WorldWideScience

Sample records for ammonia fluxes obtained

  1. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, A.; Nemitz, E.; Flynn, M. J.; Blatter, A.; Jones, S. K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hensen, B.; Pryor, S. C.; Jensen, B.; Otjes, R. P.; Cobussen, J.; Loubet, B.; Erisman, J. W.; Gallagher, M. W.; Neftel, A.; Sutton, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    The exchange of Ammonia (NH3) between grassland and the atmosphere was determined using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements. The use of REA is of special interest for NH3, since the determination of fluxes at one height permits multiple systems to be deployed to quantify vertical flux divergence (either due to effects of chemical production or advection). During the Braunschweig integrated experiment four different continuous-sampling REA systems were operated during a period of about 10 days and were compared against a reference provided by independent application of the Aerodynamic Gradient Method (AGM). The experiment covered episodes before and after both cutting and fertilizing and provided a wide range of fluxes -60-3600 ng NH3 m-2 s-1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3 surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that reference sampling periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects, significant improvements in sampling precision are essential to allow robust determination of flux divergence in future studies. Wet chemical techniques will be developed further since they use the adsorptive and reactive properties of NH3 that impedes development of cheaper optical systems.

  2. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sutton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of Ammonia (NH3 between grassland and the atmosphere was determined using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA measurements. The use of REA is of special interest for NH3, since the determination of fluxes at one height permits multiple systems to be deployed to quantify vertical flux divergence (either due to effects of chemical production or advection. During the Braunschweig integrated experiment four different continuous-sampling REA systems were operated during a period of about 10 days and were compared against a reference provided by independent application of the Aerodynamic Gradient Method (AGM. The experiment covered episodes before and after both cutting and fertilizing and provided a wide range of fluxes −60–3600 ng NH3 m−2 s−1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3 surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that reference sampling periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects, significant improvements in sampling precision are essential to allow robust determination of flux divergence in future studies. Wet chemical techniques will be developed further since they use the adsorptive and reactive properties of NH3 that impedes development of cheaper optical systems.

  3. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensen, A.; Nemitz, E.; Flynn, M.J.;

    2009-01-01

    Gradient Method (AGM). The experiment covered episodes before and after both cutting and fertilizing and provided a wide range of fluxes −60–3600 ng NH3 m−2 s−1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions...... between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3...... surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that reference sampling periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects...

  4. Inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes obtained using the relaxed eddy accumulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hensen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of NH3 between grassland and the atmosphere was determined using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA measurements. The use of REA is of special interest for NH3, since the determination of fluxes at one height permits multiple systems to be deployed to quantify vertical flux divergence (either due to effects of chemical production or advection. During the Braunschweig integrated experiment four different continuous-sampling REA systems were operated during a period of about 10 days and were compared against a reference provided by independent application of the Aerodynamic Gradient Method (AGM. The experiment covered episodes before, after cutting and fertilising and provided a wide range of fluxes −60–3600 ng NH3 m−2 s−1 for testing the REA systems. The REA systems showed moderate to good correlation with the AGM estimates, with r2 values for the linear regressions between 0.3 and 0.82. For the period immediately after fertilization, the REA systems showed average fluxes 20% to 70% lower than the reference. At periods with low fluxes REA and AGM can agree within a few %. Overall, the results show that the continuous REA technique can now be used to measure NH3 surface exchange fluxes. While REA requires greater analytical precision in NH3 measurement than the AGM, a key advantage of REA is that auto-referencing periods can be introduced to remove bias between sampling inlets. However, while the data here indicate differences consistent with advection effects, further improvements in sampling precision are needed to allow measurement of flux divergence. Wet chemical techniques will be developed further since they use the sticky and reactive properties of NH3 that impedes development of cheaper optical systems.

  5. Fluxes of ammonia in the coastal marine boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, L.L.; Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C.A.;

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of ammonia in air and ammonium in surface water were measured from a platform in the Southern North Sea close to the Dutch coast. Fluxes were derived from the measurements applying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and exchange velocities calculated. The fluxes and air concentrations...

  6. Background concentrations and fluxes of atmospheric ammonia overa deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Pryor, Sara C.; Bøgh, Eva;

    2015-01-01

    this study, we present two months of half-hourly NH3 fluxes and concentrations measured using a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation system during late summer and fall 2013 above a remote forest site in the central Midwest in USA. Supplementary nitric acid (HNO3) flux and size-resolved aerosol-N measurements are...... magnitude of up to 0.11 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1. The wetness of the forest surfaces (assessed using a proxy of time since precipitation) was found to be crucial in controlling both deposition and emission of atmospheric NH3. Size resolved aerosol concentrations (of NH4+, NO3−, Cl− and SO42−) indicated that the...... aerosol and gas phase concentration of ammonia/ammonium were of similar magnitude but that the aerosol phase typically dominated. Nitric acid flux measurements showed periods of apparent upward fluxes, but they were not preferentially associated with upwards NH3 fluxes indicating they may not have a...

  7. Effect of Heat Fluxes on Ammonia Emission from Swine Waste Lagoon Based on Neural Network Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    N. Lovanh; A. Quintanar; M. Rysz; J. Loughrin; Mahmood, R.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding factors that affect ammonia emissions from swine waste lagoons or any animal waste receptacles is a necessary first step in deploying potential remediation options. In this study, we examined the various meteorological factors (i.e., air temperatures, solar radiation and heat fluxes) that potentially affect ammonia emissions from swine waste lagoon. Ammonia concentrations were monitored using a photoacoustic gas analyzer. The ammonia emissions from ...

  8. Measurements of ammonia concentrations, fluxes and dry deposition velocities to a spruce forest 1991-1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.V.; Hovmand, M.F.; Hummelshøj, P.;

    1999-01-01

    The dry deposition velocities and fluxes of ammonia have been estimated from measurements of the vertical gradient of ammonia and micrometeorology above a spruce forest in western Jutland, Denmark. Measurements have been made in seven periods, each lasting about one week and covering all seasons......, i.e. an ammonia concentration below which the trees and/or the surface emit ammonia due to an equilibrium with the ammonia inside the needles or on the surface. Emission of ammonia was also observed at relatively high ammonia concentration levels (above 2 mu g NH3-N m(-3)), mainly during one...... measuring period characterized by easterly winds with dry conditions and high ammonia concentrations, and the emissions might relate to evaporation from ammonia saturated surfaces or emission from mineralization in the forest soil. In general, relatively high net deposition velocities were observed during...

  9. Ammonia fluxes for beech forest in the leaf fall transition period - measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L.; Hertel, O.; Geels, C.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Boegh, E.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of atmospheric reactive nitrogen represents uncertainties for the prediction of future greenhouse gas exchange between land surfaces and the atmosphere. This is because the mechanisms describing nutritional effects are not well developed in climate and ecosystems models. Improving the understanding of biochemical feed-back mechanisms in the climate system and quantifying the magnitude of the NH3 flux in the biosphere-atmosphere system is therefore essential. In particular, more knowledge of the bi-directional ammonia (NH3) exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere is needed. We investigated the NH3 exchange for deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall by studying the atmospheric NH3 fluxes throughout a 25 days period during autumn 2010 (21 October - 14 November) for the Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest, Lille Bøgeskov. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). The atmospheric NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method and compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations were obtained using the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS). We found that 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% deposition. The mean NH3 flux was 0.087±0.19 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1. Measurements indicate a clear tendency of the flux going from negative (deposition) to positive (emission) fluxes of up to 0.96±0.40 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1 throughout the measurement period. In the leaf fall period (23 October - 8 November) the measured atmospheric NH3 concentration was increasing in relation to the increasing forest NH3 flux. The mean NH3 concentration was well simulated in DAMOS before leaf fall, but was underestimated following leaf fall. The results indicate that there is a missing contribution to atmospheric NH3 concentration from vegetative surfaces related to leaf fall of a relatively large magnitude in the model. This points to the need for representing forest leaf fall

  10. Synthesis and reactivity of aluminium nitride obtained by action of ammonia on alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminium nitride is a ceramic with potential nuclear applications because of its exceptional structural resistance to neutrons. To improve quality and reactivity a new preparation process by reaction between ammonia and alumina is presented. The aluminium nitride thus obtained, white colored, is pure and its reactivity gives an useful product for a lot of synthesis in the area of nitrided ceramics and glasses

  11. Synthesis and reactivity of aluminium nitride obtained by action of ammonia on alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocherulle, J.; Guyader, J.; Verdier, P.; Laurent, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminium nitride is a ceramic with potential nuclear applications because of its exceptional structural resistance to neutrons. To improve quality and reactivity a new preparation process by reaction between ammonia and alumina is presented. The aluminium nitride thus obtained, white colored, is pure and its reactivity gives an useful product for a lot of synthesis in the area of nitrided ceramics and glasses.

  12. Aqua ammonia 15 N obtaining and application with vainness for sugar-cane fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen compounds marked with the isotope 15 N are continuously being used in agronomic studies and, when associated to the isotopic dilution technique, they constitute an important tool in clarifying the N cycle. At the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), it was obtained ( 15 NH4)2SO4 enhanced at 3,5% of 15 N atoms, by means of the ionic exchange chromatography technique, which made possible to produce aqua ammonia (15 NH3aq). Four repetitions were taken to the aqua ammonia production process to use the nitrogen compound in the field experiment. In each process 150g of ammonium sulfate enhanced at 3,5% of 15 N atoms was used, obtaining 31,0 ± 1,6 g of aqua ammonia on the average (80% yield), with the same enhancement. The incidence of isotopic dilution has not been observed during the procedure, what made the use of such methodology possible. After obtaining the aqua ammonia 15 N through this procedure, it was added to the vinasse (an equivalent to 50 m3 ha-1 ) in doses that corresponded to 70 kg ha-1 of N-NH3aq. The mixture was applied to the sugar-cane straw on the soil's surface, aimed to the crop's fertilization. The compound's isotopic composition was analyzed by means of a spectrometer of masses ANCA-SL Europe Scientific, while the total-N volatilized, by the micro-Kjeldahl. Method. In accordance to the low NH3 (6,4 ± 1,9 kg ha-1 ) volatilization results, it could be concluded that the application of vinasse and aqua ammonia mixture to the straw on the soil's surface was efficient, due to the vinasse's acid character, which allowed the NH3, in presence of the ion H+, to stay in the NH4+ form in solution. (author)

  13. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA MASS EMISSION FLUX FROM HOG WASTE EFFLUENT SPRAYING OPERATION USING OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY WITH VERTICAL RADIAL PLUME MAPPING ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission of ammonia from concentrated animal feeding operations represents an increasingly important environmental issue. Determination of total ammonia mass emission flux from extended area sources such as waste lagoons and waste effluent spraying operations can be evaluated usi...

  14. The effects of management on ammonia fluxes over a cut grassland as measured by use of dynamic chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. David

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Grassland management may lead to strong modification of the canopy structure and hence fluxes of carbon and nitrogen in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Mowing or grazing removes green leaves, which are often a sink for ammonia. Consequently, the ratio between actively growing leaves and senescing/dead parts of the plants is strongly changed in favour of the latter, which may constitute a large source of ammonia. Moreover, fertilisers are a known source of ammonia through direct volatilisation.

    The effects of grassland management, e.g. growing, cutting and fertilisation, on ammonia emission were investigated using a dynamic chamber. This technique made it possible to monitor ammonia emissions in the field at the plant level. With ammonia-free air at the inlet, the ammonia emissions from mature sward did not exceed 4 ng NH3 m−2 s−1. They were approximately 20 times larger above a sward re-growing after cutting and 200 times larger after fertilisation, where 0.5–1.0% of the applied inorganic nitrogen fertiliser was lost by volatilisation.

    Cutting implied three main changes in ammonia sources and sinks within the canopy: (i physiological changes with nitrogen remobilisation to the growing leaves and increase in senescence, (ii changes in compartment proportions with only 5% of green leaves remaining after cutting as opposed to equal proportions of dead leaves as green leaves before cutting, (iii microclimate changes within the canopy especially for litter with higher turbulence, temperature, and alternation of dry (day and wet (night conditions after cutting. These changes promoted ammonia volatilisation from the litter, which could account for the increased ammonia loss following cutting. Another potential source was the wounded surfaces of the stubble which may have emitted ammonia during bleeding and evaporation of sap containing significant levels of ammonium.

    These results

  15. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by high temperature chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sintermann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A system for fast ammonia (NH3 measurements with chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180 °C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the instrument for eddy covariance (EC measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min−1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150 °C to an air-conditioned trailer where the gas was sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m−2 s−1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 μg m−2 s−1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  16. Obtaining and Characterization of Flux-Based Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmina Maria Bogăţean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of creating this assortment was to remind the public of a long forgotten sugar based product, with a high energy value and which can be easily associated both with plain or mineral water consumption. Also we have taken into consideration the well-known '' home-made'' and ''vintage'' concepts. The purpose of this scientific research is to obtain a laboratory created product, as well as obtaining both the cocoa and the lemon sorbet. In the technological process this type of products can be redefined under a new form. The great advantage comes with the fact that it dosen't currently exit on the market and so it can be considered as being a brand new product. The anbalyses both on the raw materials and on the final deliverable product were done in the Faculty's laboratories and it was proven to meet the standars.

  17. Ammonia fluxes in relation to cutting and fertilization of an intensively managed grassland derived from an inter-comparison of gradient measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milford, C.; Theobald, M. R.; Nemitz, E.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Horvath, L.; Raso, J.; Dämmgen, U.; Neftel, A.; Jones, S. K.; Hensen, A.; Loubet, B.; Cellier, P.; Sutton, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    Quantification of ammonia (NH3) land-atmosphere exchange is required for atmospheric modelling and assessment of nitrogen deposition, yet flux measurement methods remain highly uncertain. To address this issue, a major inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes over intensively managed grassland was conducted during the GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment held in Braunschweig, Germany. In order to provide a robust dataset of ammonia exchange with the vegetation, four independent continuous flux gradient systems were operated. Three independently operated continuous wet denuders systems (AMANDA) were compared with a Wet Effluent Diffusion Denuder (mini-WEDD) system. Measurements were made at two distances from an adjacent livestock farm, allowing effects of advection to be quantified in a real landscape setting. Data treatment included filtering for instrument failure, disturbed wind sectors and unsuitable micrometeorological conditions, with corrections made for storage and advection errors. The inter-comparison demonstrated good agreement in measured ammonia concentrations and fluxes (relative standard error <20%) for some periods, although the performance of the ammonia analyzers were variable, with much poorer agreement on particular days. However, by using four systems, the inter-comparison was able to provide a robust mean estimate of continuous ammonia fluxes through the experiment. The observed fluxes were: a) small bi-directional fluxes prior to cutting (-64 to 42 ng NH3 m-2 s-1), b) larger diurnally-varying emissions following cutting (-49 to 703 ng NH3 m-2 s-1) and c) much larger emissions following fertilizer application (0 to 3820 ng NH3 m-2 s-1). The results are a salutary reminder of the uncertainty in unreplicated ammonia flux measurements, while the replication of the present study provides a uniquely robust dataset for the evaluation of ammonia exchange processes. It is clear that consistently reliable determination of ammonia concentrations remains the major

  18. The annual ammonia budget of fertilised cut grassland – Part 1: Micrometeorological flux measurements and emissions after slurry application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spirig

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Two commercial ammonia (NH3 analysers were customised to allow continuous measurements of vertical concentration gradients. The gradients were used to derive ammonia exchange fluxes above a managed grassland site at Oensingen (Switzerland by application of the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM. The semi-continuous measurements during 1.5 years covered five complete growth-cut cycles and included six applications of liquid cattle slurry. The average accuracy of the flux measurements during conditions of well established turbulence was 20% and the detection limit 10 ng NH3 m−2 s−1, hence sufficient for studying the background exchange of NH3. Quantifying emissions after slurry applications required the application of elaborate interpolations because of difficulties capturing the initial emissions during manure spreading in some parts of the experiments. The emissions were also calculated with a mass balance method (MBM yielding similar fluxes. NH3 losses after slurry application expressed as percentage of emitted nitrogen versus applied total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN varied between 4 and 19%, which is lower than typical values for broadspreading of liquid manure. The comparatively low emission factors appear to be a consequence of the rather thin slurry applied here and soil properties favouring ammonium adsorption.

  19. Method to obtain sulphur from the hydrogen sulphide of coke oven gas with simultaneous combustion of the coke oven gas ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, G.; Weber, H.

    1976-02-05

    The invention deals with a method to obtain sulphur from coke oven gas hydrogen sulphide by partly combusting to sulphur dioxide and processing to sulphur with simultaneous combustion of the coke oven ammonia according to the Claus method. The method is thus characterized in that the ammonia combustion gases released from the heating boiler are after cooling freed from the aqueous condensate and then are added to the partly combusted hydrogen sulphide clouds before introducing into the Claus oven system.

  20. "Advances in Coupled Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry to address bidirectional ammonia flux"

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cropland farm management modeling system for regional air quality and field-scale applications of bi-directional ammonia exchange was presented at ITM XXI. The goal of this research is to improve estimates of nitrogen deposition to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and ambien...

  1. Investigation of the accuracy that can be obtained in the thermal neutron flux determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An absolute method to determine the neutron flux by avoiding the knowledge of an intermediate cross-section is presented. With this aim in view, a B10 target was used with a thickness calculated so that the neutron escape probability be less than 10-5. Using a Ge(Li) spectrometer, the neutron capture in the boron nucleus was detected through the gamma rays of 7Li. Irradiating in the same neutron flux a gold foil of the same area as the boron target, the spectrometer efficiency was determined. The absolute activity of this foil was obtained with a 4πβ-γ counter. It results that, by this method, thermal neutron fluxes can be determined with an error less than 0.5%. (author)

  2. Ammonia concentrations and fluxes over a forest in the midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, S.C.; Barthelmie, R.J.; Sørensen, L.L.;

    2001-01-01

    indicate mean concentrations of 0.6-1.2 mug m(-3) during the spring and 0.3 mug m(-3) during the winter. Measurements suggest that on average the Forest act as a sink of NH3, with a representative daily deposition flux of 1.8 mg-NH3: m(-2) during the spring. However, on some days during the spring inverted...

  3. Coefficients de-noising with wavelet transform for magnetic flux leakage data obtained from oil pipeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Wenhua; Que Peiwen

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of noise cancellation for the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) data obtained from the inspection of oil pipelines. MFL data is contaminated by various sources of noise, and the noise can considerably reduce the detectability of flaw signals in MFL data. This paper presents a new de-noising approach for removing the system noise contained in the MFL data by using the coefficients de-noising with wavelet transform. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the advantages of this de-noising approach over the conventional wavelet de-noising method.

  4. Direct and indirect effects of ammonia, ammonium and nitrate on phosphatase activity and carbon fluxes from decomposing litter in peatland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we investigate the response of soils and litter to 5 years of experimental additions of ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and ammonia (NH3) to an ombrotrophic peatland. We test the importance of direct (via soil) and indirect (via litter) effects on phosphatase activity and efflux of CO2. We also determined how species representing different functional types responded to the nitrogen treatments. Our results demonstrate that additions of NO3, NH4 and NH3 all stimulated phosphatase activity but the effects were dependent on species of litter and mechanism (direct or indirect). Deposition of NH3 had no effect on efflux of CO2 from Calluna vulgaris litter, despite it showing signs of stress in the field, whereas both NO3 and NH4 reduced CO2 fluxes. Our results show that the collective impacts on peatlands of the three principal forms of nitrogen in atmospheric deposition are a result of differential effects and mechanisms on individual components. - We found that nitrogen deposition affects microbial activity associated with litter through both indirect and direct mechanisms, but these effects were dependent on the chemical form of inorganic nitrogen compounds.

  5. An Optimal Estimation Method to Obtain Surface Layer Turbulent Fluxes from Profile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of direct turbulence measurements, the turbulence characteristics of the atmospheric surface layer are often derived from measurements of the surface layer mean properties based on Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST). This approach requires two levels of the ensemble mean wind, temperature, and water vapor, from which the fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and water vapor can be obtained. When only one measurement level is available, the roughness heights and the assumed properties of the corresponding variables at the respective roughness heights are used. In practice, the temporal mean with large number of samples are used in place of the ensemble mean. However, in many situations the samples of data are taken from multiple levels. It is thus desirable to derive the boundary layer flux properties using all measurements. In this study, we used an optimal estimation approach to derive surface layer properties based on all available measurements. This approach assumes that the samples are taken from a population whose ensemble mean profile follows the MOST. An optimized estimate is obtained when the results yield a minimum cost function defined as a weighted summation of all error variance at each sample altitude. The weights are based one sample data variance and the altitude of the measurements. This method was applied to measurements in the marine atmospheric surface layer from a small boat using radiosonde on a tethered balloon where temperature and relative humidity profiles in the lowest 50 m were made repeatedly in about 30 minutes. We will present the resultant fluxes and the derived MOST mean profiles using different sets of measurements. The advantage of this method over the 'traditional' methods will be illustrated. Some limitations of this optimization method will also be discussed. Its application to quantify the effects of marine surface layer environment on radar and communication signal propagation will be shown as well.

  6. Anthropogenic point and non-point nitrogen inputs into Huai River Basin and their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen flux

    OpenAIRE

    W. S. Zhang; D. P. Swaney; Li, X.Y.; Hong, B.; Howarth, R. W.; Ding, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a new approach to estimate both anthropogenic non-point and point nitrogen (N) inputs to the landscape, and determines their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen (AN) flux, providing a foundation for further exploration of anthropogenic effects on N pollution. Our study site is Huai River Basin of China, a watershed with one of the highest levels of N input in the world. Multi-year average (2003–2010) inputs of N to the watershed are 27 2...

  7. Cd1−xZnxS thin films with low Zn content obtained by an ammonia-free chemical bath deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cd1−xZnxS films with low Zn content were obtained on glass substrates by an ammonia-free chemical bath deposition process. Alkaline reaction solutions were prepared using cadmium chloride, zinc chloride, sodium citrate, thiourea and potassium hydroxide. As a result of varying the mixture ratio between Cd and Zn precursors, microstructural studies from X-ray diffraction reveal that the resulting films have hexagonal, wurzite type, crystalline structure with changes in the preferential growth orientation. Important changes on the surface morphology and thickness of the Cd1−xZnxS films were also observed as effects of adding Zn to the CdS lattice. Optical studies show that Cd1−xZnxS thin films with energy band gaps in the range from 2.48 to 2.65 eV were obtained. - Highlights: • Cd1−xZnxS layers were grown on glass by ammonia-free chemical bath deposition • Films with low Zn content were obtained using reaction solutions with pH11.5 • Zn addition produced changes on the orientation growth and morphology of the films • Cd1−xZnxS films have energy band gap values from 2.48 to 2.65 eV

  8. Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S thin films with low Zn content obtained by an ammonia-free chemical bath deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreón-Moncada, I. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalúrgica 1062, CP. 25900, Ramos Arizpe, Coah., México (Mexico); González, L.A., E-mail: luis.gonzalez@cinvestav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalúrgica 1062, CP. 25900, Ramos Arizpe, Coah., México (Mexico); Pech-Canul, M.I. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalúrgica 1062, CP. 25900, Ramos Arizpe, Coah., México (Mexico); Ramírez-Bon, R. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Querétaro, Apartado Postal 1-798, CP. 76001 Querétaro, Qro., México (Mexico)

    2013-12-02

    Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S films with low Zn content were obtained on glass substrates by an ammonia-free chemical bath deposition process. Alkaline reaction solutions were prepared using cadmium chloride, zinc chloride, sodium citrate, thiourea and potassium hydroxide. As a result of varying the mixture ratio between Cd and Zn precursors, microstructural studies from X-ray diffraction reveal that the resulting films have hexagonal, wurzite type, crystalline structure with changes in the preferential growth orientation. Important changes on the surface morphology and thickness of the Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S films were also observed as effects of adding Zn to the CdS lattice. Optical studies show that Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S thin films with energy band gaps in the range from 2.48 to 2.65 eV were obtained. - Highlights: • Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S layers were grown on glass by ammonia-free chemical bath deposition • Films with low Zn content were obtained using reaction solutions with pH11.5 • Zn addition produced changes on the orientation growth and morphology of the films • Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S films have energy band gap values from 2.48 to 2.65 eV.

  9. A PC-based facility to obtain on line neutron flux profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need to get on-line neutron flux profile in the inaccessible areas of the power reactors along the end shield surfaces or in the fuelling machine vault areas. To achieve this aim, a PC based facility has been designed. The facility has a scanning table capable of scanning 500 mm x 500 mm area when positioned at one location. The counting head of this table can be loaded with BF3 counter or miniature fission counter as neutron sensor. The horizontal and vertical movements of the counting head are made by two stepping motors. The direction, speed and number of steps of the stepping motors are controlled by PC/XT system. The digital data from the BF3 counter/fission counter is logged during the movement of the counting head by using the read-on-the-fly method. For the control of the stepping motors and for the digital data acquisition, two separate add-on cards have been loaded in two expansion slots of PC. This paper gives the details of the system and some typical results obtained. (author). 3 figs

  10. Influence of gas-particle partitioning on ammonia and nitric acid fluxes above a deciduous forest in the Midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hornsby, Karen E.;

    diffusion denuders with detection by florescence and half-hourly flux measurements are calculated. HNO3 REA system is based on gas capture on sodium chloride (NaCl) coated denuders with subsequent analysis by ion-chromatography, and the resulting fluxes have a resolution of 3-4 hours. CO2 fluxes are...

  11. Anthropogenic point and non-point nitrogen inputs into Huai River Basin and their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. S.; Swaney, D. P.; Li, X. Y.; Hong, B.; Howarth, R. W.; Ding, S. H.

    2015-02-01

    This study provides a new approach to estimate both anthropogenic non-point and point nitrogen (N) inputs to the landscape, and determines their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen (AN) flux, providing a foundation for further exploration of anthropogenic effects on N pollution. Our study site is Huai River Basin of China, a watershed with one of the highest levels of N input in the world. Multi-year average (2003-2010) inputs of N to the watershed are 27 200 ± 1100 kg N km-2 yr-1. Non-point sources comprised about 98% of total N input and only 2% of inputs are directly added to the aquatic ecosystem as point sources. Fertilizer application was the largest non-point source of new N to the Huai River Basin (69% of net anthropogenic N inputs), followed by atmospheric deposition (20%), N fixation in croplands (7%), and N content of imported food and feed (2%). High N inputs showed impacts on riverine AN flux: fertilizer application, point N input and atmospheric N deposition were proved as more direct sources to riverine AN flux. Modes of N delivery and losses associated with biological denitrification in rivers, water consumption, interception by dams influenced the extent of export of riverine AN flux from N sources. Our findings highlight the importance of anthropogenic N inputs from point and non-point sources in heavily polluted watersheds, and provide some implications for AN prediction and management.

  12. Anthropogenic point-source and non-point-source nitrogen inputs into Huai River basin and their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. S.; Swaney, D. P.; Li, X. Y.; Hong, B.; Howarth, R. W.; Ding, S. H.

    2015-07-01

    This study provides a new approach to estimate both anthropogenic non-point-source and point-source nitrogen (N) inputs to the landscape, and determines their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen (AN) flux, providing a foundation for further exploration of anthropogenic effects on N pollution. Our study site is Huai River basin of China, a water-shed with one of the highest levels of N input in the world. Multi-year average (2003-2010) inputs of N to the watershed are 27 200 ± 1100 kg N km-2 yr-1. Non-point sources comprised about 98 % of total N input, and only 2 % of inputs are directly added to the aquatic ecosystem as point sources. Fertilizer application was the largest non-point source of new N to the Huai River basin (69 % of net anthropogenic N inputs), followed by atmospheric deposition (20 %), N fixation in croplands (7 %), and N content of imported food and feed (2 %). High N inputs showed impacts on riverine AN flux: fertilizer application, point-source N input, and atmospheric N deposition were proved as more direct sources to riverine AN flux. Modes of N delivery and losses associated with biological denitrification in rivers, water consumption, interception by dams may influence the extent of export of riverine AN flux from N sources. Our findings highlight the importance of anthropogenic N inputs from both point sources and non-point sources in heavily polluted watersheds, and provide some implications for AN prediction and management.

  13. Spatial distribution of the neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor core obtained by means of foil activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional distribution of the neutron flux in IEA-R1 reactor, obtained by activating gold foils, is presented. The foils of diameter 8mm and thickness 0,013mm were mounted on lucite plates and located between the fuel element plates. Foil activities were measured using a 3x3 inches Nal(Tl) scintilation detector calibrated against a 4πβγ coincidence detector. Foil positions were chosen to minimize the errors of measurement; the overall estimated error on the measured flux is 5%. (Author)

  14. Advances in Linked Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry Models to Address Bidirectional Ammonia Flux in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent increases in anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to air, land and water media pose a growing threat to human health and ecosystems. Modeling of air-surface N flux is one area in need of improvement. Implementation of a linked air quality and cropland management system is de...

  15. "Advances in Linked Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry Models to Address Bidrectional Ammonia Flux in CMAQ"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent increases in anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to air, land and water media pose a growing threat to human health and ecosystems. Modeling of air-surface N flux is one area in need of improvement. Implementation of a linked air quality and cropland management system is de...

  16. Rejection of seamless pipe noise in magnetic flux leakage data obtained from gas pipeline inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Udpa, Satish; Udpa, Lalita; Lord, William

    2000-05-01

    Natural gas is traditionally transmitted from production facilities to customer locations through a vast pipeline network. A major segment of this network employs seamless pipes. This is especially true for smaller diameter transmission and distribution lines. Manufacturing process associated with the production of seamless pipes contribute to a helical variation in the pipe along the axis. The deformation introduces an artifact in the data obtained from MFL inspection of these pipelines. This seamless pipe noise is usually correlated with signals generated by defects and other elements (joints, tees, etc.) in pipelines, and can therefore, mask their indications in MFL data. This warrants the need for methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MFL data from seamless pipes. This paper presents a technique for detecting signals in MFL data from seamless pipes. The approach processes the data in various steps. First, a wavelet based denoising technique is applied to reduce the noise due to instrumentation and other sources. An adaptive filtering approach is then applied to reject seamless noise in the data. Since the inspection of pipelines typically generates vast amounts of data, it is imperative that the algorithm be computationally efficient. The processing method has to be robust in that it should be data independent. The approach described in this paper meet these criteria. Results from application of the approach to data from field tests are presented.

  17. [Characteristics and Transport Patterns of Ammonia, Nitrites, Nitrates and Inorganic Nitrogen Flux at Epikarst Springs and a Subterranean Stream in Nanshan, Chongqing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-zhu; He, Qiu-fang; Jiang, Yong-jun; Li, Yong

    2016-04-15

    In a karst groundwater system, it develops complex multiple flows because of its special geological structure and unique physical patterns of aquifers. In order to investigate the characteristics and transport patterns of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in epikarst water and subterranean stream, the water samples were collected monthly in a fast-urbanizing karst region. The results showed distinctive characteristics of three forms of inorganic nitrogen. The concentration of inorganic nitrogen was stable in the epikarst water while it was fluctuant in the subterranean stream. Epikarst water was less affected by rainfall and sewage compared with subterranean stream. In epikarst water, the nitrate concentration was much higher than the ammonia concentration. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, mainly from non-point source pollution related to agricultural activities, passed in and out of the epikarst water based on a series of physical; chemical and biological processes in the epikarst zone, such as ammonification, adsorption and nitrification. On the contrary, subterranean stream showed a result of NH₄⁺-N > NO₃⁻-N in dry seasons and NO₃⁻-N > NH₄⁺-N in rainy seasons. This can be due to the fact that sanitary and industrial sewage flowed into subterranean river through sinkholes, fissures and grikes in dry season. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen in subterranean river was mainly from the non-point source pollution in wet season. Non-point source pollutants entered into subterranean water by two transport ways, one by penetration along with vadose flow through fissures and grikes, and the other by conduit flow through sinkholes from the surface runoff, soil water flow and epikarst flow. The export flux of DIN was 56.05 kg · (hm² · a)⁻¹, and NH₄⁺-N and NO₃⁻-N accounted for 46.03% and 52.51%, respectively. The contributions of point-source pollution and non point-source pollution to the export flux of DIN were 25.08% and 74.92%, respectively, based on run

  18. Use of flux welding slag of the Mn-O-SiO2 system for the obtaining of a new alloyed agglomerated flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the use of welding slags of the MnO-SiO2 system fluxes, coming from the recovering by means of the submerged arc welding in the manufacturing of agglomerated fluxes for surfacing with the same propose. the composition of the matrix is studied by means of an experimental design in a restricted area of the Mc Lean Anderson kind, the technological behaviour of the different mixtures is checked, and the results of the best types that have alloy charges included are analysed by a characterization of the weld. (Author) 20 refs

  19. Detailed study of the plasma-activated catalytic generation of ammonia in N2-H2 plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, J. H.; Wagemans, W.; Yagci, G.; Zijlmans, R. A. B.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.; Lombardi, G.; Stancu, G. D.; Röpcke, J.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the efficiency and formation mechanism of ammonia generation in recombining plasmas generated from mixtures of N2 and H2 under various plasma conditions. In contrast to the Haber-Bosch process, in which the molecules are dissociated on a catalytic surface, under these plasma conditions the precursor molecules, N2 and H2, are already dissociated in the gas phase. Surfaces are thus exposed to large fluxes of atomic N and H radicals. The ammonia production turns out to be strongly dependent on the fluxes of atomic N and H radicals to the surface. By optimizing the atomic N and H fluxes to the surface using an atomic nitrogen and hydrogen source ammonia can be formed efficiently, i.e., more than 10% of the total background pressure is measured to be ammonia. The results obtained show a strong similarity with results reported in literature, which were explained by the production of ammonia at the surface by stepwise addition reactions between adsorbed nitrogen and hydrogen containing radicals at the surface and incoming N and H containing radicals. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ammonia production is independent of wall material. The high fluxes of N and H radicals in our experiments result in a passivated surface, and the actual chemistry, leading to the formation of ammonia, takes place in an additional layer on top of this passivated surface.

  20. Comparison of neutron fluxes obtained by 2-D and 3-D geometry with different shielding libraries in biological shield of the TRIGA MARK II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron fluxes in different spatial locations in biological shield are obtained with TORT code (TORT-Three Dimensional Oak Ridge Discrete Ordinates Neutron/Photon Transport Code). Libraries used with TORT code were BUGLE-96 library (coupled library with 47 neutron groups and 20 gamma groups) and VITAMIN-B6 library (coupled library with 199 neutron groups and 42 gamma groups). BUGLE-96 library is derived from VITAMIN-B6 library. 2-D and 3-D models for homogeneous type of problem (without inserted beam port 4) and problem with asymmetry (non-homogeneous problem; inserted beam port 4, filled with different materials) were of interest for neutron flux calculation. The main purpose is to verify the possibility for using 2-D approximation model instead of large 3-D model in some calculations. Another purpose of this paper was to compare neutron spectral constants obtained from neutron fluxes (3-D model) determined with smaller BUGLE-96 library with new constants obtained from fluxes calculated with bigger VITAMIN-B6 library. These neutron spectral constants are used in isotopic calculation with SCALE code package (ORIGEN-S). In past only neutron spectral constants determined by neutron fluxes from BUGLE-96 library were used. Experimental results used for isotopic composition comparison are available from irradiation experiment with selected type of concrete and other materials in beam port 4 (irradiation channel 4) in TRIGA Mark II reactor. These experimental results were used as a benchmark in this paper. (author)

  1. Modeling the effect of heat fluxes on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from an anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding factors that affect ammonia and nitrous emissions from anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoons or any animal waste receptacles is a necessary first step in deploying potential remediation options. In this study, we examined the various meteorological factors (i.e., air temperatures, s...

  2. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through g...

  3. The final power calibration of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor for various configurations obtained from the measurements of the absolute average neutron flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandre Fonseca Povoa da, E-mail: alexandre.povoa@mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza; Betti, Flavio; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use of neutron activation foils is a widely spread technique applied to obtain nuclear parameters then comparing the results with those calculated using specific methodologies and available nuclear data. By irradiation of activation foils and subsequent measurement of its induced activity, it is possible to determine the neutron flux at the position of irradiation. The power level during operation of the reactor is a parameter which is directly proportional to the average neutron flux throughout the core. The objective of this work is to gather data from irradiation of gold foils symmetrically placed along a cylindrically configured core which presents only a small excess reactivity in order to derive the power generated throughout the spatial thermal and epithermal neutron flux distribution over the core of the IPEN/MB-01 Nuclear Reactor, eventually lending to a proper calibration of its nuclear channels. The foils are fixed in a Lucite plate then irradiated with and without cadmium sheaths so as to obtain the absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux. The correlation between the average power neutron flux resulting from the gold foils irradiation, and the average power digitally indicated by the nuclear channel number 6, allows for the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. The reactor power level obtained by thermal neutron flux mapping was (74.65 ± 2.45) watts to a mean counting per seconds of 37881 cps to nuclear channel number 10 a pulse detector, and 0.719.10{sup -5} ampere to nuclear linear channel number 6 (a non-compensated ionization chamber). (author)

  4. The final power calibration of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor for various configurations obtained from the measurements of the absolute average neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of neutron activation foils is a widely spread technique applied to obtain nuclear parameters then comparing the results with those calculated using specific methodologies and available nuclear data. By irradiation of activation foils and subsequent measurement of its induced activity, it is possible to determine the neutron flux at the position of irradiation. The power level during operation of the reactor is a parameter which is directly proportional to the average neutron flux throughout the core. The objective of this work is to gather data from irradiation of gold foils symmetrically placed along a cylindrically configured core which presents only a small excess reactivity in order to derive the power generated throughout the spatial thermal and epithermal neutron flux distribution over the core of the IPEN/MB-01 Nuclear Reactor, eventually lending to a proper calibration of its nuclear channels. The foils are fixed in a Lucite plate then irradiated with and without cadmium sheaths so as to obtain the absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux. The correlation between the average power neutron flux resulting from the gold foils irradiation, and the average power digitally indicated by the nuclear channel number 6, allows for the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. The reactor power level obtained by thermal neutron flux mapping was (74.65 ± 2.45) watts to a mean counting per seconds of 37881 cps to nuclear channel number 10 a pulse detector, and 0.719.10-5 ampere to nuclear linear channel number 6 (a non-compensated ionization chamber). (author)

  5. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Hiller, Sebastian; Bumann, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through glycolytic pathways, but the entire output of these pathways is captured by Shigella, most likely in the form of pyruvate. This striking strategy provides Shigella with an abundant favorable energy source, while preserving host cell ATP generation, energy charge maintenance, and survival, despite ongoing vigorous exploitation. Shigella uses a simple three-step pathway to metabolize pyruvate at high rates with acetate as an excreted waste product. The crucial role of this pathway for Shigella intracellular growth suggests targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy of this devastating disease. PMID:24958876

  6. Monte Carlo based method for conversion of in-situ gamma ray spectra obtained with a portable Ge detector to an incident photon flux energy distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    1998-02-01

    A Monte Carlo based method for the conversion of an in-situ gamma-ray spectrum obtained with a portable Ge detector to photon flux energy distribution is proposed. The spectrum is first stripped of the partial absorption and cosmic-ray events leaving only the events corresponding to the full absorption of a gamma ray. Applying to the resulting spectrum the full absorption efficiency curve of the detector determined by calibrated point sources and Monte Carlo simulations, the photon flux energy distribution is deduced. The events corresponding to partial absorption in the detector are determined by Monte Carlo simulations for different incident photon energies and angles using the CERN's GEANT library. Using the detector's characteristics given by the manufacturer as input it is impossible to reproduce experimental spectra obtained with point sources. A transition zone of increasing charge collection efficiency has to be introduced in the simulation geometry, after the inactive Ge layer, in order to obtain good agreement between the simulated and experimental spectra. The functional form of the charge collection efficiency is deduced from a diffusion model. PMID:9450590

  7. Analysis of neutron spectra and fluxes obtained with cold and thermal moderators at IBR-2 reactor: Experimental and computer-modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklin, A. I.; Rogov, A. D.; Gorshkova, Yu. E.; Utrobin, P. K.; Kovalev, Yu. S.; Rogachev, A. V.; Ivankov, O. I.; Kutuzov, S. A.; Soloviov, D. V.; Gordeliy, V. I.

    2011-03-01

    The results of experimental and computer-modeling investigations of neutron spectra and fluxes obtained with cold and thermal moderators at the IBR-2 reactor (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna) are presented. These studies are for the YuMO small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer (IBR-2 beamline 4). The neutron spectra have been measured for two methane cold moderators for the standard configuration of the SANS instrument. The data from both moderators under different conditions of their operation are compared. The ratio of experimentally determined neutron fluxes of cold and thermal moderators is shown at different wavelengths. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to determine the spectra for cold-methane and thermal moderators. The results of calculations of the ratio of neutron fluxes of cold and thermal moderators at different wavelengths are demonstrated. In addition, the absorption of neutrons in the air gaps on the way from the moderator to the investigated sample is presented. SANS with the protein apoferritin was done with both cold methane and a thermal moderator and the data were compared. The prospects for the use of a cold moderator for a SANS spectrometer at IBR-2 are discussed. The advantages of using the YuMO spectrometer with a thermal moderator with respect to the tested cold moderator are shown.

  8. Measurement of atmospheric ammonia at a dairy using differential optical absorption spectroscopy in the mid-ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, George H.; Rumburg, Brian; Havig, Jeff; Lamb, Brian; Westberg, Hal; Yonge, David; Johnson, Kristen; Kincaid, Ronald

    Ammonia is the most abundant basic gas in the atmosphere, and after N 2 and N 2O is the most abundant nitrogen-containing specie (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: from air pollution to climate changes. Wiley, New York). Typical concentrations of ammonia in the boundary layer range from Dairy farms constitute a large fraction of the livestock inventory. Current estimates of ammonia emissions to the atmosphere are characterized by a high degree of uncertainty, and so it is very important to obtain better estimates of ammonia emissions. We are working at the Washington State University research dairy to quantify ammonia emissions and investigate the effects of various mitigation strategies on those emissions. We describe here a new instrument utilizing the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique to measure ammonia in the mid-ultraviolet with a detectability limit of about 1 ppb. DOAS avoids many of the problems that have thwarted past ammonia concentration measurements. Initial results show concentrations in the barn/concrete yard areas in the tens of parts per million range, over the slurry lagoons of hundreds of parts per billion to low parts per million, and low parts per million levels after initial slurry applications onto pastureland. Future papers will report on emission fluxes from the various parts of the dairy and the results of mitigation strategies; we show here initial data results. For a recent review of ammonia volatilization from dairy farms, see Bussink and Oenema (Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 51(1998) 19).

  9. Aquatic carbon fluxes in HD: using in-situ sensors to obtain a high definition picture of carbon cycling in streams (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, D. W.; Dornblaser, M.; Saraceno, J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Mast, A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    In-situ sensors provide a means to collect water-quality data in streams at time resolutions ranging from minutes to days, weeks, or months. Instruments may be deployed individually to investigate specific constituents of interest or in sensor arrays to provide a more complete picture for a suite of related compounds. Data from the instruments can provide direct measurements of some constituents (e.g., nitrate or dissolved CO2), or may be used as surrogates for other parameters (e.g., FDOM as a surrogate for DOC). These data may be used to improve estimates of nutrient or carbon fluxes, and to investigate processes influencing high-frequency variability in constituent concentrations. In this study, we examine high-temporal-resolution data from a suite of sensor arrays installed in mountain streams in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. The sensor arrays include fluorescing dissolved organic matter (FDOM), turbidity, and CO2 sensors, which are being used to characterize variability in dissolved and particulate forms of carbon. We will (1) compare these data to concentrations obtained through manual grab sampling to document the utility of in-situ measurements as surrogates for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC), (2) compare stream-water fluxes of carbon calculated using a conventional sample-based approach to those computed using high-temporal resolution data from in-situ sensors, and (3) use ancillary data from co-located stream gages (e.g. streamflow) and meteorological stations (e.g., solar radiation) to investigate the influences of hydrology and climate on high-frequency variability in carbon fluxes in streams.

  10. Characteristic of local boiling heat transfer of ammonia and ammonia / water binary mixture on the plate type evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Power generation using small temperature difference such as ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) is expected to be the countermeasures against global warming problem. As ammonia and ammonia/water are used in evaporators for OTEC and DTEC as working fluids, the research of their local boiling heat transfer is important for improvement of the power generation efficiency. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients were performed for ammonia /water mixture ( z = 0.9-1) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5-15 kg/m2 s), heat flux (15-23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7-0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of mass flux and composition of ammonia, and decrease with an increase of heat flux.

  11. Diffusion of ammonia gas in PDMS characterized by ATR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinský, Petr; Kalvoda, Ladislav; Aubrecht, Jan; Fojtíková, Jaroslava

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of a chemo-optical transducer layer sensitive to gaseous ammonia are characterized by means of attenuation total reflection method. The tested layer consists of cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane matrix sensitized by quinoline-based organometallic dye showing the selective chemical reaction with ammonia. Upper and lower limits of the ammonia diffusion coefficient and the ammonia-dye reaction constant are derived from the obtained experimental data and compared with other data available in literature and obtained from computer simulations.

  12. Ammonia emissions from deciduous forest after leaf fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hertel, O.; Geels, C.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Boegh, E.

    2013-07-01

    The understanding of biochemical feedback mechanisms in the climate system is lacking knowledge in relation to bi-directional ammonia (NH3) exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere. We therefore study the atmospheric NH3 fluxes during a 25-day period during autumn 2010 (21 October to 15 November) for the Danish beech forest Lille Bøgeskov to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method. The REA-based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations of the atmospheric NH3 concentration were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS). The relative contribution from the forest components to the atmospheric NH3 flux was assessed using a simple two-layer bi-directional canopy compensation point model. A total of 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% showed deposition. A clear tendency of the flux going from deposition of -0.25 ± 0.30 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1 to emission of up to 0.67 ± 0.28 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1 throughout the measurement period was found. In the leaf fall period (23 October to 8 November), an increase in the atmospheric NH3 concentrations was related to the increasing forest NH3 flux. Following leaf fall, the magnitude and temporal structure of the measured NH3 emission fluxes could be adequately reproduced with the bi-directional resistance model; it suggested the forest ground layer (soil and litter) to be the main contributing component to the NH3 emissions. The modelled concentration from DAMOS fits well the measured concentrations before leaf fall, but during and after leaf fall, the modelled concentrations are too low. The results indicate that the missing contribution

  13. Ammonia emissions from deciduous forest after leaf fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hansen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of biochemical feedback mechanisms in the climate system is lacking knowledge in relation to bi-directional ammonia (NH3 exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere. We therefore study the atmospheric NH3 fluxes during a 25-day period during autumn 2010 (21 October to 15 November for the Danish beech forest Lille Bøgeskov to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI and leaf area index (LAI. NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA method. The REA-based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations of the atmospheric NH3 concentration were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS. The relative contribution from the forest components to the atmospheric NH3 flux was assessed using a simple two-layer bi-directional canopy compensation point model. A total of 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% showed deposition. A clear tendency of the flux going from deposition of −0.25 ± 0.30 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1 to emission of up to 0.67 ± 0.28 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1 throughout the measurement period was found. In the leaf fall period (23 October to 8 November, an increase in the atmospheric NH3 concentrations was related to the increasing forest NH3 flux. Following leaf fall, the magnitude and temporal structure of the measured NH3 emission fluxes could be adequately reproduced with the bi-directional resistance model; it suggested the forest ground layer (soil and litter to be the main contributing component to the NH3 emissions. The modelled concentration from DAMOS fits well the measured concentrations before leaf fall, but during and after leaf fall, the modelled concentrations are too low. The results indicate that the

  14. Surface/atmosphere exchange of ammonia over grazed pasture.

    OpenAIRE

    Plantaz, M.A.H.G.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with the exchange of ammonia between the atmosphere and grazed pasture in an area of intensive livestock breeding. The term exchange is used because gaseous ammonia can be taken up (dry deposition) as well as released (emission) by this type of surface.Ammonia exchange fluxes over the grass pasture of a research farm for dairy cattle breeding at Zegveld (the Netherlands) were measured continuously from July 1992 until July 1994. The main objective was to investigate the long...

  15. Molecular Characterization of Soil Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria Based on the Genes Encoding Ammonia Monooxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Alzerreca, Jose Javier

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are chemolithotrophs that oxidize ammonia/ammonium to nitrite in a two-step process to obtain energy for survival. AOB are difficult to isolate from the environment and iso lated strains may not represent the diversity in soil. A genetic database and molecular tools were developed based on the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) encoding genes that can be used to assess the diversity of AOB that exist in soil and aquatic environments without the isolation of pure cult...

