively, our findings suggest that metabolic versatility and DNA replication might differ substantially between obligately thermophilic and other AOA.

  4. Intensive Ammonia and Methane Oxidation in Organic Liquid Manure Crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and are known to accumulate nitrite and nitrate, indicating the presence of ammonia oxidizers (AOB). We have surveyed six manure tanks with organic covers to investigate the prevalence of MOB and AOB and to link the potential activity with physical and chemical aspects...... characterized with respect to O2 availability by in situ profiling with electrochemical microsensors. Results show that oxygen penetration increased from few micrometers up to several centimetres with crust age. AOB and ammonium oxidation are ubiquitously present in well-developed manure crusts whereas MOB were...... also CH4 emission mitigation, an organic surface crust can be effective if populations of MOB and AOB are allowed to build up....

  5. AMMONIA REMOVAL AND NITROUS OXIDE PRODUCTION IN GAS-PHASE COMPOST BIOFILTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofiltration technology is widely utilized for treating ammonia gas (NH3), with one of its potential detrimental by-products being nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas approximately 300 times more reactive to infrared than CO2. The present work intends to provide the relation between NH3 removal d...

  6. Insights into high-temperature nitrogen cycling from studies of the thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of the nitrogen cycle has advanced significantly in recent years with the discovery of new metabolic processes and the recognition that key processes such as aerobic ammonia oxidation are more broadly distributed among extant organisms and habitat ranges. Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, is a key component of the nitrogen cycle and, until recently, was thought to be mediated exclusively by the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The discovery that mesophilic marine archaea, some of the most abundant microorganisms on the planet, are capable of oxidizing ammonia to nitrite fundamentally changed our perception of the global nitrogen cycle. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are now thought to be significant drivers of nitrification in many marine and terrestrial environments. Most studies, however, have focused on the contribution of AOA to nitrogen cycling in mesophilic environments. Our recent discovery of a thermophilic AOA, Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, has expanded the role and habitat range of AOA to include high temperature environments. Numerous studies have shown that AOA are widely distributed in geothermal habitats with a wide range of temperature and pH. The availability of multiple AOA genome sequences, combined with metagenomic studies from mesophilic and thermophilic environments gives us a better understanding of the physiology, ecology and evolution of these organisms. Recent studies have proposed that the AOA represent the most deeply branching lineage within the Archaea, the Thaumarchaeota. Furthermore, genomic comparisons between AOA and AOB reveal significant differences in the proposed pathways for ammonia oxidation. These genetic differences likely explain fundamental physiological differences such as the resistance of N. yellowstonii and other AOA to the classical nitrification inhibitors allylthiourea and acetylene. Physiological studies suggest that the marine AOA are adapted to oligotrophic

  7. Bacterial domination over Archaea in ammonia oxidation in a monsoon-driven tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vipindas, P.V.; Anas, A.; Jasmin, C.; Lallu, K.R.; Fausia, K.H.; Balachandran, K.K.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Nair, S.

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing microorganisms,which are responsible for the rate-limiting step of nitrification in most aquatic systems, have not been studied in tropical estuaries. Cochin estuary (CE) is one of the largest, productive, and monsoon...

  8. Influence of additives on selective noncatalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia in circulating fluidized bed boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leckner, Bo; Karlsson, Maria; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1991-01-01

    The application of selective noncatalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia in circulating fluidized bed boilers is investigated. Special attention is directed to the use of additives to the ammonia so that the efficiency of the NO reduction at lower temperatures can be increased. Tests under...

  9. Bioaugmentation of Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidizing Culture in Biogas Reactors Exposed to Increasing Levels of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerholm, Maria; Levén, Lotta

    2012-01-01

    The importance of syntrophic acetate oxidation for process stability in methanogenic systems operating at high ammonia concentrations has previously been emphasized. In this study we investigated bioaugmentation of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing (SAO) cultures as a possible method for decreasing the adaptation period of biogas reactors operating at gradually increased ammonia concentrations (1.5 to 11 g NH4+-N/liter). Whole stillage and cattle manure were codigested semicontinuously for about 460 days in four mesophilic anaerobic laboratory-scale reactors, and a fixed volume of SAO culture was added daily to two of the reactors. Reactor performance was evaluated in terms of biogas productivity, methane content, pH, alkalinity, and volatile fatty acid (VFA) content. The decomposition pathway of acetate was analyzed by isotopic tracer experiments, and population dynamics were monitored by quantitative PCR analyses. A shift in dominance from aceticlastic methanogenesis to SAO occurred simultaneously in all reactors, indicating no influence by bioaugmentation on the prevailing pathway. Higher abundances of Clostridium ultunense and Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans were associated with bioaugmentation, but no influence on Syntrophaceticus schinkii or the methanogenic population was distinguished. Overloading or accumulation of VFA did not cause notable dynamic effects on the population. Instead, the ammonia concentration had a substantial impact on the abundance level of the microorganisms surveyed. The addition of SAO culture did not affect process performance or stability against ammonia inhibition, and all four reactors deteriorated at high ammonia concentrations. Consequently, these findings further demonstrate the strong influence of ammonia on the methane-producing consortia and on the representative methanization pathway in mesophilic biogas reactors. PMID:22923397

  10. Diversity and abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea in tropical compost systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gannes, Vidya; Eudoxie, Gaius; Dyer, David H; Hickey, William J

    2012-01-01

    Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) has changed the paradigm of nitrification being initiated solely by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In the present study, AOA abundance and diversity was examined in composts produced from combinations of plant waste materials common in tropical agriculture (rice straw, sugar cane bagasse, and coffee hulls), which were mixed with either cow- or sheep-manure. The objective was to determine how AOA abundance and diversity varied as a function of compost system and time, the latter being a contrast between the start of the compost process (mesophilic phase) and the finished product (mature phase). The results showed that AOA were relatively abundant in composts of tropical agricultural wastes, and significantly more so than were the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, while the AOA communities in the composts were predominatly group I.1b, the communities were diverse and exhibited structures that diverged between compost types and phases. These patterns could be taken as indicators of the ecophysiological diversity in the soil AOA (group I.1b), in that significantly different AOA communties developed when exposed to varying physico-chemical environments. Nitrification patterns and levels differed in the composts which, for the mature material, could have significant effects on its performance as a plant growth medium. Thus, it will also be important to determine the association of AOA (and diversity in their communities) with nitrification in these systems.

  11. Evaluation of autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizers associated with granular activated carbon used for drinking water purification by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Kasuga, Ikuro; Kurisu, Futoshi; Furumai, Hiroaki; Shigeeda, Takaaki

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification is an important biological function of granular activated carbon (GAC) used in advanced drinking water purification processes. Newly discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have challenged the traditional understanding of ammonia oxidation, which considered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) as the sole ammonia-oxidizers. Previous studies demonstrated the predominance of AOA on GAC, but the contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation remain unclear. In the present study, DNA-stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to investigate the autotrophic growth of AOA and AOB associated with GAC at two different ammonium concentrations (0.14 mg N/L and 1.4 mg N/L). GAC samples collected from three full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo, Japan, had different abundance of AOA and AOB. These samples were fed continuously with ammonium and (13)C-bicarbonate for 14 days. The DNA-SIP analysis demonstrated that only AOA assimilated (13)C-bicarbonate at low ammonium concentration, whereas AOA and AOB exhibited autotrophic growth at high ammonium concentration. This indicates that a lower ammonium concentration is preferable for AOA growth. Since AOA could not grow without ammonium, their autotrophic growth was coupled with ammonia oxidation. Overall, our results point towards an important role of AOA in nitrification in GAC filters treating low concentration of ammonium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Review of Options for Ammonia/Ammonium Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-06

    This report is a review of literature supporting practical ammonia/ammonium destruction processes. Melter research supporting Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass production has shown that significant amounts of ammonia will be in the melter offgas condensate. Further work with secondary waste forms indicates the potential need to remove the ammonia, perhaps by an oxidative process. This review finds likely practical chemical methods to oxidize ammonia in aqueous solution at moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressure, using easily obtained reagents. Leading candidates include nitrite oxidation to produce nitrogen gas, various peroxide oxidative processes, and air stripping. This work reviews many other processes and provides reasoning to not consider those processes further for this application.

  13. Contribution of crenarchaeal autotrophic ammonia oxidizers to the dark primary production in Tyrrhenian deep waters (Central Mediterranean Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Yakimov, Michail M.; La Cono, Violetta; Smedile, Francesco; DeLuca, Thomas H.; Juarez, Silvia; Ciordia, Sergio; Fernandez, Marisol; Albar, Juan Pablo; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.; Giuliano, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Mesophilic Crenarchaeota have recently been thought to be significant contributors to nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycling. In this study, we examined the vertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota at offshore site in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The median value of the crenachaeal cell to amoA gene ratio was close to one suggesting that virtually all deep-sea Crenarchaeota possess the capacity to oxidize ammonia. Crenarchaea-specific genes, nirK and ureC, for nitrite reductase and u...

  14. Ammonia observations of the molecular clouds near S68, S140, OMC2 and S106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, L.T.; Brown, A.T.; Macdonald, G.H.; Riley, P.W.; Matheson, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    The J=1, K=1 and J=2, K=2 transitions of interstellar ammonia have been observed in the molecular clouds near S68, S140, OMC2 and S106. Maps of the ammonia emission obtained with a 2.2-arcmin beam are presented and compared with observations of other interstellar molecules, in particular carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The distribution of the ammonia emission in OMC2 and S140 resembles more closely that of 2-mm formaldehyde than 13 CO, which is generally more extended. On the other hand, the densities of hydrogen molecules derived from the ammonia observations on the basis of a simple uniform-density model for the source are much lower than those obtained from 2-mm formaldehyde observations. This discrepancy may be resolved either by assuming a 'core-halo' or a 'clumped' structure for the source. The limits to 'halo' emission are used to suggest that the latter possibility is more probable, in which case the medium is well modelled as many clumps of density approximately 10 6 cm -3 and size -2 pc, immersed in a more tenuous medium of density approximately 10sup(3 to 4)cm -3 . (author)

  15. THE BIOENERGETICS OF AMMONIA AND HYDROXYLAMINE OXIDATION IN NITROSOMONAS-EUROPAEA AT ACID AND ALKALINE PH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRIJLINK, MJ; ABEE, T; LAANBROEK, HJ; DEBOER, W; KONINGS, WN

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizers depend on alkaline or neutral conditions for optimal activity. Below pH 7 growth and metabolic activity decrease dramatically. Actively oxidizing cells of Nitrosomonas europaea do not maintain a constant internal pH when the external pH is varied from 5 to 8. Studies of

  16. Enhanced sulfamethoxazole degradation through ammonia oxidizing bacteria co-metabolism and fate of transformation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotaki, Elissavet; Buttiglieri, Gianluigi; Ferrando-Climent, Laura; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Pijuan, Maite

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of the widely-used antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SFX) in wastewaters and surface waters has been reported in a large number of studies. However, the results obtained up-to-date have pointed out disparities in its removal. This manuscript explores the enhanced biodegradation potential of an enriched culture of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) towards SFX. Several sets of batch tests were conducted to establish a link between SFX degradation and specific ammonia oxidation rate. The occurrence, degradation and generation of SFX and some of its transformation products (4-Nitro SFX, Desamino-SFX and N(4)-Acetyl-SFX) was also monitored. A clear link between the degradation of SFX and the nitrification rate was found, resulting in an increased SFX removal at higher specific ammonia oxidation rates. Moreover, experiments conducted under the presence of allylthiourea (ATU) did not present any removal of SFX, suggesting a connection between the AMO enzyme and SFX degradation. Long term experiments (up to 10 weeks) were also conducted adding two different concentrations (10 and 100 μg/L) of SFX in the influent of a partial nitrification sequencing batch reactor, resulting in up to 98% removal. Finally, the formation of transformation products during SFX degradation represented up to 32%, being 4-Nitro-SFX the most abundant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxygen Distribution and Potential Ammonia Oxidation in Floating, Liquid Manure Crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Floating, organic crusts on liquid manure, stored as a result of animal production, reduce emission of ammonia (NH3) and other volatile compounds during storage. The occurrence of NO2- and NO3- in the crusts indicate the presence of actively metabolizing NH3 oxidizing bacteria (AOB) which may...... be partly responsible for this mitigation effect. Six manure tanks with organic covers (straw and natural) were surveyed to investigate the prevalence and potential activity of AOB and its dependence on the O2 availability in the crust matrix as studied by electrochemical profiling. Oxygen penetration...... microorganisms, including AOB. The microbial activity may thus contribute to a considerable reduction of ammonia emissions from slurry tanks with well-developed crusts....

  18. Cultivation and Genomic Analysis of “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus,” an Obligately Thermophilic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Thaumarchaeon from a Hot Spring Biofilm in Graendalur Valley, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Herbold, Craig W.; Vierheilig, Julia; Sedlacek, Christopher J.; Pjevac, Petra; Albertsen, Mads; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H.; de la Torre, José R.; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota are the only known aerobic ammonia oxidizers in geothermal environments. Although molecular data indicate the presence of phylogenetically diverse AOA from the Nitrosocaldus clade, group 1.1b and group 1.1a Thaumarchaeota in terrestrial high-temperature habitats, only one§ enrichment culture of an AOA thriving above 50°C has been reported and functionally analyzed. In this study, we physiologically and genomically characterized a newly discovered thaumarchaeon from the deep-branching Nitrosocaldaceae family of which we have obtained a high (∼85%) enrichment from biofilm of an Icelandic hot spring (73°C). This AOA, which we provisionally refer to as “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus,” is an obligately thermophilic, aerobic chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer, which stoichiometrically converts ammonia to nitrite at temperatures between 50 and 70°C. “Ca. N. islandicus” encodes the expected repertoire of enzymes proposed to be required for archaeal ammonia oxidation, but unexpectedly lacks a nirK gene and also possesses no identifiable other enzyme for nitric oxide (NO) generation§. Nevertheless, ammonia oxidation by this AOA appears to be NO-dependent as “Ca. N. islandicus” is, like all other tested AOA, inhibited by the addition of an NO scavenger. Furthermore, comparative genomics revealed that “Ca. N. islandicus” has the potential for aromatic amino acid fermentation as its genome encodes an indolepyruvate oxidoreductase (iorAB) as well as a type 3b hydrogenase, which are not present in any other sequenced AOA. A further surprising genomic feature of this thermophilic ammonia oxidizer is the absence of DNA polymerase D genes§ – one of the predominant replicative DNA polymerases in all other ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota. Collectively, our findings suggest that metabolic versatility and DNA replication might differ substantially between obligately thermophilic and

  19. Cultivation and Genomic Analysis of “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus,” an Obligately Thermophilic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Thaumarchaeon from a Hot Spring Biofilm in Graendalur Valley, Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Daebeler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA within the phylum Thaumarchaeota are the only known aerobic ammonia oxidizers in geothermal environments. Although molecular data indicate the presence of phylogenetically diverse AOA from the Nitrosocaldus clade, group 1.1b and group 1.1a Thaumarchaeota in terrestrial high-temperature habitats, only one§ enrichment culture of an AOA thriving above 50°C has been reported and functionally analyzed. In this study, we physiologically and genomically characterized a newly discovered thaumarchaeon from the deep-branching Nitrosocaldaceae family of which we have obtained a high (∼85% enrichment from biofilm of an Icelandic hot spring (73°C. This AOA, which we provisionally refer to as “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus,” is an obligately thermophilic, aerobic chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer, which stoichiometrically converts ammonia to nitrite at temperatures between 50 and 70°C. “Ca. N. islandicus” encodes the expected repertoire of enzymes proposed to be required for archaeal ammonia oxidation, but unexpectedly lacks a nirK gene and also possesses no identifiable other enzyme for nitric oxide (NO generation§. Nevertheless, ammonia oxidation by this AOA appears to be NO-dependent as “Ca. N. islandicus” is, like all other tested AOA, inhibited by the addition of an NO scavenger. Furthermore, comparative genomics revealed that “Ca. N. islandicus” has the potential for aromatic amino acid fermentation as its genome encodes an indolepyruvate oxidoreductase (iorAB as well as a type 3b hydrogenase, which are not present in any other sequenced AOA. A further surprising genomic feature of this thermophilic ammonia oxidizer is the absence of DNA polymerase D genes§ – one of the predominant replicative DNA polymerases in all other ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota. Collectively, our findings suggest that metabolic versatility and DNA replication might differ substantially between obligately

  20. Nitrite as a stimulus for ammonia-starved Nitrosomonas europaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-starved cells of Nitrosomonas europaea are able to preserve a high level of ammonia-oxidizing activity in the absence of ammonium. However, when the nitrite-oxidizing cells that form part of the natural nitrifying community do not keep pace with the ammonia-oxidizing cells, nitrite

  1. Influence of environmental ammonia on the production of nitric oxide and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Mahua G. [Biochemical Adaptation Laboratory, Department of Zoology, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022 (India); Saha, Nirmalendu, E-mail: nsaha@nehu.ac.in [Biochemical Adaptation Laboratory, Department of Zoology, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High environmental ammonia caused more production and accumulation of NO in air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyper-ammonia stress caused induction and zonal specific expression of iNOS enzyme protein, mRNA expression in different tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of NF{kappa}B that resulted under hyper-ammonia stress was believed to be the cause of induction of iNOS gene. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly versatile and unique ubiquitous signaling molecule, and is known to play diverse physiological functions in mammals including those of adaptation to various stresses. The present study reports on the influence of exposure to high external ammonia (HEA) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), that produces NO from L-arginine in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis), which is reported to tolerate a very HEA. Some levels of NO were found to be present in all the tissues and also in plasma of control fish, which further enhanced significantly in fishes treated with high concentrations of environmental ammonia (25 and 50 mM ammonium chloride) for 7 days, accompanied by more efflux of NO from the perfused liver. This was accomplished by the induction of iNOS activity in different tissues of fish exposed to HEA, which otherwise was not detectable in control fish. Exposure to 25 mM ammonium chloride also led to a significant expression of iNOS protein in different tissues, followed by further increase at 50 mM ammonium chloride. Further, there was an increase in the expression of iNOS mRNA in ammonia-treated fish, thus suggesting that the expression of iNOS gene under hyper-ammonia stress was probably regulated at the transcriptional level. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that the expression of iNOS in different tissues was zonal specific and not expressed uniformly

  2. Influence of environmental ammonia on the production of nitric oxide and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Mahua G.; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High environmental ammonia caused more production and accumulation of NO in air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis). ► Hyper-ammonia stress caused induction and zonal specific expression of iNOS enzyme protein, mRNA expression in different tissues. ► Activation of NFκB that resulted under hyper-ammonia stress was believed to be the cause of induction of iNOS gene. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly versatile and unique ubiquitous signaling molecule, and is known to play diverse physiological functions in mammals including those of adaptation to various stresses. The present study reports on the influence of exposure to high external ammonia (HEA) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), that produces NO from L-arginine in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis), which is reported to tolerate a very HEA. Some levels of NO were found to be present in all the tissues and also in plasma of control fish, which further enhanced significantly in fishes treated with high concentrations of environmental ammonia (25 and 50 mM ammonium chloride) for 7 days, accompanied by more efflux of NO from the perfused liver. This was accomplished by the induction of iNOS activity in different tissues of fish exposed to HEA, which otherwise was not detectable in control fish. Exposure to 25 mM ammonium chloride also led to a significant expression of iNOS protein in different tissues, followed by further increase at 50 mM ammonium chloride. Further, there was an increase in the expression of iNOS mRNA in ammonia-treated fish, thus suggesting that the expression of iNOS gene under hyper-ammonia stress was probably regulated at the transcriptional level. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that the expression of iNOS in different tissues was zonal specific and not expressed uniformly throughout the organ. Hyper-ammonia stress also led to activation and nuclear

  3. Development of the kinetic model of platinum catalyzed ammonia oxidation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebrov, E.V.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The ammonia oxidation reaction on supported polycrystalline platinum catalyst was investigated in an aluminum-based microreactor. An extensive set of reactions was included in the chemical reactor modeling to facilitate the construction of a kinetic model capable of satisfactory predictions for a

  4. Site-Specific Reactivity of Copper Chabazite Zeolites with Nitric Oxide, Ammonia, and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Anita; Isaksen, Oliver L.; Rasmussen, Søren B.

    2018-01-01

    In-situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was applied to dilute copper chabazite (CHA) zeolites under gas flows relevant for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia (NH3-SCR). Under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, we observed differences in reactivity between...

  5. Enhanced and selective ammonia sensing of reduced graphene oxide based chemo resistive sensor at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2016-05-01

    The reduced graphene oxide thin films were fabricated by using the spin coating method. The reduced graphene oxide samples were characterised by Raman studies to obtain corresponding D and G bands at 1360 and 1590 cm-1 respectively. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra consists of peak corresponds to sp2 hybridisation of carbon atoms at 1560 cm-1. The reduced graphene oxide based chemoresistive sensor exhibited a p-type semiconductor behaviour in ambient conditions and showed good sensitivity to different concentration of ammonia from 25 ppm to 500 ppm and excellent selectivity at room temperature. The sensor displays selectivity to several hazardous vapours such as methanol, ethanol, acetone and hydrazine hydrate. The sensor demonstrated a sensitivity of 9.8 at 25 ppm concentration of ammonia with response time of 163 seconds.

  6. Aerobic nitrous oxide production through N-nitrosating hybrid formation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Mooshammer, Maria; Kitzler, Barbara; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Schleper, Christa

    2014-05-01

    Soil emissions are largely responsible for the increase of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere and are generally attributed to the activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. However, the contribution of the recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to N2O production from soil is unclear as is the mechanism by which they produce it. Here we investigate the potential of Nitrososphaera viennensis, the first pure culture of AOA from soil, to produce N2O and compare its activity with that of a marine AOA and an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) from soil. N. viennensis produced N2O at a maximum yield of 0.09% N2O per molecule of nitrite under oxic growth conditions. N2O production rates of 4.6±0.6 amol N2O cell(-1) h(-1) and nitrification rates of 2.6±0.5 fmol NO2(-) cell(-1) h(-1) were in the same range as those of the AOB Nitrosospira multiformis and the marine AOA Nitrosopumilus maritimus grown under comparable conditions. In contrast to AOB, however, N2O production of the two archaeal strains did not increase when the oxygen concentration was reduced, suggesting that they are not capable of denitrification. In (15)N-labeling experiments we provide evidence that both ammonium and nitrite contribute equally via hybrid N2O formation to the N2O produced by N. viennensis under all conditions tested. Our results suggest that archaea may contribute to N2O production in terrestrial ecosystems, however, they are not capable of nitrifier-denitrification and thus do not produce increasing amounts of the greenhouse gas when oxygen becomes limiting.

  7. Down under the tunic: bacterial biodiversity hotspots and widespread ammonia-oxidizing archaea in coral reef ascidians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Patrick M; Pineda, Mari Carmen; Webster, Nicole; Turon, Xavier; López-Legentil, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    Ascidians are ecologically important components of marine ecosystems yet the ascidian microbiota remains largely unexplored beyond a few model species. We used 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to provide a comprehensive characterization of microbial symbionts in the tunic of 42 Great Barrier Reef ascidian samples representing 25 species. Results revealed high bacterial biodiversity (3 217 unique operational taxonomic units (OTU0.03) from 19 described and 14 candidate phyla) and the widespread occurrence of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in coral reef ascidians (24 of 25 host species). The ascidian microbiota was clearly differentiated from seawater microbial communities and included symbiont lineages shared with other invertebrate hosts as well as unique, ascidian-specific phylotypes. Several rare seawater microbes were markedly enriched (200-700 fold) in the ascidian tunic, suggesting that the rare biosphere of seawater may act as a conduit for horizontal symbiont transfer. However, most OTUs (71%) were rare and specific to single hosts and a significant correlation between host relatedness and symbiont community similarity was detected, indicating a high degree of host-specificity and potential role of vertical transmission in structuring these communities. We hypothesize that the complex ascidian microbiota revealed herein is maintained by the dynamic microenvironments within the ascidian tunic, offering optimal conditions for different metabolic pathways such as ample chemical substrate (ammonia-rich host waste) and physical habitat (high oxygen, low irradiance) for nitrification. Thus, ascidian hosts provide unique and fertile niches for diverse microorganisms and may represent an important and previously unrecognized habitat for nitrite/nitrate regeneration in coral reef ecosystems.

  8. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide emissions from five passenger vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Hua Lu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, three unregulated components, ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, emitted from five passenger vehicles are investigated. With focus upon emission factors from existing production technology, vehicles produced between 1989 and 1998 with considerable mileage (7000 to 280,000) are chosen. Among the five vehicles, four were sold in the European market, whereas one was sold in the US market. The vehicles are tested on a chassis dynamometer. An EU2000 Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a US Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) of the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) are used in the study. The regulated emissions are measured using a Horiba Mexa series. Unregulated emissions, ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are analysed by mass spectrometer, gas chromatography and CNT-NA, TIM315-74W method, respectively. Both the unregulated emissions and the regulated emissions show driving cycle dependency; and they are also improved with newer vehicle and emission control technology. However, a gasoline direct injection vehicle (relatively new technology in this study) has rather high regulated emissions, whereas the NH 3 , N 2 O and HCN emissions are low

  9. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide emissions from five passenger vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hua Lu

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, three unregulated components, ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, emitted from five passenger vehicles are investigated. With focus upon emission factors from existing production technology, vehicles produced between 1989 and 1998 with considerable mileage (7000 to 280,000) are chosen. Among the five vehicles, four were sold in the European market, whereas one was sold in the US market. The vehicles are tested on a chassis dynamometer. An EU2000 Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a US Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) of the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) are used in the study. The regulated emissions are measured using a Horiba Mexa series. Unregulated emissions, ammonia (NH(3)), nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are analysed by mass spectrometer, gas chromatography and CNT-NA, TIM315-74W method, respectively. Both the unregulated emissions and the regulated emissions show driving cycle dependency; and they are also improved with newer vehicle and emission control technology. However, a gasoline direct injection vehicle (relatively new technology in this study) has rather high regulated emissions, whereas the NH(3), N(2)O and HCN emissions are low.

  10. The role of adsorbates in the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on noble and transition metal electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooys, de A.C.A.; Koper, M.T.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Veen, van J.A.R.

    2001-01-01

    The activity for ammonia oxidation and the intermediates formed during the reaction have been studied on platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, copper, silver and gold electrodes. The activity in the selective oxidation to N-2 is related directly to the nature of the species at the

  11. Niche specificity of ammonia-oxidizing archaeal and bacterial communities in a freshwater wetland receiving municipal wastewater in Daqing, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwok-Ho; Wang, Yong-Feng; Li, Hui; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Ecophysiological differences between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) enable them to adapt to different niches in complex freshwater wetland ecosystems. The community characters of AOA and AOB in the different niches in a freshwater wetland receiving municipal wastewater, as well as the physicochemical parameters of sediment/soil samples, were investigated in this study. AOA community structures varied and separated from each other among four different niches. Wetland vegetation including aquatic macrophytes and terrestrial plants affected the AOA community composition but less for AOB, whereas sediment depths might contribute to the AOB community shift. The diversity of AOA communities was higher than that of AOB across all four niches. Archaeal and bacterial amoA genes (encoding for the alpha-subunit of ammonia monooxygenases) were most diverse in the dry-land niche, indicating O2 availability might favor ammonia oxidation. The majority of AOA amoA sequences belonged to the Soil/sediment Cluster B in the freshwater wetland ecosystems, while the dominant AOB amoA sequences were affiliated with Nitrosospira-like cluster. In the Nitrosospira-like cluster, AOB amoA gene sequences affiliated with the uncultured ammonia-oxidizing beta-proteobacteria constituted the largest portion (99%). Moreover, independent methods for phylogenetic tree analysis supported high parsimony bootstrap values. As a consequence, it is proposed that Nitrosospira-like amoA gene sequences recovered in this study represent a potentially novel cluster, grouping with the sequences from Gulf of Mexico deposited in the public databases.

  12. Enhanced and selective ammonia sensing of reduced graphene oxide based chemo resistive sensor at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshphysicsdu@gmail.com; Kaur, Amarjeet, E-mail: amarkaur@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The reduced graphene oxide thin films were fabricated by using the spin coating method. The reduced graphene oxide samples were characterised by Raman studies to obtain corresponding D and G bands at 1360 and 1590 cm{sup −1} respectively. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra consists of peak corresponds to sp{sup 2} hybridisation of carbon atoms at 1560 cm{sup −1}. The reduced graphene oxide based chemoresistive sensor exhibited a p-type semiconductor behaviour in ambient conditions and showed good sensitivity to different concentration of ammonia from 25 ppm to 500 ppm and excellent selectivity at room temperature. The sensor displays selectivity to several hazardous vapours such as methanol, ethanol, acetone and hydrazine hydrate. The sensor demonstrated a sensitivity of 9.8 at 25 ppm concentration of ammonia with response time of 163 seconds.

  13. Anaerobic ammonia oxidation in a fertilized paddy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Wang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a paddy field was obtained in Southern China using an isotope-pairing technique, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil cores. A paddy field with a high load of slurry manure as fertilizer...... was selected for this study and was shown to contain a high amount of ammonium (6.2–178.8 mg kg−1). The anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox) rates in this paddy soil ranged between 0.5 and 2.9 nmolN per gram of soil per hour in different depths of the soil core, and the specific cellular anammox activity...

  14. Biochar type and factors affecting N transformation, ammonia volatilization, and nitrous oxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil amendment with biochar has shown the potential to improve nitrogen (N) availability for plant uptake and reduce environmental losses via ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. There are still many unknowns on how biochar type and soil conditions affect N dynamics and processes associa...

  15. Diversity and abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea in tropical compost systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Gannes, Vidya; Eudoxie, Gaius; Dyer, David H.; Hickey, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) has changed the p...

  16. Geographic Distribution of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea along the Kuril Islands in the Western Subarctic Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Jing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA in the ocean were affected by different physicochemical conditions, but their responses to physical barriers (such as a chain of islands were largely unknown. In our study, geographic distribution of the AOA from the surface photic zone to the deep bathypelagic waters in the western subarctic Pacific adjacent to the Kuril Islands was investigated using pyrosequencing based on the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene. Genotypes of clusters A and B dominated in the upper euphotic zone and the deep waters, respectively. Quantitative PCR assays revealed that the occurrence and ammonia-oxidizing activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA reached their maxima at the depth of 200 m, where a higher diversity and abundance of actively transcribed AOA was observed at the station located in the marginal sea exposed to more terrestrial input. Similar community composition of AOA observed at the two stations adjacent to the Kuril Islands maybe due to water exchange across the Bussol Strait. They distinct from the station located in the western subarctic gyre, where sub-cluster WCAII had a specific distribution in the surface water, and this sub-cluster seemed having a confined distribution in the western Pacific. Habitat-specific groupings of different WCB sub-clusters were observed reflecting the isolated microevolution existed in cluster WCB. The effect of the Kuril Islands on the phylogenetic composition of AOA between the Sea of Okhotsk and the western subarctic Pacific is not obvious, possibly because our sampling stations are near to the Bussol Strait, the main gateway through which water is exchanged between the Sea of Okhotsk and the Pacific. The vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of AOA communities among stations along the Kuril Islands were essentially determined by the in situ prevailing physicochemical gradients along the two dimensions.

  17. Detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in microcosms of crude oil-contaminated mangrove sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, A C F; Marques, E L S; Gross, E; Souza, S S; Dias, J C T; Brendel, M; Rezende, R P

    2012-01-27

    Currently, the effect of crude oil on ammonia-oxidizing bacterium communities from mangrove sediments is little understood. We studied the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in mangrove microcosm experiments using mangrove sediments contaminated with 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5% crude oil as well as non-contaminated control and landfarm soil from near an oil refinery in Camamu Bay in Bahia, Brazil. The evolution of CO(2) production in all crude oil-contaminated microcosms showed potential for mineralization. Cluster analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis-derived samples generated with primers for gene amoA, which encodes the functional enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, showed differences in the sample contaminated with 5% compared to the other samples. Principal component analysis showed divergence of the non-contaminated samples from the 5% crude oil-contaminated sediment. A Venn diagram generated from the banding pattern of PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to look for operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in common. Eight OTUs were found in non-contaminated sediments and in samples contaminated with 0.5, 1, or 2% crude oil. A Jaccard similarity index of 50% was found for samples contaminated with 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2% crude oil. This is the first study that focuses on the impact of crude oil on the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium community in mangrove sediments from Camamu Bay.

  18. Do freshwater macrophytes influence the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria in the rhizospere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    to unvegetated sediment, especially with respect to the availability of oxygen, organic carbon, and inorganic nitrogen. We hypothesize that macrophyte species create specific niches for ammonia oxidizing and nitrate-reducing bacteria in their rhizosphere, leading to plant-dependant differences in abundance...... dortmanna have been shown to release oxygen from their roots and to stimulate nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification in the rhizosphere. Together with the excretion of root exudates, this effect leads to strongly modified microenvironments at the root surface and in the rhizosphere compared......-denitrification using the 15N isotope pairing technique. Ammonia-oxidizing and nitrate-reducing populations are analyzed based on the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) and the nitrate reductase gene (narG) as functional markers. Preliminary data indicate that there in fact exist differences in the community composition...

  19. Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter [Institute of Process Engineering and Power Plant Technology, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 23, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Aabo (Finland)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

  20. Synthesis of nanostructured solid-state phases of V{sub 7}O{sub 16} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} compounds for ppb-level detection of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huotari, J., E-mail: joni.huotari@ee.oulu.fi [Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 4500, FIN-90014, University of Oulu (Finland); Lappalainen, J. [Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 4500, FIN-90014, University of Oulu (Finland); Eriksson, J.; Bjorklund, R. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83, Linköping (Sweden); Heinonen, E. [Center of Microscopy and Nanotechnology, Erkki Koiso-Kanttilankatu 3, Tietotalo 1, Linnanmaa, FIN-90570, Oulu (Finland); Miinalainen, I. [Biocenter Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014, University of Oulu (Finland); Puustinen, J. [Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 4500, FIN-90014, University of Oulu (Finland); Lloyd Spetz, A. [Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 4500, FIN-90014, University of Oulu (Finland); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83, Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-08-05

    Solid state phase of V{sub 7}O{sub 16} with separate V{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition. The crystal structure and symmetry of the deposited films were studied with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Rietveld analysis was performed to the X-ray diffraction measurement results. The surface potentials and morphologies of the films were studied with atomic force microscopy, and microstructure of the thin films was analysed by transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and Rietveld refinement results confirmed that the thin-film crystal structures varied between orthorombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase and another phase, triclinic V{sub 7}O{sub 16}, previously found only in the walls of vanadium oxide nanotubes (VO{sub x}-NT), bound together with organic amine. We have earlier presented the first results of stable and pure metal-oxide solid-state phase of V{sub 7}O{sub 16} manufactured from ceramic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} target. Here we show more detailed study of these structures. The microstructure studies showed a variation on the porosity of the films according to crystal structures and also some fibre-like nanostructures were found in the films. The surface morphology depended strongly on the crystal structure and the surface potential studies showed ∼50 meV difference in the work function values between the phases. Compounds were found to be extremely sensitive towards ammonia, NH{sub 3}, down to ∼40 ppb concentrations, and have shown to have the stability and selectivity to control the Selective Catalytic Reduction process, where nitrogen oxides are reduced by ammonia in, e.g. diesel exhausts. - Highlights: • The triclinic V{sub 7}O{sub 16} phase is proven to exist in solid state thin-film form. • The existence of V{sub 7}O{sub 16} in thin-film form is proven by several methods. • The structure of mixed V{sub 7}O{sub 16} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is proven to be sensitive to NH{sub 3} at ppb-level.

  1. Large cryoconite aggregates on a Svalbard glacier support a diverse microbial community including ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarsky, Jakub D.; Stibal, Marek; Hodson, Andy; Sattler, Birgit; Schostag, Morten; Hansen, Lars H.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Psenner, Roland

    2013-09-01

    The aggregation of surface debris particles on melting glaciers into larger units (cryoconite) provides microenvironments for various microorganisms and metabolic processes. Here we investigate the microbial community on the surface of Aldegondabreen, a valley glacier in Svalbard which is supplied with carbon and nutrients from different sources across its surface, including colonies of seabirds. We used a combination of geochemical analysis (of surface debris, ice and meltwater), quantitative polymerase chain reactions (targeting the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid and amoA genes), pyrosequencing and multivariate statistical analysis to suggest possible factors driving the ecology of prokaryotic microbes on the surface of Aldegondabreen and their potential role in nitrogen cycling. The combination of high nutrient input with subsidy from the bird colonies, supraglacial meltwater flow and the presence of fine, clay-like particles supports the formation of centimetre-scale cryoconite aggregates in some areas of the glacier surface. We show that a diverse microbial community is present, dominated by the cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, that are well-known in supraglacial environments. Importantly, ammonia-oxidizing archaea were detected in the aggregates for the first time on an Arctic glacier.

  2. Large cryoconite aggregates on a Svalbard glacier support a diverse microbial community including ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarsky, Jakub D; Sattler, Birgit; Psenner, Roland; Stibal, Marek; Schostag, Morten; Jacobsen, Carsten S; Hodson, Andy; Hansen, Lars H

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of surface debris particles on melting glaciers into larger units (cryoconite) provides microenvironments for various microorganisms and metabolic processes. Here we investigate the microbial community on the surface of Aldegondabreen, a valley glacier in Svalbard which is supplied with carbon and nutrients from different sources across its surface, including colonies of seabirds. We used a combination of geochemical analysis (of surface debris, ice and meltwater), quantitative polymerase chain reactions (targeting the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid and amoA genes), pyrosequencing and multivariate statistical analysis to suggest possible factors driving the ecology of prokaryotic microbes on the surface of Aldegondabreen and their potential role in nitrogen cycling. The combination of high nutrient input with subsidy from the bird colonies, supraglacial meltwater flow and the presence of fine, clay-like particles supports the formation of centimetre-scale cryoconite aggregates in some areas of the glacier surface. We show that a diverse microbial community is present, dominated by the cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, that are well-known in supraglacial environments. Importantly, ammonia-oxidizing archaea were detected in the aggregates for the first time on an Arctic glacier. (letter)

  3. Large cryoconite aggregates on a Svalbard glacier support a diverse microbial community including ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarsky, Jakub D; Sattler, Birgit; Psenner, Roland [Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria); Stibal, Marek; Schostag, Morten; Jacobsen, Carsten S [Department of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hodson, Andy [Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars H, E-mail: j.zarsky@gmail.com [Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-09-15

    The aggregation of surface debris particles on melting glaciers into larger units (cryoconite) provides microenvironments for various microorganisms and metabolic processes. Here we investigate the microbial community on the surface of Aldegondabreen, a valley glacier in Svalbard which is supplied with carbon and nutrients from different sources across its surface, including colonies of seabirds. We used a combination of geochemical analysis (of surface debris, ice and meltwater), quantitative polymerase chain reactions (targeting the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid and amoA genes), pyrosequencing and multivariate statistical analysis to suggest possible factors driving the ecology of prokaryotic microbes on the surface of Aldegondabreen and their potential role in nitrogen cycling. The combination of high nutrient input with subsidy from the bird colonies, supraglacial meltwater flow and the presence of fine, clay-like particles supports the formation of centimetre-scale cryoconite aggregates in some areas of the glacier surface. We show that a diverse microbial community is present, dominated by the cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, that are well-known in supraglacial environments. Importantly, ammonia-oxidizing archaea were detected in the aggregates for the first time on an Arctic glacier. (letter)

  4. Energy-mediated versus ammonium-regulated gene expression in the obligate ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Y Stein

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia serves as the source of energy and reductant and as a signaling molecule that regulates gene expression in obligate ammonia-oxidizing chemolithotrophic microorganisms. The gammaproteobacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani, was the first obligate ammonia-oxidizer isolated from seawater and is one of the model systems for ammonia chemolithotrophy. We compared global transcriptional responses to ammonium and the catabolic intermediate, hydroxylamine, in ammonium-starved and non-starved cultures of N. oceani to discriminate transcriptional effects of ammonium from a change in overall energy and redox status upon catabolite availability. The most highly expressed genes from ammonium- or hydroxylamine-treated relative to starved cells are implicated in catabolic electron flow, carbon fixation, nitrogen assimilation, ribosome structure and stress tolerance. Catabolic inventory-encoding genes, including electron flow-terminating Complexes IV, FoF1 ATPase, transporters, and transcriptional regulators were among the most highly expressed genes in cells exposed only to ammonium relative to starved cells, although the differences compared to steady-state transcript levels were less pronounced. Reduction in steady-state mRNA levels from hydroxylamine-treated relative to starved-cells were less than five-fold. In contrast, several transcripts from ammonium-treated relative to starved cells were significantly less abundant including those for forward Complex I and a gene cluster of cytochrome c encoding proteins. Identified uneven steady-state transcript levels of co-expressed clustered genes support previously reported differential regulation at the levels of transcription and transcript stability. Our results differentiated between rapid regulation of core genes upon a change in cellular redox status versus those responsive to ammonium as a signaling molecule in N. oceani, both confirming and extending our knowledge of metabolic modules involved in ammonia

  5. Microstructure and electrical-optical properties of cesium tungsten oxides synthesized by solvothermal reaction followed by ammonia annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingxiao; Ando, Yoshihiko; Dong Xiaoli; Shi Fei; Yin Shu; Adachi, Kenji; Chonan, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akikazu; Sato, Tsugio

    2010-01-01

    Cesium tungsten oxides (Cs x WO 3 ) were synthesized by solvothermal reactions using ethanol and 57.1 vol% ethanol aqueous solution at 200 o C for 12 h, and the effects of post annealing in ammonia atmosphere on the microstructure and electrical-optical properties were investigated. Agglomerated particles consisting of disk-like nanoparticles and nanorods of Cs x WO 3 were formed in the pure ethanol and ethanol aqueous solutions, respectively. The samples retained the original morphology and crystallinity after annealing in ammonia atmosphere up to 500 o C, while a small amount of nitrogen ion were incorporated in the lattice. The as-prepared Cs x WO 3 sample showed excellent near infrared (NIR) light shielding ability as well as high transparency in the visible light region. The electrical resistivity of the pressed pellets of the powders prepared in pure ethanol and 57.1 vol% ethanol aqueous solution greatly decreased after ammonia annealing at 500 o C, i.e., from 734 to 31.5 and 231 to 3.58 Ω cm, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Cesium tungsten oxides (Cs x WO 3 ) with different morphology were synthesized by solvothermal reaction, and the effects of post-ammonia annealing on the microstructure and electrical-optical properties were investigated.

  6. U.S. broiler housing ammonia emissions inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, R. S.; Casey, K. D.; Wheeler, E. F.; Xin, H.; Pescatore, A. J.

    Using recently published baseline ammonia emissions data for U.S. broiler chicken housing, we present a method of estimating their contribution to an annual ammonia budget that is different from that used by USEPA. Emission rate increases in a linear relationship with flock age from near zero at the start of the flock to a maximum at the end of the flock, 28-65 days later. Market weight of chickens raised for meat varies from "broilers" weighing about 2 kg to "roasters" weighing about 3 kg. Multiple flocks of birds are grown in a single house annually, with variable downtime to prepare the house between flocks. The method takes into account weight and number of chickens marketed. Uncertainty in baseline emissions estimates is used so that inventory estimates are provided with error estimates. The method also incorporates the condition of litter that birds are raised upon and the varying market weight of birds grown. Using 2003 USDA data on broiler production numbers, broiler housing is estimated to contribute 8.8-11.7 kT ammonia for new and built-up litter, respectively, in Kentucky and 240-324 kT ammonia for new and built-up litter, respectively, nationally. Results suggest that a 10% uncertainty in annual emission rate is expected for the market weight categories of broilers, heavy broilers, and roasters. A 27-47% reduction in annual housing emission rate is predicted if new rather than built-up litter were used for every flock. The estimating method can be adapted to other meat bird building emissions and future ammonia emission strategies, with suitable insertion of an age-dependent emission factor or slope into a predictive model equation. The method can be readily applied and is an alternative to that used by USEPA.

