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Sample records for aminoglycoside resistance genes

  1. The aac(6'Ib gene in Proteus mirabilis strains resistant to aminoglycosides.

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    Jerzy Ratajczak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of aac(6'-Ib gene conferring resistance to aminoglycosides in Proteus mirabilis strains. Five isolates had aac(6'-Ib gene. In one case the gene was no-expressed. Three isolates were resistant to all aminoglycosides and minimum inhibitory concentrations were > or = 256 microg/ml. Additionally, all positive strains were resistant to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin.

  2. Relationship between antimicrobial resistance and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-feng; JIANG Jian-ping; MI Zu-huang

    2005-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the main gram-negative bacilli in clinical practice. Nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii is very difficult to treat. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance characteristics and four resistant gene expressions of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes including N-acetyltransferases and O-phosphotransferases in Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods Bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed by PhoenixTM system in 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of seven aminoglycosides including gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin, neomycin and streptomycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were detected by agar dilution. Four aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by DNA sequencer.Results The resistance rates of 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii against cefotaxime, levofloxacin, piperacillin, aztreonam, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol were more than 50%. Imipenem and meropenem showed high antibacterial activities with resistance rates of 3.2% and 4.1%. MIC50 and MIC90 of gentamicin, amikacin, streptomycin and kanamycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii were all more than 1024 mg/L, and the resistance rates were 100%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. But their resistance rates to tobramycin, netilmicin and neomycin were 86.7%, 93.3% and 46.7%, respectively. Three modifying enzyme genes, including aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes, were found in 15 strains, but aphA6 had not been detected. Their positive rates were 93.3%, 20.0% and 20.0%, respectively. These three genes existed simultaneously in No.19 strain. Nucleotide sequences of aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes shared 100%, 97.9% and 99.7% identities with GenBank genes (AY307113, S68058 and AY

  3. Worldwide Disseminated armA Aminoglycoside Resistance Methylase Gene Is Borne by Composite Transposon Tn1548

    OpenAIRE

    Galimand, M.; Sabtcheva, S.; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T.

    2005-01-01

    The armA (aminoglycoside resistance methylase) gene, which confers resistance to 4,6-disubstituted deoxystreptamines and fortimicin, was initially found in Klebsiella pneumoniae BM4536 on IncL/M plasmid pIP1204 of ca. 90 kb which also encodes the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M-3. Thirty-four enterobacteria from various countries that were likely to produce a CTX-M enzyme since they were more resistant to cefotaxime than to ceftazidime were studied. The armA gene was detected in 12 clinic...

  4. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch controls the expression of aminoglycoside resistance acetyltransferase and adenyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens is an increasing threat to public health. The fundamental mechanisms that control the high levels of expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are one of the earliest classes of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. In the clinic aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug although resistance through enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or the overexpression of efflux pumps is also appearing. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch has been identified that controls expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes that encode the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (ANT) (adenyltransferase (AAD)) enzymes. AAC and ANT cause resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics through modification of the drugs. Expression of the AAC and ANT resistance genes is regulated by aminoglycoside binding to the 5' leader RNA of the aac/aad genes. The aminoglycoside sensing RNA is also associated with the integron cassette system that captures antibiotic resistance genes. Specific aminoglycoside binding to the leader RNA induces a structural transition in the leader RNA, and consequently induction of resistance protein expression. Reporter gene expression, direct measurements of drug RNA binding, chemical probing and UV cross-linking combined with mutational analysis demonstrated that the leader RNA functioned as an aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch in which drug binding to the leader RNA leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches. PMID:24631585

  5. Emergence of aminoglycoside resistance genes aadA and aadE in the genus Campylobacter.

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    Pinto-Alphandary, H; Mabilat, C; Courvalin, P

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to streptomycin or spectinomycin or both in five Campylobacter coli strains, two Campylobacter jejuni strains, and a Campylobacter-like strain was studied by enzymatic assays and dot blot hybridization. Resistance was due to 6- or 3",9-aminoglycoside adenylyltransferases and to new types of phospho- and adenylyltransferases.

  6. Involvement of aph(3‘-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

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    Markus eWoegerbauer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination.We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3’-IIa (nptII gene. APH(3’-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria.The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in 3 datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program, RDP4, and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection, GARD.From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99% - 100% sequence identity with aph(3’-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3’-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3’-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants.

  7. Involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

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    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3′)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3′)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3′)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3′)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  8. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6’)-aph(2”) Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran

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    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. Objectives: This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3”)-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. Results: The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6’)-aph(2”). The prevalence of aph(3”)-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6’)-aph(2”) among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary.

  9. A nanoplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of vancomycin and bifunctional aminoglycoside resistance genes in Enterococcus species

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    Ravichandran Manickam

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci have emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections in many parts of the world over the last decade. The most common enterococci strains present in clinical isolates are E. faecalis and E. faecium which have acquired resistant to either gentamicin or vancomycin. The conventional culture test takes 2–5 days to yield complete information of the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Hence our present study was focused on developing a nanoplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of vancomycin and bifunctional aminoglycoside resistant enterococci (V-BiA-RE. This assay simultaneously detects 8 genes namely 16S rRNA of Enterococcus genus, ddl of E. faecalis and E. faecium, aacA-aphD that encodes high level gentamicin resistance (HLGR, multilevel vancomycin resistant genotypes such as vanA, vanB, vanC and vanD and one internal control gene. Results Unique and specific primer pairs were designed to amplify the 8 genes. The specificity of the primers was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the nanoplex PCR products and BLAST analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of V-BiA-RE nanoplex PCR assay was evaluated against the conventional culture method. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was found to be 1 ng at the DNA level while the analytical specificity was evaluated with 43 reference enterococci and non-enterococcal strains and was found to be 100%. The diagnostic accuracy was determined using 159 clinical specimens, which showed that 97% of the clinical isolates belonged to E. faecalis, of which 26% showed the HLGR genotype, but none were vancomycin resistant. The presence of an internal control in the V-BiA-RE nanoplex PCR assay helped us to rule out false negative cases. Conclusion The nanoplex PCR assay is robust and can give results within 4 hours about the 8 genes that are essential for the identification of the most common Enterococcus spp. and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern. The PCR assay

  10. Aminoglycoside resistance in clinical Gram-negative isolates from Norway

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    Haldorsen, Bjørg Christina

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides represent an important class of antimicrobial agents. The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance among Gram-negative bacteria in Norway is low, but an increased prevalence among clinical isolates of Escherichia coli has been observed during the last years. The most prevalent resistance mechanism is aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. In addition, resistance may occur when bacteria produces 16S rRNA methylases, which causes high level and broad-spectrum aminoglycoside resistance...

  11. Aminoglycoside resistance among isolates of nosocomial Enterobacteriaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-seven gentamicin-resistant isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, obtained from patients attending hospital, were examined for the production of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Of the 51 strains producing such enzymes, 34 were presumptively plasmid-mediated as indicated by conjugation experiments

  12. Determination of aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by DNA hybridization.

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    Dickgiesser, N; Kreiswirth, B N

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for identification of the genes conferring aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by dot-blot and Southern blot techniques. As radioactive probes, fragments of plasmids pAT48, pUBH2, and pH13, carrying the genes for an aminocyclitol-3'-phosphotransferase, an aminocyclitol-4'-adenylyltransferase, and an aminocyclitol-2''-phosphotransferase-aminocyclitol-6'-acetyltransferase, respectively, were used.

  13. 16S ribosomal RNA methylation: emerging resistance mechanism against aminoglycosides.

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    Doi, Yohei; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2007-07-01

    Methylation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance against aminoglycosides among gram-negative pathogens belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae and glucose-nonfermentative microbes, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species. This event is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases, which share modest similarity to those produced by aminoglycoside-producing actinomycetes. Their presence confers a high level of resistance to all parenterally administered aminoglycosides that are currently in clinical use. The responsible genes are mostly located on transposons within transferable plasmids, which provides them with the potential to spread horizontally and may in part explain the already worldwide distribution of this novel resistance mechanism. Some of these organisms have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases or metallo-beta-lactamases, contributing to their multidrug-resistant phenotypes. A 2-tiered approach, consisting of disk diffusion tests followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction, is recommended for detection of 16S rRNA methylase-mediated resistance. PMID:17554708

  14. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

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    Dexi Bi

    Full Text Available Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa.

  15. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

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    Bi, Dexi; Xie, Yingzhou; Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Aminoglycosides Resistance in Acinetobacter Spp. with Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Strains

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    MH Nazem Shirazi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acinetobacter spp. is characterized as an important nosocomial pathogen and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Our aim was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility and aminoglycosides resistance genes of Acinetobacter spp. isolated from hospitalized patients.Methods: Sixty isolates were identified as Acinetobacter species. The isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance by disc diffusion method for 12 antimicrobials. The presence of aphA6, aacC1 aadA1, and aadB genes were detected using PCR.Results: From the isolated Acinetobacter spp. the highest resistance rate showed against amikacin, tobramycin, and ceftazidim, respectively; while isolated bacteria were more sensitive to ampicillic/subactam. More than 66% of the isolates were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics, and 27.5% of MDR strains were resistant to all seven tested classes of antimicrobials. The higher MDR rate presented in bacteria isolated from the ICU and blood samples. More than 60% of the MDR bacteria were resistance to amikacin, ceftazidim, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, doxycycline, tobramycin and levofloxacin. Also, more than 60% of the isolates contained phosphotransferase aphA6, and acetyltransferase genes aacC1, but adenylyltransferase genes aadA1 (41.7%, and aadB (3.3% were less prominent. 21.7% of the strains contain three aminoglycoside resistance genes (aphA6, aacC1 and aadA1.Conclusion: The rising trend of resistance to aminoglycosides poses an alarming threat to treatment of such infections. The findings showed that clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. in our hospital carrying various kinds of aminoglycoside resistance genes.

  17. Emerging resistance to aminoglycosides in lactic acid bacteria of food origin-an impending menace.

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    Jaimee, G; Halami, P M

    2016-02-01

    Aminoglycosides are the most preferred choice of therapy against serious infections in humans. Therefore, its use in animal husbandry has been strictly regulated in the EU, UK, and USA to avoid the hazards of aminoglycoside resistance in gut microflora. Nevertheless, aminoglycosides are recommended for prophylaxis and therapeutics in food animals and agriculture owing to its bactericidal nature. In the recent past, the global surge in aminoglycoside-resistant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from food sources has been noticed that might question its continued use in animal husbandry. Upon antibiotic administration, a selective pressure is created in the gut environment; in such instances, LAB could act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance which may facilitate their transfer to pathogenic organisms contradicting its probiotic and industrial significance. This may be a risk to human health as the presence of one aminoglycoside resistance gene renders the bacteria tolerant to almost all antibiotics of the same class, thereby challenging its therapeutic efficacy. Low doses of aminoglycosides are recommended in farm animals due to its toxic nature and insolubility in blood. However, recent investigations indicate that use of aminoglycosides in sub-lethal concentrations can trigger the selection and conjugal transfer of aminoglycoside resistance in probiotic LAB. Resistance to erythromycin, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones in LAB were reported earlier to which immediate regulatory measures were adopted by some countries. Paradoxically, lack of regulations on antibiotic use in farms in most developing countries makes them a potential source of antibiotic resistance and its uncontrolled spread around the globe. The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance was observed in enterococci from food origin earlier; however, its emergence in lactobacilli and pediococci suggests its spread in probiotic cultures which prompts immediate precautionary methods. This review highlights the

  18. Genetic basis of aminoglycoside resistance following changes in aminoglycoside prescription patterns.

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    Kosmidis, Chris; Giannopoulou, Maria; Flountzi, Anastasia; Markogiannakis, Antonis; Goukos, Dimitris; Petrikkos, George; Daikos, George L; Tzanetou, Konstantina

    2013-08-01

    Aminoglycosides (AG) offer an important therapeutic option for the treatment of infections caused by multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae. We observed a change in AG usage patterns in our institution between 1997 and 2006, namely a reduction in use of all AG except amikacin. We studied the changes in AG susceptibility rates in these time periods and correlated with prevalence of different molecular resistance mechanisms. Enterobacteriaceae isolated from blood cultures from 1997 and 2006 were studied. Susceptibilities to AG were determined with the disk diffusion method. PCR was used to detect genes encoding AG-modifying enzymes and methylases. Gentamicin resistance rates dropped from 14·5 to 8·8%, whereas resistance rates to other AG remained unchanged. The AAC(6')-I+AAC(3)-I combination was more common in 1997, whereas AAC(6')-I was the most common mechanism in 2006. Reduction in gentamicin use may preserve the usefulness of this agent against severe infections by multiresistant bacteria such as carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:23906075

  19. A nanoplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of vancomycin and bifunctional aminoglycoside resistance genes in Enterococcus species

    OpenAIRE

    Ravichandran Manickam; Lalitha Pattabhiraman; Yin Lee; Yean Chan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Enterococci have emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections in many parts of the world over the last decade. The most common enterococci strains present in clinical isolates are E. faecalis and E. faecium which have acquired resistant to either gentamicin or vancomycin. The conventional culture test takes 2–5 days to yield complete information of the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Hence our present study was focused on developing a nanoplex P...