  16. Calibration of the nuclear power channels for the cylindrical configuration of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of gold foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activation foil is one of the most used techniques to obtain and compare nuclear parameters from the nuclear data libraries, given by a gamma spectrometry system. Through the measurements of activity induced in the foils, it is possible to determine the neutron flux profile exactly where it has been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. The objective of this work is to obtain, for a cylindrical configuration, the power generation through a spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 Reactor, by irradiating gold foils positioned symmetrically into the core. They are put in a Lucite plate which will not interfere in the analysis of the neutron flux, because of its low microscopic absorption cross section for the analyzed neutrons. The foils are irradiated with and without cadmium covered small plates, to obtain the thermal and epithermal neutron flux, through specific equations. The correlation between the average power neutron flux, as a result of the foil's irradiation, and the average power digital neutron flux of the nuclear power channels, allows the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. This same correlation was done in 2008 with the reactor in a rectangular configuration, which resulted in a specific calibration of the power level operation. This calibration cannot be used in the cylindrical configuration, because the nuclear parameters could change, which may lead to a different neutron profile. Furthermore, the precise knowledge of the power neutron flux in the core also validates the mathematics used to calculate the power neutron flux. (author)

  17. Calibration of the nuclear power channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several nuclear parameters are obtained through the gamma spectrometry of targets irradiated in a research reactor core and this is the case of the activation foils which make possible, through the measurements of the activity induced, to determine the neutron flux in the place where they had been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. This work aims to get the power operation of the reactor through of spatial neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 reactor by the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils and prudently located in its interior. These foils were made in the form of metallic alloy in concentration levels such that the phenomena of flux disturbance, as the self-shielding factors to neutrons become worthless. These activation foils has only 1% of dispersed gold atoms in an aluminium matrix content of 99% of this element. The irradiations of foils have been carried through with and without cadmium plate. The total correlation between the average thermal neutron flux obtained by irradiation of infinitely diluted activation foils and the average digital value of current of the nuclear power channels 5 and 6 (non-compensated ionization chambers - CINC), allow the calibration of the nuclear channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. (author)

  18. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  19. Using ammonia as a sustainable fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Dincer, I.

    In this study, ammonia is identified as a sustainable fuel for mobile and remote applications. Similar to hydrogen, ammonia is a synthetic product that can be obtained either from fossil fuels, biomass, or other renewable sources. Some advantages of ammonia with respect to hydrogen are less expensive cost per unit of stored energy, higher volumetric energy density that is comparable with that of gasoline, easier production, handling and distribution with the existent infrastructure, and better commercial viability. Here, the possible ways to use ammonia as a sustainable fuel in internal combustion engines and fuel-cells are discussed and analysed based on some thermodynamic performance models through efficiency and effectiveness parameters. The refrigeration effect of ammonia, which is another advantage, is also included in the efficiency calculations. The study suggests that the most efficient system is based on fuel-cells which provide simultaneously power, heating and cooling and its only exhaust consists of water and nitrogen. If the cooling effect is taken into consideration, the system's effectiveness reaches 46% implying that a medium size car ranges over 500 km with 50 l fuel at a cost below 2 per 100 km. The cooling power represents about 7.2% from the engine power, being thus a valuable side benefit of ammonia's presence on-board.

  20. Ammonia at Blodgett Forest, Sierra Nevada, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Littlejohn, David

    2007-11-06

    Ammonia is a reactive trace gas that is emitted in large quantities by animal agriculture and other sources in California, which subsequently forms aerosol particulate matter, potentially affecting visibility, climate, and human health. We performed initial measurements of NH{sub 3} at the Blodgett Forest Research Station (BFRS) during a two week study in June, 2006. The site is used for ongoing air quality research and is a relatively low-background site in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratios were quite low (< 1 to {approx} 2 ppb), contrasting with typical conditions in many parts of the Central Valley. Eddy covariance measurements showed NH{sub 3} fluxes that scaled with measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratio and calculated aerodynamic deposition velocity, suggesting dry deposition is a significant loss mechanism for atmospheric NH{sub 3} at BFRS. A simple model of NH{sub 3} transport to the site supports the hypothesis that NH{sub 3} is transported from the Valley to BFRS, but deposits on vegetation during the summer. Further work is necessary to determine whether the results obtained in this study can be generalized to other seasons.

  1. Measurements of Ammonia at Blodgett Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Littlejohn, David

    2007-04-01

    Ammonia is a reactive trace gas that is emitted in large quantities by animal agriculture and other sources in California, which subsequently forms aerosol particulate matter, potentially affecting visibility, climate, and human health. We performed initial measurements of NH{sub 3} at the Blodgett Forest Research Station (BFRS) during a 3 week study in June, 2006. The site is used for ongoing air quality research and is a relatively low-background site in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratios were quite low (< 1 to {approx}2 ppb), contrasting with typical conditions in many parts of the Central Valley. Eddy covariance measurements showed NH{sub 3} fluxes that scaled with measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratio and calculated aerodynamic deposition velocity, suggesting dry deposition is a significant loss mechanism for atmospheric NH{sub 3} at BFRS. A simple model of NH{sub 3} transport to the site supports the hypothesis that NH{sub 3} is transported from the Valley to BFRS, but deposits on vegetation during the summer. Further work is necessary to determine whether the results obtained in this study can be generalized to other seasons.

  2. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  3. Ammonia in the environment: From ancient times to the present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M.A.; Erisman, J.W.; Dentener, F.; Moller, D. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Penicuik (United Kingdom). Edinburgh Research Station

    2008-12-15

    Recent research on atmospheric ammonia has made good progress in quantifying sources/sinks and environmental impacts. This paper reviews the achievements and places them in their historical context. It considers the role of ammonia in the development of agricultural science and air chemistry, showing how these arose out of foundations in 18th century chemistry and medieval alchemy, and then identifies the original environmental sources from which the ancients obtained ammonia. Ammonia is revealed as a compound of key human interest through the centuries, with a central role played by sal ammoniac in alchemy and the emergence of modern science. The review highlights how recent environmental research has emphasized volatilization sources of ammonia. Conversely, the historical records emphasize the role of high-temperature sources, including dung burning, coal burning, naturally burning coal seams and volcanoes. Present estimates of ammonia emissions from these sources are based on few measurements, which should be a future priority.

  4. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Nissen, Poul; de Groot, Bert L; Kjellbom, Per; Gourdon, Pontus; Johanson, Urban

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins) have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding of how aquaporins facilitate ammonia flux across membranes could potentially be used to modulate ammonia losses over the plasma membrane to the atmosphere, e.g., during photorespiration, and thereby to modify the nitrogen use efficiency of plants. PMID:27028365

  5. Ammonia emissions from beech forest after leaf fall - measurements and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hertel, O.; Geels, C.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Boegh, E.

    2012-11-01

    The understanding of biochemical feed-back mechanisms in the climate system is lacking knowledge in relation to bi-directional ammonia (NH3) exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere. We therefore study the atmospheric NH3 fluxes during a 25 days period during autumn 2010 (21 October-15 November) for the Danish beech forest, Lille Bøgeskov, to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method. The REA based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS). 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% showed deposition. The mean NH3 flux was 0.087 ± 0.19 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1. A clear tendency of the flux going from negative (deposition) to positive (emission) fluxes of up to 0.96 ± 0.40 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1 throughout the measurement period was found. In the leaf fall period (23 October-8 November), an increase in the atmospheric NH3 concentrations was related to the increasing forest NH3 flux. The modelled concentration from DAMOS fits well the measured concentrations before leaf fall. During and after leaf fall, the modelled concentrations are too low. The results indicate that the missing contribution to atmospheric NH3 concentration from vegetative surfaces related to leaf fall are of a relatively large magnitude. We therefore conclude that emissions from deciduous forests are important to include in model calculations of atmospheric NH3 for forest ecosystems. Finally, diurnal variations in the measured NH3 concentrations were related to meteorological conditions, forest phenology and the spatial distribution of local anthropogenic NH3 sources

  6. Ammonia emissions from beech forest after leaf fall – measurements and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hansen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of biochemical feed-back mechanisms in the climate system is lacking knowledge in relation to bi-directional ammonia (NH3 exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere. We therefore study the atmospheric NH3 fluxes during a 25 days period during autumn 2010 (21 October–15 November for the Danish beech forest, Lille Bøgeskov, to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI and leaf area index (LAI. NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA method. The REA based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS. 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% showed deposition. The mean NH3 flux was 0.087 ± 0.19 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1. A clear tendency of the flux going from negative (deposition to positive (emission fluxes of up to 0.96 ± 0.40 μg NH3-N m−2 s−1 throughout the measurement period was found. In the leaf fall period (23 October–8 November, an increase in the atmospheric NH3 concentrations was related to the increasing forest NH3 flux. The modelled concentration from DAMOS fits well the measured concentrations before leaf fall. During and after leaf fall, the modelled concentrations are too low. The results indicate that the missing contribution to atmospheric NH3 concentration from vegetative surfaces related to leaf fall are of a relatively large magnitude. We therefore conclude that emissions from deciduous forests are important to include in model calculations of atmospheric NH

  7. Radiation chemistry in ammonia-water ices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H2, N2, NO, and N2O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete (∼97% destroyed) after a fluence of 1016 ions/cm2. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N2 and H2, which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

  8. Analysis of neutron spectra and fluxes obtained with cold and thermal moderators at IBR-2 reactor: experimental and computer modeling studies at small-angle scattering YuMO setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experimental and computer modeling investigations of neutron spectra and fluxes obtained with cold and thermal moderators at the IBR-2 reactor (JINR, Dubna) are presented. The studies are done for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer YuMO (beamline number 4 of the IBR-2). The measurements of neutron spectra for two methane cold moderators are done for the standard configuration of the SANS instrument. The data from both moderators under different conditions of their operation are compared. The ratio of experimentally determined neutron fluxes of cold and thermal moderators at different wavelength is shown. Monte Carlo simulations are done to determine spectra for cold methane and thermal moderators. The results of the calculations of the ratio of neutron fluxes of cold and thermal moderators at different wavelength are demonstrated. In addition, the absorption of neutrons in the air gaps on the way from the moderator to the investigated sample is presented. SANS with the protein apoferritin was done in the case of cold methane as well as a thermal moderator and the data were compared. The perspectives for the use of the cold moderator for a SANS spectrometer at the IBR-2 are discussed. The advantages of the YuMO spectrometer with the thermal moderator with respect to the tested cold moderator are shown

  9. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog 14C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism

  10. Detection of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Fish Processing Effluent Treatment Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Devivaraprasad Reddy, A.; Subrahmanyam, Gangavarapu; Shivani Kallappa, Girisha; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the rate limiting step in nitrification and thus have an important role in removal of ammonia in natural and engineered systems with participation of both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, their relative distribution and activity in fish processing effluent treatment plants (FPETPs) though significant, is hitherto unreported. Presence of AOA in sludge samples obtained from FPETPs was studied by amplification and sequencing of t...

  11. On the robustness of the ammonia thermometer

    CERN Document Server

    Maret, Sebastien; Scifoni, Emanuele; Wiesenfeld, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Ammonia inversion lines are often used as probes of the physical conditions in the dense ISM. The excitation temperature between the first two para metastable (rotational) levels is an excellent probe of the gas kinetic temperature. However, the calibration of this ammonia thermometer depends on the accuracy of the collisional rates with H2. Here we present new collisional rates for ortho-NH3 and para-NH3 colliding with para-H2 (J=0) and we investigate the effects of these new rates on the excitation of ammonia. Scattering calculations employ a new, high accuracy, potential energy surface computed at the coupled-cluster CCSD(T) level with a basis set extrapolation procedure. Rates are obtained for all transitions involving ammonia levels with J <= 3 and for kinetic temperatures in the range 5-100 K. We find that the calibration curve of the ammonia thermometer -- which relates the observed excitation temperature between the first two para metastable levels to the gas kinetic temperature -- does not change ...

  12. Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, III, Melvin P.; Hennessey, Susan Marie

    2011-08-16

    Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  13. Ammonia in Archives.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašková, Ludmila

    -: -, 2016, s. 58-59. ISBN N. [Indoor Air Quality - in Heritage and Historic Environment s. Birmingham (GB), 03.03.2016-04.03.2016] R&D Projects: GA MK DF11P01OVV020 Keywords : ammonia * diffusive sampling * indoor source Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  14. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  15. Characteristic of Local Boiling Heat Transfer of Ammonia / Water Binary Mixture on the Plate Type Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Akiyama, Hirokuni; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) are expected to be the next generation energy production systems. Both systems use a plate type evaporator, and ammonia or ammonia/water mixture as a working fluid. It is important to clarify heat transfer characteristic for designing efficient power generation systems. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients and visualization were performed for ammonia /water mixture (z = 0.9) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5 - 15 kg/m2s), heat flux (15 - 23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7 - 0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of vapor quality and mass flux, and decrease with an increase of heat flux, and the influence of the flow pattern on the local heat transfer coefficient is observed.

  16. Highly oriented CdS films deposited by an ammonia-free chemical bath method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we report an ammonia-free chemical bath method to deposit highly oriented CdS films on glass substrates. The method is based in the substitution of ammonia by sodium citrate as the complexing agent of cadmium ions in the reaction solution. We compared the physical properties of the CdS films obtained by this method to those of CdS films obtained by a traditional method which uses the thiourea-ammonia system. We found that [0 0 2] crystalline orientation is higher in the films obtained by the ammonia-free method than in the ones obtained by the traditional method

  17. Highly oriented CdS films deposited by an ammonia-free chemical bath method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno Lopez, M.B.; Valenzuela-Jauregui, J.J.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Mendoza-Galvan, A.; Ramirez-Bon, R

    2003-04-01

    In this work we report an ammonia-free chemical bath method to deposit highly oriented CdS films on glass substrates. The method is based in the substitution of ammonia by sodium citrate as the complexing agent of cadmium ions in the reaction solution. We compared the physical properties of the CdS films obtained by this method to those of CdS films obtained by a traditional method which uses the thiourea-ammonia system. We found that [0 0 2] crystalline orientation is higher in the films obtained by the ammonia-free method than in the ones obtained by the traditional method.

  18. Net summertime emission of ammonia from corn and triticale fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Undine; Smith, Jeremy; Brümmer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Recent advancements in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of environmentally relevant trace gases. In this study, we used a quantum cascade laser (QCL) absorption spectrometer to continuously measure high-frequency concentrations of ammonia and the net exchange between an agricultural site and the atmosphere based on the eddy-covariance approach. The footprint was split into two main sectors, one planted with corn (Zea mays) and the other one with triticale. Ammonia concentrations were highly variable between 2 and almost 100 ppb with an average value of 8.1 ppb during the observation period from April to September 2015. While both deposition and emission of ammonia was observed, the total campaign exchange resulted in a loss of 3.3 kg NH3-N ha‑1. Highest average emission fluxes of 65 ng N m‑2 s‑1 were recorded after fertilization at the beginning of the campaign in April and May. Afterwards the exchange of ammonia with the atmosphere decreased considerably, but the site remained on average a consistent source with sporadic lower peaks and an average flux of 13 ng N m‑2 s‑1. While management in the form of fertilization was the main driver for ammonia concentration and exchange at the site, biophysical controls from temperature, wind regime, and surface wetness are also presented.

  19. Fiber Optic Detection of Ammonia Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kalvoda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bathochromic shifts accompanying the formation of several bivalent metallic complexes containing 5-(4’-dimethylaminophenylimino quinolin-8-one (L1, and 7-chlore-5(4’-diethylamino-2-methylphenylimino quinolin-8-one (L2 ligands in ethanol solutions were evaluated by VIS-NIR spectroscopy. The [L1-Cu-L1] sulphide complex was selected as a reagent for further tests on optical fibres. Samples of multimode siloxane-clad fused-silica fibre were sensitized by diffusing an ethanol/chloroform solution of the dye into the cladding polymer, and tested by VIS-NIR optical spectroscopy (12 cm long fibre sections, and optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR; 20 ns laser pulses, wavelength 850 nm, 120 m long fibre sensitized within the interval 104–110 m. A well-resolved absorption band of the reagent could be identified in the absorption spectra of the fibres. After exposure to dry ammonia/nitrogen gas with increasing ammonia concentration (0–4000 ppm, the short fibre samples showed subsequent decay of NIR optical absorption; saturation was observed for higher ammonia levels. The concentration resolution r ? 50 ppm and forward response time t90 ? 30 sec were obtained within the interval 0–1000 ppm. The OTDR courses showed an enhancement of the back-scattered light intensity coming from the sensitized region after diffusion of the initial reagent, and decay after exposure to concentrated ammonia/nitrogen gas (10000 ppm.

  20. Ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the...... technology is adopted quicker and that the farm has the right location. It is concluded that the new application process so far has not lived up to the high expectations at the outset. Despite this, the paper concludes that Denmark is likely to reduce emission by 50% from 1990 to 2020 and reach the likely...

  1. Ammonia in the environment: From ancient times to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research on atmospheric ammonia has made good progress in quantifying sources/sinks and environmental impacts. This paper reviews the achievements and places them in their historical context. It considers the role of ammonia in the development of agricultural science and air chemistry, showing how these arose out of foundations in 18th century chemistry and medieval alchemy, and then identifies the original environmental sources from which the ancients obtained ammonia. Ammonia is revealed as a compound of key human interest through the centuries, with a central role played by sal ammoniac in alchemy and the emergence of modern science. The review highlights how recent environmental research has emphasized volatilization sources of ammonia. Conversely, the historical records emphasize the role of high-temperature sources, including dung burning, coal burning, naturally burning coal seams and volcanoes. Present estimates of ammonia emissions from these sources are based on few measurements, which should be a future priority. - Past ammonia applications reveal new emphases in biospheric transformations

  2. Ammonia caramels: specifications and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patey, A L; Shearer, G; Knowles, M E; Denner, W H

    1985-01-01

    Twenty three UK commercially produced ammonia caramels and eight experimentally produced ammonia caramels have been analysed by a range of physical and chemical tests, which include solids content, nitrogen levels, colour intensity and pH. A statistical treatment of the results is reported. PMID:4018316

  3. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Limei Ran; Jonathan Pleim

    2011-01-01

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic compounds, can be upward into the air as well as downward to the surface and therefore should be modeled as bi-directional fluxes. Model parameterizations of dry deposition in air quality models have been represented by...

  4. Separation of ammonia from the ammonia rinsing liquor of resin adsorbed molybdenum and tungsten by membrane technology%膜法分离氨淋洗吸附钼钨树脂后淋洗液中的氨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡磊; 肖连生; 张贵清

    2012-01-01

    以钨湿法冶金中的一种氨淋洗吸附钼钨树脂后淋洗液为料液,采用膜分离技术实现氨的分离.通过比较多种纳滤和反渗透膜对钼钨与氨的分离效果,从中选择了一种合适的低压反渗透膜,考察了膜分离过程中原料液浓度、操作压力、浓缩比、温度因素对透过液通量、钼钨截留率、氨回收率(或透过率)以及钼钨与氨分离系数的影响,在操作压力2.41MPa,温度在36℃,浓缩比为4∶1的条件下,透过液通量达27 L/(m2·h),Mo、WO3的截留率接近100%,Mo、WO3与NH3的分离系数分别达18和51,料液中76%的氨得到回收.以实验室的试验结果为依据,选用低压反渗透膜用于工业生产,取得了良好的效果.%A membrane technology was used to separate ammonia from the ammonia rinsing liquor of resin adsorbed molybdenum and tungsten in the process of tungsten hydromctallurgy. Compared with the separating effect of molybdenum-tungsten from ammonia of various nanofiltration membranes and reverse osmosis membranes,a low-pressure RO membrane was selected. The effects of feed liquor concentration, operation pressure,concentration ratio and temperature on the parameters of permeation flux,molybdenum and tungsten retention rate,ammonia recovery rate(or transparence rate),the separation coefficient of Mo and WO3 over ammonia were studied. And the optimum technical conditions, were obtained: operation pressure 2. 41 MPa, temperature 36℃ with concentration ratio 4: 1. Under these conditions, the permeation flux reached 27 L/(m2 · h) with nearly 100% retention rate of Mo and WO3, the recovery rate of ammonia reached 76% and the separation coefficient of Mo and WO3 over NH3 were 18 and 51, respectively. The successful application of this process in industry has delivered good economical benefits.

  5. Potential for Ammonia Recapture by Farm Woodlands: Design and Application of a New Experimental Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Theobald

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing pressure on farmers in Europe to reduce the emissions of ammonia from their land. Due to the current financial climate in which farmers have to operate, it is important to identify ammonia control measures that can be adopted with minimum cost. The planting of trees around farmland and buildings has been identified as a potentially effective and low-cost measure to enhance ammonia recapture at a farm level and reduce long-range atmospheric transport. This work assesses experimentally what fraction of ammonia farm woodlands could potentially remove from the atmosphere. We constructed an experimental facility in southern Scotland to simulate a woodland shelterbelt planted in proximity to a small poultry unit. By measuring horizontal and vertical ammonia concentration profiles within the woodland, and comparing this to the concentration of an inert tracer (SF6 we estimate the depletion of ammonia due to dry deposition to the woodland canopy. Together with measurements of mean ammonia concentrations and throughfall fluxes of nitrogen, this information is used to provide a first estimate of the fraction of emitted ammonia that is recaptured by the woodland canopy. Analysis of these data give a lower limit of recapture of emitted ammonia, at the experimental facility, of 3%. By careful design of shelterbelt woodlands this figure could be significantly higher.

  6. Review of Options for Ammonia/Ammonium Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-06

    This report is a review of literature supporting practical ammonia/ammonium destruction processes. Melter research supporting Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass production has shown that significant amounts of ammonia will be in the melter offgas condensate. Further work with secondary waste forms indicates the potential need to remove the ammonia, perhaps by an oxidative process. This review finds likely practical chemical methods to oxidize ammonia in aqueous solution at moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressure, using easily obtained reagents. Leading candidates include nitrite oxidation to produce nitrogen gas, various peroxide oxidative processes, and air stripping. This work reviews many other processes and provides reasoning to not consider those processes further for this application.

  7. Hydrogen Production from Ammonia Using a Plasma Membrane Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kambara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an efficient method for using pulsed plasma to produce hydrogen from ammonia was developed. An original pulsed plasma reactor with a hydrogen separation membrane was developed for efficient hydrogen production, and its hydrogen production performance was investigated. Hydrogen production in the plasma was affected by the applied voltage and flow rate of ammonia gas. The maximum hydrogen production flow rate of a typical plasma reactor was 8.7 L/h, whereas that of the plasma membrane reactor was 21.0 L/h. We found that ammonia recombination reactions in the plasma controlled hydrogen production in the plasma reactor. In the plasma membrane reactor, a significant increase in hydrogen production was obtained because ammonia recombination reactions were inhibited by the permeation of hydrogen radicals generated in the plasma through a palladium alloy membrane. The energy efficiency was 4.42 mol-H2/kWh depending on the discharge power.

  8. Ammonia production in nitrogen seeded plasma discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, V., E-mail: Volker.Rohde@ipp.mpg.de; Oberkofler, M.

    2015-08-15

    In present tokamaks nitrogen seeding is used to reduce the power load onto the divertor tiles. Some fraction of the seeded nitrogen reacts with hydrogen to form ammonia. The behaviour of ammonia in ASDEX Upgrade is studied by mass spectrometry. Injection without plasma shows strong absorption at the inner walls of the vessel and isotope exchange reactions. During nitrogen seeding in H-mode discharges the onset of a saturation of the nitrogen retention is observed. The residual gas consists of strongly deuterated methane and ammonia with almost equal amounts of deuterium and protium. This confirms the role of surface reactions in the ammonia formation. The results are consistent with findings in previous investigations. A numerical decomposition of mass spectra is under development and will be needed for quantitative evaluation of the results obtained.

  9. Lattice dynamics of ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequencies of selected intermolecular modes of vibration and libration in a single crystal of deuterated ammonia (ND3) have been measured by the technique of coherent inelastic neutron scattering, at temperatures of 20 and 95K. The results are compared with the previous optical measurements at the Γ point, and with calculations based on two different models for the intermolecular potential function. A detailed assessment of these data leads to a set of mode frequencies for the Γ, R, and M points. The elastic constants are calculated from the measured acoustic mode dispersion curves propagating along the three major symmetry directions. The existing intermolecular force models are in good qualitative agreement with experiment, but significant discrepancies remain to be resolved by future theoretical refinements. (author)

  10. Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The top cloud layer on Jupiter is thought to consist of ammonia ice, but most of that ammonia 'hides' from spectrometers. It does not absorb light in the same way ammonia does. To many scientists, this implies that ammonia churned up from lower layers of the atmosphere 'ages' in some way after it condenses, possibly by being covered with a photochemically generated hydrocarbon mixture. The New Horizons Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), the half of the Ralph instrument that is able to 'see' in infrared wavelengths that are absorbed by ammonia ice, spotted these clouds and watched them evolve over five Jupiter days (about 40 Earth hours). In these images, spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia clouds are shown in bright blue. The largest cloud appeared as a localized source on day 1, intensified and broadened on day 2, became more diffuse on days 3 and 4, and disappeared on day 5. The diffusion seemed to follow the movement of a dark spot along the boundary of the oval region. Because the source of this ammonia lies deeper than the cloud, images like these can tell scientists much about the dynamics and heat conduction in Jupiter's lower atmosphere.

  11. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA...

  12. Anaerobic digestion of swine manure: Inhibition by ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kaare Hvid; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1998-01-01

    A stable anaerobic degradation of swine manure with ammonia concentration of 6 g-N/litre was obtained in continuously stirred tank reactors with a hydraulic retention time of 15 days, at Four different temperatures. Methane yields of 188, 141, 67 and 22 ml-CH4/g-VS were obtained at 37, 45, 55...

  13. Atmospheric Fate and Transport of Agricultural Dust and Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Fitz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust and odor are significant sources of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. Daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots associated with increased cattle activity in the early evenings are routinely observed, while consistently high ammonia is observed throughout the day. Here we present measurements of aerosol size distributions and concentrations of gas and particulate phase ammonia species collected at a feedlot in Texas during summers of 2006, 2007 and 2008. A GRIMM sequential mobility particle sizer and GRIMM 1.108 aerosol spectrometer were used to determine aerosol size distributions in the range of 10 nm to 20 µm aerodynamic diameter at the downwind and upwind edges of the facility. Using aqueous scrubbers, simultaneous measurements of both gas phase and total ammonia species present in the gas and particle phases were also collected. In addition to the continuous measurements at the edges of the facility, coincident aerosol and ammonia measurements were obtain at an additional site further downwind (~3.5 km). Taken together our measurements will be used to quantify aerosol and ammonia dispersion and transport. Relationships between the fate and transport of the aerosols and ammonia will be discussed.

  14. A highly flexible polymerization technique to prepare fluorescent nanospheres for trace ammonia detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of pH-sensitive nanospheres by emulsion polymerization for the detection of trace levels of ammonia is described. A fluorescent, polymerizable xanthene dye was copolymerized with styrene, crosslinkers and further copolymers aimed at enhancing the sensitivity to obtain materials for sensing of ammonia. A half-seeded technique was used to obtain stable emulsions of the monomers which were cured to obtain nanospheres with covalently attached active components. The nanospheres were embedded in a silicon matrix and the sensor films obtained were investigated regarding their response to ammonia at concentrations between 25 and 1,000 ppb. Sensors containing polystyrene nanospheres crosslinked with divinylbenzene showed the best performance in ammonia measurements exhibiting detection limits (LODs) of less than 25 ppb ammonia.

  15. Solubility of ammonia in rainwater

    OpenAIRE

    G. P. Ayers; Gras, J. L.; Adriaansen, A.; Gillett, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Partitioning of ammonia between the gaseous and rainwater phases has been investigated at theAustralian Baseline Air Pollution Station during in-situ experiments in which rainwater andammonia gas were sampled concurrently. The relationship between ammonia concentrations inthe gaseous and aqueous phases did not follow either traditional solubility theory based onHenry’s Law, or a recent modified theory that includes secondary equilibria between dissolvedammonia and carbon dioxide.DOI: 10.1111/...

  16. Removal of Ammonia from Air, using Three Iranian Natural Zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Asilian

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia in air can be hazardous to human and animal life and should be removed from the environment. Recently the removal of environmental pollutants such as ammonia by means of natural and modified zeolites has attracted a lot of attention and interests. In this study the capability of three Iranian natural zeolites (Clinoptilolite in point of view of removal of ammonia from air was investigated. Through this research, different zeolites from various regions of Iran including Semnan, Meyaneh, and Firoozkooh resources were considered to be studied. These samples of zeolites were ground and granulized into 425 µm to 4 mm and were utilized in dynamic sorption experiments. Curves of sorption were plotted and breakthrough and saturated points of zeolite samples were obtained. The adsorption capacities at different ammonia concentrations, temperatures, and flow – rates were also calculated. Results obtained showed that, the natural Iranian zeolite (Clinoptilolite was identified to be more efficient adsorbent than the others to remove ammonia from the air. In the same conditions, the obtained breakthrough time for clinoptilolite sample of Meyaneh was longer than the others ( 135min , while, the adsorption capacity of Semnan clinoptilolite was higher than adsorbents ( 6.30 mg /g (P<0.0001.

  17. Positron emission tomography of hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, S; Munk, O L; Roelsgaard, K;

    2001-01-01

    scan data were analysed by a model of sinusoidal zonation of ammonia metabolism with periportal urea formation and perivenous formation of glutamine. The hepatic extraction fraction of (13)NH(3) was 0.73+/-0.16 (mean+/-SD, n=7 pigs). Values of clearance of ammonia to urea and to glutamine were obtained......, as were rate constants for washout of these two metabolites. Overall, the modelling showed half of the ammonia uptake to be converted to urea and half to glutamine. The washout rate constant for glutamine was about one-tenth of that for urea. We conclude that hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia...

  18. Global Seabird Ammonia Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, S. N.; Blackall, T. D.; Dragosits, U.; Daunt, F. H.; Braban, C. F.; Tang, Y. S.; Trathan, P.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Seabird colonies represent a major source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote coastal and marine systems in temperate, tropical and polar regions. Previous studies have shown that NH3 emissions from Scottish seabird colonies were substantial - of similar magnitude to the most intensive agricultural point source emissions. The UK data were used to model global seabird NH3 emissions and suggested that penguins are a major source of emissions on and around the Antarctic continent. The largest seabird colonies are in the order of millions of seabirds. Due to the isolation of these colonies from anthropogenic nitrogen sources, they may play a major role in the nitrogen cycle within these ecosystems. A global seabird database was constructed and used in conjunction with a species-specific seabird bioenergetics model to map the locations of NH3 emissions from seabird colonies. The accuracy of the modelled emissions was validated with field data of NH3 emissions measured at key seabird colonies in different climatic regions of the world: temperate (Isle of May, Scotland), tropical (Ascension Island) and polar (Signy Island, South Georgia). The field data indicated good agreement between modelled and measured NH3 emissions. The measured NH3 emissions also showed the variability of emission with climate. Climate dependence of seabird NH3 emissions may have further implications under a changing global climate. Seabird colonies represent NH3 emission ‘hotspots’, often far from anthropogenic sources, and are likely to be the major source of nitrogen input to these remote coastal ecosystems. The direct manuring by seabirds at colony locations may strongly influence species richness and biodiversity. The subsequent volatilisation and deposition of NH3 increases the spatial extent of seabird influence on nitrogen cycling in their local ecosystem. As many seabird populations are fluctuating due to changing food supply, climate change or anthropogenic pressures, these factors

  19. Treatment of biomass to obtain a target chemical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, III, Melvin P.; Elander, Richard T.; Hennessey, Susan Marie

    2010-08-24

    Target chemicals were produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  20. Spatial Variability in Nitrification Rates and Ammonia-Oxidizing Microbial Communities in the Agriculturally Impacted Elkhorn Slough Estuary, California ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Scott D Wankel; Mosier, Annika C.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Paytan, Adina; Francis, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation—the microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and the first step in nitrification—plays a central role in nitrogen cycling in coastal and estuarine systems. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the connection between this biogeochemical process and the diversity and abundance of the mediating microbial community. In this study, we measured nutrient fluxes and rates of sediment nitrification in conjunction with the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA...

  1. Improving ammonia emissions in air quality modelling for France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaoui-Laguel, Lynda; Meleux, Frédérik; Beekmann, Matthias; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Génermont, Sophie; Cellier, Pierre; Létinois, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    We have implemented a new module to improve the representation of ammonia emissions from agricultural activities in France with the objective to evaluate the impact of such emissions on the formation of particulate matter modelled with the air quality model CHIMERE. A novel method has been set up for the part of ammonia emissions originating from mineral fertilizer spreading. They are calculated using the one dimensional 1D mechanistic model “VOLT'AIR” which has been coupled with data on agricultural practices, meteorology and soil properties obtained at high spatial resolution (cantonal level). These emissions display high spatiotemporal variations depending on soil pH, rates and dates of fertilization and meteorological variables, especially soil temperature. The emissions from other agricultural sources (animal housing, manure storage and organic manure spreading) are calculated using the national spatialised inventory (INS) recently developed in France. The comparison of the total ammonia emissions estimated with the new approach VOLT'AIR_INS with the standard emissions provided by EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) used currently in the CHIMERE model shows significant differences in the spatiotemporal distributions. The implementation of new ammonia emissions in the CHIMERE model has a limited impact on ammonium nitrate aerosol concentrations which only increase at most by 10% on the average for the considered spring period but this impact can be more significant for specific pollution episodes. The comparison of modelled PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) and ammonium nitrate aerosol with observations shows that the use of the new ammonia emission method slightly improves the spatiotemporal correlation in certain regions and reduces the negative bias on average by 1 μg m-3. The formation of ammonium nitrate aerosol depends not only on ammonia concentrations but also on nitric acid availability, which

  2. 15N-enrichments of ammonia and glutamine in blood after infusion of 15N-ammonia in chickens fed low or high protein diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experment, the blood ammonia and glutamine amide came from infused ammonia were determined when N-15 labeled ammonium acetate was intraportally infused into the chickens fed 5 or 20 % protein diet. The data obtained indicated that the infused ammonia was taken into blood glutamine amide, and also accumulated in blood as it is, in both dietary groups. 10 to 12 months old White Leghorn male birds were used. The experimental diet was fed once a day for 5 days to the birds weighting about 1.2 kg by 35 g per kg body weight. The experimental diet was consumed within 40 min in all cases. Cardiac and portal catheterization were performed for blood collection and ammonia infusion, respectively. After finishing the infusion, blood samples were taken to analyze the ammonia and glutamine contents and their N-15 enrichment. Statistical difference was not observed in the appearance of N-15 in ammonia and glutamine amide between two dietary groups. The N-15 enrichment in blood ammonia and the amide of plasma glutamine, and the calculated exogenous nitrogen in the ammonia and glutamine amide tended to be more in the 5 % protein diet group than the other. (Kako, I.)

  3. Benthic flux of nutrients and trace metals in the northern component of San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Parcheso, Francis; Engelstad, Anita C.; Greene, Valerie E.

    2009-01-01

    Two sets of sampling trips were coordinated in late summer 2008 (weeks of July 8 and August 6) to sample the interstitial and overlying bottom waters at 10 shallow locations (9 sites metals) that may affect the base of the food web in this part of the estuary. A nonmetallic pore-water profiler was used to obtain the first centimeter-scale estimates of the vertical solute-concentration gradients for diffusive-flux determinations. This study, performed in collaboration with scientists from San Francisco State University?s Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, provides information to assist in developing and refining management strategies for the Bay/Delta system and supports efforts to monitor changes in food-web structure associated with regional habitat modifications directed by the California Bay-Delta Authority. On July 7, 2008, and August 5, 2008, pore-water profilers were successfully deployed at six North Bay sites per trip to measure the concentration gradient of dissolved macronutrients and trace metals near the sediment-water interface. Only two of the sites (433 and SSB009 within Honker Bay) were sampled in both series of profiler deployments. At each sampling site, profilers were deployed in triplicate, while discrete samples and dataloggers were used to collect ancillary data from both the water column and benthos to help interpret diffusive-flux measurements. Benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) inorganic phosphate (that is, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP)) ranged from negligible levels (-0.003?0.005 millimole per square meter per day (mmole m-2d-1) at Site 4.1 outside Honker Bay) to 0.060?0.006 mmole m-2d-1 near the northern coast of Brown?s Island. Except for the elevated flux at Browns Island, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was consistently: (1) lower than previously reported for South Bay sites, (2) an order of magnitude lower than oligotrophic Coeur d?Alene Lake, (3) two orders of magnitude lower than

  4. Energy efficient ammonia heat pump. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Claus; Pijnenburg, B.; Schumann Grindorf, H. [Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus (Denmark); Christensen, Rolf [Alfa Laval, Lund (Sweden); Rasmussen, Bjarne D. [Grundfos, Bjerringbro (Denmark); Gram, S.; Fredborg Jakobsen, D. [Svedan Industri Koeleanlaeg, Greve (Denmark)

    2013-09-15

    The report describes the development of a highly effective ammonia heat pump. Heat pumps play an increasingly important role in the search for more effective use of energy in our society. Highly efficient heat pumps can contribute to reduced energy consumption and improved economy of the systems which they are a part of. An ammonia heat pump with high pressure reciprocating compressor and a novel split condenser was developed to prove potential for efficiency optimization. The split of the condenser in two parts can be utilized to obtain smaller temperature approaches and, thereby, improved heat pump efficiency at an equal heat exchanger area, when compared to the traditional solution with separate condenser and de-superheater. The split condenser design can also be exploited for heating a significant share of the total heating capacity to a temperature far above the condensing temperature. Furthermore, the prototype heat pump was equipped with a plate type evaporator combined with a U-turn separator with a minimum liquid height and a liquid pump with the purpose of creating optimum liquid circulation ratio for the highest possible heat transfer coefficients at the lowest possible pressure drop. The test results successfully confirmed the highest possible efficiency; a COP of 4.3 was obtained when heating water from 40 deg. C to 80 deg. C while operating with evaporating/condensing temperatures of +20 deg C/+73 deg C. (Author)

  5. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA IN EAR-LOBE CAPILLARY BLOOD IS AN ALTERNATIVE TO ARTERIAL BLOOD AMMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUIZENGA, [No Value; GIPS, CH; CONN, HO; JANSEN, PLM

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  6. Ammonia for hydrogen storage: challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet;

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier is discussed. Compared to other hydrogen storage materials, ammonia has the advantages of a high hydrogen density, a well-developed technology for synthesis and distribution, and easy catalytic decomposition. Compared to hydrocarbons and...... maintains the high volumetric hydrogen density while alleviating the problems of handling the ammonia. Some of the remaining challenges for research in ammonia as a hydrogen carrier are outlined....

  7. Niche specialization of terrestrial archaeal ammonia oxidizers

    OpenAIRE

    Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Hai, Brigitte; Quince, Christopher; Engel, Marion; Thomson, Bruce C.; James, Phillip; Schloter, Michael; Robert I. Griffiths; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2011-01-01

    Soil pH is a major determinant of microbial ecosystem processes and potentially a major driver of evolution, adaptation, and diversity of ammonia oxidizers, which control soil nitrification. Archaea are major components of soil microbial communities and contribute significantly to ammonia oxidation in some soils. To determine whether pH drives evolutionary adaptation and community structure of soil archaeal ammonia oxidizers, sequences of amoA, a key functional gene of ammonia oxidation, were...

  8. Direct analysis of human breath ammonia using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazan, Elham; Mirzaei, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, ammonia in human breath was directly determined using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) technique with several important advantages including high sensitivity, low cost, high speed, and ease of maintenance. The temperature effect on the ammonia signal was evaluated too. The results indicated that the best temperature for the investigation of breath ammonia was 150°C. The analytical results showed that the linear dynamic range was between 12 and 810ppb and the detection limit was 6.6ppb. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was obtained to be 5, 3, and 3 for 290, 348, and 522ppb, respectively. The amounts of ammonia in breath of eight healthy volunteers were measured. The values were between 236 and 1218ppb. Also, the inequality in breath ammonia levels was scrutinized over a 6h working day for three healthy volunteers. The results showed a drop in breath ammonia from the morning amount to the mid-day measurement and then, a progressive increase while the day continued. In addition, the amounts of ammonia were determined to be 1494-1553ppb in exhaled breath of two renal failure patients. The results obtained in this work revealed that the method was conveniently established without any considerable sample pretreatment for direct analysis of ammonia in human breath. PMID:24120979

  9. Parameter Optimization on Experimental Study to Reduce Ammonia Escape in CO2 Absorption by Ammonia Scrubbing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Leng; Jianmin Gao; Mingyue He; Min Xie; Qian Du; Rui Sun; Shaohua Wu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research ammonia escape in CO2 absorption by ammonia scrubbing, ammonia escape was studied in CO2 absorption process using the bubbling reactor in different conditions as gas flow rate, CO2 ratio, absorbent temperature and ammonia concentration and quantity of escaped ammonia was measured by chemical titration. The results indicated that, the amount of ammonia escape can be around 20% of original amount in 90 min and the escaped amount will increase with the rise of gas flow rate, absorbent temperature, concentration of ammonia while decrease as CO2 ratio goes up. Through the analysis of the law of ammonia escape, at the same time, combined with ammonia escape and the influence of the relationship between the CO2 absorption efficiency, reducing ammonia escape working condition parameter optimization is given.

  10. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  11. Forced convection of ammonia. 2. part.: gaseous ammonia - very high wall temperatures (1000 to 3000 K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop of gaseous ammonia in forced convection are experimentally determined. The fluid flows (mass flow rate 0.6 to 2.4 g/s) in a long tungsten tube (di = 2.8 mm, de = 5.1 mm, L = 700 mm) electrically heated. The temperature of the wall reaches 3000 deg. K and the fluid 2500 deg. K; maximum heat flux 530 w/cm2. Ammonia is completely dissociated and the power necessary for dissociation reaches 30 per cent of the total power exchanged. Inlet pressure varies between 6 and 16 bars and the maximum pressure drop in the tube reaches 15 bars. Two regimes of dissociation have been shown: catalytic and homogeneous and the variation of dissociation along the length of the tube is studied. The measured heat transfer coefficients may be about 10 times these calculated by the means of classical formulae. A correlation of experimental results using enthalpy as a driving force for heat transmission is presented. Pressure drops may be calculated by the means of a classical friction factor. (authors)

  12. Ammonia oxidation rates and nitrification in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Silvia E.; Babbin, Andrew R.; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrification rates, as well as the relationships between rates and ammonia oxidizer abundance (both archaeal and bacterial), were investigated in the Arabian Sea. Ammonia oxidation rates were measured directly using 15N-NH4+stable isotope additions in gas-impermeable, trace metal clean trilaminate bags (500 mL) at in situ temperature. Tracer incubations were performed at three stations at depths above, below, and within the oxycline of the open-ocean oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Ammonia oxidation rates were similar to previous open-ocean measurements, ranging from undetectable to 21.6 ± 0.1 nmol L-1 d-1. The highest rates at each station occurred at the primary nitrite maximum (above the OMZ), and rates were very low at depths greater than 900 m. The abundances of both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were estimated using theamoA gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Both AOA and AOB amoA were detected above, within, and below the OMZ, although the AOA were always more abundant than the AOB, by a factor of 35-216. Nitrification rates were not directly correlated to AOA or AOB amoA abundance. These rates offer new insight into the role of nitrification in the mesopelagic zone. The abundance of AOA amoA genes at 1000 m suggests that ˜50% of the microbial biomass could be autotrophic. Additionally, the integrated nitrification rate at depth implies that nitrification could consume most of the ammonium produced by the flux of organic carbon in the mesopelagic zone.

  13. Coumarin meets fluorescein: a Förster resonance energy transfer enhanced optical ammonia gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Susanne; Dorrestijn, Marko; Camerlo, Agathe; Urek, Špela Korent; Lobnik, Aleksandra; Housecroft, Catherine E; Constable, Edwin C; Scherer, Lukas J

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on the development of an optical ammonia gas sensor, the sensing mechanism of which is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between coumarin and fluorescein. The dyes were immobilized into an organically modified silicate matrix during polymerizing methyltriethoxysilane with trifluoropropyltrimethoxysilane on a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate. The resulting dye-doped xerogel films were exposed to different gaseous ammonia concentrations. A logarithmic decrease of the coumarin fluorescence emission band at 442 nm was observed with increasing gaseous ammonia concentrations, which was due to enhanced FRET between coumarin and fluorescein. The coumarin/fluorescein composition was optimized in order to obtain the best ammonia sensitivity. First experiments in a flow cell gas sensor setup demonstrated a sensitive and reversible response to gaseous ammonia. PMID:25004956

  14. [Spectroscopic study on the high voltage fast pulsed discharge of nitrogen, ammonia or their mixture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z P; Wang, P N; Yang, W D; Zheng, J B; Li, F M

    2001-10-01

    The emission spectra from the pulsed discharge plasma of nitrogen, ammonia or their mixture were measured. In the discharge of pure nitrogen gas, as the pressure increased, the discharge volume decreased and more dissociation of nitrogen molecules occurred due to the higher energy density. In the discharge of ammonia, N,N+ and NH+ were observed, but no NH2 and NH3 were detected, indicating that ammonia, which has the lower dissociation and ionization energies as compared to nitrogen, was highly dissociated. The discharge of the mixture of N2 and NH3 was also studied. The dependence of the dissociation of nitrogen on the ratio of nitrogen to ammonia was investigated by emission spectra. The optimal ratio for nitrogen dissociation was obtained. The advantage of using the mixture of nitrogen and ammonia in the synthesis of nitrides was discussed. PMID:12945317

  15. Morphological and stoichiometric study of chemical bath deposited CdS films by varying ammonia concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of ammonia concentration on stoichiometric, surface morphological, and optical properties of chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide thin films has been studied systemically. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS thin films was carried out via using cadmium acetate as the cadmium ion source, thiourea as the sulphur source and ammonia as the complexing agent. Ammonia concentration was changed from 0 to 2.5 M. At ammonia concentration greater than or equal to 0.1 M and lower than 0.6 M, nanowires or flake-like structures were obtained. At ammonia concentration ranging from 0.8 to 2.0 M, uniform, dense, and continuously coated films were obtained. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analysis revealed that as the ammonia concentration changed from 0.1 to 2.0 M, the Cd/S ratio in the obtained film increased from 0.24 to 2.61. Not only typical cadmium-poor but also unusual sulphur deficiency phenomena were observed for CBD CdS thin films. The films deposited with ammonia concentration of 1.0 M show the highest degree of crystallinity and closest stoichiometry Cd/S≅1, and have a preferred orientation. The direct band energy gaps of as-grown films were found to be 2.23-2.77 eV. The formation mechanism of the films with various morphologies and cadmium and sulphur deficiencies are discussed.

  16. Control of ammonia air pollution through the management of thermal processes in cowsheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleizgys, Rolandas; Bagdoniene, Indre

    2016-10-15

    Experimental researches performed in manufacturing cowsheds have demonstrated a variation of ammonia concentration and the factors influencing this most during different periods of the year. The process of ammonia evaporation from manure is influenced by many varying and interrelated factors with temperature and the intensity of air ventilation being the most critical ones. The influence of these factors on the process of ammonia evaporation was established by laboratory researches. An increase in temperature results in an exponential increase in ammonia emission, whereas the dependence of the emission on the air velocity is best expressed by a second degree polynomial. The results obtained may be used as a forecast of the ammonia emissions from cowsheds during different periods of the year. Intensive ventilation is required for the removal of excess moisture from the housing, and this limits the possibilities to reduce ammonia emissions by controlling the intensity of ventilation. A reduction in the amount of ventilation is only recommended if the air quality indices meet the requirements applied to the housing. Better opportunities to reduce ammonia emissions are provided through management of the thermal processes in a cowshed. If the average annual air temperature (11.3°C) is reduced by one degree in a cubicle housing cowshed, the ammonia emissions will decrease by 10%. PMID:27350091

  17. Flow boiling heat transfer of ammonia/water mixture in a plate heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taboas, Francisco [Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Leonardo da Vinci, 14014 Cordoba (Spain); Valles, Manel; Bourouis, Mahmoud; Coronas, Alberto [CREVER - Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans No. 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    The objective of this work is to contribute to the development of plate heat exchangers as desorbers for ammonia/water absorption refrigeration machines driven by waste heat or solar energy. In this study, saturated flow boiling heat transfer and the associated frictional pressure drop of ammonia/water mixture flowing in a vertical plate heat exchanger is experimentally investigated. Experimental data is presented to show the effects of heat flux between 20 and 50 kW m{sup -2}, mass flux between 70 and 140 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, mean vapour quality from 0.0 to 0.22 and pressure between 7 and 15 bar, for ammonia concentration between 0.42 and 0.62. The results show that for the selected operating conditions, the boiling heat transfer coefficient is highly dependent on the mass flux, whereas the influence of heat flux and pressure are negligible mainly at higher vapour qualities. The pressure drop increases with increasing mass flux and quality. However, the pressure drop is independent of the imposed heat flux. (author)

  18. Superionic water-ammonia mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethkenhagen, M.; Cebulla, D.; Redmer, R.; Hamel, S.

    2014-12-01

    The interior of the Giant Planets Uranus and Neptune contains large amounts of water, ammonia and methane (referred to as planetary ices). Many observable properties of these planets, such as luminosity, gravitational moments and magnetic fields, are thought to be determined by the physical and chemical properties of matter within this ice layer. Hence, the phase diagrams, equations of state and structural properties of these materials and their respective mixtures are of great interest.Especially the phase diagrams of water and ammonia gained much attention since Cavazzoni et al. [1] proposed superionic phases for these materials, which are characterized by highly mobile hydrogen ions in a lattice of oxygen and nitrogen ions, respectively. For water, the influence of such a phase on the properties of the Giant Planets as well as on exoplanets has been discussed widely. [2,3] Nevertheless, it is an open question how the properties of such a water layer change when another compound, e.g., ammonia is introduced. Considering a 1:1 mixture, we have performed ab initio simulations based on density functional theory using the VASP code [4] heating up structures which we had found from evolutionary random structure search calculations with XtalOpt [5]. We propose possible superionic water-ammonia structures present up to several Mbar. Moreover, we investigate the equation of state and transport properties of this mixture such as diffusion coefficients in order to compare with the pure compounds. These results are essential to construct new interior models for Neptune-like planets.[1] C. Cavazzoni et al., Science 283, 44 (1999).[2] R. Redmer et al., Icarus 211, 798 (2011).[3] L. Zeng and D. Sasselov, ApJ 784, 96 (2014).[4] G. Kresse and J. Hafner, Phys. Rev. B 47, 558 (1993).[5] D. C. Lonie and E. Zurek, Comput. Phys. Commun. 182, 372 (2011).