  7. Bacterial community composition in different sediments from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea: a comparison of four 16S ribosomal DNA clone libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Bertilsson, Stefan; Tselepides, Anastasios; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2005-10-01

    The regional variability of sediment bacterial community composition and diversity was studied by comparative analysis of four large 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone libraries from sediments in different regions of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (Thermaikos Gulf, Cretan Sea, and South lonian Sea). Amplified rDNA restriction analysis of 664 clones from the libraries indicate that the rDNA richness and evenness was high: for example, a near-1:1 relationship among screened clones and number of unique restriction patterns when up to 190 clones were screened for each library. Phylogenetic analysis of 207 bacterial 16S rDNA sequences from the sediment libraries demonstrated that Gamma-, Delta-, and Alphaproteobacteria, Holophaga/Acidobacteria, Planctomycetales, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Verrucomicrobia were represented in all four libraries. A few clones also grouped with the Betaproteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Spirochaetales, Chlamydiae, Firmicutes, and candidate division OPl 1. The abundance of sequences affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria was higher in libraries from shallow sediments in the Thermaikos Gulf (30 m) and the Cretan Sea (100 m) compared to the deeper South Ionian station (2790 m). Most sequences in the four sediment libraries clustered with uncultured 16S rDNA phylotypes from marine habitats, and many of the closest matches were clones from hydrocarbon seeps, benzene-mineralizing consortia, sulfate reducers, sulk oxidizers, and ammonia oxidizers. LIBSHUFF statistics of 16S rDNA gene sequences from the four libraries revealed major differences, indicating either a very high richness in the sediment bacterial communities or considerable variability in bacterial community composition among regions, or both.

  8. Response of ammonia oxidizing archaea and bacteria to decabromodiphenyl ether and copper contamination in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linqiong; Li, Yi; Niu, Lihua; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhang, Huanjun; Wang, Longfei; Wang, Peifang

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation plays a fundamental role in river nitrogen cycling ecosystems, which is normally governed by both ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Co-contamination of typical emerging pollutant Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and heavy metal on AOA and AOB communities in river sediments remains unknown. In this study, multiple analytical tools, including high-throughput pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), were used to reveal the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) activity, subunit alpha (amoA) gene abundance, and community structures of AOA and AOB in river sediments. It was found that the inhibition of AMO activities was increased with the increase of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209, 1-100 mg kg -1 ) and copper (Cu, 50-500 mg kg -1 ) concentrations. Moreover, the synergic effects of BDE 209 and Cu resulted in a higher AMO activity reduction than the individual pollutant BDE 209. The AOA amoA copy number declined by 75.9% and 83.2% and AOB amoA gene abundance declined 82.8% and 90.0% at 20 and 100 mg kg -1 BDE 209 with a 100 mg kg -1 Cu co-contamination, respectively. The pyrosequencing results showed that both AOB and AOA community structures were altered, with a higher change of AOB than that of AOA. The results demonstrated that the AOB microbial community may be better adapted to BDE 209 and Cu pollution, while AOA might possess a greater capacity for stress resistance. Our study provides a better understanding of the ecotoxicological effects of heavy metal and micropollutant combined exposure on AOA and AOB in river sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the rhizosphere soil of three plants in the Ebinur Lake wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Hu, Wenge; Ma, Decao; Lan, Hongzhu; Yang, Yang; Gao, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation is carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). The Ebinur Lake wetland is the best example of a temperate arid zone wetland ecosystem in China. Soil samples were collected from rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil containing Halocnemum strobilaceum (samples H and H'), Phragmites australis (samples R and R'), and Karelinia caspia (samples K and K') to study the relationship between environmental factors and the community structure of AOB and AOA. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOA sequences belonged to the Nitrosopumilus and Nitrososphaera clusters. AOB were grouped into Nitrosospira sp. and Nitrosomonas sp. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the AOA abundance ranged from 2.09 × 10 4 to 2.94 × 10 5 gene copies/g soil. The highest number of AOA was detected in sample K, followed by samples R and H. AOB abundance varied between 2.91 × 10 5 and 1.05 × 10 6 gene copies/g soil, which was higher than that of AOA. Redundancy analysis indicated that electrical conductivity, pH, and NH 4 + -N might influence the community structure of AOA and AOB. AOB might play a more crucial role than AOA in ammonia oxidation based on AOB's higher diversity and abundance in the Ebinur Lake wetland in Xinjiang.

  10. Method for forming ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  11. Anaerobic ammonia removal in presence of organic matter: A novel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabumon, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the feasibility of anaerobic ammonia removal process in presence of organic matter. Different sources of biomass collected from diverse eco-systems containing ammonia and organic matter (OM) were screened for potential anaerobic ammonia removal. Sequential batch studies confirmed the possibility of anaerobic ammonia removal in presence of OM, but ammonia was oxidized anoxically to nitrate (at oxidation reduction potential; ORP -248 ± 25 mV) by an unknown mechanism unlike in the reported anammox process. The oxygen required for oxidation of ammonia might have been generated through catalase enzymatic activity of facultative anaerobes in mixed culture. The oxygen generation possibility by catalase enzyme route was demonstrated. Among the inorganic electron acceptors (NO 2 - , NO 3 - and SO 4 2- ) studied, NO 2 - was found to be most effective in total nitrogen removal. Denitrification by the developed culture was much effective and faster compared to ammonia oxidation. The results of this study show that anaerobic ammonia removal is feasible in presence of OM. The novel nitrogen removal route is hypothesized as enzymatic anoxic oxidation of NH 4 + to NO 3 - , followed by denitrification via autotrophic and/or heterotrophic routes. The results of batch study were confirmed in continuous reactor operation

  12. [Effects of transgenic Bt + CpTI cotton on rhizosphere bacteria and ammonia oxidizing bacteria population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lianhua; Meng, Ying; Wang, Jing

    2014-03-04

    The effect of transgenic cotton on the rhizosphere bacteria can be important to the risk assessment for the genetically modified crops. We studied the rhizosphere microbial community with cultivating genetically modified cotton. The effects of transgenic Bt + CpTI Cotton (SGK321) and its receptor cotton (SY321) on rhizosphere total bacteria and ammonia oxidizing bacteria population size were studied by using droplet digital PCR. We collected rhizosphere soil before cotton planting and along with the cotton growth stage (squaring stage, flowering stage, belling stage and boll opening stage). There was no significant change on the total bacterial population between the transgenic cotton and the receptor cotton along with the growth stage. However, the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in both type of cottons showed significant difference between different growth stages, and the variation tendency was different. In squaring stage, the numbers of AOB in rhizosphere of SY321 and SGK321 increased 4 and 2 times, respectively. In flowering stage, AOB number in rhizosphere of SY321 significantly decreased to be 5.96 x 10(5) copies/g dry soil, however, that of SGK321 increased to be 1.25 x 10(6) copies/g dry soil. In belling stage, AOB number of SY321 greatly increased to be 1.49 x 10(6) copies/g dry soil, but no significant change was observed for AOB number of SGK321. In boll opening stage, both AOB number of SY321 and SGK321 clearly decreased and they were significantly different from each other. Compared to the non-genetically modified cotton, the change in abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria was slightly smooth in the transgenic cotton. Not only the cotton growth stage but also the cotton type caused this difference. The transgenic cotton can slow down the speed of ammonia transformation through impacting the number of AOB, which is advantageous for plant growth.

  13. Influence of tropical leaf litter on nitrogen mineralization and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diallo, MD.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. The present study concerns the relationships among leaf litter decomposition, substrate quality, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB community composition and nitrogen (N availability. Decomposition of organic matter affects the biogeochemical cycling of carbon (C and N. Since the composition of the soil microbial community can alter the physiological capacity of the community, it is timely to study the litter quality effect on N dynamic in ecosystems. Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of leaf litter decomposition on N mineralization. The specific objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of the litter biochemistry of five plants species (Faidherbia albida A.Chev., Azadirachta indica A.Juss., Casuarina equisetifolia L., Andropogon gayanus Kunth and Eragrostis tremula Hochst. ex Steud. on N mineralization in a tropical ferrous soil (Lixisol, nitrification, and genetic diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of amplified fragments of genes coding for 16S rRNA was used to study the development of bacterial communities during decomposition of leaf litter in soils. Method. Community structure of AOB was determined at two time periods: day 0 and day 140. Ten strains were tested and each of these strains produced a single band. Thus, DGGE DNA band patterns were used to estimate bacterial diversity. Plant secondary compounds such as polyphenols are purported to influence nutrient cycling by affecting organic matter degradation, mineralization rates, N availability and humus formation. In a laboratory study, we investigated the influence of six phenolic acids (ferulic, gallic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric and p-HBA acids commonly found in the plant residues on N mineralization and NH4+ and NO3- production in soils. Results. The results showed that litter type did affect soil nitrification. Faidherbia albida litter was associated with

  14. Natural Carbonized Sugar as a Low-Temperature Ammonia Sensor Material: Experimental, Theoretical, and Computational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghule, Balaji G; Shaikh, Shoyebmohamad; Ekar, Satish U; Nakate, Umesh T; Gunturu, Krishna Chaitanya; Shinde, Nanasaheb M; Naushad, Mu; Kim, Kwang Ho; O'Dwyer, Colm; Mane, Rajaram S

    2017-12-13

    Carbonized sugar (CS) has been synthesized via microwave-assisted carbonization of market-quality tabletop sugar bearing in mind the advantages of this synthesis method, such as being useful, cost-effective, and eco-friendly. The as-prepared CS has been characterized for its morphology, phase purity, type of porosity, pore-size distribution, and so on. The gas-sensing properties of CS for various oxidizing and reducing gases are demonstrated at ambient temperature, where we observe good selectivity toward liquid ammonia among other gases. The highest ammonia response (50%) of a CS-based sensor was noted at 80 °C for 100 ppm concentration. The response and recovery times of the CS sensor are 180 and 216 s, respectively. This unveiling ammonia-sensing study is explored through a plausible theoretical mechanism, which is further well-supported by computational modeling performed using density function theory. The effect of relative humidity on the CS sensor has also been studied at ambient temperature, which demonstrated that the minimum and maximum (20-100%) relative humidity values revealed 16 and 62% response, respectively.

  15. Diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in relation to soil environment in Ebinur Lake Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenge Hu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Ebinur Lake Wetland, the most representative temperate arid zone wetland ecosystem in China, is the centre of oasis and desertification of the northern slope of Tianshan conjugate. Soil samples were collected from three sites (Tamarix ramosissima, Halocnemum strobilaceum and Phragmites australis and different soil layers (0–5, 5–15, 15–25 and 25–35 cm in this wetland in spring, summer and autumn and were used to characterize the diversity of AOB based on the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA gene. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE and bivariate correlation analysis were used to analyse the relationship between the diversity of AOB and soil environment factors. The PCR-DGGE indicated that the diversity of AOB was high in the entire sample and the Shannon diversity index varied from 1.369 to 2.471. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the amoA fragments were grouped into Nitrosospira sp. and Nitrosomonas sp. Most amoA gene sequences fell within the Nitrosospira sp. cluster, and only a few sequences were clustered with Nitrosomonas sp., indicating that Nitrosospira sp. may be more adaptable than Nitrosomonas sp. in this area. Bivariate correlation analysis showed that the diversity of AOB was significantly correlated with soil organic matter, conductivity, total phosphorus and nitrate in the Ebinur Lake Wetland in Xinjiang.

  16. Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

    2010-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and

  17. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira species from Dutch coastal North Sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Caroline Marianne Haaijer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite-oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB, a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to first enrich nitrifiers and ultimately nitrite oxidizers from Dutch coastal North Sea water. With solely ammonia as the substrate an active nitrifiying community consisting of novel marine Nitrosomonas aerobic ammonia oxidizers (AOB and Nitrospina and Nitrospira NOB was obtained which converted a maximum of 2 mmoles of ammonia per liter per day. Switching the feed of the culture to nitrite as a sole substrate resulted in a Nitrospira NOB dominated community (approximately 80% of the total microbial community based on FISH and metagenomic data converting a maximum of 3 mmoles of nitrite per liter per day. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the Nitrospira enriched from the North Sea is a novel Nitrospira species with Nitrospira marina as the next taxonomically described relative (94% 16S rRNA sequence identity. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a cell plan typical for Nitrospira species. The cytoplasm contained electron light particles that might represent glycogen storage. A large periplasmic space was present which was filled with electron dense particles. Nitrospira-targeted PCR analyses demonstrated the presence of the enriched Nitrospira species in a time series of North Sea genomic DNA samples. The availability of this new Nitrospira species enrichment culture facilitates further in-depth studies such as determination of physiological constraints, and comparison to other NOB species.

  18. [Abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaeal accA and amoA genes in response to NO2 - and NO3 - of hot springs in Yunnan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoqi; Wang, Li; Zhou, Enmin; Wang, Fengping; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Chuanlun; Li, Wenjun

    2014-12-04

    Yunnan hot springs have highly diverseammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which are autotrophic and can fix CO2 using the 3-hydroxypropionate/ 4-hydroxybutyrate (HP/HD) pathway. In this study, we investigated the abundances of prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene and archaeal accA and amoA genes in the sediments of hot springs of Yunnan Province, and analysed the correlations between the above gene abundances and environmental factors. We selected the sediments of twenty representative hot springs, and detected the gene abundances by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The principal component analysis (PCA) and the Mantel test in the R software package were performed for the correlations of gene abundance and environmental variables. The bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundances were from 6.6 x 10(7) to 4.19 x 10(11) and from 1.27 x 10(6) to 1.51 x 10(11) copies/g sediment, respectively; Archaeal accA and amoA genes were from 8.89 x 10(3) to 6.49 x 10(5) and from 7.64 x 10(3) to 4.36 x 10(5) copies/g sediment, respectively. The results of mantel test showed that accA gene was significantly (R = 0.98, P < 0.001) correlated with amoA gene; Both of them also were correlated significantly with NO2- and NO3 -, but not with pH. The abundances of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the ratio between them varied significantly among Yunnan hot springs. The archaealaccA and amoA genes showed significant correlation with each other, validating our previous finding that AOA in terrestrial hot springs might acquire energy from ammonia oxidation coupled with CO2 fixation using the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway.

  19. Enrichment and genome sequence of the group I.1a ammonia-oxidizing Archaeon "Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis" representing a clade globally distributed in thermal habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Lebedeva

    Full Text Available The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called "marine" group I.1a thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as "Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis", is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, "Candidatus N. uzonensis" also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in "Ca. N. uzonensis", which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation.

  20. Enrichment and genome sequence of the group I.1a ammonia-oxidizing Archaeon "Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis" representing a clade globally distributed in thermal habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Elena V; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Pelletier, Eric; Schuster, Nathalie; Hauzmayer, Sandra; Bulaev, Aleksandr; Grigor'eva, Nadezhda V; Galushko, Alexander; Schmid, Markus; Palatinszky, Marton; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called "marine" group I.1a) thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as "Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis", is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold) of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, "Candidatus N. uzonensis" also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in "Ca. N. uzonensis", which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation.

  1. Continuously Monocropped Jerusalem Artichoke Changed Soil Bacterial Community Composition and Ammonia-Oxidizing and Denitrifying Bacteria Abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingang; Wang, Zhilin; Jia, Huiting; Li, Li; Wu, Fengzhi

    2018-01-01

    Soil microbial communities have profound effects on the growth, nutrition and health of plants in agroecosystems. Understanding soil microbial dynamics in cropping systems can assist in determining how agricultural practices influence soil processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study, soil bacterial communities were monitored in a continuously monocropped Jerusalem artichoke (JA) system, in which JA was successively monocropped for 3 years in a wheat field. Soil bacterial community compositions were estimated by amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Abundances of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria were estimated by quantitative PCR analysis of the amoA , nirS , and nirK genes. Results showed that 1-2 years of monocropping of JA did not significantly impact the microbial alpha diversity, and the third cropping of JA decreased the microbial alpha diversity ( P < 0.05). Principal coordinates analysis and permutational multivariate analysis of variance analyses revealed that continuous monocropping of JA changed soil bacterial community structure and function profile ( P < 0.001). At the phylum level, the wheat field was characterized with higher relative abundances of Latescibacteria , Planctomycetes , and Cyanobacteria , the first cropping of JA with Actinobacteria , the second cropping of JA with Acidobacteria , Armatimonadetes , Gemmatimonadetes , and Proteobacteria . At the genus level, the first cropping of JA was enriched with bacterial species with pathogen-antagonistic and/or plant growth promoting potentials, while members of genera that included potential denitrifiers increased in the second and third cropping of JA. The first cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms related to lignocellulose degradation and phosphorus cycling, the second cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms nitrous-oxide reductase and nitric-oxide reductase, and the third cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms

  2. Continuously Monocropped Jerusalem Artichoke Changed Soil Bacterial Community Composition and Ammonia-Oxidizing and Denitrifying Bacteria Abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingang Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial communities have profound effects on the growth, nutrition and health of plants in agroecosystems. Understanding soil microbial dynamics in cropping systems can assist in determining how agricultural practices influence soil processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study, soil bacterial communities were monitored in a continuously monocropped Jerusalem artichoke (JA system, in which JA was successively monocropped for 3 years in a wheat field. Soil bacterial community compositions were estimated by amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Abundances of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria were estimated by quantitative PCR analysis of the amoA, nirS, and nirK genes. Results showed that 1–2 years of monocropping of JA did not significantly impact the microbial alpha diversity, and the third cropping of JA decreased the microbial alpha diversity (P < 0.05. Principal coordinates analysis and permutational multivariate analysis of variance analyses revealed that continuous monocropping of JA changed soil bacterial community structure and function profile (P < 0.001. At the phylum level, the wheat field was characterized with higher relative abundances of Latescibacteria, Planctomycetes, and Cyanobacteria, the first cropping of JA with Actinobacteria, the second cropping of JA with Acidobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Proteobacteria. At the genus level, the first cropping of JA was enriched with bacterial species with pathogen-antagonistic and/or plant growth promoting potentials, while members of genera that included potential denitrifiers increased in the second and third cropping of JA. The first cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms related to lignocellulose degradation and phosphorus cycling, the second cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO terms nitrous-oxide reductase and nitric-oxide reductase, and the third cropping of JA had higher relative abundances of KO

  3. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in wastewater treatment plant sludge and nearby coastal sediment in an industrial area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Sun, Renhua; Dai, Tianjiao; Tian, Jinping; Wen, Donghui

    2015-05-01

    Under the increasing pressure of human activities, Hangzhou Bay has become one of the most seriously polluted waters along China's coast. Considering the excessive inorganic nitrogen detected in the bay, in this study, the impact of an effluent from a coastal industrial park on ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs) of the receiving area was interpreted for the first time by molecular technologies. Revealed by real-time PCR, the ratio of archaeal amoA/bacterial amoA ranged from 5.68 × 10(-6) to 4.79 × 10(-5) in the activated sludge from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and 0.54-3.44 in the sediments from the effluent receiving coastal area. Analyzed by clone and pyrosequencing libraries, genus Nitrosomonas was the predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), but no ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was abundant enough for sequencing in the activated sludge from the WWTPs; genus Nitrosomonas and Nitrosopumilus were the dominant AOB and AOA, respectively, in the coastal sediments. The different abundance of AOA but similar structure of AOB between the WWTPs and nearby coastal area probably indicated an anthropogenic impact on the microbial ecology in Hangzhou Bay.

  4. Emissions of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane during composting of organic household waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsdotter Beck-Friis, Barbro

    2001-01-01

    In Sweden, composting of source-separated organic household waste is increasing, both domestically at the small-scale, and in larger municipal plants. Composting means a microbial decomposition of organic material, which results in the production of environmentally undesirable gases, such as ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and methane (CH 4 ). The aim of this thesis was to study the emissions of NH 3 , N 2 O and CH 4 to the atmosphere during composting of source-separated organic household waste. The studies were conducted in an experimental reactor under constant and controlled conditions and in municipal compost heaps. Emissions of NH 3 , N 2 O and CH 4 occurred at different phases during composting. Ammonia started to volatilise during the shift from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions when short-chained fatty acids were decomposed. Nitrous oxide was only emitted during the first days of composting and later during the cooling phase when nitrate was formed. Methane was only produced during the thermophilic phase. Large municipal compost heaps are a significant source for the production and emission of the greenhouse gases N 2 O and CH 4 . To avoid unwanted gaseous emissions to the atmosphere during composting, gaseous exchange with the atmosphere should be controlled in future composting plants

  5. A gold electrode modified with silver oxide nanoparticle decorated carbon nanotubes for electrochemical sensing of dissolved ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Mohammed M.; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Balkhoyor, Hasan B.; Marwani, Hadi M.

    2016-01-01

    We have prepared silver oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼ 15 nm and decorated with carbon nanotube nanocomposites (Ag_2O/CNT NCs) by a facile wet chemical method using reducing agents in alkaline medium. These NCs were characterized by UV/vis, FTIR and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, by X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The NCs were then deposited on a flat gold electrode with the help of a conducting binder to result in an electrochemical sensor for aqueous ammonia using the I-V technique. Response is based on surface oxidation of ammonium hydroxide with electrode-adsorbed oxygen to form nitrogen oxide, these simultaneously liberating free electrons in the conduction band. Sensor features include a sensitivity of 32.856 μA.μM"-"1.cm"-"2, a low detection limit (1.3 pM at a signal to noise ratio of 3), reliability, reproducibility, ease of integration, and long term stability. The response to dissolved ammonia is linear (r"2: 0.9778) over the 0.01 nM to 0.1 mM concentration range. (author)

  6. Ammonia synthesis by means of plasma over MgO catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, K.; Akazawa, K.; Matsuda, T.; Miura, H.; Oshima, M.

    1986-01-01

    Ammonia synthesis from H 2 -N 2 mixed gas was studied at room temperature in a glow-discharge plasma in the presence of metals or metal oxides. Magnesia (Mg0) and calcia (CaO), which are oxides with solid basicity, revealed catalytic activity in the plasma synthesis of ammonia, although they are catalytically inactive in industrial ammonia synthesis. The acid oxides (Al 2 0 3 W0 3 , and Si0 2 -Al 2 0 3 ) lead to the consumption of the reactant, i.e., the H2-N2 mixed gas. No ammonia was isolated. Metal catalysts showed higher activity than the above basic oxides. They have, however, different activities. The reaction was faster over the active materials than over sodium chloride (NaCl) or glass wool or in a blank reactor without any catalyst

  7. Population diversity of ammonium oxidizers investigated by specific PCR amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B.B.; Voytek, M.A.; Witzel, K.-P.

    1997-01-01

    The species composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in aquatic environments was investigated using PCR primers for 16S rRNA genes to amplify specific subsets of the total ammonia-oxidizer population. The specificity of the amplification reactions was determined using total genomic DNA from known nitrifying strains and non-nitrifying strains identified as having similar rDNA sequences. Specificity of amplification was determined both for direct amplification, using the nitrifier specific primers, and with nested amplification, in which the nitrifier primers were used to reamplify a fragment obtained from direct amplification with Eubacterial universal primers. The present level of specificity allows the distinction between Nitrosomonas europaea, Nitrosomonas sp. (marine) and the other known ammonia-oxidizers in the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria. Using total DNA extracted from natural samples, we used direct amplification to determine presence/absence of different species groups. Species composition was found to differ among depths in vertical profiles of lake samples and among samples and enrichments from various other aquatic environments. Nested PCR yielded several more positive reactions, which implies that nitrifier DNA was present in most samples, but often at very low levels.

  8. Ammonia oxidizer populations vary with nitrogen cycling across a tropical montane mean annual temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Pierre; I. Hewson; J. P. Sparks; C. M. Litton; C. Giardina; P. M. Groffman; T. J. Fahey

    2017-01-01

    Functional gene approaches have been used to better understand the roles of microbes in driving forest soil nitrogen (N) cycling rates and bioavailability. Ammonia oxidation is a rate limiting step in nitrification, and is a key area for understanding environmental constraints on N availability in forests. We studied how increasing temperature affects the role of...

  9. Community size and composition of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers in an alluvial intertidal wetland ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziye eHu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Global nitrogen cycling is mainly mediated by the activity of microorganisms. Nitrogen cycle processes are mediated by functional groups of microorganisms that are affected by constantly changing environmental conditions and substrate availability. In this study, we investigated the temporal and spatial patterns of nitrifier and denitrifier communities in an intertidal wetland. Soil samples were collected over four distinct seasons from three locations with different vegetative cover. Multiple environmental factors and process rates were measured and analyzed together with the community size and composition profiles. We observed that the community size and composition of the nitrifiers and denitrifiers are affected significantly by seasonal factors, while vegetative cover affected the community composition. The seasonal impacts on the community size of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA are much higher than that of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB. The seasonal change was a more important indicator for AOA community composition patterns, while vegetation was more important for the AOB community patterns. The microbial process rates were correlated with both the community size and composition.

  10. COMPARISON OF CATALYTIC ACTIVITIES BOTH FOR SELECTIVE OXIDATION AND DECOMPOSITION OF AMMONIA OVER Fe/HZβ CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YELİZ ÇETİN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is one of the syngas contaminants that must be removed before using the syngas downstream applications. The most promising hot-gas clean-up techniques of ammonia are selective catalytic oxidation (SCO and catalytic decomposition. In this study, the catalytic activities over Zeolite Hβ supported iron catalyst (Fe/HZβ were compared both for the two catalytic routes. For SCO experiments; temperature (300-550 °C, O2 (2000-6000 ppmv and (0-10% H2 concentrations were investigated with the presence of 800 ppm NH3 in each of the final gas mixture. In the second route, catalytic ammonia decomposition experiments were carried out with H2 in balance N2 (0-30% containing 800 ppm NH3 at 700°C and 800°C. In the SCO, NH3 conversions were increased with increasing reaction temperatures with the absence of H2 in the reaction mixture. With 10% H2, it was shown that NH3 conversions increased with decreasing the reaction temperature. This was interpreted as the competing H2 and NH3 oxidations over the catalyst. On the other hand, in the catalytic decomposition, thermodynamic equilibrium conversion of almost 100% was attained at both 700 and 800 °C. Upon H2 addition, all conversions decreased. The decrease in conversion seemed to be linear with inlet hydrogen concentration. Hydrogen was seen to inhibit ammonia decomposition reaction. It was shown that Fe/HZβ catalyst is better to use for catalytic decomposition of NH3 in syngas rather than SCO of NH3 in spite of higher reaction temperatures needed in the decomposition reaction.

  11. Consumption of ammonia-nitrogen by aob in immobilized batch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the performance of bio-filters immobilized nitrifying bacteria, ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In particular, it was to assess the consumption of ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N) by the AOB. The experiment was conducted in a one litre reactor.The reactor consisted of ...

  12. Diversity, abundance and niche differentiation of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in mud deposits of the eastern China marginal seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaolan eYu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The eastern China marginal seas are prominent examples of river-dominated ocean margins, whose most characteristic feature is the existence of isolated mud patches on sandy sediments. Ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes play a crucial role in the nitrogen cycles of many marine environments, including marginal seas. However, few studies have attempted to address the distribution patterns of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in mud deposits of these seas. The horizontal and vertical community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB were investigated in mud deposits of the South Yellow Sea (SYS and the East China Sea (ECS by using amoA clone libraries and quantitative PCR. The diversity of AOB was comparable or higher in the mud zone of SYS and lower in ECS when compared with AOA. Vertically, surface sediments had generally higher diversity of AOA and AOB than middle and bottom layers. Diversity of AOA and AOB showed significant correlation with latitude. Nitrosopumilus and Nitrosospira lineages dominated AOA and AOB communities, respectively. Both AOA and AOB assemblages exhibited greater variations across different sites than those among various depths at one site. The abundance of bacterial amoA was generally higher than that of archaeal amoA, and both of them decreased with depth. Niche differentiation, which was affected by dissolved oxygen, salinity, ammonia and silicate (SiO32-, was observed between AOA and AOB and among different groups of them. The spatial distribution of AOA and AOB was significantly correlated with δ15NTN and SiO32-, and nitrate and δ13C, respectively. Both archaeal and bacterial amoA abundance correlated strongly with SiO32-. This study improves our understanding of spatial distribution of AOA and AOB in ecosystems featuring oceanic mud deposits.

  13. Diversity, Abundance, and Niche Differentiation of Ammonia-Oxidizing Prokaryotes in Mud Deposits of the Eastern China Marginal Seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaolan; Yao, Peng; Liu, Jiwen; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Guiling; Zhao, Meixun; Yu, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The eastern China marginal seas (ECMS) are prominent examples of river-dominated ocean margins, whose most characteristic feature is the existence of isolated mud patches on sandy sediments. Ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes play a crucial role in the nitrogen cycles of many marine environments, including marginal seas. However, few studies have attempted to address the distribution patterns of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in mud deposits of these seas. The horizontal and vertical community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) were investigated in mud deposits of the South Yellow Sea (SYS) and the East China Sea (ECS) by using amoA clone libraries and quantitative PCR. The diversity of AOB was comparable or higher in the mud zone of SYS and lower in ECS when compared with AOA. Vertically, surface sediments had generally higher diversity of AOA and AOB than middle and bottom layers. Diversity of AOA and AOB showed significant correlation with latitude. Nitrosopumilus and Nitrosospira lineages dominated AOA and AOB communities, respectively. Both AOA and AOB assemblages exhibited greater variations across different sites than those among various depths at one site. The abundance of bacterial amoA was generally higher than that of archaeal amoA, and both of them decreased with depth. Niche differentiation, which was affected by dissolved oxygen, salinity, ammonia, and silicate (SiO[Formula: see text]), was observed between AOA and AOB and among different groups of them. The spatial distribution of AOA and AOB was significantly correlated with δ(15)NTN and SiO[Formula: see text], and nitrate and δ(13)C, respectively. Both archaeal and bacterial amoA abundance correlated strongly with SiO[Formula: see text]. This study improves our understanding of spatial distribution of AOA and AOB in ecosystems featuring oceanic mud deposits.

  14. Effects of submerged macrophytes on the abundance and community composition of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in a eutrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Da-yong; Luo, Juan; Zeng, Jin; Wang, Meng; Yan, Wen-ming; Huang, Rui; Wu, Qinglong L

    2014-01-01

    Abundances and community compositions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in unvegetated sediment and the rhizosphere sediments of three submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria spinulosa, and Potamogeton crispus) were investigated in a large, eutrophic freshwater lake, Lake Taihu. Abundances of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase alpha-subunit (amoA) gene (from 6.56 × 10(6) copies to 1.06 × 10(7) copies per gram of dry sediment) were higher than those of bacterial amoA (from 6.13 × 10(5) to 3.21 × 10(6) copies per gram of dry sediment) in all samples. Submerged macrophytes exhibited no significant effect on the abundance and diversity of archaeal amoA gene. C. demersum and V. spinulosa increased the abundance and diversity of bacterial amoA gene in their rhizosphere sediment. However, the diversity of bacterial amoA gene in the rhizosphere sediments of P. crispus was decreased. The data obtained in this study would be helpful to elucidate the roles of submerged macrophytes involved in the nitrogen cycling of eutrophic lake ecosystems.

  15. Stable isotope probing of acetate fed anaerobic batch incubations shows a partial resistance of acetoclastic methanogenesis catalyzed by Methanosarcina to sudden increase of ammonia level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liping; Lü, Fan; Mazéas, Laurent; Desmond-Le Quéméner, Elie; Madigou, Céline; Guenne, Angéline; Shao, Liming; Bouchez, Théodore; He, Pinjing

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia inhibition represents a major operational issue for anaerobic digestion. In order to refine our understanding of the terminal catabolic steps in thermophilic anaerobic digestion under ammonia stress, we studied batch thermophilic acetate fed experiments at low (0.26 g L(-1)) and high (7.00 g L(-1)) Total Ammonia Nitrogen concentrations (TAN). Although methane production started immediately for all incubations and resulted in methane yields close to stoichiometric expectations, a 62-72% decrease of methanogenic rate was observed throughout the incubation at 7.00 g L(-1) of TAN compared to 0.26 g L(-1). Stable Isotope Probing analysis of active microbial communities in (13)C-acetate fed experiments coupled to automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and 16S rDNA pyrotag sequencing confirmed that microbial communities were similar for both TAN conditions. At both TAN levels, the (13)C-labeled bacterial community was mainly affiliated to Clostridia-relatives, with OPB54 bacteria being the most abundant sequence in the heavy DNA 16S rDNA pyrotag library. Sequences closely related to Methanosarcina thermophila were also abundantly retrieved in the heavy DNA fractions, showing that this methanogen was still actively assimilating labeled carbon from acetate at free ammonia nitrogen concentrations up to 916 mg L(-1). Stable isotopic signature analysis of biogas, measured in unlabeled acetate fed experiments that were conducted in parallel, confirmed that acetoclastic methanogenic pathway was dominant at both ammonia concentrations. Our work demonstrates that, besides the syntrophic acetate oxidation pathway, acetoclastic methanogenesis catalyzed by Methanosarcina can also play a major role in methane production at high ammonia levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation of Hydroxylamine on Dust Grains via Ammonia Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Lemaire, Jean-Louis; Garrod, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    The quest to detect prebiotic molecules in space, notably amino acids, requires an understanding of the chemistry involving nitrogen atoms. Hydroxylamine (NH2OH) is considered a precursor to the amino acid glycine. Although not yet detected, NH2OH is considered a likely target of detection with ALMA. We report on an experimental investigation of the formation of hydroxylamine on an amorphous silicate surface via the oxidation of ammonia. The experimental data are then fed into a simulation of the formation of NH2OH in dense cloud conditions. On ices at 14 K and with a modest activation energy barrier, NH2OH is found to be formed with an abundance that never falls below a factor 10 with respect to NH3. Suggestions of conditions for future observations are provided.

  17. Study on treatment of distilled ammonia waste water from coke plant with activated carbon-NaClO catalytic oxidation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, D.; Yi, P.; Liu, J.; Chen, A. [Xiangtan Polytechnic University, Xiangtan (China). Dept. of Chemical Enginering

    2001-12-01

    Catalytic oxidation method for the treatment of distilled ammonia waste water from coke plant was investigated using activated carbon as catalyst and NaClO as oxidant. The influences of main factors, such as NaClO, activated carbon, pH and reactionary time were discussed. The results showed that under the conditions of 25{degree}C, NaClO/CODO=1.5, carbon/NaClO=0.6 and pH=3.0, the reaction completed within 120 minutes with 99.5% of phenol removal and 75.8% of COD removal when the distilled ammonia waste water from coke plant which containing phenol 510 mg/L and CODO 8420 mg/L was treated. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Spatial distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria across eight freshwater lakes in sediments from Jiangsu of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizingarchaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB play an important role innitrogen transformation in freshwater sediments. However, it is still unclear towhat extent the distribution patterns of these microorganisms are affected bythe freshwater sediment across a large geographical scale. This study wasdesigned to gain insight into the heterogeneity distribution of AOA and AOB in32 freshwater sediments from a wide range of ecologic types. Real-time quantitative polymerasechain reaction PCR(qPCR combined with the terminal restrictionfragment length polymorphism(T-RFLP were employed to characterize the abundance, diversity, and communitystructure of the AOA and AOB in 32 freshwater sediments. AOA and AOB wereubiquitous in all sediments, and archaeal amoA far outnumbered bacterial amoA inmost sediments with lower organic matters. The abundance of AOA and AOB did notvary with the freshwater ecological type (macrophyte dominated region and algaedominated region. Based on  the T-RFLP of an amoA gene, this research found that organicmatters in pore water rather than other factors affect the AOA communitystructure in sediments, while the AOB were not significantly different in thefreshwater sediments. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all archaeal amoAsequences fell within either the Crenarchaeotal Group (CG I.1b or the CGI.1asubgroup, and all AOB clustered with genus Nitrosomonas or Nitrosospira. The data obtained inthis study elucidates the role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea andammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the nitrogen cycle of freshwater ecosystems.

  19. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abby, Sophie S; Melcher, Michael; Kerou, Melina; Krupovic, Mart; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Rossel, Claudia; Pfeifer, Kevin; Schleper, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally at 68°C under chemolithoautotrophic conditions on ammonia or urea converting ammonia stoichiometrically into nitrite with a generation time of approximately 23 h. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins place the organism as a sister group to all known mesophilic AOA. The 1.58 Mb genome of Ca. N. cavascurensis harbors an amo AXCB gene cluster encoding ammonia monooxygenase and genes for a 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway for autotrophic carbon fixation, but also genes that indicate potential alternative energy metabolisms. Although a bona fide gene for nitrite reductase is missing, the organism is sensitive to NO-scavenging, underlining the potential importance of this compound for AOA metabolism. Ca. N. cavascurensis is distinct from all other AOA in its gene repertoire for replication, cell division and repair. Its genome has an impressive array of mobile genetic elements and other recently acquired gene sets, including conjugative systems, a provirus, transposons and cell appendages. Some of these elements indicate recent exchange with the environment, whereas others seem to have been domesticated and might convey crucial metabolic traits.

  20. Microbial activities in boreal soils: Biodegradation of organic contaminants at low temperature and ammonia oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurola, J. (University of Helsinki, Faculty of Biosciences, Department of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, Lahti (FI))

    2006-07-01

    This thesis deals with the response of biodegradation of selected anthropogenic organic contaminants and natural autochthonous organic matter to low temperature in boreal surface soils. Furthermore, the thesis describes activity, diversity and population size of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a boreal soil used for landfarming of oil-refinery wastes, and presents a new approach, in which the particular AOB were enriched and cultivated in situ from the landfarming soil onto cation exchange membranes. This thesis demonstrates that rhizosphere fraction of natural forest humus soil and agricultural clay loam soil from Helsinki Metropolitan area were capable of degrading of low to moderate concentrations (0.2 - 50 mug cm-3) of PCP, phenanthrene and 2,4,5-TCP at temperatures realistic to boreal climate (-2.5 to +15 deg C). At the low temperatures, the biodegradation of PCP, phenanthrene and 2,4,5-TCP was more effective (Q10-values from 1.6 to 7.6) in the rhizosphere fraction of the forest soil than in the agricultural soil. Q10-values of endogenous soil respiration (carbon dioxide evolution) and selected hydrolytic enzyme activities (acetate-esterase, butyrate-esterase and beta-glucosidase) in acid coniferous forest soil were 1.6 to 2.8 at temperatures from -3 to +30 deg C. The results indicated that the temperature dependence of decomposition of natural autochthonous soil organic matter in the studied coniferous forest was only moderate. The numbers of AOB in the landfarming (sandy clay loam) soil were determined with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and with Most Probable Number (MPN) methods, and potential ammonium oxidation activity was measured with the chlorate inhibition technique. The results indicated presence of large and active AOB populations in the heavily oil-contaminated and urea-fertilised landfarming soil. Assessment of the populations of AOB with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling and sequence

  1. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Abby, Sophie S.; Melcher, Michael; Kerou, Melina; Krupovic, Mart; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Rossel, Claudia; Pfeifer, Kevin; Schleper, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally ...

  2. Catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciyama, T; Arakawa, T; Matsuda, T; Yamazoe, N; Takita, Y

    1975-01-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia was studied over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolite (Me-Y) catalysts. The reaction products are nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water in all cases. Selectivities to N/sub 2/ are 60 to 80% on all the cation exchanged zeolite catalysts exhibiting a relatively minor variation with the cationic species exchanged. The copper (II)-Y catalyst exhibits low temperature activity and has an unusual catalytic activity-temperature profile with a maximum at 120/sup 0/C. The catalytic activity is enhanced considerably when a second cation, especially cobalt (II) or iron (III) is coexchanged together with Cu (II) in Y zeolite.

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of ammonia-containing wastewater using Ti/RuO2-Pt electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-wu Hu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation degradation processes for artificial and actual wastewater containing ammonia were carried out with a Ti/RuO2-Pt anode and a Ti plate cathode. We studied the effects of different current densities, space sizes between the two electrodes, and amounts of added NaCl on ammonia-containing wastewater treatment. It was shown that, after a 30-min treatment under the optimal conditions, which were a current density of 20 mA/cm2, a space size between the two electrodes of 1 cm, and an added amount of 0.5 g/L of NaCl, the COD concentration in municipal wastewater was 40 mg/L, a removal rate of 90%; and the NH3-N concentration was 7 mg/L, a removal rate of 88.3%. The effluent of municipal wastewater qualified for Class A of the Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB18918-2002.

  4. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a chloraminated distribution system: seasonal occurrence, distribution and disinfection resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, R L; Lieu, N I; Izaguirre, G; Means, E G

    1990-02-01

    Nitrification in chloraminated drinking water can have a number of adverse effects on water quality, including a loss of total chlorine and ammonia-N and an increase in the concentration of heterotrophic plate count bacteria and nitrite. To understand how nitrification develops, a study was conducted to examine the factors that influence the occurrence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a chloraminated distribution system. Samples were collected over an 18-month period from a raw-water source, a conventional treatment plant effluent, and two covered, finished-water reservoirs that previously experienced nitrification episodes. Sediment and biofilm samples were collected from the interior wall surfaces of two finished-water pipelines and one of the covered reservoirs. The AOB were enumerated by a most-probable-number technique, and isolates were isolated and identified. The resistance of naturally occurring AOB to chloramines and free chlorine was also examined. The results of the monitoring program indicated that the levels of AOB, identified as members of the genus Nitrosomonas, were seasonally dependent in both source and finished waters, with the highest levels observed in the warm summer months. The concentrations of AOB in the two reservoirs, both of which have floating covers made of synthetic rubber (Hypalon; E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.), had most probable numbers that ranged from less than 0.2 to greater than 300/ml and correlated significantly with temperature and levels of heterotrophic plate count bacteria. No AOB were detected in the chloraminated reservoirs when the water temperature was below 16 to 18 degrees C. The study indicated that nitrifiers occur throughout the chloraminated distribution system. Higher concentrations of AOB were found in the reservoir and pipe sediment materials than in the pipe biofilm samples. The AOB were approximately 13 times more resistant to monochloramine than to free chlorine. After 33 min

  5. Ammonia-oxidizing activity and microbial community structure in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, K; Yamada, T; Hiraishi, A; Takanashi, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ammonia-oxidizing activity and the phylogentic composition of microorganisms involved in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil. All soil samples were collected from three sites located in Tahara and Toyohashi, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The potential nitrification rate (PNR) was measured by the chlorate inhibition method. The soil pH of tea orchards studied ranged from 2.78 to 4.84, differing significantly from sample to sample, whereas that of meadow and unplanted fields ranged from 5.78 to 6.35. The PNR ranged from 0.050 to 0.193 μg NO 2 - -Ng -1 h -1 and were positively correlated with the soil pH (r 2 0.382, p 2 - -Ng -1 h -1 ) and subjected to PCR-aided clone library analyses targeting archaeal and bacterial amoA genes. The detected archaeal clones separated from the cluster of the 'Soil clones' and tightly clustered with the clones originating from other acidic soil environments including the Chinese tea orchard soil. These results suggest that the specific archaeal populations dominate as the ammonia oxidizers in acid tea-orchard soils and possibly other acid soils, independent of geographic locations, which results from the adaptation to specific ecological niches.

  6. Laboratory-Scale Demonstration Using Dilute Ammonia Gas-Induced Alkaline Hydrolysis of Soil Contaminants (Chlorinated Propanes and Explosives)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    stabilization of metals (like Cr (VI)) and radionuclides ( uranium or technetium) (Thornton and Amonette 1999, Thornton et al. 2007). Master variable...successful at significantly reducing uranium mobility, although the effect was somewhat reversible. Ammonia oxidation and remediation Ammonia...activity of ammonia- oxidizing microorganisms. A 283-day experiment did not result in any measureable increase in ammonia- oxidizing microorganisms

  7. FORMATION OF HYDROXYLAMINE ON DUST GRAINS VIA AMMONIA OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco [Physics Department, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Lemaire, Jean-Louis [Paris Observatory, F-75014 Paris (France); Garrod, Robin T., E-mail: gvidali@syr.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    The quest to detect prebiotic molecules in space, notably amino acids, requires an understanding of the chemistry involving nitrogen atoms. Hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) is considered a precursor to the amino acid glycine. Although not yet detected, NH{sub 2}OH is considered a likely target of detection with ALMA. We report on an experimental investigation of the formation of hydroxylamine on an amorphous silicate surface via the oxidation of ammonia. The experimental data are then fed into a simulation of the formation of NH{sub 2}OH in dense cloud conditions. On ices at 14 K and with a modest activation energy barrier, NH{sub 2}OH is found to be formed with an abundance that never falls below a factor 10 with respect to NH{sub 3}. Suggestions of conditions for future observations are provided.