  20. Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Aminoglycoside Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Strain BM4454

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    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs in...

  1. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

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    Abdul Rouf Mir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45% isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55% as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients.

  2. Plasmid-Mediated High-Level Resistance to Aminoglycosides in Enterobacteriaceae Due to 16S rRNA Methylation

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    Galimand, Marc; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    A self-transferable plasmid of ca. 80 kb, pIP1204, conferred multiple-antibiotic resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae BM4536, which was isolated from a urinary tract infection. Resistance to β-lactams was due to the blaTEM1 and blaCTX-M genes, resistance to trimethroprim was due to the dhfrXII gene, resistance to sulfonamides was due to the sul1 gene, resistance to streptomycin-spectinomycin was due to the ant3"9 gene, and resistance to nearly all remaining aminoglycosides was due to the aac3-...

  3. Clonal origin of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii isolates in a Danish county

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norskov-Lauritsen, N.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Hedegaard, J.; Fussing, V.; Mortensen, K.K.; Sperling-Petersen, H.U.; Schonheyder, H.C.

    2001-01-01

    During 1997, attention was drawn to an increased frequency of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii in a Danish county, when a total of 24 resistant C. freundii isolates was detected. In this study, 15 such isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, riboprinting and partial ...... dihydrofolate reductase gene in a class I integron. The source of the strain remains unresolved. Representative isolates were obtained from various specimens from hospitals and general practice throughout the county, with no evidence of patient-to-patient transmission....

  4. Study of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme associated resistance genes in Enterococcus%产氨基糖苷类修饰酶肠球菌临床分离株相关耐药基因的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚杰; 徐元宏; 王友梅; 刘灿

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解临床分离的肠球菌对高水平氨基糖苷类抗菌药物的耐药情况并对其氨基糖苷类修饰酶基因进行检测.方法 用琼脂稀释法检测112株粪肠球菌和118株屎肠球菌对高浓度庆大霉素(500 μg/ml)和高浓度链霉素(2 000 μg/ml)的最低抑菌浓度,随机选取氨基糖苷类高水平耐药的粪肠球菌和屎肠球菌各48株进行氨基糖苷类修饰酶基因检测,PCR扩增aac(6')/aph(2″)、aph(3')-Ⅲ和ant(6)-Ⅰ基因,并对其进行测序分析.结果 112株粪肠球菌和118株屎肠球菌对高浓度庆大霉素的耐药率分别为53.6%和78.8%,对高浓度链霉素的耐药率分别为39.3%和64.4%,且粪肠球菌与屎肠球菌的耐药率差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).aac(6')/aph(2″)基因阳性分别为38株和45株,占80.2%和93.8%;aph(3')-Ⅲ基因阳性分别为14株和19株,占29.2%和39.6%;ant(6)-Ⅰ基因阳性分别为15株和21株,占31.3%和43.8%.其中同时检测出两种和两种以上氨基糖苷类修饰酶基因的菌株有40株,高达41.7%.结论 氨基糖苷类高水平耐药肠球菌已成为医院感染的重要耐药菌,AAC(6')/APH(2″)酶的产生是肠球菌最为常见的氨基糖苷类耐药机制.%Objective To investigate enterococci isolated from clinical specimens on the high level of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance and the detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene. Methods 112 strains of E.faecalis and 118 strains of E. faecium to the high-level gentamicin(500 μg/ml)and high-level of streptomycin (2 000 μg/ml)minimum inhibitory concentration were detected by agar ditution method. The aac (6')/aph (2"),aph(3')-Ⅲ and ant(6)- Ⅰ genes were amplified by PCR. Finally,their genotype were determined by DNA sequencing. Results 112 strains of E. faecalis and 118 strains of E. faecium HLGR rates were 53. 1% and 73.2%, and HLSR rates were 38. 9% and 59. 8%. The drug resistance of the two species to high-level gentamicin and high

  5. Synergistic effect of [10]-gingerol and aminoglycosides against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Chihiro; Shiota, Sumiko; Kuroda, Teruo; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Kariyama, Reiko; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2006-03-01

    An extract from ginger (root of Zingiber officinale) reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aminoglycosides in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The effective compound was isolated and identified as [10]-gingerol. In the presence of [10]-gingerol at 1/10 concentration of its own MIC, the MIC of arbekacin was lowered by 1/32 to 1/16. [10]-Gingerol also reduced the MICs of other aminoglycosides, and of bacitracin and polymixin B, but not of other antimicrobial agents tested. Because [10]-gingerol reduced the MICs of several aminoglycosides both in strains possessing or lacking aminoglycoside-modification enzymes, it seems that the effect of [10]-gingerol is not related to these enzymes, which mainly confer bacterial resistance against aminoglycosides. It seemed that a detergent-like effect of [10]-gingerol potentiated the antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycosides. In fact, some detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100 reduced the MICs of aminoglycosides, bacitracin and polymixin B in VRE. Since the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci is due to low level of entry of the drugs into the cells, increase in the membrane permeability caused by [10]-gingerol will enhance the influx of aminoglycosides into enterococcal cells. PMID:16508142

  6. Study of Pseudomonas Aeroginosa resistance to Penicillines, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleknezhad P

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug therapy and prophylaxy in infectious diseases, from hygienic and economical point of view, are very important. Infections caused by pseudomonas aeroginosa were particularly severe, with high mortality rates. In the recent years pseudomonas aeroginosa continued to cause the most severe, life-thereating infections in burned patients, in spite of the introduction of a wide variety of antibiotics advised specifically for their anti pseudomonal activity. The aim of this study, in which many cases of ps.aeroginosa infections are assessed is to identify the drug resistance of this bacteria to penicillines, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides by antibiotic sensitivity test (disk ager diffusion. Results as percent of resistance to each antibiotic were 89% to carbenicillin, 55% to piperacillin, 89% to mezlocillin, 89.5% to ticarcillin+clavulonic acid, 85% to ceftriaxone, 95% to tobramycin, 5% of all isolates were not sensitive to any antibiotics.

  7. The prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes (aac (6'-I, aac (6'-II, ant (2"-I, aph (3'-VI in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzam Vaziri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is one of the primary opportunistic pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections. Aminoglycosides are an import ant component of antipseudomonal chemotherapy. The inactivation of drugs by modifying enzymes is the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. OBJECTIVES: The inactivation of aminoglycosides by modifying enzymes is the primary resistance mechanism employed by P. aeruginosa. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of aminoglycoside resistance and the prevalence of four import ant modifying enzyme genes (aac (6'-I, aac (6'-II, ant (2"-I, aph (3'-VI in P. aeruginosa in Iran. METHODS: A total of 250 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from several hospitals in seven cities in Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests (using the disk diffusion method and E-tests were performed for all 250 isolates. In addition, all isolates were screened for the presence of modifying enzyme genes by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The resistance rates, as determined by the disk diffusion method, were as follows: gentamicin 43%, tobramycin 38%, and amikacin 24%. Of the genes examined, aac (6'-II (36% was the most frequently identified gene in phenotypic resist ant isolates, followed by ant (2"-I, aph (3'-VI, and aac (6'-I. CONCLUSIONS: Aminoglycoside resistance in P. aeruginosa remains a signific ant problem in Iran. Therefore, there is considerable local surveillance of aminoglycoside resistance.

  8. Intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Enterococcus faecium is conferred by the 16S rRNA m5C1404-specific methyltransferase EfmM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galimand, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Panvert, Michel; Desmolaize, Benoît; Douthwaite, Stephen Roger; Mechulam, Yves; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are ribosome-targeting antibiotics and a major drug group of choice in the treatment of serious enterococcal infections. Here we show that aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecium strain CIP 54-32 is conferred by the chromosomal gene efmM, encoding the E. faecium methyltr......Aminoglycosides are ribosome-targeting antibiotics and a major drug group of choice in the treatment of serious enterococcal infections. Here we show that aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecium strain CIP 54-32 is conferred by the chromosomal gene efmM, encoding the E. faecium...... locations are required for catalysis. The tertiary structure of EfmM is highly similar to that of RsmF, consistent with m(5)C formation at adjacent sites on the 30S subunit, while distinctive structural features account for the enzymes' respective specificities for nucleotides C1404 and C1407....

  9. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of...

  10. Strategies to overcome the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes for treating resistant bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Labby, Kristin J.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of the first antibiotics, bacterial resistance began to emerge. Many mechanisms give rise to resistance; the most prevalent mechanism of resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) family of antibiotics is the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Since the identification of these modifying enzymes, many efforts have been put forth to prevent their damaging alterations of AGs. These diverse strategies are discussed within this review, including: creating new...

  11. Prevalence of resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in a University Hospital in Northeastern Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Diana Michalska; Pawel Tomasz Sacha; Dominika Ojdana; * Anna Wieczorek; Elzbieta Tryniszewska

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones among twenty-five Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated between 2002 and 2009. In PCR, following genes were detected: ant(2″)-Ia in 9 (36.0%), aac(6′)-Ib in 7 (28.0%), qnrB in 5 (20.0%), aph(3″)-Ib in 2 (8.0%) of isolates.

  12. Cholera in Vietnam: changes in genotypes and emergence of class I integrons containing aminoglycoside resistance gene cassettes in vibrio cholerae O1 strains isolated from 1979 to 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, A; Forslund, A; Tam, N V; Vinh, D X; Cam, P D

    1999-03-01

    The number of cholera cases and the mortality rates reported from different regions of Vietnam varied considerably in the period from 1979 to 1996, with between 2,500 and 6,000 cases reported annually from 1992 to 1995. Annual mortality rates ranged from 2.0 to 9.6% from 1979 to 1983 to less than 1.8% after 1983. Major cholera outbreaks were reported from the High Plateau region for the first time in 1994 and 1995; this is an area with limited access to health services and safe drinking-water supplies. All cases were associated with Vibrio cholerae O1. Using ribotyping, cholera toxin (CT) genotyping, and characterization of antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antibiotic resistance genes by PCR, we show that strains isolated after 1990 were clearly different from strains isolated before 1991. In contrast to strains isolated before 1991, 94% of 104 strains isolated after 1990 showed an identical ribotype R1, were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and streptomycin, and showed a different CT genotype. Furthermore, PCR analysis revealed that sulfamethoxazole-resistant strains harbored class I integrons containing a gene cassette ant(3")-1a encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of class I integrons in V. cholerae. The development of cholera and the changes in the phenotypic and genotypic properties of V. cholerae O1 shown in the present study highlight the importance of monitoring V. cholerae O1 in Vietnam as in other parts of the world. In particular, the emergence of the new ribotype R1 strain containing class I integrons should be further studied. PMID:9986842

  13. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants among carbapeneme non-susceptible Enterobacter cloacae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simultaneous resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS isolates will inevitably create problems. The present study was performed to characterize the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs among the CNS Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and to acquire their molecular epidemiological characteristics. METHODS: The β-lactamases genes (including class A carbapenemase genes bla(KPC and bla(SME, metallo-β-lactamase genes (MBLs bla(IMP, bla(VIM and bla(NDM, and extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs,bla(CTX-M, bla(TEM and bla(SHV, QRDs (including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6'-Ib-cr and ARDs (including aac(6'-Ib, armA and rmtB of these 35 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS: Of the 35 isolates, 9 (25.7% harbored a carbapenemase gene; 23 (65.7% carried ESBLs; 24 (68.6% were QRD positive; and 27 (77.1% were ARD positive. Among the 5 bla(IMP-8 positive strains, 4 (80% contained both ESBL and QRD genes, and all the 5 (100% harbored ARD genes. Of the 23 ESBLs positive isolates, 6 (26.1% were carbapenemase positive, 14 (60.9% were QRD positive, and 18 (78.3% were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 35 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. cloacae isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. CONCLUSION: QRD and ARD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. cloacae isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. The CNS E. cloacae isolate co-expressing bla(NDM-1, bla(IMP-26, qnrA1 and qnrS1 was first reported.