  19. Accuracy of cuticular resistance parameterizations in ammonia dry deposition models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Frederik; Brümmer, Christian; Richter, Undine; Fléchard, Chris; Wichink Kruit, Roy; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of total reactive nitrogen (Nr) exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere is a crucial part of modern air quality models. However, bi-directional exchange of ammonia (NH3), the dominant Nr species in agricultural landscapes, still poses a major source of uncertainty in these models, where especially the treatment of non-stomatal pathways (e.g. exchange with wet leaf surfaces or the ground layer) can be challenging. While complex dynamic leaf surface chemistry models have been shown to successfully reproduce measured ammonia fluxes on the field scale, computational restraints and the lack of necessary input data have so far limited their application in larger scale simulations. A variety of different approaches to modelling dry deposition to leaf surfaces with simplified steady-state parameterizations have therefore arisen in the recent literature. We present a performance assessment of selected cuticular resistance parameterizations by comparing them with ammonia deposition measurements by means of eddy covariance (EC) and the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM) at a number of semi-natural and grassland sites in Europe. First results indicate that using a state-of-the-art uni-directional approach tends to overestimate and using a bi-directional cuticular compensation point approach tends to underestimate cuticular resistance in some cases, consequently leading to systematic errors in the resulting flux estimates. Using the uni-directional model, situations where low ratios of total atmospheric acids to NH3 concentration occur lead to fairly high minimum cuticular resistances, limiting predicted downward fluxes in conditions usually favouring deposition. On the other hand, the bi-directional model used here features a seasonal cycle of external leaf surface emission potentials that can lead to comparably low effective resistance estimates under warm and wet conditions, when in practice an expected increase in the compensation point due to

  20. Ammonia Production, Excretion, Toxicity, and Defense in Fish: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ip, Yuen K.; Chew, Shit F.

    2010-01-01

    Many fishes are ammonotelic but some species can detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. Certain fish species can accumulate high levels of ammonia in the brain or defense against ammonia toxicity by enhancing the effectiveness of ammonia excretion through active NH 4 + transport, manipulation of ambient pH, or reduction in ammonia permeability through the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Recent reports on ammonia toxicity in mammalian brain reveal the importance of permeation of ammonia thr...

  1. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  2. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  3. Fluorographene based Ultrasensitive Ammonia Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Pal, Shubhadeep; Narayanan, Tharangattu N

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule detection using graphene can be brought by tuning the interactions via specific dopants. Electrostatic interaction between the most electronegative element fluorine (F) and hydrogen (H) is one of the strong interactions in hydrogen bonding, and here we report the selective binding of ammonia/ammonium with F in fluorographene (FG) resulting to a change in the impedance of the system. Very low limit of detection value of ~0.44 pM with linearity over wide range of concentrations (1 pM-0.1 μM) is achieved using the FG based impedance sensor, andthisscreen printed FG sensor works in both ionized (ammonium) and un-ionized ammonia sensing platforms. The interaction energies of FG and NH3/NH4(+) are evaluated using density functional theory calculations and the interactions are mapped. Here FGs with two different amounts of fluorinecontents -~5 atomic% (C39H16F2) and ~24 atomic% (C39H16F12) - are theoretically and experimentally studied for selective, high sensitive and ultra-low level detection of ammonia. Fast responding, high sensitive, large area patternable FG based sensor platform demonstrated here can open new avenues for the development of point-of-care devices and clinical sensors. PMID:27142522

  4. Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation in ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Vladimir G.; Malin, Timur V.; Galitsyn, Yurij G.; Shklyaev, Alexander A.; Zhuravlev, Konstantin S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation under an ammonia flux at different substrate temperatures are investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Two different stages of the nitridation process were revealed. The initial stage is the fast (within few seconds) formation of ordered two-dimensional SiN phase, occuring due to the topmost active surface Si atom (Sisurf) interaction with ammonia molecules. It is followed by the late stage consisting in the slow (within few minutes) amorphous Si3N4 phase formation as a result of the interaction of Si atoms in the lattice site (Siinc) with chemisorbed ammonia molecules. It was found that the ordered SiN phase formation rate decreases, as the temperature increases. The kinetic model of the initial stage was developed, in which the ordered SiN phase formation is the two-dimensional phase transition in the lattice gas with SiN cells. The enthalpy of the active surface Si atom generation on the clean Si(111) surface was estimated to be about 1.5 eV. In contrast, the amorphous Si3N4 phase formation is the normal (thermally activated) chemical process with the first-order kinetics, whose activation energy and pre-exponential factor are 2.4 eV and 108 1/s, respectively.

  5. Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions from a Dairy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumburg, B. P.; Filipy, J. M.; Bays, J.; Mount, G. H.; Yonge, D.; Lamb, B. K.; Johnson, K.; Kincaid, R.

    2002-12-01

    Gaseous ammonia (NH3) emissions at high concentrations can damage human and animal respiratory systems. NH3 environmental impacts include aerosol formation, altering atmospheric chemistry, terrestrial and aquatic eutrophication, soil acidification and global warming. Preindustrial NH3 emissions are estimated to be 21 Tg yr-1 while current emissions are estimated to be 47 Tg yr-1 with most of the increase coming from domestic animals (Galloway et al., 1995). There is a lack of detailed emission data from the United States and there are many problems with applying emissions estimates from Europe due to the difference in farming practices between the two regions. Feed and manure management practices can have a large impact on emissions. We are studying NH3 emissions at the WSU dairy located near Pullman, WA to provide a detailed emission inventory of the various sources at the dairy. The dairy has approximately 170 milking cows housed in open air barns and the waste from the milking cows is stored in liquid slurry lagoons until it is applied to grass fields in the late summer. NH3 is measured using a short-path spectroscopic absorption near 200 nm with a sensitivity of a few ppbv and a time resolution of a few seconds. The open air short-path method is advantageous because it is self calibrating and avoids inlet wall adherence which is a major problem for most NH3 measurement techniques. As part of the detailed emission inventory, NH3 fluxes were determined from the milking stalls, main slurry lagoon and the application of slurry to the fields with a large sprinkler using a SF6 tracer technique and a dense point Gaussian plume model. NH3 emission fluxes from various parts of the dairy will be presented.

  6. Effect of ascorbic acid on the properties of ammonia caramel colorant additives and acrylamide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongxing; Gu, Zhengbiao

    2014-09-01

    Ammonia caramels are among the most widely used colorant additives in the food industry. They are commonly prepared through the Maillard reaction and caramelization of mixtures of reducing sugars with ammonia or ammonium salts. Antioxidants are known to inhibit acrylamide formation during the Maillard reaction, and they may affect the properties of the ammonia caramel products. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the antioxidant ascorbic acid on the properties of ammonia caramel. A mixture of glucose and ammonia was allowed to react at 120 °C for 60 min in the presence of ascorbic acid at final concentrations of 0 to 0.08 M. The ammonia caramels obtained from these reactions were all positively charged. As the concentration of ascorbic acid increased, the color intensity of the ammonia caramel showed a decreasing trend, while the intensity of the fluorescence and total amount of pyrazines in the volatiles showed a tendency to increase. The addition of ascorbic acid did not result in obvious changes in the UV-visible spectra of the ammonia caramels and the types of pyrazines in the volatiles were also unchanged. It is noteworthy that the addition of 0.02 to 0.08 M ascorbic acid did reduce the formation of the by-product acrylamide, a harmful substance in food. When the concentration of ascorbic acid added reached 0.04 M, the content of acrylamide in the ammonia caramel was 20.53 μg/L, which was approximately 44% lower than that without ascorbic acid. As a result, ascorbic acid can be considered to improve the quality and safety of ammonia caramels. PMID:25204396

  7. Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Felix Jegede

    2010-12-27

    The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

  8. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements 85Sr and 137Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, 85Sr could not be detected in the leachates. 137Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way

  9. REGENERATION OF AMMONIA SOLUTION FOR CO2 CAPTURE IN POSTCOMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROL TORO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated enthalpy of solutions and solubility for a NH3/CO2 system. Measurements were performed in a thermoregulated Lewis-type cell reactor, temperatures ranging from 278 to 303 K and mass concentrations from 2 wt% to 5 wt%. Enthalpies of solution of CO2 and solubility have been obtained as function of loading, α (moles CO2/mol NH3. Results show that ammonia solutions concentrations of 3 and 5 wt% promote the formation of ammonium bicarbonate. Beside, ammonia concentration of 2 wt% promotes the formation of ammonium carbonate. Therefore, to use ammonia concentrations of 3 and 5 wt% need less energy that a concentration of 2 wt% to reverse the reaction. Regeneration system was simulated using Aspen plus™ software for a pulverised coal fired power plant (CF in a post-combustion process. Model analysis established that NH3 heat duty is lower than MEA and MDEA ones. The energy consumption reaches 2.83 GJ•t-1 CO2. Regarding heat duty and ammonia losses, 3 wt% NH3 is the suitable concentration to capture CO2.

  10. Validation of CFD Simulation for Ammonia Emissions from an Equeous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Elhadidib, Basman; Khalifa, Ezzat;

    2011-01-01

    as boundary condition for CFD prediction of ammonia emission. The accuracy of CFD simulation depends on many factors. In this study, the effects of appropriate geometry model, inlet turbulent parameters and three turbulence models (low-Reynolds number k–ε model, renormalization group k–ε model and...... current HLC models generally over-predict the ammonia emissions from aqueous solution in this study whereas VLE gives better agreement between simulated and measured results. A linear relation is observed between ammonia mass transfer coefficient obtained from the VLE relation and those from HLC models....

  11. Analysis of Ammonia Toxicity in Landfill Leachates

    OpenAIRE

    Takuya Osada; Keisuke Nemoto; Hiroki Nakanishi; Ayumi Hatano; Ryo Shoji; Tomohiro Naruoka; Masato Yamada

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxic...

  12. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation by soil thaumarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Offre, Pierre R.; He, Ji-Zheng; Verhamme, Daniel T.; Nicol, Graeme W.; Prosser, James I.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrification plays a central role in the global nitrogen cycle and is responsible for significant losses of nitrogen fertilizer, atmospheric pollution by the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, and nitrate pollution of groundwaters. Ammonia oxidation, the first step in nitrification, was thought to be performed by autotrophic bacteria until the recent discovery of archaeal ammonia oxidizers. Autotrophic archaeal ammonia oxidizers have been cultivated from marine and thermal spring environments, bu...

  13. Cylinder supplied ammonia scrubber testing in IDMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of the off-line testing the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) ammonia scrubbers using ammonia supplied from cylinders. Three additional tests with ammonia are planned to verify the data collected during off-line testing. Operation of the ammonia scrubber during IDMS SRAT and SME processing will be completed during the next IDMS run. The Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) scrubbers were successful in removing ammonia from the vapor stream to achieve ammonia vapor concentrations far below the 10 ppM vapor exit design basis. In most of the tests, the ammonia concentration in the vapor exit was lower than the detection limit of the analyzers so results are generally reported as <0.05 parts per million (ppM). During SRAT scrubber testing, the ammonia concentration was no higher than 2 ppM and during SME testing the ammonia concentration was no higher than 0.05 m

  14. Tetraammineplatinum(II dichloride ammonia tetrasolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grassl

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Pt(NH34]Cl2·4NH3, was crystallized in liquid ammonia from the salt PtCl2. The platinum cation is coordinated by four ammonia molecules, forming a square-planar complex. The chloride anions are surrounded by nine ammonia molecules, either bound within the platinum complex or solvent molecules. The solvent ammonia molecules are packed in such a way that an extended network of N—H...N and N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds is formed. The structure is isotypic with [Pd(NH34]Cl2·4NH3 [Grassl & Korber (2014. Acta Cryst. E70, i32].

  15. Recovery of ammonia and sulfate from waste streams and bioenergy production via bipolar bioelectrodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia and sulfate, which are prevalent pollutants in agricultural and industrial wastewaters, can cause serious inhibition in several biological treatment processes, such as anaerobic digestion. In this study, a novel bioelectrochemical approach termed bipolar bioelectrodialysis was developed to...... recover ammonia and sulfate from waste streams and thereby counteracting their toxicity during anaerobic digestion. Furthermore, hydrogen production and wastewater treatment were also accomplished. At an applied voltage of 1.2 V, nitrogen and sulfate fluxes of 5.1 g View the MathML sourceNH4+-N/m2/d and...

  16. Flux Creep and Flux Jumping

    CERN Document Server

    Mints, R G

    1995-01-01

    We consider the flux jump instability of the Bean's critical state arising in the flux creep regime in type-II superconductors. We find the flux jump field, $B_j$, that determines the superconducting state stability criterion. We calculate the dependence of $B_j$ on the external magnetic field ramp rate, magnetization experiments the slope of the current-voltage curve in the flux creep regime determines the stability of the Bean's critical state, {\\it i.e.}, the value of $B_j$. We show that a flux jump can be preceded by the magneto-thermal oscillations and find the frequency of these oscillations as a function of $\\dot B_e$.

  17. Chemical Processing of Pure Ammonia and Ammonia-Water Ices Induced by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordalo, V.; da Silveira, E. F.; Lv, X. Y.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Seperuelo Duarte, E.; Boduch, P.

    2013-09-01

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H2O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH3 and NH3-H2O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N2H4), diazene (N2H2 isomers), molecular hydrogen (H2), and nitrogen (N2) were identified after irradiation of pure NH3 ices. Nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) are some of the products of the NH3-H2O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 μm was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH_{4}^{+}) and amino (NH2) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH2OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH3-H2O ices. The spectral shift of the NH3 "umbrella" mode (9.3 μm) band is parameterized as a function of NH3/H2O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH3-H2O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H2O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH3 destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  18. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...... not lived up to the high expectations at the outset. Despite this, the paper concludes that Denmark is likely to reduce emission by 50% from 1990 to 2020 and reach the likely 2020 NEC ceiling....

  19. Ammonia synthesis at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    contrast to the biological process, the industrial process requires high temperatures and pressures to proceed, and an explanation of this important difference is discussed. The possibility of a metal surface catalyzed process running at low temperatures and pressures is addressed, and DFT calculations...... have been carried out to evaluate its feasibility. The calculations suggest that it might be possible to catalytically produce ammonia from molecular nitrogen at low temperatures and pressures, in particular if energy is fed into the process electrochemically. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  20. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing: description, validation and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Móring

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new process-based, weather-driven model for ammonia (NH3 emission from a urine patch has been developed and its sensitivity to various factors assessed. This model, the GAG model (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing was developed as a part of a suite of weather-driven NH3 exchange models, as a necessary basis for assessing the effects of climate change on NH3 related atmospheric processes. GAG is capable of simulating the TAN (Total Ammoniacal Nitrogen content, pH and the water content of the soil under a urine patch. To calculate the TAN budget, GAG takes into account urea hydrolysis as a TAN input and NH3 volatilization as a loss. In the water budget, in addition to the water content of urine, precipitation and evaporation are also considered. In the pH module we assumed that the main regulating processes are the dissociation and dissolution equilibria related to the two products of urea hydrolysis: ammonium and bicarbonate. Finally, in the NH3 exchange flux calculation we adapted a canopy compensation point model that accounts for exchange with soil pores and stomata as well as deposition to the leaf surface. We validated our model against measurements, and carried out a sensitivity analysis. The validation showed that the simulated parameters (NH3 exchange flux, soil pH, TAN budget and water budget are well captured by the model (r > 0.5 for every parameter at p 3 emission. In addition, our results suggested that more sophisticated simulation of CO2 emission in the model could potentially improve the modelling of pH. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange; however, presumably due to the TAN limitation, the GAG model currently provides only a modest overall temperature dependence in total NH3 emission compared with the values in the literature. Since all the input parameters can be obtained for study at larger scales, GAG is potentially suitable for larger scale application, such as

  1. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description, validation and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móring, A.; Vieno, M.; Doherty, R. M.; Laubach, J.; Taghizadeh-Toosi, A.; Sutton, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper a new process-based, weather-driven model for ammonia (NH3) emission from a urine patch has been developed and its sensitivity to various factors assessed. This model, the GAG model (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) was developed as a part of a suite of weather-driven NH3 exchange models, as a necessary basis for assessing the effects of climate change on NH3 related atmospheric processes. GAG is capable of simulating the TAN (Total Ammoniacal Nitrogen) content, pH and the water content of the soil under a urine patch. To calculate the TAN budget, GAG takes into account urea hydrolysis as a TAN input and NH3 volatilization as a loss. In the water budget, in addition to the water content of urine, precipitation and evaporation are also considered. In the pH module we assumed that the main regulating processes are the dissociation and dissolution equilibria related to the two products of urea hydrolysis: ammonium and bicarbonate. Finally, in the NH3 exchange flux calculation we adapted a canopy compensation point model that accounts for exchange with soil pores and stomata as well as deposition to the leaf surface. We validated our model against measurements, and carried out a sensitivity analysis. The validation showed that the simulated parameters (NH3 exchange flux, soil pH, TAN budget and water budget) are well captured by the model (r > 0.5 for every parameter at p CO2 emission in the model could potentially improve the modelling of pH. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange; however, presumably due to the TAN limitation, the GAG model currently provides only a modest overall temperature dependence in total NH3 emission compared with the values in the literature. Since all the input parameters can be obtained for study at larger scales, GAG is potentially suitable for larger scale application, such as in regional atmospheric and ecosystem models.

  2. Ammonia Decomposition over Bimetallic Nitrides Supported on γ-Al2O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Shan LU; Xiao Nian LI; Yi Feng ZHU; Hua Zhang LIU; Chun Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A series of monometallic nitrides and bimetallic nitrides were prepared by temperature-programmed reaction with NH3. The effects of Co, Ni and Fe additives and the synergic action between Fe, Co, Ni and Mo on the ammonia decomposition activity were investigated. TPR-MS, XRD were also carried out to obtain better insight into the structure of the bimetallic nitride. The results of ammonia decomposition activity show that bimetallic nitrides are more active than monometallic nitrides or bimetallic oxides.

  3. Theoretical study of Moessbauer hyperfine parameters of Fe bound to ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, J.; Guenzburger, D.

    1995-01-01

    The first-principles Discrete Variational method was employed to study the species formed by the interaction of an Fe atom and ammonia. Total energy calculations were performed for several configurations. The hyperfine parameters isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and magnetic hyperfine were calculated for the ground state found, and compared to reported experimental values obtained by Moessbauer spectroscopy in frozen ammonia. (author). 14 refs, 1 tab.

  4. Pretreatment of rice straw with combined process using dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung Bong; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Ju Hun; Jung, You Ree; Thapa, Laxmi Prasad; Kim, Jun Seok; Um, Youngsoon; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of lignocellulosic biomass has received attention lately because it can be converted into various versatile chemical compounds by biological processes. In this study, a two-step pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia was performed efficiently on rice straw to obtain fermentable sugar. The soaking in aqueous ammonia process was also optimized by a statistical method. Results Response surface methodology was employed. The determination coefficient (R2) value w...

  5. Analysis of Cryogenic Ammonia System for Energy Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    B. Raei; F. Shahraki; Khorrami, M.; A. Ghadi

    2010-01-01

    There are several alternatives to enhance the efficiency of energy usage and to decrease energy losses. Pinch technology is the best method of approach to enhance energy efficiency. Heat exchangers network (HEN) of refrigeration unit of ammonia production process was analyzed to use pinch technology to decrease energy usage. The obtained results showed that pinch technology was unsuccessful for the shaft work targeting capabilities. In contrast, it is posed that for optimization of such syste...

  6. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  7. Determinants of [13N]ammonia kinetics in hepatic PET experiments: a minimal recirculatory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was the development of a modelling approach for the analysis of the systemic kinetics of the tracer nitrogen-13 ammonia administered for dynamic liver scanning. The radioactive half-life of this tracer is 9.8 min, which limits the time span in which data are available in a positron emission tomography experimental setting. A circulatory pharmacokinetic model was applied to the metabolism of ammonia in anaesthetised pigs, which incorporated data from serial measurements of [13N]ammonia and [13N]metabolite activity in arterial and portal venous blood together with blood flow rates through the portal vein and through the hepatic artery obtained over 20 min after intravenous injection of [13N]ammonia. Model analysis showed that up to 20 min after injection the time course of [13N]ammonia concentration in arterial blood is primarily determined by distribution kinetics (steady-state volume of distribution 1,856±531 ml kg-1). Simultaneous fitting of arterial ammonia and metabolite blood concentrations allowed for estimation of the hepatic [13N]ammonia clearance (10.25±1.84 ml min-1 kg-1), which accounted for the formation of the circulating metabolites. (orig.)

  8. Effects of conservation tillage practices on ammonia emissions from Loess Plateau rain-fed winter wheat fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhou, Chunju; Li, Na; Han, Kun; Meng, Yuan; Tian, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Linquan

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia emissions from agricultural activities contribute to air pollution. For the rain-fed winter wheat system in the Loess Plateau there is a lack of information about ammonia emissions. Current study aimed to provide field data on ammonia emissions affected by conservation tillage practices and nitrogen applications. A two-year field experiment was conducted during 2011-2013 wheat growing seasons followed a split-plot design. Main plots consisted of one conventional tillage (CT, as the control) and five conservation tillage systems, i.e., stalk mulching (SM), film mulching (FM), ridge tillage (RT), ridge tillage with film mulch on the ridge (RTfm), and ridge tillage with film mulch on the ridge and stalk mulch in the furrow (RTfmsm); while subplots consisted of two nitrogen application rates, i.e., 0 and 180 kg N ha-1. Ammonia emissions were measured using an acid trapping method with vented chambers. Results showed ammonia fluxes peaked during the first 10 days after fertilization. On average, nitrogen application increased ammonia emissions by 26.5% (1.31 kg N ha-1) compared with treatments without nitrogen application (P soil ammonium, moisture, and temperature. Tillage systems had significant effects on ammonia emissions. On average, conservation tillage practices reduced ammonia emissions by 7.7% (0.46 kg N ha-1) compared with conventional tillage (P effective. Deep-band application of nitrogen fertilizer, stalk mulches, and film mulches were responsible for reductions in ammonia emissions from nitrogen fertilization in conservation tillage systems, thus they were recommended to reduce ammonia emissions from winter wheat production regions in the southern Loess Plateau.

  9. Evaluation of ammonia metabolism in the skeletal muscles of patients with cirrhosis using N-13 ammonia PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    liver cirrhosis. Both ascites and encephalopathy were present. The red blood cell count was 365 X 104/ml, the platelet count was 6.2 X l04/ml, the serum albumin concentration was 3.1 g/dl, the cholinesterase activity was 228 IU/l, the total bilirubin concentration was 2.1 mg/dl, the blood ammonia was 120 g/dl, the prothrombin time was 63%, and BTR was 2.09. This study conformed to the ethical guidelines of the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the Ethics Committee of Osaka City University Medical School. Informed consent was obtained from both patients. N-13 ammonia was produced with an NKK-Oxford superconducting cyclotron and an NKK synthesis system (AMANO1, NKK Co., Muroran, Japan). PET images were obtained by a PET scanner (HEADTOME IV SET-1400W-10, Shimadzu Co., Kyoto, Japan), which had 4 detector rings providing 7 contiguous slices at 13-mm intervals with an intrinsic resolution of 4.5 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM). Attenuation correction of the reconstructed images was accomplished by acquiring a patient-specific transmission study using a Ge-68 ring source. PET studies were performed before and 2 hours after drip injection of BCAA (Morihepamin, AJIMONOTO Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Serial dynamic PET scans (2 min x lo frames) were started simultaneously with a 185 MBq N-13 ammonia injection. For quantitative evaluation, ROIs were placed over both thighs. The average activity within each ROI was subsequently corrected for radioactive decay, and standardized uptake values (SUV) were calculated by dividing the tissue activity by the injected dose of radioactivity per unit body weight. Results: After intravenous administration of N-13 ammonia, SUV in the skeletal muscles increased gradually in both patients. The difference of SUV from the last frame to the first frame before administration of BCAA was higher in case 2 than in case 1 (0.67 and 0.32, respectively). In case l, there was little difference in the rate of increase in

  10. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  11. Evaluation of ammonia emissions from broiler litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from poultry litter results in air pollution and can cause high levels of ammonia in poultry houses, which negatively impacts bird performance. The objectives of this study were to: (1) conduct a nitrogen (N) mass balance in broiler houses by measuring the N inputs (bedding, chick...

  12. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks

  13. Ammonia Sensor Using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Aamir

    2015-09-01

    An ammonia sensor can include a laser detector configured to provide stable sample readings. The sensor can implement a method including processing the recorded intensity of the laser beam to determine a first harmonic component and a second harmonic component and the amount of ammonia in the sample.

  14. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Ammonia Electro-Oxidation on Polycrystalline Pt Deposited Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Aldana, Luis A.

    The ammonia electrolysis process has been proposed as a feasible way for electrochemical generation of fuel grade hydrogen (H2). Ammonia is identified as one of the most suitable energy carriers due to its high hydrogen density, and its safe and efficient distribution chain. Moreover, the fact that this process can be applied even at low ammonia concentration feedstock opens its application to wastewater treatment along with H 2 co-generation. In the ammonia electrolysis process, ammonia is electro-oxidized in the anode side to produce N2 while H2 is evolved from water reduction in the cathode. A thermodynamic energy requirement of just five percent of the energy used in hydrogen production from water electrolysis is expected from ammonia electrolysis. However, the absence of a complete understanding of the reaction mechanism and kinetics involved in the ammonia electro-oxidation has not yet allowed the full commercialization of this process. For that reason, a kinetic model that can be trusted in the design and scale up of the ammonia electrolyzer needs to be developed. This research focused on the elucidation of the reaction mechanism and kinetic parameters for the ammonia electro-oxidation. The definition of the most relevant elementary reactions steps was obtained through the parallel analysis of experimental data and the development of a mathematical model of the ammonia electro-oxidation in a well defined hydrodynamic system, such as the rotating disk electrode (RDE). Ammonia electro-oxidation to N 2 as final product was concluded to be a slow surface confined process where parallel reactions leading to the deactivation of the catalyst are present. Through the development of this work it was possible to define a reaction mechanism and values for the kinetic parameters for ammonia electro-oxidation that allow an accurate representation of the experimental observations on a RDE system. Additionally, the validity of the reaction mechanism and kinetic parameters

  16. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B;

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation.......In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  17. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    /arginine region, and an exclusively water-permeable aquaporin can be transformed into an ammonia-permeable aquaporin by single point mutations in this region. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins fall into two groups: those that are permeable (AQP3, 7, 9, 10) and those that are impermeable (AQP8) to glycerol. The two......The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... significant at alkaline pH. It is debated whether the H(+) ion passes via the aquaporin or by some external route; the investigation of this problem requires the aquaporin-expressing cell to be voltage-clamped. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins differ from other aquaporins by having a less restrictive aromatic...

  18. Moisture and temperature controls on nitrification differ among ammonia oxidizer communities from three alpine soil habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Brooke B.; Baron, Jill S.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2016-03-01

    Climate change is altering the timing and magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes in many highelevation ecosystems. The consequent changes in alpine nitrification rates have the potential to influence ecosystem scale responses. In order to better understand how changing temperature and moisture conditions may influence ammonia oxidizers and nitrification activity, we conducted laboratory incubations on soils collected in a Colorado watershed from three alpine habitats (glacial outwash, talus, and meadow). We found that bacteria, not archaea, dominated all ammonia oxidizer communities. Nitrification increased with moisture in all soils and under all temperature treatments. However, temperature was not correlated with nitrification rates in all soils. Site-specific temperature trends suggest the development of generalist ammonia oxidzer communities in soils with greater in situ temperature fluctuations and specialists in soils with more steady temperature regimes. Rapidly increasing temperatures and changing soil moisture conditions could explain recent observations of increased nitrate production in some alpine soils.

  19. Studies of the kinetics of two parallel reactions: ammonia decomposition and nitriding of iron catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabczyk, Walerian; Pelka, Rafat

    2009-01-15

    The reaction of ammonia decomposition and nitriding reaction as an example of the parallel reactions were studied. A surface reaction was assumed as the rate limiting step. The experiments were carried out in the range of temperatures from 623 to 723 K. Mixtures of different iron nitrides (gamma'-Fe(4)N, epsilon-Fe(3-2)N) were obtained. Differential tubular reactor with thermogravimetric (TG) measurement and analysis of the gas phase composition in the reaction volume was used. Reacting gases flowing through the reactor were mixed. Effective reactor volume was determined. The rate constants for ammonia decomposition and ammonia adsorption process at critical point between alpha-Fe and gamma'-Fe(4)N phases were estimated. The number of collisions and the sticking coefficient of ammonia over alpha-Fe phase were also assessed. PMID:19086865

  20. Adsorption of ammonia on treated stainless steel and polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaittinen, O.; Metsälä, M.; Persijn, S.; Vainio, M.; Halonen, L.

    2014-05-01

    Adsorption of dynamically diluted ammonia at part-per-billion to low part-per-million concentrations in dry nitrogen was studied with treated and non-treated stainless steel and polymer test tubes. The treatments included electropolishing and two types of coatings based on amorphous silicon. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared wavelength range was used to monitor the adsorption process in real time in continuous-flow conditions to obtain quantitative assessment of the adsorptive properties of the studied surfaces. The investigated polymers were all less adsorptive than any of the treated or non-treated stainless steel surfaces. Some of the commercial coatings reduced the adsorption loss of stainless steel by a factor of ten or more. Polyvinylidene fluoride was found to be superior (less adsorption) to the four other studied polymer coatings. The number of adsorbed ammonia molecules per surface area obtained at different ammonia gas phase concentrations was modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The time behavior of the adsorption-desorption process occurring in the time scale of seconds and minutes was simulated with a simple kinetic model.

  1. Removal of Ammonia from air using Iranian natural (clinoptilolite) zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays environmental pollution abatement through the use of natural absorbents are becoming more important, therefore, in this project the absorption behavior of ammonia on some natural zeolites (clinoptilolite) is studied. In this regard, three clinoptilolite samples of various region in Iran (Semnan, Meyaneh and Firuzkooh) were crushed, sieved and particle size of 425 μm to 4mm were used in the dynamic experiments. The breakthrough curves were plotted, and breakthrough, saturation capacity were calculated in various concentrations, temperatures and flow rates. In general, the obtained preliminary results showed that, the Iranian natural clinoptilolites are suitable absorbents for ammonia gas. In similar conditions, breakthrough time of Meyaneh sample (135 min) and absorption capacity of Semnan sample (6.35 mg/g) was higher than others

  2. Thin boron nitride nanotubes formed during annealing in ammonia gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We present a mechano-thermal process to synthesis thin boron nitride nanotubes of diameter around 7 nanometers. They were produced by mechanical milling of amorphous boron powder at ambient temperature, followed by thermal annealing in ammonia gas. High energy ball milling creates a precursor containing a high density of nanocrystalline BN seeds and fine particles of metal catalyst. Nanotubes grow out from the milled boron powder during subsequent annealing. The novelty of this approach lies in the formation of the thin BN nanotubes by annealing in ammonia gas instead of nitrogen gas. The boron nitride nanotubes produced have a well-defined crystalline structure and there is no iron within them. If nitrogen gas is used, thicker nanotubes of diameter in the range of 20-100 nm were obtained and iron was more likely to be found inside the nanotubes. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  3. AMMONOX-Ammonia for enhancing biogas yield & reducing NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Kristensen, P.G.; Paamand, K.;

    2013-01-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. Due to the animal production intensification, manure is being used as the primary feedstock for most of the biogas plants. However......, biogas plants digesting liquid manure alone are not economically viable due to the relatively low organic content of the manure, usually 3-5%.Thus, their economical profitable operation relies partly on increasing the methane yield from manure, and especially of its solid fraction, usually called...... of innovative ammonia recovery technology and c) the coupling of the excess ammonia obtained from manure with the catalytic elimination of NOx emissions when the biogas is used for subsequent electricity generation with gas engines....

  4. Experimental Transmission Spectra of Hot Ammonia in the Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Dulick, Michael; Bernath, Peter F.

    2015-06-01

    High resolution absorption spectra of hot ammonia have been recorded in the 2400--5500 cm-1 region and the line lists are presented. This extends our previous work on ammonia in the 740--4000 cm-1 region and utilizes our improved cell design that has been successfully applied to methane in a similar spectral region. Transmission spectra were acquired for seven temperatures up to 700°C using a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer and empirical lower state energies are obtained from the temperature dependence of intensities. Applications of our spectra and line lists include modeling of brown dwarfs and (exo)planetary atmospheres. R.J. Hargreaves, G. Li and P.F. Bernath. 2011, ApJ, 735, 111 R.J. Hargreaves, G. Li and P.F. Bernath. 2011, JQSRT, 113, 670

  5. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha;

    2016-01-01

    Livestock production systems can be major sources of trace gases including ammonia (NH3), the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and odorous compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Short-term campaigns have indicated that acidification of livestock slurry during in....... The effect of acidification on emissions of H2S differed between experiments. Implications of slurry acidification for subsequent field application, including N and S availability, and soil pH, are discussed....... rates were generally high. It was concluded that the contribution from floors to NH3 emissions was <50%. There was some evidence for reduced CH4 emissions from acidified slurry, but CH4 emissions were generally low and apparently dominated by enteric fermentation. No effect on N2O emissions was observed...

  6. Biogas upgrading by chemical absorption using ammonia rich absorbents derived from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Andrew; Jefferson, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J

    2014-12-15

    The use of ammonia (NH3) rich wastewaters as an ecological chemical absorption solvent for the selective extraction of carbon dioxide (CO2) during biogas upgrading to 'biomethane' has been studied. Aqueous ammonia absorbents of up to 10,000 gNH3 m(-3) demonstrated CO2 absorption rates higher than recorded in the literature for packed columns using 20,000-80,000 g NH3 m(-3) which can be ascribed to the process intensification provided by the hollow fibre membrane contactor used in this study to support absorption. Centrifuge return liquors (2325 g m(-3) ionised ammonium, NH4(+)) and a regenerant (477 gNH4(+) m(-3)) produced from a cationic ion exchanger used to harvest NH4(+) from crude wastewater were also tested. Carbon dioxide fluxes measured for both wastewaters compared reasonably with analogue ammonia absorption solvents of equivalent NH3 concentration. Importantly, this demonstrates that ammonia rich wastewaters can facilitate chemically enhanced CO2 separation which eliminates the need for costly exogenic chemicals or complex chemical handling which are critical barriers to implementation of chemical absorption. When testing NH3 analogues, the potential to recover the reaction product ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) in crystalline form was also illustrated. This is significant as it suggests a new pathway for ammonia separation which avoids biological nitrification and produces ammonia stabilised into a commercially viable fertiliser (NH4HCO3). However, in real ammonia rich wastewaters, sodium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate were preferentially formed over NH4HCO3 although it is proposed that NH4HCO3 can be preferentially formed by manipulating both ion exchange and absorbent chemistry. PMID:25277752

  7. Atmospheric ammonia over China: emission estimates and impacts on air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Yuanhong; Chen, Youfan; Henze, Daven

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) in the atmosphere is an important precursor of inorganic aerosols, and its deposition through wet and dry processes can cause adverse effects on ecosystems. The ammonia emissions over China are particularly large due to intensive agricultural activities, yet our current estimates of Chinese ammonia emissions and associated consequences on air quality are subject to large errors. Here we use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint model to better quantify this issue. The TES satellite observations of ammonia concentrations and surface measurements of wet deposition fluxes are assimilated into the model to constrain the ammonia emissions over China. Optimized emissions show a strong seasonal variability with emissions in summer a factor of 3 higher than winter. We improve the bottom-up estimate of Chinese ammonia emissions from fertilizer use by using more practical feritilizer application rates for different crop types, which explains most of the discrepancies between our top-down estimates and prior emission estimates. We further use the GEOS-Chem adjoint at 0.25x0.3125 degree resolution to examine the sources contributing to the PM2.5 air pollution over North China. We show that wintertime PM2.5 over Beijing is largely contributed by residential and industrial sources, and ammonia emissions from agriculture activities. PM2.5 concentrations over North China are particularly sensitive to NH3 emissions in cold seasons due to strong nitrate formation. By converting shorted-lived nitric acid to aerosol nitrate, NH3 significantly promotes the regional transport influences of PM2.5 sources.

  8. Biological Removal of Ammonia from Contaminated Air Streams Using Biofiltration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Shahmansouri, H Taghipour, B Bina, H Movahdian

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a colorless, toxic, reactive and corrosive gas with a sharp odor. It is irritating to the skin, eyes, nose, throat, and lungs. Ammonia gas occurs in the environment naturally and is emitted by many industries and, therefore, its control is essential. Biofiltration is a new emerging technology that is being used as a control procedure. This study evaluates the use of a mixture of compost, sludge, and pieces of PVC as biofilter media to remove ammonia gas. The study investigates the effects of parameters such as inlet concentration, accumulation time, and depth of filter media to evaluate the removal efficiency. A laboratory scale biofilter column was built and operated to investigate the removal of ammonia from a waste gas stream. The findings indicate that for inlet concentrations of 236 ppm, and ammonia loading of less than 9.86 g-NH3/m3.h at empty bed residence time of 1 min, an ammonia removal efficiency of more than 99.9% was obtained. The acclimation period of the bacteria was 10 days. The average pressure drop during measurement was 4.44 mm H2O. The study also revealed that for concentration levels of 99, 211, and 236 ppmv, biofilter media depths of 40, 80, and 120 cm will be required, respectively. The results obtained in this study indicate that the biofiltration system composed of compost in the mixture of sludge and smashed polyvinyl chloride as biofilter media is an efficient method for the removal of ammonia from waste gas streams. It is also found that the optimum depth of biofilter media depends on the inlet concentration of ammonia.

  9. Ammonia synthesis using magnetic induction method (MIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, P.; Razak, J. Abd; Yahya, N.

    2012-09-01

    The most challenging issues for ammonia synthesis is to get the high yield. New approach of ammonia synthesis by using Magnetic Induction Method (MIM) and the Helmholtz Coils has been proposed. The ammonia detection was done by using Kjeldahl Method and FTIR. The system was designed by using Autocad software. The magnetic field of MIM was vary from 100mT-200mT and the magnetic field for the Helmholtz coils was 14mT. The FTIR result shows that ammonia has been successfully formed at stretching peaks 1097,1119,1162,1236, 1377, and 1464 cm-1. UV-VIS result shows the ammonia bond at 195nm of wavelength. The ammonia yield was increase to 244.72μmole/g.h by using the MIM and six pairs of Helmholtz coils. Therefore this new method will be a new promising method to achieve the high yield ammonia at ambient condition (at 25δC and 1atm), under the Magnetic Induction Method (MIM).

  10. Resveratrol prevents ammonia toxicity in astroglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Daniele Bobermin

    Full Text Available Ammonia is implicated as a neurotoxin in brain metabolic disorders associated with hyperammonemia. Acute ammonia toxicity can be mediated by an excitotoxic mechanism, oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO production. Astrocytes interact with neurons, providing metabolic support and protecting against oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Astrocytes also convert excess ammonia and glutamate into glutamine via glutamine synthetase (GS. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and red wines, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and modulates glial functions, such as glutamate metabolism. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, GS activity, S100B secretion, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in astroglial cells exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced oxidative stress, decreased GS activity and increased cytokines release, probably by a mechanism dependent on protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathways. Resveratrol prevented ammonia toxicity by modulating oxidative stress, glial and inflammatory responses. The ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB are involved in the protective effect of resveratrol on cytokines proinflammatory release. In contrast, other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid and trolox were not effective against hyperammonemia. Thus, resveratrol could be used to protect against ammonia-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. WOOD COLOR CHANGES BY AMMONIA FUMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Miklečić,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the influence of ammonia gas on wood color changes in response to an increasing demand for dark colored wood specimens. The darker wood color in ammonia fuming is accomplished through chemical reactions between ammonia gas and wood compounds. We exposed oak, maple, spruce, and larch wood samples to ammonia gas for 16 days. During fuming, the color changes were studied using CIE L*a*b* parameters. After fuming, the changes in extractives content, tannin, and nitrogen content were analyzed. The chemical changes of wood and residues of wood extractives after fuming were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. Oak wood reacted intensively with ammonia gas in a very short time, and the darkening was prominent for all the investigated wood species. It was established that tannin had no major influence on color changes of maple and larch wood in the ammonia-fuming process. The FTIR spectra of fumed wood indicated involvement of carbonyl groups, and the FTIR spectra of wood extractives indicated involvement of carbonyl, aromatic, and alcohol groups in reaction with ammonia gas.

  12. Lyoluminescence of luminol in aqueous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission spectrum of lyoluminescence of luminol in aqueous ammonia was recorded on a Fuess spectrograph. A continuous emission band from 370 to 600 nm, on resolution, showed three-banded emission with peaks at 413, 463 and 545 nm. The resolved fluorescence spectrum of luminol in ammonia showed two peaks, at 407 and 446 nm. The fluorescence lifetime of luminol in aqueous ammonia solution is 0.7 ns. The lyoluminescence emission bands are explained on the basis of the reactions of colour centres with luminol during the dissolution of irradiated NaCl crystals in an aqueous ammoniated solution of luminol. (author)

  13. Aerodynamic gradient measurements of the NH3-HNO3-NH4NO3 triad using a wet chemical instrument: an analysis of precision requirements and flux errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. X. Meixner

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic gradient method is widely used for flux measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, particulate ammonium nitrate (the NH3-HNO3-NH4NO3 triad and other water-soluble reactive trace compounds. The surface exchange flux is derived from a measured concentration difference and micrometeorological quantities (turbulent exchange coefficient. The significance of the measured concentration difference is crucial for the significant determination of surface exchange fluxes. Additionally, measurements of surface exchange fluxes of ammonia, nitric acid and ammonium nitrate are often strongly affected by phase changes between gaseous and particulate compounds of the triad, which make measurements of the four individual species (NH3, HNO3, NH4+, NO3– necessary for a correct interpretation of the measured concentration differences. We present here a rigorous analysis of results obtained with a multi-component, wet-chemical instrument, able to simultaneously measure gradients of both gaseous and particulate trace substances. Basis for our analysis are two field experiments, conducted above contrasting ecosystems (grassland, forest. Precision requirements of the instrument as well as errors of concentration differences and micrometeorological exchange parameters have been estimated, which, in turn, allows the establishment of thorough error estimates of the derived fluxes of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3–. Derived median flux errors for the grassland and forest field experiments were: 39 and 50% (NH3, 31 and 38% (HNO3, 62 and 57% (NH4+, and 47 and 68% (NO3–, respectively. Additionally, we provide the basis for using field data to characterize the instrument performance, as well as subsequent quantification of surface exchange fluxes and underlying mechanistic processes under realistic ambient measurement conditions.

  14. Ammonia as a Suitable Fuel for Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5 wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel ...

  15. Ammonia as a suitable fuel for fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShanwenTao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  16. Use of ammonia as an additive reducing sulphur dioxide and nitric oxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Test results obtained on an operating object when proportioning ammonia have been presented. As analyses of the obtained results was carried out and possibilities of SO2 and NOx emission reductions by using additives was discussed in this aspect. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Raman spectra of ordinary and deuterated liquid ammonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three deuterated ammonia molecules, as well as ordinary ammonia, have been examined in the liquid state by Raman spectroscopy using a high-pressure cell described elsewhere. This work thus completes the infrared spectrometry studies. We have examined the NH and ND valency absorption regions. The polarization measurements and isotope effect considerations make it possible to confirm most of the attributions recently proposed for interpreting the infrared spectra of the four isotopic molecules: the apparent disagreement between the NH3 and ND3 spectra obtained in this region by infrared and Raman spectroscopy is discussed: by the first technique the number of bands in the spectra corresponds well to the theoretically expected number, and the relative intensities conform more or less to expectations; the Raman spectra however have a strong supplementary band in the same region, produced by a Fermi resonance; it is possible to explain, from theoretical considerations, why this resonance appears so easily in the Raman spectrum, whereas it is detected in the infrared only by a very detailed analysis of the effects of solvents on the ammonia. (authors)

  18. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH3BH3) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 oC at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  19. Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia in Solid Electrolyte Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichaelStoukides

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developed in the early 1900's, the “Haber-Bosch” synthesis is the dominant NH3 synthesis process. Parallel to catalyst optimization, current research efforts are also focused on the investigation of new methods for ammonia synthesis, including the electrochemical synthesis with the use of solid electrolyte cells. Since the first report on Solid State Ammonia Synthesis (SSAS, more than 30 solid electrolyte materials were tested and at least 15 catalysts were used as working electrodes. Thus far, the highest rate of ammonia formation reported is 1.13×10−8 mol s−1 cm−2, obtained at 80°C with a Nafion solid electrolyte and a mixed oxide, SmFe0.7Cu0.1Ni0.2O3, cathode. At high temperatures (>500oC the maximum rate was 9.5*10-9 mol s−1 cm−2 using Ce0.8Y0.2O2-δ -[Ca3(PO42 -K3PO4] as electrolyte and Ag-Pd as cathode. In this paper, the advantages and the disadvantages of SSAS vs the conventional process and the requirements that must be met in order to promote the electrochemical process into an industrial level, are discussed.

  20. Process for reprocessing and regenerating wash water containing ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to produce nuclear fuels, an oxide hydrate gel is precipitated by hydrolysis from nitrate solutions of uranium, plutonium and thorium, which contains the rest of the precipitation chemicals and by-products of the reaction, which have to be removed before further processing. Apart from ammonium salts, the 2-3% solution of ammonia in water used as wash water contains small quantities of heavy metal salts after being used several times. The waste water containing ammonia is evaporated to a concentration of about 1000 g/litre and the vapour produced is washed with hot (above 1000C) 30% caustic soda solution before condensation, in order to prevent dissolving of oxide particles by wash water containing carbonate. The regenerate obtained in this way, which is now free of carbonate, can be used to wash the oxide hydrate gel out, after adding the ammonia. The soda solution produced in this washing out or the soda produced by drying is the only waste product of the process, apart from filter material. (PW)

  1. Ammonia manipulates the ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the coastal sediment-water microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Dai, Tianjiao; Sun, Renhua; Wen, Donghui

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia was observed as a potential significant factor to manipulate the abundance and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs) in water environments. For the first time, this study confirmed this phenomenon by laboratory cultivation. In a series of estuarine sediment-coastal water microcosms, we investigated the AOM's phylogenetic composition and activity change in response to ammonia concentration. Increase of ammonia concentration promoted bacterial amoA gene abundance in a linear pattern. The ratio of transcribed ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene/ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) amoA gene increased from 0.1 to 43 as NH4 (+)-N increased from less than 0.1 to 12 mg L(-1), and AOA amoA transcription was undetected under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). The incubation of stable isotope probing (SIP) microcosms revealed a faster (13)C-NaHCO3 incorporation rate of AOA amoA gene under 0.1 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1) and a sole (13)C-NaHCO3 utilization of the AOB amoA gene under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). Our results indicate that ammonia concentration manipulates the structure of AOM. AOA prefers to live and perform higher amoA transcription activity than AOB in ammonia-limited water environments, and AOB tends to take the first contributor place in ammonia-rich ones. PMID:25797330

  2. Fabrication of interdigitated electrodes by inkjet printing technology for apllication in ammonia sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam Le, Duy; Nhien Nguyen, Thi Ngoc; Chanh Tin Doan, Duc; Dung Dang, Thi My; Chien Dang, Mau

    2016-06-01

    In this paper interdigitated electrodes for gas sensors were fabricated by inkjet printing technology. Silver electrodes were inkjet printed on Si/SiO2 substrates instead of traditional photolithography method. The inkjet printing parameters to obtain desired dimensions, thickness of the electrodes and distance between the interdigitated electrodes were optimized in this study. The fabricated interdigitated silver electrodes were tested for application in ammonia gas sensors. Conductive polyaniline (PANI) layer was coated on the silver interdigitated electrodes by drop-coating. Ammonia detection of the PANI-coated chips was characterized with a gas measurement system in which humidity and ammonia concentrations were well-controlled. The electrical conductivity of the PANI films coated on the electrodes was measured when the PANI films were exposed to nitrogen and ammonia. The conductivity of the PANI films decreased significantly due to the deprotonation process of PANI upon ammonia expodure. The recovery time was about 15 min by heating up the polymer chip at 60 °C. The results showed that the silver electrodes fabricated by inkjet printing technique could be used as a sensor platform for ammonia detection.

  3. Ammonia Volatilization from Urea Applied to Acid Paddy Soil in Southern China and Its Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAIGUI-XIN; PENGGUANG-HAO; 等

    1992-01-01

    Results showed that ammonia loss from urea broadcast into floodwater and incorporated into soil at transplanting was as high as 40% of applied N,and the corresponding total nitrogen (N) loss was 56%.Ammonia loss was measured with simplified micrometeorological method (ammonia sampler),and total N loss was concurrently measured using 15N balance technique.The experiment was conducted under strong sunshine conditions on acid paddy soil derived from Quaternary red clay.The ammonia loss in this particular condition was much greater than those obtained from previous studies when urea was also applied to acid paddy soil but under cloudy conditions.It is concluded that the strong sunshine conditions with high temperature and shallow floodwater during the period of present experiment favoured ammonia volatilization.Application of stearyl alcohol on the surface of the floodwater reduced ammonia loss to 23% of applied N.However,the effect of stearyl alcohol was short-lived,probably due to the microbiological decomposition.