  8. Modeling of nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with multiple production pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Peng, Lai; Law, Yingyu; Guo, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-04-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been recognized as a major contributor to N2O production in wastewater treatment systems. However, so far N2O models have been proposed based on a single N2O production pathway by AOB, and there is still a lack of effective approach for the integration of these models. In this work, an integrated mathematical model that considers multiple production pathways is developed to describe N2O production by AOB. The pathways considered include the nitrifier denitrification pathway (N2O as the final product of AOB denitrification with NO2(-) as the terminal electron acceptor) and the hydroxylamine (NH2OH) pathway (N2O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of NH2OH to NO2(-)). In this model, the oxidation and reduction processes are modeled separately, with intracellular electron carriers introduced to link the two types of processes. The model is calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained with two independent nitrifying cultures. The model satisfactorily describes the N2O data from both systems. The model also predicts shifts of the dominating pathway at various dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite levels, consistent with previous hypotheses. This unified model is expected to enhance our ability to predict N2O production by AOB in wastewater treatment systems under varying operational conditions.

  9. 1 Ammonia Concentrations in Different Aquaculture 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Introduction. Most studies have shown that the best feed for optimal fish production in aquaculture is one rich in high amount of protein. The amount of protein in the ..... Aquatic Science, Florida Coop, Ext. Serv. FA-16, 4 pp. Hargreaves J. A. and Tucker C. S. (2004). Managing. Ammonia in Fish Ponds. SRAC Publication Fact.

  10. Environmental factors determining ammonia-oxidizing organism distribution and diversity in marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskill, Nicholas J; Eveillard, Damien; Chien, Diana; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2012-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) play a vital role in bridging the input of fixed nitrogen, through N-fixation and remineralization, to its loss by denitrification and anammox. Yet the major environmental factors determining AOB and AOA population dynamics are little understood, despite both groups having a wide environmental distribution. This study examined the relative abundance of both groups of ammonia-oxidizing organisms (AOO) and the diversity of AOA across large-scale gradients in temperature, salinity and substrate concentration and dissolved oxygen. The relative abundance of AOB and AOA varied across environments, with AOB dominating in the freshwater region of the Chesapeake Bay and AOA more abundant in the water column of the coastal and open ocean. The highest abundance of the AOA amoA gene was recorded in the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) and the Arabian Sea (AS). The ratio of AOA : AOB varied from 0.7 in the Chesapeake Bay to 1600 in the Sargasso Sea. Relative abundance of both groups strongly correlated with ammonium concentrations. AOA diversity, as determined by phylogenetic analysis of clone library sequences and archetype analysis from a functional gene DNA microarray, detected broad phylogenetic differences across the study sites. However, phylogenetic diversity within physicochemically congruent stations was more similar than would be expected by chance. This suggests that the prevailing geochemistry, rather than localized dispersal, is the major driving factor determining OTU distribution. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie S. Abby

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally at 68°C under chemolithoautotrophic conditions on ammonia or urea converting ammonia stoichiometrically into nitrite with a generation time of approximately 23 h. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins place the organism as a sister group to all known mesophilic AOA. The 1.58 Mb genome of Ca. N. cavascurensis harbors an amoAXCB gene cluster encoding ammonia monooxygenase and genes for a 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway for autotrophic carbon fixation, but also genes that indicate potential alternative energy metabolisms. Although a bona fide gene for nitrite reductase is missing, the organism is sensitive to NO-scavenging, underlining the potential importance of this compound for AOA metabolism. Ca. N. cavascurensis is distinct from all other AOA in its gene repertoire for replication, cell division and repair. Its genome has an impressive array of mobile genetic elements and other recently acquired gene sets, including conjugative systems, a provirus, transposons and cell appendages. Some of these elements indicate recent exchange with the environment, whereas others seem to have been domesticated and might convey crucial metabolic traits.

  12. Effects of different fertilizers on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in a yellow clay soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huaiying; Huang, Sha; Qiu, Qiongfen; Li, Yaying; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Dai, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Yellow clay paddy soil (Oxisols) is a typical soil with low productivity in southern China. Nitrification inhibitors and slow release fertilizers have been used to improve nitrogen fertilizer utilization and reduce environmental impaction of the paddy soil. However, their effects on ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in paddy soil have rarely been investigated. In the present work, we compared the influences of several slow release fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors on the community structure and activities of the ammonia oxidizers in yellow clay soil. The abundances and community compositions of AOA and AOB were determined with qPCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and clone library approaches. Our results indicated that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) of the soil was significantly related to the abundances of both AOA and AOB. Nitrogen fertilizer application stimulated the growth of AOA and AOB, and the combinations of nitrapyrin with urea (NPU) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) inhibited the growth of AOA and AOB, respectively. Compared with other treatments, the applications of NPU and UF also led to significant shifts in the community compositions of AOA and AOB, respectively. NPU showed an inhibitory effect on AOA T-RF 166 bp that belonged to Nitrosotalea. UF had a negative effect on AOB T-RF 62 bp that was assigned to Nitrosospira. These results suggested that NPU inhibited PNR and increased nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by inhibiting the growth of AOA and altering AOA community. UF showed no effect on NUE but decreased AOB abundance and shifted AOB community.

  13. Probing the electronic structure of M-graphene oxide (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) catalysts for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Binhua; Liu, Jinyin; Zhou, Litao [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Long, Dan, E-mail: legend_long@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou 310022 (China); Feng, Kun; Sun, Xuhui [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhong, Jun, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Material (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: An interaction between metal and graphene oxide was probed to enhance the hydrolysis efficiency of ammonia borane. - Highlights: • Various metal elements (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) were dispersed on graphene oxide (GO) for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB). • The electronic structure of the hybrids has been probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). • An interfacial interaction between metal and GO was observed which could be related to the hydrolysis performance. • The results provide new insight into the enhanced performance of the M-GO hybrids. - Abstract: Various metal elements (M = Ni, Co, NiCo) were dispersed on graphene oxide (GO) to form the M-GO hybrids by a facile way. The hybrids showed good catalytic activities in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB, NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}), which were significantly enhanced when compared to the metal nanoparticles or GO alone. The electronic structure of the hybrids has been probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The distribution of metal elements was clearly imaged with identical electronic structure. Moreover, an interfacial interaction between metal and GO was observed with the peak intensity proportional to the catalytic performance in the hydrolysis of AB. The results provide new insight into the enhanced performance of the M-GO hybrids and may help for the design of advanced catalysts.

  14. Calcium in the Mechanism of Ammonia-Induced Astrocyte Swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A.R.; Rao, K.V. Rama; Tong, X.Y; Norenberg, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema, due largely to astrocyte swelling, is an important clinical problem in patients with acute liver failure. While mechanisms underlying astrocyte swelling in this condition are not fully understood, ammonia and associated oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS) appear to be involved. Mechanisms responsible for the increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) and their role in ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling, however, are poorly understood. Recent studies have demonstrated a transient increase in intracellular Ca2+ in cultured astrocytes exposed to ammonia. As Ca2+ is a known inducer of RONS, we investigated potential mechanisms by which Ca2+ may be responsible for the production of RONS and cell swelling in cultured astrocytes after treatment with ammonia. Exposure of cultured astrocytes to ammonia (5 mM) increased the formation of free radicals, including nitric oxide, and such increase was significantly diminished by treatment with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. We then examined the activity of Ca2+-dependent enzymes that are known to generate RONS and found that ammonia significantly increased the activities of NADPH oxidase (NOX), constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and such increases in activity were significantly diminished by BAPTA. Pretreatment of cultures with 7-nitroindazole, apocyanin and quinacrine, respective inhibitors of cNOS, NOX and PLA2, all significantly diminished RONS production. Additionally, treatment of cultures with BAPTA or with inhibitors of cNOS, NOX and PLA2 reduced ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. These studies suggest that the ammonia-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+ activates free radical producing enzymes that ultimately contribute to the mechanism of astrocyte swelling. PMID:19393035

  15. Influence of tropical leaf litter on nitrogen mineralization and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Diallo, M. D.; Guisse, A.; Sall, S. N.; Dick, R. P.; Assigbetsé, Komi; Dieng, A. L.; Chotte, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Description of the subject. The present study concerns the relationships among leaf litter decomposition, substrate quality, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community composition and nitrogen (N) availability. Decomposition of organic matter affects the biogeochemical cycling of carbon (C) and N. Since the composition of the soil microbial community can alter the physiological capacity of the community, it is timely to study the litter quality effect on N dynamic in ecosystems. Objectives. T...

  16. Atmospheric cycles of nitrogen oxides and ammonia. [source strengths and destruction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottger, A.; Ehhalt, D. H.; Gravenhorst, G.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric cycles of nitrogenous trace compounds for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are discussed. Source strengths and destruction rates for the nitrogen oxides: NO, NO2 and HNO3 -(NOX) and ammonia (NH3) are given as a function of latitude over continents and oceans. The global amounts of NOX-N and NH3-N produced annually in the period 1950 to 1975 (34 + 5 x one trillion g NOx-N/yr and 29 + or - 6 x one trillion g NH3-N/yr) are much less than previously assumed. Globally, natural and anthropogenic emissions are of similar magnitude. The NOx emission from anthropogenic sources is 1.5 times that from natural processes in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere, it is a factor of 3 or 4 less. More than 80% of atmospheric ammonia seems to be derived from excrements of domestic animals, mostly by bulk deposition: 24 + or - 9 x one trillion g NO3 -N/yr and 21 + or - 9 x one trillion g NH4+-N/yr. Another fraction may be removed by absorption on vegetation and soils.

  17. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence.

  18. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence

  19. Ammonia-oxidizing activity and microbial community structure in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, K.; Takanashi, A.; Yamada, T.; Hiraishi, A.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ammonia-oxidizing activity and the phylogentic composition of microorganisms involved in acid tea (Camellia sinensis) orchard soil. All soil samples were collected from three sites located in Tahara and Toyohashi, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The potential nitrification rate (PNR) was measured by the chlorate inhibition method. The soil pH of tea orchards studied ranged from 2.78 to 4.84, differing significantly from sample to sample, whereas that of meadow and unplanted fields ranged from 5.78 to 6.35. The PNR ranged from 0.050 to 0.193 μg NO2--Ng-1 h-1 and were positively correlated with the soil pH (r2 = 0.382, p<0.001). Bulk DNA was extracted from a tea orchard soil (pH 4.8; PNR, 0.078 μg NO2--Ng-1 h-1) and subjected to PCR-aided clone library analyses targeting archaeal and bacterial amoA genes. The detected archaeal clones separated from the cluster of the 'Soil clones' and tightly clustered with the clones originating from other acidic soil environments including the Chinese tea orchard soil. These results suggest that the specific archaeal populations dominate as the ammonia oxidizers in acid tea-orchard soils and possibly other acid soils, independent of geographic locations, which results from the adaptation to specific ecological niches.

  20. Phylogenetic diversity and ecological pattern of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the surface sediments of the western Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yiguo; Li, Meng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-11-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was surveyed in the surface sediments from the northern part of the South China Sea (SCS). The distribution pattern of AOA in the western Pacific was discussed through comparing the SCS with other areas in the western Pacific including Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea where high input of anthropogenic nitrogen was evident, the tropical West Pacific Continental Margins close to the Philippines, the deep-sea methane seep sediments in the Okhotsk Sea, the cold deep sea of Northeastern Japan Sea, and the hydrothermal field in the Southern Okinawa Trough. These various environments provide a wide spectrum of physical and chemical conditions for a better understanding of the distribution pattern and diversities of AOA in the western Pacific. Under these different conditions, the distinct community composition between shallow and deep-sea sediments was clearly delineated based on the UniFrac PCoA and Jackknife Environmental Cluster analyses. Phylogenetic analyses showed that a few ammonia-oxidizing archaeal subclades in the marine water column/sediment clade and endemic lineages were indicative phylotypes for some environments. Higher phylogenetic diversity was observed in the Philippines while lower diversity in the hydrothermal vent habitat. Water depth and possibly with other environmental factors could be the main driving forces to shape the phylogenetic diversity of AOA observed, not only in the SCS but also in the whole western Pacific. The multivariate regression tree analysis also supported this observation consistently. Moreover, the functions of current and other climate factors were also discussed in comparison of phylogenetic diversity. The information collectively provides important insights into the ecophysiological requirements of uncultured ammonia-oxidizing archaeal lineages in the western Pacific Ocean.

  1. Substrate availability drives spatial patterns in richness of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Norman; J.E. Barrett

    2016-01-01

    We sought to investigate the drivers of richness of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in temperate forest soils. We sampled soils across four experimental watersheds in the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina USA. These watersheds are geographically close, but vary in soil chemistry due to differences in land use history. While we...

  2. Evaluating primers for profiling anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria within freshwater environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntipar Sonthiphand

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox bacteria play an important role in transforming ammonium to nitrogen gas and contribute to fixed nitrogen losses in freshwater environments. Understanding the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria requires reliable molecular tools, and these are not yet well established for these important Planctomycetes. To help validate PCR primers for the detection of anammox bacteria within freshwater ecosystems, we analyzed representative positive controls and selected samples from Grand River and groundwater sites, both from Ontario, Canada. The objectives of this study were to identify a suitable anammox denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprint method by using GC-clamp modifications to existing primers, and to verify the specificity of anammox-specific primers used for DGGE, cloning and qPCR methods. Six primer combinations were tested from four published primer sets (i.e. A438f/A684r, Amx368f/Amx820r, An7f/An1388r, and Pla46/1392r for both direct and nested PCR amplifications. All PCR products were run subsequently on DGGE gels to compare the resulting patterns. Two anammox-specific primer combinations were also used to generate clone libraries and quantify anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes with qPCR. The primer set A438f/A684r was highly specific to anammox bacteria, provided reliable DGGE fingerprints and generated a high proportion of anammox-related clones. A second primer set (Amx368f/Amx820r was anammox specific, based on clone library analysis, but PCR products from different candidate species of anammox bacteria resolved poorly using DGGE analysis. Both DGGE and cloning results revealed that Ca. Brocadia and an uncharacterized anammox bacterial cluster represented the majority of anammox bacteria found in Grand River sediment and groundwater samples, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that although Amx368f/Amx820r was useful for anammox-specific qPCR and clone library

  3. Numerical analysis on effect of aspect ratio of planar solid oxide fuel cell fueled with decomposed ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wee Choon; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Masashi; Brus, Grzegorz; Szmyd, Janusz S.; Yoshida, Hideo

    2018-04-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with decomposed ammonia are numerically studied to investigate the effect of the cell aspect ratio. The ammonia decomposer is assumed to be located next to the SOFCs, and the heat required for the endothermic decomposition reaction is supplied by the thermal radiation from the SOFCs. Cells with aspect ratios (ratios of the streamwise length to the spanwise width) between 0.130 and 7.68 are provided with the reactants at a constant mass flow rate. A parametric study is conducted by varying the cell temperature and fuel utility factor to investigate their effects on the cell performance in terms of the voltage efficiency. The effect of the heat supply to the ammonia decomposer is also studied. The developed model shows good agreement, in terms of the current-voltage curve, with the experimental data obtained from a short stack without parameter tuning. The simulation study reveals that the cell with the highest aspect ratio achieves the highest performance under furnace operation. On the other hand, the 0.750 aspect ratio cell with the highest voltage efficiency of 0.67 is capable of thermally sustaining the ammonia decomposers at a fuel utility of 0.80 using the thermal radiation from both sidewalls.

  4. Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia in Solid Electrolyte Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garagounis, Ioannis; Kyriakou, Vasileios; Skodra, Aglaia; Vasileiou, Eirini; Stoukides, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Developed in the early 1900s, the “Haber–Bosch” synthesis is the dominant NH 3 synthesis process. Parallel to catalyst optimization, current research efforts are also focused on the investigation of new methods for ammonia synthesis, including the electrochemical synthesis with the use of solid electrolyte cells. Since the first report on Solid State Ammonia Synthesis (SSAS), more than 30 solid electrolyte materials were tested and at least 15 catalysts were used as working electrodes. Thus far, the highest rate of ammonia formation reported is 1.13 × 10 -8 mol s -1 cm -2 , obtained at 80°C with a Nafion solid electrolyte and a mixed oxide, SmFe 0.7 Cu 0.1 Ni 0.2 O 3 , cathode. At high temperatures (>500°C), the maximum rate was 9.5 × 10 −9 mol s -1 cm -2 using Ce 0.8 Y 0.2 O 2-δ –[Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 –K 3 PO 4 ] as electrolyte and Ag–Pd as cathode. In this paper, the advantages and the disadvantages of SSAS vs. the conventional process and the requirements that must be met in order to promote the electrochemical process into an industrial level are discussed.

  5. Ammonia volatilization from crop residues and frozen green manure crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruijter, F. J.; Huijsmans, J. F. M.; Rutgers, B.

    2010-09-01

    Agricultural systems can lose substantial amounts of nitrogen (N). To protect the environment, the European Union (EU) has adopted several directives that set goals to limit N losses. National Emission Ceilings (NEC) are prescribed in the NEC directive for nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Crop residues may contribute to ammonia volatilization, but sufficient information on their contribution to the national ammonia volatilization is lacking. Experiments were carried out with the aim to assess the ammonia volatilization of crop residues left on the soil surface or incorporated into the soil under the conditions met in practice in the Netherlands during late autumn and winter. Ammonia emission from residues of broccoli, leek, sugar beet, cut grass, fodder radish (fresh and frozen) and yellow mustard (frozen) was studied during two winter seasons using volatilization chambers. Residues were either placed on top of soil or mixed with soil. Mixing residues with soil gave insignificant ammonia volatilization, whereas volatilization was 5-16 percent of the N content of residues when placed on top of soil. Ammonia volatilization started after at least 4 days. Total ammonia volatilization was related to C/N-ratio and N concentration of the plant material. After 37 days, cumulative ammonia volatilization was negligible from plant material with N concentration below 2 percent, and was 10 percent of the N content of plant material with 4 percent N. These observations can be explained by decomposition of plant material by micro-organisms. After an initial built up of the microbial population, NH 4+ that is not needed for their own growth is released and can easily emit as NH 3 at the soil surface. The results of the experiments were used to estimate the contribution of crop residues to ammonia volatilization in the Netherlands. Crop residues of arable crops and residues of pasture topping may contribute more than 3 million kg NH 3-N to the national ammonia volatilization of the

  6. Absorption spectra of ammonia near 1 mu m

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barton, E. J.; Polyansky, O. L.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.; Civiš, Svatopluk; Ferus, Martin; Hargreaves, R.; Ovsyannikov, R. I.; Kyuberis, A. A.; Zobov, N. F.; Béguier, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 203, DEC 2017 (2017), s. 392-397 ISSN 0022-4073 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 267219 - EXOMOL Grant - others:RFBR(RU) 16-32-00244 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : room temperature * ammonia * absorption intensities * FTIR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.419, year: 2016

  7. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lin; Wang Dianlong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites are prepared by hydrothermal reaction in distilled water or 5% ammonia aqueous solution at 130 deg. C, with MnO 2 -graphene oxide composites which are synthesized by a redox reaction between KMnO 4 and graphene oxide. → MnO 2 is deoxidized to MnOOH on graphene oxide through hydrothermal reaction without any extra reductants. → It is found that the electrochemical resistance of MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites decreases and the capacitance increases to 76 F g -1 when hydrothermal reaction is conducted in ammonia aqueous solution. → MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites prepared by hydrothermal reaction in 5% ammonia aqueous solution have excellent capacitance retention ratio at scan rate from 5 mV s -1 to 40 mV s -1 . - Abstract: MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites are prepared by hydrothermal reaction in distilled water or 5% ammonia aqueous solution at 130 deg. C with MnO 2 -graphene oxide composites which are synthesized by a redox reaction between KMnO 4 and graphene oxide. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and energy dispersive X-ray analyses (EDAX) show MnO 2 is deoxidized to MnOOH on graphene oxide through hydrothermal reaction without any extra reductants. The electrochemical capacitance of MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites prepared in 5% ammonia aqueous solution is 76 F g -1 at current density of 0.1 A g -1 . Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggests the electrochemical resistance of MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites is reduced when hydrothermal reaction is conducted in ammonia aqueous solution. The relationship between the electrochemical capacitance and the structure of MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites is characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results indicate the electrochemical performance of MnOOH nanowire-graphene oxide composites strongly depends on their

  8. Promotion of catalytic performance by adding W into Pt/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst for selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mengmeng [Institute of New Energy and Low-Carbon Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan (China); Wang, Suning; Li, Yuanshan [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan (China); Xu, Haidi, E-mail: xuhaidi@scu.edu.cn [Institute of New Energy and Low-Carbon Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan (China); Chen, Yaoqiang, E-mail: nic7501@scu.edu.cn [Institute of New Energy and Low-Carbon Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan (China)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • The tungsten species weaken platinum-oxygen bond strength. • Pt{sup 0} was the active species of ammonia oxidation reaction in the low temperature. • Some PtO species could convert to Pt [111] beside WO{sub 3} species. - Abstract: Pt-WO{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst was prepared by co-impregnation method to improve the ammonia oxidation performance of Pt/ZrO{sub 2}. Differences in textural, structural, surface chemical states, redox properties and acid properties, together with the catalytic performance of Pt/ZrO{sub 2} and Pt-WO{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} catalysts were investigated systematically. The results of H{sub 2}-TPR revealed that higher reduction ability was possessed by Pt-WO{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} than that of Pt/ZrO{sub 2} due to the influence of tungsten on platinum. The XPS results showed that electron transfer from tungsten to platinum species made higher electron density around platinum. The TEM results revealed that the active lattice plane Pt[111] was obtained by modification of W species. Consequently, Pt-WO{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} exhibited obviously better ammonia oxidation performance compared with Pt/ZrO{sub 2}, the light-off temperature of NH{sub 3} shifted from 284 °C to 249 °C, the activation energy decreased from 113.4 kJ mol{sup −1} to 96.2 kJ mol{sup −1}.

  9. Hydrogen bonding-mediated dehydrogenation in the ammonia borane combined graphene oxide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Anlong; Liu, Taijuan; Kuang, Minquan; Yang, Ruifeng; Huang, Rui; Wang, Guangzhao; Yuan, Hongkuan; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xiaolan

    2018-03-01

    The dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) adsorbed on three different graphene oxide (GO) sheets is investigated within the ab initio density functional theory. The energy barriers to direct combination the hydrogens of hydroxyl groups and the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 are relatively high, indicating that the process is energetically unfavorable. Our theoretical study demonstrates that the dehydrogenation mechanism of the AB-GO systems has undergone two critical steps, first, there is the formation of the hydrogen bond (O-H-O) between two hydroxyl groups, and then, the hydrogen bond further react with the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 with low reaction barriers.

  10. Enrichment of Thermophilic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea from an Alkaline Hot Spring in the Great Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Huang, Z.; Jiang, H.; Wiegel, J.; Li, W.; Dong, H.

    2010-12-01

    One of the major advances in the nitrogen cycle is the recent discovery of ammonia oxidation by archaea. While culture-independent studies have revealed occurrence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nearly every surface niche on earth, most of these microorganisms have resisted isolation and so far only a few species have been identified. The Great Basin contains numerous hot springs, which are characterized by moderately high temperature (40-65 degree C) and circumneutral or alkaline pH. Unique thermophilic archaea have been identified based on molecular DNA and lipid biomarkers; some of which may be ammonia oxidizers. This study aims to isolate some of these archaea from a California hot spring that has pH around 9.0 and temperature around 42 degree C. Mat material was collected from the spring and transported on ice to the laboratory. A synthetic medium (SCM-5) was inoculated with the mat material and the culture was incubated under varying temperature (35-65 degree C) and pH (7.0-10.0) conditions using antibiotics to suppress bacterial growth. Growth of the culture was monitored by microscopy, decrease in ammonium and increase in nitrite, and increases in Crenarchaeota and AOA abundances over time. Clone libraries were constructed to compare archaeal community structures before and after the enrichment experiment. Temperature and pH profiles indicated that the culture grew optimally at pH 9.0 and temperature 45 degree C, which are consistent with the geochemical conditions of the natural environment. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the final OTU was distantly related to all known hyperthermophilic archaea. Analysis of the amoA genes showed two OTUs in the final culture; one of them was closely related to Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis. However, the enrichment culture always contained bacteria and attempts to separate them from archaea have failed. This highlights the difficulty in bringing AOA into pure culture and suggests that some of the AOA may

  11. Methane, nitrous oxide and ammonia emissions from pigs housed on litter and from stockpiling of spent litter

    KAUST Repository

    Phillips, F. A.; Wiedemann, S. G.; Naylor, T. A.; McGahan, E. J.; Warren, B. R.; Murphy, C. M.; Parkes, Stephen; Wilson, J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitigation of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions is a target area for the Australian Government and the pork industry. The present study measured methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and ammonia (NH3) from a deep-litter piggery and litter stockpile over two trials in southern New South Wales, to compare emissions from housing pigs on deep litter with those of pigs from conventional housing with uncovered anaerobic effluent-treatment ponds. Emissions were measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, in conjunction with a backward Lagrangian stochastic model. Manure excretion was determined by mass balance and emission factors (EFs) were developed to report emissions relative to volatile solids and nitrogen (N) input. Nitrous oxide emissions per animal unit (1 AU ≤ 500 kg liveweight) from deep-litter sheds were negligible in winter, and 8.4 g/AU.day in summer. Ammonia emissions were 39.1 in winter and 52.2 g/AU.day in summer, while CH4 emissions were 16.1 and 21.6 g/AU.day in winter and summer respectively. Emission factors averaged from summer and winter emissions showed a CH4 conversion factor of 3.6%, an NH3-N EF of 10% and a N2O-N EF of 0.01 kg N2O-N/kg N excreted. For the litter stockpile, the simple average of summer and winter showed an EF for NH3-N of 14%, and a N2O-N EF of 0.02 kg N2O-N/kg-N of spent litter added to the stockpile. We observed a 66% and 80% decrease in emissions from the manure excreted in litter-based housing with litter stockpiling or without litter stockpiling, compared with conventional housing with an uncovered anaerobic effluent-treatment pond. This provides a sound basis for mitigation strategies that utilise litter-based housing as an alternative to conventional housing with uncovered anaerobic effluent-treatment ponds. © CSIRO 2016.

  12. Methane, nitrous oxide and ammonia emissions from pigs housed on litter and from stockpiling of spent litter

    KAUST Repository

    Phillips, F. A.

    2016-05-05

    Mitigation of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions is a target area for the Australian Government and the pork industry. The present study measured methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and ammonia (NH3) from a deep-litter piggery and litter stockpile over two trials in southern New South Wales, to compare emissions from housing pigs on deep litter with those of pigs from conventional housing with uncovered anaerobic effluent-treatment ponds. Emissions were measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, in conjunction with a backward Lagrangian stochastic model. Manure excretion was determined by mass balance and emission factors (EFs) were developed to report emissions relative to volatile solids and nitrogen (N) input. Nitrous oxide emissions per animal unit (1 AU ≤ 500 kg liveweight) from deep-litter sheds were negligible in winter, and 8.4 g/AU.day in summer. Ammonia emissions were 39.1 in winter and 52.2 g/AU.day in summer, while CH4 emissions were 16.1 and 21.6 g/AU.day in winter and summer respectively. Emission factors averaged from summer and winter emissions showed a CH4 conversion factor of 3.6%, an NH3-N EF of 10% and a N2O-N EF of 0.01 kg N2O-N/kg N excreted. For the litter stockpile, the simple average of summer and winter showed an EF for NH3-N of 14%, and a N2O-N EF of 0.02 kg N2O-N/kg-N of spent litter added to the stockpile. We observed a 66% and 80% decrease in emissions from the manure excreted in litter-based housing with litter stockpiling or without litter stockpiling, compared with conventional housing with an uncovered anaerobic effluent-treatment pond. This provides a sound basis for mitigation strategies that utilise litter-based housing as an alternative to conventional housing with uncovered anaerobic effluent-treatment ponds. © CSIRO 2016.

  13. Anodic oxidation of ammonia in alkaline solutions at Pt/Pt electrodes. Hakkin denkyokujo ni okeru enkisei ammonia yoeki no anodo sanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Ryoichiro; Katsuta, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Asami, Yusaku; Hirano, Katsuhiko (Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-01-05

    Anodic oxidation of ammonia in alkaline solutions on Pt/Pt electrode, in which NH {sub 3} is oxidized producing N {sub 2}, is a promising reaction in application to a fuel cell and water treatment. In this study, the relations between electrode potential and adsorbed intermediates, reaction process were elucidated by potentiodynamic method and potential step method. In measurement, a transient memory device and a microprocessor were connected to an electrolysis device as a new method, then measurement of electric potential and current and integral calculation were perfromed at high speed. Active sites of electrode were covered by Pt NH {sub x}. Faradic current corresponds to the N {sub 2} evolution was shown markedly by anodic scanning. The relation between electrode potential and reaction process was revealed by potential step method. It is found that Pt-NH {sub 2} is the active intermediate for the N {sub 2} evolution, and when current shows maximum, its coverage is nearly 0.5. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from...... their roots and thereby stimulate nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification in their rhizosphere. However, oxygen release and inorganic nitrogen concentrations differ markedly between macrophyte species. We therefore propose (i) that the rhizosphere of freshwater macrophytes harbours a species......-specific microbial community distinct from that of unvegetated sediment and (ii) that aquatic macrophytes have an impact on abundance and activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in freshwater sediment. The goal of this study was to test these hypotheses for the key functional group for coupled nitrification...

  15. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    tested in the study; which is contradicting to the general belief that thermophilic methanogens are more vulnerable to high ammonia loads compared to mesophilic. This unexpected finding underlines the fact that the complete knowledge of ammonia inhibition effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens is still...

  16. Ammonia gas sensing property of gadolinium oxide using fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J. Santhosh; Ranganathan, B.; Sastikumar, D.

    2017-05-01

    The design of fiber optic sensor is based on a cladding modification methodology. A fiber-optic chemical sensor is developed by replacing a certain portion of the original cladding with a chemically sensitive material, specifically, calcinated gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3).Both the light absorption co-efficient and refractive index change upon exposure to chemical vapours of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ammonia (NH3), ethanol (CH3CH2OH), and methanol (CH3OH). The spectral characteristics of the sensor were studied for different concentrations ranging from 0-500 ppm. These changes induced the optical intensity modulation of the transmitted optical signal. During interaction between the sensing material and VOCs, the output intensity is taken into account to detect the toxic VOCs present in the environment. This was systematically investigated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and SEM. The XRD analysis indicated that the calcinated Gd2O3 was formed in cubic structure with the crystallite size of 13 nm. The Gd2O3 nanorods with thickness ranging from 80 to 120 nm were confirmed from SEM. The ammonia gas response of the Gd2O3 sensor is presented. A model is proposed for understanding the spectral intensity variations.

  17. Simultaneous determination of ammonia, dimethylamine, trimethylamine and trimethylamine-N-oxide in fish extracts by capillary electrophoresis with indirect UV-detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Jørgensen, Bo

    2002-01-01

    A capillary electrophoretic method with indirect UV detection is described for simultaneous determination of ammonia, dimethylamine (DMA), trimethylamine (TMA) and trimethylamine-N- oxide (TMAO) in aqueous extracts of fish, A buffer consisting of 4 mM formic acid, 5 mM copper(II)sulfate and 3 m......M. The detection limit for ammonia, DMA, TMA, and TMAO was less than 0.04 mM, corresponding to 2 mg nitrogen per 100 g fish. As an extra benefit, the method also provided a quantitative determination of potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium ions. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Ammonia synthesis over multi-promoted iron catalysts obtained by high-energy ball-milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Mørup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of producing ammonia synthesis catalysts from high-energy ball-milling of a simple mixture of the constituent oxides has been investigated. The effect of ball-milling the fused oxidic precursor of the industrial KM1 ammonia synthesis catalyst has also been studied. The results show...

  19. Simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by air under calcium oxide assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongliang; Liu, Renlong; Shu, Jiancheng; Li, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Leaching tests of electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) indicated that high contents of soluble manganese and ammonia-nitrogen posed a high environmental risk. This work reports the results of simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese by air under calcium oxide assist. The ammonia-nitrogen stripping rate increased with the dosage of CaO, the air flow rate and the temperature of EMR slurry. Stripped ammonia-nitrogen was absorbed by a solution of sulfuric acid and formed soluble (NH4)2SO4 and (NH4)3H(SO4)3. The major parameters that effected soluble manganese precipitation were the dosage of added CaO and the slurry temperature. Considering these two aspects, the efficient operation conditions should be conducted with 8 wt.% added CaO, 60°C, 800 mL min(-1) air flow rate and 60-min reaction time. Under these conditions 99.99% of the soluble manganese was precipitated as Mn3O4, which was confirmed by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. In addition, the stripping rate of ammonia-nitrogen was 99.73%. Leaching tests showed the leached toxic substances concentrations of the treated EMR met the integrated wastewater discharge standard of China (GB8978-1996).

  20. High abundances of potentially active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in oligotrophic, high-altitude lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis J Hayden

    Full Text Available Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle by determining the oxidation state of nitrogen and its subsequent bioavailability and cycling. However, relatively little is known about the underlying ecology of the microbial communities that carry out nitrification in freshwater ecosystems--and particularly within high-altitude oligotrophic lakes, where nitrogen is frequently a limiting nutrient. We quantified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in 9 high-altitude lakes (2289-3160 m in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, in relation to spatial and biogeochemical data. Based on their ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected. AOB were present in 88% of samples and were more abundant than AOA in all samples. Both groups showed >100 fold variation in abundance between different lakes, and were also variable through time within individual lakes. Nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate were generally low but also varied across and within lakes, suggestive of active internal nutrient cycling; AOB abundance was significantly correlated with phosphate (r(2 = 0.32, p<0.1, whereas AOA abundance was inversely correlated with lake elevation (r(2 = 0.43, p<0.05. We also measured low rates of ammonia oxidation--indicating that AOB, AOA, or both, may be biogeochemically active in these oligotrophic ecosystems. Our data indicate that dynamic populations of AOB and AOA are found in oligotrophic, high-altitude, freshwater lakes.

  1. Catalytic ozonation of ammonia using biomass char and wood fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, James R; Miller, Joby; Kolar, Praveen; Das, K C

    2009-05-01

    Catalytic ozonation of gaseous ammonia was investigated at room temperature using wood fly ash (WFA) and biomass char as catalysts. WFA gave the best results, removing ammonia (11 ppmv NH(3), 45% conversion) at 23 degrees C at a residence time of 0.34 s, using 5 g of catalyst or ash at the lowest ozone concentration (62 ppmv). Assuming pseudo zero order kinetics in ozone, a power rate law of -r(NH3) = 7.2 x 10(-8) C(NH3)(0.25) (r, mol g(-1)s(-1), C(NH3)molL(-1)) was determined at 510 ppmv O(3) and 23 degrees C for WFA. Water vapor approximately doubled the oxidation rate using WFA and catalytic ozonation activity was not measured for the char without humidifying the air stream. Overall oxidation rates using the crude catalysts were lower than commercial catalysts, but the catalytic ozonation process operated at significantly lower temperatures (23 vs. 300 degrees C). Nitric oxide was not detected and the percentage of NO(2) formed from NH(3) oxidation ranged from 0.3% to 3% (v/v), with WFA resulting in the lowest NO(2) level (at low O(3) levels). However, we could not verify that N(2)O was not formed, so further research is needed to determine if N(2) is the primary end-product. Additional research is required to develop techniques to enhance the oxidation activity and industrial application of the crude, but potentially inexpensive catalysts.

  2. Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia in Solid Electrolyte Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garagounis, Ioannis; Kyriakou, Vasileios [Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Chemical Processes and Energy Resources Institute, Center for Research and Technology Hellas, Thessaloniki (Greece); Skodra, Aglaia [Chemical Processes and Energy Resources Institute, Center for Research and Technology Hellas, Thessaloniki (Greece); Vasileiou, Eirini; Stoukides, Michael, E-mail: stoukidi@cperi.certh.gr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Chemical Processes and Energy Resources Institute, Center for Research and Technology Hellas, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-01-17

    Developed in the early 1900s, the “Haber–Bosch” synthesis is the dominant NH{sub 3} synthesis process. Parallel to catalyst optimization, current research efforts are also focused on the investigation of new methods for ammonia synthesis, including the electrochemical synthesis with the use of solid electrolyte cells. Since the first report on Solid State Ammonia Synthesis (SSAS), more than 30 solid electrolyte materials were tested and at least 15 catalysts were used as working electrodes. Thus far, the highest rate of ammonia formation reported is 1.13 × 10{sup -8} mol s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, obtained at 80°C with a Nafion solid electrolyte and a mixed oxide, SmFe{sub 0.7}Cu{sub 0.1}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, cathode. At high temperatures (>500°C), the maximum rate was 9.5 × 10{sup −9} mol s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} using Ce{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-δ}–[Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}–K{sub 3}PO{sub 4}] as electrolyte and Ag–Pd as cathode. In this paper, the advantages and the disadvantages of SSAS vs. the conventional process and the requirements that must be met in order to promote the electrochemical process into an industrial level are discussed.

  3. Comparison among amoA Primers Suited for Quantification and Diversity Analyses of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Yumi; Morimoto, Sho; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Akiyama, Hiroko; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA) is frequently used as a functional gene marker for diversity analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). To select a suitable amoA primer for real-time PCR and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), three reverse primers (degenerate primer amoA-2R; non-degenerate primers amoA-2R-GG and amoA-2IR) were examined. No significant differences were observed among the three primers in terms of quantitative values of amoA from environmental samples using real-time PCR. We found that PCR-DGGE analysis with the amoA-2IR primer gave the best results in this studied soil. These results indicate that amoA-2IR is a suitable primer for community analysis of AOB in the environment. PMID:22075625

  4. Detoxification of ammonia in mouse cortical GABAergic cell cultures increases neuronal oxidative metabolism and reveals an emerging role for release of glucose-derived alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse K; Anker, Malene; Melø, Torun M; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Portela, Luis V; Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-04-01

    Cerebral hyperammonemia is believed to play a pivotal role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a debilitating condition arising due to acute or chronic liver disease. In the brain, ammonia is thought to be detoxified via the activity of glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme. Moreover, it has been suggested that cerebral tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism is inhibited and glycolysis enhanced during hyperammonemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the ammonia-detoxifying mechanisms as well as the effects of ammonia on energy-generating metabolic pathways in a mouse neuronal-astrocytic co-culture model of the GABAergic system. We found that 5 mM ammonium chloride affected energy metabolism by increasing the neuronal TCA cycle activity and switching the astrocytic TCA cycle toward synthesis of substrate for glutamine synthesis. Furthermore, ammonia exposure enhanced the synthesis and release of alanine. Collectively, our results demonstrate that (1) formation of glutamine is seminal for detoxification of ammonia; (2) neuronal oxidative metabolism is increased in the presence of ammonia; and (3) synthesis and release of alanine is likely to be important for ammonia detoxification as a supplement to formation of glutamine.

  5. Biogeochemical controls and isotopic signatures of nitrous oxide production by a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Frame

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is a trace gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion. The N2O yield from nitrification (moles N2O-N produced per mole ammonium-N consumed has been used to estimate marine N2O production rates from measured nitrification rates and global estimates of oceanic export production. However, the N2O yield from nitrification is not constant. Previous culture-based measurements indicate that N2O yield increases as oxygen (O2 concentration decreases and as nitrite (NO2 concentration increases. Here, we have measured yields of N2O from cultures of the marine β-proteobacterium Nitrosomonas marina C-113a as they grew on low-ammonium (50 μM media. These yields, which were typically between 4 × 10−4 and 7 × 10−4 for cultures with cell densities between 2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml−1, were lower than previous reports for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The observed impact of O2 concentration on yield was also smaller than previously reported under all conditions except at high starting cell densities (1.5 × 106 cells ml−1, where 160-fold higher yields were observed at 0.5% O2 (5.1 μM dissolved O2 compared with 20% O2 (203 μM dissolved O2. At lower cell densities (2 × 102 and 2.1 × 104 cells ml−1, cultures grown under 0.5% O2 had yields that were only 1.25- to 1.73-fold higher than cultures grown under 20% O2. Thus, previously reported many-fold increases in N2O yield with dropping O2 could be reproduced only at cell densities that far exceeded those of ammonia oxidizers in the ocean. The presence of excess NO2 (up to 1 mM in the growth

  6. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts : temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, A.C.M.; Grondelle, van J.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity

  7. Serial ammonia measurement in patients poisoned with glufosinate ammonium herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, J M; Chun, B J

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether ammonia concentrations can predict delayed neurotoxicity development and neurotoxicity latency in glufosinate ammonium (GLA) herbicide-poisoned patients presenting with an alert mental state and stable hemodynamics. This retrospective observational case study included 26 patients divided into 2 groups: neurotoxicity during hospitalization (complicated group) and without neurotoxicity (noncomplicated group). Thirteen patients (50.0%) experienced neurotoxicity at 16 h post-ingestion. Although ammonia concentrations at presentation did not differ significantly between the two groups, the ammonia level in the complicated group increased significantly at the next measurement and remained significantly higher than that in the noncomplicated group until 48 h after ingestion. The peak ammonia concentration before neurotoxicity development was an independent predictor of neurotoxicity (odds ratio: 1.047, 95% confidence interval: 1.010-1.087, p value = 0.014), and the optimal cutoff value of peak ammonia concentration for predicting neurotoxicity was 101.5 μg/dL. The rate of ammonia increase was not associated with the time latency from ingestion to neurotoxicity development. This study showed that serial ammonia measurements in GLA-poisoned patients may identify those who are at high risk of developing neurotoxicity. However, as this study enrolled few patients, further qualified trials are required to confirm our results and to reveal the etiology of hyperammonemia and its causality in neurotoxicity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Effects of aqueous ammonia treatment on fiber’s surface morphology and enzymatic digestibility of empty fruit bunch fiber (EFBF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Tang Pei; Hassan, Osman

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of aqueous ammonia reflux and soaked treatment on the fiber’s surface morphology and enzymatic digestibility of empty fruit bunch fiber (EFBF). The surface morphological changes of the fiber after aqueous ammonia treatment was linked to the sugars yield by enzymatic hydrolysis. The effectiveness of 6.25% aqueous ammonia treatment in improving enzymatic digestibility of EFBF was initially studied in reflux system and by soaking. The results showed that soaked treatment was more effective than reflux system. Further study on soaked treatment of EFBF was carried out by increasing the ammonia concentration to 12.50%. Soaking in aqueous ammonia was conducted at 30°C and 50°C for 24 hours. The results of enzymatic hydrolysis showed that sugar yield from EFBF soaked in 12.50% aqueous ammonia at 50°C was the highest. Approximately 242.91±15.50 mg/g EFBF of xylose and 320.49±28.31 mg/g EFBF of glucose were produced by the action of enzyme Cellic Ctec 2. Results of scanning electron microscopic showed that aqueous ammonia treatment by soaking had caused a more severe structural distortion on the fiber’s surface and higher removal of silica bodies that embedded on the fiber than those in reflux system. The changes on the fiber’s surface morphology were believed is the contributing factor that improved the enzymatic digestibility of EFBF after aqueous ammonia treatment

  9. Effects of aqueous ammonia treatment on fiber’s surface morphology and enzymatic digestibility of empty fruit bunch fiber (EFBF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Tang Pei; Hassan, Osman [Department of Food Science, School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of aqueous ammonia reflux and soaked treatment on the fiber’s surface morphology and enzymatic digestibility of empty fruit bunch fiber (EFBF). The surface morphological changes of the fiber after aqueous ammonia treatment was linked to the sugars yield by enzymatic hydrolysis. The effectiveness of 6.25% aqueous ammonia treatment in improving enzymatic digestibility of EFBF was initially studied in reflux system and by soaking. The results showed that soaked treatment was more effective than reflux system. Further study on soaked treatment of EFBF was carried out by increasing the ammonia concentration to 12.50%. Soaking in aqueous ammonia was conducted at 30°C and 50°C for 24 hours. The results of enzymatic hydrolysis showed that sugar yield from EFBF soaked in 12.50% aqueous ammonia at 50°C was the highest. Approximately 242.91±15.50 mg/g EFBF of xylose and 320.49±28.31 mg/g EFBF of glucose were produced by the action of enzyme Cellic Ctec 2. Results of scanning electron microscopic showed that aqueous ammonia treatment by soaking had caused a more severe structural distortion on the fiber’s surface and higher removal of silica bodies that embedded on the fiber than those in reflux system. The changes on the fiber’s surface morphology were believed is the contributing factor that improved the enzymatic digestibility of EFBF after aqueous ammonia treatment.