  14. Association of the novel aminoglycoside resistance determinant RmtF with NDM carbapenemase in Enterobacteriaceae isolated in India and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Laura; Hopkins, Katie L; Gutierrez, Belen; Ovejero, Cristina M; Shukla, Suruchi; Douthwaite, Stephen Roger; Prasad, Kashi N; Woodford, Neil; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases are an emerging mechanism conferring high-level resistance to clinically relevant aminoglycosides and have been associated with important mechanisms such as NDM-1. We sought genes encoding these enzymes in isolates highly resistant (MIC >200 mg/L) to gentamicin and ami...

  15. Development of aminoglycoside and β-lactamase resistance in intestinal microbiota of swine treated with lincomycin, chlorotetracycline and amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eSun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin are commonly used antimicrobials for growth promotion and infectious disease prophylaxis in swine production. In this study, we investigated the shifts and resistance development among intestinal microbiota in pregnant sows before and after lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin treatment by using phylogenetic analysis, bacterial enumeration, and PCR. After the antimicrobial treatment, shifts in microbial community, an increased proportion of resistant bacteria, and genes related to antimicrobial resistance as compared to the day before antimicrobial administration (day 0 were observed. Importantly, a positive correlation between antimicrobial resistance gene expression in different categories, especially those encoding aminoglycoside and β-lactamase and antimicrobial resistance, was observed. These findings demonstrate an important role of antimicrobial usage in animals in the development of antimicrobial resistance, and support the notion that prudent use of antimicrobials in swine is needed to reduce the risk of the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR zoonotic pathogens.

  16. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460-3.854), p-value animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the bla CTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6')-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact. PMID:26904015

  17. Multiple ESBL-producing Escherichia coli sequence types carrying quinolone and aminoglycoside resistance genes circulating in companion and domestic farm animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, harbor commonly occurring plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah eSeni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing bacteria in humans, animals and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7% animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130 and 33.1% (43/130, respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI = 2.372 (1.460 - 3.854, p-value <0.001] was found to be a predictor of ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25, ST2852 (3/25, ST1303 (3/25 were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the blaCTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6’Ib-cr and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the United States. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact.

  18. 耐药大肠埃希菌β-内酰胺类、氨基糖苷类获得性耐药基因与可移动遗传元件研究%Investigation of acquired resistance genes to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and mobile genetic elements in multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建明; 万长标; 钱玮和; 程建平; 金跃

    2011-01-01

    目的 调查多药耐药大肠埃希菌β-内酰胺类、氨基糖苷类获得性耐药基因与可移动遗传元件的存在情况.方法 收集医院2007年1-12月患者标本中分离的20株多药耐药大肠埃希菌,采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)的方法,分析42种β-内酰胺类、氨基糖苷类获得性耐药基因以及10种可移动遗传元件的遗传标记;并对上述检测结果做样本聚类分析.结果20 株多药耐药大肠埃希菌检出β-内酰胺类获得性耐药基因TEM-1及CTX-M-55,检出率为80.0%、50.0%,氨基糖苷类获得性耐药基因aac(3)-Ⅱ、aac(6’)-Ⅰb、ant(3")-Ⅰ、aadA5、aph(3’)-Ⅰ,检出率分别为45.0%、5.0%、10.0%、45.0%、5.0%,可移动遗传元件检出intⅠ 1、tnp513、IS26、ISEcp1、traA、trbC,检出率分别为55.0%、25.0%、90.0%、65.0%、80.0%、75.0%;其他39种基因未检出.结论 20株多药耐药大肠埃希菌耐β-内酰胺类、氨基糖苷类药物与细菌产2种β-内酰胺类获得性耐药基因、5种氨基糖苷类获得性耐药基因相关;可移动遗传元件的水平转移使细菌的耐药性在同种细菌菌株之间甚至不同种细菌菌株之间得以快速传播;样本聚类分析提示,该组多药耐药大肠埃希菌尚无克隆传播.%OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution of acquired resistance genes to [3-lactams, aminoglycosides and mobile genetic elements in multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. Coli). METHODS From Jan 2007 to Dec 2007, 20 strains of E. Coli were collected from The Second People's Hospital of Huaian. Then, 42 kinds of acquired resistance genes to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and 10 kinds of genetic markers of mobile genetic elements were analyzed by PCR. In addition, sample cluster analysis was performed. RESULTS In 20 strains of multidrug-resistant E. Coli, acquired resistance genes to β-actams: TEM-1, CTX-M-55, acquired resistance genes to aminoglycosides! Aac(3)-II , aac(6')-I b, ant(3")-I

  19. Resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux pump involved in aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii strain BM4454.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, S; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    2001-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  20. Structural and Molecular Basis for Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics by the Adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Georgina; Peter J. Stogios; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure...

  1. In vitro activities of quinolones against enterococci resistant to penicillin-aminoglycoside synergy.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahm, D F; Koburov, G T

    1989-01-01

    The MICs and MBCs of CI-934, ciprofloxacin, difloxacin (A-56619), A-56620, norfloxacin, enoxacin, amifloxacin, and coumermycin were determined for 43 clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis known to be resistant to penicillin-aminoglycoside synergy. Results were compared with those obtained for 37 synergy-susceptible E. faecalis and 22 Enterococcus faecium strains. Although no substantial differences in quinolone activities were observed between synergy-resistant and -susceptible E. faecal...

  2. In70 of plasmid pAX22, a bla(VIM-1)-containing integron carrying a new aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene cassette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M L; Pallecchi, L; Fontana, R; Rossolini, G M

    2001-04-01

    An Achromobacter xylosoxydans strain showing broad-spectrum resistance to beta-lactams (including carbapenems) and aminoglycosides was isolated at the University Hospital of Verona (Verona, Italy). This strain was found to produce metallo-beta-lactamase activity and to harbor a 30-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pAX22, carrying a bla(VIM-1) determinant inserted into a class 1 integron. Characterization of this integron, named In70, revealed an original array of four gene cassettes containing, respectively, the bla(VIM-1) gene and three different aminoglycoside resistance determinants, including an aacA4 allele, a new aph-like gene named aphA15, and an aadA1 allele. The aphA15 gene is the first example of an aph-like gene carried on a mobile gene cassette, and its product exhibits close similarity to the APH(3')-IIa aminoglycoside phosphotransferase encoded by Tn5 (36% amino acid identity) and to an APH(3')-IIb enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38% amino acid identity). Expression of the cloned aphA15 gene in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to kanamycin and neomycin as well as (slightly) to amikacin, netilmicin, and streptomycin. Characterization of the 5' and 3' conserved segments of In70 and of their flanking regions showed that In70 belongs to the group of class 1 integrons associated with defective transposon derivatives originating from Tn402-like elements. The structure of the 3' conserved segment indicates the closest ancestry with members of the In0-In2 lineage. In70, with its array of cassette-borne resistance genes, can mediate broad-spectrum resistance to most beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. PMID:11257042

  3. The MisR Response Regulator Is Necessary for Intrinsic Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Justin L; Holley, Concerta L; Reimche, Jennifer L; Dhulipala, Vijaya; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Muszyński, Artur; Carlson, Russell W; Shafer, William M

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus) encounters numerous host-derived antimicrobials, including cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) produced by epithelial and phagocytic cells. CAMPs have both direct and indirect killing mechanisms and help link the innate and adaptive immune responses during infection. Gonococcal CAMP resistance is likely important for avoidance of host nonoxidative killing systems expressed by polymorphonuclear granulocytes (e.g., neutrophils) and intracellular survival. Previously studied gonococcal CAMP resistance mechanisms include modification of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine by LptA and export of CAMPs by the MtrCDE efflux pump. In the related pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, a two-component regulatory system (2CRS) termed MisR-MisS has been shown to contribute to the capacity of the meningococcus to resist CAMP killing. We report that the gonococcal MisR response regulator but not the MisS sensor kinase is involved in constitutive and inducible CAMP resistance and is also required for intrinsic low-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The 4- to 8-fold increased susceptibility of misR-deficient gonococci to CAMPs and aminoglycosides was independent of phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A and the levels of the MtrCDE efflux pump and seemed to correlate with a general increase in membrane permeability. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical studies confirmed that expression of lptA and mtrCDE was not impacted by the loss of MisR. However, several genes encoding proteins involved in membrane integrity and redox control gave evidence of being MisR regulated. We propose that MisR modulates the levels of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobials by influencing the expression of genes involved in determining membrane integrity. PMID:27216061

  4. Dissecting the cosubstrate structure requirements of the Staphylococcus aureus aminoglycoside resistance enzyme ANT(4').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Vanessa R; Green, Keith D; Zolova, Olga E; Houghton, Jacob L; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2010-12-01

    Aminoglycosides are important antibiotics used against a wide range of pathogens. As a mechanism of defense, bacteria have evolved enzymes able to inactivate these drugs by regio-selectively adding a variety of functionalities (acetyl, phospho, and nucelotidyl groups) to their scaffolds. The aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(4') is one of the most prevalent and unique modifying-enzymes. Here, by TLC, HRMS, and colorimetric assays, we demonstrate that the resistance enzyme ANT(4') from Staphylococcus aureus is highly substrate and cosubstrate promiscuous. We show that deoxy-ribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) are better cosubstrates than NTPs. We demonstrate that the position of the triphosphate group (5' and not 3') on the ribose/deoxyribose ring is important for recognition by ANT(4'), and that NTPs with larger substituents at the 3'-position of the ribose ring are not cosubstrates for ANT(4'). We confirm that for all aminoglycosides tested, the respective nucleotidylated products are completely inactive. These results provide valuable insights into the development of strategies to combat the ever-growing bacterial resistance problem. PMID:21040710

  5. Mechanism of enhanced activity of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O; Lafrenie, Robert M; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of > or =32 versus < or =8 microg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% +/- 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% +/- 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 +/- 2.3 versus 24.2 +/- 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P < or = 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  6. Rescue of non-sense mutated p53 tumor suppressor gene by aminoglycosides

    OpenAIRE

    Floquet, Célia; Deforges, Jules; Rousset, Jean-Pierre; Bidou, Laure

    2010-01-01

    Mutation-based treatments are a new development in genetic medicine, in which the nature of the mutation dictates the therapeutic strategy. Interest has recently focused on diseases caused by premature termination codons (PTCs). Drugs inducing the readthrough of these PTCs restore the production of a full-length protein. In this study, we explored the possibility of using aminoglycoside antibiotics to induce the production of a full-length functional p53 protein from a gene carrying a PTC. We...

  7. Development and evaluation of immunochromatography to detect Gram-negative bacteria producing ArmA 16S rRNA methylase responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Satoshi; Tada, Tatsuya; Kameoka, Yousuke; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohmagari, Norio; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2015-11-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of aminoglycoside-resistant bacteria is an important infection-control measure and a crucial aspect of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The enzyme 16S rRNA methylase has been shown to mediate aminoglycoside resistance in bacteria. This study describes a newly developed immunochromatographic assay using novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize ArmA 16S rRNA methylase. Epitope mapping showed that these mAbs recognized amino acids 1-93 of ArmA, which consists of 257 amino acids. Evaluation of the assay using ArmA producing and non-producing bacterial species, as well as bacteria producing other types of 16S rRNA methylases, indicated that immunochromatographic detection of the ArmA-type 16S rRNA methylase was fully consistent with PCR analysis for armA genes, with all immunochromatographically positive strains being resistant to aminoglycosides (MIC≥128μg/mL). The detection limit of the assay was 12ng ArmA. These findings indicate that this assay can be used for the rapid and reliable detection of the production of ArmA 16S rRNA methylase by Gram-negative bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. PMID:26381663

  8. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-01

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  9. Distribution of 16S rRNA methylases among different species of Gram-negative bacilli with high-level resistance to aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Yu, H; Guo, Q; Xu, X; Ye, X; Wu, S; Guo, Y; Wang, M

    2010-11-01

    16S rRNA methylases confer high-level resistance to most aminoglycosides in Gram-negative bacteria. Seven 16S rRNA methylase genes, armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE and npmA, have been identified since 2003. We studied the distribution of methylase genes in more than 200 aminoglycoside-resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates collected in 2007 at our hospital in Shanghai, China. 16S rRNA methylase genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) among 217 consecutive clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacilli resistant to gentamicin and amikacin by a disk diffusion method. 16S rRNA methylase genes were present in 97.5% (193/198) of clinical isolates highly resistant to amikacin (≥512 μg/ml), with armA and rmtB detected in 67.2 and 30.3% of strains, respectively, while no 16S rRNA methylase genes were detected in 19 strains with amikacin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤256 μg/ml. armA or rmtB genes were detected in 100% of 104 strains of Enterobacteriaceae, and these two genes were equally represented (49 vs. 55 strains). Genes for armA or rmtB were detected in 94.7% (89/94) of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, and armA was predominant (84 vs. 5 strains with rmtB). No rmtA, rmtC, rmtD or npmA genes were found. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence (ERIC-PCR) indicated that armA and rmtB genes were spread by both horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination. PMID:20614151

  10. Appearance of amikacin and tobramycin resistance due to 4'-aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase [ANT(4')-II] in gram-negative pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, G A; Blaser, M J; Santanam, P; Hächler, H; Kayser, F H; Hare, R S; Miller, G. H.