  4. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias;

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide emi...... removal without too much energy consumption, waste water production, green house gas emission, or suppression of the filters odor removal efficiency.......Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... nitrite oxidation only appeared in locations with minimal ammonia and nitrite levels. Nitrous oxide emission depended on anoxic microsites, and nitric oxide production was associated with nitrite accumulation. Water and biomass management appear to be the important tools for optimization of ammonia...

  5. Assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikes, V; Chválová, H; Mátlová, L

    1991-01-01

    Two pathways serve for assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans. Glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) catalyzes the assimilation at a high NH4+ concentration. If nitrate serves as the nitrogen source, glutamate is synthesized by glutamate-ammonia ligase and glutamate synthase (NADPH). At a very low NH4+ concentration, all three enzymes are synthesized simultaneously. No direct relationship exists between glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) and glutamate-ammonia ligase in P. denitrificans, while the glutamate synthase (NADPH) activity changes in parallel with that of the latter enzyme. Ammonia does not influence the induction or repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+). The inner concentration of metabolites indicates a possible repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) by the high concentration of glutamine or its metabolic products as in the case when NH4+ is formed by assimilative nitrate reduction. No direct effect of the intermediates of nitrate assimilation on the synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) was observed. PMID:1688163

  6. INVESTIGATION OF THE ORION RESEARCH AMMONIA MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Orion Research ammonia monitor was investigated using the Orion specifications and environmental considerations as a guide. Laboratory tests under controlled environmental conditions showed the electronic stability (drift) to be well within + or - 10 percent of reading over t...

  7. Mitigate emissions of Ammonia from Nitrogen fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonia emissions are one of the main causes of acidification and eutrophication processes, and one of the most important contributors to the formation of secondary PM. The European NEC Directive 2001/81/CE introduced compulsory national emission ceiling for different pollutants and fixed for each countries a national ceiling for ammonia emissions to be reached in 2010. Agriculture plays a crucial role by emitting more than 90% of the total ammonia emissions. The main sources are livestock and fertilizer uses. In our activities we have studied the effects of different strategies to reduce Nitrogen fertilizer use and specifically Urea in Italy at the year 2010 and 2020. Different measures and techniques have been evaluated to estimate their effects as a potential options to mitigate emissions: fertilization, controlled release of fertilizers and biological agriculture. Each one of this option has been evaluated in terms of NH3 emission abatement showing that they could together provide good result in reducing ammonia air emission

  8. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bodega

    Full Text Available Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis.

  9. Ultrafast dynamics of electrons in ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöhringer, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Solvated electrons were first discovered in solutions of metals in liquid ammonia. The physical and chemical properties of these species have been studied extensively for many decades using an arsenal of electrochemical, spectroscopic, and theoretical techniques. Yet, in contrast to their hydrated counterpart, the ultrafast dynamics of ammoniated electrons remained completely unexplored until quite recently. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy on metal-ammonia solutions and femtosecond multiphoton ionization spectroscopy on the neat ammonia solvent have provided new insights into the optical properties and the reactivities of this fascinating species. This article reviews the nature of the optical transition, which gives the metal-ammonia solutions their characteristic blue appearance, in terms of ultrafast relaxation processes involving bound and continuum excited states. The recombination processes following the injection of an electron via photoionization of the solvent are discussed in the context of the electronic structure of the liquid and the anionic defect associated with the solvated electron. PMID:25493716

  10. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF AMMONIA SYNTHESIS REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madjid Kakavand

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an industrial ammonia synthesis reactor has been modeled. The reactor under study is of horizontal type. This reactor which is under the license of Kellogg Company is equipped with three axial flow catalyst beds and an internal heat exchanger in accompany with a cooling flow. The achieved modeling is one dimensional and non-homogenous. Considering the sever effect of internal heat exchanger on reactor operation, it has been simulated by calculation of film heat transfer coefficients in its tube and shell and then, taking into account the shell thermal resistance and fouling coefficient, obtaining the overall heat transfer coefficient. So in the developed software, the heat transfer coefficient is first calculated using the conditions of the input flow to the exchanger and then the input flows to the first and second beds are calculated. The differential equations have been solved using Rung Kutta 4 method and the results have been compared with the available industrial data. Finally the capability of the developed software for industrial application has been investigated by changing the reactor operation conditions and studying their effects on reactor output.

  11. Measurement of Ammonia Emission Following Surface Application of Urea Fertilizer from Irrigated Paddy Rice Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md.Toufiq Iqbal; TIAN Guang-ming; LIANG Xin-qiang; Fatima Rukshana

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia emission is one of the most important pathways of nitrogen loss from agricultural cultivated field. In this paper, we report the measurement of ammonia emission from paddy rice field obtained by surface application of urea fertilizer with water management. The main objective of the present study were to assess the amount of NH3 emission and the loss of nitrogen from paddy field as affected by various N doses, i.e., 0 (control), 90 (N1), 180 (N2), 270 (N3) and 360 (N4) kg ha-1, following field surface application of urea fertilizer with water management. Ammonia emissions were measured by continuous airflow enclosure method from plots fertilized with the application of surface urea. Increase in urea-N dosage increased NH3 emission thatwas measured from paddy rice field. Ammonia emission started immediately and was almost complete within 12 days after top dressing of urea application to the soils. Ammonia emissions were nearly constant in all treatments from 12 days after fertilizer application. Highest ammonia emission rate was 28 g/day and total amount of ammonia emission was 56.21 kg ha-1 for 360 kg N ha-1 dose. No remarkable observation was found about temperature for ammonia emission. Due to proper water management practices less emission was observed throughout the experiment period. The results also show that N loss through NH3 emission accounted for 11 to 16% during the ricegrowing season. These magnitudes of loss of N appear to be most important for environmental point of view.

  12. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F. [Departamento de Fisica/Laboratorio do Acelerador Van de Graaff, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lv, X. Y.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie), CIMAP-CIRIL-GANIL, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Seperuelo Duarte, E., E-mail: vbordalo@fis.puc-rio.br [Grupo de Fisica e Astronomia, Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-10

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  13. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere and...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  14. Sanitisation of faecal sludge by ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Fidjeland, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    Faecal sludge contains valuable plant nutrients and can be used as a fertiliser in agriculture, instead of being emitted as a pollutant. As this involves a risk of pathogen transmission, it is crucial to inactivate the pathogens in faecal sludge. One treatment alternative is ammonia sanitisation, as uncharged ammonia (NH₃) inactivates pathogens. The aim of this thesis was to study how the pathogen inactivation depends on treatment factors, mainly NH₃ concentration, temperature and storage tim...

  15. Evaluating ammonia deposition rates for deciduous forest using measurements and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.; Geels, C.; Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Soerensen, L. L.; Boegh, E.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is a major contributor to soil acidification and eutrophication of natural terrestrial ecosystem leading to e.g. reduced biodiversity (Erisman et al. 2007, Environmental Pollution, Stevens et al. 2004, Science, Sutton et al. 2009, Biogeoscience). In order to assess these impacts, quantifying the magnitude of the NH3 flux in the biosphere atmosphere system is essential. Model simulations using the Danish Ammonia Modelling System (DAMOS) have recently indicated that particular forest ecosystems are exposed to critical load exceedances of N (Geels et al., not yet submitted). However, there are relatively few datasets of atmospheric NH3 fluxes available for forests which can contribute verifying model results. The atmospheric dry deposition of NH3 for the beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest, Lille Bøgeskov, in Sorø, Denmark, is investigated using the high resolution micrometeorological measuring technique, Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA), for 26 October - 11 November 2010. Measurements of atmospheric NH3 concentrations and fluxes are compared to local-scale model simulations using the Danish Ammonia Modelling System (DAMOS). It was found that long-term measured and modelled atmospheric mean concentrations of NH3 agreed well within the range of 0.56-0.68 µg NH3-N m-3, however, observed emission fluxes of up to app. 0.8 µg NH3-N m-2 s-1 after leaf fall were not represented by DAMOS because the model system does not consider vegetative and soil NH3 emissions from non-agricultural areas (Skjøth et al. 2011, ACPD). New atmospheric NH3 flux measurements for Lille Bøgeskov have been conducted throughout 2011 and these data are presented and discussed in relation to the 2010 data of atmospheric NH3. Future studies aim to improve the description of dry deposition of NH3 for vegetative surfaces in local-scale models whereby the NH3 vegetative emission and its contribution to the atmospheric NH3 concentration and flux is considered.

  16. Study of Ammonia Emissions in a Ventilated Pig Pen

    OpenAIRE

    Rong, Li

    2011-01-01

    Pig productions cause a wide emission of odors, such as ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Ammonia is one of the most important emissions for evaluating the air quality either in animal buildings or atmospheric environment. In studies of ammonia emission from animal buildings reported in literature, little effort has been made to investigate the accuracy of current Henry’s law constant for modeling ammonia mass transfer process and study ammonia emissions in a full scal...

  17. Study of the acceleration of ammonia generation process from poultry residues aiming at hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen, utilized in fuel cells, can be produced from a variety of intermediate chemicals, between them, the ammonia. The ammonia gas as a raw material for the hydrogen production has been used due to its high energetic content, facility of decomposition, high availability, low prices, low storage pressure and its by-products are environmentally correct. One of the sources of ammonia is poultry and egg production systems. In these systems the ammonia is produced from the decomposition of uric acid present in the excreta of birds. The residue from the poultry-rearing farms is the broiler litter and from the egg production system is the excreta without any substrate. The characterization of these residues was performed using the Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF), Elementary Analysis (CHN), Thermogravimetry and GC/MS - Gas chromatography/ Mass spectrometry. The studied factors which influence the ammonia volatilization were: nitrogen content, raising period, urease enzyme, temperature, pH and moisture content. The experiment results with poultry litter and excreta allow to conclude that the manipulation of the following parameters increased the ammonia emission: pH, nitrogen content, raising period, age of birds and excreta accumulation, urease enzyme and the temperature. The addition of different amounts of sand in the excreta and different volumes of water in the poultry litter inhibited the emission of ammonia. The variation of the quantity of material (broiler litter or excreta) and the volume of the flask used as incubator chamber showed no significant alterations to be chosen as a variable. The excreta was considered more appropriate than poultry litter for the objectives of this work due to the higher ammonia concentrations determined in this material. Due to the large amount of poultry litter and excreta from the production processes, the reuse of poultry residues to obtain ammonia is necessary to improve the quality of the local

  18. Livestock wastewater treatment: ammonia removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livestock wastewater contains high concentration of ammonia. Removal of this inorganic species of nitrogen could be achieved through nitrification and de-nitrification. Nitrification process was conducted in the laboratory using activated sludge process with HRT of three and five days. After wastewater undergone nitrification process at Livestock Wastewater Treatment Plant the concentration of influent for N-NH4+ reduced from 400 mg/l to 0 mg/l and concentration of N-NO3- increased from 11 mg/l to 300 mg/l. Nitrification using lab-scale activated sludge process also recorded similar result. Concentration of N-NH4+ reduced from 400 mg/l to 2 mg/l and 380 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l for HRT=5 days and HRT=3 days respectively. N-NO3- was increased from 11 mg/l to 398 mg/l and 14 mg/l to 394 mg/l for HRT=5 days and HRT=3 days, respectively. However changes of N-NH4+ and N=NO3- were not observed using gamma irradiation. The combination of gamma irradiation with activated sludge process indicated difference and its contribution is still investigated

  19. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  20. Screening of electrocatalysts for direct ammonia fuel cell: Ammonia oxidation on PtMe (Me: Ir, Rh, Pd, Ru) and preferentially oriented Pt(1 0 0) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Iglesias, F. J.; Solla-Gullón, J.; Montiel, V.; Feliu, J. M.; Aldaz, A.

    Ammonia has attracted attention as a possible fuel for direct fuel cells since it is easy to handle and to transport as liquid or as concentrated aqueous solution. However, on noble metal electrodes ammonia oxidation is a sluggish reaction and the electrocatalyst needs to be improved for developing efficient ammonia fuel cells. In this work, ammonia electrooxidation reaction on 3-4-nm bimetallic PtMe (Ir, Rh, Pd, Ru) and on preferentially oriented Pt(1 0 0) nanoparticles is reported. PtMe nanoparticles have been prepared by using water-in-oil microemulsions to obtain a narrow size distribution whereas preferentially oriented Pt nanoparticles have been prepared through colloidal routes. Among all the bimetallic samples tested, only Pt 75Ir 25 and Pt 75Rh 25 nanoparticles show, at the low potential range, an enhancement of the oxidation density current with respect to the behaviour found for pure platinum nanoparticles prepared by the same method. In addition, two Pt(1 0 0) preferentially oriented nanoparticles of different particle size (4 and 9 nm) have been also studied. These oriented nanoparticles show higher current densities than polycrystalline Pt nanoparticles due to the sensitivity of ammonia oxidation toward the presence of surface sites with square symmetry. The reactivity of the different 4-nm nanoparticles parallels well with that expected from bulk PtMe alloys and Pt single crystal electrodes.

  1. Vertical Distribution and Flux of Nutrients in the Sediments of the Mangrove Reclamation Region of Muara Angke Kapuk, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ida Sunaryo Purwiyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The reclaimed mangrove estuary in Muara Angke Kapuk is a reclaimed area that has not evaded the impacted of pollution and waste in the areas surrounding Cengkareng, Jakarta. This is apparent from the fact that almost all sediments under the mangrove trees are buried under heaps of plastic trash. However, the reclaimed region still has variety of organism, which indicating that the region still has an internal carrying capacity, especially nutrients from sediment. The purpose of this research was to examine the condition of sediment nutrients in this mangrove reclamation region. The research was conducted by taking water samples using a modification of the stratified cup at a sediment depth of 0-15 cm with depth intervals of 2.5 cm, and taking sediment samples using the sediment ring. Pore water samples were measured for dissolved oxygen (DO and concentrations of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate. Sediment samples were used to obtain porosity values. The data obtained is used to make vertical concentration profiles and analysis of vertical nutrient flux. Vertical nutrient flux analysis was performed with the aid of QUAL2K software version 2.11. The results showed different vertical distributions and flux of nutrients, where influx for ammonia and phosphate and an increase in line with increasing sediment depth, while nitrate efflux and a decreased concentration. The flux calculation of nitrite as transitory nutrient was not done, but the concentration decreased after a depth of 2.5 cm. This indicates that the high contamination on the surface does not prevent the natural chemical processes so the reclaimed region can still provide nutritional support for its organism.

  2. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Ran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic compounds, can be upward into the air as well as downward to the surface and therefore should be modeled as bi-directional fluxes. Model parameterizations of dry deposition in air quality models have been represented by simple electrical resistance analogs for almost 30 years. Uncertainties in surface flux modeling in global to mesoscale models are being slowly reduced as more field measurements provide constraints on parameterizations. However, at the same time, more chemical species are being added to surface flux models as air quality models are expanded to include more complex chemistry and are being applied to a wider array of environmental issues. Since surface flux measurements of many of these chemicals are still lacking, resistances are usually parameterized using simple scaling by water or lipid solubility and reactivity. Advances in recent years have included bi-directional flux algorithms that require a shift from pre-computation of deposition velocities to fully integrated surface flux calculations within air quality models. Improved modeling of the stomatal component of chemical surface fluxes has resulted from improved evapotranspiration modeling in land surface models and closer integration between meteorology and air quality models. Satellite-derived land use characterization and vegetation products and indices are improving model representation of spatial and temporal variations in surface flux processes. This review describes the current state of chemical dry deposition modeling, recent progress in bi-directional flux modeling, synergistic model development research with field measurements, and coupling with meteorological land surface models.

  3. Fluorescence Excitation Models of Ammonia and Amidogen Radical (NH2) in Comets: Application to Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH2 -- a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH3/H2O is 0.46% +/- 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH2 observations (0.31% -- 0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH3 could be the sole parent of NH2 in this comet.

  4. Ammonia removal in the carbon contactor of a hybrid membrane process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoquart, Céline; Servais, Pierre; Barbeau, Benoit

    2014-12-15

    The hybrid membrane process (HMP) coupling powdered activated carbon (PAC) and low-pressure membrane filtration is emerging as a promising new option to remove dissolved contaminants from drinking water. Yet, defining optimal HMP operating conditions has not been confirmed. In this study, ammonia removal occurring in the PAC contactor of an HMP was simulated at lab-scale. Kinetics were monitored using three PAC concentrations (1-5-10 g L(-1)), three PAC ages (0-10-60 days), two temperatures (7-22 °C), in ambient influent condition (100 μg N-NH4 L(-1)) as well as with a simulated peak pollution scenario (1000 μg N-NH4L(-1)). The following conclusions were drawn: i) Using a colonized PAC in the HMP is essential to reach complete ammonia removal, ii) an older PAC offers a higher resilience to temperature decrease as well as lower operating costs; ii) PAC concentration inside the HMP reactor is not a key operating parameter as under the conditions tested, PAC colonization was not limited by the available surface; iii) ammonia flux limited biomass growth and iv) hydraulic retention time was a critical parameter. In the case of a peak pollution, the process was most probably phosphate-limited but a mixed adsorption/nitrification still allowed reaching a 50% ammonia removal. Finally, a kinetic model based on these experiments is proposed to predict ammonia removal occurring in the PAC reactor of the HMP. The model determines the relative importance of the adsorption and biological oxidation of ammonia on colonized PAC, and demonstrates the combined role of nitrification and residual adsorption capacity of colonized PAC. PMID:25459222

  5. Efficient Total Nitrogen Removal in an Ammonia Gas Biofilter through High-Rate OLAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Clippeleir, Haydée; Courtens, Emilie; Mosquera, Mariela;

    2012-01-01

    .86 ± 0.04 kg N m–3 biofilter d–1 and an empty bed residence time of 14 s. After 45 days of operation a stable nitrogen removal rate of 0.67 ± 0.06 kg N m–3 biofilter d–1, an ammonia removal efficiency of 99%, a removal of 75–80% of the total nitrogen, and negligible NO/N2O productions were obtained at......Ammonia gas is conventionally treated in nitrifying biofilters; however, addition of organic carbon to perform post-denitrification is required to obtain total nitrogen removal. Oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND), applied in full-scale for wastewater treatment, can...... therefore shows the appealing potential of the OLAND process to treat ammonia containing gaseous streams....

  6. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation......Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... tolerant methanogenic culture as potential bioaugmentation inoculum in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operating under “inhibited steady-state”, triggered by high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). The results of the current study established for the first time that bioaugmentation of an enriched...

  7. Effect of time duration of ruminal urea infusions on ruminal ammonia concentrations and portal-drained visceral extraction of arterial urea-N in lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2012-01-01

    The effects of a 6 versus 24h ruminal urea infusion in lactating dairy cows fed a basal diet deficient in N on ruminal ammonia concentration, arterial urea-N concentration, net portal-drained viscera (PDV) urea-N flux, arterial urea-N extraction across the PDV, and renal urea-N kinetics were...... urea/kg of dry matter intake (DMI; 24-h INF), and 6-h infusion of 15g of urea/kg of DMI (6-h INF). The 6-h INF was initiated 0.5h after the afternoon feeding, and ran until 2230h. Eight sample sets of arterial, portal, and hepatic blood, ruminal fluid, and urine were obtained at 0.5h before the morning...... experimental setting plan was met (i.e., to cause changes in the daily pattern of ruminal ammonia and blood urea-N concentrations). The arterial urea-N concentration for 24-h INF and 6-h INF were greater than the arterial urea-N concentration with water INF throughout the sampling window. However, the arterial...

  8. Thiourea-treated graphene aerogel as a highly selective gas sensor for sensing of trace level of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Taher; Ahmadian, Farzaneh

    2015-10-15

    As a result of this study, a new and simple method was proposed for the fabrication of an ultra sensitive, robust and reversible ammonia gas sensor. The sensing mechanism was based upon the change in electrical resistance of a graphene aerogel as a result of sensor exposing to ammonia. Three-dimensional graphene hydrogel was first synthesized via hydrothermal method in the absence or presence of various amounts of thiourea. The obtained material was heated to obtain aerogel and then it was used as ammonia gas sensor. The materials obtained were characterized using different techniques such as Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thiourea-treated graphene aerogel was more porous (389 m(2) g(-1)) and thermally unstable and exhibited higher sensitivity, shorter response time and better selectivity toward ammonia gas, compared to the aerogel produced in the absence of thiourea. Thiourea amount, involved in the hydrogel synthesis step, was found to be highly effective factor in the sensing properties of finally obtained aerogel. The sensor response time to ammonia was short (100 s) and completely reversible (recovery time of about 500 s) in ambient temperature. The sensor response to ammonia was linear between 0.02 and 85 ppm and its detection limit was found to be 10 ppb (3S/N). PMID:26515009

  9. Ammonia/Hydrogen Mixtures in an SI-Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Christian Sandersen; Bjerre, Andreas; Gøttrup, Morten Piil;

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing focus on using metal ammine complexes for ammonia storage. In this paper a fuel system for ammonia fuelled internal combustion engines using metal ammine complexes as ammonia storage is analyzed. The use of ammonia/hydrogen mixtures as an SI-engine fuel is...... investigated in the same context. Ammonia and hydrogen were introduced into the intake manifold of a CFR-engine. Series of experiments with varying excess air ratio and different ammonia to hydrogen ratios was conducted. This showed that a fuel mixture with 10 vol.% hydrogen performs best with respect to...

  10. The effect of outside conditions on anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; WANG Shu-bo

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon, inorganic carbon, temperature, pH and ORP are all to have a certain influence on the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. We can draw some conclusions on the optimum conditions of anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. The optimum temperature of the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction is 30-35℃. And the optimum pH of the anaerobic ammonia reaction is 7.5-8.3. The presence of organic matters can affect the anaerobic ammonia reaction, and different organic matters have different influence on it. The concentration of the inorganic carbon also exist great influence on the reaction. High inorganic carbon concentration also can inhibit anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction.

  11. Phase behaviour and thermoelastic properties of ammonia hydrate and ice polymorphs from 0 - 2 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, A. D.; Wood, I. G.; Vocadlo, L.

    2008-12-01

    growth kinetics of the high-pressure ammonia dihydrate, ammonia monohydrate and ice polymorphs obtained from our data.

  12. Quantification of myocardial blood flow using dynamic N-13 ammonia PET and factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate the feasibility of extracting pure left ventricular blood pool and myocardial time activity curves (TACs) and of generating factor images from human dynamic N-13 ammonia PET using factor analysis. The myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimates obtained with factor analysis were compared with those obtained with the user drawn region-of-interest (ROI) method. Stress and rest N-13 ammonia cardiac PET imaging was acquired for 23 min in 5 patients with coronary artery disease using GE Advance tomography. Factor analysis generated physiological TACs and factor images using the normalized TACs from each dixel. Four steps were involved in this algorithm: (a) data preprocessing; (b) principal component analysis; (c) oblique rotation with positivity constraints; (d) factor image computation. Area under curves and MBF estimated using the two compartment N-13 ammonia model were used to validate the accuracy of the factor analysis generated physiological TACs. The MBF values obtained by factor analysis were linearly correlated with MBF obtained by the ROI method (slope = 0.84, r=0.91. Left ventricular blood pool TACs obtained by the two methods agreed well (Area under curve ratio: 1.02 (0∼1 min), 0.98 (0∼2 min), 0.86 (1∼2 min). The results of this study demonstrates that MBF can be measured accurately and noninvasively with dynamic N-13 ammonia PET imaging and factor analysis. This method is simple and accurate, and can measure MBF without blood sampling, ROI definition or spillover correction

  13. Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Deldar, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles obtained from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for $SU(3)$ gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

  14. Heat Flux Apportionment to Heterogeneous Surfaces Using Flux Footprint Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Heat flux data collected from the Baiyangdian Heterogeneous Field Experiment were analyzed using the footprint method. High resolution (25 m) Landsat-5 satellite imaging was used to determine the land cover as one of four surface types: farmland, lake, wetland, or village. Data from two observation sites in September 2005 were used. One site (Wangjiazhai) was characterized by highly heterogeneous surfaces in the central area of the Baiyangdian: lake/wetland. The other site (Xiongxian) was on land with more uniform surface cover. An improved Eulerian analytical flux footprint model was used to determine "source areas" of the heat fluxes measured at towers located at each site from surrounding landscapes of mixed surface types.In relative terms results show that wetland and lake areas generally contributed most to the observed heat flux at Wangjiazhai, while farmland contributed most at Xiongxian. Given the areal distribution of surface type contributions, calculations were made to obtain the magnitudes of the heat flux from lake, wetland and farmland to the total observed flux and apportioned contributions of each surface type to the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Results show that on average the sensible heat flux from wetland and farmland were comparable over the diurnal cycle, while the latent heat flux from farmland was somewhat larger by about 30-50 W m-2 during daytime. The latent and sensible fluxes from the lake source in daytime were about 50 W m-2 and 100 W m-2 less, respectively, than from wetland and farmland. The results are judged reasonable and serve to demonstrate the potential for flux apportionment over heterogeneous surfaces.

  15. Ammonia emission time profiles based on manure transport data improve ammonia modelling across north western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, C.; Kranenburg, R.; Kuenen, J. J. P.; Van den Bril, B.; Verguts, V.; Schaap, M.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate modelling of mitigation measures for nitrogen deposition and secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) episodes requires a detailed representation of emission patterns from agriculture. In this study the meteorological influence on the temporal variability of ammonia emissions from livestock housing and application of manure and fertilizer are included in the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS. For manure application, manure transport data from Flanders (Belgium) were used as a proxy to derive the emission variability. Using improved ammonia emission variability strongly improves model performance for ammonia, mainly by a better representation of the spring maximum. The impact on model performance for SIA was negligible as explained by the limited, ammonia rich region in which the emission variability was updated. The contribution of Flemish agriculture to modelled annual mean ammonia and SIA concentrations in Flanders were quantified at respectively 7-8 and 1-2 μg/m3. A scenario study was performed to investigate the effects of reducing ammonia emissions from manure application during PM episodes by 75%, yielding a maximum reduction in modelled SIA levels of 1-3 μg/m3 during episodes. Year-to-year emission variability and a soil module to explicitly model the emission process from manure and fertilizer application are needed to further improve the modelling of the ammonia budget.

  16. Biochemistry of Ammonia Monoxygenase from Nitrosomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Hooper

    2009-07-15

    Major results. 1. CytochromecM552, a protein in the electron transfer chain to ammonia monooxygenase. Purification, modeling of protein structure based on primary structure, characterization of 4 hemes by magnetic spectroscopy, potentiometry, ligand binding and turnover. Kim, H. J., ,Zatsman, et al. 2008). 2. Characterization of proteins which thought to be involved in the AMO reaction or to protect AMO from toxic nitrogenous intermediates such as NO. Nitrosocyanin is a protein present only in bacteria which catalyze the ammonia monoxygenase reaction (1). Cytochrome c P460 beta and cytochrome c’ beta.

  17. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van;

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...... pressure up to 100bars. The results show that solid phases consisting of ammonium carbonate and bicarbonate are formed in the absorber. The heat requirements in the absorber and in the desorber have been studied. The enthalpy calculations show that a heat requirement for the desorber lower than 2GJ/ton CO2...

  18. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M;

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...... C and pressure up to 100 bars [1]. The results show that solid phases consisting of ammonium carbonate and bicarbonate are formed in the absorber. The energy requirements in the absorber and in the desorber have been studied. The enthalpy calculations show that an energy requirement for the desorber...

  19. Enrichment of high ammonia tolerant methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Proietti, Nicolas; Angelidaki, Irini

    population was derived from a full scale biogas reactor (Hashøj, Denmark), fed with 75% animal manure and 25% food industries organic waste. Basal anaerobic medium was used for the enrichment along with sodium acetate (1 g HAc L-1) as a carbon source. Fluorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) was used to...... of the current study was to isolate and identify methanogenic cultures tolerant to high ammonia concentrations. A mixed methanogenic population was stepwise exposed to ammonia concentrations (1 to 9.26 g NH4+-N L-1) during an enrichment process with successive batch cultivations. The methanogenic...

  20. Chemical deactivation of Cu-SSZ-13 ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Deka, U.; van der Bij, H. E.; Paalanen, P.; Arstad, B.; Weckhuysen, B. M.; Beale, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical deactivation of Cu-SSZ-13 Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction (NH3-SCR) catalysts by Pt, Zn, Ca and P has been systematically investigated using a range of analytical techniques in order to study the influence on both the zeolitic framework and the active Cu2+ ions. The results obtain

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in ammonia emissions - a freely accessible model code for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla; Berge, H.; Gyldenkærne, Steen; Fagerli, H.; Ellermann, Thomas; Frohn, Lise; Christensen, Jesper Heile; Hansen, Kaj Mantzius; Hansen, Kristina; Hertel, Ole

    2011-01-01

    demonstrates how local climate and local management can be accounted for in CTMs by applying a modular approach for deriving data as input to a dynamic ammonia emission model for Europe. Default data are obtained from information in the RAINS system, and it is demonstrated how this dynamic emission model based......Deriving a parameterisation of ammonia emissions for use in chemistry-transport models (CTMs) is a complex problem as the emission varies locally as a result of local climate and local agricultural management. In current CTMs such factors are generally not taken into account. This paper...

  2. Imaging of the umbrella motion and tunneling in the ammonia molecule by strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Förster, Johann; Magana, Alvaro; Saenz, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The geometry-dependent ionization behavior of the ammonia molecule is investigated. Different theoretical approaches for obtaining the ionization yield are compared, all of them showing a strong dependence of the ionization yield on the inversion coordinate at long wavelengths ($\\geq$ 800 nm). It is shown how this effect can be exploited to create and probe nuclear wave packets in neutral ammonia using Lochfra{\\ss}. Furthermore, imaging of a wave packet tunneling through the barrier of a double-well potential in real time is discussed.

  3. Removal of ammonia from air on molybdenum and tungsten oxide modified activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Camille; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2008-04-15

    Microporous coconut-based activated carbon was impregnated with solutions of ammonium metatungstate or ammonium molybdate and then calcined in air in order to convert the salts into their corresponding oxides. The surface of those materials was characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis. The results indicated a significant increase in surface acidity related to the presence of tungsten or molybdenum oxides. On the materials obtained, adsorption of ammonia from either dry or moist air was carried out. The oxides distributed on the surface provided Lewis and/or Brønsted centers for interactions with ammonia molecules or ammonium ions. Water on the surface of carbon or in the gas phase increased the amount of ammonia adsorbed via involvement of Brønsted-type interactions and/or by leading to the formation of molybdate or tungstate salts on the surface. Although the amount of ammonia adsorbed is closely related to the number of moles of oxides and their acidic centers, the carbon surface also contributes to the adsorption via providing small pores where ammonia can be dissolved in the water film. PMID:18497162

  4. Room Temperature Ammonia Gas Sensing Characteristics of Co3O4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Shelke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Room temperature ammonia gas-sensing characteristics of Co3O4 pellet sensor are reported in this paper. For this purpose, Co3O4 powder is prepared by a route of simple precipitation + heating at 800 °C/2 hr. The as-prepared powder is characterized by using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The ammonia gas-sensing properties of Co3O4 pellets made at various loads of 3, 5, 7 & 9 ton and at constant time = 4 min. are measured using home-built static gas sensing system. The characterization studies revealed that the cobalt oxide particles formed are cubic spinel Co3O4, highly pure and spherical in shape. The particle size distribution is found to be nearly uniform with average particle size ~ 1 µm. The ammonia gas sensing properties of Co3O4 pellet sensor are found to be good. The highest sensitivities – S.F. = 175 and 358 are found at ~ 25 ppm and 250 ppm concentrations of ammonia gas respectively for the Co3O4 pellet sensor made at the load = 3 ton. Further, an admirable repeatability and reversibility in the ammonia gas sensing characteristics are observed for all the Co3O4 pellet sensors. The average response time of 4.0 min. and recovery time of 3.0 min. are obtained for all the Co3O4 pellet sensors.

  5. Electrospun Nanofibers from a Tricyanofuran-Based Molecular Switch for Colorimetric Recognition of Ammonia Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Tawfik A; Abdelmoez, Sherif; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2016-03-14

    A chromophore based on tricyanofuran (TCF) with a hydrazone (H) recognition moiety was developed. Its molecular-switching performance is reversible and has differential sensitivity towards aqueous ammonia at comparable concentrations. Nanofibers were fabricated from the TCF-H chromophore by electrospinning. The film fabricated from these nanofibers functions as a solid-state optical chemosensor for probing ammonia vapor. Recognition of ammonia vapor occurs by proton transfer from the hydrazone fragment of the chromophore to the ammonia nitrogen atom and is facilitated by the strongly electron withdrawing TCF fragment. The TCF-H chromophore was added to a solution of poly(acrylic acid), which was electrospun to obtain a nanofibrous sensor device. The morphology of the nanofibrous sensor was determined by SEM, which showed that nanofibers with a diameter range of 200-450 nm formed a nonwoven mat. The resultant nanofibrous sensor showed very good sensitivity in ammonia-vapor detection. Furthermore, very good reversibility and short response time were also observed. PMID:26864701

  6. The structure of polaronic electron cavities in lithium-ammonia solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction has been used in conjunction with isotopic substitution of deuterium for hydrogen to study the structure of lithium-ammonia solutions, at concentrations spanning the metal-nonmetal transition. Detailed analysis and visualization of our experimental data has been carried out via iterative refinement of a three-dimensional molecular model, allowing us to obtain unique insight into the formation of polaronic electron cavities in the solutions. At low electron concentrations the solutions are nonmetallic, and the ammonia molecules are orientated around cavity centres to form Bjerrum-type defects. As the electron content is increased, the solutions become metallic, and we find evidence of percolation channels through the solvent. The dissociated electrons therefore play an active role in determining the structure of these solutions, and serve to disrupt the hydrogen bonding present in liquid ammonia

  7. Non-intrusive, fast and sensitive ammonia detection by laser photothermal deflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently developed non-intrusive photothermal deflection (PTD) instrument allows sensitive, rapid and quantitative detection of local ammonia concentrations in the air. Ammonia is vibrationally excited by an infrared CO2 laser in an intracavity configuration. A HeNe beam passing over the CO2 laser beam (multipass arrangement) is deflected by the induced refractive index gradient. The detection limit for ammonia in ambient air is 0.5 ppbv with a spatial resolution of a few mm3. The time resolution is 0.1 s (single line) or 15 s (multi line). The system is fully automated and suited for non-stop measuring periods of at least one week. Results were compared to those obtained with a continuous-flow denuder (CFD). (author)

  8. Detection of Ammonia in Liquids Using Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmi Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of ammonia plays a vital role for counter-bioterrorism applications. Using millimeter wave absorption measurements, ammonia dissolved in water solution is analyzed and compared to water-only solution. The inversion of ammonia molecule results in split rotational spectral lines and transitions of these lines can be detected. Two-port measurements were carried out with vector network analyzer and measurements revealed that ammonia presence can be identified, especially between 30–35 GHz.

  9. Ammonia production, excretion, toxicity, and defense in fish: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Y K Ip

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many fishes are ammonotelic but some species can detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. Certain fish species can accumulate high levels of ammonia in the brain or defense against ammonia toxicity by enhancing the effectiveness of ammonia excretion through active NH4+ transport, manipulation of ambient pH, or reduction in ammonia permeability through the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Recent reports on ammonia toxicity in mammalian brain reveal the importance of permeation of ammonia through the blood-brain barrier and passages of ammonia and water through transporters in the plasmalemma of brain cells. Additionally, brain ammonia toxicity could be related to the passage of glutamine through the mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. On the other hand, recent reports on ammonia excretion in fish confirm the involvement of Rhesus glycoproteins in the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Therefore, this review focuses on both the earlier literature and the up-to-date information on the problems and mechanisms concerning the permeation of ammonia, as NH3, NH4+ or proton-neutral nitrogenous compounds, across mitochondrial membranes, the blood-brain barrier, the plasmalemma of neurons, and the branchial and cutaneous epithelia of fish. It also addresses how certain fishes with high ammonia tolerance defend against ammonia toxicity through the regulation of the permeation of ammonia and related nitrogenous compounds through various types of membranes. It is hoped that this review would revive the interests in investigations on the passage of ammonia through the mitochondrial membranes and the blood-brain barrier of ammonotelic fishes and fishes with high brain ammonia-tolerance, respectively.

  10. Modelling of ammonia emissions from dairy cow houses

    OpenAIRE

    Monteny, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Dairy cow husbandry contributes to environmental acidification through the emission of ammonia. In-depth knowledge on the processes and variable factors that play a role in the emission of ammonia from dairy cow houses benefits the production of emission data, the development of low emission housing systems, and evaluation of emission levels in a farming system approach. A mechanistic simulation model for the ammonia emission from dairy cow houses was developed to facilitate this.An ammonia p...

  11. Nitrite as a stimulus for ammonia-starved Nitrosomonas europaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-starved cells of Nitrosomonas europaea are able to preserve a high level of ammonia-oxidizing activity in the absence of ammonium. However, when the nitrite-oxidizing cells that form part of the natural nitrifying community do not keep pace with the ammonia-oxidizing cells, nitrite accumulat

  12. Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil Treated with the Insecticide Imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Cycoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to assess the effect of imidacloprid on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB in soil using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approach. Analysis showed that AOA and AOB community members were affected by the insecticide treatment. However, the calculation of the richness (S and the Shannon-Wiener index (H values for soil treated with the field rate (FR dosage of imidacloprid (1 mg/kg soil showed no changes in measured indices for the AOA and AOB community members. In turn, the 10*FR dosage of insecticide (10 mg/kg soil negatively affected the AOA community, which was confirmed by the decrease of the S and H values in comparison with the values obtained for the control soil. In the case of AOB community, an initial decline followed by the increase of the S and H values was obtained. Imidacloprid decreased the nitrification rate while the ammonification process was stimulated by the addition of imidacloprid. Changes in the community structure of AOA and AOB could be due to an increase in the concentration of N-NH4+, known as the most important factor which determines the contribution of these microorganisms to soil nitrification.

  13. The influence of gas-particle partitioning and surface-atmosphere exchange on ammonia during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology study (BAQS-Met was an intensive field campaign conducted in Southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2007. The focus of BAQS-Met was determining the causes of the formation of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5, and of the regional significance of trans-boundary transport and lake breeze circulations on that formation. Fast (1 Hz measurements of ammonia were acquired using a Quantum Cascade Laser Tunable Infrared Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS at the Harrow supersite. Measurements of PM2.5 ammonium, sulfate and nitrate were made using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC with hourly time resolution.The median mixing ratio of ammonia was 2.5 ppb, with occasional high spikes at night resulting from local emissions. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions of NH3, diurnal profiles and gas-particle partitioning. The measurements were compared with results from A Unified Regional Air-quality Modelling System (AURAMS. While the fraction of total ammonia (NHx≡NH3 + NH4+ observed in the gas phase peaks between 0.1 and 0.8, AURAMS tended to predict fractions of either less than 0.05 or greater than 0.8. The model frequently predicted acidic aerosol, in contrast withobservations whereinNHx always exceeded the observed equivalents of sulfate. One explanation for our observations is that the net flux of ammonia from the land surface to the atmosphere increases when aerosol sulfate is present, effectively buffering the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, a process not included in the model. We explore the impact of a bi-directional flux parameterization on the predicted gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric ammonia.

  14. Respiratory morbidity due to ammonia exposure among the employees of a urea manufacturing industry located in western part of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naman Zala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is produced in the fertilizer industry. The amount of ammonia inhaled by employees of a urea manufacturing industry is very high. It would be interesting to study whether such an amount has any impact on the employees working there for many years. This study explores the magnitude of respiratory morbidity among employees of a urea manufacturing industry and to establish its association with exposure to ammonia. Data was collected related to significant respiratory illnesses of all the employees over a period of 10 years using computer-based medical record system of the industry′s hospital. The results obtained from the data analysis showed that there is no cause and effect relationship between exposure to ammonia and respiratory morbidity. Thus it was advised to the medical authority at industry to go for mass treatment with anthelmintics and that all the employees should be screened for specific allergens and this information should be used while managing respiratory morbidity.

  15. A Stability Study of Ni/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Anode for Direct Ammonia Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2015-12-30

    In recent years, solid oxide fuel cells fueled with ammonia have been attracting intensive attention. In this work, ammonia fuel was supplied to the Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermet anode at 600 and 700 °C, and the change of electrochemical performance and microstructure under the open-circuit state was studied in detail. The influence of ammonia exposure on the microstructure of Ni was also investigated by using Ni/YSZ powder and Ni film deposited on a YSZ disk. The obtained results demonstrated that Ni in the cermet anode was partially nitrided under an ammonia atmosphere, which considerably roughened the Ni surface. Moreover, the destruction of the anode support layer was confirmed for the anode-supported cell upon the temperature cycling test between 600 and 700 °C because of the nitriding phenomenon of Ni, resulting in severe performance degradation. PMID:26642379

  16. Bioaugmentation of an acetate-oxidising anaerobic consortium in up-flow sludge blanket reactor subjected to high ammonia loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    . in association with Methanoculleus spp. strain MAB1), is an acetate oxidising methanogenic consortium that can produce methane (CH4) at high ammonia levels. In the current study the bioaugmentation of the SAO culture in a mesophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor subjected to high ammonia loads......Ammonia is the major inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process leading to suboptimal utilisation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks and causing economical losses to the biogas plants. However, ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... was tested. The co-cultivation in fed-batch of a fast-growing hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) with the SAO culture was also investigated. Results obtained clearly demonstrated that bioaugmentation of SAO culture in a UASB reactor was not possible most probably due to the slow...

  17. Application of a Chemiluminescence Detector for the Measurement of Total Oxides of Nitrogen and Ammonia in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgeson, J. A.; Bell, J. P.; Rehme, K. A.; Krost, K. J.; Stevens, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    By means of the thermal conversion of nitrogen dioxide to the nitric oxide, the chemiluminescent nitric oxide monitor, based on the nitric oxide plus ozone reaction, may be used for monitoring nitrogen dioxide plus nitric oxide (NO(x)). Under conditions previously described, ammonia is also converted to nitric oxide and therefore interferes. A metal surface, gold wool or stainless steel, operated at two different temperatures has been used to convert only nitrogen dioxide or nitrogen dioxide plus ammonia. Quantitative conversion of nitrogen dioxide to nitric oxide has been obtained at temperatures as low as 200 C. Conversion of ammonia is effected at temperatures of 300 C or higher. By the addition of a converter the basic nitric oxide monitor may be used for measuring NO(x) or NO(x) plus ammonia. As an alternate mode, for a fixed high temperature, a specific scrubber is described for removing NH3 without affecting NO2 concentrations.

  18. Ammonia transformation in a biotrickling air filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Nielsen, Marie Louise; Andersen, Mathias; Nielsen, Anders M.

    outlet / water inlet, and only 8% of the nitrite was turned into nitrate. Water supply only exceeded evaporation by 20% but modelling indicated that additional watering would have limited effect on filter efficiency. The filter was also robust to varying loading, as a 4-fold increase in ammonia inlet...

  19. Assesment methods for ammonia hot-spot

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cellier, P.; Theobald, M. R.; Asman, W.; Bealey, W.; Bittmann, S.; Dragosits, U.; Fudala, J.; Jones, M.; Loefstroem, P.; Loubet, B.; Misselbrook, T.; Rihm, B.; Smith, K.; Střižík, M.; van der Hoek, K.; van Jaarsveld, H.; Walker, J.; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    Dordrecht: Springer, 2009 - (Sutton, M.; Reis, S.; Baker, S.), s. 391-407 ISBN 978-1-4020-9120-9 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : ammonia * NH3 dispersion * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  20. Modelling of Ammonia Heat Pump Desuperheaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stefan Wuust; Elmegaard, Brian; Markussen, Wiebke Brix;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of modelling desuperheating in ammonia heat pumps. Focus is on the temperature profile of the superheated refrigerant. Typically, the surface area of a heat exchanger is estimated using the Log Mean Temperature Difference (LMTD) method. The assumption of this method is...

  1. A porous SiC ammonia sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connolly, E.J.; Timmer, B.H.; Pham, H.T.M.; Groeneweg, J.; Sarro, P.M.; Olthuis, W.; French, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    When used as the dielectric in a capacitive sensing arrangement, porous SiC has been found to be extremely sensitive to the presence of ammonia (NH3) gas. The exact sensing method is still not clear, but NH3 levels as low as 0.5 ppm could be detected. We report the fabrication and preliminary charac

  2. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of manufacture; a statement that additional protein should not be fed to lactating dairy cows... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... 16 to 17 percent ammonia, with molasses, minerals, and not less than 83 percent crude protein....

  3. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montella, Salvatore; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Gunawan, Christa; Giacobbe, Simona; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-03-01

    The lignocellulosic fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as renewable resources due to the widespread availability, predictable and low pricing and suitability for most conversion technologies. In particular, after the typical paper recycling loop, the newspaper waste (NW) could be further valorized as feedstock in biorefinering industry since it still contains up to 70 % polysaccharides. In this study, two different physicochemical methods-ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and extractive ammonia (EA) were tested for the pretraetment of NW. Furthermore, based on the previously demonstrated ability of the recombinant enzymes endocellulase rCelStrep, α-L-arabinofuranosidase rPoAbf and its evolved variant rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F to improve the saccharification of different lignocellulosic pretreated biomasses (such as corn stover and Arundo donax), in this study these enzymes were tested for the hydrolysis of pretreated NW, with the aim of valorizing the lignocellulosic fractions of the MSW. In particular, a mixture of purified enzymes containing cellulases, xylanases and accessory hemicellulases, was chosen as reference mix and rCelStrep and rPoAbf or its variant were replaced to EGI and Larb. The results showed that these enzymatic mixes are not suitable for the hydrolysis of NW after AFEX or EA pretreatment. On the other hand, when the enzymes rCelStrep, rPoAbf and rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F were tested for their effect in hydrolysis of pretreated NW by addition to a commercial enzyme mixture, it was shown that the total polysaccharides conversion yield reached 37.32 % for AFEX pretreated NW by adding rPoAbf to the mix whilst the maximum sugars conversion yield for EA pretreated NW was achieved 40.80 % by adding rCelStrep. The maximum glucan conversion yield obtained (45.61 % for EA pretreated NW by adding rCelStrep to the commercial mix) is higher than or comparable to those reported in recent manuscripts adopting hydrolysis conditions similar to those used

  4. Controlling factors of biosphere-atmosphere ammonia exchange at a semi-natural peatland site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, C.; Richter, U.; Smith, J. J.; Delorme, J. P.; Kutsch, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advancements in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate net biosphere-atmosphere exchange of ammonia. During a three month field campaign from February to May 2014, we tested the performance of a quantum cascade laser within an eddy-covariance setup. The laser was operated at a semi-natural peatland site that is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and intensive livestock production (~1 km distance). Ammonia concentrations were highly variable between 2 and almost 100 ppb with an average value of 15 ppb. Different concentration patterns could be identified. The variability was closely linked to the timing of management practices and the prevailing local climate, particularly wind direction, temperature and surface wetness with the latter indicating higher non-stomatal uptake under wet conditions leading to decreased concentrations. Average ammonia fluxes were around -15 ng N m-2 s-1 at the beginning of the campaign in February and shifted towards a neutral average exchange regime of -1 to 0 ng N m-2 s-1 in April and May. Intriguingly, during the time of decreasing ammonia uptake, concentrations were considerably rising, which clearly indicated N saturation in the predominant vegetation such as bog heather, purple moor-grass, and cotton grass. The cumulative net uptake for the period of investigation was ~300 g N ha-1. This stresses the importance of a thorough method inter-comparison, e.g. with denuder systems in combination with dry deposition modeling. As previous results from the latter methods showed an annual uptake of ~9 kg N ha-1 for the same site, the implementation of adequate ammonia compensation point parameterizations become crucial in surface-atmosphere exchange schemes for bog vegetation. Through their high temporal resolution, robustness and continuous measurement mode, quantum cascade lasers will help assessing the effects of atmospheric N loads to vulnerable N-limited ecosystems such as peatlands.

  5. AMMONIA CONCENTRATION IN SALTSTONE HEADSPACE SUMMARY REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar into Tank 50. Saltstone samples were prepared with an 'MCU' type salt solution spiked with ammonia. The ammonia released from the saltstone was captured and analyzed. The ammonia concentration found in the headspace of samples maintained at 95 C and 1 atm was, to 95% confidence, less than or equal to 3.9 mg/L. Tank 50 is fed by several influent streams. The salt solution from Tank 50 is pumped to the salt feed tank (SFT) in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The premix materials cement, slag and fly ash are blended together prior to transfer to the grout mixer. The premix is fed to the grout mixer in the SPF and the salt solution is incorporated into the premix in the grout mixer, yielding saltstone slurry. The saltstone slurry drops into a hopper and then is pumped to the vault. The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar(regsign) L into Tank 50. Waste Solidification-Engineering requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing to characterize the release of ammonia in curing saltstone at 95 C. The test temperature represents the maximum allowable temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Ammonia may be present in the salt solution and premix materials, or may be produced by chemical reactions when the premix and salt solution are combined. A final report (SRNS-STI-2008-00120, Rev. 0) will be issued that will cover in more depth the information presented in this report

  6. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; Doherty, Ruth M.; Laubach, Johannes; Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Sutton, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a new process-based, weather-driven model for ammonia (NH3) emission from a urine patch has been developed and its sensitivity to various factors assessed. The GAG model (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) is capable of simulating the TAN (total ammoniacal nitrogen) and the water content of the soil under a urine patch and also soil pH dynamics. The model tests suggest that ammonia volatilization from a urine patch can be affected by the possible restart of urea hydrolysis after a rain event as well as CO2 emission from the soil. The vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange is supported by our model results; however, the GAG model provides only a modest overall temperature dependence in total NH3 emission compared with the literature. This, according to our findings, can be explained by the higher sensitivity to temperature close to urine application than in the later stages and may depend on interactions with other nitrogen cycling processes. In addition, we found that wind speed and relative humidity are also significant influencing factors. Considering that all the input parameters can be obtained for larger scales, GAG is potentially suitable for field and regional scale application, serving as a tool for further investigation of the effects of climate change on ammonia emissions and deposition.