  10. amoA Gene abundances and nitrification potential rates suggest that benthic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and not Archaea dominate N cycling in the Colne Estuary, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jialin; Nedwell, David B; Beddow, Jessica; Dumbrell, Alex J; McKew, Boyd A; Thorpe, Emma L; Whitby, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification, mediated by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), is important in global nitrogen cycling. In estuaries where gradients of salinity and ammonia concentrations occur, there may be differential selections for ammonia-oxidizer populations. The aim of this study was to examine the activity, abundance, and diversity of AOA and AOB in surface oxic sediments of a highly nutrified estuary that exhibits gradients of salinity and ammonium. AOB and AOA communities were investigated by measuring ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene abundance and nitrification potentials both spatially and temporally. Nitrification potentials differed along the estuary and over time, with the greatest nitrification potentials occurring mid-estuary (8.2 μmol N grams dry weight [gdw](-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 37.4 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January). At the estuary head, the nitrification potential was 4.3 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 11.7 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January. At the estuary head and mouth, nitrification potentials fluctuated throughout the year. AOB amoA gene abundances were significantly greater (by 100-fold) than those of AOA both spatially and temporally. Nitrosomonas spp. were detected along the estuary by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band sequence analysis. In conclusion, AOB dominated over AOA in the estuarine sediments, with the ratio of AOB/AOA amoA gene abundance increasing from the upper (freshwater) to lower (marine) regions of the Colne estuary. These findings suggest that in this nutrified estuary, AOB (possibly Nitrosomonas spp.) were of major significance in nitrification. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis. Jayant M Modak. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1159-1167. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1159-1167. Keywords.

  12. Dynamics of nitrification and denitrification in root- oxygenated sediments and adaptation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria to low-oxygen or anoxic habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Libochant, J.A.; Blom, C.W.P.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen-releasing plants may provide aerobic niches in anoxic sediments and soils for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, The oxygen- releasing, aerenchymatous emergent macrophyte Glycerin maxima had a strong positive effect on numbers and activities of the nitrifying bacteria in its root zone in spring and

  13. Dynamics of nitrification and denitrification in root- oxygenated sediments and adaptation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria to low-oxygen or anoxic habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Libochant, J.A.; Blom, C.W.P.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen-releasing plants may provide aerobic niches in anoxic sediments and soils for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The oxygen-releasing, aerenchymatous emergent macrophyte Glyceria maxima had a strong positive effect on numbers and activities of the nitrifying bacteria in its root zone in spring and

  14. Nitrospina-like bacteria are the main drivers of nitrite oxidation in the seasonal upwelling area of the Eastern South Pacific (Central Chile ∼36°S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levipan, Héctor A; Molina, Verónica; Fernandez, Camila

    2014-12-01

    Aerobic nitrite oxidation in marine environments plays a key role in the nitrification process. Marine bacteria involved in this nitrate-producing process have however been seldom studied compared with the ammonia-oxidizing community. Here, we report for the first time the community structure of aerobic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the seasonal upwelling and oxygen-deficient area off Central Chile. Analysis of 16S rRNA by tag pyrosequencing was combined with specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and reverse transcription qPCR in summer and wintertime. Nitrospina-like bacteria were the only known NOB detected by means of pyrosequencing between 30 and 80 m depth, accounting for up to 5% of total bacteria. This guild was represented by 11 and 7 operational taxonomic units (97% cut-off) in winter and summertime respectively. Nitrospina-like bacteria were phylogenetically related to sequences retrieved from coastal upwelling, oxygen minimum zones and deep-sea environments. This group was also detected by qPCR with abundances that increased with depth throughout the water column. Importantly, Nitrospina from surface layers showed low abundances but high 16S rRNA : rDNA ratios and mainly in summertime. Overall, our results highlight the seasonal variability between the structure and physiological state of this community and suggest a significant role of Nitrospina in the nitrogen cycle of seasonal upwelling areas.

  15. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important)

  16. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important).

  17. Nitrous oxide emission from the agriculture in the Netherlands. Outline of effects of manure and ammonia measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kros, J.; De Vries, W.; Oenema, O.; Velthof, G.; Kuikman, P.J.; Van Hove, B.

    2004-01-01

    By means of the model INITIATOR an integral outline was made of the effects of several measures within the framework of the manure and ammonia policy focusing on nitrous oxide emission. The results are compared with the IPCC method. The model INITIATOR is a mechanistic model by means of which the carbon cycle in the Netherlands can be differentiated on a regional scale as a function of land use, type of soil and hydrology [nl

  18. Bioaugmentation as a solution to increase methane production from an ammonia-rich substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Fiedel, Nicolai Russell

    2014-01-01

    production yield. To date there are not any reliable methods to alleviate the ammonia toxicity effect and/or to efficiently digest ammonia-rich waste. In the current study, bioaugmentation as a possible method to alleviate ammonia toxicity effect in a mesophilic continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR......) operating under “inhibited steady state” was tested. A fast growing hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis MS2T) was bioaugmented in the CSTR reactor at high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). A second CSTR reactor used as control with no bioaugmentation. The results derived from...... this study clearly demonstrated a 31.3% increase in methane production yield in the CSTR reactor, at steady-state, after bioaugmentation. Additionally, high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis showed a fivefold increase in relative abundance of Methanoculleus spp. after bioaugmentation. On contrary...

  19. Community Composition and Transcriptional Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Prokaryotes of Seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in Coral Reef Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ling

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Seagrasses in coral reef ecosystems play important ecological roles by enhancing coral reef resilience under ocean acidification. However, seagrass primary productivity is typically constrained by limited nitrogen availability. Ammonia oxidation is an important process conducted by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB, yet little information is available concerning the community structure and potential activity of seagrass AOA and AOB. Therefore, this study investigated the variations in the abundance, diversity and transcriptional activity of AOA and AOB at the DNA and transcript level from four sample types: the leaf, root, rhizosphere sediment and bulk sediment of seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in three coral reef ecosystems. DNA and complementary DNA (cDNA were used to prepare clone libraries and DNA and cDNA quantitative PCR (qPCR assays, targeting the ammonia monooxygenase-subunit (amoA genes as biomarkers. Our results indicated that the closest relatives of the obtained archaeal and bacterial amoA gene sequences recovered from DNA and cDNA libraries mainly originated from the marine environment. Moreover, all the obtained AOB sequences belong to the Nitrosomonadales cluster. Nearly all the AOA communities exhibited higher diversity than the AOB communities at the DNA level, but the qPCR data demonstrated that the abundances of AOB communities were higher than that of AOA communities based on both DNA and RNA transcripts. Collectively, most of the samples shared greater community composition similarity with samples from the same location rather than sample type. Furthermore, the abundance of archaeal amoA gene in rhizosphere sediments showed significant relationships with the ammonium concentration of sediments and the nitrogen content of plant tissue (leaf and root at the DNA level (P < 0.05. Conversely, no such relationships were found for the AOB communities. This work provides new insight into the nitrogen cycle

  20. A framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, Damian E; Johnson, David R; Lee, Tae Kwon; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2015-03-01

    The rates at which wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) microbial communities biotransform specific substrates can differ by orders of magnitude among WWTP communities. Differences in taxonomic compositions among WWTP communities may predict differences in the rates of some types of biotransformations. In this work, we present a novel framework for establishing predictive relationships between specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence abundances and biotransformation rates. We selected ten WWTPs with substantial variation in their environmental and operational metrics and measured the in situ ammonia biotransformation rate constants in nine of them. We isolated total RNA from samples from each WWTP and analyzed 16S rRNA sequence reads. We then developed multivariate models between the measured abundances of specific bacterial 16S rRNA sequence reads and the ammonia biotransformation rate constants. We constructed model scenarios that systematically explored the effects of model regularization, model linearity and non-linearity, and aggregation of 16S rRNA sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a function of sequence dissimilarity threshold (SDT). A large percentage (greater than 80%) of model scenarios resulted in well-performing and significant models at intermediate SDTs of 0.13-0.14 and 0.26. The 16S rRNA sequences consistently selected into the well-performing and significant models at those SDTs were classified as Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira groups. We then extend the framework by applying it to the biotransformation rate constants of ten micropollutants measured in batch reactors seeded with the ten WWTP communities. We identified phylogenetic groups that were robustly selected into all well-performing and significant models constructed with biotransformation rates of isoproturon, propachlor, ranitidine, and venlafaxine. These phylogenetic groups can be used as predictive biomarkers of WWTP microbial community activity towards these specific

  1. Surface chemistry of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth modified by treatment with ammonia and steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudou, J.P. [University of Paris, Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    The influence of ammonia treatment at 800{sup o}C on the catalytic activity of a viscose-based activated carbon cloth (ACC) was evaluated for the oxidative retention of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} at room temperature. Change in the surface chemistry was observed by X-ray spectroscopy of nitrogen (N1s) and by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Dynamic adsorption of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} in moist air onto a packed bed of activated carbon cloth was monitored by measurement of the breakthrough curves at room temperature. ACC modified by ammonia showed noteworthy enhanced SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S loading relative to the untreated ACC. Improved SO{sub 2} retention rate could be replicated several times after regeneration by washing at room temperature, in contrast to the case with H{sub 2}S. The likely reasons for the behavior of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} on the ammonia-treated ACC are discussed with reference to the recent literature.

  2. Baseline ambient gaseous ammonia concentrations in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Mark E; Mathew, Johnson; Nguyen, Nghia; Lay, John; Golod, George; Vet, Robert; Cotie, Joseph; Hertel, Terry; Aaboe, Erik; Callison, Ryan; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Freise, Jeremy; Hathcoat, April; Sakizzie, Brenda; King, Michael; Lee, Chris; Oliva, Sylvia; San Miguel, George; Crow, Leon; Geasland, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Ambient ammonia monitoring using Ogawa passive samplers was conducted in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA during 2007. The resulting data will be useful in the multipollutant management of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and visibility (atmospheric regional haze) in the Four Corners area, an area with growing oil/gas production and increasing coal-based power plant construction. The passive monitoring data also add new ambient ammonia concentration information for the U.S. and will be useful to scientists involved in present and future visibility modeling exercises. Three week integrated passive ammonia samples were taken at five sites in the Four Corners area and two sites in eastern Oklahoma from December, 2006 through December, 2007 (January, 2008 for two sites). Results show significantly higher regional background ammonia concentrations in eastern Oklahoma (1.8 parts per billion (ppb) arithmetic mean) compared to the Four Corners area (0.2 ppb arithmetic mean). Annual mean ammonia concentrations for all Four Corners area sites for the 2007 study ranged from 0.2 ppb to 1.5 ppb. Peak ambient ammonia concentrations occurred in the spring and summer in both areas. The passive samplers deployed at the Stilwell, Oklahoma site compared favorably with other passive samplers and a continuous ammonia monitoring instrument.

  3. Photocatalytic H.sub.2./sub. generation from aqueous ammonia solution using ZnO photocatalysts prepared by different methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reli, M.; Edelmannová, M.; Šihor, M.; Praus, P.; Svoboda, L.; Kutláková Mamulová, K.; Otoupalíková, H.; Čapek, L.; Hospodková, Alice; Obalová, L.; Kočí, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 27 (2015), s. 8530-8538 ISSN 0360-3199 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hydrogen production * zinc oxide * ammonia * photocatalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.205, year: 2015

  4. Isolation and characterization of two cryptic plasmids in the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, A; Kato, J; Hirota, R; Kuroda, A; Ikeda, T; Takiguchi, N; Ohtake, H

    1999-06-01

    Two plasmids were discovered in the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11, which was isolated from activated sludge. The plasmids, designated pAYS and pAYL, were relatively small, being approximately 1.9 kb long. They were cryptic plasmids, having no detectable plasmid-linked antibiotic resistance or heavy metal resistance markers. The complete nucleotide sequences of pAYS and pAYL were determined, and their physical maps were constructed. There existed two major open reading frames, ORF1 in pAYS and ORF2 in pAYL, each of which was more than 500 bp long. The predicted product of ORF2 was 28% identical to part of the replication protein of a Bacillus plasmid, pBAA1. However, no significant similarity to any known protein sequences was detected with the predicted product of ORF1. pAYS and pAYL had a highly homologous region, designated HHR, of 262 bp. The overall identity was 98% between the two nucleotide sequences. Interestingly, HHR-homologous sequences were also detected in the genomes of ENI-11 and the plasmidless strain Nitrosomonas europaea IFO14298. Deletion analysis of pAYS and pAYL indicated that HHR, together with either ORF1 or ORF2, was essential for plasmid maintenance in ENI-11. To our knowledge, pAYS and pAYL are the first plasmids found in the ammonia-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria.

  5. Catalytic Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane by Cobalt Nickel Nanoparticles Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Well dispersed magnetically recyclable bimetallic CoNi nanoparticles (NPs supported on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO were synthesized by one-step in situ coreduction of aqueous solution of cobalt(II chloride, nickel (II chloride, and graphite oxide (GO with ammonia borane (AB as the reducing agent under ambient condition. The CoNi/RGO NPs exhibits excellent catalytic activity with a total turnover frequency (TOF value of 19.54 mol H2 mol catalyst−1 min−1 and a low activation energy value of 39.89 kJ mol−1 at room temperature. Additionally, the RGO supported CoNi NPs exhibit much higher catalytic activity than the monometallic and RGO-free CoNi counterparts. Moreover, the as-prepared catalysts exert satisfying durable stability and magnetically recyclability for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB, which make the practical reusing application of the catalysts more convenient. The usage of the low-cost, easy-getting catalyst to realize the production of hydrogen under mild condition gives more confidence for the application of ammonia borane as a hydrogen storage material. Hence, this general method indicates that AB can be used as both a potential hydrogen storage material and an efficient reducing agent, and can be easily extended to facile preparation of other RGO-based metallic systems.

  6. The Experiment Study of Anaerobic Ammonia Oxidation Start-up by Using the Upflow Double Layer Anaerobic Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAO Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anammox is an efficient nitrogen removal process, but it is difficult to start-up and operate, and ananammox reactor is the efficient way to resolve this problem. The start-up of anammox reactor by upflow anaerobic filter was studied. Denitrifying sludge, anaerobic sludge, and mixed sludge was inoculated on the packing materials, respectively and an autotrophic denitrification condition was provided by the simulated wastewater influent. Along with the gradual increase of matrix concentration and hydraulic load, the microflora was converted to the anaerobic ammonium oxidation(anammoxreaction. The results showed that the anammox reaction could be started by all the three sludge, and the time of start-up of denitrifying sludge, anaerobic sludge, mixed sludge was 42, 54 days and 45 days, respectively. The best result was that inoculated with denitrifying sludge with 82.2% of the total nitrogen removal rate, which started-up quickly and nitrogen was removed efficiently. Double packing effectively improved the stability of anammox process in the reactor, in which the suitable influent concentration loading for the anammox bacteria was 270 mg·L-1 and 360 mg·L-1 for ammonia nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen, respectively, and the COD concentration could not be more than 150 mg· L-1. Furthermore, there was a coexist-effect for anaerobic ammonia oxidation and methanation in this reactor system.

  7. Ammonia stress under high environmental ammonia induces Hsp70 and Hsp90 in the mud eel, Monopterus cuchia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangzo, Hnunlalliani; Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Saha, Shrabani; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2017-02-01

    The obligatory air-breathing mud eel (Monopterus cuchia) is frequently being challenged with high environmental ammonia (HEA) exposure in its natural habitats. The present study investigated the possible induction of heat shock protein 70 and 90 (hsp70, hsc70, hsp90α and hsp90β) genes and more expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins under ammonia stress in different tissues of the mud eel after exposure to HEA (50 mM NH 4 Cl) for 14 days. HEA resulted in significant accumulation of toxic ammonia in different body tissues and plasma, which was accompanied with the stimulation of oxidative stress in the mud eel as evidenced by more accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) during exposure to HEA. Further, hyper-ammonia stress led to significant increase in the levels of mRNA transcripts for inducible hsp70 and hsp90α genes and also their translated proteins in different tissues probably as a consequence of induction of hsp70 and hsp90α genes in the mud eel. However, hyper-ammonia stress was neither associated with any significant alterations in the levels of mRNA transcripts for constitutive hsc70 and hsp90β genes nor their translated proteins in any of the tissues studied. More abundance of Hsp70 and Hsp90α proteins might be one of the strategies adopted by the mud eel to defend itself from the ammonia-induced cellular damages under ammonia stress. Further, this is the first report of ammonia-induced induction of hsp70 and hsp90α genes under hyper-ammonia stress in any freshwater air-breathing teleost.

  8. Bioaugmentation as a solution to increase methane production from an ammonia-rich substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotidis, Ioannis A; Wang, Han; Fiedel, Nicolai R; Luo, Gang; Karakashev, Dimitar B; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-07-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates inhibit the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and constitute the main reason for low energy recovery in full-scale reactors. It is estimated that many full-scale AD reactors are operating in ammonia induced "inhibited steady-state" with significant losses of the potential biogas production yield. To date there are not any reliable methods to alleviate the ammonia toxicity effect or to efficiently digest ammonia-rich waste. In the current study, bioaugmentation as a possible method to alleviate ammonia toxicity effect in a mesophilic continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) operating under "inhibited steady state" was tested. A fast growing hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e., Methanoculleus bourgensis MS2(T)) was bioaugmented in the CSTR reactor at high ammonia levels (5 g NH4(+)-N L(-1)). A second CSTR reactor was used as control with no bioaugmentation. The results derived from this study clearly demonstrated a 31.3% increase in methane production yield in the CSTR reactor, at steady-state, after bioaugmentation. Additionally, high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis showed a 5-fold increase in relative abundance of Methanoculleus spp. after bioaugmentation. On the contrary to all methods used today to alleviate ammonia toxicity effect, the tested bioaugmentation process performed without interrupting the continuous operation of the reactor and without replacing the ammonia-rich feedstock.

  9. Decreasing ammonia inhibition in thermophilic methanogenic bioreactors using carbon fiber textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Ohmura, Naoya; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    Ammonia accumulation is one of the main causes of the loss of methane production observed during fermentation. We investigated the effect of addition of carbon fiber textiles (CFT) to thermophilic methanogenic bioreactors with respect to ammonia tolerance during the process of degradation of artificial garbage slurry, by comparing the performance of the reactors containing CFT with the performance of reactors without CFT. Under total ammonia-N concentrations of 3,000 mg L(-1), the reactors containing CFT were found to mediate stable removal of organic compounds and methane production. Under these conditions, high levels of methanogenic archaea were retained at the CFT, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis for methanogenic archaea. In addition, Methanobacterium sp. was found to be dominant in the suspended fraction, and Methanosarcina sp. was dominant in the retained fraction of the reactors with CFT. However, the reactors without CFT had lower rates of removal of organic compounds and production of methane under total ammonia-N concentrations of 1,500 mg L(-1). Under this ammonia concentration, a significant accumulation of acetate was observed in the reactors without CFT (130.0 mM), relative to the reactors with CFT (4.2 mM). Only Methanobacterium sp. was identified in the reactors without CFT. These results suggest that CFT enables stable proliferation of aceticlastic methanogens by preventing ammonia inhibition. This improves the process of stable garbage degradation and production of methane in thermophilic bioreactors that include high levels of ammonia.

  10. Electrolytic synthesis of ammonia in molten salts under atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tsuyoshi; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-15

    Ammonia was successfully synthesized by using a new electrochemical reaction with high current efficiency at atmospheric pressure and at lower temperatures than the Haber-Bosch process. In this method, nitride ion (N3-), which is produced by the reduction from nitrogen gas at the cathode, is anodically oxidized and reacts with hydrogen to produce ammonia at the anode.

  11. Electrospun V2O5 composite fibers: Synthesis, characterization and ammonia sensing properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modafferi, V.; Trocino, S.; Donato, A.; Panzera, G.; Neri, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, vanadium oxide (V 2 O 5 ) fibers have been investigated for monitoring ammonia (NH 3 ) at ppb levels in air. A simple sol gel-based electrospinning process has been applied for the synthesis of vanadium oxide/polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) and vanadium oxide/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) composite fibers. Composite fibers doped with platinum (Pt) have been also prepared. The pure and Pt-doped metal oxide phase has been subsequently obtained by removing the polymer binder at high temperature in air. The samples have been widely studied to characterize their morphological and microstructural properties by X-Ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy investigations. The application of the produced fibers in highly sensitive ammonia resistive sensors has been demonstrated. The influence of the nature of polymer binder and platinum addition on the sensing performances of the V 2 O 5 fibers has been investigated and discussed.V 2 O 5 fibers produced by using PVP as a polymer binder have shown higher sensitivity toward ammonia at ppb concentrations than fibers obtained with PVAc. Pt-doped samples have shown a lower response compared to un-doped samples. - Highlights: • Synthesis of vanadium oxide composite fibers by electrospinning • Physical and chemical characterization of prepared samples • Investigation of the sensing properties to ppb concentrations of ammonia in air

  12. Biotreatment of ammonia and butanal containing waste gases

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Vriens, L.; Verachtert, H.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract The biological removal of ammonia and butanal in contaminated air was investigated by using, respectively, a laboratory-scale filter and a scrubber-filter combination. It was shown that ammonia can be removed with an elimination efficiency of 83% at a volumetric load of 100 m3·m–2·h–1 with 4–16 ppm of ammonia. During the experiment percolates were analysed for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and pH. It was found that the nitrification in the biofilter could deteriorate due to an inhibitio...

  13. The effect of gaseous ammonia on cobalt perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, L.P.; Men'shikov, O.D.; Borisov, V.V.; Sorokin, S.I.; Krutovertsev, S.A.; Kharkevich, S.I.; Ivanova, O.M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of humid air ammonia mixture on crystal pentahydrate of cobalt(2) perrhenate has been studied by the methods of PES, IR spectroscopy thermal analysis and electrophysical measurements. It is shown that with an increase in ammonia content in gaseous phase cobalt perrhenate successively transforms into diaquodiammine-, tetrammine- and μ-dioxo-bis-(tetrammine) derivatives of cobalt. Reversibility of dioxocomplex formation and a correlation between the change in electrophysical properties of crystal sample and change in ammonia content in gaseous phase are pointed out. 16 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Adsorption of Ammonia on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Jesph E.; Serio, Michael A..; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Data on sorption and desorption of ammonia, which is a major TC of concern, are presented in this paper. The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for ammonia sorption. Ammonia-sorption capacity was related to carbon pore structure characteristics, and the temperature of oxidative carbon-surface treatment was optimized for enhanced ammonia-sorption performance.

  15. Cerebral ammonia uptake and accumulation during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Dalsgaard, Mads K.; Steensberg, Adam

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated whether peripheral ammonia production during prolonged exercise enhances the uptake and subsequent accumulation of ammonia within the brain. Two studies determined the cerebral uptake of ammonia (arterial and jugular venous blood sampling combined with Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebral...... blood flow; n = 5) and the ammonia concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; n = 8) at rest and immediately following prolonged exercise either with or without glucose supplementation. There was a net balance of ammonia across the brain at rest and at 30 min of exercise, whereas 3 h of exercise...... exercise with glucose, and further to 16.1 ± 3.3 µM after the placebo trial (P

  16. Shifts in Abundance and Diversity of Soil Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea Associated with Land Restoration in a Semi-Arid Ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Chen

    Full Text Available The Grain to Green Project (GGP is an unprecedented land restoration action in China. The project converted large areas (ca 10 million ha of steep-sloped/degraded farmland and barren land into forest and grassland resulting in ecological benefits such as a reduction in severe soil erosion. It may also affect soil microorganisms involved in ammonia oxidization, which is a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. The methods for restoration that are typically adopted in semi-arid regions include abandoning farmland and growing drought tolerant grass (Lolium perenne L. or shrubs (Caragana korshinskii Kom.. In the present study, the effects of these methods on the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA were evaluated via quantitative real-time PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library analysis of amoA genes. Comparisons were made between soil samples from three restored lands and the adjacent farmland in Inner Mongolia. Both the abundance and community composition of AOB were significantly different between the restored lands and the adjacent control. Significantly lower nitrification activity was observed for the restored land. Clone library analysis revealed that all AOB amoA gene sequences were affiliated with Nitrosospira. Abundance of the populations that were associated with Nitrosospira sp. Nv6 which had possibly adapted to high concentrations of inorganic nitrogen, decreased on the restored land. Only a slight difference in the AOB communities was observed between the restored land with and without the shrub (Caragana korshinskii Kom.. A minor effect of land restoration on AOA was observed. In summary, land restoration negatively affected the abundance of AOB and soil nitrification activities, suggesting the potential role of GGP in the leaching of nitrates, and in the emission of N2O in related terrestrial ecosystems.

  17. Ammonia Oxidation by Abstraction of Three Hydrogen Atoms from a Mo–NH 3 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Papri; Heiden, Zachariah M.; Wiedner, Eric S.; Raugei, Simone; Piro, Nicholas A.; Kassel, W. Scott; Bullock, R. Morris; Mock, Michael T.

    2017-02-15

    We report ammonia oxidation by homolytic cleavage of all three H atoms from a Mo-15NH3 complex using the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical to afford a Mo-alkylimido (Mo=15NR) complex (R = 2,4,6-tri-t-butylcyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-one). Reductive cleavage of Mo=15NR generates a terminal Mo≡N nitride, and a [Mo-15NH]+ complex is formed by protonation. Computational analysis describes the energetic profile for the stepwise removal of three H atoms from the Mo-15NH3 complex and the formation of Mo=15NR. Acknowledgment. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Re-search Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. EPR and mass spectrometry experiments were performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. The authors thank Dr. Eric D. Walter and Dr. Rosalie Chu for assistance in performing EPR and mass spectroscopy analysis, respectively. Computational resources provided by the National Energy Re-search Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Pacific North-west National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE.

  18. Thermochemical study of MoS2 oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filimonov, D.S.; Topor, N.D.; Kesler, Ya.A.

    1990-01-01

    Thermochemical studies of oxidation processes of metallic molybdenum, sulfur, molybdenum disulfide under different conditions in microcalorimeter are conducted. Values of thermal effects which are used to calculate standard formation enthalpy of MoS 2 and which correlate well are obtained. Δ f H 0 (MoS 2 ,298.15 K) recommended value constitutes (-223.0±16.7) kJ/mol

  19. Tide as steering factor in structuring archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizing communities in mangrove forest soils dominated by Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcos, Magali S.; Barboza, A.D.H.; Keijzer, R.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2018-01-01

    Mangrove species are adapted to grow at specific zones in a tidal gradient. Here we tested the hypothesis that the archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities differ in soils dominated by the mangrove species Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle. Two of the sampling locations

  20. Gold cementation with zinc powder from leaching solutions with ammonia-thiosulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.; Alvarez, R.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2005-01-01

    The cementation of gold with powder of zinc, from solutions with thiosulphate and ammonia, was studied. the variables evaluated were: thiosulphate concentration, ammonia concentration, pH, copper concentration and zinc concentration. the results have revealed the great importance of ammonia/thiosulphate relationship in this process and that the impurities presence like copper and zinc will to inhibit the cementation process. (Author) 16 refs

  1. Evaluating four mathematical models for nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Chandran, Kartik; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Murthy, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are major contributors to N(2)O emissions from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Although the fundamental metabolic pathways for N(2)O production by AOB are now coming to light, the mechanisms responsible for N(2)O production by AOB in WWTP are not fully understood. Mathematical modeling provides a means for testing hypotheses related to mechanisms and triggers for N(2)O emissions in WWTP, and can then also become a tool to support the development of mitigation strategies. This study examined the ability of four mathematical model structures to describe two distinct mechanisms of N(2)O production by AOB. The production mechanisms evaluated are (1) N(2)O as the final product of nitrifier denitrification with NO(2)- as the terminal electron acceptor and (2) N(2)O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) to NO(2)-. The four models were compared based on their ability to predict N(2)O dynamics observed in three mixed culture studies. Short-term batch experimental data were employed to examine model assumptions related to the effects of (1) NH4+ concentration variations, (2) dissolved oxygen (DO) variations, (3) NO(2)- accumulations and (4) NH(2OH as an externally provided substrate. The modeling results demonstrate that all these models can generally describe the NH4+, NO(2)-, and NO(3)- data. However, none of these models were able to reproduce all measured N(2)O data. The results suggest that both the denitrification and NH(2)OH pathways may be involved in N(2)O production and could be kinetically linked by a competition for intracellular reducing equivalents. A unified model capturing both mechanisms and their potential interactions needs to be developed with consideration of physiological complexity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Synthesis of Ru nanoparticles confined in magnesium oxide-modified mesoporous alumina and their enhanced catalytic performance during ammonia decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Hua

    2012-09-01

    In this work, Ru nanoparticles confined in the channels of ordered mesoporous alumina (MA) and magnesium oxide-modified ordered MA are prepared for the first time via a two-solvent technique, combined with the amorphous citrate route. Structural characterizations reveal that uniform 2-3 nm Ru nanoparticles are highly dispersed in the blockage-free channels of mesoporous supports. The Ru nanoparticles confined in MA modified with 20% molar ratio magnesium oxide exhibited a high catalytic activity and stability during ammonia decomposition due to the optimized particle size, basic support, lack of chlorine, and confined space provided by the channels of the mesoporous supports. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis of Ru nanoparticles confined in magnesium oxide-modified mesoporous alumina and their enhanced catalytic performance during ammonia decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Hua; Li, Kun; Sioud, Salim; Cha, Dong Kyu; Amad, Maan H.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Al-Talla, Zeyad

    2012-01-01

    In this work, Ru nanoparticles confined in the channels of ordered mesoporous alumina (MA) and magnesium oxide-modified ordered MA are prepared for the first time via a two-solvent technique, combined with the amorphous citrate route. Structural characterizations reveal that uniform 2-3 nm Ru nanoparticles are highly dispersed in the blockage-free channels of mesoporous supports. The Ru nanoparticles confined in MA modified with 20% molar ratio magnesium oxide exhibited a high catalytic activity and stability during ammonia decomposition due to the optimized particle size, basic support, lack of chlorine, and confined space provided by the channels of the mesoporous supports. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia in Solid Electrolyte Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eGaragounis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developed in the early 1900's, the Haber-Bosch synthesis is the dominant NH3 synthesis process. Parallel to catalyst optimization, current research efforts are also focused on the investigation of new methods for ammonia synthesis, including the electrochemical synthesis with the use of solid electrolyte cells. Since the first report on Solid State Ammonia Synthesis (SSAS, more than 30 solid electrolyte materials were tested and at least 15 catalysts were used as working electrodes. Thus far, the highest rate of ammonia formation reported is 1.13×10−8 mol s−1 cm−2, obtained at 80°C with a Nafion solid electrolyte and a mixed oxide, SmFe0.7Cu0.1Ni0.2O3, cathode. At high temperatures (>500oC the maximum rate was 9.5*10-9 mol s−1 cm−2 using Ce0.8Y0.2O2-δ -[Ca3(PO42 -K3PO4] as electrolyte and Ag-Pd as cathode. In this paper, the advantages and the disadvantages of SSAS vs the conventional process and the requirements that must be met in order to promote the electrochemical process into an industrial level, are discussed.

  5. Stable isotope probing and dynamic loading experiments provide insight into the ecophysiology of novel ammonia oxidizers in rapid gravity sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, Jane; Palomo, Alejandro; Gülay, Arda

    to elucidate the differences in ecophysiology between the ammonia oxidizing clades that enable them to co-exist in this unique environment. Experiments were conducted using sand columns designed and operated to mimic the conditions in the full-scale parent RSF. RNA and DNA stable isotope probing based on 13C......-bicarbonate incorporation during continuous feeding with either ammonium or nitrite as sole energy source implicated Nitrospira spp. and certain ‘heterotrophic’ bacteria in addition to Nitrosomonas spp. in autotrophy during ammonium oxidation in RSFs. Further experimentation aimed to elucidate the ecophysiology of each...

  6. Impact Assessment and Environmental Evaluation of Various Ammonia Production Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, Yusuf; Dincer, Ibrahim; Vezina, Greg; Raso, Frank

    2017-05-01

    In the current study, conventional resources-based ammonia generation routes are comparatively studied through a comprehensive life cycle assessment. The selected ammonia generation options range from mostly used steam methane reforming to partial oxidation of heavy oil. The chosen ammonia synthesis process is the most common commercially available Haber-Bosch process. The essential energy input for the methods are used from various conventional resources such as coal, nuclear, natural gas and heavy oil. Using the life cycle assessment methodology, the environmental impacts of selected methods are identified and quantified from cradle to gate. The life cycle assessment outcomes of the conventional resources based ammonia production routes show that nuclear electrolysis-based ammonia generation method yields the lowest global warming and climate change impacts while the coal-based electrolysis options bring higher environmental problems. The calculated greenhouse gas emission from nuclear-based electrolysis is 0.48 kg CO2 equivalent while it is 13.6 kg CO2 per kg of ammonia for coal-based electrolysis method.

  7. Elevational diversity and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea community in meadow soils on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kang; Kong, Weidong; Khan, Ajmal; Liu, Jinbo; Guo, Guangxia; Muhanmmad, Said; Zhang, Xianzhou; Dong, Xiaobin

    2017-09-01

    Unraveling elevational diversity patterns of plants and animals has long been attracting scientific interests. However, whether soil microorganisms exhibit similar elevational patterns remains largely less explored, especially for functional microbial communities, such as ammonia oxidizers. Here, we investigated the diversity and distribution pattern of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in meadow soils along an elevation gradient from 4400 m to the grassline at 5100 m on the Tibetan Plateau using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequencing methods by targeting amoA gene. Increasing elevations led to lower soil temperature and pH, but higher nutrients and water content. The results showed that AOA diversity and evenness monotonically increased with elevation, while richness was relatively stable. The increase of diversity and evenness was attributed to the growth inhibition of warm-adapted AOA phylotypes by lower temperature and the growth facilitation of cold-adapted AOA phylotypes by richer nutrients at higher elevations. Low temperature thus played an important role in the AOA growth and niche separation. The AOA community variation was explained by the combined effect of all soil properties (32.6%), and 8.1% of the total variation was individually explained by soil pH. The total AOA abundance decreased, whereas soil potential nitrification rate (PNR) increased with increasing elevations. Soil PNR positively correlated with the abundance of cold-adapted AOA phylotypes. Our findings suggest that low temperature plays an important role in AOA elevational diversity pattern and niche separation, rising the negative effects of warming on AOA diversity and soil nitrification process in the Tibetan region.

  8. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes from oil field microbial communities indicates the presence of a variety of sulfate-reducing, fermentative, and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Voordouw, G; Armstrong, S M; Reimer, M F; Fouts, B; Telang, A J; Shen, Y; Gevertz, D

    1996-01-01

    Oil field bacteria were characterized by cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. A variety of gram-negative, sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected (16 members of the family Desulfovibrionaceae and 8 members of the family Desulfobacteriaceae). In contrast, a much more limited number of anaerobic, fermentative, or acetogenic bacteria was found (one Clostridium sp., one Eubacterium sp., and one Synergistes sp.). Potential sulfide oxidizers and/or microaerophiles (Thiomicrospira,...

  9. Communities of archaea and bacteria in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps, and evidence of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidler, Gerhard W; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Gerbl, Friedrich W; Heinen, Wolfgang; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy revealed great morphological diversity in biofilms from several largely unexplored subterranean thermal Alpine springs, which contain radium 226 and radon 222. A culture-independent molecular analysis of microbial communities on rocks and in the water of one spring, the "Franz-Josef-Quelle" in Bad Gastein, Austria, was performed. Four hundred fifteen clones were analyzed. One hundred thirty-two sequences were affiliated with 14 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and 283 with four archaeal OTUs. Rarefaction analysis indicated a high diversity of bacterial sequences, while archaeal sequences were less diverse. The majority of the cloned archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to the soil-freshwater-subsurface (1.1b) crenarchaeotic group; other representatives belonged to the freshwater-wastewater-soil (1.3b) group, except one clone, which was related to a group of uncultivated Euryarchaeota. These findings support recent reports that Crenarchaeota are not restricted to high-temperature environments. Most of the bacterial sequences were related to the Proteobacteria (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta), Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. One OTU was allied with Nitrospina sp. (delta-Proteobacteria) and three others grouped with Nitrospira. Statistical analyses suggested high diversity based on 16S rRNA gene analyses; the rarefaction plot of archaeal clones showed a plateau. Since Crenarchaeota have been implicated recently in the nitrogen cycle, the spring environment was probed for the presence of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Sequences were obtained which were related to crenarchaeotic amoA genes from marine and soil habitats. The data suggested that nitrification processes are occurring in the subterranean environment and that ammonia may possibly be an energy source for the resident communities.

  10. Nitrogen fate model for gas-phase ammonia-enhanced in situ bioventing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    Subsurface bioremediation of contaminants is sometimes limited by the availability of nitrogen. Introduction of gaseous ammonia to the subsurface is a feasible and economical approach to enhance biodegradation in some environments. A gaseous nutrient source may be a practical option for sites where surface application of liquid nutrients is not possible, such as sites with shallow groundwater or sites with surface operations. A conceptual nitrogen fate model was developed to provide remediation scientists and engineers with some practical guidelines in the use of ammonia-enhanced bioventing. Ammonia supplied to the subsurface dissolves readily in soil moisture and sorbs strongly to soil particles. The ammonium ion is the preferred nutrient form of many microorganisms. Some of the ammonia will be converted to nitrate by ammonia-oxidizing organisms. Field monitoring data from an operating ammonia-enhanced bioventing remediation site for diesel fuel contamination are presented. Conservative additions of ammonia promoted appreciable increases in evolved carbon dioxide and rate of oxygen utilization. An overabundance of added ammonia promoted formation of methane from likely anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in the presence of nitrate as the electron acceptor

  11. Impact of dicyandiamide on emissions of nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and ammonia from agricultural field in the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yizhen; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Tian, Di; Mu, Yujing

    2016-02-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH3) emissions from an agricultural field in the North China Plain were compared for three treatments during a whole maize growing period from 26 June to 11 October, 2012. Compared with the control treatment (without fertilization, designated as CK), remarkable pulse emissions of N2O, NO and NH3 were observed from the normal fertilization treatment (designated as NP) just after fertilization, whereas only N2O and NH3 pulse emissions were evident from the nitrification inhibitor treatment (designated as ND). The reduction proportions of N2O and NO emissions from the ND treatment compared to those from the NP treatment during the whole maize growing period were 31% and 100%, respectively. A measurable increase of NH3 emission from the ND treatment was found with a cumulative NH3 emission of 3.8 ± 1.2 kg N/ha, which was 1.4 times greater than that from the NP treatment (2.7 ± 0.7 kg N/ha). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Nitrosomonas communis strain YNSRA, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, isolated from the reed rhizoplane in an aquaponics plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyama, Tatsuaki; Mine, Atsusi; Kamiyama, Kaoru; Yabe, Ryuichi; Satoh, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Reiji; Itonaga, Koji

    2004-01-01

    An ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (strain YNSRA) was isolated from the rhizoplane of the reed (Phragmites communis) used in an aquaponics plant which is a wastewater treatment plant. Strain YNSRA was identified as Nitrosomonas communis by taxonomic studies. The hydroxylamine-cytochrome c reductase (HCR) of strain YNSRA was found to have a higher activity (25.60 u/mg) than that of Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC25978T (8.94 u/mg). Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) activity was detected at very low levels in strain YNSRA, whereas strain ATCC25978T had definite activity.

  13. Nitrogen removal from wastewater by a catalytic oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T L; Macinnes, J M; Cliffe, K R

    2001-06-01

    The ammonia-containing waste produced in industries is usually characterized by high concentration and high temperature, and is not treatable by biological methods directly. In this study, a hydrophobic Pt/SDB catalyst was first used in a trickle-bed reactor to remove ammonia from wastewater. In the reactor, both stripping and catalytic oxidation occur simultaneously. It was found that higher temperature and higher oxygen partial pressure enhanced the ammonia removal. A reaction pathway, which involves oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, which then further reacts with ammonia to produce nitrogen and water, was confirmed. Small amounts of by-products, nitrites and nitrates were also detected in the resultant reaction solution. These compounds came from the absorption of nitrogen oxides. Both the minimum NO2- selectivity and maximum ammonia removal were achieved when the resultant pH of treated water was near 7.5 for a feed of unbuffered ammonia solution.

  14. Nitrate reduction, nitrous oxide formation, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation to nitrite in the gut of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes and Ophiotermes spp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2011-11-28

    Soil-feeding termites play important roles in the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in tropical soils. Through the mineralization of nitrogenous humus components, their intestinal tracts accumulate enormous amounts of ammonia, and nitrate and nitrite concentrations are several orders of magnitude above those in the ingested soil. Here, we studied the metabolism of nitrate in the different gut compartments of two Cubitermes and one Ophiotermes species using 15N isotope tracer analysis. Living termites emitted N 2 at rates ranging from 3.8 to 6.8nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1. However, in homogenates of individual gut sections, denitrification was restricted to the posterior hindgut, whereas nitrate ammonification occurred in all gut compartments and was the prevailing process in the anterior gut. Potential rates of nitrate ammonification for the entire intestinal tract were tenfold higher than those of denitrification, implying that ammonification is the major sink for ingested nitrate in the intestinal tract of soil-feeding termites. Because nitrate is efficiently reduced already in the anterior gut, reductive processes in the posterior gut compartments must be fuelled by an endogenous source of oxidized nitrogen species. Quite unexpectedly, we observed an anaerobic oxidation of 15N-labelled ammonia to nitrite, especially in the P4 section, which is presumably driven by ferric iron; nitrification and anammox activities were not detected. Two of the termite species also emitted substantial amounts of N 2O, ranging from 0.4 to 3.9nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1, providing direct evidence that soil-feeding termites are a hitherto unrecognized source of this greenhouse gas in tropical soils. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Study of Ammonia Emissions in a Ventilated Pig Pen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li

    Pig productions cause a wide emission of odors, such as ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Ammonia is one of the most important emissions for evaluating the air quality either in animal buildings or atmospheric environment. In studies of ammonia emission from animal buildings...... emission rate was measured in a wind tunnel under different airflow and ammonium solution temperatures. This investigation provides a general understanding for the influence of velocity, turbulence intensity and temperature on the ammonia emissions. The relationship between ammonia emissions and boundary...... through the air-liquid interface is suggested from vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of ammonia water. Furthermore, the effects of airflow and temperature on ammonia mass transfer coefficient are also analyzed under different concentration boundary conditions determined by various Henry’s law constant...

  16. System and method for controlling ammonia levels in a selective catalytic reduction catalyst using a nitrogen oxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2017-07-25

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes an air/fuel ratio determination module and an emission level determination module. The air/fuel ratio determination module determines an air/fuel ratio based on input from an air/fuel ratio sensor positioned downstream from a three-way catalyst that is positioned upstream from a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. The emission level determination module selects one of a predetermined value and an input based on the air/fuel ratio. The input is received from a nitrogen oxide sensor positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst. The emission level determination module determines an ammonia level based on the one of the predetermined value and the input received from the nitrogen oxide sensor.