    1990-01-01

    Following the use of amikacin as the principal aminoglycoside at a Denver hospital, amikacin resistance appeared first in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and then in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and other enteric organisms from debilitated and compromised patients who had spent time in intensive care units and who had been treated with multiple antibiotics, usually including amikacin. In a P. aeruginosa isolate, resistance to amikacin and tobramycin was transferable by the IncP-2 plasmid p...

  11. Audiologic monitoring of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients on aminoglycoside treatment with long term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Malay

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis has emerged as a significant problem with the resurfacing of tuberculosis and thus the need to use the second line drugs with the resultant increased incidence of adverse effects. We discuss the effect of second line aminoglycoside anti-tubercular drugs on the hearing status of MDR-TB patients. Methods Sixty four patients were put on second line aminoglycoside anti-TB drugs. These were divided into three groups: group I, 34 patients using amikacin, group II, 26 patients using kanamycin and group III, 4 patients using capreomycin. Results Of these, 18.75% of the patients developed sensorineural hearing loss involving higher frequencies while 6.25% had involvement of speech frequencies also. All patients were seen again approximately one year after aminoglycoside discontinuation and all hearing losses were permanent with no threshold improvement. Conclusion Aminoglycosides used in MDR-TB patients may result in irreversible hearing loss involving higher frequencies and can become a hearing handicap as speech frequencies are also involved in some of the patients thus underlining the need for regular audiologic evaluation in patients of MDR-TB during the treatment.

  12. Isolation and speciation of Enterococci from various clinical samples and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern with special reference to high level Aminoglycoside resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    :Saroj Golia, Nirmala AR, Asha S Kamath B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Enterococci are important nosocomial agents and strains resistant to penicillin and other antibiotics occur frequently. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins and offer low level resistance to aminoglycosides. In penicillin sensitive strains, synergism occurs with combination treatment with penicillin and aminoglycoside. Serious infections caused by them are treated with penicillin and aminoglycoside combination. But the synergistic effect is lost, when the strain develops high level aminoglycoside resistance. The choice of drug for infections due to such strains is vancomycin. The present study was carried out to isolate and speciate Enterococci from various clinical samples, to know the susceptibility pattern of the isolates, to determine the High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance (HLAR among Enterococcal isolates. Methods: A total of One hundred Enterococcal species isolated from various clinical samples were identified by various biochemical reactions. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and HLAR were determined by Kirby- Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: Out of 100 Enterococcal isolates, 59 were E. faecalis, 38 were E. faecium, 3 were other Enterococcal species. Among these 53 isolates showed High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance. Conclusion: Present study shows the presence of drug resistance to most of commonly used antibiotics and HLAR is also more in E.faecium compared to E.fecalis.

  13. Ribozyme-based aminoglycoside switches of gene expression engineered by genetic selection in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauser, Benedikt; Atanasov, Janina; Siewert, Lena K; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-05-15

    Systems for conditional gene expression are powerful tools in basic research as well as in biotechnology. For future applications, it is of great importance to engineer orthogonal genetic switches that function reliably in diverse contexts. RNA-based switches have the advantage that effector molecules interact immediately with regulatory modules inserted into the target RNAs, getting rid of the need of transcription factors usually mediating genetic control. Artificial riboswitches are characterized by their simplicity and small size accompanied by a high degree of modularity. We have recently reported a series of hammerhead ribozyme-based artificial riboswitches that allow for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression via switching mRNA, tRNA, or rRNA functions. A more widespread application was so far hampered by moderate switching performances and a limited set of effector molecules available. Here, we report the re-engineering of hammerhead ribozymes in order to respond efficiently to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We first established an in vivo selection protocol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that enabled us to search large sequence spaces for optimized switches. We then envisioned and characterized a novel strategy of attaching the aptamer to the ribozyme catalytic core, increasing the design options for rendering the ribozyme ligand-dependent. These innovations enabled the development of neomycin-dependent RNA modules that switch gene expression up to 25-fold. The presented aminoglycoside-responsive riboswitches belong to the best-performing RNA-based genetic regulators reported so far. The developed in vivo selection protocol should allow for sampling of large sequence spaces for engineering of further optimized riboswitches. PMID:24871672

  14. Widespread Dissemination of Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes armA and rmtB in Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Taiwan Producing CTX-M-Type Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Ling; Lin, Chi-Jan; Chen, Jiun-Han; Fung, Chang-Phone; Chang, Feng-Yee; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Lin, Jung-Chung; Siu, L. K.

    2008-01-01

    Among 235 extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL) isolates collected from a nationwide surveillance performed in Taiwan, 102 (43.4%) were resistant to amikacin. Ninety-two of these 102 (90.2%) isolates were carrying CTX-M-type β-lactamases individually or concomitantly with SHV-type or CMY-2 β-lactamases. The armA and rmtB alleles were individually detected in 44 and 37 of these 92 isolates, respectively. One isolate contained both armA and rmtB. The coexistence o...

  15. The prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes (aac (6′)-I, aac (6′)-II, ant (2″)-I, aph (3′)-VI) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Farzam Vaziri; Shahin Najar Peerayeh; Qorban Behzadian Nejad; Abbas Farhadian

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is one of the primary opportunistic pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections. Aminoglycosides are an import ant component of antipseudomonal chemotherapy. The inactivation of drugs by modifying enzymes is the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. OBJECTIVES: The inactivation of aminoglycosides by modifying enzymes is the primary resistance mechanism employed by P. aeruginosa. The aim of the present study was to investig...

  16. 30S Subunit-Dependent Activation of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 Aminoglycoside Resistance-Conferring 16S rRNA Methyltransferase Kmr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Miloje; Sunita, S.; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Desai, Pooja M.; Macmaster, Rachel; Vinal, Kellie

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of bacterial 16S rRNA within the ribosomal decoding center confers exceptionally high resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. This resistance mechanism is exploited by aminoglycoside producers for self-protection while functionally equivalent methyltransferases have been acquired by human and animal pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report structural and functional analyses of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 aminoglycoside resistance-conferring methyltransferase Kmr. Our results demonstrate that Kmr is a 16S rRNA methyltransferase acting at residue A1408 to confer a canonical aminoglycoside resistance spectrum in Escherichia coli. Kmr possesses a class I methyltransferase core fold but with dramatic differences in the regions which augment this structure to confer substrate specificity in functionally related enzymes. Most strikingly, the region linking core β-strands 6 and 7, which forms part of the S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) binding pocket and contributes to base flipping by the m1A1408 methyltransferase NpmA, is disordered in Kmr, correlating with an exceptionally weak affinity for SAM. Kmr is unexpectedly insensitive to substitutions of residues critical for activity of other 16S rRNA (A1408) methyltransferases and also to the effects of by-product inhibition by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). Collectively, our results indicate that adoption of a catalytically competent Kmr conformation and binding of the obligatory cosubstrate SAM must be induced by interaction with the 30S subunit substrate. PMID:25733511

  17. Partial characterization of an endemic strain of a methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) homogeneously resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, J; Meers, P D

    1992-06-01

    Selected strains of methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) were subjected to a preliminary examination. They were representative of a larger group collected in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory over a period of 2 years. MARSA was endemic in the associated hospital. The characteristics investigated were antimicrobial resistance, the production of beta-lactamase, free and bound coagulase, protein A, DNA-ase, urease, lipase and pigment. The MARSA strains were generally indistinguishable, other than in their antimicrobial resistances. The resistance to methicillin was completely homogeneous. Except with imipenem, growth extended to the edge of discs containing methicillin and the other beta-lactam antibiotics tested when the strains were cultured at 37 degrees C on media without added salt. Homogeneous resistance may confer an epidemiological advantage on strains of this phenotype. PMID:1353087

  18. Chemoprophylactic efficacy against experimental endocarditis caused by beta-lactamase-producing, aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci is associated with prolonged serum inhibitory activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, A S; Tu, J

    1990-01-01

    We studied the prevention of experimental aortic endocarditis caused by a beta-lactamase-producing, aminoglycoside-resistant strain of Enterococcus faecalis (HH22) in 146 catheterized rabbits. Both vancomycin and ampicillin-sulbactam readily killed this resistant enterococcus strain in vitro. At a challenge inoculum of approximately 10(9) CFU, vancomycin (40 mg/kg intravenously [i.v.]), ampicillin (40 mg/kg i.v.), or a combination of ampicillin plus a beta-lactamase inhibitor, sulbactam (20 m...

  19. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Hein-Kristensen, Line; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to...... heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of...... the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more...

  20. Identification of clinically antibiotic resistant genes Aac(3)-IIa and Aac(6’)-Ib in wastewater samples by multiplex PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Naser Samadi; Rahim Aali; Esrafil Asgari; Hamed Mirhosaeini; Ali Shahriari; Farhad Mahmoodi; Fardin Nouri; Asad Hamdi; Farzad Fanaie; Shahla Yosefi; Saied Dadashi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used in medical centers, particularly to treat infections. The resistance developed against these agents is a huge concern in health care. A number of researchers have reported that hospital and municipal wastewaters are among the most important dissemination sources of these agent into the environment. Some, however, do not agree with this opinion. In the present study, the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes was investigated in raw...

  1. Correction of ATM gene function by aminoglycoside-induced read-through of premature termination codons

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chun, Helen H.; Nahas, Shareef A.; Mitui, Midori; Gamo, Kristin M.; Du, Liutao; Gatti, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 14% of genetic mutations in patients with ataxia-telangiectsia (A-T) are single-nucleotide changes that result in primary premature termination codons (PTCs), either UAA, UAG, or UGA. The purpose of this study was to explore a potential therapeutic approach for this subset of patients by using aminoglycosides to induce PTC read-through, thereby restoring levels of full-length ATM (A-T mutated) protein. In experiments using a modified in vitro cDNA coupled transcription/translati...

  2. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Sharma

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK and kanamycin (KM are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308, Trigger factor (Rv2462c, Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462, Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685, Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479, Universal stress protein (Rv2005c, 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c, Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c, Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148, Bacterioferritin (Rv1876, Ferritin (Rv3841 and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c. Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM.