  7. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  8. Ammonia regeneration for a combined lime/ammonia spray dryer for SO[sub 2] control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinjian, Yang (Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1992-12-23

    A research project designed to study the feasibility of ammonia regeneration for a combined lime/ammonia FGD process was conducted at the University of Cincinnati. The major objective for this project was to regenerate ammonia from a combined ammonia/calcium hydroxide spray dryer FGD byproduct for reuse which would reduce the operating cost of this FGD process. This final report covers the six phases of the project: (1) generation of original feedstock, (2) batch regeneration studies, (3) continuous regeneration studies, (4) waste characteristic analysis, (5) pilot scale demonstration and (6) economic analysis. This research has shown that regeneration of ammonia is feasible at a reasonable cost. The effects on Ohio coal use from the results of this research could be substantial, depending on the Phase II application of FGD systems for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions. In conclusion, experiments in this study have shown that ammonia recovery efficiencies greater than 90% are technically and economically feasible. In addition, the sludge produced from the regeneration process is stable and will meet existing Federal standards.

  9. Process-based modelling of ammonia emission over a urine patch - Towards developing a field scale emission model for regional use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; Doherty, Ruth; Sutton, Mark A.

    2014-05-01

    This work investigates the influence of meteorological factors on ammonia related atmospheric processes, with a special focus on emission from grazing. For this purpose we are developing a process-based model (GAG: Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) driven by meteorology that can simulate the ammonia emission from a field covered by urine patches. The aim of this work is to implement the GAG model into the EMEP atmospheric chemical transport model (ACTM), and examine the changes of surface ammonia concentrations under future climate scenarios. The research is carried out within the framework of the ECLAIRE project (Effects of Climate Change on Air Pollution and Response Strategies for European Ecosystems). To estimate the sensitivity of surface concentrations of ammonia to a temperature dependent emission approach, we applied a temperature function in the EMEP model for the agricultural ammonia emissions from the UK. With the original emissions the resulting surface ammonia concentration has a bimodal seasonal tendency, with a peak in the beginning of the spring when agricultural management starts and with a second maximum during the autumn when fertilizer is typically spread. With our new temperature dependent approach the seasonal cycle became unimodal with a peak in June. This significant difference supports the need for a dynamic emission approach in ACTMs. The GAG model currently works for a single urine patch. Before it calculates the ammonia emission flux over the urine patch the model simulates the ammoniacal nitrogen budget and the water budget under the patch. The preliminary results for emission fluxes are in good agreement with the measurements. However, the differences highlight that further improvements are necessary.

  10. Decomposition of indoor ammonia with TiO 2-loaded cotton woven fabrics prepared by different textile finishing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yongchun; Bai, Zhipeng; Liu, Ruihua; Zhu, Tan

    Addition of urea-based antifreeze admixtures during cement mixing in construction of buildings has led to increasing indoor air pollution due to continuous transformation and emission of urea to gaseous ammonia in indoor concrete wall. In order to control ammonia pollution from indoor concrete wall, the aqueous dispersion was firstly prepared with nano-scale TiO 2 photocatalysts and dispersing agent, and then mixed with some textile additives to establish a treating bath or coating paste. Cotton woven fabrics were used as the support materials owing to their large surface area and large number of hydrophilic groups on their cellulose molecules and finished using padding and coating methods, respectively. Two TiO 2-loaded fabrics were obtained and characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, a specifically designed ammonia photocatalytic system consisting of a small environmental chamber and a reactor was used for assessing the performance of these TiO 2-loaded fabrics as the wall cloth or curtains used in house rooms in the future and some factors affecting ammonia decomposition are discussed. Furthermore, a design equation of surface catalytic kinetics was developed for describing the decomposition of ammonia in air stream. The results indicated that increasing dosage of the TiO 2 aqueous dispersion in treating bath or coating paste improved the ammonia decomposition. And ammonia was effectively removed at low ammonia concentration or gas flow rate. When relative humidity level was 45%, ammonia decomposition was remarkably enhanced. It is the fact that ammonia could be significantly decomposed in the presence of the TiO 2-padded cotton fabric. Whereas, the TiO 2-coated cotton fabric had the reduced photocatalytic decomposition of ammonia and high adsorption to ammonia owing to their acrylic binder layer. Finally, the reaction rate constant k and the adsorption equilibrium constant K values were determined through a

  11. Submersible microbial desalination cell for simultaneous ammonia recovery and electricity production from anaerobic reactors containing high levels of ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    High ammonia concentration in anaerobic reactors can seriously inhibit the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) was developed as an innovative method to lower the ammonia level in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) by in situ ammonia...

  12. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal

  13. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process. Syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens are important for the ammonia inhibitory mechanism on anaerobic digestion. The roles and interactions of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens...... to ammonia inhibition effect are still unclear. The aim of the current study was to determine the ammonia toxicity levels of various pure strains of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Moreover, ammonia toxicity on the syntrophic cultivated strains of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens was...... tested. Thus, four hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis, Methanobacterium congolense, Methanoculleus thermophilus and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus), two SAOB (i.e. Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) and their syntrophic cultivation, were...

  14. Analysis of Cryogenic Ammonia System for Energy Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Raei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several alternatives to enhance the efficiency of energy usage and to decrease energy losses. Pinch technology is the best method of approach to enhance energy efficiency. Heat exchangers network (HEN of refrigeration unit of ammonia production process was analyzed to use pinch technology to decrease energy usage. The obtained results showed that pinch technology was unsuccessful for the shaft work targeting capabilities. In contrast, it is posed that for optimization of such systems, one should use the combined pinch and exergy analysis (CPEA method. In this analysis CPEA method was used in the system. It was observed that the refrigeration system use cold streams for cooling the hot streams. Therefore, retrofitting the refrigeration cycle without changing the main process is impossible. Some suggestions were made for improving the refrigeration system, such as the use of economizer after cooler, multistage cycle and removal of the 111-FFD3 stream. It was also observed that the exchanger 128-E act as an intercooler and the flashed 110-F, 111-F and 112-F act as an economizer. In addition, ammonia refrigerant was used at three different temperatures of -33,-7 and 13.5 ˚C. Also, eliminated the 111-FFD3 stream bring about 2% reduction in exergy loss.

  15. Pretreatment of Biomass by Aqueous Ammonia for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y. Y.

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  16. Geometrical correction factors for heat flux meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Papell, S. S.

    1974-01-01

    General formulas are derived for determining gage averaging errors of strip-type heat flux meters used in the measurement of one-dimensional heat flux distributions. The local averaging error e(x) is defined as the difference between the measured value of the heat flux and the local value which occurs at the center of the gage. In terms of e(x), a correction procedure is presented which allows a better estimate for the true value of the local heat flux. For many practical problems, it is possible to use relatively large gages to obtain acceptable heat flux measurements.

  17. Broadcast urea reduces N2O emissions but increases NO emissions compared with conventional and shallow-applied anhydrous ammonia in a coarse-textured soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) fluxes from corn (Zea Mays L.) production fields under contrasting fertilizer regimes is essential for identifying ways of mitigating agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Despite the importance of anhydrous ammonia (AA) and urea as N fert...

  18. Implementação computacional do modelo carga-fluxo de carga-fluxo de dipolo para cálculo e interpretação das intensidades do espectro infravermelho Computational implementation of the model charge-charge flux-dipole flux for calculation and analysis of infrared intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago C. F. Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The first computational implementation that automates the procedures involved in the calculation of infrared intensities using the charge-charge flux-dipole flux model is presented. The atomic charges and dipoles from the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM model was programmed for Morphy98, Gaussian98 and Gaussian03 programs outputs, but for the ChelpG parameters only the Gaussian programs are supported. Results of illustrative but new calculations for the water, ammonia and methane molecules at the MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p theoretical level, using the ChelpG and QTAIM/Morphy charges and dipoles are presented. These results showed excellent agreement with analytical results obtained directly at the MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p level of theory.

  19. Small capacity absorption systems for cooling and power with a scroll expander and ammonia based working fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to now, the use of ammonia/water absorption cycles has been mainly limited to the production of refrigeration or air conditioning but due to the relatively high generator pressure some authors have proposed the integration in parallel of an expander to produce cooling and power simultaneously. This feature could provide many benefits in the future such as the use of solar thermal energy to partially cover the heating, cooling and electricity demand of a building. In the other hand the life cycle cost of the absorption system is improved because of the increase in the number of running hours in periods in which there is no demand for cooling but the demand for electrical power is still important. This paper shows a new combined absorption system using a scroll expander and three different working fluids using ammonia as refrigerant: ammonia/water, ammonia/lithium nitrate and ammonia/sodium thiocyanate. The scroll expander performance maps were obtained experimentally and modeled to predict the power production, rotational speed and exhaust temperature of the expander and included in the complete absorption cycle model build using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) Software. This system produces different amounts of cooling and power at the desired power/cooling ratio to cover varying demand profiles. - Highlights: • New combined absorption system using a scroll expander and three different working fluids. • Characterization the scroll expander with ammonia as working fluid. • Sensitivity to the heat source, sink and chilled water temperatures on the new combined absorption system

  20. Ammonia Synthesis using Ti and Nb Nitride Nano-particles Prepared by Mesoporous Graphitic C3N4

    KAUST Repository

    Kumagai, Hiromu

    2015-01-22

    TiN and NbN nanoparticles were synthesized from mesoporous graphitic C3N4 (mpg-C3N4) as a reactive template and used as the catalyst for ammonia synthesis. The obtained TiN and NbN nanoparticles possess high surface areas of 299 and 275 m2 g-1, respectively, making them attractive in the use of catalysis and support. Although most of the TiN and NbN particles show no measurable activity for ammonia formation, the nanoparticles enabled an ammonia synthesis rate of 31 μmol h-1 g-cat-1 at 673 K and 0.1 MPa of synthesis gas (N2 + 3H2) for both TiN and NbN catalysts. It is evident that the formation of nanoparticles with high nitride surface area is essential for the materials to function as catalysts in ammonia synthesis. The addition of Fe to TiN enhanced the ammonia synthesis activity, whereas it had detrimental effects on the catalytic activity of NbN. The properties of these catalysts in ammonia synthesis are discussed.

  1. Was early Mars warmed by ammonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.; Brown, L. L.; Acord, J. M.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Runoff channels and valley networks present on ancient, heavily cratered Martian terrain suggests that the climate of Mars was originally warm and wet. One explanation for the formation of these channels is that the surface was warmed by the greenhouse effect of a dense, CO2 atmosphere. However, recent work shows that this theory is not consistent for the early period of the solar system. One way to increase the surface temperature predicted is to assume that other greenhouse gases were present in Mars' atmosphere in addition to CO2 and H2O. This possible gas is ammonia, NH3. If ammonia was present in sufficient quantities, it could have raised the surface temperature to 273 K. An adequate source would have been volcanic outgassing if the NH3 produced was shielded from photolysis by an ultraviolet light absorber.

  2. Electrochemical ammonia production on molybdenum nitride nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2013-01-01

    energy profile for electrochemical protonation of N2 and N adatoms on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoparticles. Pathways for electrochemical ammonia production via direct protonation of N adatoms and N2 admolecules with an onset potential as low as -0.5 V and generally lower than -0.8 V on both a nitrogen......Theoretical investigations of electrochemical production of ammonia at ambient temperature and pressure on nitrogen covered molybdenum nanoparticles are presented. Density functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free...... covered or clean Mo nanoparticle. Calculations presented here show that nitrogen dissociation at either nitrogen vacancies on a nitrogen covered molybdenum particle or at a clean molybdenum particle is unlikely to occur at ambient conditions due to very high activation barriers of 1.8 eV. The calculations...

  3. Transport, thermodynamic, and structural properties of fluid ammonia using a new intermolecular potential: The inversion method and molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Comparison between the potential energy function of ammonia calculated using inversion of reduced viscosity collision integrals and different literature potentials using ab initio calculation. Highlights: ► A new pair-potential function of ammonia has been determined via the inversion method. ► The potential reproduces transport properties in a good accordance with experiment. ► A simple three-body potential also used to improve the prediction of pressure results. ► MD simulation also performed to obtain pressure, diffusion, and g(r) of fluid ammonia. - Abstract: A new pair-potential energy function of ammonia has been determined via the inversion of reduced viscosity collision integrals and fitted to obtain a Hartree–Fock dispersion (HFD)-like potential form. The pair-potential reproduces the second virial coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and self-diffusion coefficient of ammonia in a good accordance with experimental data over wide ranges of temperatures. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been also performed to obtain pressure, self-diffusion coefficient, and radial distribution function of fluid ammonia at different temperatures and densities using the calculated HFD-like pair-potential. To take higher-body forces into account, three-body potential of Hauschild and Prausnitz (1993) extended as a function of density and temperature and used with the HFD-like potential to improve the prediction of the pressures of fluid ammonia without requiring an expensive three-body calculation. The results are in a good agreement with experiment and literature values.

  4. Reduction of Ammonia Volatilization through Mixing Urea with Humic and Fulvic Acids isolated from Palm Oil Mill Effluent Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddin Rosliza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ammonia volatilization from surface-applied urea may be substantial but it is possible to control it by mixing urea with acidic substances such as Humic Acids (HA and Fulvic Acids (FA. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of urea-HA, urea-FA, urea-acidified (HA+FA mixtures on ammonia loss, soil pH, soil exchangeable ammonium and available nitrate accumulation compared to urea alone. Approach: The effects of urea amended with or without HA and FA were evaluated in a laboratory condition using a closed-dynamic air flow system. Ammonia loss, soil pH, soil exchangeable ammonium and available nitrate were determined using standard procedures. Results: Humic acid alone was not effective in controlling ammonia volatilization even though ammonium retention was found to be significantly higher compared to urea alone. Fulvic acid significantly reduced ammonia volatilization by 50% compared to urea alone. It also caused the highest retention of soil exchangeable ammonium and available nitrate. However, there was no ammonia volatilization with acidified HA and FA. Ammonium and nitrate accumulation for FA was better than acidified HA and FA. Ammonia loss could be reduced by improving ammonium retention. It must be stressed that results obtained in the incubation experiment using an acidic (pHwater 6.32 soil of Typic Paleudults (Bekenu series may only be applicable to similar acid soils. Conclusion: Urea amended with HA or HA and FA significantly reduced ammonia loss. The outcome of this study might be contributed to the improvement of urea N use efficiency as well as reducing environmental pollution.

  5. Spin-state chemistry of deuterated ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, O.; Harju, J.; Caselli, P.; Schlemmer, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim to develop a chemical model that contains a consistent description of spin-state chemistry in reactions involving chemical species with multiple deuterons. We apply the model to the specific case of deuterated ammonia, to derive values for the various spin-state ratios. Methods. We apply symmetry rules in the complete scrambling assumption to calculate branching ratio tables for reactions between chemical species that include multiple protons and/or deuterons. Reaction sets for b...

  6. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  7. Dynamical implications of Jupiter's tropospheric ammonia abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showman, Adam P.; de Pater, Imke

    2005-03-01

    Groundbased radio observations indicate that Jupiter's ammonia is globally depleted from 0.6 bars to at least 4-6 bars relative to the deep abundance of ˜3 times solar, a fact that has so far defied explanation. The observations also indicate that (i) the depletion is greater in belts than zones, and (ii) the greatest depletion occurs within Jupiter's local 5-μm hot spots, which have recently been detected at radio wavelengths. Here, we first show that both the global depletion and its belt-zone variation can be explained by a simple model for the interaction of moist convection with Jupiter's cloud-layer circulation. If the global depletion is dynamical in origin, then important endmember models for the belt-zone circulation can be ruled out. Next, we show that the radio observations of Jupiter's 5-μm hot spots imply that the equatorial wave inferred to cause hot spots induces vertical parcel oscillation of a factor of ˜2 in pressure near the 2-bar level, which places important constraints on hot-spot dynamics. Finally, using spatially resolved radio maps, we demonstrate that low-latitude features exceeding ˜4000 km diameter, such as the equatorial plumes and large vortices, are also depleted in ammonia from 0.6 bars to at least 2 bars relative to the deep abundance of 3 times solar. If any low-latitude features exist that contain 3-times-solar ammonia up to the 0.6-bar ammonia condensation level, they must have diameters less than ˜4000 km.

  8. Manufacture of Catalyst Systems for Ammonia Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAKH S.V.; SAVENKOV D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum catalyst gauzes have been in use since the moment of development of the process of catalyst oxidation of ammonia for production of nitric acid or hydrocyanic acid.Catalyst gauzes are usually made of platinum or its alloys with rhodium and palladium.These precious metals have remarkable properties that make them ideal catalysts for acceleration of the ammonia/oxygen reaction.In 2008,OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’" and Umicore AG&Co.KG launched a production line for Pt-alloy-based catalyst systems to be used for ammonia oxidation in the production of weak nitric acid.Catalyst systems consist of a pack of catalyst gauzes and a pack of catchment gauzes,which are made using flat-bed knitting machines and wire-cloth looms.Today,up-to-date catalyst systems MKSpreciseTM are being manufactured,the basic advantages of which are an individual structure of gauzes and composition of the material,which allows to define precisely the position of each gauze in the catalyst pack,a high activity of the catalyst pack,direct catching of platinum and rhodium in the catalyst system,and a reasonable combination of single- and multilayer types of gauzes.This makes it possible to vary the configuration of the catalyst and select an optimum composition of the system to ensure the maximum efficiency of the ammonia oxidation process.We also produce the catchment systems that allow to find the best decision from the economic point view for each individual case.

  9. Nitrocarburising in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammoniapropene- hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere and...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  10. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (I) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N₂O was 92–92,5 % at the ammonia conversion of 98–99.5 % in the optimal temperature range.

  11. Ammonia emissions in Europe, part II: How ammonia emission abatement strategies affect secondary aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Anna M.; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-02-01

    In central Europe, ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate make up a large fraction of fine particles which pose a threat to human health. Most studies on air pollution through particulate matter investigate the influence of emission reductions of sulphur- and nitrogen oxides on aerosol concentration. Here, we focus on the influence of ammonia (NH3) emissions. Emission scenarios have been created on the basis of the improved ammonia emission parameterization implemented in the SMOKE for Europe and CMAQ model systems described in part I of this study. This includes emissions based on future European legislation (the National Emission Ceilings) as well as a dynamic evaluation of the influence of different agricultural sectors (e.g. animal husbandry) on particle formation. The study compares the concentrations of NH3, NH4+, NO3 -, sulphur compounds and the total concentration of particles in winter and summer for a political-, technical- and behavioural scenario. It was found that a reduction of ammonia emissions by 50% lead to a 24% reduction of the total PM2.5 concentrations in northwest Europe. The observed reduction was mainly driven by reduced formation of ammonium nitrate. Moreover, emission reductions during winter had a larger impact than during the rest of the year. This leads to the conclusion that a reduction of the ammonia emissions from the agricultural sector related to animal husbandry could be more efficient than the reduction from other sectors due to its larger share in winter ammonia emissions.

  12. Hot Ammonia in the Center of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 3079

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Yusuke; Seta, Masumichi; Salak, Dragan; Hagiwara, Kenzaburo; Nagai, Makoto; Ishii, Shun; Yamauchi, Aya

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of ammonia observations toward the center of NGC 3079. The NH3(J, K) = (1, 1) and (2, 2) inversion lines were detected in absorption with the Tsukuba 32-m telescope, and the NH3(1,1) through (6,6) lines with the VLA, although the profile of NH3(3,3) was in emission in contrast to the other transitions. The background continuum source, whose flux density was ~50 mJy, could not be resolved with the VLA beam of ~~ 175 K, tracing hot gas associated with the interaction of the fast nuclear outflow with dense molecular material around the nucleus.

  13. Spin-state chemistry of deuterated ammonia

    CERN Document Server

    Sipilä, O; Caselli, P; Schlemmer, S

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim to develop a chemical model that contains a consistent description of spin-state chemistry in reactions involving chemical species with multiple deuterons. We apply the model to the specific case of deuterated ammonia, to derive values for the various spin-state ratios. Methods. We apply symmetry rules in the complete scrambling assumption to calculate branching ratio tables for reactions between chemical species that include multiple protons and/or deuterons. Reaction sets for both gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry are generated using an automated routine that forms all possible spin-state variants of any given reaction with up to six H/D atoms. Single-point and modified Bonnor-Ebert models are used to study the density and temperature dependence of ammonia and its isotopologs, and the associated spin-state ratios. Results. We find that the spin-state ratios of the ammonia isotopologs are, at late times, very different from their statistical values. The ratios are rather insensitive to varia...

  14. Personal exposures to acidic aerosols and ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor, outdoor, and personal exposures to acidic aerosols, sulfates, and ammonia were monitored for twenty-four children living in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. Adolescent children, age 11, participated in an investigation of air pollution (PM10, sulfates, acid aerosols, ozone) and pulmonary performance during the Summer of 1990. 92% of the participants (all from non-smoking homes) volunteered to wear personal monitors and record daily activities over two twelve-hour daytime periods. Similar air pollution measurements were made inside and immediately outside their homes. Indoor and outdoor concentrations were measured using the Harvard-EPA annular denuder system (HEADS), while personal exposures were measured using the Personal Annular Denuder system (PADS). All exposure measurements were compared to measurements collected at a centrally located ambient monitoring site. The paper reports the relationships among personal, indoor home, outdoor home, and central site measurements of acidic aerosols, sulfate particles, and ammonia. During days where personal monitoring occurred, hydrogen ion concentrations range from 0 to 520 nmoles/m3 at the central site. There was not substantial spatial variation in ambient acidity over this Western Pennsylvania community. Indoor concentrations were substantially lower than outdoors, with a mean ratio of 0.14. Personal exposures were typically greater than indoor exposures, but averaged only 29% of the outdoor concentrations. Time activity, housing factors, sulfate particles, and ammonia concentrations are analyzed. The impact of this study on the characterization of population exposures to acidic aerosols in epidemiologic studies and modeling also are discussed

  15. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  16. Wastewater centrate ammonia removal by chemisorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' This presentation will describe the nature, scope, and findings of a third-party evaluation of a patent-protected wastewater treatment technology identified as the ThermoEnergy Ammonia Recovery Process TM (ARP). The ARP is a reversible chemisorption process using a zinc-impregnated ion exchange resin, and it is unique in that it removes/reduces the ammonia-nitrogen load in the solids processing liquor of municipal sewage treatment plants and recycles the recovered product into a pelletized ammonium salt that can be used as an agricultural fertilizer. The primary objective of the ARP evaluation was to perform well-defined field and laboratory tests to provide data on process performance. The evaluation process was overseen and coordinated by the Environmental Technology Evaluation Center (EvTEC), a program of the Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF), the research and technology transfer arm of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). EvTEC is a pilot program evaluating innovative environmental technologies under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. A pilot scale ARP treatment facility was constructed and tested at the Oakwood Beach Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) in Staten Island, New York, from September through December of 1998. While operating during the 3 month period using the anaerobically digested centrate normally produced at the WPCP, the pilot study demonstrated that the ARP process was capable of removing/recovering ammonia with efficiencies ranging from 75-99+ % at influent concentrations exceeding 400 mg/L. During the pilot plant operations, forty-eight (48) complete validated runs of centrate processing were performed. The plant processed the centrate under normal day-to-day conditions at the WPCP, and no special operational considerations were given to the centrifuge operation to accommodate the ARP pilot plant. The Oakwood WPCP operated exactly the way

  17. Adaptation of an Ammonia Detecting Paint to Commerical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Renee C.; Mallow, William A.

    1994-01-01

    An ammonia-sensitive coating was developed in feasibility studies sponsored by Lockheed Engineering. The paint comprised a cellulosic binder, a dye, a family of solvents, and plasticizer. The resulting coating formulation proved to be very sensitive to trace levels of Lewis-bases and/or nucleophiles, but was limited to concentrations of approximately 1 ppm and higher. In the months following completion of this Lockheed project, efforts to perfect and optimize the paint formulation continued with internal funding. A unique sensitivity enhancing additive was identified and patented which when applied at concentrations of approximately 10% by weight, transcended the 1 ppm sensitivity barrier to fractional ppb. The paint composition was modified by the addition of certain proprietary agents, which promoted a much more intense yellow color in the coating and enhanced its durability in high-vacuum. Paint preparation is a simple one day procedure that can be completed using conventional equipment. Most of the materials are easily obtained.

  18. Moisture and temperature controls on nitrification differ among ammonia oxidizer communities from three alpine soil habitats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brooke B.OSBORNE; Jill S.BARON; Matthew D.WALLENSTEIN

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing and magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes in many high-elevation ecosystems.The consequent changes in alpine nitrification rates have the potential to influence ecosystem scale responses.In order to better understand how changing temperature and moisture conditions may influence ammonia oxidizers and nitrification activity,we conducted laboratory incubations on soils collected in a Colorado watershed from three alpine habitats (glacial outwash,talus,and meadow).We found that bacteria,not archaea,dominated all ammonia oxidizer communities.Nitrification increased with moisture in all soils and under all temperature treatments.However,temperature was not correlated with nitrification rates in all soils.Site-specific temperature trends suggest the development of generalist ammonia oxidzer communities in soils with greater in situ temperature fluctuations and specialists in soils with more steady temperature regimes.Rapidly increasing temperatures and changing soil moisture conditions could explain recent observations of increased nitrate production in some alpine soils.

  19. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  20. Surface fluxes over natural landscapes using scintillometry

    OpenAIRE

    Meijninger, W.M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the demand for reliable area-averaged fluxes associated with natural landscapes this thesis investigates a relative new measurement technique known as the scintillation method. For homogeneous areas the surface fluxes can be derived with reasonable accuracy. However, fluxes representative for large natural landscapes (comparable to the horizontal grid box size of numerical models or the pixel size of satellite imagers) are more difficult to obtain because at these scales the surf...

  1. Toxic effects of ammonia on vegetation in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, P.J.; Harper, D.S.; Pearson, R.G.; Linzon, S.N.

    1979-12-01

    Ammonia injury to vegetation has been observed frequently in Ontario in recent years due primarily to increased agricultural use of liquid ammonia fertilizers. Of 12 major incidents of ammonia injury to vegetation investigated recently, 11 involved the manufacture, storage, or transportation of liquid ammonia fertilizer. One case involved spillage of ammonia from a large refrigeration system. Data on foliar injury symptoms and relative susceptibility to ammonia were compiled for over a hundred species of native and cultivated plants injured in these episodes. Symptoms of acute injury on woody plants usually consisted of large, irregular, dark brown or black necrotic lesions scattered over the surface of the leaf. Some thin-leaved herbaceous plants developed necrotic lesions that bleached to an ivory or light tan color. The most susceptible species were balsam poplar, red mulberry, and catnip. Maples and conifers were very resistant to foliar injury.

  2. Modeling of ammonia emission in the USA and EU countries using an artificial neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, Lidija J; Antanasijević, Davor Z; Ristić, Mirjana Đ; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra A; Pocajt, Viktor V

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia emissions at the national level are frequently estimated by applying the emission inventory approach, which includes the use of emission factors, which are difficult and expensive to determine. Emission factors are therefore the subject of estimation, and as such they contribute to inherent uncertainties in the estimation of ammonia emissions. This paper presents an alternative approach for the prediction of ammonia emissions at the national level based on artificial neural networks and broadly available sustainability and economical/agricultural indicators as model inputs. The Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) architecture was optimized using a trial-and-error procedure, including the number of hidden neurons, activation function, and a back-propagation algorithm. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to reduce mutual correlation between the inputs. The obtained results demonstrate that the MLP model created using the PCA transformed inputs (PCA-MLP) provides a more accurate prediction than the MLP model based on the original inputs. In the validation stage, the MLP and PCA-MLP models were tested for ammonia emission predictions for up to 2 years and compared with a principal component regression model. Among the three models, the PCA-MLP demonstrated the best performance, providing predictions for the USA and the majority of EU countries with a relative error of less than 20%. PMID:26201663

  3. Prediction of Transport Properties of Liquid Ammonia and Its Binary Mixture with Methanol by Molecular Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2012-03-01

    Transport properties of ammonia and of the binary mixture ammonia + methanol are predicted for a broad range of liquid states by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on the basis of rigid, non-polarizable molecular models of the united-atom type. These models were parameterized in preceding work using only experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data. The self- and the Maxwell-Stefan (MS) diffusion coefficients as well as the shear viscosity are obtained by equilibrium MD and the Green-Kubo formalism. Non-equilibrium MD is used for the thermal conductivity. The transport properties of liquid ammonia are predicted for temperatures between 223 K and 473 K up to pressures of 200 MPa and are compared to experimental data and correlations thereof. Generally, good agreement is achieved. The predicted self-diffusion coefficient as well as the shear viscosity deviates on average by less than 15 % from the experiment and the thermal conductivity by less than 6 %. Furthermore, the self- and the MS transport diffusion coefficients as well as the shear viscosity of the liquid mixture ammonia + methanol are studied at different compositions and compared to the available experimental data.

  4. Nitrosomonas Nm143-like ammonia oxidizers and Nitrospira marina -like nitrite oxidizers dominate the nitrifier community in a marine aquaculture biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foesel, Bärbel U.; Gieseke, Armin; Schwermer, Carsten;

    2008-01-01

    recirculating marine aquaculture system are presented. Repeated rounds of the full-cycle rRNA approach were necessary to optimize DNA extraction and the probe set for FISH to obtain a reliable and comprehensive picture of the ammonia-oxidizing community. Analysis of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA...

  5. Upwind impacts of ammonia from an intensive poultry unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated potential ammonia impacts on a sand dune nature reserve 600 m upwind of an intensive poultry unit. Ammonia concentrations and total nitrogen deposition were measured over a calendar year. A series of ammonia and nitrogen exposure experiments using dune grassland species were conducted in controlled manipulations and in the field. Ammonia emissions from the intensive poultry unit were detected up to 2.8 km upwind, contributing to exceedance of critical levels of ammonia 800 m upwind and exceedance of critical loads of nitrogen 2.8 km upwind. Emissions contributed 30% of the total N load in parts of the upwind conservation site. In the nitrogen exposure experiments, plants showed elevated tissue nitrogen contents, and responded to ammonia concentrations and nitrogen deposition loads observed in the conservation site by increasing biomass. Estimated long-term impacts suggest an increase in the soil carbon pool of 9% over a 50-year timescale. -- Highlights: •Ammonia from a poultry unit can be detected 2.8 km upwind. •Ammonia caused exceedance of critical levels 800 m and critical loads 2.8 km upwind. •Dune grassland species utilised ammonia as a nutrient source. •Plant biomass increased at low levels of ammonia and total nitrogen deposition. •Soil C pools are predicted to increase by 9% over 50 years due to the excess ammonia. -- Ammonia from a poultry unit has upwind impacts, exceeding critical levels 800 m and critical loads 2.8 km upwind, and increasing biomass and tissue N of dune grassland species

  6. Removal of Ammonia from Air, using Three Iranian Natural Zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    H. Asilian; SB Mortazavi; Kazemian, H; S Phaghiehzadeh; Sj Shahtaheri; Salem, M.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia in air can be hazardous to human and animal life and should be removed from the environment. Recently the removal of environmental pollutants such as ammonia by means of natural and modified zeolites has attracted a lot of attention and interests. In this study the capability of three Iranian natural zeolites (Clinoptilolite) in point of view of removal of ammonia from air was investigated. Through this research, different zeolites from various regions of Iran including Semnan, Meyane...

  7. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein ...

  8. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S.; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Nissen, Poul; de Groot, Bert L.; Kjellbom, Per; Gourdon, Pontus; Johanson, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins) have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteol...

  9. Options and Costs of Controlling Ammonia Emissions in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Klaassen, G.

    1994-01-01

    Ammonia emissions contribute to acidification in Europe. The major emission sources are livestock and fertilizer use. This study presents the costs of controlling ammonia emissions in 33 regions in Europe. Abatement options include low nitrogen feed, stable adaptations, covering manure storage, cleaning stable air, and low ammonia applications of manure. Cost estimates are based on country- and technology-specific data. The structure of livestock population and fertilizer use mean that th...

  10. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  11. Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhaesalmi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajjad Athar, M., E-mail: sajathar@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Honda, M., E-mail: mhonda@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kajita, T., E-mail: kajita@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and the Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kasahara, K., E-mail: kasahara@icrc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan); Midorikawa, S., E-mail: midori@aomori-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Software and Information Technology, Aomori University, Aomori, 030-0943 (Japan)

    2013-01-29

    We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyhaesalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present Letter would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

  12. Regeneration of ammonia borane spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H2) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H2 storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H3N-BH3, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H2 (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol-1). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H2 can be readily released in contrast to the loss of H2 from C2H6 which is substantially endothermic. As such, a number of publications have described H2 release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any chemical H2 storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, but reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. Our group is currently engaged in trying to find and fully demonstrate an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H2 depleted AB with a minimum number of steps. Although spent fuel composition depends on the dehydrogenation method, we have focused our efforts on the spent fuel resulting from metal-based catalysis, which has thus far shown the most promise. Metal-based catalysts have produced the fastest rates for a single equivalent of H2 released from AB and up to 2.5 equiv. of H2 can be produced within 2 hours. While ongoing work is being carried out to tailor the composition of spent AB fuel, a method has been developed for regenerating the predominant product, polyborazylene (PB) which can be obtained readily from the decomposition of borazine or from nickel

  13. Electrolysis of ammonia for hydrogen production catalyzed by Pt and Pt-Ir deposited on nickel foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min; Jiang; Dandan; Zhu; Xuebo; Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Electrolysis of ammonia in alkaline electrolyte solution was applied for the production of hydrogen. Both Pt-loaded Ni foam and Pt-Ir loaded Ni foam electrodes were prepared by electrodeposition and served as anode and cathode in ammonia electrolytic cell, respectively. The electrochemical behaviors of ammonia in KOH solution were individually investigated via cyclic voltammetry on three electrodes, i.e. bare Ni foam electrode, Pt-loaded Ni foam electrode and Pt-Ir loaded Ni foam electrode. The morphology and composition of the prepared Ni foam electrode were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and X-ray diffraction(XRD). Effects of the concentration of electrolyte solution and temperature of electrolytic cell on the electrolysis reaction were examined in order to enhance the efficiency of ammonia electrolysis. The competition of ammonia electrolysis and water electrolysis in the same alkaline solution was firstly proposed to explain the changes of cell voltage with the electrolysis proceeding. At varying current densities, different cell voltages could be obtained from galvanostatic curves.The low cell voltage of 0.58 V, which is less than the practical electrolysis voltage of water(1.6 V), can be obtained at a current density of2.5 mA/cm2. Based on some experimental parameters, such as the applied current, the resulting cell voltage and output of hydrogen gas, the power consumption per gram of H2produced can be estimated.

  14. Ammonia pollution characteristics of centralized drinking water sources in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Fu; Binghui Zheng; Xingru Zhao; Lijing Wang; Changming Liu

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of ammonia in drinking water sources in China were evaluated during 2005-2009.The spatial distribution and seasonal changes of ammonia in different types of drinking water sources of 22 provinces,5 autonomous regions and 4 municipalities were investigated.The levels of ammonia in drinking water sources follow the order of river > lake/reservoir > groundwater.The levels of ammonia concentration in river sources gradually decreased from 2005 t0 2008,while no obvious change was observed in the lakes/reservoirs and groundwater drinking water sources.The proportion of the type of drinking water sources is different in different regions.In river drinking water sources,the ammonia level was varied in different regions and changed seasonally.The highest value and wide range of annual ammonia was found in South East region,while the lowest value was found in Southwest region.In lake/reservoir drinking water sources,the ammonia levels were not varied obviously in different regions.In underground drinking water sources,the ammonia levels were varied obviously in different regions due to the geological permeability and the natural features of regions.In the drinking water sources with higher ammonia levels,there are enterprises and wastewater drainages in the protected areas of the drinking water sources.

  15. Release of ammonia from HAN-type PHA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary design basis for ammonia scrubbers in the DWPF has been issued. This design basis is based on a theoretical model of ammonia evolution from the SRAT, SME and RCT. It is desirable to acquire actual process data on ammonia evolution prior to performing detailed design of scrubbers for DWPF. The evolution of ammonia from the SRAT and SME in the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) was investigated during the HM4 run. In this run, Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA), which was made in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) using the HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process was used, thus resulting in PHA with a high concentration of ammonium ion

  16. Optimization of biomethanation focusing on high ammonia loaded processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han

    players in the SAO pathway. Thirdly, based on the same idea (promoting the syntrophic acetate oxidation pathway to alleviate ammonia inhibition), the hypothesis of bioaugmentation with high ammonia tolerant methanogenic archaea could be a new practical solution for fast recovery from ammonia inhibition......) in mesophilic and thermophilic condition, respectively. For the reactors without adding hydrogen, the methane yield decreased 65.0% (mesophilic) and 44.2% (thermophilic) when ammonia level increased to 7 g NH4+-N L-1. The results demonstrated that the hydrogen assisted biogas production and upgrading...

  17. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta E. Ebert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  18. Ammonia-induced robust photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of graphitic carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengju; Zhao, Jianghong; Qiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-11-01

    We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 μmol h-1 to 316.7 μmol h-1 under visible light.We report a new and effective method to prepare high activity graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) by a simple ammonia etching treatment. The obtained g-C3N4 displays a high BET surface area and enhanced electron/hole separation efficiency. The hydrogen evolution rates improved from 52 μmol h-1 to 316.7 μmol h-1 under visible light. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05570a

  19. Flexible, all-organic ammonia sensor based on dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid-doped polyaniline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stable chlorobenzene dispersion of conducting polyaniline (PANI) has been obtained by doping emeraldine base with dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) and studied by spectrophotometric measurements in the UV-vis-IR range. The electrical properties of PANI: DBSA films obtained from the above dispersion have been investigated under different temperature and relative humidity conditions. All-organic chemoresistive devices have been developed by spin-coating the PANI: DBSA dispersion on flexible substrates, and then by depositing electrodes on the top, from a carbon nanotube conducting ink. Sensing tests performed under exposition to calibrated amounts of ammonia reveal that these simple and inexpensive sensors are able to detect ammonia at room temperature in a reliable way, with a sensitivity linearly related to concentration in the range between 5 ppm and 70 ppm.

  20. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a novel NOx control system that has the potential to drastically reduce cost, and enhance performance, operation and safety of power plant NOx control. The new system optimizes the burner and the furnace to achieve very low NOx levels and to provide an adequate amount of CO, and uses the CO for reducing NO both in-furnace and over a downstream AFSCR (ammonia-free selective catalytic reduction) reactor. The AF-SCR combines the advantages of the highly successful SCR technology for power plants and the TWC (three-way catalytic converter) widely used on automobiles. Like the SCR, it works in oxidizing environment of combustion flue gas and uses only base metal catalysts. Like the TWC, the AF-SCR removes NO and excess CO simultaneously without using any external reagent, such as ammonia. This new process has been studied in a development program jointed funded by the US Department of Energy and Foster Wheeler. The report outlines the experimental catalyst work performed on a bench-scale reactor, including test procedure, operating conditions, and results of various catalyst formulations. Several candidate catalysts, prepared with readily available transition metal oxides and common substrate materials, have shown over 80-90% removal for both NO and CO in oxidizing gas mixtures and at elevated temperatures. A detailed combustion study of a 400 MWe coal-fired boiler, applying computational fluid dynamics techniques to model boiler and burner design, has been carried out to investigate ways to optimize the combustion process for the lowest NOx formation and optimum CO/NO ratios. Results of this boiler and burner optimization work are reported. The paper further discusses catalyst scale-up considerations and the conceptual design of a 400 MWe size AF-SCR reactor, as well as economics analysis indicating large cost savings of the ammonia-free NOx control process over the current SCR technology.

  1. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    tolerant methanogenic culture as potential bioaugmentation inoculum in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operating under “inhibited steady-state”, triggered by high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). The results of the current study established for the first time that bioaugmentation of an enriched...

  2. Computational Search for Improved Ammonia Storage Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Lysgaard, Steen; Vegge, Tejs;

    of natural selection. The GA is evolving from an initial (random) population and selecting those with highest fitness, a function based on e.g. stability, release temperature, storage capacity and the price of the elements. The search space includes all alkaline earth, 3d and 4d metals in combination......Metal halide ammines, e.g. Mg(NH3)6Cl2 and Sr(NH3)8Cl2, can reversibly store ammonia, with high volumetric hydrogen storage capacities. The storage in the halide ammines is very safe, and the salts are therefore highly relevant as a carbon-free energy carrier in future transportation infrastructure...

  3. Ammonia synthesis from first principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Hellman, Anders; Remediakis, Ioannis; Logadottir, Ashildur; Carlsson, A.; Dahl, Søren; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    . When the size distribution of ruthenium particles measured by transmission electron microscopy was used as the [ink between the catalyst material and the theoretical treatment, the calculated rate was within a factor of 3 to 20 of the experimental rate. This offers hope for computer-based methods in......The rate of ammonia synthesis over a nanoparticle ruthenium catalyst can be calculated directly on the basis of a quantum chemical treatment of the problem using density functional theory. We compared the results to measured rates over a ruthenium catalyst supported on magnesium aluminum spinet...

  4. Distribution and Diversity of Archaeal Ammonia Monooxygenase Genes Associated with Corals▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Beman, J. Michael; Roberts, Kathryn J.; Wegley, Linda; Rohwer, Forest; Francis, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    Corals are known to harbor diverse microbial communities of Bacteria and Archaea, yet the ecological role of these microorganisms remains largely unknown. Here we report putative ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes of archaeal origin associated with corals. Multiple DNA samples drawn from nine coral species and four different reef locations were PCR screened for archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and archaeal amoA gene sequences were obtained from five different species of coral coll...

  5. FIRST DETECTION OF AMMONIA IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: THE KINETIC TEMPERATURE OF DENSE MOLECULAR CORES IN N 159 W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first detection of ammonia (NH3) is reported from the Magellanic Clouds. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we present a targeted search for the (J, K) = (1,1) and (2,2) inversion lines toward seven prominent star-forming regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Both lines are detected in the massive star-forming region N 159 W, which is located in the peculiar molecular ridge south of 30 Doradus, a site of extreme star formation strongly influenced by an interaction with the Milky Way halo. Using the ammonia lines, we derive a kinetic temperature of ∼16 K, which is 2-3 times below the previously derived dust temperature. The ammonia column density, averaged over ∼17'', is ∼6 x 1012 cm-2 (13 cm-2 over 9'' in the other six sources) and we derive an ammonia abundance of ∼4 x 10-10 with respect to molecular hydrogen. This fractional abundance is 1.5-5 orders of magnitude below those observed in Galactic star-forming regions. The nitrogen abundance in the LMC (∼10% solar) and the high UV flux, which can photo-dissociate the particularly fragile NH3 molecule, both must contribute to the low fractional NH3 abundance, and we likely only see the molecule in an ensemble of the densest, best shielded cores of the LMC.

  6. Analysis on Ammonia Synthesis over Wuestite-Based Iron Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小年; 刘化章; 等

    2003-01-01

    Wuestite-based catalyst for ammonia synthesis exhibits extremely high activity and easy to reduction under a wide range of conditions.The reaction kinetics of ammonia synthesis can be illustrated perfectly by both the classical Temkin-Pyzhev and modified Tecmkin equations with optimized α of 0.5,The pre-exponent factors and activation energies at the pressures of 8.0 and 15.0MPa are respectively κ0=1.09×1015,7.35×1014Pa0.5·s-1,and E=156.6,155.5kJ·mol-1 derived from the classical Temkin-Phyzhev equation,as well as k0=2.45×1014 ,1.83×1014Pa0.5·s-1,and E=147.7,147.2kJ·mol-1 derived from the modified Temkin equation.Although the degree of reduction under isothermal condition is primarily dependent upon temperature,low pressure seems to be imperative for reduction under high temperature and low space velocity to be considered as a high activity catalyst.The reduction behavior with dry feed gas can be illustrated perfectly by the shrinking-sphere-particle model,by which the reduction-rate constants of 4248exp(-71680/RT) and 644exp(-87260/RT) were obtained for the powder (0.045-0.054mm) and irregular shape(nominal diameter 3.17mm) catalysts respectively.The significant effect of particle size on reduction rate was observed,therefore,it is important to take into account the influence of particle size on reduction for the optimization of reduction process in industry.

  7. Ammonia-based intermittent aeration control optimized for efficient nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Pusker; Bunce, Ryder; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the development of an intermittently aerated pilot-scale process (V = 0.45 m(3) ) operated for optimized efficient nitrogen removal in terms of volume, supplemental carbon and alkalinity requirements. The intermittent aeration pattern was controlled using a strategy based on effluent ammonia concentration set-points. The unique feature of the ammonia-based aeration control was that a fixed dissolved oxygen (DO) set-point was used and the length of the aerobic and anoxic time (anoxic time ≥25% of total cycle time) were changed based on the effluent ammonia concentration. Unlike continuously aerated ammonia-based aeration control strategies, this approach offered control over the aerobic solids retention time (SRT) to deal with fluctuating ammonia loading without solely relying on changes to the total SRT. This approach allowed the system to be operated at a total SRT with a small safety factor. The benefits of operating at an aggressive SRT were reduced hydraulic retention time (HRT) for nitrogen removal. As a result of such an operation, nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) out-selection was also obtained (ammonia oxidizing bacteria [AOB] maximum activity: 400 ± 79 mgN/L/d, NOB maximum activity: 257 ± 133 mgN/L/d, P < 0.001) expanding opportunities for short-cut nitrogen removal. The pilot demonstrated a total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal rate of 95 ± 30 mgN/L/d at an influent chemical oxygen demand: ammonia (COD/NH4 (+) -N) ratio of 10.2 ± 2.2 at 25°C within the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 h and within a total SRT of 5-10 days. The TIN removal efficiency up to 91% was observed during the study, while effluent TIN was 9.6 ± 4.4 mgN/L. Therefore, this pilot-scale study demonstrates that application of the proposed on-line aeration control is capable of relatively high nitrogen removal without supplemental carbon and alkalinity addition at a low HRT. PMID:26058705

  8. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  9. Ammonia Masers in W51: Interferometric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Clarke, T. E.; Boboltz, D. A.; Henkel, C.; Mauersberger, R.; Wootten, H. A.; Broullet, N.; Baudry, A.; Despois, D.

    2014-01-01

    The galactic continuum sources W51D and W51e1e2 have been long recognized as remarkable centers of ammonia maser phenomena in the centimeter wavelength range. Henkel et al. (2013 A&A 549, A90) have measured 19 masers, of which 13 are newly found for W51-IRS2, otherwise known as W51D. These arise from inversion-rotation transitions. The single dish data were taken with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the MPIfR with an angular resolution of 43 arc seconds. The conclusion that these lines were caused by maser action is based on: (1) time variability, and (2) narrow linewidths. In addition, some lines showed systematic velocity variations. High brightness temperatures and compact sizes are needed to conclusively prove maser action. We have measured a sub-set of these ammonia lines with the C array of the Jansky-Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in June 2013 with an angular resolution of better than 1 arc second. Source sizes, positions, excitation models and reasons why W51 shows such a plethora of masers will be presented.

  10. An infrared spectroscopy method to detect ammonia in gastric juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M; Pennecchi, Francesca; Muller, Paul; Balma Tivola, Paolo; Roncari, Silvia; Rossi, Andrea M

    2015-11-01

    Ammonia in gastric juice is considered a potential biomarker for Helicobacter pylori infection and as a factor contributing to gastric mucosal injury. High ammonia concentrations are also found in patients with chronic renal failure, peptic ulcer disease, and chronic gastritis. Rapid and specific methods for ammonia detection are urgently required by the medical community. Here we present a method to detect ammonia directly in gastric juice based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ammonia dissolved in biological liquid samples as ammonium ion was released in air as a gas by the shifting of the pH equilibrium of the ammonium/ammonia reaction and was detected in line by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy system equipped with a gas cell for the quantification. The method developed provided high sensitivity and selectivity in ammonia detection both in pure standard solutions and in a simulated gastric juice matrix over the range of diagnostic concentrations tested. Preliminary analyses were also performed on real gastric juice samples from patients with gastric mucosal injury and with symptoms of H. pylori infection, and the results were in agreement with the clinicopathology information. The whole analysis, performed in less than 10 min, can be directly applied on the sample without extraction procedures and it ensures high specificity of detection because of the ammonia fingerprint absorption bands in the infrared spectrum. This method could be easily used with endoscopy instrumentation to provide information in real time and would enable the endoscopist to improve and integrate gastroscopic examinations. PMID:26377936

  11. ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA AND NITRITE TO CUTTHROAT TROUT FRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity of ammonia and of nitrite was tested on cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) fry (1-3 g) for periods up to a month in eight laboratory flow-through bioassays. Median lethal concentration (LC50) values for ammonia (mg/liter un-ionized NH3) were 0.5-0.8 for 96 hours, and 0.3...

  12. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we have considered the catalytic synthesis of ammonia in the presence of vibrationally excited nitrogen. The distribution over vibrational states was assumed to be maintained during the reaction, and it was shown that the yield of ammonia increased considerably compared to tha...