  17. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  18. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  19. Ultrasonic chemical synthesis of CdS-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites with an enhanced visible light photoactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Du-Cheng; Chang, Zue-Chin; Shieu, Fuh-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we report a facile ultrasonic method to prepare a series of CdS and reduced graphene oxide (CdS/rGO) composites with different weight ratios of graphene at temperature as low as 70 °C for 20 min by employing ammonia as a complexing agent of Cd2+ ions and reducing agent of graphene oxide (GO). Pure CdS particles had a poor crystallinity and aggregated to large particles size. As GO was incorporated into CdS, a uniform dispersion of CdS particles with high crystallinity on rGO sheets was clearly observed. The as-prepared CdS/rGO composites have a wide and strong photo absorption in the visible region and display a substantially improved photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation by forming a heterojunction of rGO and CdS. However, too much rGO will shield the light of the active sites for the CdS nanoparticle surface and thus limit further improvement in the photocatalytic efficiency.

  20. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodega, Guillermo; Segura, Berta; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María del Carmen; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; García, María Isabel; Trabado, Isabel; Suárez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis. PMID:26421615

  1. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bodega

    Full Text Available Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis.

  2. Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Raul E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

  3. Impact Assessment and Environmental Evaluation of Various Ammonia Production Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, Yusuf; Dincer, Ibrahim; Vezina, Greg; Raso, Frank

    2017-05-01

    In the current study, conventional resources-based ammonia generation routes are comparatively studied through a comprehensive life cycle assessment. The selected ammonia generation options range from mostly used steam methane reforming to partial oxidation of heavy oil. The chosen ammonia synthesis process is the most common commercially available Haber-Bosch process. The essential energy input for the methods are used from various conventional resources such as coal, nuclear, natural gas and heavy oil. Using the life cycle assessment methodology, the environmental impacts of selected methods are identified and quantified from cradle to gate. The life cycle assessment outcomes of the conventional resources based ammonia production routes show that nuclear electrolysis-based ammonia generation method yields the lowest global warming and climate change impacts while the coal-based electrolysis options bring higher environmental problems. The calculated greenhouse gas emission from nuclear-based electrolysis is 0.48 kg CO 2 equivalent while it is 13.6 kg CO 2 per kg of ammonia for coal-based electrolysis method.

  4. Comparison of different two-pathway models for describing the combined effect of DO and nitrite on the nitrous oxide production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Longqi; Pocquet, Mathieu; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Spérandio, Mathieu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the capability of two recently proposed two-pathway models for predicting nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) for varying ranges of dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite. The first model includes the electron carriers whereas the second model is based on direct coupling of electron donors and acceptors. Simulations are confronted to extensive sets of experiments (43 batches) from different studies with three different microbial systems. Despite their different mathematical structures, both models could well and similarly describe the combined effect of DO and nitrite on N 2 O production rate and emission factor. The model-predicted contributions for nitrifier denitrification pathway and hydroxylamine pathway also matched well with the available isotopic measurements. Based on sensitivity analysis, calibration procedures are described and discussed for facilitating the future use of those models.

  5. Reverse-transcriptional gene expression of anammox and ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in soybean and rice paddy soils of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Dong, Hailiang; Wang, Weidong; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2014-03-01

    The relative gene expression of hydrazine oxidoreductase encoding gene (hzo) for anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox) and ammonia monooxygenase encoding gene (amoA) for both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in Sanjiang Plain soybean and rice paddy soils of Northeast China was investigated by using real-time reverse-transcriptional quantitative PCR. Metabolically active populations of anammox, AOA, and AOB in rice paddy soils were evident by the presence and successful quantification of hzo mRNA and amoA mRNA genes. The expression ratio of amoA gene for both AOA and AOB varied between soybean soils and different rice paddy soils while the expression of hzo gene for anammox was detectable only in rice paddy soils by showing a diverse relative expression ratio in each soil sample. Gene expression of both archaeal and bacterial amoA genes in rice paddy soils differed among the three sampling depths, but that of hzo was not. Both archaeal and bacterial amoA genes showed an increase trend of expression level with continuation of rice paddy cultivation, but the low expression ratio of hzo gene indicated a relatively small contribution of anammox in overall removal of inorganic nitrogen through N2 even under anoxic and high nitrogen input in agriculture. Bacterial amoA gene from two soybean fields and three rice paddy fields were also analyzed for community composition by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprint. Community shift was observed between soybean and paddy fields and within each of them. The consistent occurrence of three bands 5, 6, and 7 in all samples showed their high adaptability for both arid cultivation and continuous rice paddy cultivation. Our data suggest that AOA and AOB are playing a more important role in nitrogen transformation in agricultural soils in oxic or anoxic environment and anammox bacteria may also contribute but in a less extent to N transformation in these agricultural soils

  6. Water addition regulates the metabolic activity of ammonia oxidizers responding to environmental perturbations in dry subhumid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Macdonald, Catriona A; Trivedi, Pankaj; Holmes, Bronwyn; Bodrossy, Levente; He, Ji-Zheng; Singh, Brajesh K

    2015-02-01

    Terrestrial arid and semi-arid ecosystems (drylands) constitute about 41% of the Earth's land surface and are predicted to experience increasing fluctuations in water and nitrogen availability. Mounting evidence has confirmed the significant importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in nitrification, plant nitrogen availability and atmospheric N2 O emissions, but their responses to environmental perturbations in drylands remain largely unknown. Here we evaluate how the factorial combinations of irrigation and fertilization in forests and land-use change from grassland to forest affects the dynamics of AOA and AOB following a 6-year dryland field study. Potential nitrification rates and AOA and AOB abundances were significantly higher in the irrigated plots, accompanied by considerable changes in community compositions, but their responses to fertilization alone were not significant. DNA-stable isotope probing results showed increased (13) CO2 incorporation into the amoA gene of AOA, but not of AOB, in plots receiving water addition, coupled with significantly higher net mineralization and nitrification rates. High-throughput microarray analysis revealed that active AOA assemblages belonging to Nitrosopumilus and Nitrosotalea were increasingly labelled by (13) CO2 following irrigation. However, no obvious effects of land-use changes on nitrification rates or metabolic activity of AOA and AOB could be observed under dry conditions. We provide evidence that water addition had more important roles than nitrogen fertilization in influencing the autotrophic nitrification in dryland ecosystems, and AOA are increasingly involved in ammonia oxidation when dry soils become wetted. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Simultaneous oxidation of cyanide and thiocyanate at high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario, E-mail: mariodiaz@uniovi.es

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The oxidation rate of SCN{sup −} was greatly enhanced by the presence of CN{sup −}. • The degradation of mixtures was significantly affected by temperature and pressure. • A free-radical pathway was proposed, CN{sup −} and CNO{sup −} being the reaction intermediates. • The principal reaction products were found to be HCOO{sup −}, NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. • One of the parallel routes gives the found products and the other N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. - Abstract: Thiocyanate and cyanide are important contaminants that frequently appear mixed in industrial effluents. In this work the wet oxidation of mixtures of both compounds, simulating real compositions, was carried out in a semi-batch reactor at temperature between 393 K and 483 K and pressure in the range of 2.0–8.0 MPa. The presence of cyanide (3.85 mM) increased the kinetic constant of thiocyanate degradation by a factor of 1.6, in comparison to the value obtained for the individual degradation of thiocyanate, (5.95 ± 0.05) × 10{sup −5} s{sup −1}. On the other hand, the addition of thiocyanate (0.98 mM) decreased the degradation rate of cyanide by 16%. This revealed the existence of synergistic and inhibitory phenomena between these two species. Additionally, cyanide was identified as an intermediate in the oxidation of thiocyanate, and formate, ammonia and sulfate were found to be the main reaction products. Taking into account the experimental data, a reaction pathway for the simultaneous wet oxidation of both pollutants was proposed. Two parallel reactions beginning from cyanate as intermediate were considered, one yielding ammonia and formate and the other giving carbon dioxide and nitrogen as final products.

  8. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria on granular activated carbon and their fates during drinking water purification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Kasuga, Ikuro; Kurisu, Futoshi; Furumai, Hiroaki; Shigeeda, Takaaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia is a precursor to trichloramine, which causes an undesirable chlorinous odor. Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration is used to biologically oxidize ammonia during drinking water purification; however, little information is available regarding the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) associated with GAC. In addition, their sources and fates in water purification process remain unknown. In this study, six GAC samples were collected from five full-scale drinking water purification plants in Tokyo during summer and winter, and the abundance and community structure of AOA and AOB associated with GAC were studied in these two seasons. In summer, archaeal and bacterial amoA genes on GACs were present at 3.7 × 10(5)-3.9 × 10(8) gene copies/g-dry and 4.5 × 10(6)-4.2 × 10(8) gene copies/g-dry, respectively. In winter, archaeal amoA genes remained at the same level, while bacterial amoA genes decreased significantly for all GACs. No differences were observed in the community diversity of AOA and AOB from summer to winter. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high AOA diversity in group I.1a and group I.1b in raw water. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of processed water samples revealed that AOA diversity decreased dramatically to only two OTUs in group I.1a after ozonation, which were identical to those detected on GAC. It suggests that ozonation plays an important role in determining AOA diversity on GAC. Further study on the cell-specific activity of AOA and AOB is necessary to understand their contributions to in situ nitrification performance.

  9. Adsorption of ammonia on vanadium-antimony mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Hernan; German, Estefania [Departamento e Instituto de Fisica del Sur, Universidad Nacional del Sur-CONICET, Avda. Alem 1253, (8000) Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Juan, Alfredo, E-mail: cajuan@uns.edu.ar [Departamento e Instituto de Fisica del Sur, Universidad Nacional del Sur-CONICET, Avda. Alem 1253, (8000) Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Irigoyen, Beatriz [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellon de Industrias, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-02-01

    We analyzed the adsorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on the VSbO{sub 4}(1 1 0) catalyst surface using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We followed the evolution of the chemical bonds between different atoms of the resulting NH{sub 3}/VSbO{sub 4} system and the changes in the electronic structure of the catalyst. NH{sub 3} preferential adsorption geometries were analyzed through the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) concept and the density of states (DOS) curves. The VSbO{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface exhibits Lewis and Bronsted acid sites on which the ammonia molecule can interact. On the Lewis acid site, NH{sub 3} adsorption resulted in the interaction between the N and a surface V-isolated cation. On Bronsted acid site, N interacted with a surface H coming from the chemical dissociation of water. The COOP analysis indicate that NH{sub 3} interaction on the VSbO{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface is weak. In addition, the DOS curves show more developed electronic interactions for NH{sub 3} adsorption on Lewis acid site than over Bronsted acid site.

  10. Removal of arsenic, phosphates and ammonia from well water using electrochemical/chemical methods and advanced oxidation: a pilot plant approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orescanin, Visnja; Kollar, Robert; Nad, Karlo; Halkijevic, Ivan; Kuspilic, Marin; Findri Gustek, Stefica

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a pilot plant purification system and apply it to groundwater used for human consumption, containing high concentrations of arsenic and increased levels of phosphates, ammonia, mercury and color. The groundwater used was obtained from the production well in the Vinkovci County (Eastern Croatia). Due to a complex composition of the treated water, the purification system involved a combined electrochemical treatment, using iron and aluminum electrode plates with simultaneous ozonation, followed by a post-treatment with UV, ozone and hydrogen peroxide. The removal of the contaminant with the waste sludge collected during the electrochemical treatment was also tested. The combined electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatment resulted in the complete removal of arsenic, phosphates, color, turbidity, suspended solids and ammonia, while the removal of other contaminants of interest was up to 96.7%. Comparable removal efficiencies were obtained by using waste sludge as a coagulant.

  11. Ammonia blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003506.htm Ammonia blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Encephalopathy - ammonia; Cirrhosis - ammonia; Liver failure - ammonia Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Ammonia (NH3) - blood ...

  12. Measuring ammonia content in flue gas. Maaling af ammoniak i roeggas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, P. R.

    1988-05-15

    As ammonia is utilized in the desulfurization of emission from power plants, there is a standing need for efficient instruments for measuring ammonia content in flue gas. Analysis is hampered by the tendency of ammonia to be adsorbed on solid surfaces when temperatures are under 350 deg. C., and to form ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate when combined with sulfur oxides. A number of measuring principles and systems are described in connection with extraction systems, and the immediate removal of sulfur oxides from flue gas is recommended. At the present time (May 1988) the only efficient measuring principle seems to be infrared gas filter correlation, IR-GFC, which has been demonstrated in extraction systems, but the principle can also be used in in-situ analysis, and here the serious problem of how to keep the extraction system operating under very high temperatures is thus eliminated. High temperatures could solve the problems of adsorption and bisulfate formation in extraction systems with regard to power plants. (AB).

  13. Ammonia Diffusion through Nalophan Double Bags: Effect of Concentration Gradient Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Laura; Boiardi, Emanuela; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The ammonia loss through Nalophan bags has been studied. The losses observed for storage conditions and times as allowed by the reference standard for dynamic olfactometry (EN 13725:2003) indicate that odour concentration values due to the presence of small molecules may be significantly underestimated if samples are not analysed immediately after sampling. A diffusion model was used in order to study diffusion through the bag. The study discusses the effect of concentration gradient (ΔC) across the polymeric membrane of the analyte. The ΔC was controlled by using a setup bag called “double bags.” Experimental data show a reduction of ammonia percentage losses due to the effect of the external multibarrier. The expedient of the double bag loaded with the same gas mixture allows a reduced diffusion of ammonia into the inner bag. Comparing the inner bag losses with those of the single bag stored in the same conditions (T, P, u) and with equal geometrical characteristics (S/V, z), it was observed that the inner bag of the double bag displays a 16% loss while the single bag displays a 37% loss. Acting on the ΔC it is possible to achieve a gross reduction of 57% in the ammonia leakage due to diffusion. PMID:25506608

  14. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan double bags: effect of concentration gradient reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Capelli, Laura; Boiardi, Emanuela; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The ammonia loss through Nalophan bags has been studied. The losses observed for storage conditions and times as allowed by the reference standard for dynamic olfactometry (EN 13725:2003) indicate that odour concentration values due to the presence of small molecules may be significantly underestimated if samples are not analysed immediately after sampling. A diffusion model was used in order to study diffusion through the bag. The study discusses the effect of concentration gradient (ΔC) across the polymeric membrane of the analyte. The ΔC was controlled by using a setup bag called "double bags." Experimental data show a reduction of ammonia percentage losses due to the effect of the external multibarrier. The expedient of the double bag loaded with the same gas mixture allows a reduced diffusion of ammonia into the inner bag. Comparing the inner bag losses with those of the single bag stored in the same conditions (T, P, u) and with equal geometrical characteristics (S/V, z), it was observed that the inner bag of the double bag displays a 16% loss while the single bag displays a 37% loss. Acting on the ΔC it is possible to achieve a gross reduction of 57% in the ammonia leakage due to diffusion.

  15. Degradation of spent craft brewer’s yeast by caprine rumen hyper ammonia-producing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spent brewer’s yeast has long been included in ruminant diets as a protein supplement. However, modern craft beers often include more hops (Humulus lupulus L.) compounds than traditional recipes. These compounds include alpha and beta-acids, which are antimicrobial to the rumen hyper ammonia-produci...

  16. Genistein inhibited ammonia induced astrocyte swelling by inhibiting NF-κB activation-mediated nitric oxide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongliang; Jia, Guizhi; Wang, Wei; Liang, Chunguang; Han, Siyu; Chu, Minghui; Mei, Xifan

    2017-06-01

    Our previous study has indicated the involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation in ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling, which represents a major pathogenesis of brain edema in hepatic encephalopathy. In this study, we examined the effect of genistein, a naturally occurred broad-spectrum protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor, on ammonia-induced cell swelling. We found that genistein pretreatment significantly prevented ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. Mechanistically, ammonia triggered EGFR/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) association and subsequent ERK phosphorylation were alleviated by genistein pretreatment. Moreover, ammonia-induced NF-κB nuclear location, iNOS expression, and consequent NO production were all prevented by AG1478 and genistein pretreatment. This study suggested that genistein could alleviate ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling, which may be, at least partly, related to its PTK-inhibiting activity and repression of NF-κB mediated iNOS-derived NO accumulation.

  17. Radiation Chemistry in Ammonia-Water Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H2, N2 NO, and N2O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete (approximately 97% destroyed) after a fluence of 10(exp 16) ions per square centimeter. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N2 and H2 which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

  18. Ammonia intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessman, S.P.; Pal, N.

    1982-01-01

    Data is presented which shows that there is a relation between ammonia concentration in the blood and state of consciousness. The concentrations of GTP and ATP also relate both to the ammonia concentration in blood and the state of consciousness. The rate of protein synthesis in the brain as measured by the percent of intracellular counts that are incorporated into protein is also related to ammonia concentration. These findings of energy depletion and depressed synthesis resulting from energy depletion suggest that the primary lesion in ammonia intoxication involves the Krebs cycle. The greater effect of ammonia on GTP than on ATP metabolism supports the view that the primary site of action of ammonia is at the glutamate dehydrogenase-ketoglutarate reduction step - and is consistent with previous work on this subject. (H.K.)

  19. Processes and problems of ammonia elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippmer, K

    1974-01-01

    In many cases a conversion of ammonia in coke oven gases to ammonium sulfate (fertilizer) is not useful. It must then be eliminated by oxidation to nitrogen and water or catalytically to N2 and hydrogen. Several processes are available for this which are combined with the simultaneous removal of hydrogen sulfide. The absorption of NH3 with NH3 incineration with and without heat utilization, the NH3 absorption with catalytic cracking of NH3, H2S and NH3 scrubbing with NH3 incineration and production of sulfuric acid (78 or 96 percent), as well as H2S and NH3 scrubbing with catalytic cracking of NH3 and production of pure sulfur are discussed in great detail. A cost comparison of these methods is provided. Lowest investments are required for an NH3 scrubbing process with elimination of NH3 but without desulfurization. Expenditures for an NH3 scrubber with desulfurization of the coke oven gas to about 1.5 g H2S/cu m and NH3 incineration with production of 78 percent H2SO4 are lower than those for the production of 96 percent H2SO4. For the latter there is more demand, however. Desulfurization to about 0.7 g H2S/cu m is only slightly more expensive. The process producing sulfur in combination with an H2S oxidation method requires somewhat lower investment costs.

  20. Influence of carboxyl group formation on ammonia adsorption of NiO-templated nanoporous carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Long-Yue [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The scope of this work was to control the surface functional groups of nanoporous carbons (NPs) by oxidizing agents (nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) treatments and to investigate the relation between carboxyl group and ammonia removal efficiency. The NPs were directly prepared from a cation exchange resin by the carbonization of a mixture with Ni acetate at 900 Degree-Sign C. N{sub 2}/-196 Degree-Sign C adsorption, Boehm's titrations, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyzes were employed to confirm the physicochemical properties of NPs. The ammonia removal efficiency was confirmed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique. In the result, the oxygen content of NPs increased after various treatments and the highest content of carboxyl group formation appeared at a 2:3 volume ratio of HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It was also found that the oxidation treatment led to an increase in ammonia removal efficiency of NPs, mainly due to an increase of acid oxygen functional groups (such as carboxyl) on NPs surfaces. -- Graphical abstract: The nanoporous carbons were prepared from an exchange resin by the carbonization of a mixture with Ni acetate for ammonia adsorption. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbons were prepared from an exchange resin by the carbonization of a mixture with Ni acetate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon surfaces were modified with HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at different volume radio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest content of carboxyl group formation appeared at a 2:3 volume ratio of HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid oxygen functional groups (such as carboxyl) on carbon surfaces led to an increase in ammonia adsorption.

  1. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... emitted to the air. To identify the key regulators of these transformations we have combined data from studies of microbiology and performance in 10 experimental and full scale filters of varying design, loading, and management. Inhibition by nitrite controlled ammonium oxidation and pH, while biological...... removal without too much energy consumption, waste water production, green house gas emission, or suppression of the filters odor removal efficiency....

  2. Spatial and temporal patterns of nitrogen isotopic composition of ammonia at U.S. ammonia monitoring network sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, J. David; Elliott, Emily M.; Gay, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions and ammonium (NH4+) deposition can have harmful effects on the environment and human health but remain generally unregulated in the U.S. PM2.5 regulations require that an area not exceed an annual average PM2.5 value of 12 μg/m3 (averaged over three years), and since NH3 is a significant precursor to PM2.5 formation these are the closest indirect regulations of NH3 emissions in the U.S. If the U.S. elects to adopt NH3 emission regulations similar to those applied by the European Union, it will be imperative to first adequately quantify NH3 emission sources and transport, and also understand the factors causing varying emissions from each source. To further investigate NH3 emission sources and transport at a regional scale, NH3 was sampled monthly at a subset of nine Ammonia Monitoring Network (AMoN) sites and analyzed for nitrogen isotopic composition of NH3 (δ15N-NH3). The observed δ15N-NH3 values ranged from -42.4 to +7.1‰ with an average of -15.1 ± 9.7. The observed δ15N-NH3 values reported here provide insight into the spatial and temporal trends of the NH3 sources that contribute to ambient [NH3] in the U.S. In regions where agriculture is prevalent (i.e., U.S. Midwest), low and seasonally variable δ15N-NH3 values are observed and are associated with varying agricultural sources. In comparison, rural nonagricultural areas have higher and more seasonally consistent δ15N-NH3 values associated with a constant "natural" (e.g. soil, vegetation, bi-directional flux, ocean) NH3 source. With regards to temporal variation, the peak in U.S. spring agricultural activity (e.g. fertilizer application, livestock waste volatilization) is accompanied by a decrease in δ15N-NH3 values at a majority of the sites, whereas higher δ15N-NH3 values in other seasons could be due to shifting sources (e.g. coal-fired power plants) and/or fractionation scenarios. Fractionation processes that may mask NH3 source signatures are discussed and require

  3. Evaluation of the potential for significant ammonia releases from Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.; Anderson, C.M.; Chen, G.; Cuta, J.M.; Ferryman, T.A.; Terrones, G.

    1996-07-01

    Ammonia is ubiquitous as a component of the waste stored in the Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). Because ammonia is both flammable and toxic, concerns have been raised about the amount of ammonia stored in the tanks and the possible mechanisms by which it could be released from the waste into the head space inside the tanks as well as into the surrounding atmosphere. Ammonia is a safety issue for three reasons. As already mentioned, ammonia is a flammable gas and may contribute to a flammability hazard either directly, if it reaches a high enough concentration in the tank head space, or by contributing to the flammability of other flammable gases such as hydrogen (LANL 1994). Ammonia is also toxic and at relatively low concentrations presents a hazard to human health. The level at which ammonia is considered Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) is 300 ppm (WHC 1993, 1995). Ammonia concentrations at or above this level have been measured inside the head space in a number of SSTs. Finally, unlike hydrogen and nitrous oxide, ammonia is highly soluble in aqueous solutions, and large amounts of ammonia can be stored in the waste as dissolved gas. Because of its high solubility, ammonia behaves in a qualitatively different manner from hydrogen or other insoluble gases. A broader range of scenarios must be considered in modeling ammonia storage and release

  4. Molecular diversity of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria community in disused tin-mining ponds located within Kampar, Perak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, S L S; Khoo, G; Chong, L K; Smith, T J; Harrison, P L; Ong, H K A

    2014-02-01

    Disused tin-mining ponds make up a significant amount of water bodies in Malaysia particularly at the Kinta Valley in the state of Perak where tin-mining activities were the most extensive, and these abundantly available water sources are widely used in the field of aquaculture and agriculture. However, the natural ecology and physicochemical conditions of these ponds, many of which have been altered due to secondary post-mining activities, remains to be explored. As ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are directly related to the nutrient cycles of aquatic environments and are useful bioindicators of environmental variations, the focus of this study was to identify AOBs associated with disused tin-mining ponds that have a history of different secondary activities in comparison to ponds which were left untouched and remained as part of the landscape. The 16S rDNA gene was used to detect AOBs in the sediment and water sampled from the three types of disused mining ponds, namely ponds without secondary activity, ponds that were used for lotus cultivation and post-aquaculture ponds. When the varying pond types were compared with the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the AOB clone libraries, both Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira-like AOB were detected though Nitrosospira spp. was seen to be the most ubiquitous AOB as it was present in all ponds types. However, AOBs were not detected in the sediments of idle ponds. Based on rarefaction analysis and diversity indices, the disused mining pond with lotus culture indicated the highest richness of AOBs. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that among the physicochemical properties of the pond sites, TAN and nitrite were shown to be the main factors that influenced the community structure of AOBs in these disused tin-mining ponds.

  5. Spatial distribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers in the littoral buffer zone of a nitrogen-rich lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Guibing; Ye, Lei; Feng, Xiaojuan; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Yin, Chengqing

    2012-01-01

    The spatial distribution and diversity of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB) were evaluated targeting amoA genes in the gradient of a littoral buffer zone which has been identified as a hot spot for N cycling. Here we found high spatial heterogeneity in the nitrification rate and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in the five sampling sites. The bacterial amoA gene was numerically dominant in most of the surface soil but decreased dramatically in deep layers. Higher nitrification potentials were detected in two sites near the land/water interface at 4.4-6.1 microg NO(2-)-N/(g dry weight soil x hr), while only 1.0-1.7 microg NO(2-)-N/(g dry weight soil x hr) was measured at other sites. The potential nitrification rates were proportional to the amoA gene abundance for AOB, but with no significant correlation with AOA. The NH4+ concentration was the most determinative parameter for the abundance of AOB and potential nitrification rates in this study. Higher richness in the surface layer was found in the analysis of biodiversity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the bacterial amoA sequences in surface soil were affiliated with the genus of Nitrosopira while the archaeal sequences were almost equally affiliated with Candidatus 'Nitrososphaera gargensis' and Candidatus 'Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii'. The spatial distribution of AOA and AOB indicated that bacteria may play a more important role in nitrification in the littoral buffer zone of a N-rich lake.

  6. Mechanisms of Persistence of the Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria Nitrosomonas to the Biocide Free Nitrous Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloo, Andrew E; Wei, Justin; Wang, Dongbo; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Vanwonterghem, Inka; Waite, David; Steen, Jason; Kaysen, Anne; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Wang, Qilin; Schulz, Benjamin; Nouwens, Amanda; Wilmes, Paul; Hugenholtz, Philip; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2018-05-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) exerts a broad range of antimicrobial effects on bacteria, although susceptibility varies considerably among microorganisms. Among nitrifiers found in activated sludge of wastewater treatment processes (WWTPs), nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are more susceptible to FNA compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). This selective inhibition of NOB over AOB in WWTPs bypasses nitrate production and improves the efficiency and costs of the nitrogen removal process in both the activated sludge and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) system. However, the molecular mechanisms governing this atypical tolerance of AOB to FNA have yet to be understood. Herein we investigate the varying effects of the antimicrobial FNA on activated sludge containing AOB and NOB using an integrated metagenomics and label-free quantitative sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion mass spectra (SWATH-MS) metaproteomic approach. The Nitrosomonas genus of AOB, on exposure to FNA, maintains internal homeostasis by upregulating a number of known oxidative stress enzymes, such as pteridine reductase and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase. Denitrifying enzymes were upregulated on exposure to FNA, suggesting the detoxification of nitrite to nitric oxide. Interestingly, proteins involved in stress response mechanisms, such as DNA and protein repair enzymes, phage prevention proteins, and iron transport proteins, were upregulated on exposure to FNA. In addition enzymes involved in energy generation were also upregulated on exposure to FNA. The total proteins specifically derived from the NOB genus Nitrobacter was low and, as such, did not allow for the elucidation of the response mechanism to FNA exposure. These findings give us an understanding of the adaptive mechanisms of tolerance within the AOB Nitrosomonas to the biocidal agent FNA.

  7. Long-term ammonia removal in a coconut fiber-packed biofilter: analysis of N fractionation and reactor performance under steady-state and transient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquerizo, Guillermo; Maestre, Juan P; Machado, Vinicius C; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2009-05-01

    A comprehensive study of long-term ammonia removal in a biofilter packed with coconut fiber is presented under both steady-state and transient conditions. Low and high ammonia loads were applied to the reactor by varying the inlet ammonia concentration from 90 to 260 ppm(v) and gas contact times ranging from 20 to 36 s. Gas samples and leachate measurements were periodically analyzed and used for characterizing biofilter performance in terms of removal efficiency (RE) and elimination capacity (EC). Also, N fractions in the leachate were quantified to both identify the experimental rates of nitritation and nitratation and to determine the N leachate distribution. Results showed stratification in the biofilter activity and, thus, most of the NH(3) removal was performed in the lower part of the reactor. An average EC of 0.5 kg N-NH(3)m(-3)d(-1) was obtained for the whole reactor with a maximum local average EC of 1.7 kg N-NH(3)m(-3)d(-1). Leachate analyses showed that a ratio of 1:1 of ammonium and nitrate ions in the leachate was obtained throughout steady-state operation at low ammonia loads with similar values for nitritation and nitratation rates. Low nitratation rates during high ammonia load periods occurred because large amounts of ammonium and nitrite accumulated in the packed bed, thus causing inhibition episodes on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria due to free ammonia accumulation. Mass balances showed that 50% of the ammonia fed to the reactor was oxidized to either nitrite or nitrate and the rest was recovered as ammonium indicating that sorption processes play a fundamental role in the treatment of ammonia by biofiltration.

  8. Etching of germanium-tin using ammonia peroxide mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yuan; Ong, Bin Leong; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiao; Liang, Gengchiau; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng [Institute of Material Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, #08-03, Innovis, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Tok, Eng-Soon [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117551 (Singapore)

    2015-12-28

    The wet etching of germanium-tin (Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}) alloys (4.2% < x < 16.0%) in ammonia peroxide mixture (APM) is investigated. Empirical fitting of the data points indicates that the etch depth of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} is proportional to the square root of the etch time t and decreases exponentially with increasing x for a given t. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that increasing t increases the intensity of the Sn oxide peak, whereas no obvious change is observed for the Ge oxide peak. This indicates that an accumulation of Sn oxide on the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} surface decreases the amount of Ge atoms exposed to the etchant, which accounts for the decrease in etch rate with increasing etch time. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the surface morphologies of the Ge{sub 0.918}Sn{sub 0.082} samples. Both root-mean-square roughness and undulation periods of the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} surface were observed to increase with increasing t. This work provides further understanding of the wet etching of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} using APM and may be used for the fabrication of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}-based electronic and photonic devices.

  9. Two Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Contaminant Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Two catalysts for the selective oxidation of trace amounts of contaminant gases in air have been developed for use aboard the International Space Station. These catalysts might also be useful for reducing concentrations of fumes in terrestrial industrial facilities especially facilities that use halocarbons as solvents, refrigerant liquids, and foaming agents, as well as facilities that generate or utilize ammonia. The first catalyst is of the supported-precious-metal type. This catalyst is highly active for the oxidation of halocarbons, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates at low concentrations in air. This catalyst is more active for the oxidation of hydrocarbons and halocarbons than are competing catalysts developed in recent years. This catalyst completely converts these airborne contaminant gases to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral acids that can be easily removed from the air, and does not make any chlorine gas in the process. The catalyst is thermally stable and is not poisoned by chlorine or fluorine atoms produced on its surface during the destruction of a halocarbon. In addition, the catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to nitrogen at a temperature between 200 and 260 C, without making nitrogen oxides, which are toxic. The temperature of 260 C is higher than the operational temperature of any other precious-metal catalyst that can selectively oxidize ammonia. The purpose of the platinum in this catalyst is to oxidize hydrocarbons and to ensure that the oxidation of halocarbons goes to completion. However, the platinum exhibits little or no activity for initiating the destruction of halocarbons. Instead, the attack on the halocarbons is initiated by the support. The support also provides a high surface area for exposure of the platinum. Moreover, the support resists deactivation or destruction by halogens released during the destruction of halocarbons. The second catalyst is of the supported- metal-oxide type. This catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to

  10. Source of Nitrous Oxide Emissions during the Cow Manure Composting Process as Revealed by Isotopomer Analysis of and amoA Abundance in Betaproteobacterial Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Koki; Toyoda, Sakae; Shimojima, Ryosuke; Osada, Takashi; Hanajima, Dai; Morioka, Riki; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2010-01-01

    A molecular analysis of betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers and a N2O isotopomer analysis were conducted to study the sources of N2O emissions during the cow manure composting process. Much NO2−-N and NO3−-N and the Nitrosomonas europaea-like amoA gene were detected at the surface, especially at the top of the composting pile, suggesting that these ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) significantly contribute to the nitrification which occurs at the surface layer of compost piles. However, the 15N site preference within the asymmetric N2O molecule (SP = δ15Nα − δ15Nβ, where 15Nα and 15Nβ represent the 15N/14N ratios at the center and end sites of the nitrogen atoms, respectively) indicated that the source of N2O emissions just after the compost was turned originated mainly from the denitrification process. Based on these results, the reduction of accumulated NO2−-N or NO3−-N after turning was identified as the main source of N2O emissions. The site preference and bulk δ15N results also indicate that the rate of N2O reduction was relatively low, and an increased value for the site preference indicates that the nitrification which occurred mainly in the surface layer of the pile partially contributed to N2O emissions between the turnings. PMID:20048060

  11. Links between seawater flooding, soil ammonia oxidiser communities and their response to changes in salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacke, Heiko; Schöning, Ingo; Schindler, Malte; Schrumpf, Marion; Daniel, Rolf; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2017-11-01

    Coastal areas worldwide are challenged by climate change-associated increases in sea level and storm surge quantities that potentially lead to more frequent flooding of soil ecosystems. Currently, little is known of the effects of inundation events on microorganisms controlling nitrification in these ecosystems. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of seawater flooding on the abundance, community composition and salinity tolerance of soil ammonia oxidisers. Topsoil was sampled from three islands flooded at different frequencies by the Wadden Sea. Archaeal ammonia oxidiser amoA genes were more abundant than their betaproteobacterial counterparts, and the distribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidiser amoA and 16S rRNA gene sequences significantly differed between the islands. The findings indicate selection of ammonia oxidiser phylotypes with greater tolerance to high salinity and slightly alkaline pH (e.g. Nitrosopumilus representatives) in frequently flooded soils. A cluster phylogenetically related to gammaproteobacterial ammonia oxidisers was detected in all samples analysed in this survey. Nevertheless, no gammaprotebacterial amoA genes could be amplified via PCR and only betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidisers were detected in enrichment cultures. A slurry-based experiment demonstrated the tolerance of both bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers to a wide range of salinities (e.g. Wadden Sea water salinity) in soil naturally exposed to seawater at a high frequency. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Acclimation to extremely high ammonia levels in continuous biomethanation process and the associated microbial community dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    Acclimatized anaerobic communities to high ammonia levels can offer a solution to the ammonia toxicity problem in biogas reactors. In the current study, a stepwise acclimation strategy up to 10 g NH4+-N L−1, was performed in mesophilic (37 ± 1 °C) continuously stirred tank reactors. The reactors...... change throughout the ammonia acclimation process. Clostridium ultunense, a syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria, increased significantly alongside with hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanoculleus spp., indicating strong hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity at extreme ammonia levels (>7 g NH4+-N L−1...

  13. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and NOX with ammonia absorbent in a packed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yong; Du, Daqian; Zhang, Xinxi; Ding, Xilou; Zhong, Oin

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of NO followed by simultaneous removal of SO 2 and NO X with ammonia is a promising method for control of coal-fired flue gas pollutants. We investigated simultaneous absorption of SO 2 and NO X in a packed column with ammonia, and found that SO 2 and NO X could promote absorption with each other in the process of simultaneous removal SO 2 and NO X . The removal efficiency of SO 2 and NO X was, respectively, about 98% and 70.9% at pH 5.5, temperature 323.15 K, SO 2 concentration 1,800x10 −6 , NO X concentration 400x10 −6 and m NO2 /m NO 1 in our experimental system. The experimental results also show that the formation of sulfite oxidized by reacting with dissolved NO 2 and the molar ratio of sulfite to total sulfur is more than 0.8 in the solution. Accordingly, the energy consumption for sulfite oxidation would be greatly reduced in the process of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification with ammonia

  14. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F. [Departamento de Fisica/Laboratorio do Acelerador Van de Graaff, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lv, X. Y.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie), CIMAP-CIRIL-GANIL, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Seperuelo Duarte, E., E-mail: vbordalo@fis.puc-rio.br [Grupo de Fisica e Astronomia, Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-10

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  15. Electrochemical monitoring of ammonia during anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    Ammonia is known as key inhibitor to methanogens in anaerobic digestion (AD) process. It’s of importance to develop efficient tool for ammonia monitoring. In this study, an electrolysis cell (EC) coupled with a complete nitrification reactor was developed as sensor for real time and online monito...

  16. Ammonia Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  17. The role of oxygen during the catalytic oxidation of ammonia on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 0 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shojaee, Kambiz; Haynes, Brian S.; Montoya, Alejandro, E-mail: alejandro.montoya@sydney.edu.au

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ammonia oxidation on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 0 0) surface is studied using Density Functional Theory. • The role of lattice O, on-surface O and OH in the dehydrogenation of ammonia is clarified. • NO and H{sub 2}O are the main products of ammonia oxidation on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 0 0). • The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} surface is itself capable of oxidising NH{sub 3} to NO using the lattice O, opening the way for a Mars–van Krevelen mechanism of reaction. - Abstract: The adsorption selectivity and dehydrogenation energy barriers of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2} and NH on the (1 0 0) surface planes of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are determined by means of density functional methods. Stepwise hydrogen abstraction is effected by lattice O{sup 3o} associated with octahedrally coordinated surface Co atoms. The final H-abstraction, from NH, leads directly to the formation of gaseous product NO with the creation of a lattice oxygen vacancy. Reaction of this vacancy with gas-phase O{sub 2} repairs the vacancy and creates surface-adsorbed O{sup *} which is also capable of abstracting H from NH{sub 3}{sup *}, NH{sub 2}{sup *} and NH{sup *}, the final step leading to directly again to NO formation. The mobile surface OH{sup *} formed from the O{sup *}-mediated abstraction steps is also capable of abstracting H from the NH{sub x}{sup *} species, leading ultimately to surface N{sup *} which then easily extracts a lattice O{sup 3o} to form NO and a new vacancy. The overall mechanism to form NO is a complex cycle of lattice- and surface-mediated abstractions. The hydrogen budget in the reaction shows corresponding complexity. Surface H{sup *} (formed when lattice O{sup 3o} abstracts H from NH{sub x}) is stable and immobile but it can be abstracted by surface OH{sup *} to form water. OH{sup *} disproportionation reaction also forms water.

  18. Oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy as SOFC interconnect in dry/wet air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Fu-Shen; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A special thermodynamic description corresponding to the kinetics was applied. •We reported the relationships of degradation time with temperature and moisture. •”Turning time” in the Fe–16Cr alloy oxidation kinetic model was given. •The oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy in the wet air was discussed. -- Abstract: Experimental study on the oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was carried out at 800–1100 °C under dry/wet air conditions. Faster oxidation rate was observed at higher temperature and water vapor content. The degradation time t d between two stages in oxidation process showed an exponential relationship with elevating corrosion temperature in dry air, and a linear relationship with the water content in the case of water vapor introduced to the system. The mechanism of oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was suggested by the Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. It was found that the break-away oxidation in stage II was controlled by diffusion at initial both in dry and wet air, then became linear with the exposure time, which implied that the oxidation rate was then controlled by chemical reaction of the interface between the metal and the oxidized scale. Moreover, the effect of water in the oxidation process is not only to supply more oxygen into system, but also to modify the structures of oxide scale due to the existence of hydrogen atom, which results in the accelerated corrosions

  19. Manufacture of a Polyaniline Nanofiber Ammonia Sensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyan-Chyi Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the fabrication of a polyaniline nanofiber ammonia sensor integrated with a readout circuit on a chip using the commercial 0.35 mm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process and a post-process. The micro ammonia sensor consists of a sensing resistor and an ammonia sensing film. Polyaniline prepared by a chemical polymerization method was adopted as the ammonia sensing film. The fabrication of the ammonia sensor needs a post-process to etch the sacrificial layers and to expose the sensing resistor, and then the ammonia sensing film is coated on the sensing resistor. The ammonia sensor, which is of resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. A readout circuit is employed to convert the resistance of the ammonia sensor into the voltage output. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the ammonia sensor is about 0.88 mV/ppm at room temperature

  20. Contribution of crenarchaeal autotrophic ammonia oxidizers to the dark primary production in Tyrrhenian deep waters (Central Mediterranean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M; Cono, Violetta La; Smedile, Francesco; DeLuca, Thomas H; Juárez, Silvia; Ciordia, Sergio; Fernández, Marisol; Albar, Juan Pablo; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2011-06-01

    Mesophilic Crenarchaeota have recently been thought to be significant contributors to nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycling. In this study, we examined the vertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota at offshore site in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The median value of the crenachaeal cell to amoA gene ratio was close to one suggesting that virtually all deep-sea Crenarchaeota possess the capacity to oxidize ammonia. Crenarchaea-specific genes, nirK and ureC, for nitrite reductase and urease were identified and their affiliation demonstrated the presence of 'deep-sea' clades distinct from 'shallow' representatives. Measured deep-sea dark CO(2) fixation estimates were comparable to the median value of photosynthetic biomass production calculated for this area of Tyrrhenian Sea, pointing to the significance of this process in the C cycle of aphotic marine ecosystems. To elucidate the pivotal organisms in this process, we targeted known marine crenarchaeal autotrophy-related genes, coding for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (accA) and 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase (4-hbd). As in case of nirK and ureC, these genes are grouped with deep-sea sequences being distantly related to those retrieved from the epipelagic zone. To pair the molecular data with specific functional attributes we performed [(14)C]HCO(3) incorporation experiments followed by analyses of radiolabeled proteins using shotgun proteomics approach. More than 100 oligopeptides were attributed to 40 marine crenarchaeal-specific proteins that are involved in 10 different metabolic processes, including autotrophy. Obtained results provided a clear proof of chemolithoautotrophic physiology of bathypelagic crenarchaeota and indicated that this numerically predominant group of microorganisms facilitate a hitherto unrecognized sink for inorganic C of a global importance.

  1. The response of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to trace metals and urine in two grassland soils in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; Tan, Qiling; Podolyan, Andriy; Zhao, Xiaohu; McLaren, Ron G; Hu, Chengxiao

    2017-01-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the response of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and the nitrification rate to the contamination of Cu, Zn, and Cd in two New Zealand grassland soils. The soils spiked with different concentrations of Cu (20 and 50 mg kg -1 ), Zn (20 and 50 mg kg -1 ), and Cd (2 and 10 mg kg -1 ) were incubated for 14 days and then treated with 500 mg kg -1 urine-N before continuing incubation for a total of 115 days. Soils were sampled at intervals throughout the incubation. The nitrification rate in soils at each sampling period was determined, and the abundance of AOB and AOA was measured by real-time quantification polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay of the amoA gene copy numbers. The results revealed that moderate trace metal stress did not significantly affect the abundance of AOB and AOA in the two soils, probably due to the high organic matter content of the soils which would have reduced the toxic effect of the metals. Nitrification rates were much greater and the observable nitrification period was much shorter in the dairy farm (DF) soil, in which the AOB and AOA abundances were greater than those of the mixed cropping farm (MF) soil. AOB were shown to grow under high nitrogen conditions, whereas AOA were shown to grow under low N environments, with different metal concentrations. Therefore, nitrogen status rather than metal applications was the main determining factor for AOB and AOA growth in the two soils studied.

  2. Identification of active methanotrophs in a landfill cover soil through detection of expression of 16S rRNA and functional genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Dumont, Marc G; Cébron, Aurélie; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-11-01

    Active methanotrophs in a landfill soil were revealed by detecting the 16S rRNA of methanotrophs and the mRNA transcripts of key genes involved in methane oxidation. New 16S rRNA primers targeting type I and type II methanotrophs were designed and optimized for analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Direct extraction of RNA from soil enabled the analysis of the expression of the functional genes: mmoX, pmoA and mxaF, which encode subunits of soluble methane monooxygenase, particulate methane monooxygenase and methanol dehydrogenase respectively. The 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for type I methanotrophs detected Methylomonas, Methylosarcina and Methylobacter sequences from both soil DNA and cDNA which was generated from RNA extracted directly from the landfill cover soil. The 16S rRNA primers for type II methanotrophs detected primarily Methylocella and some Methylocystis 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of mRNA recovered from the soil indicated that Methylobacter, Methylosarcina, Methylomonas, Methylocystis and Methylocella were actively expressing genes involved in methane and methanol oxidation. Transcripts of pmoA but not mmoX were readily detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), indicating that particulate methane monooxygenase may be largely responsible for methane oxidation in situ.