  3. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM. PMID:26436944

  4. Enhancement of the antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides by extracts from Anadenanthera colubrine (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Humberto M; Coelho, Kivia M R N; Ferreira, Josie H L; Dos Santos, Bernadete H C; de Abreu, Aislan P L; Coutinho, Henrique D M; da Silva, Romezio A C; de Sousa, Taciana O; Citó, Antonia M das G L; Lopes, José A D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol (EEAC) and hexane (HFAC) extracts from the stem bark of Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil alone or in combination with aminoglycosides against multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extracts were determined by using microdilution assay. For the evaluation of extracts as modulators of antibiotic resistance, MICs of neomycin and amikacin were determined in presence or absence of each compound at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Both EEAC and HFAC did not show antimicrobial activity against MDR strains tested. However, the addition of EEAC and HFAC enhanced the activity of neomycin and amikacin against Staphylococcus aureus SA10 strain. When the natural products were replaced by chlorpromazine, the same effect was observed. Anadenanthera colubrine var. cebil may be a source of phytochemicals able to potentiate the aminoglycoside activity against MDR S. aureus by the inhibition of efflux pump. PMID:26158209

  5. Aminoglycosides: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kevin M; Serio, Alisa W; Kane, Timothy R; Connolly, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are natural or semisynthetic antibiotics derived from actinomycetes. They were among the first antibiotics to be introduced for routine clinical use and several examples have been approved for use in humans. They found widespread use as first-line agents in the early days of antimicrobial chemotherapy, but were eventually replaced in the 1980s with cephalosporins, carbapenems, and fluoroquinolones. Aminoglycosides synergize with a variety of other antibacterial classes, which, in combination with the continued increase in the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of the class through optimized dosing regimens, has led to a renewed interest in these broad-spectrum and rapidly bactericidal antibacterials. PMID:27252397

  6. Diversity of enterococcal species and characterization of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci of samples of wastewater and surface water in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Said, Leila; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Slama, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    One hundred-fourteen samples of wastewater (n=64) and surface-water (n=50) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented or not with gentamicin (SB-Gen and SB plates, respectively) for enterococci recovery. Enterococci were obtained from 75% of tested samples in SB media (72% in wastewater; 78% in surface-water), and 85 enterococcal isolates (one/positive-sample) were obtained. Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (63.5%), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (20%), Enterococcus hirae (9.4%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.7%), and Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus durans (2.4%). Antibiotic resistance detected among these enterococci was as follows [percentage/detected gene (number isolates)]: kanamycin [29%/aph(3')-IIIa (n=22)], streptomycin [8%/ant(6)-Ia (n=4)], erythromycin [44%/erm(B) (n=34)], tetracycline [18%/tet(M) (n=6)/tet(M)-tet(L) (n=9)], chloramphenicol [2%/cat(A) (n=1)], ciprofloxacin [7%] and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [94%]. High-level-gentamicin resistant (HLR-G) enterococci were recovered from 15 samples in SB-Gen or SB plates [12/64 samples of wastewater (19%) and 3/50 samples of surface-water (6%)]; HLR-G isolates were identified as E. faecium (n=7), E. faecalis (n=6), and E. casseliflavus (n=2). These HLR-G enterococci carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and erm(B) genes, in addition to aph(3')-IIIa (n=10), ant(6)-Ia (n=9), tet(M) (n=13), tet(L) (n=8) and cat(A) genes (n=2). Three HLR-G enterococci carried the esp virulence gene. Sequence-types detected among HLR-G enterococci were as follows: E. faecalis (ST480, ST314, ST202, ST55, and the new ones ST531 and ST532) and E. faecium (ST327, ST12, ST296, and the new ones ST985 and ST986). Thirty-two different PFGE patterns were detected among 36 high-level-aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci recovered in water samples. Diverse genetic lineages of HLR-G enterococci were detected in wastewater and surface-water in Tunisia. Water can represent an important source for the

  7. Development of a miniaturised microarray-based assay for the rapid identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batchelor, M.; Hopkins, K.L.; Liebana, E.; Slickers, P.; Ehricht, R.; Mafura, M.; Aerestrup, F.; Mevius, D.J.; Clifton-Hadley, F.A.; Woodward, M.; Davies, R.; Threlfall, J.; Anjum, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the development of a miniaturised microarray for the detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria. Included on the array are genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and ß-lactams, including extended-spectrum ß-lact

  8. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  9. Combinations of β-lactam or aminoglycoside antibiotics with plectasin are synergistic against methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Hu

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101 and MRSA (n = 115. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI, plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin in 87-89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA

  10. Assessment of hearing loss in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB patients undergoing Aminoglycoside treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Nizamuddin

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Aminoglycosides in MDR-TB patients may cause irreversible hearing loss involving higher frequencies and can become a hearing handicap as speech frequencies are too implied in more or less of the patients, thus underlining the need for regular audiologic evaluation in patients of MDR-TB during the treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1734-1740

  11. Pediatric fecal microbiota harbor diverse and novel antibiotic resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée M Moore

    Full Text Available Emerging antibiotic resistance threatens human health. Gut microbes are an epidemiologically important reservoir of resistance genes (resistome, yet prior studies indicate that the true diversity of gut-associated resistomes has been underestimated. To deeply characterize the pediatric gut-associated resistome, we created metagenomic recombinant libraries in an Escherichia coli host using fecal DNA from 22 healthy infants and children (most without recent antibiotic exposure, and performed functional selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from eight drug classes. Resistance-conferring DNA fragments were sequenced (Illumina HiSeq 2000, and reads assembled and annotated with the PARFuMS computational pipeline. Resistance to 14 of the 18 antibiotics was found in stools of infants and children. Recovered genes included chloramphenicol acetyltransferases, drug-resistant dihydrofolate reductases, rRNA methyltransferases, transcriptional regulators, multidrug efflux pumps, and every major class of beta-lactamase, aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, and tetracycline resistance protein. Many resistance-conferring sequences were mobilizable; some had low identity to any known organism, emphasizing cryptic organisms as potentially important resistance reservoirs. We functionally confirmed three novel resistance genes, including a 16S rRNA methylase conferring aminoglycoside resistance, and two tetracycline-resistance proteins nearly identical to a bifidobacterial MFS transporter (B. longum s. longum JDM301. We provide the first report to our knowledge of resistance to folate-synthesis inhibitors conferred by a predicted Nudix hydrolase (part of the folate synthesis pathway. This functional metagenomic survey of gut-associated resistomes, the largest of its kind to date, demonstrates that fecal resistomes of healthy children are far more diverse than previously suspected, that clinically relevant resistance genes are present even without recent selective

  12. Identification of a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iak, from a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2014-10-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IOMTU250 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Iak. The encoded protein, AAC(6')-Iak, consists of 153 amino acids and has 86.3% identity to AAC(6')-Iz. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing aac(6')-Iak exhibited decreased susceptibility to arbekacin, dibekacin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Iak acetylated amikacin, arbekacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not apramycin, gentamicin, or lividomycin. PMID:25092711

  13. Drug-resistant genes carried by Acinetobacter baumanii isolated from patients with lower respiratory tract infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Ning; ZHANG Wei; LI Jia-shu; YU Qin; WAN Huan-ying; MU Lan; ZHONG Xiao-ning; WEI Li-ping; MA Jian-jun; WANG Qiu-yue; HU Ke; LI De-zhi; TIAN Gui-zhen; CAI Shao-xi; WANG Rui-qin; HE Bei; WANG Si-qin; WANG Zhan-wei; ZHAO Su-rui; GAO Zhan-cheng; CHEN Ji-chao; CHEN Yu-sheng; GENG Rong; HU Ying-hui; YANG Jing-ping; DU Juan; HU Cheng-ping

    2010-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumanii (A. baumanii) remains an important microbial pathogen resulting in nosocomial acquired infections with significant morbidity and mortality. The mechanism by which nosocomial bacteria, like A.baumanii, attain multidrug resistance to antibiotics is of considerable interest. The aim in this study was to investigate the spread status of antibiotic resistance genes, such as multiple β-lactamase genes and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes, from A. baumanii strains isolated from patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs).Methods Two thousand six hundred and ninety-eight sputum or the bronchoalveolar lavage samples from inpatients with LRTIs were collected in 21 hospitals in the mainland of China from November 2007 to February 2009. All samples were routinely inoculated. The isolated bacterial strains and their susceptibility were analyzed via VITEK-2 expert system.Several kinds of antibiotic resistant genes were further differentiated via polymerase chain reaction and sequencing methods.Results Totally, 39 A. baumanii strains were isolated from 2698 sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage samples. There was not only a high resistant rate of the isolated A. baumanii strains to ampicillin and first- and second-generation cephalosporins (94.87%, 100% and 97.44%, respectively), but also to the third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone at 92.31%, ceftazidine at 51.28%) and imipenem (43.59%) as well. The lowest antibiotic resistance rate of 20.51% was found to amikacin. The OXA-23 gene was identified in 17 strains of A. baumanii, and the AmpC gene in 23 strains. The TEM-1 gene was carried in 15 strains. PER-1 and SHV-2 genes were detected in two different strains.Aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene aac-3-la was found in 23 strains, and the aac-6'-lb gene in 19 strains, aac-3-la and aac-6'-lb genes hibernated in three A. baumanii strains that showed no drug-resistant phenotype.Conclusions A. baumaniican carry multiple drug-resistant

  14. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  15. The impact of methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on the pattern of hospital-acquired infection in an acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, P D; Leong, K Y

    1990-10-01

    Infections due to methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) appeared in a new teaching hospital shortly after it opened. The effect this had on the pattern of hospital-acquired infections in the four years that followed is described. No control measures were applied and MARSA became endemic. New infections appeared at a rate of about four for each 1000 patients discharged. It established itself at different levels of incidence in various specialist units, patients under intensive care being most severely affected. MARSA was implicated in half of all hospital-acquired infections due to S. aureus but it was not more pathogenic than its more sensitive counterpart. It had little impact on the life of the hospital. PMID:1979573

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Aminoglycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lokangu Lombo(Congo); HE Hua

    2004-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics informations of aminoglycosides, their monograph and clinical Pharmacokinetics parameters are reported in this review. The Aminoglycosides are highly polarity and in reserve for serious infections caused by aerobic gram-negative bacteria and some gram-positive bacteria but their toxicity are major limitations in clinical use.

  17. Study of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases against aminoglycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI FENG SHI; SU JIAN WANG; JIAN PING QIN

    2007-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ( K. pneumoniae) is one of the main gram-negative bacilli in clinical practice. Nosocomial infections caused by K. pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are very difficult to treat. This paper investigated the resistant characteristics of K. pneumoniae producing ESBLs and their aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions including Nacetyltransferases and O-adenyhransferases. Bacteria identification and ESBLs confirmatory tests were performed by Phoenix TM-100 system. And minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of gentamicin,amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin and neomycin in 53 K. pneumoniae isolates were detected by agar dilution. In addition, six aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by DNA sequencer. It was found that imipenem and meropenem against 120 K. pneumoniae isolates produced powerful antimicrobial activities. The resistant rates of gentamicin and amikacin were 55.0% and 46.7%, respectively. Except neomycin,MIC50 and MIC90 of gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin and netilmicin in 53 K. pneumoniae were all > 128 μg/ml, and the resistant rates were 83.0%, 52.3%, 75.5%, 81. 1% and 69.8%, respectively. However, neomycin was only 39.6%. In addition, five modifying enzyme genes, including aac(3)- Ⅰ , aac(3)-Ⅱ, aac(6′) - Ⅰ b, ant(3″) - Ⅰ, ant(2″) - Ⅰ genes, were found in 53 isoahes except aac (6′)-Ⅱ, and their positive rates were 11.3%, 67.9%, 47.2%,1.9 % and 39.6 %, respectively. It was also confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis that the above resistant genes shared nearly 100% identities with GenBank published genes. The results obtained in the present study indicated that K. pneumoniae producing ESBLs strains are rapidly spreading in our hospital, and their resistance to aminoglycosides may be associated with aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions.

  18. Development of a miniaturised microarray-based assay for the rapid identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchelor, Miranda; Hopkins, Katie L; Liebana, Ernesto;

    2008-01-01

    We describe the development of a miniaturised microarray for the detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria. Included on the array are genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and beta-lactams, including extended...... also seen in the number and type of resistance genes harboured by E. coli and Salmonella strains. The array provides an effective, fast and simple method for detection of resistance genes in clinical isolates suitable for use in diagnostic laboratories, which in future will help to understand the...... epidemiology of isolates and to detect gene linkage in bacterial populations. (C) 2008 Published by Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy....