  13. Molecular physiology of the Rh ammonia transport proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent studies have identified a new family of ammonia-specific transporters, Rh glycoproteins, which enable NH3-specific transport. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent evidence regarding the role of Rh glycoproteins in renal ammonia transport. Recent findings The Rh glycoproteins, RhAG/Rhag, RhBG/Rhbg and RhCG/Rhcg, transport ammonia in the form of molecular NH3, although there is some evidence suggesting the possibility of NH4+ transport. RhAG/Rhag is expressed only in erythrocytes, and not in the kidney. Rhbg and Rhcg are expressed in distal nephron sites, from the distal convoluted tubule through the inner medullary collecting duct, with basolateral Rhbg expression and both apical and basolateral Rhcg expression. Whether Rhbg contributes to renal ammonia transport remains controversial. Rhcg expression parallels ammonia excretion in multiple experimental models and genetic deletion studies, both global and collecting duct-specific, demonstrate a critical role for Rhcg in both basal and acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion. X-ray crystallography has defined critical structural elements in Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport. Finally, Rh glycoproteins may also function as CO2 transporters. Summary No longer can NH3 transport be considered to occur only through diffusive NH3 movement. Transporter-mediated NH3 movement is fundamental to ammonia metabolism. PMID:20539225

  14. Observations of ammonia in galactic H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas Boas, J. W. S.; Scalise, E., Jr.; Monteiro Do Vale, J. L.

    1988-02-01

    This paper presents the first results for the (J,K) = (1,1) and (2,2) ammonia transitions observed in the direction of some southern galactic H II regions, selected among the strongest H2CO emitters. Some physical parameters derived for each individual source, including several new sources of ammonia lines, are presented.

  15. Modelling of ammonia emissions from dairy cow houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteny, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Dairy cow husbandry contributes to environmental acidification through the emission of ammonia. In-depth knowledge on the processes and variable factors that play a role in the emission of ammonia from dairy cow houses benefits the production of emission data, the development of low emission housing

  16. New technology for ammonia recovery from poultry litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatement of gaseous ammonia in poultry houses is beneficial to both improve health/productivity of the birds and to reduce emissions into the environment surrounding the production facility. Current ammonia abatement technologies from poultry houses can be classified into four broad categories: 1) ...

  17. Electrolytic synthesis of ammonia in molten salts under atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tsuyoshi; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-15

    Ammonia was successfully synthesized by using a new electrochemical reaction with high current efficiency at atmospheric pressure and at lower temperatures than the Haber-Bosch process. In this method, nitride ion (N3-), which is produced by the reduction from nitrogen gas at the cathode, is anodically oxidized and reacts with hydrogen to produce ammonia at the anode. PMID:12517136

  18. Managing Ammonia Emissions From Screwworm Larval Rearing Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagel, Agustin; Phillips, Pamela; Chaudhury, Muhammad; Skoda, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Mass production, sterilization, and release of screwworms (Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel)) that were competitive in the field significantly contributed to the successful application of the sterile insect technique for eradication of screwworms from continental North America. Metabolic byproducts resulting from protein-rich diets required for larval screwworms lead to ammonia liberation, sometimes at high levels, within the mass rearing facility. Until recently a sodium polyacrylate gel bulking agent was used for the larval media and adsorbed much of the ammonia. A need to replace the gel with an environmentally "friendly" bulking agent, while not increasing ammonia levels in the rearing facility, led to a series of experiments with the objective of developing procedures to reduce ammonia emissions from the larval media bulked with cellulose fiber. Additives of ammonia-converting bacteria, potassium permanganate, and Yucca schidigera Roezl ex Otrgies powder extract, previously reported to reduce ammonia levels in organic environments, were evaluated. Ammonia-converting bacteria did not have a positive effect. Addition of Y. schidigera powder extract (∼1% of total volume), potassium permanganate (∼250 ppm), and a combination of these two additives (at these same concentrations) kept ammonia at equivalent levels as when larval media was bulked with gel. Potassium permanganate also had sufficient antimicrobial properties that the use of formaldehyde in the diet was not necessary. Further testing is needed, at a mass rearing level, before full implementation into the screwworm eradication program. PMID:26468514

  19. Sugar-Driven Prebiotic Synthesis of Ammonia from Nitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2010-03-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and α-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible α-hydroxycarbonyl group or an α-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe+3 catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia’s reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species.

  20. Diversity and quantity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in sediment of the Pearl River Estuary, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Tao; ZHANG, Tong; Lin YE; Lee, On On; Wong, Yue Him; Qian, Pei Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the sediment of the Pearl River Estuary were investigated by cloning and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). From one sediment sample S16, 36 AOA OTUs (3% cutoff) were obtained from three clone libraries constructed using three primer sets for amoA gene. Among the 36 OTUs, six were shared by all three clone libraries, two appeared in two clone libraries, and the other 28...

  1. Studies of the kinetics of ammonia decomposition on promoted nanocrystalline iron using gas phases of different nitriding degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełbasa, Karolina; Pelka, Rafał; Arabczyk, Walerian

    2010-04-01

    Promoted nanocrystalline iron was nitrided in a differential reactor equipped with systems that made it possible to conduct both thermogravimetric measurements and hydrogen concentration analyses in the reacting gas mixture. The nitriding process, particularly catalytic ammonia decomposition reaction, was investigated under an atmosphere of ammonia-hydrogen mixtures, under atmospheric pressure. Ammonia concentrations, and so nitriding potentials, were changed gradually from 0 to 100% at the inlet of reactor. The temperature was changed in the range of 475-500 degrees C. While values of nitriding potential were increasing, the rate of catalytic ammonia decomposition on alpha-Fe(N) was increasing too, but on mixture of alpha-Fe(N) with gamma'-Fe(4)N nitride the rate was decreasing. The obtained results were interpreted on the basis of the adsorption range model. New equations describing the catalytic ammonia decomposition reaction rate as a function of the logarithm of the nitriding potential of the gas phase, temperature, and nitriding degree of solid samples were proposed. PMID:20235497

  2. Fast In Situ Airborne Measurement of Ammonia Using a Mid-Infrared Off-Axis ICOS Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, Brian; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S.; Hubbe, John M.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Hubbell, Michael R.

    2013-09-17

    A new ammonia (NH3) spectrometer was developed based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. Its feasibility was demonstrated in airborne test flights in the troposphere on board of the Department of Energy (DOE) Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft. This ammonia gas analyzer consists of an optical cell, a quantum-cascade laser, gas sampling system, electronics for control and data acquisition, and data-analysis software. The NH3 mixing ratio is determined from high-resolution NH3 absorption line shapes by tuning the laser wavelength over the sR(3,K) transition of the fundamental vibration band near 9.67 m. Excellent linearity is obtained in a wide range (0- 101 ppb) during calibration. The instrument is capable of collecting data at 2 Hz. Two research flights were conducted over Sunnyside, Washington. In the first test flight, the ammonia gas sensor was used to identify signatures of feedstock from local dairy farms with high vertical spatial resolution under low wind and stable atmospheric conditions. In the second flight, the NH3 spectrometer showed high sensitivity in capturing feedstock emission signals under windy and less stable conditions. Our results demonstrate that this new ammonia spectrometer is airborne feasible and that it has the capability to provide fast in situ observations of ammonia to advance our understanding of atmospheric compositions and aerosol formation.

  3. The excretion of isotope in urea and ammonia for estimating protein turnover in man with [15N]glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four normal adults were given [15N]-glycine in a single dose either orally or intravenously. Rates of whole-body protein turnover were estimated from the excretion of 15N in ammonia and in urea during the following 9 h. The rate derived from urea took account of the [15N]urea retained in body water. In postabsorptive subjects the rates of protein synthesis given by ammonia were equal to those from urea, when the isotope was given orally, but lower when an intravenous dose was given. In subjects receiving equal portions of food every 2 h rates of synthesis calculated from ammonia were much lower than those from urea whether an oral or intravenous isotope was given. Comparison of rates obtained during the postabsorptive and absorptive periods indicated regulation by food intake primarily of synthesis when measurements were made on urea, but regulation primarily of breakdown when measurements were made on ammonia. These inconsistencies suggest that changes in protein metabolism might be assessed better by correlating results given by different end-products, and it is suggested that the mean value given by urea and ammonia will be useful for this purpose. (author)

  4. Study of Ammonia Emissions in a Ventilated Pig Pen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li

    Pig productions cause a wide emission of odors, such as ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Ammonia is one of the most important emissions for evaluating the air quality either in animal buildings or atmospheric environment. In studies of ammonia emission from animal buildings...... emission rate was measured in a wind tunnel under different airflow and ammonium solution temperatures. This investigation provides a general understanding for the influence of velocity, turbulence intensity and temperature on the ammonia emissions. The relationship between ammonia emissions and boundary...... layer thickness of velocity are shown linearly under different ammonium solution temperatures. Using the experiment data measured in the wind tunnel including velocity, concentration and temperature profiles and emission rate, this study adopts computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to investigate the...

  5. Alkaline Ammonia Electrolysis on Electrodeposited Platinum for Controllable Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jieun; Choun, Myounghoon; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2016-02-19

    Ammonia is beginning to attract a great deal of attention as an alternative energy source carrier, because clean hydrogen can be produced through electrolytic processes without the emission of COx . In this study, we deposited various shapes of Pt catalysts under potentiostatic mode; the electrocatalytic oxidation behavior of ammonia using these catalysts was studied in alkaline media. The electrodeposited Pt was characterized by both qualitative and quantitative analysis. To discover the optimal structure and the effect of ammonia concentration, the bulk pH value, reaction temperature, and applied current of ammonia oxidation were investigated using potential sweep and galvanostatic methods. Finally, ammonia electrolysis was conducted using a zero-gap cell, producing highly pure hydrogen with an energy efficiency over 80 %. PMID:26530809

  6. Safety assessment of ammonia as a transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, N.J.; Markert, Frank; Paulsen, Jette Lundtang

    2005-01-01

    be controlled by a combination of technical and regulatory measures. The most important requirements are: - Advanced safety systems in the vehicle -Additional technical measures and regulations are required to avoid releases in maintenance workshops and unauthorised maintenance on the fuel system...... transport of ammonia to the refuelling stations and safety of the activities at the refuelling station (unloading and refuelling). Comparisons are made between the safety of using ammonia and the safety of otherexisting or alternative fuels. The conclusion is that the hazards in relation to ammonia need to....... - Road transport of ammonia to refuelling stations in refrigerated form - Sufficient safety zonesbetween refuelling stations and residential or otherwise public areas. When these measures are applied, the use of ammonia as a transport fuel wouldn’t cause more risks than currently used fuels (using...

  7. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick;

    2016-01-01

    the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals......Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins) have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report...... filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding...

  8. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    Substrates that contain high ammonia levels can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process and unstable biogas production. The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of different ammonia levels on pure strains of (syntrophic acetate oxidizing) SAO bacteria and hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens. Two pure strains of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e: Methanoculleus bourgensis and Methanoculleus thermophiles) and two pure strains of SAO bacteria (i.e: Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) were inoculated under four different ammonia (0.26, 3, 5 and 7g NH4+-N/L) and...... free ammonia levels (Mesophilic: 3.31, 38.2, 63.68 and 89.15 g NH3-N/L. Thermophilic: 8.48, 97.82, 163.03 and 228.24 g NH3-N/L). The results indicated that both T. acetatoxydans and T. phaeum were more sensitive to high ammonia levels compared to the hydrogenotrophic methanogens tested. Additionally...

  9. Ammonia emissions in Europe, part I: Development of a dynamical ammonia emission inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Anna; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen input from agricultural ammonia emissions into the environment causes numerous environmental and health problems. The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate an improved ammonia emission inventory based on a dynamical temporal parameterization suitable to compare and assess ammonia abatement strategies. The setup of the dynamical time profile (DTP) consists of individual temporal profiles for ammonia emissions, calculated for each model grid cell, depending on temperature, crop type, fertilizer and manure application, as well as on local legislation. It is based on the method of Skjøth et al., 2004 and Gyldenkærne et al., 2005. The method has been modified to cover the study area and to improve the performance of the emission model. To compare the results of the dynamical approach with the results of the static time profile (STP) the ammonia emission parameterizations have been implemented in the SMOKE for Europe emission model. Furthermore, the influence on secondary aerosol formation in the North Sea region and possible changes triggered through the use of a modified temporal distribution of ammonia emissions were analysed with the CMAQ chemistry transport model. The results were evaluated with observations of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP). The correlation coefficient of NH3 improved significantly for 12 out of 16 EMEP measurement stations and an improvement in predicting the Normalized Mean Error can be seen for particulate NH4+ and NO3-. The prediction of the 95th percentile of the daily average concentrations has improved for NH3, NH4+ and NO3-. The NH3 concentration modelled with the STP is 157% higher in winter, and about 22% lower in early summer than the one modelled with the new DTP. Consequently, the influence of the DTP on the formation of secondary aerosols is particularly noticeable in winter, when the PM2.5 concentration is 25% lower in comparison to the use of STP for temporal disaggregation. Besides

  10. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, P.J.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Hamilton, S.J.; Buhl, K.J.; Summers, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48??h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01-2.36??mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-ammonia niche of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in rotating biological contactors of a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauder, L.A.; Peterse, F.; Schouten, S.; Neufeld, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The first step of nitrification is catalysed by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), but physicochemical controls on the relative abundance and function of these two groups are not yet fully understood, especially in freshwater environments. This study investigated ammonia-oxidiz

  12. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m‑2 s‑1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm‑2 s‑1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  13. Ammonia synthesis. Ammonia synthesis by N₂ and steam electrolysis in molten hydroxide suspensions of nanoscale Fe₂O₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Cui, Baochen; Wang, Baohui; Li, Fang-Fang; Lau, Jason; Liu, Shuzhi

    2014-08-01

    The Haber-Bosch process to produce ammonia for fertilizer currently relies on carbon-intensive steam reforming of methane as a hydrogen source. We present an electrochemical pathway in which ammonia is produced by electrolysis of air and steam in a molten hydroxide suspension of nano-Fe2O3. At 200°C in an electrolyte with a molar ratio of 0.5 NaOH/0.5 KOH, ammonia is produced at 1.2 volts (V) under 2 milliamperes per centimeter squared (mA cm(-2)) of applied current at coulombic efficiency of 35% (35% of the applied current results in the six-electron conversion of N2 and water to ammonia, and excess H2 is cogenerated with the ammonia). At 250°C and 25 bar of steam pressure, the electrolysis voltage necessary for 2 mA cm(-2) current density decreased to 1.0 V. PMID:25104378

  14. Characterization of FeCo based catalyst for ammonia decomposition. The effect of potassium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendzion-Bieluń Zofia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available FeCo fused catalyst was obtained by fusing iron and cobalt oxides with an addition of calcium, aluminium, and potassium oxides (CaO, Al2O3, K2O. An additional amount of potassium oxide was inserted by wet impregnation. Chemical composition of the prepared catalysts was determined with an aid of the XRF method. On the basis of XRD analysis it was found that cobalt was built into the structure of magnetite and solid solution of CoFe2O4 was formed. An increase in potassium content develops surface area of the reduced form of the catalyst, number of adsorption sites for hydrogen, and the ammonia decomposition rate. The nitriding process of the catalyst slows down the ammonia decomposition.

  15. Enhanced and selective ammonia sensing of reduced graphene oxide based chemo resistive sensor at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2016-05-01

    The reduced graphene oxide thin films were fabricated by using the spin coating method. The reduced graphene oxide samples were characterised by Raman studies to obtain corresponding D and G bands at 1360 and 1590 cm-1 respectively. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra consists of peak corresponds to sp2 hybridisation of carbon atoms at 1560 cm-1. The reduced graphene oxide based chemoresistive sensor exhibited a p-type semiconductor behaviour in ambient conditions and showed good sensitivity to different concentration of ammonia from 25 ppm to 500 ppm and excellent selectivity at room temperature. The sensor displays selectivity to several hazardous vapours such as methanol, ethanol, acetone and hydrazine hydrate. The sensor demonstrated a sensitivity of 9.8 at 25 ppm concentration of ammonia with response time of 163 seconds.

  16. Ammonia sources and sinks in an intensively managed grassland using dynamic chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. David

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Grassland is a canopy with a complex structure where sources and sinks of ammonia may coexist at the plant level. Moreover, management practices such as mowing, hay production and grazing, may change the composition of the sward and hence the source-sinks relationship at the canopy level as well as the interaction with the atmosphere. There is therefore a need to better understand the exchanges of ammonia between grasslands and the atmosphere, especially regarding the locations of sources and sinks and their magnitudes.

    Fluxes of atmospheric ammonia (NH3 within a grassland canopy were assessed in the field and under controlled conditions using a dynamic chamber technique (cuvette. These cuvette measurements were combined with extraction techniques to estimate the ammonium (NH4+ concentration and the pH of a given part of the plant or soil, leading to an estimated ammonia compensation point (Cp. The combination of the cuvette and the extraction techniques was used to identify the potential sources and sinks of NH3 within the different compartments of the grassland: the soil, the litter or "litter leaves", and the functioning "green leaves". A set of 6 field experiments and 6 laboratory experiments were performed in which the different compartments were either added or removed from the cuvettes.

    This study shows that the cuvette measurements agree with the extraction technique in ordering the strength of compartment sources. It suggests that in the studied grassland the green leaves were mostly a sink for NH3 with a compensation point around 0.1–0.4 μg m−3 NH3 and an NH3 flux of 6 to 7 ng m−2 s−1 NH3. Cutting of the grass did not increase the NH3 fluxes of the green leaves. The litter was found to be the largest source of NH3 in the canopy, with a compensation

  17. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. von Bobrutzki

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3, based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in S. Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia, two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system, DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system, c-QCLAS, two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux, Nitrolux-100, a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS, a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS, an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR spectroscopy. Each instrument was compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84, was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS to 1.13 (AiRRmonia with intercepts of –0.74 ppbv (RBD to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS. More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv. Here the overruling factors affecting measurement precision are (a the inlet design, (b the state of inlet filters (where applicable, and (c the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable. By reference to the fast (1 Hz instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  18. A miniDOAS instrument optimised for ammonia field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintermann, Jörg; Dietrich, Klaus; Häni, Christoph; Bell, Michael; Jocher, Markus; Neftel, Albrecht

    2016-06-01

    We present a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument, called "miniDOAS", optimised for optical open-path field-measurements of ambient ammonia (NH3) alongside nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The instrument is a further development of the miniDOAS presented by Volten et al. (2012). We use a temperature-controlled spectrometer, a deuterium light source and a modified optical arrangement. The system was set up in a robust, field-deployable, temperature-regulated housing. For the evaluation of light spectra we use a new high-pass filter routine based upon robust baseline extraction with local regression. Multiple linear regression including terms of an autoregressive-moving-average model is used to determine concentrations. For NH3 the random uncertainty is about 1.4 % of the concentration, and not better than 0.2 µg m-3. Potential biases for the slope of the calibration are given by the precision of the differential absorption cross sections (±3 %) and for the offset by the precision of the estimation of concentration offsets (cref) introduced by the reference spectrum Iref. Comparisons of miniDOAS measurements to those by NH3 acid trap devices showed good agreement. The miniDOAS can be flexibly used for a wide range of field trials, such as micrometeorological NH3 flux measurements with approaches based upon horizontal or vertical concentration differences. Results from such applications covering concentration dynamics of less than one up to several hundreds of µg m-3 are presented.

  19. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Montella, Salvatore; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Gunawan, Christa; Giacobbe, Simona; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-01-01

    The lignocellulosic fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as renewable resources due to the widespread availability, predictable and low pricing and suitability for most conversion technologies. In particular, after the typical paper recycling loop, the newspaper waste (NW) could be further valorized as feedstock in biorefinering industry since it still contains up to 70 % polysaccharides. In this study, two different physicochemical methods—ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and e...

  20. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Wu; Z. Fan; R. Herman

    2004-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the January 1 to March 31, 2004 time period.

  1. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2004-09-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2004 time period.

  2. Towards an ammonia-mediated hydrogen economy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Johannessen, Tue; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink;

    2006-01-01

    Materialization of a hydrogen economy could provide a solution to significant global challenges, In particular. the possibility of improving the efficiency and simultaneously minimizing the environmental impact of energy conversion processes, together with the opportunity to reduce the dependency...... of fossil fuels, are main drivers for the currently increasing research and development efforts. However. significant technological breakthroughs are necessary for making a hydrogen economy feasible. In particular, it is necessary to develop appropriate hydrogen storage and transportation technologies....... Recently, metal ammine salts were proposed as safe, reversible. high-density and low-cost hydrogen carriers. Here, we discuss how this development could provide a platform for using ammonia as a fuel for the hydrogen economy, We do that by comparing various possible hydrogen carriers with respect to energy...

  3. Regeneration of ammonia borane spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Andrew David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Benjamin L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H{sub 2}) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H{sub 2} storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3}, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H{sub 2} (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1}). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H{sub 2} can be readily released in contrast to the loss of H{sub 2} from C{sub 2}H{sub 6} which is substantially endothermic. As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any chemical H{sub 2} storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, but reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. Our group is currently engaged in trying to find and fully demonstrate an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB with a minimum number of steps. Although spent fuel composition depends on the dehydrogenation method, we have focused our efforts on the spent fuel resulting from metal-based catalysis, which has thus far shown the most promise. Metal-based catalysts have produced the fastest rates for a single equivalent of H{sub 2} released from AB and up to 2.5 equiv. of H{sub 2} can be produced within 2 hours. While ongoing work is being carried out to tailor the composition of spent AB fuel, a method has been developed for regenerating the predominant product

  4. Paecilomyces variotii: A Fungus Capable of Removing Ammonia Nitrogen and Inhibiting Ammonia Emission from Manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyun; Liu, Guohua; Cai, Huiyi; Shi, Pengjun; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Zheng, Aijuan; Xie, Qing; Ma, Jianshuang

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from animal manure are a significant environmental and public concern. Despite the numerous studies regarding NH3 emissions from manure, few of them have considered microbial nitrification approaches, especially fungal nitrification. In this study, a filamentous fungus was isolated from chicken manure and was used for nitrification. The species was Paecilomyces variotii by morphological characteristics and 18S rDNA gene sequencing. It played the biggest role in the removal of ammonium at pH 4.0–7.0, C/N ratio of 10–40, temperature of 25–37°C, shaking speed of 150 rpm, and with glucose as the available carbon source. Further analysis revealed that all ammonium was removed when the initial ammonium concentration was less than 100 mg/L; 40% ammonium was removed when the initial ammonium concentration was 1100 mg/L. The results showed that the concentration of ammonia from chicken manure with strain Paecilomyces variotii was significantly lower than that in the control group. We concluded that Paecilomyces variotii has good potential for future applications in in situ ammonium removal as well as ammonia emissions control from poultry manure. PMID:27348533

  5. Effects of salt pond restoration on benthic flux: Sediment as a source of nutrients to the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Brent R.; Kuwabara, James S.; Carter, James L.; Garrettt, Krista K.; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sarah; Takekawa, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding nutrient flux between the benthos and the overlying water (benthic flux) is critical to restoration of water quality and biological resources because it can represent a major source of nutrients to the water column. Extensive water management commenced in the San Francisco Bay, Beginning around 1850, San Francisco Bay wetlands were converted to salt ponds and mined extensively for more than a century. Long-term (decadal) salt pond restoration efforts began in 2003. A patented device for sampling porewater at varying depths, to calculate the gradient, was employed between 2010 and 2012. Within the former ponds, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus and that of dissolved ammonia were consistently positive (i.e., moving out of the sediment into the water column). The lack of measurable nitrate or nitrite concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface suggested negligible fluxes for dissolved nitrate and nitrite. The dominance of ammonia in the porewater indicated anoxic sediment conditions, even at only 1 cm depth, which is consistent with the observed, elevated sediment oxygen demand. Nearby openestuary sediments showed much lower benthic flux values for nutrients than the salt ponds under resortation. Allochthonous solute transport provides a nutrient advective flux for comparison to benthic flux. For ammonia, averaged for all sites and dates, benthic flux was about 80,000 kg/year, well above the advective flux range of −50 to 1500 kg/year, with much of the variability depending on the tidal cycle. By contrast, the average benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus was about 12,000 kg/year, of significant magnitude, but less than the advective flux range of 21,500 to 30,000 kg/year. These benthic flux estimates, based on solute diffusion across the sediment-water interface, reveal a significant nutrient source to the water column of the pond which stimulates algal blooms (often autotrophic). This benthic source may be

  6. Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, Melvin; Elander, Richard; Hennessey, Susan M.

    2011-04-26

    Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

  7. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Móring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; M. Doherty, Ruth;

    2016-01-01

    content of the soil under a urine patch and also soil pH dynamics. The model tests suggest that ammonia volatilization from a urine patch can be affected by the possible restart of urea hydrolysis after a rain event as well as CO2 emission from the soil. The vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange is...... may depend on interactions with other nitrogen cycling processes. In addition, we found that wind speed and relative humidity are also significant influencing factors. Considering that all the input parameters can be obtained for larger scales, GAG is potentially suitable for field and regional scale...

  8. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorette Noiret

    Full Text Available The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and [Formula: see text], and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts.

  9. Arterial ammonia levels in the management of fulminant liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curry S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that an arterial ammonia level greater than 150 mmol/L is highly sensitive for predicting subsequent development of cerebral edema in patients with fulminant liver failure. We performed a prospective cohort study to confirm this relationship. We enrolled 22 consecutive patients who presented to our transplant hepatology service with grade 3-4 encephalopathy associated with fulminant liver failure. All patients underwent placement of an intraparenchymal ICP monitor, and every 12 hourly arterial ammonia levels. The prevalence of intracranial hypertension (IHTN in our population was 95% (21/22 patients, with 82 discrete episodes recorded. The sensitivity of arterial ammonia levels to predict the onset of IHTN was 62% (95% CI: 40.8 to 79.3 at a cut point of 150 mmol/L. Arterial ammonia levels preceding the first intracranial hypertension event were less than 150 mmol/L in 8 of 21 patients (39%. Fifty nine of 82 episodes of IHTN (73% occurred when arterial ammonia levels were less than 150 mmol/L. We conclude that the arterial ammonia level is not useful in making decisions regarding management related to cerebral edema in patients with fulminant liver failure. In fact, since almost all our study patients with grade III or IV encephalopathy secondary to fulminant liver failure went on to develop intracranial hypertension, our study supports the contention that all such patients might benefit from ICP monitoring regardless of arterial ammonia levels.

  10. Safety assessment of ammonia as a transport fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijm, N.J.; Markert, F.; Lundtang paulsen, Jette

    2005-02-01

    This report describes the safety study performed as part of the EU supported project 'Ammonia Cracking for Clean Electric Power Technology' The study addresses the following activities: safety of operation of the ammonia-powered vehicle under normal and accident (collision) conditions, safety of transport of ammonia to the refuelling stations and safety of the activities at the refuelling station (unloading and refuelling). Comparisons are made between the safety of using ammonia and the safety of other existing or alternative fuels. The conclusion is that the hazards in relation to ammonia need to be controlled by a combination of technical and regulatory measures. The most important requirements are: - Advanced safety systems in the vehicle - Additional technical measures and regulations are required to avoid releases in maintenance workshops and unauthorised maintenance on the fuel system - Road transport of ammonia to refuelling stations in refrigerated form - Sufficient safety zones between refuelling stations and residential or otherwise public areas. When these measures are applied, the use of ammonia as a transport fuel wouldnt cause more risks than currently used fuels (using current practice). (au)

  11. Haifa Chemicals Ltd. may buy second-hand ammonia plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-15

    Israel's Haifa Chemicals is negotiating with unnamed U.S. companies for purchase of 1 of 20 or more 50,000-80,000 ton/yr ammonia plants forced to close owing to competition and to the current world ammonia surplus. Such a plant would cost about $13 million, including shipping and reassembly, whereas a new plant of the same capacity would cost $30 million. Haifa plans to use refinery waste gases as feedstock, which will be drawn from either of its refineries at Haifa or at the port of Ashdod, either of which is planned as the site for the ammonia plant. An alternative plan would be construction of a $5-$6 million modern 8000 ton ammonia terminal that would be capable of receiving vessels larger than 500 dwt (the existing terminal's maximum ability), thereby cutting shipping costs from $160-$170/ton to $125-$130/ton of ammonia. Israel's ammonia production was approx. 90,000 tons/yr against a demand of 110,000 tons in 1978, including 40,000 tons by Haifa, which is expected to increase to 45,000 tons in 1979 for its nitric acid and potassium nitrate production. Israel Chemicals Ltd., which owns the existing naphtha-based ammonia plant at Haifa, uses some of its own output for its fertilizer operations.

  12. Dynamics of ammonia exchange with cut grassland: strategy and implementation of the GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sutton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A major international experiment on ammonia (NH3 biosphere-atmosphere exchange was conducted over intensively managed grassland at Braunschweig, Germany. The experimental strategy was developed to allow an integrated analysis of different features of NH3 exchange including: a quantification of nearby emissions and advection effects, b estimation of net NH3 fluxes with the canopy by a range of micrometeorological measurements, c analysis of the sources and sinks of NH3 within the plant canopy, including soils and bioassay measurements, d comparison of the effects of grassland management options on NH3 fluxes and e assessment of the interactions of NH3 fluxes with aerosol exchange processes. Additional technical objectives included the inter-comparison of different estimates of sensible and latent heat fluxes, as well as continuous-gradient and Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA systems for NH3 fluxes.

    The prior analysis established the spatial and temporal design of the experiment, allowing significant synergy between these objectives. The measurements were made at 7 measurement locations, thereby quantifying horizontal and vertical profiles, and covered three phases: a tall grass canopy prior to cutting (7 days, b short grass after cutting (7 days and c re-growing sward following fertilization with ammonium nitrate (10 days. The sequential management treatments allowed comparison of sources-sinks, advection and aerosol interactions under a wide range of NH3 fluxes.

    This paper describes the experimental strategy and reports the grassland management history, soils, environmental conditions and air chemistry during the experiment, finally summarizing how the results are coordinated in the accompanying series of papers.

  13. Ice nucleation of ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation characteristics of montmorillonite mineral dust aerosols with and without exposure to ammonia gas were measured at different atmospheric temperatures and relative humidities with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. The montmorillonite particles were exposed to pure (100% and diluted ammonia gas (25 ppm at room temperature in a stainless steel chamber. There was no significant change in the mineral dust particle size distribution due to the ammonia gas exposure. 100% pure ammonia gas exposure enhanced the ice nucleating fraction of montmorillonite mineral dust particles 3 to 8 times at 90% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw and 5 to 8 times at 100% RHw for 120 min exposure time within our experimental conditions. The percentages of active ice nuclei were 2 to 9 times higher at 90% RHw and 2 to 13 times higher at 100% RHw in 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite compared to unexposed montmorillonite. All montmorillonite particles are more efficient as ice nuclei with increasing relative humidities and decreasing temperatures. The activation temperature of montmorillonite exposed to 100% pure ammonia was 12°C higher than for unexposed montmorillonite particles at 90% RHw and 10°C higher at 100% RHw. In the 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite experiments, the activation temperature was 7°C warmer than unexposed montmorillonite at 100% RHw. Degassing does not reverse the ice nucleating ability of ammonia exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles. This is the first experimental evidence that ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles can enhance its activation as ice nuclei and that the activation can occur at temperatures warmer than –10°C where natural atmospheric ice nuclei are very scarce.

  14. Fast responsive, optical trace level ammonia sensor for environmental monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Abel Tobias; Ungerböck Birgit; Klimant Ingo; Mayr Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Ammonia is a ubiquitous chemical substance which is created in technical and biological processes and harmful to many different organisms. One specific problem is the toxicity of ammonia in fish at levels of 25 μg/l - a very common issue in today’s aqua culture. In this study we report a development of a fast responsive, optical ammonia sensor for trace concentrations. Results Different hydrogels have been investigated as host polymers for a pH based sensing mechanism base...

  15. Erbium Doped Fiber Sensor for Ammonia Detection into Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water pollution is a health problem around the world. One of the most common pollutants in water is the Ammonia. Some sensors have been developed for Ammoniac detection even though most of them are not in real time and could be expensive. In this work an Erbium-doped fibre-sensor for Ammonia detection with a mechanical long period fibre grating and a taper in cascade for improving the sensitivity; the detection bandwidth is in the 1550 nm region from 1460 nm to 1640 nm. Output optical spectrum for Ammonia concentrations from 1ml to 5 ml is shown

  16. Ammonia volatilization from crop residues and frozen green manure crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruijter, F. J.; Huijsmans, J. F. M.; Rutgers, B.

    2010-09-01

    Agricultural systems can lose substantial amounts of nitrogen (N). To protect the environment, the European Union (EU) has adopted several directives that set goals to limit N losses. National Emission Ceilings (NEC) are prescribed in the NEC directive for nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Crop residues may contribute to ammonia volatilization, but sufficient information on their contribution to the national ammonia volatilization is lacking. Experiments were carried out with the aim to assess the ammonia volatilization of crop residues left on the soil surface or incorporated into the soil under the conditions met in practice in the Netherlands during late autumn and winter. Ammonia emission from residues of broccoli, leek, sugar beet, cut grass, fodder radish (fresh and frozen) and yellow mustard (frozen) was studied during two winter seasons using volatilization chambers. Residues were either placed on top of soil or mixed with soil. Mixing residues with soil gave insignificant ammonia volatilization, whereas volatilization was 5-16 percent of the N content of residues when placed on top of soil. Ammonia volatilization started after at least 4 days. Total ammonia volatilization was related to C/N-ratio and N concentration of the plant material. After 37 days, cumulative ammonia volatilization was negligible from plant material with N concentration below 2 percent, and was 10 percent of the N content of plant material with 4 percent N. These observations can be explained by decomposition of plant material by micro-organisms. After an initial built up of the microbial population, NH 4+ that is not needed for their own growth is released and can easily emit as NH 3 at the soil surface. The results of the experiments were used to estimate the contribution of crop residues to ammonia volatilization in the Netherlands. Crop residues of arable crops and residues of pasture topping may contribute more than 3 million kg NH 3-N to the national ammonia volatilization of the

  17. A spatial ammonia emission inventory for pig farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, Boris; Gil, Antonia; Pallarés, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric emissions of ammonia (NH3) from the agricultural sector have become a significant environmental and public concern as they have impacts on human health and ecosystems. This work proposes an improved methodology in order to identify administrative regions with high NH3 emissions from pig farming and calculates an ammonia density map (kg NH3-N ha-1), based on the number of pigs and available agricultural land, terrain slopes, groundwater bodies, soil permeability, zones sensitive to nitrate pollution and surface water buffer zones. The methodology has been used to construct a general tool for locating ammonia emissions from pig farming when detailed information of livestock farms is not available.

  18. Protective effect of immobilized ammonia oxidizers and phenol-degrading bacteria on nitrification in ammonia- and phenol-containing wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, M.; Watanabe, A. [Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Chiba (Japan); Kudo, N.; Shinozaki, H. [Materials Science Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo (Japan); Uemoto, H.

    2007-12-15

    Phenol present in wastewaters from various industries has an inhibitory effect on nitrification even at low concentrations. Hence, the biological treatment of wastewater containing both phenol and ammonia involves a series of treatment steps. It is difficult to achieve nitrification capability in an activated sludge system that contains phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. Batch treatment of wastewater containing various concentrations of phenol showed that the ammonia oxidation capability of suspended Nitrosomonas europaea cells, an ammonia oxidizer, was completely inhibited in the presence of more than 5.0 mg/L phenol. To protect the ammonia oxidizer from the inhibitory effect of phenol and to achieve ammonia oxidation capability in the wastewater containing phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level, a simple bacterial consortium composed of an ammonia oxidizer (N. europaea) and a phenol-degrading bacterial strain (Acinetobacter sp.) was used. Ammonia oxidation did not occur in the presence of phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level when suspended or immobilized N. europaea and Acinetobacter sp. cells were used in batch treatment. Following the acclimatization of the immobilized cells, accumulation of nitrite was observed, even when the wastewater contained phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. These results showed that immobilization was effective in protecting N. europaea cells from the inhibitory effect of phenol present in the wastewater. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Effect of different ammonia concentrations on community succession of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in a simulated paddy soil column.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Baolan

    Full Text Available Ammonia oxidation is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA. To explore the effect of ammonia concentration on the population dynamic changes of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms, we examined changes in the abundance and community composition of AOA and AOB in different layers. Most of the archaeal amoA sequences were Nitrosotalea-related and the proportion that Nitrosotalea cluster occupied decreased in the surface layer and increased in the deep layer during the cultivation process. Nitrosopumilus-related sequences were only detected in the deep layer in the first stage and disappeared later. Both phylogenetic and quantitative analysis showed that there were increased Nitrosomonas-related sequences appeared in the surface layer where the ammonia concentration was the highest. Both AOA and AOB OTU numbers in different layers decreased under selective pressure and then recovered. The potential nitrification rates were 25.06 µg · N · L(-1 · g(-1 dry soil · h(-1 in the mid layer which was higher than the other two layers. In general, obvious population dynamic changes were found for both AOA and AOB under the selective pressure of exogenous ammonia and the changes were different in three layers of the soil column.

  20. High flux expansion divertor studies in NSTX

    CERN Document Server

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Maqueda, R; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L

    2009-01-01

    High flux expansion divertor studies have been carried out in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using steady-state X-point height variations from 22 to 5-6 cm. Small-ELM H-mode confinement was maintained at all X-point heights. Divertor flux expansions from 6 to 26-28 were obtained, with associated reduction in X-point connection length from 5-6 m to 2 m. Peak divertor heat flux was reduced from 7-8 MW/m$^2$ to 1-2 MW/m$^2$. In low X-point configuration, outer strike point became nearly detached. Among factors affecting deposition of parallel heat flux in the divertor, the flux expansion factor appeared to be dominant

  1. New efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis: barium-promoted cobalt on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Stefan; Barfod, Rasmus; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Jacobsen, Claus J.H.; Teunissen, Herman T; Ståhl, Kenny; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2002-01-01

    Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia......Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia...

  2. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    rate measurements revealed clear differences in ammonia oxidation rates. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was assessed using the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene as functional marker. Both AOA and AOB could be detected in the rhizosphere of all...

  3. Evaluation of ionic liquids as absorbents for ammonia absorption refrigeration cycles using COSMO-based process simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • NH3–IL absorption cycles are modeled by COSMO-based Aspen simulations. • Proposed a priori computational approach is validated using experimental data. • Cycle performance was analyzed for conventional and task-specific ILs. • IL solvents with high NH3 absorption capacity improve the cycle performance. • Using IL mixtures is revealed as promising alternative in NH3 absorption applications. - Abstract: COSMO-based process simulations with Aspen Plus/Aspen HYSYS are used, for the first time, to a priori estimate the thermodynamic performance of ammonia absorption refrigeration cycles using ionic liquids as absorbents. This allows not only broadening the criteria set used to select/design ionic liquids with optimized properties to be used in that role, but also evaluating innovative strategies to improve the cycle’s performances. COSMO-RS method provides the information required for both creating the ionic liquid non-database components and specifying the COSMOSAC property model to perform Aspen Plus calculations. The computational procedure used here gives at the same time reasonable good property predictions of the vapor (refrigerant) and the condensed (ammonia + ionic liquid) phases as well as physically consistent estimations of the cycle’s performance under different conditions. Current results agree with those previously reported in the literature for several ionic liquid-based systems taken for comparison. In addition, task-specific ionic liquids, with improved properties for ammonia absorption, and also binary ionic liquid mixtures are considered in the analysis. It is obtained that ionic liquids showing higher ammonia absorption capacity among the considered absorbents simultaneously provide the best cycle’s performances. The cycle performances vary in relatively wide intervals depending on the ammonia concentration in the (refrigerant + absorbent) solutions. This behavior is strongly modulated by the ammonia absorption

  4. Experimental Setup for Determining Ammonia-Salt Adsorption and Desorption Behavior Under Typical Heat Pump Conditions. Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Pal, M.; De Boer, R.; Veldhuis, J.B.J. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    For the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the performance of a salt-ammonia sorption reactor/heat exchanger a new test-rig was developed. This test-rig enables the measurement of the performance in adsorption and desorption mode of different sorption reactor designs. It measures the speed of uptake and release of ammonia gas of various salt-ammonia reactions under well-controlled and well-monitored process conditions, similar to the heat pump conditions. The test-rig measures the ammonia uptake and release under controlled pressure and temperature conditions. Temperatures of the salt reactor can be varied from ambient temperature up to 200{sup o}C and the ammonia pressure can be varied between 0.02 to 2 MPa. These conditions can be set independently and repeated at regular time-intervals. Besides NH3-mass-flow meters, pressure and temperature sensors, the setup also contains an endoscope to observe any macroscopic structural changes in the material during uptake and release of ammonia. Measurements so far have shown a liquid phase of LiCl.3NH3 at pressures of 0.5 MPa and temperatures exceeding 90{sup o}C. Voilent foaming is observed at 120{sup o}C resulting in salt losses. A correlation was determined between the reaction rate of MgCl{sub 2}(2-6)NH3 and the relative pressure gradient yielding a reaction time of about 1500 seconds for a relative pressure difference of 1. Multiple sorption cycles of the CaCl{sub 2}(2-4)NH3 reaction, showed a reduced activity from 85% of the theoretical maximum sorbed mass at the first sorption cycle, to 15% after 300+ cycles.

  5. Video Meteor Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  6. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and residue management practices on ammonia emissions from subtropical sugarcane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    mudi, Sanku Datta; Wang, Jim J.; Dodla, Syam Kumar; Arceneaux, Allen; Viator, H. P.

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from soil is a loss of nitrogen (N) nutrient for plant production as well as an issue of air quality, due to the fact that it is an active precursor of airborne particulate matters. Ammonia also acts as a secondary source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission when present in the soil. In this study, the impacts of different sources of N fertilizers and harvest residue management schemes on NH3 emissions from sugarcane production were evaluated based on an active chamber method. The field experiment plots consisting of two sources of N fertilizer (urea and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN)) and two common residue management practices, namely residue retained (RR) and residue burned (RB), were established on a Commerce silt loam. The NH3 volatilized following N fertilizer application was collected in an impinger containing diluted citric acid and was subsequently analyzed using ion chromatography. The NH3 loss was primarily found within 3-4 weeks after N application. Average seasonal soil NH3 flux was significantly greater in urea plots with NH3-N emission factor (EF) twice or more than in UAN plots (2.4-5.6% vs. 1.2-1.7%). The RR residue management scheme had much higher NH3 volatilization than the RB treatment regardless of N fertilizer sources, corresponding to generally higher soil moisture levels in the former. Ammonia-N emissions in N fertilizer-treated sugarcane fields increased with increasing soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) up to 45-55% observed in the field. Both N fertilizer sources and residue management approaches significantly affected NH3 emissions.

  7. Effect of chamber enclosure time on soil respiration flux: A comparison of linear and non-linear flux calculation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandel, Tanka; Lærke, Poul Erik; Elsgaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    -deployment fluxes by linear regression techniques. Thus, usually the cumulative flux curve becomes downward concave due to the decreased gas diffusion rate. Non-linear models based on biophysical theory usually fit to such curvatures and may reduce the underestimation of fluxes. In this study, we examined the...... effect of increasing chamber enclosure time on SR flux rates calculated using a linear, an exponential and a revised Hutchinson and Mosier model (HMR). Soil respiration rates were measured with a closed chamber in combination with an infrared gas analyzer. During SR flux measurements the chamber was......) to obtain a range of fluxes with different shapes of flux curves. The linear method provided more stable flux results during short enclosure times (few min) but underestimated initial fluxes by 15–300% after 45 min deployment time. Non-linear models reduced the underestimation as average...

  8. Integration of a gas turbine with an ammonia process for improving energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is intended to investigate how one can improve the overall energy efficiency of an ammonia process. A gas turbine is integrated with the process to reduce the exergy loss associated with ammonia synthesis loop and produce electricity. Combined Pinch and Exergy Analysis is applied to identify how exergy loss is distributed throughout heat transfer process. This is needed to find appropriate placement for gas turbine integration. Having introduced an exergy loss index for the whole plant, including the heat transfer process and gas turbine system, optimum shaftwork can be generated through recovering part of the exergy loss. Eventually, heat integration of the process streams is done to reduce additional consumption of high pressure steam caused by temperature drop in gas turbine. The results show that 4 MW of electricity can be produced in exchange of adding 7350 kW of high pressure steam. Total amount of exergy loss is reduced by 3323 kW, which indicates 19% reduction compared to the existing process. Based on the economic data, the net income is estimated to be 2,549,653 US$/y with 3 years payback. -- Highlights: • A new configuration is proposed to improve the energy efficiency of ammonia plant. • Combined pinch and exergy is used to obtain the new configuration conditions. • Considerable net income is achieved by proposed modifications

  9. [Optimization of liquid ammonia treatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of Saccharum arundinaceum to fermentable sugars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Peng, Hehuan; Zhao, Xiangjun; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Feng; Shao, Qianjun

    2013-03-01

    China has abundant available marginal land that can be used for cultivation of lignocellulosic energy plants. Saccharum arundinaceum Retz. is a potential energy crop with both high biomass yield and low soil fertility requirements. It can be planted widely as cellulosic ethanol feedstock in southern China. In the present work Saccharum arundinaceum was pretreated by liquid ammonia treatment (LAT) to overcome biomass recalcitrance, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. The monosaccharide contents (glucose, xylose, and arabinose) of the enzymatic hydrolysate were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Experimental results show that the optimal LAT pretreatment conditions were 130 0C, 2:1 (W/W) ammonia to biomass ratio, 80% moisture content (dry weight basis) and 5 min residence time. Approximately 69.34% glucan and 82.60% xylan were converted after 72 h enzymatic hydrolysis at 1% glucan loading using 15 FPU/(g of glucan) of cellulase. The yields of glucose and xylose were 573% and 1 056% higher than those of the untreated biomass, and the LAT-pretreated substrates obtained an 8-fold higher of total monosaccharide yield than untreated substrates. LAT pretreatment was an effective to increase the enzymatic digestibility of Saccharum arundinaceum compared to acid impregnated steam explosion and similar to that of acid treatment and ammonia fiber expansion treatment. PMID:23789274

  10. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell O Khunjar

    Full Text Available The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  11. Enhanced sulfamethoxazole degradation through ammonia oxidizing bacteria co-metabolism and fate of transformation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotaki, Elissavet; Buttiglieri, Gianluigi; Ferrando-Climent, Laura; Rodriguez-Roda, Ignasi; Pijuan, Maite

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of the widely-used antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SFX) in wastewaters and surface waters has been reported in a large number of studies. However, the results obtained up-to-date have pointed out disparities in its removal. This manuscript explores the enhanced biodegradation potential of an enriched culture of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) towards SFX. Several sets of batch tests were conducted to establish a link between SFX degradation and specific ammonia oxidation rate. The occurrence, degradation and generation of SFX and some of its transformation products (4-Nitro SFX, Desamino-SFX and N(4)-Acetyl-SFX) was also monitored. A clear link between the degradation of SFX and the nitrification rate was found, resulting in an increased SFX removal at higher specific ammonia oxidation rates. Moreover, experiments conducted under the presence of allylthiourea (ATU) did not present any removal of SFX, suggesting a connection between the AMO enzyme and SFX degradation. Long term experiments (up to 10 weeks) were also conducted adding two different concentrations (10 and 100 μg/L) of SFX in the influent of a partial nitrification sequencing batch reactor, resulting in up to 98% removal. Finally, the formation of transformation products during SFX degradation represented up to 32%, being 4-Nitro-SFX the most abundant. PMID:26938496

  12. Vaporization reduction characteristics of aqueous ammonia solutions by the addition of ethylene glycol, glycerol and glycine to the CO2 absorption process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong-Beom Seo; Soo-Bin Jeon; Je-Young Kim; Gang-Woo Lee; Jong-Hyeon Jung; Kwang-Joong Oh

    2012-01-01

    Aqueous ammonia(NH3)solution can be used as an alternative absorption for the control of CO2 emitted from flue gases due to its high absorption capacity,fast absorption rate and low corrosion problem.The emission of CO2 from iron and steel plants requires much attention,as they are higher than those emitted from power plants at a single point source.In the present work,low concentration ammonia liquor,9 wt.%,was used with various additives to obtain the kinetic properties using the blast furnace gas model.Although a solution with a high ammonia concentration enables high CO2 absorption efficiency,ammonium ions are lost as ammonia vapor,resulting in reduced CO2 absorption due to the lower concentration of the ammonia absorbent.To decrease the vaporization of ammonia,ethylene glycol,glycerol and glycine,which contain more than one hydroxyl radical,were chosen.The experiments were conducted at 313 K similar to the CO2 absorption conditions for the blast furnace gas model.

  13. Assessment of global and regional left ventricular function by electrocardiographic gated N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrocardiographic gated 13N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) enables simultaneous assessment of myocardial blood flow and left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of gated 13N-ammonia PET for evaluating global and regional LV function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in comparison with conventional left ventriculography (LVG). Fifty-four patients with CAD underwent gated 13N-ammonia PET and LVG. The LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (LVEDV, LVESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) by gated 13N-ammonia PET were calculated using Cedars-Sinai automated quantitative gated single photon emission computed tomography (QGS) and compared with those obtained by LVG. The regional wall motion (RWM) was visually scored, and compared with that on LVG. There were good correlations between the 2 methods for LVEF, LVEDV and LVESV (R=0.828, R=0.821 and R=0.874 respectively). The RWM assessed by gated 13N-ammonia PET also agreed well with that by LVG (complete agreement was 70.4%, κ=0.58). Gated 13N-ammonia PET combined with QGS works reasonably well for the assessment of both global and regional LV function in CAD patients, although additional calibration may be necessary. (author)

  14. Effect of ammonia plasma treatment on graphene oxide LB monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gulbagh; Botcha, V. Divakar; Narayanam, Pavan K.; Sutar, D. S.; Talwar, S. S.; Major, S. S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai - 400076 (India); Srinivasa, R. S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai - 400076 (India)

    2013-02-05

    Graphene oxide monolayer sheets were transferred on Si and SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett technique and were exposed to ammonia plasma at room temperature. The monolayer character of both graphene oxide and plasma treated graphene oxide sheets were ascertained by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that ammonia plasma treatment results in enhancement of graphitic carbon content along with the incorporation of nitrogen. The conductivity of graphene oxide monolayers, which was in the range of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7} S/cm, increased to 10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} S/cm after the ammonia plasma treatment. These results indicate that the graphene oxide was simultaneously reduced and N-doped during ammonia plasma treatment, without affecting the morphological stability of sheets.