  3. AMMONIA AS A TEMPERATURE TRACER IN THE ULTRALUMINOUS GALAXY MERGER Arp 220

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Jürgen; Henkel, Christian; Weiß, Axel; Braatz, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of ammonia (NH 3 ) and the 1.2 cm radio continuum toward the ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger Arp 220. We detect the NH 3 (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), (5,5), and (6,6) inversion lines in absorption against the unresolved, (62 ± 9) mJy continuum source at 1.2 cm. The peak apparent optical depths of the ammonia lines range from ∼0.05 to 0.18. The absorption lines are well described by single-component Gaussians with central velocities in between the velocities of the eastern and western cores of Arp 220. Therefore, the ammonia likely traces gas that encompasses both cores. The absorption depth of the NH 3 (1,1) line is significantly shallower than expected based on the depths of the other transitions. The shallow (1,1) profile may be caused by contamination from emission by a hypothetical, cold (∼ 14 cm –2 . This layer would have to be located behind or away from the radio continuum sources to produce the contaminating emission. The widths of the ammonia absorption lines are ∼120-430 km s –1 , in agreement with those of other molecular tracers. We cannot confirm the extremely large line widths of up to ∼1800 km s –1 previously reported for this galaxy. Using all of the ATCA detections except for the shallow (1,1) line, we determine a rotational temperature of (124 ± 19) K, corresponding to a kinetic temperature of T kin = (186 ± 55) K. Ammonia column densities depend on the excitation temperature. For excitation temperatures of 10 K and 50 K, we estimate N(NH 3 ) = (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10 16 cm –2 and (8.4 ± 0.5) × 10 16 cm –2 , respectively. The relation scales linearly for possible higher excitation temperatures. Our observations are consistent with an ortho-to-para-ammonia ratio of unity, implying that the ammonia formation temperature exceeds ∼30 K. In the context of a model with a molecular ring that connects the two nuclei in Arp

  4. Treatment of effluents from ammonia plants--3. Ozonation of amines in an effluent from a reforming plant serving an ammonia complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, F G.N.D.

    1977-01-01

    The use of ozone in aqueous solutions was studied in an investigation of the oxidation of methylamines in the process condensate from an ammonia plant. Good conversion of trimethylamine to the nonodorous oxidation product could be achieved with a 1:1.5 ratio of amine to ozone when ozone passed into a packed tower through which an alkaline solution of the amine was flowing. Mono- and dimethylamine did not react as readily. The importance of a high pH value is stressed.

  5. Removal of ammonia from tarry water using a tubular furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.V. Grabko; V.A. Kofanova; V.M. Li; M.A. Solov' ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    An ammonia-processing system without the use of live steam from OAO Alchevskkoks plant's supply network is considered. Steam obtained from the wastewater that leaves the ammonia column is used to process the excess tarry water, with the release of volatile ammonia.

  6. Investigation of the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene on oxide catalysts containing molybdenum and using the response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadzhiev, K.N.; Adzhamov, K.Y.; Alkhazov, T.G.; Khanmamedova, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The response method has been used to study the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene on MoO 3 and molybdenum oxide systems containing bismuth, silicon, and phosphorous ions. The response curves obtained for ammonia, propylene, CO 2 , acrolein, acrylonitrile in these systems are discussed and compared with individual molybdenum trioxide. It has been shown that the modifying action of ammonia on the catalyst surfaces determines the direction of the oxidative conversion of the propylene

  7. Interaction of ammonia with semiconducting oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Sandeep; Sahoo, Suman Kalyan; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2018-04-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) we have investigated the adsorption of NH3 molecule on the rutile SnO2(110) and mixed Sn0.5Ti0.5O2(110) surfaces. NH3 molecule gets absorbed on the 5-coordinated Sn atom (Sn5c) of the surface in tilted mode having an additional hydrogen bond with nearby surface bridged oxygen (Obr) atom. After adsorption, 3a1 molecular orbital of ammonia undergo significant dispersal as it donates its electron to surface atoms. The adsorption energy is found to be 1.4-1.6eV. Inclusion of Ti atoms in the SnO2 lattice leads to decrease in the adsorption energy value.

  8. The transformation from anammox granules to deammonification granules in micro-aerobic system by facilitating indigenous ammonia oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gao, Dawen

    2018-02-01

    Granular deammonification process is a good way to retain aerobic and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB and anammox bacteria) and exhaust flocculent nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this study, to facilitate indigenous AOB growth on anammox granules, by stepwise reducing influent nitrite, anammox granules were effectively transformed into deammonification granules in a micro-aerobic EGSB in 100 days. Total nitrogen removal efficiency of 90% and nitrogen removal rate of 2.3 g N/L/d were reached at stable deammonification stage. High influent FA and limited oxygen supply contributed suppression for Nitrospira-like NOB. In transition stages, Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi were always dominated. Anammox abundance decreased, while AOB abundance grew fast. Anammox bacteria and AOB were dominated by Brocadia fulgida and Nitrosomonas europaea, respectively. Denitrification activity and bacteria existed although without influent organic. The final AOB abundance was about 4.55-13.8 times more than anammox bacteria abundance, with almost equal potential activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Respiratory ammonia output and blood ammonia concentration during incremental exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Huizenga, [No Value; Kort, E; van der Mark, TW; Grevink, RG; Verkerke, GJ

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the increase of ammonia concentration and lactate concentration in blood was accompanied by an increased expiration of ammonia during graded exercise. Eleven healthy subjects performed an incremental cycle ergometer test. Blood ammonia, blood lactate

  10. Hydrodynamic analysis and simulation of a flow cell ammonia electrolyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Luis A.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NH_3 electrooxidation mechanism was validated in a bench scale electrolyzer. • All kinetic parameters for NH_3 electro-oxidation were calculated and verified. • Hydrodynamic behavior of the NH_3 electrolyzer was properly described as a CSTR. • CSTR model was successfully applied to simulate a flow ammonia electrolyzer. - Abstract: The hydrodynamic analysis and simulation of a non-ideal single pass flow cell alkaline ammonia electrolyzer was performed after the scale-up of a well-characterized deposited polycrystalline Pt on Ni anode. The hydrodynamic analysis was performed using the residence time distribution (RTD) test. The results of the hydrodynamic investigation provide additional insights for the kinetic analysis of the ammonia electrooxidation reaction on polycrystalline Pt electrocatalysts -which are typically obtained under controlled flow regime, e.g., rotating disk electrode- by including the flow non-uniformity present in the electrolyzer. Based on the RTD function, the ammonia electrolyzer performance was simulated as a non-steady stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and the unknown kinetic parameters were obtained by fitting the simulation results with an experimental current profile, obtaining an adequate prediction of the ammonia conversion. This simplified approach for the simulation of the ammonia electrolyzer could be implemented in process simulation packages and could be used for the design and scale-up of the process for hydrogen production and wastewater remediation.

  11. Improving The Efficiency Of Ammonia Electrolysis For Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Ramasamy

    electrolysis. PAA-K allowed for a wider operating potential for the electrolytic cell while increasing the rate for HER at lower cell voltages. The conversion of ammonia improved from 16 % to 25 %, while the current efficiency for the consumption of ammonia increased from 92 +/- 1 % to 97 +/- 2 % by using PAA-K in lieu of KOH. The use of PAA-K also prevented the crossover of the hydrogen produced to the anode side, unlike aqueous KOH.

  12. Decreased STAT3 Phosphorylation Mediates Cell Swelling in Ammonia-Treated Astrocyte Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam R. Jayakumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain edema, due largely to astrocyte swelling, and the subsequent increase in intracranial pressure and brain herniation, are major complications of acute liver failure (ALF. Elevated level of brain ammonia has been strongly implicated in the development of astrocyte swelling associated with ALF. The means by which ammonia brings about astrocyte swelling, however, is incompletely understood. Recently, oxidative/nitrosative stress and associated signaling events, including activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, as well as activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB, have been implicated in the mechanism of ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. Since these signaling events are known to be regulated by the transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, we examined the state of STAT3 activation in ammonia-treated cultured astrocytes, and determined whether altered STAT3 activation and/or protein expression contribute to the ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. STAT3 was found to be dephosphorylated (inactivated at Tyrosine705 in ammonia-treated cultured astrocytes. Total STAT3 protein level was also reduced in ammonia-treated astrocytes. We also found a significant increase in protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type-1 (PTPRT-1 protein expression in ammonia-treated cultured astrocytes, and that inhibition of PTPRT-1 enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT3 after ammonia treatment. Additionally, exposure of cultured astrocytes to inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases diminished the ammonia-induced cell swelling, while cultured astrocytes over-expressing STAT3 showed a reduction in the astrocyte swelling induced by ammonia. Collectively, these studies strongly suggest that inactivation of STAT3 represents a critical event in the mechanism of the astrocyte swelling associated with acute liver failure.

  13. Mass transfer of ammonia escape and CO2 absorption in CO2 capture using ammonia solution in bubbling reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Shuangchen; Chen, Gongda; Zhu, Sijie; Han, Tingting; Yu, Weijing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mass transfer coefficient models of ammonia escape were built. • Influences of temperature, inlet CO 2 and ammonia concentration were studied. • Mass transfer coefficients of ammonia escape and CO 2 absorption were obtained. • Studies can provide the basic data as a reference guideline for process application. - Abstract: The mass transfer of CO 2 capture using ammonia solution in the bubbling reactor was studied; according to double film theory, the mass transfer coefficient models and interface area model were built. Through our experiments, the overall volumetric mass transfer coefficients were obtained, while the interface areas in unit volume were estimated. The volumetric mass transfer coefficients of ammonia escaping during the experiment were 1.39 × 10 −5 –4.34 × 10 −5 mol/(m 3 s Pa), and the volumetric mass transfer coefficients of CO 2 absorption were 2.86 × 10 −5 –17.9 × 10 −5 mol/(m 3 s Pa). The estimated interface area of unit volume in the bubbling reactor ranged from 75.19 to 256.41 m 2 /m 3 , making the bubbling reactor a viable choice to obtain higher mass transfer performance than the packed tower or spraying tower.

  14. Selenite protects Caenorhabditis elegans from oxidative stress via DAF-16 and TRXR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Hsuan; Shi, Yeu-Ching; Chang, Chun-Han; Huang, Chi-Wei; Hsiu-Chuan Liao, Vivian

    2014-04-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient. In the present study, trace amount of selenite (0.01 μM) was evaluated for oxidative stress resistance and potential associated factors in Caenorhabditis elegans. Selenite-treated C. elegans showed an increased survival under oxidative stress and thermal stress compared to untreated controls. Further studies demonstrated that the significant stress resistance of selenite on C. elegans could be attributed to its in vivo free radical-scavenging ability. We also found that the oxidative and thermal stress resistance phenotypes by selenite were absent from the forkhead transcription factor daf-16 mutant worms. Moreover, selenite influenced the subcellular distribution of DAF-16 in C. elegans. Furthermore, selenite increased mRNA levels of stress-resistance-related proteins, including superoxide dismutase-3 and heat shock protein-16.2. Additionally, selenite (0.01 μM) upregulated expressions of transgenic C. elegans carrying sod-3::green fluorescent protein (GFP) and hsp-16.2::GFP, whereas this effect was abolished by feeding daf-16 RNA interference in C. elegans. Finally, unlike the wild-type N2 worms, the oxidative stress resistance phenotypes by selenite were both absent from the C. elegans selenoprotein trxr-1 mutant worms and trxr-1 mutants feeding with daf-16 RNA interference. These findings suggest that the antioxidant effects of selenite in C. elegans are mediated via DAF-16 and TRXR-1. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Synthesis of ammonia directly from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rong; Irvine, John T. S.; Tao, Shanwen

    2013-01-01

    The N≡N bond (225 kcal mol−1) in dinitrogen is one of the strongest bonds in chemistry therefore artificial synthesis of ammonia under mild conditions is a significant challenge. Based on current knowledge, only bacteria and some plants can synthesise ammonia from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure. Here, for the first time, we report artificial ammonia synthesis bypassing N2 separation and H2 production stages. A maximum ammonia production rate of 1.14 × 10−5 mol m−2 s−1 has been achieved when a voltage of 1.6 V was applied. Potentially this can provide an alternative route for the mass production of the basic chemical ammonia under mild conditions. Considering climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels used for synthesis of ammonia by conventional methods, this is a renewable and sustainable chemical synthesis process for future. PMID:23362454

  16. Synthesis of ammonia directly from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rong; Irvine, John T S; Tao, Shanwen

    2013-01-01

    The N≡N bond (225 kcal mol⁻¹) in dinitrogen is one of the strongest bonds in chemistry therefore artificial synthesis of ammonia under mild conditions is a significant challenge. Based on current knowledge, only bacteria and some plants can synthesise ammonia from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure. Here, for the first time, we report artificial ammonia synthesis bypassing N₂ separation and H₂ production stages. A maximum ammonia production rate of 1.14 × 10⁻⁵ mol m⁻² s⁻¹ has been achieved when a voltage of 1.6 V was applied. Potentially this can provide an alternative route for the mass production of the basic chemical ammonia under mild conditions. Considering climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels used for synthesis of ammonia by conventional methods, this is a renewable and sustainable chemical synthesis process for future.

  17. Purification of ammonia-containing trap waters from atomic power plant by ozone treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachok, M.A.; Prokudina, S.A.; Shulyat'ev, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of research was to study the process of ozonation of ammonia-containing trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant both on the model solutions and on real ones. Different factors (pH of the medium, temperature, concentration of the initial substances) have been studied for their effect on ozonation of aqueous ammonia solutions, model solutions of trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant as well as ammonia-containing trap waters and liquid radioactive wastes delivered to special water treatment at the Kursk Atomic Power Plant. It is shown that in all the cases the highest rate of ammonia oxidation by ozone is observed in the alkaline medium (pH 1.4-11.0) and at 55 deg C. The obtained results have shown that a method of ozonation followed by evaporation of water to be purified can be used to treat ammonia-containing waters from atomic power plant

  18. Ammonia complexes of metals in aqueous solutions with high concentrations of ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padar, T.G.; Novikov, L.K.; Stupko, T.V.; Isaev, I.D.; Pashkov, G.L.; Mironov, V.E.

    1991-01-01

    Potentiometric method, glass electrodes and Bierrum function were used to study the formation of ammonia complexes of magnesium, calcium, cadmium, zinc, copper(2) and silver in 2.0 mol/dm 3 aqueous solutions of ammonia nitrate with 0-18 mol/dm 3 ammonia concentrations at 25.0 deg C. Step constants of stability of studied complexes were calculated and their compositions were determined with account of nonideal character of aqueous-salt solutions with ammonia concentrations above 1.0 mol/dm 3 . Values of correction effects on salting out ammonia action for Bierrum function in solutions with 1.0-18 mol/dm 3 ammonia concentrations were found

  19. Comparison of partial and full nitrification processes applied for treating high-strength nitrogen wastewaters: microbial ecology through nitrous oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joon Ho; Kwan, Tiffany; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-04-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the microbial ecology, gene expression, biokinetics, and N2O emissions from a lab-scale bioreactor operated sequentially in full-nitrification and partial-nitrification modes. Based on sequencing of 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes, ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) populations during full- and partial-nitrification modes were distinct from one another. The concentrations of AOB (XAOB) and their respiration rates during full- and partial-nitrification modes were statistically similar, whereas the concentrations of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (XNOB) and their respiration rates declined significantly after the switch from full- to partial-nitrification. The transition from full-nitrification to partial nitrification resulted in a protracted transient spike of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions, which later stabilized. The trends in N2O and NO emissions correlated well with trends in the expression of nirK and norB genes that code for the production of these gases in AOB. Both the transient and stabilized N2O and NO emissions during partial nitrification were statistically higher than those during steady-state full-nitrification. Based on these results, partial nitrification strategies for biological nitrogen removal, although attractive for their reduced operating costs and energy demand, may need to be optimized against the higher carbon foot-print attributed to their N2O emissions.

  20. Effect of H{sub 2}S on the catalytic decomposition of tar and ammonia with dolomite and sintered iron ore in synthetic gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepola, J [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The toluene-decomposing activity of calcined dolomite was not affected by the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas. Iron was active with respect to toluene and ammonia at metallic state. The increase of the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas (0 - 500 ppmv) decreased the tar-decomposing activity but not the ammonia- decomposing activity of sintered iron ore. (author) (12 refs.)

  1. Effect of H{sub 2}S on the catalytic decomposition of tar and ammonia with dolomite and sintered iron ore in synthetic gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepola, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The toluene-decomposing activity of calcined dolomite was not affected by the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas. Iron was active with respect to toluene and ammonia at metallic state. The increase of the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas (0 - 500 ppmv) decreased the tar-decomposing activity but not the ammonia- decomposing activity of sintered iron ore. (author) (12 refs.)

  2. Phosphazene like film formation on InP in liquid ammonia (223 K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, A.-M., E-mail: goncalves@chimie.uvsq.fr; Njel, C.; Mathieu, C.; Aureau, D.; Etcheberry, A.

    2013-07-01

    An anodic photo-galvanostatic treatment at low current density (1 μA·cm{sup −2}) is carried out on n-InP semiconductor in liquid ammonia (223 K). The gradual chemical evolution of the surface is studied as a function of the anodic charge. Proof and reproducibility of the chemical transformation of the surface are clearly evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. Like by cyclic voltammetry, the perfect coverage of the InP surface by a thin phosphazene like film is also revealed by XPS data. However, a low anodic charge (≈ 0.5 mC·cm{sup −2}) is required by photo-galvanostatic treatment while a higher anodic charge (≈ 7 mC·cm{sup −2}) is involved by cyclic voltammetry. The excess of charge could be related to ammonia oxidation during the formation of the passivating film. This result proves the electrochemical oxidation of the solvent as a determinant step of the mechanism film formation. - Highlights: ► Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic modes on n-InP in liquid ammonia (223 K). ► A thin film growth is reached by photo-anodic polarization. ► The same phosphazene like film is evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. ► An excess of charge is observed by cyclic voltammetry. ► An electrochemical oxidation step of the solvent is assumed.

  3. Ammonia volatilization from crop residues and frozen green manure crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de F.J.; Huijsmans, J.F.M.; Rutgers, B.

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural systems can lose substantial amounts of nitrogen (N). To protect the environment, the European Union (EU) has adopted several directives that set goals to limit N losses. National Emission Ceilings (NEC) are prescribed in the NEC directive for nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Crop residues

  4. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes from oil field microbial communities indicates the presence of a variety of sulfate-reducing, fermentative, and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voordouw, G; Armstrong, S M; Reimer, M F; Fouts, B; Telang, A J; Shen, Y; Gevertz, D

    1996-05-01

    Oil field bacteria were characterized by cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. A variety of gram-negative, sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected (16 members of the family Desulfovibrionaceae and 8 members of the family Desulfobacteriaceae). In contrast, a much more limited number of anaerobic, fermentative, or acetogenic bacteria was found (one Clostridium sp., one Eubacterium sp., and one Synergistes sp.). Potential sulfide oxidizers and/or microaerophiles (Thiomicrospira, Arcobacter, Campylobacter, and Oceanospirillum spp.) were also detected. The first two were prominently amplified from uncultured production water DNA and represented 28 and 47% of all clones, respectively. Growth on media containing sulfide as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor and designed for the isolation of Thiomicrospira spp. gave only significant enrichment of the Campylobacter sp., which was shown to be present in different western Canadian oil fields. This newly discovered sulfide oxidizer may provide a vital link in the oil field sulfur cycle by reoxidizing sulfide formed by microbial sulfate or sulfur reduction.

  5. Performance evaluation and microbial community analysis of the function and fate of ammonia in a sulfate-reducing EGSB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Depeng; Liu, Bo; Ding, Xinchun; Sun, Xinbo; Liang, Zi; Sheng, Shixiong; Du, Lingfeng

    2017-10-01

    Ammonia is widely distributed in sulfate-reducing bioreactor dealing with sulfate wastewater, which shows potential effect on the metabolic pathway of sulfate and ammonia. This study investigates the sulfate-reducing efficiency and microbial community composition in the sulfate-reducing EGSB reactor with the increasing ammonia loading. Results indicated that, compared with low ammonia loading (166-666 mg/L), the sulfate and organic matter removal efficiencies were improved gradually with the appropriate ammonia loading (1000-2000 mg/L), which increased from 63.58 ± 3.81 to 71.08 ± 1.36% and from 66.24 ± 1.32 to 81.88 ± 1.83%, respectively. Meanwhile, with the appropriate ratio of ammonia and sulfate (1.5-3.0) and hydraulic retention time (21 h), the sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonia oxidation (SRAO) process was occurred efficiently, inducing the accumulation of S 0 (270 mg/L) and the simultaneous ammonia removal (70.83%) in EGSB reactor. Moreover, the key sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Desulfovibrio) and denitrification bacteria (Pseudomonas and Alcaligenes) were responsible for the sulfate and nitrogen removal in these phases, which accounted for 3.66-5.54 and 3.85-9.13%, respectively. However, as the ammonia loading higher than 3000 mg/L (phases 9 and 10), the sulfate-reducing efficiency was decreased to only 28.3 ± 1.26% with the ammonia removal rate of 18.4 ± 3.37% in the EGSB reactor. Meanwhile, the predominant SRB in phases 9 and 10 were Desulfomicrobium (1.22-1.99%) and Desulfocurvus (4.0-5.46%), and the denitrification bacteria accounted for only 0.88% (phase 10), indicating the low nitrogen removal rate.

  6. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR; F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-01-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H(sub 2)S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that employ coal and natural gas and produce electric power and clean transportation fuels. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H(sub 2)S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in which the H(sub 2)S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H(sub 2)S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. Specifically, we aim to: Measure the kinetics of direct oxidation of H(sub 2)S to elemental sulfur over selective catalysts in the presence of major

  7. Formation of Hydroxylamine from Ammonia and Hydroxyl Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Lahouari; Zins, Emilie-Laure

    2014-06-01

    In the interstellar medium, as well as in icy comets, ammonia may be a crucial species in the first step toward the formation of amino-acids and other prebiotic molecules such as hydroxylamine (NH2OH). It is worth to notice that the NH3/H2 ratio in the ISM is 3 10-5 compared the H2O/H2 one which is only 7 10-5. Using either electron-UV irradiations of water-ammonia ices or successive hydrogenation of solid nitric oxide, laboratory experiments have already shown the feasibility of reactions that may take place on the surface of ice grains in molecular clouds, and may lead to the formation of this precursor. Herein is proposed a new reaction pathway involving ammonia and hydroxyl radicals generated in a microwave discharge. Experimental studies, at 3 and 10 K, in solid phase as well as in neon matrix have shown that this reaction proceed via a hydrogen abstraction, leading to the formation of NH2 radical, that further recombine with hydroxyl radical to form hydroxylamine, under non-energetic conditions.

  8. Pharmacological experiment of 13N-ammonia as PET imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingfang; Tang Ganghua; Gao Xiao; Li Zhi; Wu Hubing; Huang Zuhan; Jiang Hong; Zhong Jinmei; Wang Quanshi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the pharmacological characteristics of 13 N-ammonia, the clinical PET imaging methods of 13 N-ammonia, and its application in myocardial blood flow perfusion. Methods: The uptakes of 13 N-ammonia in the myocardium and other organs in dogs were measured by whole body scanning and chest dynamic PET scanning. The regional myocardial blood flow (rMBF) in healthy volunteers was also measured by the dynamic and static PET imaging following intravenous bolus administration of 13 N-ammonia. Results: The heart and lungs were the first-pass organs that was found out by PET imaging with 13 N-ammonia in dogs and human volunteers, the highest uptake of 13 N-ammonia in the myocardium was also observed. At 30 s after injection the radioactivity in the blood pool of left and right ventricles reached its peak, at 1 min it began to drop, and at 4-20 min after injection the lower radioactivity was kept on. Regional analysis of PET imaging showed that the myocardial uptake of 13 N-ammonia began at 10 s after injection, and the uptake in the septum wall was higher than that in the lateral wall; but in the septum wall was slightly higher than in the lateral wall at 2 min after injection. The radioactivity in the liver and lungs reached its peak at 30 s and was sharply declined hereafter. The uptake of 13 N-ammonia in the liver and lungs remained at the lower levels and the heart-to-blood, heart-to-liver and heart-to-lung ratios were above 2.0 after 5 min. Whole-body PET scanning for dogs showed that 13 N-ammonia was distributed primarily in the organs with rich blood flow and its clearance was observed in the kidney. The images of regional myocardial blood flow (rMBF) acquired from the dynamic or static PET imaging following intravenous bolus administration of 13 N-ammonia were of no difference. Conclusions: The analysis of distribution of 13 N-ammonia indicates that the heart-to-blood, heart-to-liver and heat-to-lung ratios were high and the PET images were clear

  9. Ammonia in Jupiter’s troposphere from high-resolution 5-micron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Rohini; Fletcher, Leigh; Irwin, Patrick; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Jupiter's tropospheric ammonia (NH3) abundance is studied using spatially-resolved 5-micron observations from CRIRES, a high-resolution spectrometer at the Very Large Telescope in 2012. The high resolving power (R=96,000) allows the line shapes of three NH3 absorption features to be resolved. These three absorption features have different line strengths and probe slightly different pressure levels, and they can therefore be used to constrain the vertical profile of NH3 in the 1-4 bar pressure range. The instrument slit was aligned north-south along Jupiter's central meridian, allowing us to search for latitudinal variability. The CRIRES observations do not provide evidence for belt-zone variability in NH3, as any spectral differences can be accounted for by the large differences in cloud opacity between the cloudy zones and the cloud-free belts. However, we do find evidence for localised small-scale variability in NH3. Specifically, we detect a strong enhancement in NH3 on the southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt (4-6°N). This is consistent with the ‘ammonia plumes’ observed by Fletcher et al. (2016, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.06.008) at the 500-mbar level using 10-micron observations from TEXES/IRTF, as well as with measurements by Juno’s Microwave Radiometer (Li et al. 2017, doi:10.1002/2017GL073159).

  10. Visible bands of ammonia: band strengths, curves of growth, and the spatial distribution of ammonia on Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, B.L.; Owen, T.

    1980-01-01

    We report room-temperature laboratory studies of the 5520 A (6ν 1 ) and 6475 A (5ν 1 ) bands of self-broadened ammonia at column densities ranging from 1.7--435.7 meter-amagats (m-am). Detailed equivalent-width measurements at 24 different pressure-pathlength combinations corresponding to four pressures between 44 and 689 torr and pathlengths between 32 and 512 m are used to determin curves of growth and integrated band strengths. The band strengths for the 6ν 1 and 5ν 1 overtones are 5520 A: S=0.096 +- 0.005 cm -1 (m-am) -1 and 6475 A: S=0.63 +- 0.03 cm -1 (m-am) -1 , respectively.Using these band strengths and curves of growth, we analyze new spatially resolved spectra of Jupiter showing a nonhomogeneous distribution of ammonia in the Jovian atmosphere. The observed variations in the CH 4 /NH 3 mixing ratio are interpreted as evidence of altitude-dependent depletion of ammonia in the atmosphere

  11. The kinetics for ammonium and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinyu; Xiao, Pengying; Zhang, Daijun; Lu, Peili; Yao, Zongbao; He, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics for ammonium (NH4(+)) oxidation and nitrite (NO2(-)) oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were studied by respirometry using the nitrifying sludge from a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor. Modified models were used to estimate kinetics parameters of ammonia and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine. An inhibition effect of hydroxylamine on the ammonia oxidation was observed under different hydroxylamine concentration levels. The self-inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine oxidation and noncompetitive inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine for nitrite oxidation was estimated by simulating exogenous oxygen-uptake rate profiles, respectively. The inhibitive effect of NH2OH on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria was stronger than on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. This work could provide fundamental data for the kinetic investigation of the nitrification process.

  12. Ammonia synthesis at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    have been carried out to evaluate its feasibility. The calculations suggest that it might be possible to catalytically produce ammonia from molecular nitrogen at low temperatures and pressures, in particular if energy is fed into the process electrochemically. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics.......Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of reaction paths and energies for the industrial and the biological catalytic ammonia synthesis processes are compared. The industrial catalyst is modeled by a ruthenium surface, while the active part of the enzyme is modeled by a MoFe6S9 complex...

  13. Abundance and activity of 16S rRNA, amoA and nifH bacterial genes during assisted phytostabilization of mine tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karis N.; Neilson, Julia W.; Root, Robert A.; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mine tailings in semiarid regions are highly susceptible to erosion and are sources of dust pollution and potential avenues of human exposure to toxic metals. One constraint to revegetation of tailings by phytostabilization is the absence of microbial communities critical for biogeochemical cycling of plant nutrients. The objective of this study was to evaluate specific genes as in situ indicators of biological soil response during phytoremediation. The abundance and activity of 16S rRNA, nifH, and amoA were monitored during a nine month phytostabilization study using buffalo grass and quailbush grown in compost-amended, metalliferous tailings. The compost amendment provided a greater than 5-log increase in bacterial abundance, and survival of this compost-inoculum was more stable in planted treatments. Despite increased abundance, the activity of the introduced community was low, and significant increases were not detected until six and nine months in quailbush, and unplanted compost and buffalo grass treatments, respectively. In addition, increased abundances of nitrogen-fixation (nifH) and ammonia-oxidizing (amoA) genes were observed in rhizospheres of buffalo grass and quailbush, respectively. Thus, plant establishment facilitated the short term stabilization of introduced bacterial biomass and supported the growth of two key nitrogen-cycling populations in compost-amended tailings. PMID:25495940

  14. Abundance and Activity of 16S rRNA, AmoA and NifH Bacterial Genes During Assisted Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karis N; Neilson, Julia W; Root, Robert A; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M

    2015-01-01

    Mine tailings in semiarid regions are highly susceptible to erosion and are sources of dust pollution and potential avenues of human exposure to toxic metals. One constraint to revegetation of tailings by phytostabilization is the absence of microbial communities critical for biogeochemical cycling of plant nutrients. The objective of this study was to evaluate specific genes as in situ indicators of biological soil response during phytoremediation. The abundance and activity of 16S rRNA, nifH, and amoA were monitored during a nine month phytostabilization study using buffalo grass and quailbush grown in compost-amended, metalliferous tailings. The compost amendment provided a greater than 5-log increase in bacterial abundance, and survival of this compost-inoculum was more stable in planted treatments. Despite increased abundance, the activity of the introduced community was low, and significant increases were not detected until six and nine months in quailbush, and unplanted compost and buffalo grass treatments, respectively. In addition, increased abundances of nitrogen-fixation (nifH) and ammonia-oxidizing (amoA) genes were observed in rhizospheres of buffalo grass and quailbush, respectively. Thus, plant establishment facilitated the short term stabilization of introduced bacterial biomass and supported the growth of two key nitrogen-cycling populations in compost-amended tailings.

  15. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venterea, R. T.; Sadowsky, M.; Breuillin-Sessoms, F.; Wang, P.; Clough, T. J.; Coulter, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted 'hot spots' and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils ('L' and 'W') having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  16. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  17. Orion Ammonia Boiler System Preflight Test Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Julia L.

    2017-01-01

    The Environmental Controls and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) branch at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is currently undergoing preparations for ground testing of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to prepare its subsystems for EM-1 (Exploration Mission-1). EM-1, Orions second unmanned flight, is a three-week long lunar mission during which the vehicle will complete a 6-day retrograde lunar orbit before returning to Earth. This paper focuses on the work done during the authors 16-week internship with the Mechanical Engineering Branch of KSCs Engineering Directorate. The authors project involved assisting with the preparations for testing the Orion MPCVs ammonia boiler system. The purpose of the ammonia boiler system is to keep the spacecraft sufficiently cool during the reentry portion of its mission, from service module (SM) separation to post-landing. This system is critical for keeping both the spacecraft (avionics and electronics) and crew alive during reentry, thus a successful test of the system is essential to the success of EM-1. XXXX The author was able to draft a detailed outline of the procedure for the ammonia system functional test. More work will need to be done on the vehicle power-up and power-down portions of the procedure, but the ammonia system testing portion of the procedure is thorough and includes vehicle test configurations, vehicle commands, and GSE. The author was able to compile a substantial list of questions regarding the ammonia system functional test with the help of her mentors. A significant number of these questions were answered in the teleconferences with Lockheed Martin.

  18. Effect of 2 Bedding Materials on Ammonia Levels in Individually Ventilated Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Jason M; Kumsher, David M; Kelly, Richard; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify an optimal rodent bedding and cage-change interval to establish standard procedures for the IVC in our rodent vivarium. Disposable cages were prefilled with either corncob or α-cellulose bedding and were used to house 2 adult Sprague-Dawley rats (experimental condition) or contained no animals (control). Rats were observed and intracage ammonia levels measured daily for 21 d. Intracage ammonia accumulation became significant by day 8 in experimental cages containing α-cellulose bedding, whereas experimental cages containing corncob bedding did not reach detectable levels of ammonia until day 14. In all 3 experimental cages containing α-cellulose, ammonia exceeded 100 ppm (our maximum acceptable limit) by day 11. Two experimental corncob cages required changing at days 16 and 17, whereas the remaining cage containing corncob bedding lasted the entire 21 d without reaching the 100-ppm ammonia threshold. These data suggests that corncob bedding provides nearly twice the service life of α-cellulose bedding in the IVC system.

  19. Rutile vanadium antimonates. A new class of catalysts for selective reduction of NO with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazdil, James F.; Ebner, Ann M.; Cavalcanti, Fernando A.P. [BP Chemicals Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a new class of vanadium containing oxide catalysts that are active and selective for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia. Vanadium antimony oxide based catalysts were found to be effective in the conversion of NO with little or no ammonia slippage when tested using gas mixtures containing between 300 and 700ppm NO. X-ray diffraction analyses of the catalysts show that the dominant phase present in the catalyst is vanadium antimonate having a defect rutile crystal structure. The catalysts are active and selective in the ranges of 400-460C and gas hourly space velocities of 3000-8000h{sup -1}

  20. Phylogenetic diversity and spatial distribution of the microbial community associated with the Caribbean deep-water sponge Polymastia cf. corticata by 16S rRNA, aprA, and amoA gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2008-08-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S rRNA, aprA, and amoA genes demonstrated that a phylogenetically diverse and complex microbial community was associated with the Caribbean deep-water sponge Polymastia cf. corticata Ridley and Dendy, 1887. From the 38 archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA phylotypes identified, 53% branched into the sponge-specific, monophyletic sequence clusters determined by previous studies (considering predominantly shallow-water sponge species), whereas 26% appeared to be P. cf. corticata specifically associated microorganisms ("specialists"); 21% of the phylotypes were confirmed to represent seawater- and sediment-derived proteobacterial species ("contaminants") acquired by filtration processes from the host environment. Consistently, the aprA and amoA gene-based analyses indicated the presence of environmentally derived sulfur- and ammonia-oxidizers besides putative sponge-specific sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and a sulfate-reducing archaeon. A sponge-specific, endosymbiotic sulfur cycle as described for marine oligochaetes is proposed to be also present in P. cf. corticata. Overall, the results of this work support the recent studies that demonstrated the sponge species specificity of the associated microbial community while the biogeography of the host collection site has only a minor influence on the composition. In P. cf. corticata, the specificity of the sponge-microbe associations is even extended to the spatial distribution of the microorganisms within the sponge body; distinct bacterial populations were associated with the different tissue sections, papillae, outer and inner cortex, and choanosome. The local distribution of a phylotype within P. cf. corticata correlated with its (1) phylogenetic affiliation, (2) classification as sponge-specific or nonspecifically associated microorganism, and (3) potential ecological role in the host sponge.

  1. ThermoEnergy Ammonia Recovery Process for Municipal and Agricultural Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex G. Fassbender

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ammonia Recovery Process (ARP is an award-winning, low-cost, environmentally responsible method of recovering nitrogen, in the form of ammonia, from various dilute waste streams and converting it into concentrated ammonium sulfate. The ThermoEnergy Biogas System utilizes the new chemisorption-based ARP to recover ammonia from anaerobically digested wastes. The process provides for optimal biogas production and significantly reduced nitrogen levels in the treated water discharge. Process flows for the ammonia recovery and ThermoEnergy biogas processes are presented and discussed. A comparison with other techniques such as biological nitrogen removal is made. The ARP technology uses reversible chemisorption and double salt crystal precipitation to recover and concentrate the ammonia. The ARP technology was successfully proven in a recent large-scale field demonstration at New York City’s Oakwood Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant, located on Staten Island. This project was a joint effort with Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation, the Civil Engineering Research Foundation, and New York City Department of Environmental Protection. Independent validated plant data show that ARP consistently recovers up to 99.9% of the ammonia from the city’s centrate waste stream (derived from dewatering of sewage sludge, as ammonium sulfate. ARP technology can reduce the nitrogen (ammonia discharged daily into local bodies of water by municipalities, concentrated animal farming operations, and industry. Recent advances to ARP enhance its performance and economic competitiveness in comparison to stripping or ammonia destruction technologies.

  2. Metabolic fate of 13N-labeled ammonia in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, A.J.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Gelbard, A.S.; Gledhill, R.F.; Duffy, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    After infusion of physiological concentrations of [ 13 N]ammonia for 10 min via one internal carotid artery, the relative specific activities of glutamate, glutamine (α-amino), and glutamine (amide) in rat brain were approximately 1:5:400, respectively. Analysis of metabolites, after infusion of [ 13 N]ammonia into one lateral cerebral ventricle, indicated that ammonia entering the brain from the cerebrospinal fluid is also metabolized in a small glutamate pool. Pretreatment with methionine sulfoximine led to a decrease in the label present in brain glutamine following carotid artery infusion of [ 13 N]ammonia. 13 N activity in brain glutamate was greater than in the α-amino group of glutamine. The amount of label recovered in the right cerebral hemisphere, 5 s after a rapid bolus injection of [ 13 N]ammonia via the right common carotid artery, was independent of concentration within the bolus over a 1000-fold range indicating that ammonia enters the brain largely by diffusion. In normal rats approximately 60% of the label recovered in brain was incorporated into glutamine, indicating that the t 1 /sub// 2 for conversion of ammonia to glutamine in the small pool is in the range of 1 to 3 s or less. The data emphasize the importance of the small pool glutamine synthetase as a metabolic trap for the detoxification of blood-borne and endogenously produced brain ammonia. The possibility that the astrocytes represent the anatomical site of the small pool is considered

  3. Hydrogen generation from deliquescence of ammonia borane using Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chang-Chen; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen generation from the catalyzed deliquescence/hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB) using the Ni-Co catalyst supported on the graphene oxide (Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst) under the conditions of limited water supply was studied with the molar feed ratio of water to ammonia borane (denoted as H2O/AB) at 2.02, 3.97 and 5.93, respectively. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane to hydrogen was estimated both from the cumulative volume of the hydrogen gas generated and the conversion of boron chemistry in the hydrolysates analyzed by the solid-state 11B NMR. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane could reach nearly 100% under excess water dosage, that is, H2O/AB = 3.97 and 5.93. Notably, the hydrogen storage capacity could reach as high as 6.5 wt.% in the case with H2O/AB = 2.02. The hydrolysates of ammonia borane in the presence of Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst were mainly the mixture of boric acid and metaborate according to XRD, FT-IR and solid-state 11B NMR analyses.

  4. Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Oxidation of Dimethylamine: The Reaction Pathway and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kachina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO and thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO of dimethylamine (DMA on titanium dioxide was studied in a continuous flow simple tubular reactor. Volatile PCO products of DMA included ammonia, formamide, carbon dioxide, and water. Ammonia was further oxidized in minor amounts to nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Effective at 573 K, TCO resulted in the formation of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. The PCO kinetic data fit well to the monomolecular Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, whereas TCO kinetic behaviour matched the first-order process. No deactivation of the photocatalyst during the multiple long-run experiments was observed.

  5. A novel technique for hydrogen production from hog-manure in supercritical partial oxidation (SCWPO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youssef, Emhemmed A.; Charpentier, Paul [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Nakhla, George [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the catalytic hydrogen production from hog manure using supercritical water partial oxidation was investigated in a batch reactor at a temperature of 500 C, and pressure of 28 MPa using several metallic catalysts. Hog manure was characterized by a total and soluble chemical oxygen demand (TCOD, SCOD) of 57000 and 28000 mg/L, total and volatile suspended solids (TSS, VSS) of 25000, 19000, and ammonia of 2400 mg/L, respectively. The order of H{sub 2} production was the following: Pd/AC > Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Ru/AC > AC > NaOH. The order of COD reduction efficiency was as follows: NaOH > Ru/AC > AC > Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pd/AC. The behaviour of the volatile fatty acids (VFA's), ethanol, methanol, ammonia, H{sub 2}S, and Sulfate was investigated experimentally and discussed. A 35 % reduction in the H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} yields was observed in the sequential gasification partial oxidation (oxidant at an 80 % of theoretical requirement) experiments compared to the gasification experiments (catalyst only). Moreover, this reduction in gas yields was coincided with a 45 % reduction in the liquid effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), 60 % reduction of the ammonia concentration in the liquid effluent, and 20 % reduction in the H{sub 2}S concentration in the effluent gas. (orig.)

  6. Hybrid process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W.R.; Sprague, B.N.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a process for reducing the nitrogen oxide concentration in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing into the effluent a first treatment agent comprising a nitrogenous composition selected from the group consisting of urea, ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, NH{sub 4}-lignosulfonate, fur-furylamine, tetrahydrofurylamine, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1.1{prime}-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, calcium cyanamide, and mixtures thereof under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides concentration and ensure the presence of ammonia in the effluent; introducing into the effluent a second treatment agent comprising an oxygenated hydrocarbon at an effluent temperature of about 500{degrees} F. to about 1600{degrees} F. under conditions effective to oxidize nitric oxide in the effluent to nitrogen dioxide and ensure the presence of ammonia at a weight ratio of ammonia to nitrogen dioxide of about 1:5 to about 5:1; and contacting the effluent with an aqueous scrubbing solution having a pH of 12 or lower under conditions effective to cause nitrogen dioxide to be absorbed therein.