  19. Functional Metagenome Mining of Soil for a Novel Gentamicin Resistance Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyunjoo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-03-01

    Extensive use of antibiotics over recent decades has led to bacterial resistance against antibiotics, including gentamicin, one of the most effective aminoglycosides. The emergence of resistance is problematic for hospitals, since gentamicin is an important broad-spectrum antibiotic for the control of bacterial pathogens in the clinic. Previous study to identify gentamicin resistance genes from environmental samples have been conducted using culture-dependent screening methods. To overcome these limitations, we employed a metagenome-based culture-independent protocol to identify gentamicin resistance genes. Through functional screening of metagenome libraries derived from soil samples, a fosmid clone was selected as it conferred strong gentamicin resistance. To identify a specific functioning gene conferring gentamicin resistance from a selected fosmid clone (35-40 kb), a shot-gun library was constructed and four shot-gun clones (2-3 kb) were selected. Further characterization of these clones revealed that they contained sequences similar to that of the RNA ligase, T4 rnlA that is known as a toxin gene. The overexpression of the rnlA-like gene in Escherichia coli increased gentamicin resistance, indicating that this toxin gene modulates this trait. The results of our metagenome library analysis suggest that the rnlA-like gene may represent a new class of gentamicin resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria. In addition, we demonstrate that the soil metagenome can provide an important resource for the identification of antibiotic resistance genes, which are valuable molecular targets in efforts to overcome antibiotic resistance. PMID:26699755

  20. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  1. Crystallographic Studies of Two Bacterial AntibioticResistance Enzymes: Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (2')-Ic and GES-1\\beta-lactamase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynes, Laura; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-10-31

    Guiana Extended-Spectrum-1 (GES-1) and Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (2')-Ic (APH(2')-Ic) are two bacteria-produced enzymes that essentially perform the same task: they provide resistance to an array of antibiotics. Both enzymes are part of a growing resistance problem in the medical world. In order to overcome the ever-growing arsenal of antibiotic-resistance enzymes, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of their action. Accurate structures of these proteins have become an invaluable tool to do this. Using protein crystallography techniques and X-ray diffraction, the protein structure of GES-1 bound to imipenem (an inhibitor) has been solved. Also, APH(2')-Ic has been successfully crystallized, but its structure was unable to be solved using molecular replacement using APH(2')-Ib as a search model. The structure of GES-1, with bound imipenem was solved to a resolution of 1.89A, and though the inhibitor is bound with only moderate occupancy, the structure shows crucial interactions inside the active site that render the enzyme unable to complete the hydrolysis of the {beta}-lactam ring. The APH(2')-Ic dataset could not be matched to the model, APH(2')-Ib, with which it shares 25% sequence identity. The structural information gained from GES-1, and future studies using isomorphous replacement to solve the APH(2')-Ic structure can aid directly to the creation of novel drugs to combat both of these classes of resistance enzymes.

  2. Synergistic Effect of Oleanolic Acid on Aminoglycoside Antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Shin

    Full Text Available Difficulties involved in treating drug-resistant pathogens have created a need for new therapies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using oleanolic acid (OA, a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, as a natural adjuvant for antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii. High concentrations of OA can kill cells, partly because it generates reactive oxygen species. Measurement of the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC for OA and time-kill experiments demonstrated that it only synergizes with aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin, kanamycin. Other classes of antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin, rifampicin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline have no interactions with OA. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that genes involved in ATP synthesis and cell membrane permeability, the gene encoding glycosyltransferase, peptidoglycan-related genes, phage-related genes, and DNA repair genes were upregulated under OA. OA highly induces the expression of adk, which encodes an adenylate kinase, and des6, which encodes a linoleoyl-CoA desaturase, and deletion of these genes increased FICs; these observations indicate that adk and des6 are involved in the synergism of OA with aminoglycosides. Data obtained using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, fluorescence-conjugated gentamicin, and membrane fatty acid analysis indicates that adk and des6 are involved in changes in membrane permeability. Proton-motive force and ATP synthesis tests show that those genes are also involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our data show that OA boosts aminoglycoside uptake by changing membrane permeability and energy metabolism in A. baumannii.

  3. Aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss is associated with the G7444A mutation in the mitochondrial COI/tRNASer(UCN) genes in two Chinese families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Chinese families with aminoglycoside induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in hearing impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of hearing impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical G7444A mutation associated with hearing loss. Indeed, the G7444A mutation in the CO1 gene and the precursor of tRNASer(UCN) gene is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families and 164 Chinese controls. Their mitochondrial genomes belong to the Eastern Asian haplogroups C5a and D4a, respectively. In fact, the occurrence of the G7444A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by hearing impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of hearing impairment. However, there was the absence of other functionally significant mtDNA mutations in two Chinese pedigrees carrying the G7444A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or aminoglycoside(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated G7444A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees

  4. Aquaculture changes the profile of antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic element associated genes in Baltic Sea sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muziasari, Windi I; Pärnänen, Katariina; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Karkman, Antti; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in aquaculture and they can change the environmental resistome by increasing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Sediment samples were collected from two fish farms located in the Northern Baltic Sea, Finland, and from a site outside the farms (control). The sediment resistome was assessed by using a highly parallel qPCR array containing 295 primer sets to detect ARGs, mobile genetic elements and the 16S rRNA gene. The fish farm resistomes were enriched in transposon and integron associated genes and in ARGs encoding resistance to antibiotics which had been used to treat fish at the farms. Aminoglycoside resistance genes were also enriched in the farm sediments despite the farms not having used aminoglycosides. In contrast, the total relative abundance values of ARGs were higher in the control sediment resistome and they were mainly genes encoding efflux pumps followed by beta-lactam resistance genes, which are found intrinsically in many bacteria. This suggests that there is a natural Baltic sediment resistome. The resistome associated with fish farms can be from native ARGs enriched by antibiotic use at the farms and/or from ARGs and mobile elements that have been introduced by fish farming. PMID:26976842

  5. Development of aminoglycoside and β-lactamase resistance among intestinal microbiota of swine treated with lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jian; Liang LI; Liu, Baotao; Xia, Jing; Liao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yahong

    2014-01-01

    Lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin are commonly used antimicrobials for growth promotion and infectious disease prophylaxis in swine production. In this study, we investigated the shifts and resistance development among intestinal microbiota in pregnant sows before and after lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin treatment by using phylogenetic analysis, bacterial enumeration, and PCR. After the antimicrobial treatment, shifts in microbial community, an increased proportio...

  6. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  7. Diversity of Plasmids and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Companion Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C R; Davis, J A; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M

    2015-09-01

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of genetic elements in antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from healthy companion animals. In our previous study, from May to August, 2007, healthy companion animals (155 dogs and 121 cats) from three veterinary clinics in the Athens, GA, USA area were sampled and multidrug-resistant E. coli (n = 36; MDR, resistance to ≥ 2 antimicrobial classes) were obtained. Of the 25 different plasmid replicon types tested by PCR, at least one plasmid replicon type was detected in 94% (34/36) of the MDR E. coli; four isolates contained as many as five different plasmid replicons. Nine replicon types (FIA, FIB, FII, I2, A/C, U, P, I1 and HI2) were identified with FIB, FII, I2 as the most common pattern. The presence of class I integrons (intI) was detected in 61% (22/36) of the isolates with eight isolates containing aminoglycoside- and/or trimethoprim-resistance genes in the variable cassette region of intI. Microarray analysis of a subset of the MDR E. coli (n = 9) identified the presence of genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides (aac, aad, aph and strA/B), β-lactams (ampC, cmy, tem and vim), chloramphenicol (cat), sulfonamides (sulI and sulII), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(D) and regulator, tetR] and trimethoprim (dfrA). Antimicrobial resistance to eight antimicrobials (ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, streptomycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and five plasmid replicons (FIA, FIB, FII, I1 and I2) were transferred via conjugation. The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, intI and transferable plasmid replicons indicate that E. coli from companion animals may play an important role in the

  8. Assessment of hearing loss in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients undergoing Aminoglycoside treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh Nizamuddin; Farhan Ahmad Khan; Abdur Rehman Khan; Chand Miyan Kamaal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Incomplete treatments and treatment failures has led to Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, which has emerged as a significant problem in treating tuberculosis and thus the second line drugs are used with the concomitant increase in the incidence of adverse effects. Methods: This prospective study was carried out from June 2009 to May 2014 in the department of ENT in collaboration with TB and Chest at Teerthanker Mahaveer Medical College and Research Centre. Out of 104, ...

  9. Identification of clinically antibiotic resistant genes Aac(3-IIa and Aac(6’-Ib in wastewater samples by multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Samadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used in medical centers, particularly to treat infections. The resistance developed against these agents is a huge concern in health care. A number of researchers have reported that hospital and municipal wastewaters are among the most important dissemination sources of these agent into the environment. Some, however, do not agree with this opinion. In the present study, the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes was investigated in raw and effluent wastewater from hospital and municipal wastewater treatment plants. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 30 samples were taken according to sampling principles and cold cycle and transferred to the molecular laboratory. DNA was extracted by the freeze-thaw method using a kit (Promega. The genes aac(3-IIa and aac(6’-Ib which code aminoglycoside resistance were examined in this study. Results: The results indicated that the studied genes are present in 35% of urban and hospital wastewaters, and their frequency percentage is higher in hospital wastewater (52% than urban wastewater (48%. The studied genes were identified in 61% of raw hospital wastewater samples; however, they were not detected in the output wastewater from the studied treatment plants. Conclusion: Although, the studied genes were not detected in the final effluent, there is a high potential for their release into the environment. The current study demonstrated that the coding genes of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance are present in raw urban and hospital wastewaters. In the case of improper exploitation of wastewater treatment plants, the output water can contaminate other environmental sections, such as soil and water resources, and result in the emission of these contaminants.

  10. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the aminoglycoside-6′-acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Im

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AAC(6′)-Im is an N-acetyltransferase enzyme responsible for aminoglycoside resistance in E. faecium and E. coli isolates. Crystals of the kanamycin complex of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of enzymatic deactivation of the drugs. The aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferases (AACs) are a large family of bacterial enzymes that are responsible for coenzyme-A-facilitated acetylation of aminoglycosides. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, AAC(6′)-Im, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 178 amino-acid residues) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized as the kanamycin complex. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.0 Å resolution were collected from a crystal of this complex on beamline BL12-2 at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P65, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 107.75, c = 37.33 Å, and contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Structure determination is under way using molecular replacement

  12. Durable resistance to Puccinia triticina by accumulation of resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The individual use of single race-specific resistance genes with major phenotypic effects has rarely provided lasting resistance. However, breeding and combining or pyramiding of resistance genes into individual cultivars has had considerable success, particularly in situations in which the pathogen does not reproduce sexually, as in the case of wheat leaf rust pathogen. In European-Mediterranean region perfomed international investigations of wheat leaf rust proved that breeding of new lines of wheat resistant to Puccinia triticina Eriks. for differentiation of pathogen population, as well as for sources of durable resistance is necessary. Breeding of such resistant lines has proved necessary due to the unsatisfatory survey results of these regions on standard isogenic Lr lines. It has become clear that these regions needed new, more efficient differential resistance genes, as well as sources of resistance. In the beginning, after extensive screening tests of several International Rust Nurseries, 18 donors of resistance had been selected as crosses with recurrent parents' varieties Princ and Starke. These hybrid lines had been comparatively tested with twenty six Lr single gene lines using twenty especially virulent cultures of P. triticina in order to check the presence of these known Lr genes in our hybrid lines. Considerable influence of recurrent parent to the number of resistant genes in used donors was demonstrated. On the other hand, considerable influence of the pathogen culture was established to the number of resistance genes in used donors. In order to enhance resistance and pyramiding genes in these hybrids, the most interesting selected eight lines have been crossed with only effective isogenic ones, containing the strong genes Lr9, Lr19 and Lr24. On the basis of different segregation rations of all crossing combinations it was proved that no one of resistant donors contained the applied strong resistant genes. It means that our

  13. The evolution of resistance gene in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Haiyan; LIU Xuemin; LI Lijun; LIU Li

    2007-01-01

    Resistance genes enable plants to fight against plant pathogens. Plant resistance genes (R gene) are organized complexly in genome. Some resistance gene sequence data enable an insight into R gene structure and gene evolution. Some sites like Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) are of specific interest since homologous recombination can happen. Crossing over, transposon insertion and excision and mutation can produce new specificity. Three models explaining R gene evolution were discussed. More information needed for dissection of R gene evolution though some step can be inferred from genetic and sequence analysis.

  14. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb. PMID:25896692

  15. Molecular basis of rare aminoglycoside susceptibility and pathogenesis of Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates from Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily A Trunck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei is intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides and macrolides, mostly due to AmrAB-OprA efflux pump expression. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of aminoglycoside susceptibility exhibited by Thai strains 708a, 2188a, and 3799a. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: qRT-PCR revealed absence of amrB transcripts in 708a and greatly reduced levels in 2188a and 3799a. Serial passage on increasing gentamicin concentrations yielded 2188a and 3799a mutants that became simultaneously resistant to other aminoglycosides and macrolides, whereas such mutants could not be obtained with 708a. Transcript analysis showed that the resistance of the 2188a and 3799a mutants was due to upregulation of amrAB-oprA expression by unknown mechanism(s. Use of a PCR walking strategy revealed that the amrAB-oprA operon was missing in 708a and that this loss was associated with deletion of more than 70 kb of genetic material. Rescue of the amrAB-oprB region from a 708a fosmid library and sequencing showed the presence of a large chromosome 1 deletion (131 kb and 141 kb compared to strains K96243 and 1710b, respectively. This deletion not only removed the amrAB-oprA operon, but also the entire gene clusters for malleobactin and cobalamin synthesis. Other genes deleted included the anaerobic arginine deiminase pathway, putative type 1 fimbriae and secreted chitinase. Whole genome sequencing and PCR analysis confirmed absence of these genes from 708a. Despite missing several putative virulence genes, 708a was fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain 708a may be a natural candidate for genetic manipulation experiments that use Select Agent compliant antibiotics for selection and validates the use of laboratory-constructed Delta(amrAB-oprA mutants in such experiments.