  15. Role of ammonia in the pathogenesis of brain edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara,Masachika

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of hyperammonemia in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema was investigated using mongrel dogs to develop a treatment for cerebral edema in acute hepatic failure. Intravenous infusion of ammonium acetate alone into dogs did not induce brain edema, although blood ammonia reached unphysiologically high levels. However, ammonium acetate infusion during mannitol-induced reversible (osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB effectively induced cytotoxic brain edema. Pretreatment with a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA; valine, leucine and isoleucine solution prevented an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP and brain water content, and caused a decrease in brain ammonia content and an increase in brain BCAA and glutamic acid. The results suggest that ammonia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema during acute hepatic failure and that BCAAs accelerate ammonia detoxification in the brain.

  16. CO2 emissions and mitigation potential in China's ammonia industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant pressure from increasing CO2 emissions and energy consumption in China's industrialization process has highlighted a need to understand and mitigate the sources of these emissions. Ammonia production, as one of the most important fundamental industries in China, represents those heavy industries that contribute largely to this sharp increasing trend. In the country with the largest population in the world, ammonia output has undergone fast growth spurred by increasing demand for fertilizer of food production since 1950s. However, various types of technologies implemented in the industry make ammonia plants in China operate with huge differences in both energy consumption and CO2 emissions. With consideration of these unique features, this paper attempts to estimate the amount of CO2 emission from China's ammonia production, and analyze the potential for carbon mitigation in the industry. Based on the estimation, related policy implications and measures required to realize the potential for mitigation are also discussed.

  17. Electrolytes and Electrodes for Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapina, Alberto

    effective energy storage solutions. Production of synthetic fuels (e.g. ammonia) is a promising possibility. Ammonia (NH3) can be an interesting energy carrier, thanks to its high energy density and the existence of well developed storage and transportation technologies. However the present-day production...... technology is based on the Haber-Bosch process, which is energy intensive and requires large-scale plants. One possible way to produce ammonia from sustainable electricity, nitrogen and hydrogen/water is using an electrochemical cell. This thesis studies a number of electrolytes and electrocatalysts to...... evaluate their applicability to electrochemical synthesis of ammonia. First a number of potential electrolytes are investigated in the temperature range 25-400°C in order to find a proton conductor with a conductivity higher than 10-4 S/cm in dry atmosphere (pH2O < 0.001 atm). The conductivity of materials...

  18. Ammonia-water system : Part I. Thermodynamic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various thermodynamic properties which have direct bearing on design calculations and separation factor calculations for gaseous ammonia water system have been calculated and compiled in tabular form for easy reference. (auth.)

  19. The production of ammonia by multiheme cytochromes C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jörg; Kroneck, Peter M H

    2014-01-01

    The global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle is essential for life on Earth. Many of the underlying biotic reactions are catalyzed by a multitude of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life forms whereas others are exclusively carried out by microorganisms. The last century has seen the rise of a dramatic imbalance in the global nitrogen cycle due to human behavior that was mainly caused by the invention of the Haber-Bosch process. Its main product, ammonia, is a chemically reactive and biotically favorable form of bound nitrogen. The anthropogenic supply of reduced nitrogen to the biosphere in the form of ammonia, for example during environmental fertilization, livestock farming, and industrial processes, is mandatory in feeding an increasing world population. In this chapter, environmental ammonia pollution is linked to the activity of microbial metalloenzymes involved in respiratory energy metabolism and bioenergetics. Ammonia-producing multiheme cytochromes c are discussed as paradigm enzymes. PMID:25416396

  20. Ammonia concentration in an animal radon exposure facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and dosimetric study on lung tumour induction by inhalation of radon daughters under indoor conditions has been started with the aim of analysing the various factors which determine the risk due to this inhalation. In the experimental part of the study, WAG/Rij rats will be exposed daily for a period of about 18 months in an exposure chamber to a relatively low concentration of radon daughter products. In chronic exposure chambers, ammonia is produced by the action of urease-positive bacteria in urine and faeces. There are reports showing that, in such exposure chambers, the ammonia concentrations will rise beyond acceptable levels. The ammonia concentration as a function of time has therefore been studied, as has means of reducing this concentration. The results demonstrate that, with the addition of Aqualloy granules the ammonia concentration can be reduced over a long period of time to a level for which no cooperative action with the radon exposure is expected. (Auth.)

  1. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Virginie Fontanier; Sofiane Zalouk; Stéphane Barbati

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated.Two step experiment was carried out consisting ofa non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275℃, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min.The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 ± 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 ± 13.2)%conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4+-N.Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid.It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity.The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance.The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution.Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  2. Fabrication of platinum submonolayer electrodes and their high electrocatalytic activities for ammonia oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pt submonolayer on the Au electrode for ammonia oxidation. • The surface coverage of the Pt submonolayer can be effectively controlled by the Cu UPD potential. • Pt submonolayer on the Au electrode has both high mass activity and specific activity. - Abstract: Pt submonolayer with different coverage on the Au electrode for ammonia oxidation was prepared by Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by redox replacement of UPD Cu by Pt. The effects of the Cu UPD potential and time on the deposited Cu and the redox replaced Pt layer on the electrode were investigated. The amount of the deposited Cu and Pt was determined by the anodic stripping method. The electrocatalytic activity of the Pt decorated electrodes for ammonia oxidation was characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The results showed that the Cu UPD potential has a significant influence on the formed Cu layer and the subsequent Pt submonolayer. The Cu deposition behaviour changes from UPD process to overpotential deposition (OPD) process with the decrease of deposition potential. Besides, the amount of the deposited Cu increases as the Cu deposition potential decreases. Consequently, Pt layer with different coverage on the electrode can be effectively controlled by adjusting the Cu UPD potential. The Pt submonolayer electrodes prepared by the redox replacement of Cu UPD layer have a high mass activity for ammonia oxidation, and their mass activities are more than two times higher than that of the Pt decorated electrodes obtained by redox replacement of Cu OPD layer. Besides, the Pt submonolayer electrodes also have a higher specific activity possibly due to the modification in structural and electronic properties of the Pt submonolayer induced by the Au substrate

  3. Phycoremediation of landfill leachate with chlorophytes: Phosphate a limiting factor on ammonia nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskuliakova, Andrea; Tonry, Steven; Touzet, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The potential of microalgae to bioremediate wastewater has been reported in numerous studies but has not been investigated as extensively for landfill leachate, which may be attributed to its complex nature and toxicity. In this study we explored if microalgal phycoremediation could constitute an alternative biological treatment option for landfill leachate management in regions with temperate climatic conditions. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of microalgae species at relatively low temperature (15 °C) and light intensity (14:10 h, light: dark, 22 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for reduction in energy inputs. Four chlorophyte strains originating from the North-West of Ireland were selected and used in batch experiments in order to evaluate their ability to reduce total ammonia nitrogen, oxidised nitrogen and orthophosphate in landfill leachate. The Chlamydomonas sp. strain SW15aRL isolated from raw leachate achieved the highest level of pollutant reduction whereby a decrease of 51.7% of ammonia nitrogen was observed in 10% raw leachate (∼100 mg l(-1) NH4(+)-N) by day 24 in experiments without culture agitation. However, in the experiment conducted with 10% raw leachate supplemented with phosphate, a decrease of 90.7% of ammonia nitrogen was obtained by day 24 while also achieving higher biomass production. This series of experiments pointed to phosphorus being a limiting factor in the microalgae based phycoremediation of the landfill leachate. The effective reduction of ammonia nitrogen in landfill leachate can be achieved at lower temperature and light conditions. This was attained by employing native species adapted to such conditions and by improving nutrient balance. PMID:27161884

  4. Extraction of molybdenum and vanadium from the spent diesel exhaust catalyst by ammonia leaching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhipeng; Guo, Min; Zhang, Mei

    2015-04-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) were effectively extracted from the spent diesel exhaust catalyst (V2O5-MoO3/TiO2) by using an ammonia leaching method. Meanwhile, the structure of the spent catalyst carrier (TiO2) was not destroyed and might be reused. The effects of ammonia (NH3 · H2O) concentration, leaching temperature and time, concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and liquid to solid ratio on the extraction of Mo and V were systematically investigated. It is shown that the extraction efficiency of Mo increased from 68.68% to 96.45% while the extraction efficiency of V remained stable at 27% with increasing ammonia concentration from 2.95 to 7.38 mol/L, leaching temperature from 298.15 to 473.15K, and reaction time from 1 to 8h. With the concentration of H2O2 solution increasing from 1.0 to 2.5 mol/L, the extraction efficiency of V increased from 26.87% to 39.73%. Under the optimum conditions (the ammonia concentration of 4.5 mol/L, leaching temperature of 413.15K, reaction time of 2h, the H2O2 solution concentration of 1.0 mol/L and the liquid to solid ratio of 20/1 mL/g), the extraction efficiencies of Mo and V reached 95.13% and 46.25%. Moreover, the catalyst carrier TiO2 with anatase crystal phase was also obtained. PMID:25603289

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of a novel ammonia-water trilateral Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we thermodynamically assess the performance of an ammonia-water Rankine cycle that uses no boiler, but rather the saturated liquid is flashed by a positive displacement expander (e.g., reciprocating, centrifugal, rotating vane, screw or scroll type expander) for power generation. This cycle has no pinch point and thus the exergy of the heat source can be better used by matching the temperature profiles of the hot and the working fluids in the benefit of performance improvement. The second feature comes from the use of the ammonia-water mixture that offers further opportunity to better match the temperature profiles at the sink level. The influence of the expander efficiency, ammonia concentration and the coolant flow rate is investigated and reported for a case study. The optimized cycle is then compared to four organic Rankine cycles and a Kalina-type cycle and shows the best performance. It is also shown that, in order to determine the best cycle configuration and parameters, energy efficiency must be used only in conjunction with the amount of the heat recovered from the source. The efficiency of the cycle running with ammonia-water is 0.30 in contrast to steam-only case showing 0.23 exergy efficiency, which means an increment of 7.0% is obtained for the same operating conditions. If cogeneration is used the cycle effectiveness may even be over 70%. The cycle can be applied for low power/low temperature heat recovery from geothermal sources, ocean thermal energy conversion, solar energy or process waste heat, etc

  6. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  7. Anomalous cross field flux in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous quasi-linear fluxes induced by the curvature drift resonance and transit resonance are evaluated in a rotating helical plasma. The radial electric field makes the Doppler shift, but does not contribute to the anomalous fluxes. The curvature drift resonance induces the new curvature term in the quasi-linear fluxes. The effect of helical magnetic field is through this curvature of magnetic field lines, and contributes to the inward transport. The ion heat diffusivity due to the curvature drift resonance is obtained in the form modified gyro-Bohm coefficient, and is compared with experimentally observed one in CHS Heliotron. (author)

  8. Lignin solubilisation and gentle fractionation in liquid ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Strassberger, Z.; Prinsen, P.; Klis, van der, M.; Es, van, B; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method for solubilising lignin using liquid ammonia. Unlike water, which requires harsh conditions, ammonia can solubilise technical lignins, in particular kraft lignin. A commercial pine wood Kraft lignin (Indulin AT) was solubilized instantaneously at room temperature and 7–11 bars autogeneous pressure, while a commercial mixed wheat straw/Sarkanda grass soda lignin (Protobind™ 1000) was solubilized within 3 h at ambient temperature, and 30 min at. 85 °C. Hydroxide salts...

  9. Global Ecological Pattern of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Huiluo Cao; Jean-Christophe Auguet; Ji-Dong Gu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The global distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which play a pivotal role in the nitrification process, has been confirmed through numerous ecological studies. Though newly available amoA (ammonia monooxygenase subunit A) gene sequences from new environments are accumulating rapidly in public repositories, a lack of information on the ecological and evolutionary factors shaping community assembly of AOA on the global scale is apparent. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We condu...

  10. HISTIDINE BIOTRANSFORMATION MEDIATED BY L-HISTIDINE-AMMONIA-LYASE

    OpenAIRE

    Borisova, G.; Bessonova, O.

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of the metabolism of the heterocyclic amino acid histidine exposed to the L-histidine ammonia-lyase enzyme has been investigated and the technology of extraction of histidine biotransformation products (urocanic acid and ammonia) from casein hydrolyzates enabling the subsequent use of these hydrolyzates as a milk protein concentrate for the production of specialized dietary products for the nutrition of histidinemia patients has been developed.

  11. Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia in Solid Electrolyte Cells

    OpenAIRE

    MichaelStoukides

    2014-01-01

    Developed in the early 1900s, the “Haber–Bosch” synthesis is the dominant NH3 synthesis process. Parallel to catalyst optimization, current research efforts are also focused on the investigation of new methods for ammonia synthesis, including the electrochemical synthesis with the use of solid electrolyte cells. Since the first report on Solid State Ammonia Synthesis (SSAS), more than 30 solid electrolyte materials were tested and at least 15 catalysts were used as working electrodes. Thus fa...

  12. Investigation on combustion of ammonia from coke-oven gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwiner, H.; Ulatowski, R.; Dziembala, F.; Wrobelska, K.; Bonk, M.

    1976-03-01

    Results are presented of research work performed on a pilot plant for combustion of ammonia from coke-oven gas. After being washed from gas and stripped in the stripping column, ammonia was burnt in a mixture with water vapor, hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in a combustion furnace designed by the Research Institute of Chemical Coal Utilization in Zabrze (Poland). Satisfactory results were achieved.

  13. Polarizable Interaction Model for Liquid, Supercritical, and Aqueous Ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orabi, Esam A; Lamoureux, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    A polarizable model for ammonia is optimized based on the ab initio properties of the NH3 molecule and the NH3-NH3 and NH3-H2O dimers calculated at the MP2 level. For larger (NH3)m, NH3(H2O)n, and H2O(NH3)n clusters (m = 2-7 and n = 1-4), the model yields structural and binding energies in good agreement with ab initio calculations without further adjustments. It also reproduces the structure, density, heat of vaporization, self-diffusion coefficient, heat capacity, and isothermal compressibility of liquid ammonia at the boiling point. The model is further validated by calculating some of these properties at various temperatures and pressures spanning the liquid and supercritical phases of the fluid (up to 700 K and 200 MPa). The excellent transferability of the model suggests that it can be used to investigate properties of fluid ammonia under conditions for which experiments are not easy to perform. For aqueous ammonia solutions, the model yields liquid structures and densities in good agreement with experimental data and allows the nonlinearity in the density-composition plot to be interpreted in terms of structural changes with composition. Finally, the model is used to investigate the solvation structure of ammonia in liquid water and of water in liquid ammonia and to calculate the solvation free energy of NH3 and H2O in aqueous ammonia as a function of solution composition and temperature. The simulation results suggest the presence of a transition around 50% molar NH3/H2O compositions, above which water molecules are preferably solvated by ammonia. PMID:26583551

  14. Plasma source ion implantation of ammonia into electroplated chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonia gas (NH3) has been used as a nitrogen source for plasma source ion implantation processing of electroplated chromium. No evidence was found of increased hydrogen concentrations in the bulk material, implying that ammonia can be used without risking hydrogen embrittlement. The retained nitrogen dose of 2.1 x 1017 N-at/cm2 is sufficient to increase the surface hardness of electroplated Cr by 24% and decrease the wear rate by a factor of 4

  15. Chromophores from photolyzed ammonia reacting with acetylene: Application to Jupiters Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert W.; Baines, Kevin H.; Anderson, M. S.; Filacchione, G.; Simon, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The high altitude of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) may enhance the upward flux of gaseous ammonia (NH3 ) into the high troposphere, where NH3 molecules can be photodissociated and initiate a chain of chemical reactions with downwelling acetylene molecules (C2H2 ). These reactions, experimentally studied earlier by (Ferris and Ishikawa [1987] Nature 326, 777-778) and (Ferris and Ishikawa [1988] J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 110, 4306-4312), produce chromophores that absorb in the visible and ultraviolet regions. In this work we photolyzed mixtures of NH3 and C2H2 using ultraviolet radiation with a wavelength of 214 nm and measured the spectral transmission of the deposited films in the visible region (400-740 nm). From these transmission data we estimated the imaginary indices of refraction. Assuming that ammonia grains at the top of the GRS clouds are coated with this material, we performed layered sphere and radiative transfer calculations to predict GRS reflection spectra. Comparison of those results with observed and previously unreported Cassini visible spectra and with true-color images of the GRS show that the unknown GRS chromophore is spectrally consistent with the coupled NH3-C2H2 photochemical products produced in our laboratory experiments. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy we infer that the chromophore-containing residue is composed of aliphatic azine, azo, and diazo compounds.

  16. Open-path, quantum cascade laser-based sensor for high resolution atmospheric ammonia measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Miller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a compact, open-path, quantum cascade laser-based atmospheric ammonia sensor operating at 9.06 μm for high sensitivity, high temporal resolution, ground-based measurements. Atmospheric ammonia (NH3 is a gas-phase precursor to fine particulate matter, with implications for air quality and climate change. Currently, NH3 sensing challenges have led to a lack of widespread in-situ measurements. Our open-path sensor configuration avoids sampling artifacts associated with NH3 surface adsorption onto inlet tubing and reduced pressure sampling cells, as well as condensed-phase partitioning ambiguities. Multi-harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy allows for selective and sensitive detection of atmospheric-pressure broadened absorption features. An in-line ethylene reference cell provides real-time calibration (±20% accuracy and normalization for instrument drift under rapidly changing field conditions. The sensor has a sensitivity and minimum detection limit of 0.15 ppbv NH3 at 10 Hz, a mass of ~ 5 kg and consumes ~ 50 W of electrical power. In-situ field performance of this open-path NH3 sensor is demonstrated, with 10 Hz time resolution and a large dynamic response for in-situ NH3 measurements. This sensor provides the capabilities for improved in-situ gas phase NH3 sensing relevant for emission source characterization and flux measurements.

  17. Chromophores from photolyzed ammonia reacting with acetylene: Application to Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Baines, K. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Filacchione, G.; Simon, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high altitude of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) may enhance the upward flux of gaseous ammonia (NH3) into the high troposphere, where NH3 molecules can be photodissociated and initiate a chain of chemical reactions with downwelling acetylene molecules (C2H2). These reactions, experimentally studied earlier by (Ferris and Ishikawa [1987] Nature 326, 777-778) and (Ferris and Ishikawa [1988] J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 110, 4306-4312), produce chromophores that absorb in the visible and ultraviolet regions. In this work we photolyzed mixtures of NH3 and C2H2 using ultraviolet radiation with a wavelength of 214 nm and measured the spectral transmission of the deposited films in the visible region (400-740 nm). From these transmission data we estimated the imaginary indices of refraction. Assuming that ammonia grains at the top of the GRS clouds are coated with this material, we performed layered sphere and radiative transfer calculations to predict GRS reflection spectra. Comparison of those results with observed and previously unreported Cassini visible spectra and with true-color images of the GRS show that the unknown GRS chromophore is spectrally consistent with the coupled NH3-C2H2 photochemical products produced in our laboratory experiments. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy we infer that the chromophore-containing residue is composed of aliphatic azine, azo, and diazo compounds.

  18. Thaumarchaeal Ammonia Oxidation in an Acidic Forest Peat Soil Is Not Influenced by Ammonium Amendment▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Stopnišek, Nejc; Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Höfferle, Špela; Nicol, Graeme W.; Mandič-Mulec, Ines; Prosser, James I.

    2010-01-01

    Both bacteria and thaumarchaea contribute to ammonia oxidation, the first step in nitrification. The abundance of putative ammonia oxidizers is estimated by quantification of the functional gene amoA, which encodes ammonia monooxygenase subunit A. In soil, thaumarchaeal amoA genes often outnumber the equivalent bacterial genes. Ecophysiological studies indicate that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers may have a selective advantage at low ammonia concentrations, with potential adaptation to soils...

  19. An engineered pathway for glyoxylate metabolism in tobacco plants aimed to avoid the release of ammonia in photorespiration

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho Josirley de FC; Madgwick Pippa J; Powers Stephen J; Keys Alfred J; Lea Peter J; Parry Martin AJ

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle in C3 plants involves an extensive diversion of carbon and nitrogen away from the direct pathways of assimilation. The liberated ammonia is re-assimilated, but up to 25% of the carbon may be released into the atmosphere as CO2. Because of the loss of CO2 and high energy costs, there has been considerable interest in attempts to decrease the flux through the cycle in C3 plants. Transgenic tobacco plants were generated that contained the g...

  20. [Isolation of heterotrophic nitrifiers which can tolerate high concentration of ammonia-nitrogen and the optimization of their nitrogen removal efficiency in wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Wen-Gong; Lü, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Chao

    2011-11-01

    The removal capabilities and tolerance of high concentration of ammonia-nitrogen of heterotrophic nitrifiers were studied. Methods included multi-point sampling, domestication, gradient dilution of domestication liquid, color indicator as rapid nitrification detection and isolation from streaking plate were conducted to screen heterotrophic nitrifiers. The strains were identified according to the sequence analysis of 16S rDNA. After inoculating the strains into ammonia-nitrogen wastewater, changes of nitrogen compounds were measured in order to understand their denitrification characteristics. The denitrification efficiency was optimized by improving the C/N ratio, changing the compatibility of the strains and mixing the compatible strains with the domesticated bacterial suspension. Finally 8 high-efficiency heterotrohic nitrifiers were obtained, and named as N1-N8 respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 8 strains belonged to Comamonas genus, Rhodococcus genus, Pseudomonos genus, Arthrobacter genus and Paracoccus genus, respectively. When the initial concentration of ammonia nitrogen was 256.9 mg x L(-1) and the C/N was 5.5 of the artificial wastewater, the removal rates of ammonia nitrogen by the strains were about 65%-80%, and the stain N4 was the best. When the C/N ratio of the wastewater increased to 8.0, the ammonia nitrogen removal rates of the strains correspondingly increased to about 80% -90%. As the strains compatibility, the denitrification rate of N4 + N5 + N6 was 88.2% in the artificial wastewater with initial ammonia nitrogen concentration was 261.1 mg x L(-1) and initial C/N ratio was 5.5, which was higher than that of any single strain. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate could reach to 99.8% when N4 + N5 + N6 were combined with the domesticated bacterial suspension. In the artificial wastewater, when the initial ammonia nitrogen increased to 446.9 mg x L(-1) and the C/N ratio decreased to 3.2, the ammonia nitrogen removal rate of the mixed

  1. Interorgan ammonia metabolism in health and disease: a surgeon's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souba, W W

    1987-01-01

    Ammonia is a toxic molecule that is the principal by-product of amino acid metabolism. Although the transport of ammonia in a nontoxic form protects the brain against high circulating levels, the interorgan transport of this molecule and the orchestration between tissues that has evolved is related primarily to the fact that the nitrogen molecule is an essential molecule for the maintenance of the body's nutrition economy and overall metabolic homeostasis. Efficient handling and disposal of ammonia requires a cooperative effort between tissues in order to maintain nitrogen homeostasis. The liver is the central organ of ammonia metabolism, but other organs also play a key role in the interorgan exchange of this molecule. Alterations in ammonia metabolism occur during critical illness. These changes are adaptive and are designed to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Interorgan cooperation in ammonia metabolism is necessary to insure the proper integration of the metabolic processes which contribute to and are essential for survival during critical illness. An understanding of these processes improves our knowledge of metabolic regulation and will lead to a rational approach to the nutritional and metabolic support provided to critically ill patients. PMID:3323556

  2. Cerebral ammonia uptake and accumulation during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Dalsgaard, Mads K.; Steensberg, Adam;

    2005-01-01

    blood flow; n = 5) and the ammonia concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; n = 8) at rest and immediately following prolonged exercise either with or without glucose supplementation. There was a net balance of ammonia across the brain at rest and at 30 min of exercise, whereas 3 h of exercise...... elicited an uptake of 3.7 ± 1.3 µmol min-1 (mean ± S.E.M.) in the placebo trial and 2.5 ± 1.0 µmol min-1 in the glucose trial (P < 0.05 compared to rest, not different across trials). At rest, CSF ammonia was below the detection limit of 2 µM in all subjects, but it increased to 5.3 ± 1.1 µM following......We evaluated whether peripheral ammonia production during prolonged exercise enhances the uptake and subsequent accumulation of ammonia within the brain. Two studies determined the cerebral uptake of ammonia (arterial and jugular venous blood sampling combined with Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebral...

  3. The Green Bank Ammonia Survey: Initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Friesen, Rachel; and the GBT Ammonia Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    The past several years have seen a tremendous advancement in our ability to characterize the structure of nearby molecular clouds and the substructures in which dense star-forming cores are born. These advances include identifying and classifying the young protostellar population (Spitzer c2d and Gould Belt surveys) and the dense cores and larger filaments and clumps which form the cores and YSOs (Herschel and JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Surveys). The power of these legacy surveys lies in the large areal coverage and consistency in observing strategies between nearby molecular clouds. A major gap in the present data is a comparable survey to characterize the dense gas properties. Kinematics and gas temperatures are key to understanding the history and future fate of star-forming material, and these are not accessible from the primarily continuum-based measurements in the legacy surveys described above. We have begun an ambitious legacy survey for the GBT, the Green Bank Ammonia Survey (GAS), to map NH3 emission toward all the northern Gould Belt star forming regions where Av > 7. The Gould Belt is a ring of young stars and star-forming regions that contains nearly all the ongoing, predominantly low-mass star formation within 500 pc of the Sun. Here we present the initial results from the survey.

  4. Spectrochemistry of solutions—XVIII. Infrared spectroscopy of solutions of electrolytes in liquid ammonia: A new pressure cell and its use in the quantitative determination of thiocyanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Peter; Gill, J. Bernard; MacInnes, Yvonne M.; Reyner, Colin

    A cell and solution handling system is described which enables i.r. spectra to be obtained for solutions in liquid ammonia, or other condensed gases, at pressures in excess of atmospheric at ambient temperature. Its use, together with a ratio-recording spectrometer, in obtaining quantitative spectroscopic data from dilute solutions of sodium thiocyanate in liquid ammonia by computer subtractions of solution and solvent spectra is illustrated. The applicability of the procedure to high quality determinations of the concentrations of dissolved solutes is demonstrated.

  5. Low-ammonia niche of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in rotating biological contactors of a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    OpenAIRE

    Sauder, L.A.; Peterse, F.; Schouten, S; Neufeld, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    The first step of nitrification is catalysed by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), but physicochemical controls on the relative abundance and function of these two groups are not yet fully understood, especially in freshwater environments. This study investigated ammonia-oxidizing populations in nitrifying rotating biological contactors (RBCs) from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Individual RBC stages are arranged in series, with nitrification at each stage creat...

  6. High-resolution ammonia mapping of the very young protostellar core Chamaeleon-MMS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisälä, M. S.; Harju, J.; Mantere, M. J.; Miettinen, O.; Sault, R. S.; Walmsley, C. M.; Whiteoak, J. B.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the structure and kinematics of the nearby candidate first hydrostatic core Cha-MMS1. Methods: Cha-MMS1 was mapped in the NH3(1,1) line and the 1.2 cm continuum using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The angular resolution of the ATCA observations is 7″ (~1000 AU), and the velocity resolution is 50 m s-1. The core was also mapped with the 64 m Parkes Telescope in the NH3(1,1) and (2,2) lines. Observations from Herschel Space Observatory and Spitzer Space Telescope were used to help interpretation. The ammonia spectra were analysed using Gaussian fits to the hyperfine structure. A two-layer model was applied in the central parts of the core where the ATCA spectra show signs of self-absorption. Results: A compact high column density core with a steep velocity gradient (~20 km s-1 pc-1) is detected in ammonia. We derive a high gas density (~106 cm-3) in this region, and a fractional ammonia abundance compatible with determinations towards other dense cores (~10-8). This suggests that the age of the high density core is comparable to the freeze-out timescale of ammonia in these conditions, on the order of 104 years. The direction of the velocity gradient agrees with previous single-dish observations, and the overall velocity distribution can be interpreted as rotation. The rotation axis goes through the position of a compact far-infrared source detected by Spitzer and Herschel. The specific angular momentum of the core, ~10-3km s-1 pc, is typical for protostellar envelopes. A string of 1.2 cm continuum sources is tentatively detected near the rotation axis. The ammonia spectra suggest the presence of warm embedded gas in its vicinity. An hourglass-shaped structure is seen in ammonia at the cloud's average LSR velocity, also aligned with the rotation axis. Although this structure resembles a pair of outflow lobes the ammonia spectra show no indications of shocked gas. Conclusions: The observed ammonia

  7. Ammonia regeneration for a combined lime/ammonia spray dryer for SO{sub 2} control. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinjian, Yang [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1992-12-23

    A research project designed to study the feasibility of ammonia regeneration for a combined lime/ammonia FGD process was conducted at the University of Cincinnati. The major objective for this project was to regenerate ammonia from a combined ammonia/calcium hydroxide spray dryer FGD byproduct for reuse which would reduce the operating cost of this FGD process. This final report covers the six phases of the project: (1) generation of original feedstock, (2) batch regeneration studies, (3) continuous regeneration studies, (4) waste characteristic analysis, (5) pilot scale demonstration and (6) economic analysis. This research has shown that regeneration of ammonia is feasible at a reasonable cost. The effects on Ohio coal use from the results of this research could be substantial, depending on the Phase II application of FGD systems for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions. In conclusion, experiments in this study have shown that ammonia recovery efficiencies greater than 90% are technically and economically feasible. In addition, the sludge produced from the regeneration process is stable and will meet existing Federal standards.

  8. Directed flux motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  9. Applying an Inverse Model to Estimate Ammonia Emissions at Cattle Feedlots Using Three Different Observation-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Nash, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately quantifying emissions of ammonia (NH3) from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is vital not only to the livestock industry, but essential to understanding nitrogen cycling along the Front Range of Colorado, USA, where intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, and pristine ecosystems (e.g., Rocky Mtn Nat'l Park) lie within 100-km of each other. Most observation-based techniques for estimating NH3 emissions can be expensive and highly technical. Many methods rely on concentration observations on location, which implicitly depends on weather conditions. A system for sampling NH3 using on-site weather data was developed to allow remote measurement of NH3 in a simple, cost-effective way. These systems use passive diffusive cartridges (Radiello, Sigma-Aldrich) that provide time-averaged concentrations representative of a typical two-week deployment. Cartridge exposure is robotically managed so they are only visible when winds are 1.4 m/s or greater from the direction of the CAFO. These concentration data can be coupled with stability parameters (measured on-site) in a simple inverse model to estimate emissions (FIDES, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures). Few studies have directly compared emissions estimates of NH3 using concentration data obtained from multiple measurement systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, in the summer and autumn of 2014, several conditional sampler systems were deployed at a 25,000-head cattle feedlot concomitant with an open-path infrared laser (GasFinder2, Boreal Laser Inc.) and a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) (G1103, Picarro Inc.) which each measured instantaneous NH3 concentrations. This study will test the sampler technology by first comparing concentration data from the three different methods. In livestock research, it is common to estimate NH3 emissions by using such instantaneous data in a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model (WindTrax, Thunder Beach Sci.) Considering this, NH3 fluxes

  10. Statistical modelling of variability in sediment-water nutrient and oxygen fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpetti, Natalia; Witte, Ursula; Heath, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Organic detritus entering, or produced, in the marine environment is re-mineralised to inorganic nutrient in the seafloor sediments. The flux of dissolved inorganic nutrient between the sediment and overlying water column is a key process in the marine ecosystem, which binds the biogeochemical sub-system to the living food web. These fluxes are potentially affected by a wide range of physical and biological factors and disentangling these is a significant challenge. Here we develop a set of General Additive Models (GAM) of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, phosphate, silicate and oxygen fluxes, based on a year-long campaign of field measurements off the north-east coast of Scotland. We show that sediment grain size, turbidity due to sediment re-suspension, temperature, and biogenic matter content were the key factors affecting oxygen consumption, ammonia and silicate fluxes. However, phosphate fluxes were only related to suspended sediment concentrations, whilst nitrate fluxes showed no clear relationship to any of the expected drivers of change, probably due to the effects of denitrification. Our analyses show that the stoichiometry of nutrient regeneration in the ecosystem is not necessarily constant and may be affected by combinations of processes. We anticipate that our statistical modelling results will form the basis for testing the functionality of process-based mathematical models of whole-sediment biogeochemistry.

  11. Effect of including corner point fluxes on the pin power reconstruction using nodal point flux scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Including corner fluxes improve pin power reconstruction. • The maximum errors in pin power reconstruction occur in the peripheral water region. • The errors are significantly less in the fuel region. • MSS predictions for corner pin flux are preferable. - Abstract: Although there have been well established transport based codes for core neutronics analysis, it is yet impractical to implement them in the real core treatment because their performance is not so great on ordinary server computers. For this reason, most of neutronics codes for core calculation are subject to two steps calculation procedure which consists of homogenized group constant generation and flux distribution generation which is the main concern of this work. This paper brings out a 2 dimensional nodal code based on point flux algorithm and implements two schemes for pin power reconstruction. In the first scheme, pin power reconstruction is obtained without considering corner point fluxes in the fuel assemblies but in the second method corner fluxes are included to assess their effect on pin power reconstruction. To obtain corner point fluxes, Smith’s procedure and the method of successive smoothing are used. Improvement in pin power reconstruction by including fuel assembly corner fluxes is illustrated in this paper and assessed by Monte Carlo simulation

  12. The influence of gas-particle partitioning and surface-atmosphere exchange on ammonia during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology study (BAQS-Met was an intensive field campaign conducted in Southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2007. The focus of BAQS-Met was determining the causes of the formation of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5, and of the regional significance of trans-boundary transport and lake breeze circulations on that formation. Fast (1 Hz measurements of ammonia were acquired using a Quantum Cascade Laser Tunable Infrared Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS at the Harrow supersite. Measurements of PM2.5 ammonium, sulfate and nitrate were made using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC with hourly time resolution. The median mixing ratio of ammonia was 2.5 ppb, with occasional high spikes at night resulting from local emissions. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions of NH3, diurnal profiles and gas-particle partitioning. The measurements were compared with results from A Unified Regional Air-quality Modelling System (AURAMS. While the fraction of total ammonia (NHx≡NH3 + NH4+ observed in the gas phase peaks between 0.1 and 0.8, AURAMS tended to predict fractions of either less than 0.05 or greater than 0.8. The model frequently predicted acidic aerosol, in contrast with observations wherein NHx almost always exceeded the observed equivalents of sulfate. One explanation for our observations is that the net flux of ammonia from the land surface to the atmosphere increases when aerosol sulfate is present, effectively buffering the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, a process not included in the model. A simple representation of an offline bi-directional flux parameterization using the ISORROPIA thermodynamic model was successful at reducing the population of zero gas fraction points, but not the higher gas fraction points.

  13. Ammonia thermometry of star-forming galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a goal toward deriving the physical conditions in external galaxies, we present a study of the ammonia (NH3) emission and absorption in a sample of star-forming systems. Using the unique sensitivities to kinetic temperature afforded by the excitation characteristics of several inversion transitions of NH3, we have continued our characterization of the dense gas in star-forming galaxies by measuring the kinetic temperature in a sample of 23 galaxies and one galaxy offset position selected for their high infrared luminosity. We derive kinetic temperatures toward 13 galaxies, 9 of which possess multiple kinetic temperature and/or velocity components. Eight of these galaxies exhibit kinetic temperatures >100 K, which are in many cases at least a factor of two larger than kinetic temperatures derived previously. Furthermore, the derived kinetic temperatures in our galaxy sample, which are in many cases at least a factor of two larger than derived dust temperatures, point to a problem with the common assumption that dust and gas kinetic temperatures are equivalent. As previously suggested, the use of dust emission at wavelengths greater than 160 μm to derive dust temperatures, or dust heating from older stellar populations, may be skewing derived dust temperatures in these galaxies to lower values. We confirm the detection of high-excitation OH 2Π3/2 J = 9/2 absorption toward Arp 220. We also report the first detections of non-metastable NH3 inversion transitions toward external galaxies in the (2,1) (NGC 253, NGC 660, IC 342, and IC 860), (3,1), (3,2), (4,3), (5,4) (all in NGC 660), and (10,9) (Arp 220) transitions.

  14. Aeronet Solar Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  15. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  16. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  17. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  18. Habitat-associated phylogenetic community patterns of microbial ammonia oxidizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Fernàndez-Guerra

    Full Text Available Microorganisms mediating ammonia oxidation play a fundamental role in the connection between biological nitrogen fixation and anaerobic nitrogen losses. Bacteria and Archaea ammonia oxidizers (AOB and AOA, respectively have colonized similar habitats worldwide. Ammonia oxidation is the rate-limiting step in nitrification, and the ammonia monooxygenase (Amo is the key enzyme involved. The molecular ecology of this process has been extensively explored by surveying the gene of the subunit A of the Amo (amoA gene. In the present study, we explored the phylogenetic community ecology of AOB and AOA, analyzing 5776 amoA gene sequences from >300 isolation sources, and clustering habitats by environmental ontologies. As a whole, phylogenetic richness was larger in AOA than in AOB, and sediments contained the highest phylogenetic richness whereas marine plankton the lowest. We also observed that freshwater ammonia oxidizers were phylogenetically richer than their marine counterparts. AOA communities were more dissimilar to each other than those of AOB, and consistent monophyletic lineages were observed for sediments, soils, and marine plankton in AOA but not in AOB. The diversification patterns showed a more constant cladogenesis through time for AOB whereas AOA apparently experienced two fast diversification events separated by a long steady-state episode. The diversification rate (γ statistic for most of the habitats indicated γ(AOA > γ(AOB. Soil and sediment experienced earlier bursts of diversification whereas habitats usually eutrophic and rich in ammonium such as wastewater and sludge showed accelerated diversification rates towards the present. Overall, this work shows for the first time a global picture of the phylogenetic community structure of both AOB and AOA assemblages following the strictest analytical standards, and provides an ecological view on the differential evolutionary paths experienced by widespread ammonia

  19. Relation of middle molecules levels and oxidative stress to erythropoietin requirements in high-flux versus low-flux hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala S El-Wakil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the serum beta-2-microglobulin (B2MG and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP as middle molecule uremic toxins and protein carbonyl (PCO as oxidative stress marker in uremic patients undergoing high-flux versus low-flux hemodialysis (HD and to correlate their levels to the erythropoietin requirements for those patients. Twenty patients on chronic low-flux HD were recruited in the study. At the start of the study, all patients underwent high-flux HD for eight weeks, followed by low-flux HD for two weeks as a washout period. The patients were then subjected to another eight weeks of low-flux HD. Blood samples were obtained at the beginning and at the end of the high-flux period and the low-flux period. The mean erythropoietin dose for patients using high-flux HD was significantly lower than that for low-flux HD (P = 0.0062. Post-high flux, the B2MG and PCO levels were significantly lower than the pre-high-flux levels (P = 0.026 and 0.0005, respectively, but no significant change was observed in AOPP (P = 0.68. Post-low flux, the B2MG, AOPP and PCO were significantly higher than the pre-low-flux levels (P = 0.0002, 0.021 and <0.0001, respectively. Post-low flux, the B2MG and PCO were significantly higher than the post-high-flux levels (P <0.0001, but no significant difference was observed in AOPP (P = 0.11. High-flux HD results in reduction of some of the middle molecule toxins and PCO levels better than low-flux HD, and is associated with a better response to erythropoietin.

  20. Flux Emergence (Theory)

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Hiroaki Isobe

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field) in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  1. Flux Emergence (Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. M. Cheung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  2. Path integral Liouville dynamics: Applications to infrared spectra of OH, water, ammonia, and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Path integral Liouville dynamics (PILD) is applied to vibrational dynamics of several simple but representative realistic molecular systems (OH, water, ammonia, and methane). The dipole-derivative autocorrelation function is employed to obtain the infrared spectrum as a function of temperature and isotopic substitution. Comparison to the exact vibrational frequency shows that PILD produces a reasonably accurate peak position with a relatively small full width at half maximum. PILD offers a potentially useful trajectory-based quantum dynamics approach to compute vibrational spectra of molecular systems

  3. Path integral Liouville dynamics: Applications to infrared spectra of OH, water, ammonia, and methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: jianliupku@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Zhijun [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-01-21

    Path integral Liouville dynamics (PILD) is applied to vibrational dynamics of several simple but representative realistic molecular systems (OH, water, ammonia, and methane). The dipole-derivative autocorrelation function is employed to obtain the infrared spectrum as a function of temperature and isotopic substitution. Comparison to the exact vibrational frequency shows that PILD produces a reasonably accurate peak position with a relatively small full width at half maximum. PILD offers a potentially useful trajectory-based quantum dynamics approach to compute vibrational spectra of molecular systems.

  4. Path integral Liouville dynamics: Applications to infrared spectra of OH, water, ammonia, and methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-21

    Path integral Liouville dynamics (PILD) is applied to vibrational dynamics of several simple but representative realistic molecular systems (OH, water, ammonia, and methane). The dipole-derivative autocorrelation function is employed to obtain the infrared spectrum as a function of temperature and isotopic substitution. Comparison to the exact vibrational frequency shows that PILD produces a reasonably accurate peak position with a relatively small full width at half maximum. PILD offers a potentially useful trajectory-based quantum dynamics approach to compute vibrational spectra of molecular systems. PMID:26801034

  5. An optimized and simplified method for analysing urea and ammonia in freshwater aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bodil Katrine; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2015-01-01

    without addition of a buffer. A number of tests were performed on water samples obtained from a commercial rainbow trout farm to determine the optimal urease concentration and time for complete hydrolysis. One mL of water sample was spiked with 1.3 mL urea at three different concentrations: 50 lg L 1, 100.......6–101% recovery of urea-N in samples spiked with 100 or 200 lg L 1 urea-N. The level of accurate quantification of ammonia using the method is 50 lg L 1 NH4 +-N, and the detection level is 5–10 lg L 1 NH4 +-N...

  6. An alternative method for the measurement of neutron flux

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupa Sarkar; Prasanna Kumar Mondal; Barun Kumar Chatterjee

    2015-10-01

    A simple and easy method for measuring the neutron flux is presented. This paper deals with the experimental verification of neutron dose rate–flux relationship for a non-dissipative medium. Though the neutron flux cannot be obtained from the dose rate in a dissipative medium, experimental result shows that for non-dissipative medium one can obtain the neutron flux from dose rate. We have used a 241 AmBe neutron source for neutron irradiation, and the neutron dose rate and count rate were measured using a NM2B neutron monitor and R-12 superheated droplet detector (SDD), respectively. Here, the neutron flux inferred from the neutron count rate obtained with R-12 SDD shows an excellent agreement with the flux inferred from the neutron dose rate in a non-dissipative medium.

  7. An alternative method for the measurement of neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and easy method for measuring the neutron flux is presented. This paper deals with the experimental verification of neutron dose rate-flux relationship for a non-dissipative medium. Though the neutron flux cannot be obtained from the dose rate in a dissipative medium, experimental result shows that for non-dissipative medium one can obtain the neutron flux from dose rate. We have used a 241AmBe neutron source for neutron irradiation, and the neutron dose rate and count rate were measured using a NM2B neutron monitor and R-12 superheated droplet detector (SDD), respectively. Here, the neutron flux inferred from the neutron count rate obtained with R-12 SDD shows an excellent agreement with the flux inferred from the neutron dose rate in a non-dissipative medium. (author)

  8. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States); Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  9. [The Research for Trace Ammonia Escape Monitoring System Based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-fang; Wang, Fei; Yu, Li-bin; Yan, Jian-hua; Cen, Ke-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to on-line measure the trace ammonia slip of the commercial power plant in the future, this research seeks to measure the trace ammonia by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy under ambient temperature and pressure, and at different temperatures, and the measuring temperature is about 650 K in the power plant. In recent years lasers have become commercially available in the near-infrared where the transitions are much stronger, and ammonia's spectroscopy is pretty complicated and the overlapping lines are difficult to resolve. A group of ammonia transitions near 4 433.5 cm(-1) in the v2 +v3 combination band have been thoroughly selected for detecting lower concentration by analyzing its absorption characteristic and considering other absorption interference in combustion gases where H2O and CO2 mole fraction are very large. To illustrate the potential for NH3 concentration measurements, predictions for NH3, H2O and CO2 are simultaneously simulated, NH3 absorption lines near 4 433.5 cm(-1) wavelength meet weaker H2O absorption than the commercial NH3 lines, and there is almost no CO2 absorption, all the parameters are based on the HITRAN database, and an improved detection limit was obtained for interference-free NH3 monitoring, this 2.25 μm band has line strengths several times larger than absorption lines in the 1.53 μm band which was often used by NH3 sensors for emission monitoring and analyzing. The measurement system was developed with a new Herriott cell and a heated gas cell realizing fast absorption measurements of high resolution, and combined with direct absorption and wavelenguh modulation based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The lorentzian line shape is dominant at ambient temperature and pressure, and the estimated detectivity is approximately 0.225 x 10(-6) (SNR = 1) for the directed absorption spectroscopy, assuming a noise-equivalent absorbance of 1 x 10(-4). The heated cell

  10. Extraction of molybdenum and vanadium from the spent diesel exhaust catalyst by ammonia leaching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mo and V were extracted from spent diesel exhaust catalyst by ammonia leaching method. • Effects of leaching parameters on the extraction of Mo and V were studied in detail. • The extraction efficiencies of Mo and V could reach 94.96% and 39.73%. • The leaching solution and the residue can be reused for preparing new catalyst. - Abstract: Molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) were effectively extracted from the spent diesel exhaust catalyst (V2O5–MoO3/TiO2) by using an ammonia leaching method. Meanwhile, the structure of the spent catalyst carrier (TiO2) was not destroyed and might be reused. The effects of ammonia (NH3·H2O) concentration, leaching temperature and time, concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and liquid to solid ratio on the extraction of Mo and V were systematically investigated. It is shown that the extraction efficiency of Mo increased from 68.68% to 96.45% while the extraction efficiency of V remained stable at 27% with increasing ammonia concentration from 2.95 to 7.38 mol/L, leaching temperature from 298.15 to 473.15 K, and reaction time from 1 to 8 h. With the concentration of H2O2 solution increasing from 1.0 to 2.5 mol/L, the extraction efficiency of V increased from 26.87% to 39.73%. Under the optimum conditions (the ammonia concentration of 4.5 mol/L, leaching temperature of 413.15 K, reaction time of 2 h, the H2O2 solution concentration of 1.0 mol/L and the liquid to solid ratio of 20/1 mL/g), the extraction efficiencies of Mo and V reached 95.13% and 46.25%. Moreover, the catalyst carrier TiO2 with anatase crystal phase was also obtained

  11. Heat flux anomalies in Antarctica revealed from satellite magnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maule, Cathrine Fox; Purucker, Michael E.; Olsen, Nils;

    2005-01-01

    The geothermal heat flux is an important factor in the dynamics of ice sheets; it affects the occurrence of subglacial lakes, the onset of ice streams, and mass losses from the ice sheet base. Because direct heat flux measurements in ice-covered regions are difficult to obtain, we developed a...... method that uses satellite magnetic data to estimate the heat flux underneath the Antarctic ice sheet. We found that the heat flux underneath the ice sheet varies from 40 to 185 megawatts per square meter and that areas of high heat flux coincide with known current volcanism and some areas known to have...

  12. Quasi-one-dimensional intermittent flux behavior in superconducting films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qviller, A. J.; Yurchenko, V. V.; Galperin, Y. M.;

    2012-01-01

    the applied field is gradually increased, magneto-optical imaging reveals that flux penetrates via numerous quasi-one-dimensional jumps. The distribution of flux avalanche sizes follows a power law, and data collapse is obtained by finite-size scaling, with the depth of the flux front used as...... crossover length. The intermittent behavior shows no threshold value in the applied field, in contrast to conventional flux jumping. The results strongly suggest that the quasi-one-dimensional flux jumps are of a different nature than the thermomagnetic dendritic (branching) avalanches that are commonly...

  13. Branched-chain amino acids increase arterial blood ammonia in spite of enhanced intrinsic muscle ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord; Ott, Peter; Buhl, Mads; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby; Schousboe, Arne; Møller, Niels; Sørensen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in attempts to reduce blood ammonia in patients with cirrhosis and intermittent hepatic encephalopathy based on the hypothesis that BCAA stimulate muscle ammonia detoxification. We studied the effects of an oral dose of BCAA on the skeletal muscle...... metabolism of ammonia and amino acids in 14 patients with cirrhosis and in 7 healthy subjects by combining [(13)N]ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) of the thigh muscle with measurements of blood flow and arteriovenous (A-V) concentrations of ammonia and amino acids. PET was used to measure the...