  7. Investigation of the degradation mechanism of catalytic wires during oxidation of ammonia process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pura, Jarosław; Wieciński, Piotr; Kwaśniak, Piotr; Zwolińska, Marta; Garbacz, Halina; Zdunek, Joanna; Laskowski, Zbigniew; Gierej, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Degradation mechanisms of precious metal catalytic gauzes is proposed. • Significant change of gauzes morphology and chemical composition was observed. • Samples were analyzed using SEM, EDS and micro-XCT techniques. - Abstract: The most common catalysts for the ammonia oxidation process are 80 μm diameter platinum-rhodium wires knitted or woven into the form of a gauze. In an aggressive environment and under extreme conditions (temperature 800–900 °C, intensive gas flow, high pressure) precious elements are drained from the surface of the wires. Part of this separated material quickly decomposes on the surface in the form of characteristic “cauliflower-shape protrusions”. The rest of the platinum is captured by palladium-nickel catalytic-capture gauzes located beneath. In our investigation we focused on the effects of the degradation of gauzes from one industrial catalytic system. The aim of the study was to compare the degree and the mechanism of degradation of gauzes from a different part of the reactor. The study covered PtRh7 catalytic and PdNi5 catalytic-capture gauzes. X-ray computer microtomography investigation revealed that despite strong differences in morphology, each Pt-Rh wire has a similar specific surface area. This indicates that the oxidation process and morphological changes of the wires occur in a self-regulating balance, resulting in the value of the specific surface area of the catalyst. Microtomography analysis of Pd-Ni wires revealed strong redevelopment of the wires’ surface, which is related to the platinum capture phenomenon. Scanning electron microscope observations also revealed the nanostructure in the cauliflower-shape protrusions and large grains in the wires’ preserved cores. The high temperature in the reactor and the long-term nature of the process do not favor the occurrence of the nanostructure in this type of material. Further and detailed analysis of this phenomena will provide a better

  8. Investigation of the degradation mechanism of catalytic wires during oxidation of ammonia process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pura, Jarosław, E-mail: jaroslawpura@gmail.com [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wieciński, Piotr; Kwaśniak, Piotr; Zwolińska, Marta; Garbacz, Halina; Zdunek, Joanna [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Laskowski, Zbigniew; Gierej, Maciej [Precious Metal Mint, Weteranów 95, 05-250 Radzymin (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Degradation mechanisms of precious metal catalytic gauzes is proposed. • Significant change of gauzes morphology and chemical composition was observed. • Samples were analyzed using SEM, EDS and micro-XCT techniques. - Abstract: The most common catalysts for the ammonia oxidation process are 80 μm diameter platinum-rhodium wires knitted or woven into the form of a gauze. In an aggressive environment and under extreme conditions (temperature 800–900 °C, intensive gas flow, high pressure) precious elements are drained from the surface of the wires. Part of this separated material quickly decomposes on the surface in the form of characteristic “cauliflower-shape protrusions”. The rest of the platinum is captured by palladium-nickel catalytic-capture gauzes located beneath. In our investigation we focused on the effects of the degradation of gauzes from one industrial catalytic system. The aim of the study was to compare the degree and the mechanism of degradation of gauzes from a different part of the reactor. The study covered PtRh7 catalytic and PdNi5 catalytic-capture gauzes. X-ray computer microtomography investigation revealed that despite strong differences in morphology, each Pt-Rh wire has a similar specific surface area. This indicates that the oxidation process and morphological changes of the wires occur in a self-regulating balance, resulting in the value of the specific surface area of the catalyst. Microtomography analysis of Pd-Ni wires revealed strong redevelopment of the wires’ surface, which is related to the platinum capture phenomenon. Scanning electron microscope observations also revealed the nanostructure in the cauliflower-shape protrusions and large grains in the wires’ preserved cores. The high temperature in the reactor and the long-term nature of the process do not favor the occurrence of the nanostructure in this type of material. Further and detailed analysis of this phenomena will provide a better

  9. EFFICIENCY OF PRE-TREATMENT OF LEACHATE FROM MUNICIPAL WASTE DUMPS BY GASEOUS DESORPTION (STRIPPING OF AMMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Koc-Jurczyk

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the efficiency of pre-treatment of landfill leachate by gaseous desorption of ammonia. The research was done on a municipal non-hazardous waste dump in Krosno (Sub-Carpathian Province, Poland. The pretreatment provided a favorable BOD5/COD ratio in leachate. Also concentrations of 16 PAHs and heavy metals did not exceed the legal limits. However, gaseous desorption of ammonia was insufficiently efficient in recovering ammonia nitrogen from leachate.

  10. Nitrite oxidizing bacteria for water treatment in coastal aquaculture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorak, S.; Rakkhiaw, S.; Limjirakhajornt, K.; Uppabullung, A.; Keawtawee, T.; Sangnoi, Y.

    2018-04-01

    This research aimed to isolate and characterize nitrite oxidizing bacteria and to study their capability for water quality improvement. Fourteen strains of bacteria with nitrite-oxidizing character were isolated after 21 days of enrichment in Pep-Beef-NOB medium contained NaNO2. Two strains, SF-1 and SF-5, showed highest nitrite removal rate for 42.42% and 37.2%, respectively. These strains were determined an efficiency of open-system wastewater treatment for 14 days. The results showed that control, SF-1 and SF-5 had remove ammonia from day 1 to day 6. At the end of the study, ammonia was removed by the control, SF-1 and SF-5 for 81.27%, 70.1% and 69.82%, respectively. Nitrite concentration was lowest at day 8 with removal rate of 98.73%, 98.3% and 97.24% from control, SF-1 and SF-5, respectively. However, nitrite concentration in control experiment was increased again at day 11 whereas in SF-1 and SF-5 were increased at day 13. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) was decreased by 77.78%, 73.50% and 78.63% in the control, SF-1 and SF-5, respectively. Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) in the control, SF-1 and SF-5 were reduced by 85.92%, 79.53% and 82.09%, respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene, SF-1 and SF-5 were identified as Bacillus vietnamensis and B. firmus, respectively.

  11. Ammonia chemistry at SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, J. W.; Seong, G. W.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, W. C.; Choi, B. S.; Kim, J. P.; Lee, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia is used as the pH control agent of primary water at SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Some of this ammonia is decomposed to hydrogen and nitrogen by radiation in the reactor core. The produced hydrogen gas is used for the removal of dissolved oxygen in the coolant. Some of nitrogen gas in pressurizer is dissolved into the primary water. Because ammonia, hydrogen and nitrogen which is produced by ammonia radiolysis are exist in the coolant at SMART, ammonia chemistry at SMART is different with lithium-boron chemistry at commercial PWR. In this study, the pH characteristics of ammonia and the solubility characteristics of hydrogen and nytrogen were analyzed for the management of primary water chemistry at SMART

  12. Ammonia slip measurements on ships with NO{sub x} converters. A study of different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridell, Erik; Steen, Erica (IVL, Goeteborg (SE))

    2007-12-15

    A number of techniques to measure the concentration of ammonia in exhaust gas have been evaluated. The objective is to obtain reliable methods for measuring ammonia slip from ships equipped with SCR systems for cleaning of nitrogen oxide emissions. The methods tested are FTIR, laser absorption, a wet chemical method and a method where ammonia is oxidised into NO{sub x} over a catalyst. The laser method is an in-situ technique, where the transmitter and receiver are positioned on opposite flanges at the exhaust channel, while the other methods are ex-situ, i. e., a probe volume of gas is taken from the exhaust channel into the instrumentation. The laser method worked well in the field studies and gave results with high sensitivity and good time resolution. FTIR did not work well for low concentrations. The time resolution is good but with a delay. In cases with an uneven distribution of ammonia throughout the exhaust channel, the concentration will vary depending on the location of the probe. A strong influence of the oxygen concentration on the observed ammonia concentration was found in the laboratory study. The wet chemical method gave reliable results. The time resolution is poor and the method is sensitive to uneven distribution in the exhaust channel. The method with the oxidation catalyst worked well in the lab but not in field where the catalyst was deactivated, probably by sulphur

  13. Uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use as catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Soraya Maria Rizzo da

    1996-01-01

    The preoccupation to have a secure destination for metallic uranium scraps and wastes and to search new non-nuclear uses for the huge amount of depleted metal uranium accumulated at the nuclear industry encouraged the study of the uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use. The use of uranium sesqui nitride as a catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia for the hydrogen production has enormous significance. One of the most important nuclear cycle step is the reduction of the higher uranium oxides for the production of uranium dioxide and its conversion to uranium tetrafluoride. The reduction of the UO 3 and U 3 O 8 oxides is accomplished by the gas-solid reaction with elementary hydrogen. For economical purposes and for the safety concern the nuclear industry prefers to manufacture the hydrogen gas at the local and at the moment of use, exploring the catalytic decomposition of ammonia vapor. Using metallic uranium scraps as the raw material the obtention of its nitride was achieved by the reaction with ammonia. The results of the chemical and physical characterization of the prepared uranium sesqui nitride and its behavior as a catalyst for the cracking of ammonia are commented. A lower ammonia cracking temperature (550 deg C) using the uranium sesqui nitride compared with recommended industrial catalysts iron nitride (650 deg C) and manganese nitride (700 deg C) sounds reliable and economically advantageous. (author)

  14. Cooling-water chlorination: the kinetics of chlorine, bromine, and ammonia in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.D.; Inman, G.W. Jr.; Trofe, T.W.

    1982-11-01

    The major inorganic reaction pathways for the chlorination of saline waters were measured by a variety of techniques including: (1) amperometric titration, (2) amperometric membrane covered electrode, (3) uv spectrophotometry, (4) conventional kinetics methods for slow reactions, and (5) stopped-flow kinetics measurements with a microcomputer data acquisition system. The major reactions studied were: (1) the competitive reactions of ammonia and bromide ion with hypochlorous acid, (2) bromide oxidation by hypochlorous acid, (3) monochloramine formation in sea water, (4) monobromamine formation and subsequent disproportionation to form dibromamine, and (5) monochloramine oxidation of bromide to form bromochloramine. Reaction rates were determined in sodium chloride and sea water as a function of reactant concentration, pH, salinity, and ammonia concentration. Rate constants and corresponding rate laws and mechanisms were developed for each reaction

  15. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions from California high-rise layer houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X.-J.; Cortus, E. L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, S.; Heber, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are hazardous substances that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through community right-to-know legislation (EPCRA, EPA, 2011). The emissions of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide from large commercial layer facilities are of concern to legislators and nearby neighbors. Particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) released from layer houses are two of seven criteria pollutants for which EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards as required by the Clean Air Act. Therefore, it is important to quantify the baseline emissions of these pollutants. The emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and PM from two California high-rise layer houses were monitored for two years from October 2007 to October 2009. Each house had 32,500 caged laying hens. The monitoring site was setup in compliance with a U.S. EPA-approved quality assurance project plan. The results showed the average daily mean emission rates of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide were 0.95 ± 0.67 (standard deviation) g d -1 bird -1, 1.27 ± 0.78 mg d -1 bird -1 and 91.4 ± 16.5 g d -1 bird -1, respectively. The average daily mean emission rates of PM 2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) were 5.9 ± 12.6, 33.4 ± 27.4, and 78.0 ± 42.7 mg d -1 bird -1, respectively. It was observed that ammonia emission rates in summer were lower than in winter because the high airflow stabilized the manure by drying it. The reductions due to lower moisture content were greater than the increases due to higher temperature. However, PM 10 emission rates in summer were higher than in winter because the drier conditions coupled with higher internal air velocities increased PM 10 release from feathers, feed and manure.

  16. Basics of ammonia slip measurement at the flue gas exit of boilers; Grundlagen zur Ammoniak-Schlupfmessung am Kesselende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Sascha [IBK-Verfahrenstechnik, Bad Berka (Germany); Krueger, Joerg [VWT Ing.-Buero, Schwandorf (Germany); Karau, Friedrich [Industrieberatung Karau, Wetzlar (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    When using SNCR in WtE-, biomass- and RDF combustion plants, it is not only the reduction rate of nitrogen oxide in the flue gas which is important to control but also the adherence to the limiting values for ammonia slip. Ammonia concentration in the flue gas upstream of stack is of course always in the operators' focus as limiting values have to be hold. Measuring ammonia in the flue gas downstream of boiler is not trivial due to behaviour of ammonia which occurs in bonded state (compounds) in significant amounts also at flue gas temperatures above 400 C. Ammonia compounds can occur on one hand as chemical compounds e.g. to chlorine as ammonium chlorine (chemical bonding) and on the other hand they can occur bonded to surfaces (physically adsorbed). Basic additives of the dry and quasi dry flue gas treatment cause the fractional release of bounded ammonia, therefore, after flue gas treatment, the ammonia slip can be partially measured. (orig.)

  17. Expanded metabolic versatility of ubiquitous nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Albertsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    , we identified ecophysiological traits that contribute to the ecological success of Nitrospira. Unexpectedly, N. moscoviensis possesses genes coding for a urease and cleaves urea to ammonia and CO2. Ureolysis was not observed yet in nitrite oxidizers and enables N. moscoviensis to supply ammonia...... oxidizers lacking urease with ammonia from urea, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. The presence of highly similar urease genes in Nitrospira lenta from activated sludge, in metagenomes from soils and freshwater habitats, and of other ureases in marine nitrite oxidizers...

  18. Ammonia Levels and Hepatic Encephalopathy in Patients with Known Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, Jacob; Feldman, Leonard

    2017-08-01

    Ammonia is predominantly generated in the gut by intestinal bacteria and enzymes and detoxified primarily in the liver. Since the 1930s, ammonia has been identified as the principal culprit in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Many physicians utilize serum ammonia to diagnose, assess severity, and determine the resolution of HE in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) despite research showing that ammonia levels are unhelpful in all of these clinical circumstances. HE in patients with CLD is a clinical diagnosis of exclusion that should not be based on ammonia levels. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  19. Catalytic/non-catalytic combination process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luftglass, B.K.; Sun, W.H.; Hofmann, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing a nitrogenous treatment agent comprising urea, one or more of the hydrolysis products of urea, ammonia, compounds which produce ammonia as a by-product, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, or mixtures thereof into the effluent at an effluent temperature between about 1200 degrees F and about 2100 degrees F; and contacting the treated effluent under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides in the effluent with a catalyst effective for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia

  20. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog /sup 14/C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism.

  1. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog 14 C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism

  2. The genome and genetics of a high oxidative stress tolerant Serratia sp. LCN16 isolated from the plant parasitic nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Claudia S L; Nascimento, Francisco X; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Cock, Peter J A; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2016-04-23

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) is a worldwide threat to pine forests, and is caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN) Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Bacteria are known to be associated with PWN and may have an important role in PWD. Serratia sp. LCN16 is a PWN-associated bacterium, highly resistant to oxidative stress in vitro, and which beneficially contributes to the PWN survival under these conditions. Oxidative stress is generated as a part of the basal defense mechanism used by plants to combat pathogenic invasion. Here, we studied the biology of Serratia sp. LCN16 through genome analyses, and further investigated, using reverse genetics, the role of two genes directly involved in the neutralization of H2O2, namely the H2O2 transcriptional factor oxyR; and the H2O2-targeting enzyme, catalase katA. Serratia sp. LCN16 is phylogenetically most closely related to the phytosphere group of Serratia, which includes S. proteamaculans, S. grimessi and S. liquefaciens. Likewise, Serratia sp. LCN16 shares many features with endophytes (plant-associated bacteria), such as genes coding for plant polymer degrading enzymes, iron uptake/transport, siderophore and phytohormone synthesis, aromatic compound degradation and detoxification enzymes. OxyR and KatA are directly involved in the high tolerance to H2O2 of Serratia sp. LCN16. Under oxidative stress, Serratia sp. LCN16 expresses katA independently of OxyR in contrast with katG which is under positive regulation of OxyR. Serratia sp. LCN16 mutants for oxyR (oxyR::int(614)) and katA (katA::int(808)) were sensitive to H2O2 in relation with wild-type, and both failed to protect the PWN from H2O2-stress exposure. Moreover, both mutants showed different phenotypes in terms of biofilm production and swimming/swarming behaviors. This study provides new insights into the biology of PWN-associated bacteria Serratia sp. LCN16 and its extreme resistance to oxidative stress conditions, encouraging further research on the potential role of this

  3. Acid wash scrubbing as a countermeasure for ammonia emissions from a postcombustion CO2 Capture Plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Huizinga, A.; Jurado Lopez, C.; Sanchez Sanchez, C.; Miguel Mercader, F. de; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    Amine-based absorption-desorption processes are considered to be the state-of-the-art technology for CO2 capture. However, the typical amines used are susceptible to oxidative and thermal degradation. Ammonia is formed as a result of oxidative solvent degradation. Because of the volatility of

  4. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  5. Distribution and abundance of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers in the sediments of the Dongjiang River, a drinking water supply for Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Xia, Chunyu; Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Wang, Aijie; Sun, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) play important roles in nitrification. However, limited information about the characteristics of AOA and AOB in the river ecosystem is available. The distribution and abundance of AOA and AOB in the sediments of the Dongjiang River, a drinking water source for Hong Kong, were investigated by clone library analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Group 1.1b- and Group 1.1b-associated sequences of AOA predominated in sediments with comparatively high carbon and nitrogen contents (e.g. total carbon (TC) >13 g kg(-1) sediment, NH4(+)-N >144 mg kg(-1) sediment), while Group 1.1a- and Group 1.1a-associated sequences were dominant in sediments with opposite conditions (e.g. TC <4 g kg(-1) sediment, NH4(+)-N <93 mg kg(-1) sediment). Although Nitrosomonas- and Nitrosospira-related sequences of AOB were detected in the sediments, nearly 70% of the sequences fell into the Nitrosomonas-like B cluster, suggesting similar sediment AOB communities along the river. Higher abundance of AOB than AOA was observed in almost all of the sediments in the Dongjiang River, while significant correlations were only detected between the distribution of AOA and the sediment pH and TC, which suggested that AOA responded more sensitively than AOB to variations of environmental factors. These results extend our knowledge about the environmental responses of ammonia oxidizers in the river ecosystem.

  6. Current as an indicator of ammonia concentration during wastewater treatment in an integrated microbial electrolysis cell - Nitrification system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2018-01-01

    with synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater. A good linear relationship (R2 = 0.9419) was observed between current (0.5130–3.906 mA) and ammonia levels (0–62.1 mg NH4+-N/L). Such linear relationship was always obtained regardless of the tested external power supply or wastewater pH. The external electrochemical cell......A key challenge for ammonia monitoring during nitrogen removal process is the extra cost and toxic reagent consuming. Herein the feasibility of current generated by an integrated microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) - nitrification reactor as an indicator of initial ammonia levels (NH3/NH4......+) in wastewater was explored. In this loop system, ammonia was first oxidized to nitrate in the nitrification reactor, and then the effluent was introduced into the cathode of MEC where nitrate was reduced as electron acceptor. The correlation between current and ammonia concentration was first investigated...

  7. Effects of chronic ammonia exposure on ammonia metabolism and excretion in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Na; Zhu, Limei; Guo, Zhiqiang; Yi, Meisheng; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Ammonia is highly toxic to aquatic organisms, but whether ammonia excretion or ammonia metabolism to less toxic compounds is the major strategy for detoxification in marine fish against chronic ammonia exposure is unclear to date. In this study, we investigated the metabolism and excretion of ammonia in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma during chronic ammonia exposure. The fish were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl spiked seawater for 8 weeks. Exposure of 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl had deleterious effects on the fish, including significant reductions in growth, feed intake, and total protein content. However, the fish could take strategies to detoxify ammonia. The tissue ammonia (T Amm ) in the 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments was significantly higher than those in the 0 and 0.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments after 2 weeks of exposure, but it recovered with prolonged exposure time, ultimately reaching the control level after 8 weeks. The amino acid catabolic rate decreased to reduce the gross ammonia production with the increasing ambient ammonia concentration. The concentrations of most metabolites remained constant in the 0-0.6 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments, whereas 5 amino acids and 3 energy metabolism-related metabolites decreased in the 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatment. J Amm steadily increased in ambient ammonia from 0 to 0.6 mmol l -1 and slightly decreased when the ambient ammonia concentration increased to 1.1 mmol l -1 . Overall, marine medaka cope with sublethal ammonia environment by regulating the tissue T Amm via reducing the ammonia production and increasing ammonia excretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Aerobic ammonium oxidation in the oxycline and oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific off northern Chile (˜20°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Verónica; Farías, Laura

    2009-07-01

    Aerobic NH 4+ oxidation rates were measured along the strong oxygen gradient associated with the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the eastern tropical South Pacific off northern Chile (˜20°S) during 2000, 2003, and 2004. This process was examined by comparing NH 4+ rates of change during dark incubations, with and without the addition of allylthiourea, a classical inhibitor of the ammonia monooxygenase enzyme of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. The contribution of aerobic NH 4+ oxidation in dark carbon fixation and NO 2- rates of change were also explored. Thirteen samples were retrieved from the oxycline (252 to ⩽5 μM O 2; 15 to ˜65 m depth) and three from the oxygen minimum core (⩽5 μM O 2; 100-200 m depth). Aerobic NH 4+ oxidation rates were mainly detected in the upper part (15-30 m depth) of the oxycline, with rates ranging from 0.16 to 0.79 μM d -1, but not towards the oxycline base (40-65 m depth). In the oxygen minimum core, aerobic NH 4+ oxidation was in the upper range and higher than in the upper part of the oxycline (0.70 and 1.0 μM d -1). Carbon fixation rates through aerobic NH 4+ oxidation ranged from 0.18 to 0.43 μg C L -1 d -1 and contributed between 33% and 57% of the total dark carbon fixation, mainly towards the oxycline base and, in a single experiment, in the upper part of the oxycline. NO 2- consumption was high (up to 10 μM d -1) towards the oxycline base and OMZ core, but was significantly reduced in experiments amended with allylthiourea, indicating that aerobic NH 4+ oxidation could contribute between 8% and 76% of NO 2- production, which in turn could be available for denitrifiers. Overall, these results support the important role of aerobic NH 4+ oxidizers in the nitrogen and carbon cycling in the OMZ and at its upper boundary.

  9. Plans for treating the liquid wastes from an ammonia/urea/sulfur plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padula, R.C.; Amaral, S.P.

    1980-03-01

    Plans for treating the liquid wastes from an ammonia/urea/sulfur plant under construction near the Araucaria Refinery of Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. include sending the clean rain water directly to the Barigui River (A Class 3 river suitable for domestic water supply after corrective treatment, preservation of fauna and flora, and animal drinking water); collecting contaminated and process wastewater and subjecting them to equilization, flocculation, flotation, nitrification, decantation, denitrification, rapid aeration, and decantation treatments; and disposing of the sludge in a sanitary landfill. The sewage will undergo biological treatment or be sent to an oxidation poond. The pollution load and the allowed pollutant levels in the effluents are given.

  10. Response of archaeal communities in the rhizosphere of maize and soybean to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Nelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Archaea are important to the carbon and nitrogen cycles, but it remains uncertain how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO(2] will influence the structure and function of soil archaeal communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured abundances of archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA and amoA genes, phylogenies of archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes, concentrations of KCl-extractable soil ammonium and nitrite, and potential ammonia oxidation rates in rhizosphere soil samples from maize and soybean exposed to ambient (∼385 ppm and elevated (550 ppm [CO(2] in a replicated and field-based study. There was no influence of elevated [CO(2] on copy numbers of archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA or amoA genes, archaeal community composition, KCl-extractable soil ammonium or nitrite, or potential ammonia oxidation rates for samples from maize, a model C(4 plant. Phylogenetic evidence indicated decreased relative abundance of crenarchaeal sequences in the rhizosphere of soybean, a model leguminous-C(3 plant, at elevated [CO(2], whereas quantitative PCR data indicated no changes in the absolute abundance of archaea. There were no changes in potential ammonia oxidation rates at elevated [CO(2] for soybean. Ammonia oxidation rates were lower in the rhizosphere of maize than soybean, likely because of lower soil pH and/or abundance of archaea. KCl-extractable ammonium and nitrite concentrations were lower at elevated than ambient [CO(2] for soybean. CONCLUSION: Plant-driven shifts in soil biogeochemical processes in response to elevated [CO(2] affected archaeal community composition, but not copy numbers of archaeal genes, in the rhizosphere of soybean. The lack of a treatment effect for maize is consistent with the fact that the photosynthesis and productivity of maize are not stimulated by elevated [CO(2] in the absence of drought.

  11. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA IN EAR-LOBE CAPILLARY BLOOD IS AN ALTERNATIVE TO ARTERIAL BLOOD AMMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUIZENGA, [No Value; GIPS, CH; CONN, HO; JANSEN, PLM

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  12. Determination of ammonia in ear-lobe capillary blood is an alternative to arterial blood ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J. R.; Gips, C. H.; Conn, H. O.; Jansen, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  13. Ammonia Released by Streptomyces aburaviensis Induces Droplet Formation in Streptomyces violaceoruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kathrin; Spiteller, Dieter

    2017-08-01

    Streptomyces violaceoruber grown in co-culture with Streptomyces aburaviensis produces an about 17-fold higher volume of droplets on its aerial mycelium than in single-culture. Physical separation of the Streptomyces strains by either a plastic barrier or by a dialysis membrane, which allowed communication only by the exchange of volatile compounds or diffusible compounds in the medium, respectively, still resulted in enhanced droplet formation. The application of molecular sieves to bioassays resulted in the attenuation of the droplet-inducing effect of S. aburaviensis indicating the absorption of the compound. 1 H-NMR analysis of molecular-sieve extracts and the selective indophenol-blue reaction revealed that the volatile droplet-inducing compound is ammonia. The external supply of ammonia in biologically relevant concentrations of ≥8 mM enhanced droplet formation in S. violaceoruber in a similar way to S. aburaviensis. Ammonia appears to trigger droplet production in many Streptomyces strains because four out of six Streptomyces strains exposed to ammonia exhibited induced droplet production.

  14. Effect of ozonation on microbial fish pathogens, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and bod in simulated reuse hatchery water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colberg, P.J.; Lingg, A.J.

    1978-10-01

    The effectiveness of ozone for eliminating fish pathogens and reducing nitrite, ammonia, and BOD associated with reuse hatchery systems was evaluated. Comparative survival rates of four bacterial fish pathogens and a bacterium-protozoan population during batch and continuous flow ozonation indicated a specific microbial ozone demand during batch treatment and 99% mortality of pathogens during continuous flow treatment. Oxidation of carbon and nitrite by ozone was rapid at low ozone concentrations; carbon and ammonia oxidation rates were pH dependent. The oxidation capacity of ozone in water was greatest at elevated pH even though lower ozone concentrations were used. Ozone treatment appears to be successful for disinfecting hatchery makeup water for recycling. However, the economics of such treatment are yet to be determined. (10 graphs, 28 references, 1 table)

  15. A low-crystalline ruthenium nano-layer supported on praseodymium oxide as an active catalyst for ammonia synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Imamura, Kazuya; Kawano, Yukiko; Miyahara, Shin-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia is a crucial chemical feedstock for fertilizer production and is a potential energy carrier. However, the current method of synthesizing ammonia, the Haber-Bosch process, consumes a great deal of energy. To reduce energy consumption, a process and a substance that can catalyze ammonia synthesis under mild conditions (low temperature and low pressure) are strongly needed. Here we show that Ru/Pr 2 O 3 without any dopant catalyzes ammonia synthesis under mild conditions at 1.8 times the rates reported with other highly active catalysts. Scanning transmission electron micrograph observations and energy dispersive X-ray analyses revealed the formation of low-crystalline nano-layers of ruthenium on the surface of Pr 2 O 3 . Furthermore, CO 2 temperature-programmed desorption revealed that the catalyst was strongly basic. These unique structural and electronic characteristics are considered to synergistically accelerate the rate-determining step of NH 3 synthesis, cleavage of the N 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000

  16. Positron emission tomography of hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia in pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiding, S.; Munk, O.L.; Roelsgaard, K.; Bender, D.; Bass, L.

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic first-pass metabolism plays a key role in metabolic regulation and drug metabolism. Metabolic processes can be quantified in vivo by positron emission tomography scanning (PET). We wished to develop a PET technique to measure hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia. Seven anaesthetised pigs were given positron-labelled ammonia, 13 NH 3 , into the portal vein and into the vena cava as successive 2-min infusions followed by 22-min dynamic liver scanning. Vena cava infusion data were used to account for recirculation of tracer and metabolites following the portal vein infusion. The scan data were analysed by a model of sinusoidal zonation of ammonia metabolism with periportal urea formation and perivenous formation of glutamine. The hepatic extraction fraction of 13 NH 3 was 0.73±0.16 (mean±SD, n=7 pigs). Values of clearance of ammonia to urea and to glutamine were obtained, as were rate constants for washout of these two metabolites. Overall, the modelling showed half of the ammonia uptake to be converted to urea and half to glutamine. The washout rate constant for glutamine was about one-tenth of that for urea. We conclude that hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia was successfully assessed by PET. (orig.)

  17. Potential coupling effects of ammonia-oxidizing and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria on completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite biofilm formation induced by the second messenger cyclic diguanylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Sitong; Xu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Chuanqi; Yang, Fenglin; Wang, Dong

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) on the coupling effects between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria for the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) biofilm formation in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). Analysis of the quantity of EPS and cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) confirmed that the contents of polysaccharides and c-di-GMP were correlated in the AOB sludge, anammox sludge, and CANON biofilm. The anammox sludge secreted more EPS (especially polysaccharides) than AOB with a markedly higher c-di-GMP content, which could be used by the bacteria to regulate the synthesis of exopolysaccharides that are ultimately used as a fixation matrix, for the adhesion of biomass. Indeed, increased intracellular c-di-GMP concentrations in the anammox sludge enhanced the regulation of polysaccharides to promote the adhesion of AOB and formation of the CANON biofilm. Overall, the results of this study provide new comprehensive information regarding the coupling effects of AOB and anammox bacteria for the nitrogen removal process.

  18. Novel ammonia sensor based on polyaniline/polylactic acid composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotirov, S; Bodurov, I; Marudova, M

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new type of ammonia sensor based on composite film between polyaniline (emeraldine base) dissolved in dimethylformamide, and poly(DL-lactic) acid dissolved in chloroform. The two solutions were mixed in weight ratio of the components 1:1 and cast on Al 2 O 3 substrate, on which silver electrodes were deposited previously. The active layer structure and morphology were examined by atomic force microscopy. The sensor resistance at constant humidity and different ammonia concentrations was measured. It was found that an increase in the ammonia concentration leads to resistance increase. This result is explained in the terms of ionic interactions between the polyaniline and the ammonia, which change the permittivity of the sensor active media. A response between 2% and 590% was shown depending on the ammonia concentration. The sensor is reversible and possesses response time of typically 100 s. Based on the changes of the sensor resistance, ammonia concentration from 10 ppm to 1000 ppm could be detected. (paper)

  19. Novel ammonia sensor based on polyaniline/polylactic acid composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirov, S.; Bodurov, I.; Marudova, M.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new type of ammonia sensor based on composite film between polyaniline (emeraldine base) dissolved in dimethylformamide, and poly(DL-lactic) acid dissolved in chloroform. The two solutions were mixed in weight ratio of the components 1:1 and cast on Al2O3 substrate, on which silver electrodes were deposited previously. The active layer structure and morphology were examined by atomic force microscopy. The sensor resistance at constant humidity and different ammonia concentrations was measured. It was found that an increase in the ammonia concentration leads to resistance increase. This result is explained in the terms of ionic interactions between the polyaniline and the ammonia, which change the permittivity of the sensor active media. A response between 2% and 590% was shown depending on the ammonia concentration. The sensor is reversible and possesses response time of typically 100 s. Based on the changes of the sensor resistance, ammonia concentration from 10 ppm to 1000 ppm could be detected.

  20. Carbon-free H2 production from ammonia triggered at room temperature with an acidic RuO2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Eboshi, Takaaki; Takeishi, Yuma; Tasaki, Ryo; Honda, Kyoko; Imamura, Kazuya; Sato, Katsutoshi

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia has been suggested as a carbon-free hydrogen source, but a convenient method for producing hydrogen from ammonia with rapid initiation has not been developed. Ideally, this method would require no external energy input. We demonstrate hydrogen production by exposing ammonia and O 2 at room temperature to an acidic RuO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst. Because adsorption of ammonia onto the catalyst is exothermic, the catalyst bed is rapidly heated to the catalytic ammonia autoignition temperature, and subsequent oxidative decomposition of ammonia produces hydrogen. A differential calorimeter combined with a volumetric gas adsorption analyzer revealed a large quantity of heat evolved both with chemisorption of ammonia onto RuO 2 and acidic sites on the γ-Al 2 O 3 and with physisorption of multiple ammonia molecules.

  1. Ammonia detection of 1-D ZnO/polypyrrole nanocomposite: Effect of CSA doping and their structural, chemical, thermal and gas sensing behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Shilpa [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Santacruz (East), Mumbai-400098,India (India); Karmakar, Narayan [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Santacruz (East), Mumbai-400098,India (India); Shah, Akshara [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Santacruz (East), Mumbai-400098,India (India); Kothari, D.C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Santacruz (East), Mumbai-400098,India (India); National Centre for Nanosciences& Nanotechnology, University of Mumbai, Santacruz (East), Mumbai-400098,India (India); Mishra, Satyendra [University Institute of Chemical Technology, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India); Shimpi, Navinchandra G, E-mail: navin_shimpi@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Santacruz (East), Mumbai-400098,India (India)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Synthesis of 1-Dimensional ZnO-Polypyrrole nanocomposite using In-situ oxidative polymerization technique. • High response ammonia sensing. • Optimization of ZnO content in nanocomposites for maximum sensor response. • Effect of CSA doping on structural, thermal, optical and sensing behavior. • Optimization of CSA concentration for high sensitivity, fast response and recovery time. - Abstract: Nanocomposites of polypyrrole (PPy) with varying concentration of ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) were synthesized using in-situ oxidative polymerization technique. The prepared nanocomposites (PPy, PPy-ZnO and CSA doped PPy-ZnO) were studied for various oxidizing and reducing gases at room temperature and found to be more selective towards ammonia gas. Various concentrations of ZnO NRs in Ppy matrix were studied and 15% was found to be optimum in terms of sensor response (66% towards 120 ppm NH{sub 3}). Further, with 15% doping of camphor sulphonic acid (CSA) in PPy-ZnO nanocomposite for 15% ZnO NRs in Ppy matrix, sensor response increased from 66 to 79% towards 120 ppm of NH{sub 3}. Structural, Optical and thermal behavior of nanocomposites were studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis (UV–vis) absorption spectroscopy, room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) Spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). ZnO has been completely embedded inside the polymeric chains as observed from in SEM. Meanwhile, FT-IR spectra indicate better conjugation and interaction in nanocomposites. With CSA doping interaction grows stronger due to extended delocalization over π electrons leading to higher sensor response and with response time and recovery time of 24 s and 34 s respectively. CSA doped PPy-ZnO (15%) nanocomposites observed to be a potential candidate for ammonia detection at lower ppm level.

  2. Enrichment of ammonia concentration from aqua-ammonia vapors by using 3A molecular sieve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiou, J.S.; Lin, T.M.; She, K.Y.; Chen, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    In aqua-ammonia refrigeration systems, the ammonia is the refrigerant and the water is the absorbent, the vapor produced in the generator always contains a small fraction of water. The removed of this residual water is a crucial issue in order to guarantee a reliable and efficient operation of these systems. Currently, the thermal distillation methods (via a rectifier and/or an analyzer) are used to further separate the water from aqua-ammonia mixtures. In this study, a molecular sieve module is used for ammonia purification. A thermal system with a 3A molecular sieve module was set up, and the conditions of working fluid entering into the sieve module is similar to that entering into the rectifier tower of a typical aqua-ammonia absorption system. Results from ammonia enrichment tests indicate the concentration of ammonia can be raised from about 80% up to about 99% if siever installation was properly arranged.

  3. 16O + 16O molecular structures of superdeformed states in S isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Structures of excited states in S isotopes are investigated by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method (GCM). The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter β. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed (SD) bands are predicted in 33-36S except for negative-parity states in 36S. The SD bands have structures of 16O + 16O + valence neutron(s) in molecular orbitals around the two 16O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the valence neutron(s) in the SD states are δ and/or π molecular orbitals.

  4. Biotreatment of ammonia- and butanal-containing waste gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckhuysen, B; Vriens, L; Verachtert, H

    1994-10-01

    The biological removal of ammonia and butanal in contaminated air was investigated by using, respectively, a laboratory-scale filter and a scrubber-filter combination. It was shown that ammonia can be removed with an elimination efficiency of 83% at a volumetric load of 100 m3.m-2.h-1 with 4-16 ppm of ammonia. During the experiment percolates were analysed for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and pH. It was found that the nitrification in the biofilter could deteriorate due to an inhibition of Nitrobacter species, when the free ammonia concentration was rising in the percolate. It should be easy to control such inhibition through periodic analysis of the liquid phase by using a filter-scrubber combination. Such a combination was studied for butanal removal. Butanal was removed with an elimination efficiency of 80% by a scrubber-filter combination at a volumetric load of 100 m3.m-2.h-1 and a high butanal input concentration. Mixing the filter material with CaCO3 and pH control of the liquid in the scrubber resulted in an increase of the elimination efficiency. These results, combined with previous results on the biofiltration of butanal and butyric acid, allow us to discuss the influence of odour compounds on the removal efficiency of such systems and methods for control. The results were used to construct a full-size system, which is described.

  5. Changes in the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria community in response to operational parameters during the treatment of anaerobic sludge digester supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena; Bernat, Katarzyna; Kulikowska, Dorota; Wojnowska-Baryła, Irena

    2012-07-01

    The understanding of the relationship between ammoniaoxidizing bacteria (AOB) communities in activated sludge and the operational treatment parameters supports the control of the treatment of ammonia-rich wastewater. The modifications of treatment parameters by alteration of the number and length of aerobic and anaerobic stages in the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) working cycle may influence the efficiency of ammonium oxidation and induce changes in the AOB community. Therefore, in the research, the impact of an SBR cycle mode with alternating aeration/ mixing conditions (7 h/1 h vs. 4 h/5.5 h) and volumetric exchange rate (n) on AOB abundance and diversity in activated sludge during the treatment of anaerobic sludge digester supernatant at limited oxygen concentration in the aeration stage (0.7 mg O2/l) was assessed. AOB diversity expressed by the Shannon-Wiener index (H') was determined by the cycle mode. At aeration/mixing stage lengths of 7 h/1 h, H' averaged 2.48 +/- 0.17, while at 4 h/ 5.5 h it was 2.35 +/- 0.16. At the given mode, AOB diversity decreased with increasing n. The cycle mode did not affect AOB abundance; however, a higher AOB abundance in activated sludge was promoted by decreasing the volumetric exchange rate. The sequences clustering with Nitrosospira sp. NpAV revealed the uniqueness of the AOB community and the simultaneously lower ability of adaptation of Nitrosospira sp. to the operational parameters applied in comparison with Nitrosomonas sp.

  6. Properties of photocatalytically generated oxygen species produced by Ag2Se-graphene oxide heterojunction and its application for the visible-light degradation of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ze-Da; Zhao, Wei; Kim, Sukyoung

    2017-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be produced by the interactions between sunlight and light-absorbing substances in aqueous environments, and these ROS are capable of destroying various organic pollutants in wastewater. In this study, the photocatalytic degradation of ammonia in petrochemical wastewater was investigated by solar light photocatalysis. We used graphene oxide modified Ag2Se nanoparticles to enhance the activity of photochemically generated oxygen (PGO) species. There was a catastrophic decrease in the surface area and pore volume of the Ag2Se-graphene oxide (Ag2Se-G) samples because of the deposition of Ag2Se. The generation of ROS was detected by the oxidation of 1,5- diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) to 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO). It was revealed that the photocurrent density and PGO effect increased with the graphene oxide modified. The experimental results indicate that this heterogeneous catalyst achieved a degradation of 88.43% under visiblelight irradiation. The NH3 degradation product was N2 and neither NO2- nor NO3- were detected.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Oxidation of pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleotides by osmium tetroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K

    1967-08-01

    1. Pyrimidine nucleosides such as thymidine, uridine or cytidine are oxidized readily at 0 degrees by osmium tetroxide in ammonium chloride buffer. There is virtually no oxidation in bicarbonate buffer of similar pH. Oxidation of 1-methyluracil yields 5,6-dihydro-4,5,6-trihydroxy-1-methyl-2-pyrimidone. 2. Osmium tetroxide and ammonia react reversibly in aqueous solution to form a yellow 1:1 complex, probably OsO(3)NH. A second molecule of ammonia must be involved in the oxidation of UMP since the rate of this reaction is approximately proportional to the square of the concentration of unprotonated ammonia. 3. 4-Thiouridine reacts with osmium tetroxide much more rapidly than does uridine. The changes of absorption spectra are different in sodium bicarbonate buffer and in ammonium chloride buffer. They occur faster in the latter buffer and, under suitable conditions, cytidine is a major product. 4. Polyuridylic acid is oxidized readily by ammoniacal osmium tetroxide, but its oxidation is inhibited by polyadenylic acid. Pyrimidines of yeast amino acid-transfer RNA are oxidized more slowly than the corresponding mononucleosides, especially the thymine residues. Appreciable oxidation can occur without change of sedimentation coefficient.

  8. Retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in biological activated carbon filters for drinking water and the impact on ammonia reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Yu, Shuili; Park, Heedeung; Liu, Guicai; Yuan, Qingbin

    2016-06-01

    Given the increasing discoveries related to the eco-toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) in different ecosystems and with respect to public health, it is important to understand their potential effects in drinking water treatment (DWT). The effects of TiO2 NPs on ammonia reduction, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biological activated carbon (BAC) filters for drinking water were investigated in static and dynamic states. In the static state, both the nitrification potential and AOB were significantly inhibited by 100 μg L(-1) TiO2 NPs after 12 h (p  0.05). In the dynamic state, different amounts of TiO2 NP pulses were injected into three pilot-scale BAC filters. The decay of TiO2 NPs in the BAC filters was very slow. Both titanium quantification and scanning electron microscope analysis confirmed the retention of TiO2 NPs in the BAC filters after 134 days of operation. Furthermore, the TiO2 NP pulses considerably reduced the performance of ammonia reduction. This study identified the retention of TiO2 NPs in BAC filters and the negative effect on the ammonia reduction, suggesting a potential threat to DWT by TiO2 NPs.

  9. Density and distribution of nitrifying guilds in rapid sand filters for drinking water production: Dominance of Nitrospira spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Musovic, Sanin; Gülay, Arda

    2017-01-01

    distribution of these guilds, filter material was sampled at four drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) in parallel filters of the pre- and after-filtration stages at different locations and depths. The target guilds were quantified by qPCR targeting 16S rRNA and amoA genes. Total bacterial densities......We investigated the density and distribution of total bacteria, canonical Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) (Nitrosomonas plus Nitrosospira), Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea (AOA), as well as Nitrobacter and Nitrospira in rapid sand filters used for groundwater treatment. To investigate the spatial...

  10. Kinetics of chlorine--ammonia reactions in seawater. Annual report, June 1, 1977--May 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.D.; Inman, G.W. Jr.

    1978-11-01

    By employing stopped-flow techniques, rate constants were determined for the reactions of hypochlorous acid with bromide and ammonia in solutions at different pH's and salinities. Values for the specific rate constants at 25 0 C are 3.8 x 10 3 and 3.1 x 10 6 liters/mole-s, respectively for the following reactions HOC1 + Br - → HOBr + C1 - and HOC1 + NH 3 → NH 2 C1 + H 2 O. Speciation experiments were done with full strength chlorinated seawater enriched with ammonia. The resultant solutions were analyzed by uv spectroscopy, amperometric titration, and a membrane electrode. At low ammonia nitrogen and high initial chlorine concentrations, hypobromous acid and tribromamine formed. As the ratio of C1 2 to N was decreased, some dibromamine was observed and at ratios less than 1:1, monochloramine formed and eventually predominated. Preliminary experiments were also done to determine a rate constant for the oxidation of bromide by monochloramine. Results showed that even in full strength seawater the reaction was quite slow ;half life approx. 28 hours for [NH 2 C1] 0 2 ). The reaction was found to be pH dependent and yielded an unidentified product with a uv absorbance peak near 220 nm. 22 figures

  11. Water Quality of NPP Secondary Side with Combined Water Chemistry of Ammonia and Ethanolamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, In-H.; Jung, Hyun-jun; Cho, Daechul; Park, Byunggi

    2012-09-01

    Ammonia (AM) and Ethanolamine (ETA), as pH control additive agents, were injected to the secondary side in a Korean NPP for the even pH in the entire secondary system including the wet region and the condensate. Ammonia and ETA are dominant in the vapor and liquid phases, respectively, since the former and latter are more and less volatile than water in the temperature range of 30 to 300 . pH of 9.5 to 9.7 was maintained in the water-steam cycle at the concentrations of ammonia with ∼1.0 ppm and ETA of ∼1.8 ppm. From the standpoint of corrosion, i.g, concentration of Fe, the water quality of secondary side was improved by the combined water treatment of ammonia and ETA, compared to all volatile treatment of ammonia. The electrical conductivity was increased from 6 to 10 μS/cm due to the presence of organic carboxylates produced by the decomposition of ETA. ETA was broken down by <5% in steam generator and converted into formate, acetate, and glycolate, among which acetate was largely formed. But inorganic ions such as Na + , Cl - , and SO 4 2- are not changed because their ingress was not made and the selectivity of resin over those ions was not fairly altered. The runtime of demineralizer in steam generator blowdown was shortened by a third for a mixture of ammonia and ETA. Most of Fe was originated from the shell side of heat exchangers including the condenser as a result of corrosion. Fe was only eliminated by ion exchange demineralizers, i.e., 46% at CPP and 3% at SG BD and 70% of Fe oxides were accumulated at the steam generator, on the basis of Fe concentration at the final feedwater. In conclusion, ETA is preferable to ammonia for the enhancement of pH in the liquid phase of water-steam mixture such as the shell side of heat exchanger and also the full-flow operation of CPP is more desirable than partial-flow operation for the improved removal of corrosion products, regardless of hydrogen- or amine-type operation. (authors)

  12. Synthesis and functionalisation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Mundell, VJ

    2013-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles including calcium oxide, gold, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) were synthesised using a range of techniques including reduction, co-precipitation and spinning disc technology. SPIOs were primarily synthesised via a co-precipitation method using iron (II) chloride, iron (III) chloride and ammonia; a spinning disc reactor and gaseous ammonia were trialled successfully for scale up, producing spherical particles of 10-40 nm in diameter a...