  16. Aminoglycoside antibiotics and autism: a speculative hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manev Hari

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, it has been suspected that there is a relationship between therapy with some antibiotics and the onset of autism; but even more curious, some children benefited transiently from a subsequent treatment with a different antibiotic. Here, we speculate how aminoglycoside antibiotics might be associated with autism. Presentation We hypothesize that aminoglycoside antibiotics could a trigger the autism syndrome in susceptible infants by causing the stop codon readthrough, i.e., a misreading of the genetic code of a hypothetical critical gene, and/or b improve autism symptoms by correcting the premature stop codon mutation in a hypothetical polymorphic gene linked to autism. Testing Investigate, retrospectively, whether a link exists between aminoglycoside use (which is not extensive in children and the onset of autism symptoms (hypothesis "a", or between amino glycoside use and improvement of these symptoms (hypothesis "b". Whereas a prospective study to test hypothesis "a" is not ethically justifiable, a study could be designed to test hypothesis "b". Implications It should be stressed that at this stage no direct evidence supports our speculative hypothesis and that its main purpose is to initiate development of new ideas that, eventually, would improve our understanding of the pathobiology of autism.

  17. Characterization of Resistance to Aminoglycosides in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated From a Tertiary Care Hospital in Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common nosocomial pathogens which can cause a broad spectrum of infections. Objectives: The current study aimed to describe the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of clonal groups of gentamicin-resistant strains of MRSA isolated from a tertiary care hospital in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 301 S. aureus isolates were collected during January to November 2012. All of the isolates ...

  18. Transgenic Cotton and Disease Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJASEKARAN; Kanniah

    2008-01-01

    Success in conventional breeding for resistance to mycotoxin-producing or other phytopathogenic fungi is dependent on the availability of resistance gene(s) in the germplasm.Even when it is available,breeding for disease-resistant crops is very time consuming,especially in perennial crops such as

  19. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes of wastewater and surface water in livestock farms of Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Hao, Lijun; Guo, Xinyan; Wang, Na; Ye, Boping

    2015-09-01

    The overuse of antibiotics in livestock farms is general, leading to a wide distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in aquatic environment adjacent to livestock farms. However, researches of the distribution and types of ARGs in aquatic environment of China are still in the initial stage. In this study, wastewater and surface water samples were collected from 12 livestock farms (four pig farms, four cattle farms, and four chicken farms) in Jiangsu Province of China. The prevalence, abundance, and distribution of 22 ARGs were investigated, which were categorized into six groups, including nine tetracyclin resistance genes, three sulfonamides resistance genes, three quinolone resistance genes, two macrolide resistance genes, three aminoglycoside resistance genes, and two multidrug resistance genes, employing quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The results suggested that all of the 22 ARGs were detected in samples. Sul1, sul2, and tetM were the most abundant with the average concentration of 3.84 × 10(1) copies/16S recombinant RNA (rRNA) gene copies, 1.62 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, 2.33 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Principle component analysis revealed that the comprehensive pollution of ARGs in northern Jiangsu was more serious. ARGs in wastewater were more abundant when compared to that in surface water. A preliminary study regarding the fate of ARGs after an aerobiotic process showed that tetA, tetC, sul1, sul2, oqxB, and qnrS were significantly increased. And, among the tetracycline resistance genes, the efflux pump genes were enriched while the ribosomal protection protein encoding genes were decreased in the aerobiotic process. The prevalance of ARGs in water environment is of concern; more surveillance is required to determine the pollution level and pattern of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:25948386

  20. Shift in antibiotic resistance gene profiles associated with nanosilver during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanjun; Metch, Jacob W; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the response of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to nanosilver (Ag) in lab-scale nitrifying sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), compared to Ag(+)-dosed and undosed controls. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) targeting sul1, tet(O), ermB and the class I integron gene intI1 and corresponding RNA expression did not indicate measureable effects of nanoAg or Ag(+) on abundance or expression of these genes. However, high-throughput sequencing based metagenomic analysis provided a much broader profile of gene responses and revealed a greater abundance of aminoglycoside resistance genes (mainly strA) in reactors dosed with nanoAg. In contrast, bacitracin and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were more abundant in the SBRs dosed with Ag(+). The distinct ARG profiles associated with nanoAg and Ag(+) were correlated with the taxonomic composition of the microbial communities. This study indicates that nanoAg may interact with bacteria differently from Ag(+) during biological wastewater treatment. Therefore, it cannot necessarily be assumed that nanosilver behaves identically as Ag(+) when conducting a risk assessment for release into the environment. PMID:26850160

  1. Virulence genes, antibiotic resistance and integrons in Escherichia coli strains isolated from synanthropic birds from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, C; Esperón, F; Herrera-León, S; Iglesias, I; Neves, E; Nogal, V; Muñoz, M J; de la Torre, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance profiles in 164 Escherichia coli strains isolated from birds (feral pigeons, hybrid ducks, house sparrows and spotless starlings) inhabiting urban and rural environments. A total of eight atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strains were identified: one in a house sparrow, four in feral pigeons and three in spotless starlings. Antibiotic resistance was present in 32.9% (54) of E. coli strains. The dominant type of resistance was to tetracycline (21.3%), ampicillin (19.5%) and sulfamethoxazole (18.9%). Five isolates had class 1 integrons containing gene cassettes encoding for dihydrofolate reductase A (dfrA) and aminoglycoside adenyltransferase A (aadA), one in a feral pigeon and four in spotless starlings. To our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first detection of virulence genes from E. coli in spotless starlings and house sparrows, and is also the first identification worldwide of integrons containing antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in E. coli strains from spotless starlings and pigeons. PMID:24689431

  2. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Coproducing ArmA and CTX-M-15 Mediated High Levels of Resistance to Aminoglycoside and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batah, Rima; Loucif, Lotfi; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Boutefnouchet, Nafissa; Allag, Hamoudi; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is one of the most important pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide. Here, we have investigated the molecular support of antibiotic resistance and genetic relationships in a series of 54 S. marcescens clinical isolates collected from Eastern Algeria between December 2011 and July 2013. The 54 isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and E-test methods. Antibiotic resistance genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic transfer of antibiotic resistance was performed by conjugation using azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient strain, and plasmid analysis was done by PCR-based replicon typing. The relatedness of our isolates was determined by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of four protein-encoding genes (gyrB, rpoB, infB, and atpD) and then compared to MALDI-TOF MS clustering. Thirty-five out of 54 isolates yielded an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and carried bla(CTX-M-15) (n=32), bla(TEM-1) (n=26), bla(TEM-71) (n=1), bla(SHV-1a) (n=1), and bla(PER-2) (n=12). Among these isolates, we identified a cluster of 15 isolates from a urology unit that coharbored ESBL and the 16S rRNA methyltransferase armA. Conjugation was successful for five selected strains, demonstrating the transferability of a conjugative plasmid of incompatibility group incL/M type. Phylogenetic analysis along with MALDI-TOF clustering likely suggested an outbreak of such isolates in the urology unit. In this study, we report for the first time the co-occurrence of armA methyltransferase with ESBL in S. marcescens clinical isolates in Eastern Algeria. PMID:25884511

  3. Isolation and identification of antibiotic resistance genes in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from respiratory system infections in shahrekord, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Reisi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Staphylococcus aureus is considered as one of pathogenic agents in humans, that engages different body parts including respiratory system and causes to spend lots of costs and extending patient’s treatment period. This study which is performed to separate and investigate the pattern of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from upper respiratory system infections in Shahrekord.   Materials and methods: This study was done by sectional-descriptive method On 200 suspicious persons to the upper respiratory system infections who were referred to the Imam Ali clinic in Shahrekord in 2012. After isolation of Staphylococcus aureus from cultured nose discharges, antibiotic resistance genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR by using defined primer pairs .   Results : Among 200 investigated samples in 60 cases (30% Staphylococcus aureus infection (by culturing and PCR method was determined. Isolates showed the lowest amount of antibiotic resistance to vancomycin (0.5% and the highest amount of resistance to the penicillin G and cefotaxime (100%. mecA gene (encoding methicillin resistance with frequency of 85.18% and aacA-D gene (encoding resistance to aminoglycosides with frequency of 28.33% showed the highest and lowest frequency of antibiotic resistance genes coding in Staphylococcus aureus isolates respectively .   Discussion and conclusion : Notable prevalence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in community acquired respiratory infections, recommend continuous control necessity to impede the spreading of these bacteria and their infections.  

  4. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore;

    2012-01-01

    ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic...... antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de......-novo-sequenced isolates.ResultsWhen testing the 1862 GenBank files, the method identified the resistance genes with an ID = 100% (100% identity) to the genes in ResFinder. Agreement between in silico predictions and phenotypic testing was found when the method was further tested on 23 isolates of five different bacterial...

  5. Kinetic and Structural Analysis of Bisubstrate Inhibition of the Salmonella enterica Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase†,‡

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Maria L. B.; Vetting, Matthew W.; Gao, Feng; Freiburger, Lee; Auclair, Karine; Blanchard, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are antibacterial compounds that act by binding to the A site of the small 30S bacterial ribosomal subunit and inhibiting protein translation. Clinical resistance to aminoglycosides is generally the result of the expression of enzymes that covalently modify the antibiotic, including phosphorylation, adenylylation, and acetylation. Bisubstrate analogs for the aminoglycoside N-acetyl-transferases are nanomolar inhibitors of Enterococcus faecium AAC(6′)-Ii. However, in the case o...

  6. Transgenic Cotton and Disease Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJASEKARAN Kanniah

    2008-01-01

    @@ Success in conventional breeding for resistance to mycotoxin-producing or other phytopathogenic fungi is dependent on the availability of resistance gene(s) in the germplasm.Even when it is available,breeding for disease-resistant crops is very time consuming,especially in perennial crops such as tree nut crops,and does not lend itself ready to combat the evolution of new virulent fungal races.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. casseliflavus isolates. Three different crystals of wild-type substrate-free APH(2′′)-IVa have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken on all three crystal forms. The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding

  8. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  9. Draft Genome Sequence for a Clinical Isolate of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E; Madinger, Nancy E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strain, isolated from a patient at the University of Colorado Hospital. The genome assembly is 3,040,186 bp in length with 37.6% GC content. This isolate encodes eleven resistance genes, including those for glycopeptide, aminoglycoside, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, and tetracycline resistance. PMID:27340066

  10. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greinwald John H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will

  11. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium blaPER-1-Carrying Plasmid pSTI1 Encodes an Extended-Spectrum Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase of Type Ib

    OpenAIRE

    Casin, Isabelle; Hanau-Berçot, Beatrice; Podglajen, Isabelle; Vahaboglu, Haluk; Collatz, Ekkehard

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the aminoglycoside resistance gene, which confers high levels of resistance to both amikacin and gentamicin, that is carried by plasmid pSTI1 in the PER-1 β-lactamase-producing strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium previously isolated in Turkey. This gene, called aac(6′)-Ib11, was found in a class 1 integron and codes for a protein of 188 amino acids, a fusion product between the N-terminal moiety (8 amino acids) of the signal peptide of the β-lactamase OXA-1 and t...