  14. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  15. Dynamics of ammonia exchange with cut grassland: synthesis of results and conclusions of the GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sutton

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Improved data on biosphere-atmosphere exchange are fundamental to understanding the production and fate of ammonia (NH3 in the atmosphere. The GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment combined novel measurement and modelling approaches to provide the most comprehensive analysis of the interactions to date. Major inter-comparisons of micrometeorological parameters and NH3 flux measurements using the aerodynamic gradient method and relaxed eddy accumulation (REA were conducted. These showed close agreement, though the REA systems proved insufficiently precise to investigate vertical flux divergence. Grassland management had a large effect on fluxes: emissions increased after grass cutting (−50 to 700 ng m−2 s−1 NH3 and after N-fertilization (0 to 3800 ng m−2 s−1 compared with before the cut (−60 to 40 ng m−2 s−1.

    Effects of advection and air chemistry were investigated using horizontal NH3 profiles, acid gas and particle flux measurements. Inverse modelling of NH3 emission from an experimental farm agreed closely with inventory estimates, while advection errors were used to correct measured grassland fluxes. Advection effects were caused both by the farm and by emissions from the field, with an inverse dispersion-deposition model providing a reliable new approach to estimate net NH3 fluxes. Effects of aerosol chemistry on net NH3 fluxes were small, while the measurements allowed NH3-induced particle growth rates to be calculated and aerosol fluxes to be corrected.

    Bioassays estimated the emission potential Γ = [NH4+]/[H+] for different plant pools, with the apoplast having the smallest values (30–1000. The main within-canopy sources of NH3 emission appeared to be leaf litter and the soil surface, with Γ up to 3 million and

  16. Artificial intelligent methods for thermodynamic evaluation of ammonia-water refrigeration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, Linear Regression and M5'Rules models within Data Mining Process and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for thermodynamic evaluation of ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems was carried out. A new formulation based on ANN model is presented for the analysis of ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems (AWRS) because the optimal result was obtained by using ANN Model. Thermodynamic analysis of the AWRS is very complex because of analytic functions used for calculating the properties of fluid couples and simulation programs. Therefore, it is extremely difficult to perform analysis of this system. COP and f are estimated depending on the temperatures of system component and concentration values. Using the weights obtained from the trained network a new formulation is presented for the calculation of the COP and f; the use of ANN is proliferating with high speed in simulation. The R 2-values obtained when unknown data were used to the networks was 0.9996 and 0.9873 for the circulation ratio and COP respectively which is very satisfactory. The use of this new formulation, which can be employed with any programming language or spreadsheet program for the estimation of the circulation ratio and COP of AWRS, as described in this paper, may make the use of dedicated ANN software unnecessary

  17. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence

  18. Ammonia disinfection of corn grains intended for ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Broda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial contamination is an ongoing problem for commercial bioethanol plants. It concerns factories using grain and also other raw materials for ethanol fermentation. Bacteria compete with precious yeasts for sugar substrates and micronutrients, secrete lactic and acetic acids, which are toxic for yeast and this competition leads to significant decrease of bioethanol productivity. For this study, bacterial contamination of corn grain was examined. Then the grain was treated by ammonia solution to reduce microbial pollution and after that the microbiological purity of grain was tested one more time. Disinfected and non-disinfected corn grains were ground and fermentation process was performed. Microbiological purity of this process and ethanol yield was checked out. Material and methods. The grain was disinfected by ammonia solution for two weeks. Then the grain was milled and used as a raw material for the ethanol fermentation. The fermentation process was carried out in 500-ml Erlenmeyer flasks. Samples were withdrawn for analysis at 0, 24, 48, 72 hrs. The number of total viable bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, anaerobic bacteria and the quantity of yeasts and moulds were signified by plate method. Results. Ammonia solution effectively reduces bacterial contamination of corn grain. Mash from grain disinfected by ammonia contains less undesirable microorganisms than mash from crude grain. Moreover, ethanol yield from disinfected grain is at the highest level. Conclusions. The ammonia solution proved to be a good disinfection agent for grain used as a raw material for bioethanol fermentation process.

  19. Hydrothermal oxidation of ammonia/organic waste mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal oxidation is a promising new technology for the treatment of radioactive contaminated hazardous organic wastes. Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently evaluating this technology for the U. S. Department of Energy. In this paper, we present experimental results from the study of the hydrothermal oxidation of an ammonia/alcohol/uranium waste mixture. The use of a co-oxidant system consisting of hydrogen peroxide combined with nitrate is discussed. Experiments demonstrate near complete destruction of ammonia and organic compounds at 500 degrees C, 38 MPa, and 50 seconds reaction time. The ammonia and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in a waste simulant is reduced from 8,500 mg/L of ammonia and 12,500 mg/L TOC to 30 mg/L ammonia and less than 10 mg/L TOC. The major reaction products are CO2, N2, and a small amount of N2O. Comparison experiments with nitrate and hydrogen peroxide used individually show the advantage of the co-oxidant system

  20. Fast responsive, optical trace level ammonia sensor for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Tobias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ammonia is a ubiquitous chemical substance which is created in technical and biological processes and harmful to many different organisms. One specific problem is the toxicity of ammonia in fish at levels of 25 μg/l - a very common issue in today’s aqua culture. In this study we report a development of a fast responsive, optical ammonia sensor for trace concentrations. Results Different hydrogels have been investigated as host polymers for a pH based sensing mechanism based on fluorescent dyes. A porous hydrophobic fluoropolymer membrane was used as an ion barrier cover layer to achieve a good ammonia permeability. The sensor’s sensitivity towards ammonia as well as crosssensitivity towards pH-value and salinity, and the temperature dependency have been determined. Two different methods to reference fluorescence signals have been employed to eliminate intensity-based measurement drawbacks. Conclusion The presented sensor features high sensitivity and a fast response even at concentrations near 1 ppb. No cross sensitivity towards pH and salinity could be observed and temperature dependency was determined as compensateable. Both referencing approaches prove themselves to be able to provide a simple use of the sensor for in-field applications.

  1. Ammonia nanotubes and their interactions with coinage metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Afshan, E-mail: amohajeri@shirazu.ac.ir; Bozorgizadeh, Tahereh

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The possibility of building ammonia nanotubes (ANTs) is explored. • Six ANTs formed by the stacks of 4- and 5-membered ammonia rings have been studied. • The interactions between the ANTs and coinage metals are investigated. • The nature of nitrogen–metal bonds is unveiled by quantum chemical approaches. - Abstract: The hydrogen bond networks of finite ammonia molecules are considered to explore the possibility of building ammonia nanotubes (ANTs). Six ANTs formed by the stacks of 4- and 5-membered ammonia rings have been studied. The calculated stabilization energies indicate considerable stability for ANTs. In the second part, the interactions between the constructed ANTs and coinage metals (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) are investigated with a focus on the nature of nitrogen…metal bonds. The changes in binding energies from copper to gold reveal that the three metals have almost similar tendency for the interaction with ANTs and the interaction strength is governed by the structure of ANT. Furthermore, the electronic and structural properties of the resulting complexes have been unveiled by means of the quantum chemical analyses. The N…M bonds are found to have partially covalent and partially electrostatic nature.

  2. Ammonia nanotubes and their interactions with coinage metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The possibility of building ammonia nanotubes (ANTs) is explored. • Six ANTs formed by the stacks of 4- and 5-membered ammonia rings have been studied. • The interactions between the ANTs and coinage metals are investigated. • The nature of nitrogen–metal bonds is unveiled by quantum chemical approaches. - Abstract: The hydrogen bond networks of finite ammonia molecules are considered to explore the possibility of building ammonia nanotubes (ANTs). Six ANTs formed by the stacks of 4- and 5-membered ammonia rings have been studied. The calculated stabilization energies indicate considerable stability for ANTs. In the second part, the interactions between the constructed ANTs and coinage metals (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) are investigated with a focus on the nature of nitrogen…metal bonds. The changes in binding energies from copper to gold reveal that the three metals have almost similar tendency for the interaction with ANTs and the interaction strength is governed by the structure of ANT. Furthermore, the electronic and structural properties of the resulting complexes have been unveiled by means of the quantum chemical analyses. The N…M bonds are found to have partially covalent and partially electrostatic nature

  3. Simple and inexpensive quantification of ammonia in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyub, Omar B; Behrens, Adam M; Heligman, Brian T; Natoli, Mary E; Ayoub, Joseph J; Cunningham, Gary; Summar, Marshall; Kofinas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of ammonia in whole blood has applications in the diagnosis and management of many hepatic diseases, including cirrhosis and rare urea cycle disorders, amounting to more than 5 million patients in the United States. Current techniques for ammonia measurement suffer from limited range, poor resolution, false positives or large, complex sensor set-ups. Here we demonstrate a technique utilizing inexpensive reagents and simple methods for quantifying ammonia in 100 μL of whole blood. The sensor comprises a modified form of the indophenol reaction, which resists sources of destructive interference in blood, in conjunction with a cation-exchange membrane. The presented sensing scheme is selective against other amine containing molecules such as amino acids and has a shelf life of at least 50 days. Additionally, the resulting system has high sensitivity and allows for the accurate reliable quantification of ammonia in whole human blood samples at a minimum range of 25 to 500 μM, which is clinically for rare hyperammonemic disorders and liver disease. Furthermore, concentrations of 50 and 100 μM ammonia could be reliably discerned with p = 0.0001. PMID:25936660

  4. Amine substitution into sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kupiainen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The substitution of ammonia by dimethylamine in sulfuric acid – ammonia – dimethylamine clusters was studied using a collision and evaporation dynamics model. Quantum chemical formation free energies were computed using B3LYP/CBSB7 for geometries and frequencies and RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+dZ for electronic energies. We first demonstrate the good performance of our method by a comparison with an experimental study investigating base substitution in positively charged clusters, and then continue by simulating base exchange in neutral clusters, which cannot be measured directly. Collisions of a dimethylamine molecule with an ammonia containing positively charged cluster result in the instantaneous evaporation of an ammonia molecule, while the dimethylamine molecule remains in the cluster. According to our simulations, a similar base exchange can take place in neutral clusters, although the overall process is more complicated. Neutral sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters are significantly less stable than their positively charged counterparts, resulting in a competition between cluster evaporation and base exchange.

  5. Chemically reduced graphene oxide for ammonia detection at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ruma; Midya, Anupam; Santra, Sumita; Ray, Samit K; Guha, Prasanta K

    2013-08-14

    Chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) has recently attracted growing interest in the area of chemical sensors because of its high electrical conductivity and chemically active defect sites. This paper reports the synthesis of chemically reduced GO using NaBH4 and its performance for ammonia detection at room temperature. The sensing layer was synthesized on a ceramic substrate containing platinum electrodes. The effect of the reduction time of graphene oxide (GO) was explored to optimize the response, recovery, and response time. The RGO film was characterized electrically and also with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sensor response was found to lie between 5.5% at 200 ppm (parts per million) and 23% at 2800 ppm of ammonia, and also resistance recovered quickly without any application of heat (for lower concentrations of ammonia). The sensor was exposed to different vapors and found to be selective toward ammonia. We believe such chemically reduced GO could potentially be used to manufacture a new generation of low-power portable ammonia sensors. PMID:23856001

  6. Amine substitution into sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vehkamäki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substitution of ammonia by dimethylamine in sulfuric acid – ammonia – dimethylamine clusters was studied using a collision and evaporation dynamics model. Quantum chemical formation free energies were computed using B3LYP/CBSB7 for geometries and frequencies and RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+dZ for electronic energies. We first demonstrate the good performance of our method by a comparison with an experimental study investigating base substitution in positively charged clusters, and then continue by simulating base exchange in neutral clusters, which cannot be measured directly. Collisions of a dimethylamine molecule with an ammonia containing positively charged cluster result in the instantaneous evaporation of an ammonia molecule, while the dimethylamine molecule remains in the cluster. According to our simulations, a similar base exchange can take place in neutral clusters, although the overall process is more complicated. Neutral sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters are significantly less stable than their positively charged counterparts, resulting in a competition between cluster evaporation and base exchange.

  7. Ammonia modification of oxide-free Si(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Tatiana Peixoto; Longo, Roberto C.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Chabal, Yves J.

    2016-08-01

    Amination of surfaces is useful in a variety of fields, ranging from device manufacturing to biological applications. Previous studies of ammonia reaction on silicon surfaces have concentrated on vapor phase rather than wet chemical processes, and mostly on clean Si surfaces. In this work, the interaction of liquid and vapor-phase ammonia is examined on three types of oxide-free surfaces - passivated by hydrogen, fluorine (1/3 monolayer) or chlorine - combining infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations. The resulting chemical composition highly depends on the starting surface; there is a stronger reaction on both F- and Cl-terminated than on the H-terminated Si surfaces, as evidenced by the formation of Si-NH2. Side reactions can also occur, such as solvent reaction with surfaces, formation of ammonium salt by-products (in the case of 0.2 M ammonia in dioxane solution), and nitridation of silicon (in the case of neat and gas-phase ammonia reactions for instance). Unexpectedly, there is formation of Si-H bonds on hydrogen-free Cl-terminated Si(111) surfaces in all cases, whether vapor phase of neat liquid ammonia is used. The first-principles modeling of this complex system suggests that step-edge surface defects may play a key role in enabling the reaction under certain circumstances, despite the endothermic nature for Si-H bond formation.

  8. The Effect of Macrofauna on Porewater Profiles and Nutrient Fluxes in the Intertidal Zone of the Humber Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, R. J. G.; Davey, J. T.; Krom, M. D.; Watson, P. G.; Frickers, P. E.; Clifton, R. J.

    1999-06-01

    Macrofauna, nutrient fluxes, porewater chemistry and sediment characteristics were measured at six intertidal mudflat sites in the Humber Estuary, U.K., during the different seasons. Nereis diversicolor , Macoma balthica and Corophium volutator were found to be the dominant macrofauna. Salinity was the baseline control on macrofauna distribution but this was overprinted by periodic impoverishment due to sediment mobilization. High resolution gel probe porewater samplers provided direct evidence for the impact of burrows on porewater chemistry. The macrofauna modified nutrient fluxes during periods of mud flat stability. Nereis caused a decrease in silicate and phosphate effluxes but enhanced ammonia release and nitrate uptake. Macoma enhanced ammonia and nitrite release. The impact of Corophium was not possible to discern. The Humber is a large, highly dynamic macrotidal estuary in which sediment resuspension has a large impact on porewater profiles, nutrient fluxes and macrofaunal communities. Simple patterns and inter-relationships which are seen in small sheltered estuaries are not observed in the Humber.

  9. Influence of Different Cultivars on Populations of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in the Root Environment of Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Briones, Aurelio M.; Okabe, Satoshi; Umemiya, Yoshiaki; Ramsing, Niels-Birger; Reichardt, Wolfgang; Okuyama, Hidetoshi

    2002-01-01

    Comparisons of the activities and diversities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the root environment of different cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.) indicated marked differences despite identical environmental conditions during growth. Gross nitrification rates obtained by the 15N dilution technique were significantly higher in a modern variety, IR63087-1-17, than in two traditional varieties. Phylogenetic analysis based on the ammonium monooxygenase gene (amoA) identified strains relat...

  10. Anaerobic Removal of Ammonia Nitrogen by an Autotrophic Reactor with Fixed Film Opering in a Sequential Batch

    OpenAIRE

    Murilo C. Lucas; José H. A. Vasconcelos; Francisco Javier Cuba Téran; Carla Eloísa Diniz dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    This study presents results of ammonia nitrogen oxidation in absence of molecular oxygen. They were obtained after the operation of a sequential batch anaerobic reactor with fixed film. After the inoculation with sludge from an anaerobic stabilization pond of a slaughterhouse wastewater treatment plant, the reactor was fed with a synthetic culture media, as described by Martins (2007), in order to establish ideal conditions for growth and development of Anammox culture. The duration of the ba...

  11. Ammonia Bearing Species on Ceres: Implication on Origin and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Raponi, A.; Marchi, S.; Ciarniello, M.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; McCord, T. B.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrorro, F. G.; Longobardo, A.; Tosi, F.; Fonte, S.; Giardino, M.; Palomba, E.; Magni, G.; Zambon, F.; Pieters, C. M.; McFadden, L. A.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) on board the Dawn spacecraft observed Ceres' surface acquiring spectra since January 2015. Here we report the average Ceres spectrum, including the spectral range previously precluded from telescopic measurements due to telluric atmospheric absorptions. The data indicate that the surface is very dark: average albedo of 0.090 ±0.006 at 0.55 µm, consistent with HST data (Li et al., 2006). Ceres' average spectrum is characterized by a prominent absorption band at 2.7 micron. Weaker absorption bands are observed between 3.05-3.1, 3.3-3.4 and 3.9-4 micron; the visible and near-IR ranges lack prominent bands. We modelled the spectra of Ceres using Hapke theory. Results of the spectral modelling indicate that extensive water ice is not present in surface spectra acquired so far. The best fit is obtained with a mixture of ammoniated phyllosilicates mixed with other clays, Mg-carbonates, and dark material, like magnetite (De Sanctis et al. 2015, submitted). The presence of ammonia bearing materials across the surface has implications for the origin of Ceres and its internal structure and evolution. Higher spatial resolution spectra are being acquired to address the small scale mineralogy across this dwarf planet. References: Li, et al., Photometric analysis of 1 Ceres and surface mapping from HST observations. Icarus 182, 143-160 (2006). De Sanctis et al., Ammoniated phyllosilicates on dwarf planet Ceres reveal an outer solar system origin, Nature submitted, (2015). This work is supported the Italian Space Agencies, NASA, and from the German Space Agency. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged.

  12. Flux focusing eddy current probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Clendenin, C. Gerald (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. The maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. Hence, by obtaining the position of the maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. The accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output which results in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip which enables the region for searching to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion damage causes an incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. The low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of the thickness of the test sample.

  13. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

    2015-01-01

    The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

  14. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important)

  15. Interactions in the ammonia-deuterium system under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the NH3-D2 mixture to 50 GPa using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Proton exchange was observed in the mixture, resulting in the formation of deuterated isotopes of ammonia and the formation of HD and H2. We report the changes in the vibrational spectra of the various components of the mixture, which include blueshifts and splitting in the vibration modes of hydrogen. These frequency shifts in the mixture are compared to frequency shifts in mixtures composed of the hydrogen isotopes. The changes not accounted for by interactions between the hydrogen molecules suggest repulsive interactions between the hydrogen and ammonia. The bond length of the hydrogen molecules is calculated using a Morse potential, revealing a bond length shorter than in pure hydrogen. Additionally, a change in slope of the bond length as a function of pressure was observed around ∼10-18 GPa, which is attributed to the reordering Phase IV to V transition in ammonia.

  16. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important).

  17. Ammonia as a polarized solid target material--a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enormous efforts towards dynamically polarized ammonia and deuterated ammonia (d-ammonia) with their reasonable high polarizable nucleon contents (quality factor) are reviewed. The early attempts are also a story of failures until a radiation doping method for NH3 was successfully demonstrated in the end of the 1970s. Some years later the outcome of intense studies and new developments (with pitfalls, too) was the availability of the highly polarizable target materials 14NH3, 15NH3, 14ND3 and 15ND3, all of them doped for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) by radiation. These materials have been used in new particle physics experiments which, up to that time, suffered either from the lower quality factors or from the modest polarization resistance against radiation damage of the existing alcohol and diol target materials

  18. Design Ammonia Gas Detection System by Using Optical Fiber Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Bushra. R. Mhdi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Design study and construction of Ammonia gas detection using a fiber as a sensor to based on evanescent wave sensing technique was investigated. Multi-mode fiber type (PCS with core diameter (600μm and (50cm length used where plastic clad was removed by chemical etching for effective sensing area which coated with sol-gel film to enhance its absorption characteristics to evanescent wave around the optical spectrum emitted from halogen lamp measurements through different temperature rang (25-60oc with and without air using as a carrier to ammonia molecules are investigated. Finally sensing efficiency are monitored to ammonia gas it affected to different temperature and environmental condition are studied and our result are compatible to scientific publishes

  19. Novel Ru - K/Carbon Nanotubes Catalyst for Ammonia Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel ammonia synthesis catalyst, potassium-promoted ruthenium supported on carbon nanotubes, was developed. It was found that the Ru-K/carbon nanotubes catalyst had higher activity for ammonia synthesis ( 20.85 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) than the Ru-K/fullerenes ( 13.3 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) at atmospheric ressure and 623 K. The catalyst had activity even at 473 K, and had the highest activity ( 23.46 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) at 643 K. It was suggested that the multi-walled structure favored the electron transfer, the hydrogen-storage and the hydrogen-spill which were favorable to ammonia synthesis.

  20. Isolation of 'Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus', a novel ureolytic soil archaeal ammonia oxidiser with tolerance to high ammonia concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E; Ross, Jenna; Hink, Linda; Weber, Eva B; Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Thion, Cécile; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2016-05-01

    Studies of the distribution of ammonia oxidising archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) suggest distinct ecological niches characterised by ammonia concentration and pH, arising through differences in substrate affinity and ammonia tolerance. AOA form five distinct phylogenetic clades, one of which, the 'Nitrososphaera sister cluster', has no cultivated isolate. A representative of this cluster, named 'Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus', was isolated from a pH 7.5 arable soil and we propose a new cluster name:'Nitrosocosmicus' While phylogenetic analysis of amoA genes indicates its association with the Nitrososphaera sister cluster, analysis of 16S rRNA genes provided no support for a relative branching that is consistent with a 'sister cluster', indicating placement within a lineage of the order Nitrososphaerales 'Ca.N. franklandus' is capable of ureolytic growth and its tolerances to nitrite and ammonia are higher than in other AOA and similar to those of typical soil AOB. Similarity of other growth characteristics of 'Ca.N. franklandus' with those of typical soil AOB isolates reduces support for niche differentiation between soil AOA and AOB and suggests that AOA have a wider physiological diversity than previously suspected. In particular, the high ammonia tolerance of 'Ca.N. franklandus' suggests potential contributions to nitrification in fertilised soils. PMID:26976843

  1. Isolation of ‘Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus’, a novel ureolytic soil archaeal ammonia oxidiser with tolerance to high ammonia concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E.; Ross, Jenna; Hink, Linda; Weber, Eva B.; Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Thion, Cécile; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the distribution of ammonia oxidising archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) suggest distinct ecological niches characterised by ammonia concentration and pH, arising through differences in substrate affinity and ammonia tolerance. AOA form five distinct phylogenetic clades, one of which, the ‘Nitrososphaera sister cluster’, has no cultivated isolate. A representative of this cluster, named ‘Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus’, was isolated from a pH 7.5 arable soil and we propose a new cluster name: ‘Nitrosocosmicus’. While phylogenetic analysis of amoA genes indicates its association with the Nitrososphaera sister cluster, analysis of 16S rRNA genes provided no support for a relative branching that is consistent with a ‘sister cluster’, indicating placement within a lineage of the order Nitrososphaerales. ‘Ca. N. franklandus’ is capable of ureolytic growth and its tolerances to nitrite and ammonia are higher than in other AOA and similar to those of typical soil AOB. Similarity of other growth characteristics of ‘Ca. N. franklandus’ with those of typical soil AOB isolates reduces support for niche differentiation between soil AOA and AOB and suggests that AOA have a wider physiological diversity than previously suspected. In particular, the high ammonia tolerance of ‘Ca. N. franklandus’ suggests potential contributions to nitrification in fertilised soils. PMID:26976843

  2. Effects of gaseous ammonia direct injection on performance characteristics of a spark-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This is the very first study in utilizing direct injection of gaseous ammonia in an SI engine. • Engine combustion using direct injection of gaseous ammonia is proven feasible. • Energy efficiency using ammonia is comparable to that using gasoline. • CO emissions are decreased but emissions of NOx and HC are increased when ammonia is used. - Abstract: The effects of direct injection of gaseous ammonia on the combustion characteristics and exhaust emissions of a spark-ignition engine were investigated. Port-injection gasoline was used to enhance the burning of ammonia that was directly injected into the engine cylinder. Appropriate direct injection strategies were developed to allow ammonia to be used in spark-ignition engines without sacrifice of volumetric efficiency. Experimental results show that with gasoline providing the baseline power of 0.6 kW, total engine power could increase to 2.7 kW when the injection timing of ammonia was advanced to 370 BTDC with injection duration of 22 ms. Engine performance with use of gasoline–ammonia was compared to that with gasoline alone. For operations using gasoline–ammonia, with baseline power from gasoline at 0.6 kW the appropriate ammonia injection timing was found to range from 320 to 370 BTDC for producing 1.5–2.7 kW. The peak pressures were slightly lower than those using gasoline alone because of the lower flame of ammonia, resulting in reduction of cylinder pressure. The brake specific energy consumption (BSEC) with gasoline–ammonia was very similar to that with gasoline alone. Ammonia direct injection caused slight reductions of BSCO for all the loads studied but significantly increased BSHC because of the reduced combustion temperature of ammonia combustion. The use of ammonia resulted in increased NOx emissions because of formation of fuel NOx. Ammonia slip was also detected in the engine exhaust because of incomplete combustion

  3. Synthesis of hydrides by interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Boris P., E-mail: tarasov@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Fokin, Valentin N.; Fokina, Evelina E. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yartys, Volodymyr A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interaction of the intermetallics A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} with NH{sub 3} was studied. • The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia is temperature-dependent. • Hydrides, hydridonitrides, disproportionation products or metal–N–H compounds are formed. • NH{sub 4}Cl was used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallics. • Interaction with ammonia results in the synthesis of the nanopowders. - Abstract: Interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia was studied as a processing route to synthesize hydrides and hydridonitrides of intermetallic compounds having various stoichiometries and types of crystal structures, including A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} (A = Mg, Ti, Zr, Sc, Nd, Sm; B = transition metals, including Fe, Co, Ni, Ti and nontransition elements, Al and B). In presence of NH{sub 4}Cl used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallic alloys, their interaction proceeds at rather mild P–T conditions, at temperatures 100–200 °C and at pressures of 0.6–0.8 MPa. The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia appears to be temperature-dependent and, following a rise of the interaction temperature, it leads to the formation of interstitial hydrides; interstitial hydridonitrides; disproportionation products (binary hydride; new intermetallic hydrides and binary nitrides) or new metal–nitrogen–hydrogen compounds like magnesium amide Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}. The interaction results in the synthesis of the nanopowders where hydrogen and nitrogen atoms become incorporated into the crystal lattices of the intermetallic alloys. The nitrogenated materials have the smallest particle size, down to 40 nm, and a specific surface area close to 20 m{sup 2}/g.

  4. Investigating the Efficiency of Biological Filters for Ammonia Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Motesaddi Zarandi, MR Massoudinejad, A Mazaheri Tehrani, H Pouri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and Aims: Ammonia removal from air to prevent severe damage to the environment and living organisms is very important. Biofiltration is an efficient, easy, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly process for degradation of ammonia from waste air. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficiency of biological filtration using a compost and scallop bed for ammonia removal. Materials and Methods: According to the ammonia removal method a column with 14cm inner diameter and 45cm height made from transparent Plexiglas was used. The column was filled up to 25 cm with compost and scallop (with a scallop: compost ratio of 1:4. In this study, performance of the biofilter was studied under 10 different flow rates (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 lit/min and 5 different concentrations (0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80 and 80-100 ppm at a temperature of 25 degrees Celsius. Results: The results of this study showed that efficiency is decreased when the flow rate or concentration is increased because the microbial population is reduced. The efficiency was reduced by 84.6-98.2 percent. Maximum efficiency occurred at a 0.19g/(m3.h loading rate. Efficiency was in 0-20 concentration intervals at a flow rate of 1 lit/min and at an Empty Bed Residence Time (EBRT of 240 seconds. Conclusion: The results show that a biofilter with a compost and scallop bed is efficient for ammonia removal from air. Results can be optimized in the design and operation of biological systems to be used in the industrial control of ammonia gas.

  5. Superradiance and flux conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as superradiance still continue to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that superradiance in a quantum field theory context is not the same as superradiance (superfluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux nonconservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of superradiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both superradiance and damping.

  6. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of orthogonal magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can open-quotes tunnelclose quotes through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch >1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, ≥2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and open-quotes passclose quotes through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  8. Ammonia-oxidising archaea--physiology, ecology and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleper, Christa; Nicol, Graeme W

    2010-01-01

    Nitrification is a microbially mediated process that plays a central role in the global cycling of nitrogen and is also of economic importance in agriculture and wastewater treatment. The first step in nitrification is performed by ammonia-oxidising microorganisms, which convert ammonia into nitrite ions. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) have been known for more than 100 years. However, metagenomic studies and subsequent cultivation efforts have recently demonstrated that microorganisms of the domain archaea are also capable of performing this process. Astonishingly, members of this group of ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA), which was overlooked for so long, are present in almost every environment on Earth and typically outnumber the known bacterial ammonia oxidisers by orders of magnitudes in common environments such as the marine plankton, soils, sediments and estuaries. Molecular studies indicate that AOA are amongst the most abundant organisms on this planet, adapted to the most common environments, but are also present in those considered extreme, such as hot springs. The ecological distribution and community dynamics of these archaea are currently the subject of intensive study by many research groups who are attempting to understand the physiological diversity and the ecosystem function of these organisms. The cultivation of a single marine isolate and two enrichments from hot terrestrial environments has demonstrated a chemolithoautotrophic mode of growth. Both pure culture-based and environmental studies indicate that at least some AOA have a high substrate affinity for ammonia and are able to grow under extremely oligotrophic conditions. Information from the first available genomes of AOA indicate that their metabolism is fundamentally different from that of their bacterial counterparts, involving a highly copper-dependent system for ammonia oxidation and electron transport, as well as a novel carbon fixation pathway that has recently been discovered in

  9. A Study of Life-type Processes in Liquid Ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Liquid ammonia (LNH3) has a number of properties similar to water, such as the ability to dissolve a diverse range of chemical compounds and, based on the variety of chemical reactions in this non-aqueous solvent, speculation has arisen about the possibility of life processes in liquid ammonia. "Life" is difficult to define, but the general consensus is that it is comprised of a variety of individual process that could be regarded as "processes of life", some of which can be modelled withi...

  10. Thermodynamic Model for the Ammonia-Water System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Rasmussen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The ammonia-water system is described by the Extended UNIQUAC model, which is an electrolyte model, formed by combining the original UNIQUAC model, the Debye-Hückel law and the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state. The model is limited to temperatures below the critical temperature of ammonia....... Vapor-liquid equilibria are described within the experimental accuracy. The accuracy of enthalpy calculations is better than ±100 J mol-1, and heat capacity calculations deviate less than ±1% from experimental data. The accurate description of the thermal properties is achieved by taking speciation...

  11. The Kinetics for Electrochemical Removal of Ammonia in Coking Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zhenhai; LI Su; GUO Wenqian; FAN Caimei

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical removal of ammonia is a new and effective method in coking wastewater.The reaction mechanism of ammonia removal was proved by stable polarization curve in this paper.First,the supposing of reaction steps of the electrode were proposed.And then reaction parameter of the electrode was measured by Tafel curve.Finally,the reaction mechanism was determined by quasi-equilibrium approach.The results showed that Cl2+H2O→HOCl+H++Cl was the rate-determining step,the calculated apparent transfer coefficient was uniform to the experimental value.

  12. Efficiency of deodorant materials for ammonia reduction in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Mizutani, Chiyomi; Melikov, Arsen Krikor;

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study about the removability of ammonia gas in the air by activated carbon fiber (ACF) felt chemically treated with acid and a cotton fabric processed with iron phthalocyanine with copper (Cu) was performed in small-scale experiments. The test rig consisted of a heated plate and its...... proved activated carbon fiber felt with acid to be highly efficient in removing ammonia gas. Air temperature did not have profound effect on ACF performance. However, efficiency of the carbon fiber felt decreased when relative humidity was raised from 20 to 80%....

  13. Solar central receiver reformer system for ammonia plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    An overview of a study to retrofit the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc., El Centro, California 600 ST/SD Ammonia Plant with Solar Central Receiver Technology is presented. The retrofit system consists of a solar central receiver reformer (SCRR) operating in parallel with the existing fossil fired reformer. Steam and hydrocarbon react in the catalyst filled tubes of the inner cavity receiver to form a hydrogen rich mixture which is the syngas feed for the ammonia production. The SCRR system will displace natural gas presently used in the fossil reformer combustion chamber.

  14. Test and Analysis for Spraying Ammonia in Diesel Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周华祥; 刘敬平; 贺力克; 陈方; 申奇志; 骆锐; 周正

    2011-01-01

    A certain amount of ammonia reducer were directly injected into the 4102BZLQ Diesel engine' s combustion chamber when the combustion temperature decreases to 1 573 - 1 073 K, NOx generated could be reduced to 1.11 g/( kW· h). Based on PRF combustion mechanism, NO was tested by using the heavy-duty diesel engine test cycle of ESC thirteen conditions , the ammonia spray angle and amount were tested and optimized in different conditions. The test results show that the thermal efficiency of Diesel engine does not decrease while NO exhaust decreases.

  15. Optimization of biomethanation focusing on high ammonia loaded processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han

    , could theoretically mitigate the ammonia inhibition problem (Angelidaki et al., 1999). Therefore, the effect of co-digestion of cattle manure with lipids (i.e. glycerol trioleate (GTO)) under high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N·L-1) in anaerobic continuous stirred tank (CSTR) reactors (RGTO) was assessed....... Additionally, for comparison purposes, a soluble carbohydrate (i.e. glucose) was also used as a co-substrate in an identical CSTR reactor (RGLU). At 5 g NH4+-N·L-1, relative methane production of RGTO and RGLU, was 10.5% and 41% compared to the expected uninhibited production, respectively. At the same time...

  16. Power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorin, Eva

    2000-05-01

    It is of great interest to improve the efficiency of power generating processes, i.e. to convert more of the energy in the heat source to power. This is favorable from an environmental point of view and can also be an economic advantage. To use an ammonia-water mixture instead of water as working fluid is a possible way to improve the efficiency of steam turbine processes. This thesis includes studies of power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid utilizing different kinds of heat sources for power and heat generation. The thermophysical properties of the mixture are also studied. They play an important role in the calculations of the process performance and for the design of its components, such as heat exchangers. The studies concern thermodynamic simulations of processes in applications suitable for Swedish conditions. Available correlations for the thermophysical properties are compared and their influence on simulations and heat exchanger area predictions is investigated. Measurements of ammonia-water mixture viscosities using a vibrating wire viscometer are also described. The studies performed show that power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as the working fluid are well suited for utilization of waste heat from industry and from gas engines. The ammonia-water power cycles can give up to 32 % more power in the industrial waste heat application and up to 54 % more power in the gas engine bottoming cycle application compared to a conventional Rankine steam cycle. However, ammonia-water power cycles in small direct-fired biomass-fueled cogeneration plants do not show better performance than a conventional Rankine steam cycle. When different correlations for the thermodynamic properties are used in simulations of a simple ammonia-water power cycle the difference in efficiency is not larger than 4 %, corresponding to about 1.3 percentage points. The differences in saturation properties between the correlations are, however, considerable at high

  17. Arginine protection against ammonia toxicity in exhausted rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Mohan, P; Indira, K; Rajendra, W

    1987-01-01

    Arginine administration (5 m moles/kg/day) to albino rats for 7 days, revealed that this vital basic amino acid possesses latent potentiality for the accentuation of urea cycle or at least for arginase activity. The mitigation of ammonia toxicity was observed to be more effective in the case of gastrocnemius and red vastus as compared to white vastus. Further, ammonia and lactate levels were also decreased by arginine in blood and thereby delaying the onset of fatigue by preventing ammonotoxemia and lactic acidemia. PMID:3666875

  18. Aerodynamic gradient measurements of the NH3-HNO3-NH4NO3 triad using a wet chemical instrument: an analysis of precision requirements and flux errors

    OpenAIRE

    V. Wolff; Trebs, I.; Ammann, C.; Meixner, F. X.

    2010-01-01

    The aerodynamic gradient method is widely used for flux measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, particulate ammonium nitrate (the NH3-HNO3-NH4NO3 triad) and other water-soluble reactive trace compounds. The surface exchange flux is derived from a measured concentration difference and micrometeorological quantities (turbulent exchange coefficient). The significance of the measured concentration difference is crucial for the significant determination of surface exchange fluxes. Additionally,...

  19. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  20. N-13 ammonia myocardial positron computed tomography, (1). Comparative study with thallium-201 SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Nagara; Senda, Michio; Yonekura, Yoshiharu

    1985-02-01

    Myocardial positron computed tomography (PCT) was obtained in 11 cases and the images were compared with thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The myocardial PCT was performed at rest after 10-20 mCi of N-13 labeled ammonia injection using whole-body multislice PCT device (Positologica III). The PCT clearly delineated 2.5-3.0 mm hot spots while the SPECT barely showed 5.0 mm hot spots of Derenzo phantom. The myocardial images looked better in PCT because of the better spatial resolution and count statistics. The myocardium looked thinner and the papillary muscle was visualized by PCT. The PCT also showed the right ventricle in each case. Furthermore, PCT detected increased lung uptake of ammonia in 2 of the 8 cases with myocardial infarction, suggesting presence of pulmonary congestion. Perfusion defect was clearly seen by PCT as well as SPECT. However, the cardiac short-axis and long-axis sections which were easily obtained by SPECT were useful for the localization of the lesion. We conclude that both PCT and SPECT were valuable for the assessment of coronary artery disease. (author).

  1. Adsorption, absorption, and biological degradation of ammonia in different biofilter organic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagans, Estela; Font, Xavier; Sánchez, Antoni

    2007-06-15

    A tailor-made apparatus called ammoniometer, which is a batch mode respirometer applied to the study of ammonia biodegradation in biofilter media, has been used to evaluate adsorption, absorption, and biodegradation in five different organic materials (compost, coconut fibre, bark, pruning wastes, and peat) obtained from full-scale biofilters in operation in several waste treatment plants. The results showed that absorption could be represented by a Henry's law linear equation, with values of the Henry coefficient significantly higher (from 1,866 to 15,320) than that of pure water (1,498). Adsorption data were successfully fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and maximum adsorption capacity varies from 1.06 to 1.81 mg NH(3)/g dry media. Ammonia biodegradation rates for each organic material were also calculated. Biodegradation rates varied from 0.67 to 7.82 mg NH(3)/kg media/d depending on the material tested. The data obtained showed important differences in the behaviour of the biofilter organic media, which has important implications in the design and modelling of these systems. PMID:17089384

  2. Fast neutron flux in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of calculating the fast neutron flux in a natural uranium-heavy water lattice by superposition of the individual contributions of the different fuel elements was verified using a one-dimension Monte-Carlo code. The results obtained are in good agreement with experimental measurements done in the core and reflector of the reactor AQUILON. (author)

  3. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO3 (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  4. Technology of uranium tetrafluoride preparation by hydrofluorination of UO2 obtained from ammonium diuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of preparation of uranium tetrafluoride by hydrofluorination of UO2 using anhydrous HF is described. Uranium dioxide was obtained by thermal decomposition of amonium diuranate to UO3 and its reduction with hydrogen generated by cracking ammonia gas. The main purpose is to acquire experience for the UF4 preparation and its technology and found out the best operation conditions, envisaging the installation of an experimental semi-pilot unit for training and small production

  5. Experimental characterization of the rectification process in ammonia-water absorption systems with a large-specific-area corrugated sheet structured packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieres, Jaime; Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Uhia, Francisco J. [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No 9, 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    In this paper, the mass transfer performance of a large-specific-area corrugated sheet structured packing for ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems (AARS) is reported. An experimental facility was used to test the performance of the packing. Experimental results of the temperature, ammonia concentration and mass flow rate of the rectified vapour are presented and discussed for different operating conditions including reflux ratio values from 0.2 to 1. The volumetric vapour phase mass transfer coefficient is calculated from the measured data and compared with different correlations found in the literature. A new correlation is proposed which was fitted from the experimental data. Finally, a comparison is made between the actual packing height used in the experimental setup and the height required to obtain the same ammonia rectification in AARS with different packings previously tested by the authors. (author)

  6. Loss of ammonia during electron-transfer dissociation of deuterated peptides as an inherent gauge of gas-phase hydrogen scrambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2010-01-01

    we utilize the abundant loss of ammonia upon ETD of peptide ions as a universal reporter of positional randomization of the exchangeable hydrogens (hydrogen scrambling) during HX-ETD experiments. We show that the loss of ammonia from peptide ions proceeds without depletion of deuterium when employing...... detected by a depletion of deuterium when deuterated ammonia is lost from peptides during ETD. This straightforward method requires no modifications to the experimental workflow and has the great advantage that the occurrence of hydrogen scrambling can be directly detected in the actual peptides analyzed......The application of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) to obtain single-residue resolution in hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) experiments has recently been demonstrated. For such measurements, it is critical to ensure that the level of gas-phase hydrogen scrambling is negligible. Here...

  7. Concentration and flux of bioaerosol and environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The concentration and flux transportation of bioaerosol are analyzed using the data observed in Nanjing in July 1998. Some results are obtained: (i) the concentration and flux transportation of bioaerosol vary periodically with the cycle of the solar radiation and atmospheric turbulent intensity, (ii) The bioaerosol concentration is affected by both the bioaerosol flux transportation and the environmental factors. The bacterial concentration is obviously affected by the solar radiation while the fungi concentration is significantly affected by temperature.

  8. CuS Thin Films Obtained by Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta POPESCU

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study concerning the influence of deposition parameters (reagents, electron donors, surfactants, temperature of the substrate, number of consecutive layers, spraying rate on the quality of CuS thin films achieved by spray pyrolysis on glass substrate, from solutions containing CuCl2·2H2O, thiourea, electron pair donors and surfactants. As electron pairs donors ammonia and triethanolamine were used and as surfactants C12 - C14 ether-sulphate, sodium lauryl-sulphate and cetyl-pyridinium bromide were used. The optimum conditions for the obtaining of optically clear, compact and adherent CuS thin films, showing different colors in reflected light (violet, yellow, brawn, green and exhibiting in VIS and NIR light appropriate reflectance and transmittance for utilization for solar control applications were established. The film thickness falls in the range 10- 50 nm.

  9. Bacterial domination over Archaea in ammonia oxidation in a monsoon-driven tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vipindas, P.V.; Anas, A.; Jasmin, C.; Lallu, K.R.; Fausia, K.H.; Balachandran, K.K.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Nair, S.

    rivers, seawater influx from two bar mouths [Major opening at Fort Cochin (450 m wide) and minor opening at Munambam (250 m wide)] and the prolonged southwest monsoon. Ammonia in CE accounts for 50 – 65% of the dissolved inorganic nitrogen [11... concentrations [36], while that of bacterial gets triggered at higher concentration of ammonia. CE contains high concentrations of ammonia, i.e. 50 -65 % of the dissolved inorganic nitrogen [11], and therefore the AOB’s contribution in ammonia oxidation could...

  10. Pengaruh Berbagai Bahan Litter Terhadap Konsentrasi Ammonia Udara Ambient kandang dan Performan Ayam Broiler

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman Ibrahim; Allaily Allaily

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different litter materials on ammonia concentration of the air ambient stall and broiler performance ABSTRACT. The study was conducted to observe the effect of ammonia concentration of broiler chicken coop air to the treatment various types of litter. High ammonia concentrations would interfere with performance of broiler chickens and become a problem for the environment. A good litter quality is expected to address the problem of ammonia that occur in the broiler chicken co...

  11. Bioaugmentation as a solution to increase methane production from an ammonia-rich substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Fiedel, Nicolai Russell;

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates inhibit anaerobic digestion (AD) process and constitute the main reason of low energy recovery in full-scale reactors. It is estimated that many full-scale AD reactors are operating in ammonia induced “inhibited steady-state” with significant losses of the potential biogas...... to all methods used today to alleviate ammonia toxicity effect, the tested bioaugmentation process performed without interrupting the continuous operation of the reactor and without replacing the ammonia-rich feedstock....

  12. Ammonia oxidation kinetics and temperature sensitivity of a natural marine community dominated by Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Horak, Rachel E. A.; Qin, Wei; Schauer, Andy J; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Ingalls, Anitra E; Moffett, James W.; Stahl, David A.; Devol, Allan H.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal ammonia oxidizers (AOAs) are increasingly recognized as prominent members of natural microbial assemblages. Evidence that links the presence of AOA with in situ ammonia oxidation activity is limited, and the abiotic factors that regulate the distribution of AOA natural assemblages are not well defined. We used quantitative PCR to enumerate amoA (encodes α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) abundances; AOA amoA gene copies greatly outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and amoA transcr...

  13. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs an attenuator circuit, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the attenuator circuit produce an output representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a true root mean square logarithmic output

  14. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  15. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  16. Disconnecting Solar Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2011-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by CMEs and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctie shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly-disconnected flux takes the form of a "U"-shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m/s^2 to 320 km/s, expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8uT, 6 Rs above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6x10^11 Wb (1.6x10^19 Mx). We mod...

  17. Flux pinning and flux flow studies in superconductors using flux flow noise techniques. Progress report, April 1, 1976--December 17, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joiner, W.C.H.

    1976-12-01

    Measurements of flux flow noise power spectra have been combined with critical current measurements and measurements of current-voltage characteristics to study flux flow and local pinning interactions effective during flux flow. A model of flux flow noise generation in the presence of local pinning interactions is developed and applied to situations where pinning is dominated by: (1) grain boundaries, (2) normal metal precipitates in a superconducting matrix, (3) gross deformation producing a critical current peak effect, and (4) surface grooves imposed on a sample surface. In the case of pinning caused by normal metal precipitates in a superconducting matrix, unusual training and hysterisis effects are observed in the flux flow characteristics. The greater sensitivity of noise spectra, as compared with bulk critical current measurements, in obtaining a detailed picture of flux flow is emphasized.

  18. Flux pinning and flux flow studies in superconductors using flux flow noise techniques. Progress report, April 1, 1976--December 17, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of flux flow noise power spectra have been combined with critical current measurements and measurements of current-voltage characteristics to study flux flow and local pinning interactions effective during flux flow. A model of flux flow noise generation in the presence of local pinning interactions is developed and applied to situations where pinning is dominated by: (1) grain boundaries, (2) normal metal precipitates in a superconducting matrix, (3) gross deformation producing a critical current peak effect, and (4) surface grooves imposed on a sample surface. In the case of pinning caused by normal metal precipitates in a superconducting matrix, unusual training and hysterisis effects are observed in the flux flow characteristics. The greater sensitivity of noise spectra, as compared with bulk critical current measurements, in obtaining a detailed picture of flux flow is emphasized

  19. Synthesis of dendritic iridium nanostructures based on the oriented attachment mechanism and their enhanced CO and ammonia catalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Guanjun; Sui, Yongming; Yang, Xinyi; Liu, Gang; Jia, Mingjun; Han, Wei; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Branched iridium nanodendrites (Ir NDs) have been synthesized by a simple method based on the oriented attachment mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy images reveal the temporal growth process from small particles to NDs. Precursor concentrations and reaction temperatures have a limited effect on the morphology of Ir NDs. Metal oxide and hydroxide-supported Ir NDs exhibit enhanced activity for catalytic CO oxidation. Particularly, the Fe(OH)x-supported Ir NDs catalyst with a 4 wt% Ir loading show superior CO oxidation catalytic activity with a full conversion of CO at 120 °C. Furthermore, compared with Ir NPs and commercial Ir black, Ir NDs exhibit higher activity and stability for ammonia oxidation. The specific activity and mass activity of Ir NDs for ammonia oxidation are 1.7 and 7 times higher than that of Ir NPs. The improved catalytic activities of Ir NDs are attributed not only to their large specific surface area, but also to their considerably high index facets and rich edge and corner atoms. Hence, the obtained Ir NDs provide a promising alternative for direct ammonia fuel cells and proton-exchange membrane fuel cells.Branched iridium nanodendrites (Ir NDs) have been synthesized by a simple method based on the oriented attachment mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy images reveal the temporal growth process from small particles to NDs. Precursor concentrations and reaction temperatures have a limited effect on the morphology of Ir NDs. Metal oxide and hydroxide-supported Ir NDs exhibit enhanced activity for catalytic CO oxidation. Particularly, the Fe(OH)x-supported Ir NDs catalyst with a 4 wt% Ir loading show superior CO oxidation catalytic activity with a full conversion of CO at 120 °C. Furthermore, compared with Ir NPs and commercial Ir black, Ir NDs exhibit higher activity and stability for ammonia oxidation. The specific activity and mass activity of Ir NDs for ammonia oxidation are 1.7 and 7 times higher than that of Ir NPs. The

  20. Synthesis of nanosilver on polyamide fabric using silver/ammonia complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a novel synthesis method for nanosilver has been introduced on or within the polymeric chains of polyamide 6 fabric by using silver/ammonia complex [Ag(NH3)2]+. The silver complex was reduced directly by functional groups of polyamide chains without using any additional chemical reducing agents. The polyamide fabric was also stabilized with formation of new linkages between the polymeric chains of the nylon fabric through silver nanoparticle synthesis. The presence of nanosilver on the fabric was confirmed by UV–vis spectra, EDX patterns and XRD patterns. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was utilized to identify the chemical state of silver in a range of silver oxide and silver metal. The SEM images confirmed the presence of nanosilver on the polyamide within the size of 20 and 150 nm. Excellent antibacterial properties were achieved with the treated fabrics against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Further, the antibacterial properties of the polyamide fabric treated with 35 mg/L silver/ammonia were durable against washing as they only decreased to 98.6% after 20 washes. In addition, some other properties of the treated fabrics including color changes, dimensional stability, water droplet adsorption, and reflectance spectrum are reported and thoroughly discussed. - Highlights: • Novel in situ synthesis of nanosilver on polyamide 6 • Synthesis of nanosilver without using external stabilizing and reducing agent • Synthesis of nanosilver particles within molecular chains of polyamide 6 • Producing antibacterial polyamide 6 using 35 mg/L Ag/ammonia complex • Obtaining durable antibacterial properties on polyamide 6 by this method