  13. Ammonia oxidation pathways and nitrifier denitrification are significant sources of N2O and NO under low oxygen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xia; Burger, Martin; Doane, Timothy A; Horwath, William R

    2013-04-16

    The continuous increase of nitrous oxide (N2O) abundance in the atmosphere is a global concern. Multiple pathways of N2O production occur in soil, but their significance and dependence on oxygen (O2) availability and nitrogen (N) fertilizer source are poorly understood. We examined N2O and nitric oxide (NO) production under 21%, 3%, 1%, 0.5%, and 0% (vol/vol) O2 concentrations following urea or ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4] additions in loam, clay loam, and sandy loam soils that also contained ample nitrate. The contribution of the ammonia (NH3) oxidation pathways (nitrifier nitrification, nitrifier denitrification, and nitrification-coupled denitrification) and heterotrophic denitrification (HD) to N2O production was determined in 36-h incubations in microcosms by (15)N-(18)O isotope and NH3 oxidation inhibition (by 0.01% acetylene) methods. Nitrous oxide and NO production via NH3 oxidation pathways increased as O2 concentrations decreased from 21% to 0.5%. At low (0.5% and 3%) O2 concentrations, nitrifier denitrification contributed between 34% and 66%, and HD between 34% and 50% of total N2O production. Heterotrophic denitrification was responsible for all N2O production at 0% O2. Nitrifier denitrification was the main source of N2O production from ammonical fertilizer under low O2 concentrations with urea producing more N2O than (NH4)2SO4 additions. These findings challenge established thought attributing N2O emissions from soils with high water content to HD due to presumably low O2 availability. Our results imply that management practices that increase soil aeration, e.g., reducing compaction and enhancing soil structure, together with careful selection of fertilizer sources and/or nitrification inhibitors, could decrease N2O production in agricultural soils.

  14. Innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic-digestion integrated system for ammonia recovery and bioenergy production from ammonia-rich residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    (SMRC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), to prevent ammonia toxicity during anaerobic digestion by in-situ ammonia recovery and electricity production (Figure 1). In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7 g-N/L with an average recovery rate of 0.18 g-N/L(CSTR...... performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative effect on the ammonia transportation. In continuous reactor operation, 112% extra biogas production was achieved due to ammonia recovery. High-throughput molecular sequencing analysis showed an impact...... of ammonia recovery on the microbial community composition in the integrated system. Results clearly indicate the great potential of the SMRC-CSTR-coupled system for efficient and cost-effective ammonia recovery, energy production and treatment of ammonia-rich residues....

  15. Adsorption site of ammonia on copper-exchanged Y-type zeolite under coexisting water vapor. Temperature-programed desorption and infrared adsorption spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasaoka, S.; Sasaoka, E.; Shiraga, T.; Ono, Y.

    1978-03-01

    Sodium Y zeolites were copper-exchanged with cupric nitrate in water, in aqueous ammonia, and in aqueous ammonia/ammonium chloride, and calcined at 500/sup 0/C. Temperature-programed desorption and IR spectroscopy showed three types of adsorption sites for 0.1-1.0% ammonia gas from nitrogen containing 0-12% water vapor: physisorption, adsorption as tetraamminocopper(II) on copper(II) sites (type 2 site), and adsorption as ammonium ion on hydroxyl sites (type 3 site). Adsorption on type 2 sites occurred only at high ammonia concentration; desorption occurred around 175/sup 0/C. Type 3 sites consisted of Cu(OH)/sup +/ and Al(OH)/sup +/, adsorbed ammonia from low concentrations, and at temperatures above 200/sup 0/C, were probably the active sites for the reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia.

  16. Ammonia Oxidation and Nitrite Reduction in the Verrucomicrobial Methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr S. Mohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Solfatara volcano near Naples (Italy, the origin of the recently discovered verrucomicrobial methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV was shown to contain ammonium (NH4+ at concentrations ranging from 1 to 28 mM. Ammonia (NH3 can be converted to toxic hydroxylamine (NH2OH by the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO, the first enzyme of the methane (CH4 oxidation pathway. Methanotrophs rapidly detoxify the intermediate NH2OH. Here, we show that strain SolV performs ammonium oxidation to nitrite at a rate of 48.2 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under O2 limitation in a continuous culture grown on hydrogen (H2 as an electron donor. In addition, strain SolV carries out nitrite reduction at a rate of 74.4 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under anoxic condition at pH 5–6. This range of pH was selected to minimize the chemical conversion of nitrite (NO2- potentially occurring at more acidic pH values. Furthermore, at pH 6, we showed that the affinity constants (Ks of the cells for NH3 vary from 5 to 270 μM in the batch incubations with 0.5–8% (v/v CH4, respectively. Detailed kinetic analysis showed competitive substrate inhibition between CH4 and NH3. Using transcriptome analysis, we showed up-regulation of the gene encoding hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (haoA cells grown on H2/NH4+ compared to the cells grown on CH4/NO3- which do not have to cope with reactive N-compounds. The denitrifying genes nirk and norC showed high expression in H2/NH4+ and CH4/NO3- grown cells compared to cells growing at μmax (with no limitation while the norB gene showed downregulation in CH4/NO3- grown cells. These cells showed a strong upregulation of the genes in nitrate/nitrite assimilation. Our results demonstrate that strain SolV can perform ammonium oxidation producing nitrite. At high concentrations of ammonium this may results in toxic effects. However, at low oxygen concentrations strain SolV is able to reduce nitrite to N2O to cope with this toxicity.

  17. Identification of pathogenic Nocardia species by reverse line blot hybridization targeting the 16S rRNA and 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; Sorrell, Tania C; Cao, Yongyan; Lee, Ok Cha; Liu, Ying; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C A

    2010-02-01

    Although 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis is employed most often for the definitive identification of Nocardia species, alternate molecular methods and polymorphisms in other gene targets have also enabled species determinations. We evaluated a combined Nocardia PCR-based reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay based on 16S and 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer region polymorphisms to identify 12 American Type Culture Collection and 123 clinical Nocardia isolates representing 14 species; results were compared with results from 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Thirteen 16S rRNA gene-based (two group-specific and 11 species-specific) and five 16S-23S spacer-targeted (two taxon-specific and three species-specific) probes were utilized. 16S rRNA gene-based probes correctly identified 124 of 135 isolates (sensitivity, 92%) but were unable to identify Nocardia paucivorans strains (n = 10 strains) and a Nocardia asteroides isolate with a novel 16S rRNA gene sequence. Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica strains were identified by the sequential use of an N. farcinica-"negative" probe and a combined N. farcinica/N. cyriacigeorgica probe. The assay specificity was high (99%) except for weak cross-reactivity between the Nocardia brasiliensis probe with the Nocardia thailandica DNA product; however, cross-hybridization with closely related nontarget species may occur. The incorporation of 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer-based probes enabled the identification of all N. paucivorans strains. The overall sensitivity using both probe sets was >99%. Both N. farcinica-specific 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer-directed probes were required to identify all N. farcinica stains by using this probe set. The study demonstrates the utility of a combined PCR/RLB assay for the identification of clinically relevant Nocardia species and its potential for studying subtypes of N. farcinica. Where species assignment is ambiguous or not possible, 16S rRNA gene sequencing is recommended.

  18. Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffendahl, Carmen; Duquesne, Sophie; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Bourbigot, Serge, E-mail: serge.bourbigot@ensc-lille.fr

    2014-08-20

    Highlights: • Decomposition of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions was investigated. • With increasing temperature, orthoboric acid forms boron oxide releasing water. • Melamine decomposes evolving melamine, ammonia and other fragments. • Boron oxide is transformed into boron nitride and boron nitride-oxide structures through presence of ammonia. - Abstract: Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate (MB) in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions is investigated in the condensed and gas phases using solid state NMR ({sup 13}C and {sup 11}B), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyrolysis-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TGA–FTIR). It is evidenced that orthoboric acid dehydrates to metaboric and then to boron oxide. The melamine is partially sublimated. At the same time, melamine condensates, i.e., melem and melon are formed. Melon is only formed in thermo-oxidative conditions. At higher temperature, melem and melon decompose releasing ammonia which reacts with the boron oxide to form boron nitride (BN) and BNO structures.

  19. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia.

  20. Cobalt Oxide on N-Doped Carbon for 1-Butene Oligomerization to Produce Linear Octenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dongting [Department; Xu, Zhuoran [Department; Chada, Joseph P. [Department; Carrero, Carlos A. [Department; Rosenfeld, Devon C. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Rogers, Jessica L. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Hermans, Ive [Department; Huber, George W. [Department

    2017-10-02

    Cobalt oxide supported on N-doped carbon catalysts were investigated for 1-butene oligomerization. The materials were synthesized by treating activated carbon with nitric acid and subsequently with NH3 at 200, 400, 600, and 800 °C, followed by impregnation with cobalt. The 1-butene oligomerization selectivity increased with ammonia treatment temperature of the carbon support. The oligomerization selectivity of cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized at 800 °C (800A-CoOx/N-C) is 2.6 times higher than previously reported cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized with NH4OH (2A-CoOx/N-C). Over 70% of the butene dimers were linear C8 olefins for all catalysts. The oligomerization selectivity increased with 1-butene conversion. The catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis, N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nitrogen content of the catalysts increases with ammonia treatment temperature as confirmed by elemental analysis. The surface content of pyridinic nitrogen with a binding energy of 398.4 ± 0.1 eV increased with ammonia treatment temperature as evidenced by deconvolution of N 1s XPS spectra.

  1. Catalytic properties of a titanium-antimony oxide system in oxidative ammonolysis of propylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Andrushkevich, T.V.; Aleshina, G.I.; Nikoro, T.A.; Ravilov, R.G.

    1979-03-01

    The catalytic properties of titanium-antimony oxide system in oxidative ammonolysis of propylene at 450/sup 0/C depended both on the catalyst and the reactant compositions. Stable and high (75-80Vertical Bar3<) selectivities for acrylonitrile and high activities were observed over catalysts containing 5-60 mole Vertical Bar3< Sb/sub 2/O/sub 4/ with 2Vertical Bar3< propylene and 3Vertical Bar3< ammonia in air at Vertical Bar3; 70Vertical Bar3< conversions. The selectivities of the catalysts for acetonitrile and acrolein did not exceed 5 and 1Vertical Bar3<, respectively. At high ammonia and propylene contents in the reaction mixture and over individual TiO/sub 2/ or Sb/sub 2/O/sub 4/ catalysts, the reaction selectivity shifted toward deep oxidation products. These findings were attributed to the reducing effect of propylene and ammonia at high concentrations on the active components of the catalyst, a solid solution of Sb in TiO/sub 2/ containing 5-7 mole Vertical Bar3< of Sb/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and a chemical compound with TiSb/sub 2/O/sub 6/ composition.

  2. Exergy analysis of industrial ammonia synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova-Yordanova, Zornitza

    2004-01-01

    Exergy consumption of ammonia production plants depends strongly on the ammonia synthesis loop design. Due to the thermodynamically limited low degree of conversion of hydrogen-nitrogen mixture to ammonia, industrial ammonia synthesis is implemented as recycle process (so-called 'ammonia synthesis loop'). Significant quantities of reactants are recycled back to reactor, after the removal of ammonia at low temperatures. Modern ammonia synthesis plants use well-developed heat- and cold recovery to improve the reaction heat utilisation and to reduce the refrigeration costs. In this work, the exergy method is applied to estimate the effect of the most important process parameters on the exergy efficiency of industrial ammonia synthesis. A specific approach, including suitable definitions of the system boundaries and process parameters, is proposed. Exergy efficiency indexes are discussed in order to make the results applicable to ammonia synthesis loops of various designs. The dependence of the exergy losses on properly selected independent process parameters is studied. Some results from detailed exergy analysis of the most commonly used ammonia synthesis loop design configurations at a wide range of selected parameters values are shown

  3. New investigations in the USA into formation of nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.

    1983-06-01

    This paper discusses laboratory investigations in the USA on air pollution by nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. Laboratory combustors used for combustion of black coal, anthracite and brown coal are described. Measuring systems and measuring instruments used for flue gas analyses and determining nitrogen oxide, hydrocyanic acid and ammonia content in flue gas are evaluated. Effects of excess air on nitrogen oxide formation are analyzed. Analyses show that excess air influences relation between nitrogen oxides, hydrocyanic acid and ammonia. Recommendations on the optimum excess air rate are made. In the case of all coal typs, with the exception of anthracite, the optimum excess air rate is 0.7 which guarantees the highest transformation rate of nitrogen in fuel into molecular nitrogen. Effects of excess air on oxidation of hydrocyanic acid and ammonia are described. The analyses consider effects of excess air on chemical reactions during coal combustion under laboratory conditions. (4 refs.) (In Russian)

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of a Novel Ammonia Gas Sensor Based on PANI-PVA Blend Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. DUPARE

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The polyaniline - polyvinyl alcohol blend films were synthesized by oxidative polymerization using chemical synthesis route. The polyaniline films were synthesized using optimized concentration of monomer aniline, hydrochloric acid as a dopant using ammonium peroxy-disulphate as a oxidant and insulating addative matrix polyvinyl alcohol on glass substrate for development of ammonia sensor. The formation of PANI- PVA blend films show good uniform surface morphology at 10ºc temperature, maintained at constant temperature bath. The synthesized PANI-PVA blend thin films were characterized by analyzing UV-Visible and FTIR spectra. The SEM study ensures that the thin films are uniform and porous in nature. The I-V characterization shows ohmic behaviour and also determines conductivity of the films. The response time of PANI-PVA blend thin films show that excellent behavior for 50-800 ppm and higher range of ammonia gas. This study reveals that PANI-PVA blend thin films provide a polymer matrix with very good mechanical strength, environmental stability, uniformity in surface, porous morphology and high conductivity, which are suitable for ammonia gas sensing.

  5. The dominant acetate degradation pathway/methanogenic composition in full-scale anaerobic digesters operating under different ammonia levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia is a major environmental factor influencing biomethanation in full-scale anaerobic digesters. In this study, the effect of different ammonia levels on methanogenic pathways and methanogenic community composition of full-scale biogas plants was investigated. Eight full-scale digesters...... operating under different ammonia levels were sampled, and the residual biogas production was followed in fed-batch reactors. Acetate, labelled in the methyl group, was used to determine the methanogenic pathway by following the 14CH4 and 14CO2 production. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used...... to determine the methanogenic communities’ composition. Results obtained clearly demonstrated that syntrophic acetate oxidation coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway in all digesters with high ammonia levels (2.8–4.57 g NH4 +-N L−1), while acetoclastic methanogenic pathway...

  6. Chemical modelling of trace elements in pore water from PFBC residues containing ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, L.G.; Brandberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ammonia is added to the PFBC process with the purpose to reduce the emissions of NO x in the stack gases. The design of the system for cleaning the stack gases will lead to an increased adsorption of ammonia and an accumulation of soluble ammonium salts in the cyclone ash from PFBC processes. This can be an environmental problem since the amounts will increase over the coming years and there will be a need to dispose the residues. When infiltrating rainwater penetrates the disposed residues ammonia and ammonium salts result in a contamination of the pore water with ammonia in the disposed residues. This entail the solubility of several trace elements in the residues that form soluble complexes with ammonia will increase and cause an increased contamination of groundwater and surface water. In this study the increased solubilities is calculated for the trace elements cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc in the residues using thermodynamical data. The calculations have been performed with probable solid phases of the trace elements at oxidizing and reducing conditions as a function of pH and at varying concentration of ammonia in the pore water. The thermodynamic calculations have been performed with the geochemical code EQ3NR. The results from the calculations show that as a concentration of 17 mg NH 3 /l in the pore water of the residues increases the solubilities for copper and silver. If the concentration of ammonia increases to 170 mg NH 3 /l will the solubilities increase also for cadmium, nickel and zinc. (12 refs., 39 figs.)

  7. Multi-component removal in flue gas by aqua ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, James T [Bethel Park, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2007-08-14

    A new method for the removal of environmental compounds from gaseous streams, in particular, flue gas streams. The new method involves first oxidizing some or all of the acid anhydrides contained in the gas stream such as sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) and nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N.sub.2O) to sulfur trioxide (SO.sub.3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2). The gas stream is subsequently treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide which captures the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions. The products of the reactions can be collected as slurries, dewatered, and dried for use as fertilizers, or once the slurries have been dewatered, used directly as fertilizers. The ammonium hydroxide can be regenerated and recycled for use via thermal decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate, one of the products formed. There are alternative embodiments which entail stoichiometric scrubbing of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides with subsequent separate scrubbing of carbon dioxide.

  8. Renal Ammonia Metabolism and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4+ and 2 HCO3− for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3−-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4+ trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4+-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K+, and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. PMID:23720285

  9. Airborne reduced nitrogen: ammonia emissions from agriculture and other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Natalie; Strader, Ross; Davidson, Cliff

    2003-06-01

    Ammonia is a basic gas and one of the most abundant nitrogen-containing compounds in the atmosphere. When emitted, ammonia reacts with oxides of nitrogen and sulfur to form particles, typically in the fine particle size range. Roughly half of the PM(2.5) mass in eastern United States is ammonium sulfate, according to the US EPA. Results from recent studies of PM(2.5) show that these fine particles are typically deposited deep in the lungs and may lead to increased morbidity and/or mortality. Also, these particles are in the size range that will degrade visibility. Ammonia emission inventories are usually constructed by multiplying an activity level by an experimentally determined emission factor for each source category. Typical sources of ammonia include livestock, fertilizer, soils, forest fires and slash burning, industry, vehicles, the oceans, humans, pets, wild animals, and waste disposal and recycling activities. Livestock is the largest source category in the United States, with waste from livestock responsible for about 3x10(9) kg of ammonia in 1995. Volatilization of ammonia from livestock waste is dependent on many parameters, and thus emission factors are difficult to predict. Despite a seasonal variation in these values, the emission factors for general livestock categories are usually annually averaged in current inventories. Activity levels for livestock are from the USDA Census of Agriculture, which does not give information about animal raising practices such as housing types and grazing times, waste handling systems, and approximate animal slurry spreading times or methods. Ammonia emissions in the United States in 1995 from sources other than livestock are much lower; for example, annual emissions are roughly 8x10(8) kg from fertilizer, 7x10(7) kg from industry, 5x10(7) kg from vehicles and 1x10(8) kg from humans. There is considerable uncertainty in the emissions from soil and vegetation, although this category may also be significant

  10. Inhibition of ammonia poisoning by addition of platinum to Ru/α-Al2 O3 for preferential CO oxidation in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Yagi, Sho; Zaitsu, Shuhei; Kitayama, Godai; Kayada, Yuto; Teramura, Kentaro; Takita, Yusaku; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2014-12-01

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems, small amounts of ammonia (NH3 ) present in the reformate gas deactivate the supported ruthenium catalysts used for preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide (CO). In this study, we investigated how the addition of a small amount of platinum to a Ru/α-Al2 O3 catalyst (Pt/Ru=1:9 w/w) affected the catalyst's PROX activity in both the absence and the presence of NH3 (130 ppm) under conditions mimicking the reformate conditions during steam reforming of natural gas. The activity of undoped Ru/α-Al2 O3 decreased sharply upon addition of NH3 , whereas Pt/Ru/α-Al2 O3 exhibited excellent PROX activity even in the presence of NH3 . Ruthenium K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra indicated that in the presence of NH3 , some of the ruthenium in the undoped catalyst was oxidized in the presence of NH3 , whereas ruthenium oxidation was not observed with Pt/Ru/α-Al2 O3 . These results suggest that ruthenium oxidation is retarded by the platinum, so that the catalyst shows high activity even in the presence of NH3 . © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Comparative sensing of aldehyde and ammonia vapours on synthetic polypyrrole-Sn(IVarsenotungstate nanocomposite cation exchange material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Ali Khan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole-Sn(IVarsenotungstate (PPy-SnAT conductive nanocomposite cation exchange have been synthesized by in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization of polypyrrole with Sn(IVarsenotungstate (SnAT. PPy-SnAT nanocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR, X-Ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The ion exchange capacity (IEC and DC electrical conductivity of nanocomposite was found to be 2.50 meq/g and 5.05 × 10−1 S/cm respectively. The nanocomposite showed appreciable isothermal stability in terms of DC electrical conductivity retention under ambient condition up to 130 °C. The nanocomposite cation exchange based sensor for detection of formaldehyde and ammonia vapours were fabricated at room temperature. It was revealed that the resistivity of the nanocomposite increases on exposure to higher percent concentration of ammonia and lower concentration of formaldehyde at room temperature (25 °C.

  12. An Experimental Study on What Controls the Ratios of 18O/16O and 17O/16O of O2 During Microbial Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D. A.; Ward, B. B.; Fischer, W. W.; Bender, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios of atmospheric and dissolved oceanic O2 are key biogeochemical tracers of total photosynthesis and respiration on global to local length scales and glacial/interglacial time scales (Luz et al., 1999). Critical to the use of these ratios as biogeochemical tracers is knowledge of how they are affected by production, consumption, and transport of O2. We present new measurements of O2 respiration by E. coli and N. oceanus, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium, to test three assumptions of isotopically enabled models of the O2 cycle: (i) laboratory-measured respiratory 18O/16O isotope effects (18α) of microorganisms are constant under all experimental and natural conditions (e.g., temperature and growth rate); (ii) the respiratory 'mass law' relationship between 18O/16O and 17O/16O [17α = (18α)β] is universal; and (iii) 18α and β for aerobic ammonia and organic carbon oxidation are identical. For E. coli, we find that both 18α and β are variable. From 37°C to 15°C, 18α varies linearly with temperature from 17 to 14‰, and β varies linearly from 0.513 to 0.508. 18α and β do not appear to vary with growth rate (as tested using different carbon sources). Both 18α and β are lower than previous observations for bacteria: 18α = 17-20‰ (Kiddon et al., 1993) and β = 0.515 (Luz and Barkan, 2005). We were able to simulate the observed temperature dependence of 18α and β using a model of respiration with two isotopically discriminating steps: O2 binding to cytochrome bo oxidase (the respiratory enzyme) and reduction of O2 to H2O. Finally, initial results on N. oceanus suggest it has similar values for 18α and β as previously studied aerobic bacteria that consume organic carbon, providing the first support for assumption (iii). Based on these results, isotopically constrained biogeochemical models of O2 cycling may need to consider a temperature dependence for 18α and β for microbial respiration. For example, these results may

  13. Use of zeolite for removing ammonia and ammonia-caused toxicity in marine toxicity identification evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, R M; Perron, M M; Cantwell, M G; Ho, K T; Serbst, J R; Pelletier, M C

    2004-11-01

    Ammonia occurs in marine waters including effluents, receiving waters, and sediment interstitial waters. At sufficiently high concentrations, ammonia can be toxic to aquatic species. Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods provide researchers with tools for identifying aquatic toxicants. For identifying ammonia toxicity, there are several possible methods including pH alteration and volatilization, Ulva lactuca addition, microbial degradation, and zeolite addition. Zeolite addition has been used successfully in freshwater systems to decrease ammonia concentrations and toxicity for several decades. However, zeolite in marine systems has been used less because ions in the seawater interfere with zeolite's ability to adsorb ammonia. The objective of this study was to develop a zeolite method for removing ammonia from marine waters. To accomplish this objective, we performed a series of zeolite slurry and column chromatography studies to determine uptake rate and capacity and to evaluate the effects of salinity and pH on ammonia removal. We also assessed the interaction of zeolite with several toxic metals. Success of the methods was also evaluated by measuring toxicity to two marine species: the mysid Americamysis bahia and the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. Column chromatography proved to be effective at removing a wide range of ammonia concentrations under several experimental conditions. Conversely, the slurry method was inconsistent and variable in its overall performance in removing ammonia and cannot be recommended. The metals copper, lead, and zinc were removed by zeolite in both the slurry and column treatments. The zeolite column was successful in removing ammonia toxicity for both the mysid and the amphipod, whereas the slurry was less effective. This study demonstrated that zeolite column chromatography is a useful tool for conducting marine water TIEs to decrease ammonia concentrations and characterize toxicity.

  14. Ammonia toxicity: from head to toe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Rackayova, Veronika; Rangroo Thrane, Vinita; Vairappan, Balasubramaniyan; Ott, Peter; Rose, Christopher F

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia is diffused and transported across all plasma membranes. This entails that hyperammonemia leads to an increase in ammonia in all organs and tissues. It is known that the toxic ramifications of ammonia primarily touch the brain and cause neurological impairment. However, the deleterious effects of ammonia are not specific to the brain, as the direct effect of increased ammonia (change in pH, membrane potential, metabolism) can occur in any type of cell. Therefore, in the setting of chronic liver disease where multi-organ dysfunction is common, the role of ammonia, only as neurotoxin, is challenged. This review provides insights and evidence that increased ammonia can disturb many organ and cell types and hence lead to dysfunction.

  15. Coherent 40 Gb/s SP-16QAM and 80 Gb/s PDM-16QAM in an Optimal Supercomputer Optical Switch Fabric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karinou, Fotini; Borkowski, Robert; Zibar, Darko

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of using 40 Gb/s SP-16QAM and 80 Gb/s PDM-16QAM in an optimized cell switching supercomputer optical interconnect architecture based on semiconductor optical amplifiers as ON/OFF gates.......We demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of using 40 Gb/s SP-16QAM and 80 Gb/s PDM-16QAM in an optimized cell switching supercomputer optical interconnect architecture based on semiconductor optical amplifiers as ON/OFF gates....

  16. Numerical Study of Ammonia Leak and Dispersion in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2012-01-01

    Release of ammonia into the International Space Station (ISS) cabin atmosphere can occur if the water/ammonia barrier breach of the active thermal control system (ATCS) interface heat exchanger (IFHX) happens. After IFHX breach liquid ammonia is introduced into the water-filled internal thermal control system (ITCS) and then to the cabin environment through a ruptured gas trap. Once the liquid water/ammonia mixture exits ITCS, it instantly vaporizes and mixes with the U.S. Laboratory cabin air that results in rapid deterioration of the cabin conditions. The goal of the study is to assess ammonia propagation in the Station after IFHX breach to plan the operation procedure. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for accurate prediction of airflow and ammonia transport within each of the modules in the ISS cabin was developed. CFD data on ammonia content in the cabin aisle way of the ISS and, in particular, in the Russian On- Orbit Segment during the period of 15 minutes after gas trap rupture are presented for four scenarios of rupture response. Localized effects of ammonia dispersion and risk mitigation are discussed.

  17. Degradation of halogenated aliphatic compounds by the ammonia- oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

    OpenAIRE

    Vannelli, T; Logan, M; Arciero, D M; Hooper, A B

    1990-01-01

    Suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea catalyzed the ammonia-stimulated aerobic transformation of the halogenated aliphatic compounds dichloromethane, dibromomethane, trichloromethane (chloroform), bromoethane, 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide), 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, monochloroethylene (vinyl chloride), gem-dichloroethylene, cis- and trans-dichloroethylene, cis-dibromoethylene, trichloroethylene, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane, Tetrachloromethane (carbon tetrachloride),...

  18. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  19. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-12-01

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements 85 Sr and 137 Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, 85 Sr could not be detected in the leachates. 137 Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way

  20. Application of copper sulfate pentahydrate as an ammonia removal reagent for the determination of trace impurities in ammonia by gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aomura, Yoko; Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Miyazawa, Yuzuru; Shimizu, Hideharu

    2010-03-12

    Rapid analysis of trace permanent gas impurities in high purity ammonia gas for the microelectronics industry is described, using a gas chromatograph equipped with a phtoionization detector. Our system incorporates a reactive precolumn in combination with the analytical column to remove the ammonia matrix peak that otherwise would complicate the measurements due to baseline fluctuations and loss of analytes. The performance of 21 precolumn candidate materials was evaluated. Copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO(4).5H(2)O) was shown to selectively react with ammonia at room temperature and atmospheric column pressures, without affecting the hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, methane or carbon monoxide peak areas. To prevent loss of trace carbon dioxide, an additional boron trioxide reactant layer was inserted above the copper sulfate pentahydrate bed in the reactive precolumn. Using the combined materials, calibration curves for carbon dioxide proved to be equivalent in both ammonia and helium matrix gases. These curves were equivalent in both matrix gases. The quantitative performance of the system was also evaluated. Peak repeatabilities, based on eight injections, were in the range of 4.1-8.2% relative standard deviation; and detection limits were 6.9 ppb for H(2), 1.8 ppb for O(2), 1.6 ppb for N(2), 6.4 ppb for CH(4), 13 ppb for CO, and 5.4 ppb for CO(2). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding the gas sensing properties of polypyrrole coated tin oxide nanofiber mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Sudeshna; Ghanshyam, C.

    2017-03-01

    Tin oxide-polypyrrole composites have been widely studied for their enhanced sensing performance towards ammonia vapours, but further investigations are required for an understanding of the interaction mechanisms with different target analytes. In this work, polypyrrole coated tin oxide fibers have been synthesized using a two-step approach of electrospinning and vapour phase polymerization for the sensing of ammonia, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol and acetone vapours. The resistance variation in the presence of these vapours of different nature and concentration is investigated for the determination of sensor response. A decrease in resistance occurred on interaction of tin oxide-polypyrrole with ammonia, as opposed to previous reported works. Partial reduction of polypyrrole due to interfacial interaction with tin oxide has been proposed to explain this behavior. High sensitivity of 7.45 is achieved for 1 ppm ammonia concentration. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited high sensitivity and a faster response towards ethanol vapours although methanol has the highest electron donating capability. The catalytic mechanism has been discussed to explain this interesting behavior. The results reveal that interaction between tin oxide and polypyrrole is crucial to control the predominant sensing mechanism.

  2. Use of aliphatic n-alkynes to discriminate soil nitrification activities of ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne E; Vajrala, Neeraja; Giguere, Andrew T; Gitelman, Alix I; Arp, Daniel J; Myrold, David D; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Bottomley, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia (NH3)-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and thaumarchaea (AOA) co-occupy most soils, yet no short-term growth-independent method exists to determine their relative contributions to nitrification in situ. Microbial monooxygenases differ in their vulnerability to inactivation by aliphatic n-alkynes, and we found that NH3 oxidation by the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus was unaffected during a 24-h exposure to ≤ 20 μM concentrations of 1-alkynes C8 and C9. In contrast, NH3 oxidation by two AOB (Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosospira multiformis) was quickly and irreversibly inactivated by 1 μM C8 (octyne). Evidence that nitrification carried out by soilborne AOA was also insensitive to octyne was obtained. In incubations (21 or 28 days) of two different whole soils, both acetylene and octyne effectively prevented NH4(+)-stimulated increases in AOB population densities, but octyne did not prevent increases in AOA population densities that were prevented by acetylene. Furthermore, octyne-resistant, NH4(+)-stimulated net nitrification rates of 2 and 7 μg N/g soil/day persisted throughout the incubation of the two soils. Other evidence that octyne-resistant nitrification was due to AOA included (i) a positive correlation of octyne-resistant nitrification in soil slurries of cropped and noncropped soils with allylthiourea-resistant activity (100 μM) and (ii) the finding that the fraction of octyne-resistant nitrification in soil slurries correlated with the fraction of nitrification that recovered from irreversible acetylene inactivation in the presence of bacterial protein synthesis inhibitors and with the octyne-resistant fraction of NH4(+)-saturated net nitrification measured in whole soils. Octyne can be useful in short-term assays to discriminate AOA and AOB contributions to soil nitrification.

  3. Rectal administration of 13N-ammonia in the study of ammonia metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koen, Hirofumi

    1980-01-01

    13 N-ammonia produced by the cyclotron was instilled intrarectally in patients with liver diseases for the study of the turnover of rectally absorbed 13 N-ammonia. A positron camera connected to an on-line computer system was used for imaging of the liver and heart; 13 N-activity over the head was also recorded. Sequential changes of 13 N-activity in blood was measured, and chromatographic analysis of 13 N-labeled substances in blood was carried out using a Dowex 50W x 8 column. In the control, 13 N-ammonia was absorbed quickly into blood visualizing the liver shortly after administration, and hepatic uptake of 13 N-ammonia reached a plateau in 10 -- 15 min, whereas in patients with cirrhosis, the lung and heart were visualized in 5 min when the liver image was still faint. 13 N-activity over the head was apparently higher in the cirrhotic group. It was suggested that a large proportion of absorbed 13 N-ammonia bypassed liver cells and reached peripheral tissues. The heart/liver ratio of 13 N and 13 N over the head were closely correlated with various indices of portal hypertension. The relative proportion of 13 N-metabolites in blood was lower at 5 min and 15 min after administration in cirrhosis, suggesting a reduced capacity of the liver to remove and metabolize ammonia. (author)

  4. Effects of lignite application on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from cattle pens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jianlei, E-mail: su@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Bai, Mei [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Shen, Jianlin [Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); Griffith, David W.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Denmead, Owen T. [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Hill, Julian [Ternes Agricultural Consulting Pty Ltd, Upwey, VIC 3158 (Australia); Lam, Shu Kee; Mosier, Arvin R. [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Chen, Deli, E-mail: delichen@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    Beef cattle feedlots are a major source of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) emissions from livestock industries. We investigated the effects of lignite surface applications on NH{sub 3} and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from beef cattle feedlot pens. Two rates of lignite, 3 and 6 kg m{sup −2}, were tested in the treatment pen. No lignite was applied in the control pen. Twenty-four Black Angus steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. We measured NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O concentrations continuously from 4th Sep to 13th Nov 2014 using Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) NH{sub 3} analysers and a closed-path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analyser (CP-FTIR) in conjunction with the integrated horizontal flux method to calculate NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O fluxes. During the feeding period, 16 and 26% of the excreted nitrogen (N) (240 g N head{sup −1} day{sup −1}) was lost via NH{sub 3} volatilization from the control pen, while lignite application decreased NH{sub 3} volatilization to 12 and 18% of the excreted N, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Compared to the control pen, lignite application decreased NH{sub 3} emissions by approximately 30%. Nitrous oxide emissions from the cattle pens were small, 0.10 and 0.14 g N{sub 2}O-N head{sup −1} day{sup −1} (< 0.1% of excreted N) for the control pen, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Lignite application increased direct N{sub 2}O emissions by 40 and 57%, to 0.14 and 0.22 g N{sub 2}O-N head{sup −1} day{sup −1}, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. The increase in N{sub 2}O emissions resulting from lignite application was counteracted by the lower indirect N{sub 2}O emission due to decreased NH{sub 3} volatilization. Using 1% as a default emission factor of deposited NH{sub 3} for indirect N{sub 2}O emissions, the application of lignite decreased total N{sub 2}O emissions. - Graphical abstract: Lignite application substantially decreased NH{sub 3} emissions from cattle feedlots and increased

  5. CuO mesostructures as ammonia sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneshwari, S.; Gopalakrishnan, N.

    2018-04-01

    The emission threshold of NH3 in air is 1000 kg/yr which is now about 20 Tg/yr according to environmental protection agencies. Hence, there is a rapid increase in need of NH3 sensors to timely detect and control NH3 emissions. Metal oxide nanostructures such as CuO with special features are potential candidates for NH3 sensing. In the present study, morphology controlled 3-dimensional CuO mesostructures were synthesized by surfactant-free hydrothermal method. A modified approach using a mixture of water and ethylene glycol (EG) was used as solvent to control the growth process. Hierarchical mesostructures namely, hollow-sphere-like and urchin-like feature with particle dimensions ranging from 0.3-1 µm were obtained by varying water/EG ratio. The room temperature ammonia sensing behavior of all samples was studied using an indigenous gas sensing set-up. It was found that hollow-sphere like CuO nanostructures showed a maximum response of 2 towards 300 ppm ammonia with a response and recovery time of 5 and 15 min. The hydrothermal synthesis strategy reported here has the advantage of producing shape controlled hierarchical materials are highly suitable for various technological applications.

  6. Ammonia Emissions from Agriculture in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, B.

    2016-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important alkaline pollutant in the atmosphere and it has various environmental and climatic effects. We will present an improved bottom-up estimate of ammonia emissions from agriculture in China at 0.5°×0.5° horizontal resolution and monthly variability. Ammonia emissions from fertilizer use are derived using data of crop planting area, fertilizer application time and rate for 18 main crops. Ammonia emission factors from fertilizer use are estimated as a function of soil properties such as soil pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and agricultural activity information such as crop type, fertilizer type, and application mode. We further consider ambient temperature and wind speed to account for the meteorological influences on ammonia emission factors of fertilizer use. We also estimate the ammonia emission from livestock over China using the mass-flow methodology. The derived ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 4.55 Tg NH3 from fertilizer use and 6.96 Tg from livestock. Henan and Jiangsu provinces are the two largest emitting areas for ammonia from fertilizer use (470 Gg NH3 and 365 Gg NH3). Henan (621 Gg NH3) and Shandong (533 Gg NH3) have the largest ammonia emissions from livestock. Both ammonia emissions from fertilizer use and livestock have distinct seasonal variations; peaking in June for fertilizer use (822 Gg NH3) and in July for livestock (1244 Gg NH3), and are both lowest in January (80 Gg and 241 Gg, respectively). Combining with other ammonia source (eg. human waste and transport) estimates from the REAS v2.1 emission inventory, we show that total ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 14.0 Tg NH3 a-1. Comparisons with satellite measurements of ammonia columns will also be presented.

  7. [Condition optimization for bio-oxidation of high-S and high-As gold concentrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Caiyun; Dong, Bowen; Wang, Meijun; Ye, Zhiyong; Zheng, Tianling; Huang, Huaiguo

    2015-12-04

    To study the effects of temperature and lixivium return on the concentrate bio-oxidation and rate of gold cyanide leaching. The bioleaching of a high-sulphur (S) and high-arsenic (As) refractory gold concentrate was conducted, and we studied the effects of different temperature (40 ° and 45 °C) and lixivium return (0 and 600 mL) on the bio-oxidation efficiency. The bacterial community structure also was investigated by 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results showed that both the temperature and lixivium return significantly influenced the oxidation system. The temperature rising elevated the oxidation level, while the addition of lixivium depressed the oxidation. Dissimilarity and DCA (detrended correspondence analysis) indicated the effect of temperature on oxidation system was much greater than lixivium. The bacterial community was comprised by Acidithiocacillus caldu (71%) Leptospirillum ferriphilum (23%) and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans (6%) indicated by the clone library, and the OTU coverage based on 97% sequence similarity was as high as 93.67%. Temperature rising to 45 T would improve the oxidation efficiency while lixivium return would decrease it. This study is helpful to provide an important guiding value for the industry cost optimization of mesophile bacterial oxidation and reduction process.

  8. Defences against ammonia toxicity in tropical air-breathing fishes exposed to high concentrations of environmental ammonia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Y K; Chew, S F; Wilson, J M; Randall, D J

    2004-10-01

    In the tropics, air-breathing fishes can be exposed to environmental ammonia when stranded in puddles of water during the dry season, during a stay inside a burrow, or after agricultural fertilization. At low concentrations of environmental ammonia, NH(3) excretion is impeded, as in aerial exposure, leading to the accumulation of endogenous ammonia. At high concentrations of environmental ammonia, which results in a reversed NH(3) partial pressure gradient (DeltaP(NH3)), there is retention of endogenous ammonia and uptake of exogenous ammonia. In this review, several tropical air-breathing fishes (giant mudskipper, African catfish, oriental weatherloach, swamp eel, four-eyed sleeper, abehaze and slender African lungfish), which can tolerate high environmental ammonia exposure, are used as examples to demonstrate how eight different adaptations can be involved in defence against ammonia toxicity. Four of these adaptations deal with ammonia toxicity at branchial and/or epithelial surfaces: (1) active excretion of NH(4)(+); (2) lowering of environmental pH; (3) low NH(3) permeability of epithelial surfaces; and (4) volatilization of NH(3), while another four adaptations ameliorate ammonia toxicity at the cellular and subcellular levels: (5) high tolerance of ammonia at the cellular and subcellular levels; (6) reduction in ammonia production; (7) glutamine synthesis; and (8) urea synthesis. The responses of tropical air-breathing fishes to high environmental ammonia are determined apparently by behavioural adaptations and the nature of their natural environments.

  9. Is there in vivo evidence for amino acid shuttles carrying ammonia from neurons to astrocytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Douglas L; De Feyter, Henk M; Maciejewski, Paul K; Behar, Kevin L

    2012-11-01

    The high in vivo flux of the glutamate/glutamine cycle puts a strong demand on the return of ammonia released by phosphate activated glutaminase from the neurons to the astrocytes in order to maintain nitrogen balance. In this paper we review several amino acid shuttles that have been proposed for balancing the nitrogen flows between neurons and astrocytes in the glutamate/glutamine cycle. All of these cycles depend on the directionality of glutamate dehydrogenase, catalyzing reductive glutamate synthesis (forward reaction) in the neuron in order to capture the ammonia released by phosphate activated glutaminase, while catalyzing oxidative deamination of glutamate (reverse reaction) in the astrocytes to release ammonia for glutamine synthesis. Reanalysis of results from in vivo experiments using (13)N and (15)N labeled ammonia and (15)N leucine in rats suggests that the maximum flux of the alanine/lactate or branched chain amino acid/branched chain amino acid transaminase shuttles between neurons and astrocytes are approximately 3-5 times lower than would be required to account for the ammonia transfer from neurons to astrocytes needed for glutamine synthesis (amide nitrogen) to sustain the glutamate/glutamine cycle. However, in the rat brain both the total ammonia fixation rate by glutamate dehydrogenase and the total branched chain amino acid transaminase activity are sufficient to support a branched chain amino acid/branched chain keto acid shuttle, as proposed by Hutson and coworkers, which would support the de novo synthesis of glutamine in the astrocyte to replace the ~20 % of neurotransmitter glutamate that is oxidized. A higher fraction of the nitrogen needs of total glutamate neurotransmitter cycling could be supported by hybrid cycles in which glutamate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates act as a nitrogen shuttle. A limitation of all in vivo studies in animals conducted to date is that none have shown transfer of nitrogen for glutamine amide

  10. Techniques for measuring ammonia in fly ash, mortar, and concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, R.F. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Reseach; Majors, R.K. [Boral Material Technologies, Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States). Engineered Materials

    2003-12-01

    The presence of ammonia in fly ash that is to be used in mortar and concrete is of increasing concern in the U.S., mainly due to the installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) DeNOx systems. When the SCR catalyst is new, contamination of the fly ash with ammonia is generally not a concern. However, as the catalyst in the SCR ages and becomes less efficient, the ammonia slip increases and results in a greater amount of ammonium salt being precipitated on the fly ash. The increase in ammonia concentration is compounded by variability that can occur on a day-to-day basis. When marketing ammonia-laden fly ash for use in mortar and concrete it is imperative that the concentration of ammonia is known. However, there currently is no widely accepted or ''standard'' method for ammonia measurement in fly ash. This paper describes two methods that have been developed and used by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and Boral Material Technologies, Inc. One of the methods uses gas detection tubes and can provide an accurate determination within five to ten minutes. Thus it is suitable as a rapid field technique. The other method employs a gas-sensing electrode and requires a longer period of time to complete the measurement. However, this second method can also be used to determine the quantity of ammonia in fresh mortar and concrete. (orig.)

  11. Arsenite Oxidation and Arsenite Resistance by Bacillus sp. PNKP-S2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Pattanapipitpaisal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic causes human health problems after accumulate in the body for 10-15 years and arsenite [As(III] is generally regarded as being more mobile and toxic than other oxidat