  12. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems. PMID:26232739

  13. Environmental and genetic factors affecting mutability to aminoglycoside antibiotics among Escherichia coli K12 strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro A.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental and genetic factors affecting the in vitro spontaneous mutation frequencies to aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli K12 were investigated. Spontaneous mutation frequencies to kanamycin resistance were at least 100 fold higher on modified Luria agar (L2 plates, when compared to results obtained in experiments carried out with Nutrient agar (NA plates. In contrast to rifampincin, the increased mutability to kanamycin resistance could not be attributed to a mutator phenotype expressed by DNA repair defective strains. Kanamycin mutant selection windows and mutant preventive concentrations on L2 plates were at least fourfold higher than on NA plates, further demonstrating the role of growth medium composition on the mutability to aminoglycosides. Mutability to kanamycin resistance was increased following addition of sorbitol, suggesting that osmolarity is involved on the spontaneous mutability of E. coli K12 strains to aminoglycosides. The spontaneous mutation rates to kanamycin resistance on both L2 and NA plates were strictly associated with the selective antibiotic concentrations. Moreover, mutants selected at different antibiotic concentrations expressed heterogeneous resistance levels to kanamycin and most of them expressing multiple resistance to all tested aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin, neomycin, amykacin and tobramycin. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the complex nature of aminoglycoside resistance and the emergence of spontaneous resistant mutants among E. coli K12 strains.

  14. Cotransfer of antibiotic resistance genes and a hylEfm-containing virulence plasmid in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Cesar A; Panesso, Diana; Singh, Kavindra V; Rice, Louis B; Murray, Barbara E

    2009-10-01

    The hyl(Efm) gene (encoding a putative hyaluronidase) has been found almost exclusively in Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates, and recently, it was shown to be on a plasmid which increased the ability of E. faecium strains to colonize the gastrointestinal tract. In this work, the results of mating experiments between hyl(Efm)-containing strains of E. faecium belonging to clonal cluster 17 and isolated in the United States and Colombia indicated that the hyl(Efm) gene of these strains is also carried on large plasmids (>145 kb) which we showed transfer readily from clinical strains to E. faecium hosts. Cotransfer of resistance to vancomycin and high-level resistance (HLR) to aminoglycosides (gentamicin and streptomycin) and erythromycin was also observed. The vanA gene cluster and gentamicin resistance determinants were genetically linked to hyl(Efm), whereas erm(B) and ant(6)-I, conferring macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance and HLR to streptomycin, respectively, were not. A hyl(Efm)-positive transconjugant resulting from a mating between a well-characterized endocarditis strain [TX0016 (DO)] and a derivative of a fecal strain of E. faecium from a healthy human volunteer (TX1330RF) exhibited increased virulence in a mouse peritonitis model. These results indicate that E. faecium strains use a strategy which involves the recruitment into the same genetic unit of antibiotic resistance genes and determinants that increase the ability to produce disease. Our findings indicate that the acquisition of the hyl(Efm) plasmids may explain, at least in part, the recent successful emergence of some E. faecium strains as nosocomial pathogens. PMID:19667280

  15. Minimum inhibitory concentration values and problematic disk break points of tigecycline against vancomycin and/or high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci

    OpenAIRE

    Latife İşeri; Esra Şahin; İştar Dolapçı; Zehra Yürüken

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tigecycline is a new, semisynthetic glycylcycline. It is active against important multidrug resistant pathogens. Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of multidrug-resistant enterococci to tigecycline, and to test the correlation between the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and disk diffusion methods. Materials and methods: The antimicrobial sensitivity of 108 multidrug-resistant isolates, which included 52 vancomycin-resistant enterococci (...

  16. Tetracycline resistance genes acquired at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Serrano, Angela M; Contreras, Mónica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2013-06-01

    Newborns acquire their first microbiota at birth. Maternal vaginal or skin bacteria colonize newborns delivered vaginally or by C-section, respectively (Dominguez-Bello et al. 2010 #884). We aimed to determine differences in the presence of four tetracycline (tet) resistance genes, in the microbes of ten newborns and in the mouth and vagina of their mothers, at the time of birth. DNA was amplified by PCR with primers specific for [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)]. Maternal vaginas harbored all four tet resistance genes, but most commonly tet(M) and tet(O) (63 and 38 %, respectively). Genes coding for tet resistance differed by birth mode, with 50 % of vaginally delivered babies had tet(M) and tet(O) and 16 and 13 % of infants born by C-section had tet(O) and tet(W), respectively. Newborns acquire antibiotic resistance genes at birth, and the resistance gene profile varies by mode of delivery. PMID:23483141

  17. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    OpenAIRE

    Ian May; Maha Abu-Khdeir; Roland Alexander Blackwood

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E) is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin ...

  18. The aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase Sgm impedes RsmF methylation at an adjacent rRNA nucleotide in the ribosomal A site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cubrilo, Sonja; Babić, Fedora; Douthwaite, Stephen;

    2009-01-01

    methylated nucleotides including m(4)Cm1402 and m(5)C1407. Modification at m(5)C1407 by the methyltransferase RsmF is impeded as Sgm gains access to its adjacent G1405 target on the 30S ribosomal subunit. An Sgm mutant (G135A), which is impaired in S-adenosylmethionine binding and confers lower resistance......Ribosome-targeting antibiotics block protein synthesis by binding at functionally important regions of the bacterial rRNA. Resistance is often conferred by addition of a methyl group at the antibiotic binding site within an rRNA region that is already highly modified with several nucleotide...... methylations. In bacterial rRNA, each methylation requires its own specific methyltransferase enzyme, and this raises the question as to how an extra methyltransferase conferring antibiotic resistance can be accommodated and how it can gain access to its nucleotide target within a short and functionally...

  19. Once-daily aminoglycoside therapy: potential ototoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, C. M.; Duffull, S. B.; Begg, E J

    1996-01-01

    Current data indicate that once-daily aminoglycoside therapy is as efficacious as traditional multiple daily dosing and equally or less toxic. Our experience with once-daily gentamicin, 6 mg/kg of body weight led to a 10% (3 of 33 patients) occurrence of documented ototoxicity after prolonged aminoglycoside exposure.

  20. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian May

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin in combination with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics including colistin were used. Several instillations of tobramycin into the abdominal cavity along with concomitant IV administration of colistin, ceftazidime and tobramycin and per os colistin, tobramycin and nystatin resulted in the clearance of the pseudomonal infection without any evidence of toxicity from the treatment. Intra-abdominal tobramycin with parenteral colistin therapy can be used in complicated clinical settings with appropriate nephroprotection.

  1. Occurrence of the aacA4 gene among multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from bronchial secretions obtained from the Intensive Therapy Unit at University Hospital in Bialystok, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Sacha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the aacA4 gene in a population of multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from bronchial secretions obtained from the Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU. Twelve MDR isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility and the presence of the aacA4 gene. In this study, 58.3% of the strains contained (6’-Ib’ aminoglycoside acetyltransferase gene. All of the studied strains (aacA4-positive and aacA4-negative were susceptible only to colistine (100%. Among other antibiotics, the lowest resistance rates were those shown against ceftazidime (14.3% to 20% and imipenem (28.6% to 40%. Our studies frequently revealed the presence of the aacA4 gene as a factor responsible for resistance; it is probable that other mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics also occurred.

  2. Aminoglycoside microarrays to explore interactions of antibiotics with RNAs and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D; Seeberger, Peter H

    2004-07-01

    RNA is an important target for drug discovery efforts. Several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics bind to bacterial rRNA and inhibit protein synthesis. Aminoglycosides, however, are losing efficacy due to their inherent toxicity and the increase in antibiotic resistance. Targeting of other RNAs is also becoming more attractive thanks to the discovery of new potential RNA drug targets through genome sequencing and biochemical efforts. Identification of new compounds that target RNA is therefore urgent, and we report here on the development of rapid screening methods to probe binding of low molecular weight ligands to proteins and RNAs. A series of aminoglycosides has been immobilized onto glass microscope slides, and binding to proteins and RNAs has been detected by fluorescence. Construction and analysis of the arrays is completed by standard DNA genechip technology. Binding of immobilized aminoglycosides to proteins that are models for study of aminoglycoside toxicity (DNA polymerase and phospholipase C), small RNA oligonucleotide mimics of aminoglycoside binding sites in the ribosome (rRNA A-site mimics), and a large (approximately 400 nucleotide) group I ribozyme RNA is detected. The ability to screen large RNAs alleviates many complications associated with binding experiments that use isolated truncated regions from larger RNAs. These studies lay the foundation for rapid identification of small organic ligands from combinatorial libraries that exhibit strong and selective RNA binding while displaying decreased affinity to toxicity-causing proteins. PMID:15224340

  3. Widespread Transfer of Resistance Genes between Bacterial Species in an Intensive Care Unit: Implications for Hospital Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Naiemi, N.A.; Duim, B.; Savelkoul, P. H. M.; Spanjaard, L.; de Jonge,; Bart, A.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.; Jong, de, M.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    A transferable plasmid encoding SHV-12 extended-spectrum β-lactamase, TEM-116, and aminoglycoside resistance was responsible for two sequential clonal outbreaks of Enterobacter cloacae and Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria. A similar plasmid was present among isolates of four different bacterial species. Recognition of plasmid transfer is crucial for control of outbreaks of multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogens.

  4. 糖尿病足分离的铜绿假单胞菌对氨基糖苷类抗生素耐药机制探讨%Study on aminoglycoside antibiotics resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from diabetic foot infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乌洪芳; 孙茜; 李玉珠; 张敏; 孟玲玲; 李代清

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features, phenotypes and genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) strains isolated from patients with diabetic foot infection (DFI) resisting to aminoglycosides antibiotics (AmAn). Methods The clinical profiles of 209 DFI patients hospitalized in the Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital were collected and ana⁃lyzed. Forty-one PA strains were identified, and their antibiotic resistance profiles were obtained. The DNAs of PA isolates were extracted and applied to amplifications for several aminoglycosides modifying enzyme genes, including aac(3′)-Ⅰ, aac (3′)-Ⅱ, aac(6′)-Ⅰb, aac(6′)-Ⅱ, ant(2′′)-Ⅰand ant(3′′)-Ⅰby PCR method. Combining with the clinical features and the antibiotic resistance profiles, the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes of the PA strains was analyzed. Results Gram positive bacteria (G+) were the majority of the pathogen with 51.67%detection rate. The total detection rate of PA was 19.62%, listed as the top one pathogenic bacterium among gram negative bacteria (47.67%). There was significant difference in the ratio of ulcer area≥4 cm2 between PA group and non-PA group and G+group. There were significantly higher inci⁃dence rate of ischemic ulcer and osteomyelitis in PA group than those of G+group. There were higher clinical characteristics and ulcer depth (SAD) score, and increased hypersensitive C-reactive protein in PA group than those of G+ group. There were 30 strains of PA being resistant to AmAn (73.17%). The predominant drug resistance gene to AmAn was ant(3′′)-Ⅰ(65.85%), and aac(3′)-Ⅰgene was not found from all PA isolates. Conclusion The detection rate of PA isolated from DFI patients was higher, and patients were with the characteristics of larger, deeper and severe ischemia of ulcer area. The phe⁃nomenon of PA resistant to AmAn was more serious, and ant(3′′)-Ⅰgene identified from PA isolates was the most common resistance gene identified to Am

  5. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1(+/-)) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1(+/-) mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1(+/-) mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  6. Antibiotic Resistance in Wastewater : Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)and antibiotic resistance genes

    OpenAIRE

    Börjesson, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    A large part of the antibiotics consumed ends up in wastewater, and in the wastewater the antibiotics may exert selective pressure for or maintain resistance among microorganisms. Antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes encoding antibiotic resistance are commonly detected in wastewater, often at higher rates and concentrations compared to surface water. Wastewater can also provide favourable conditions for the growth of a diverse bacterial community, which constitutes a basis for the selectio...

  7. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of VIM-1-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae EC_38VIM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Jennifer; Viedma, Esther; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    The VIM-1-producing multidrug-resistant strain Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from blood culture. The strain showed multiple resistances to clinically used antibiotics, including all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides. Sequence analysis showed the presence of 14 genes associated with resistance to antibiotics, including the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-1 gene, which was located in a class 1 integron. PMID:24009122

  8. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China. PMID:27388166

  9. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China. PMID:27388166

  10. Detection of the common resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria using gene chip technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, C.; A Jun; Z Shun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To design a resistance gene detection chip that could, in parallel, detect common clinical drug resistance genes of Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Seventy clinically significant Gram-negative bacilli (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii) were collected. According to the known resistance gene sequences, we designed and synthesized primers and probes, which were used to prepare resistance gene ...

  11. Major gene for field stem rust resistance co-locates with resistance gene Sr12 in "Thatcher" wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effecting stem rust resistance genes. "Thatcher" wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was ...

  12. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Tingfu; Guo Zhenhua; Liang Rui; Guo Yuxia; Xu Youhua; Jin Xianqing; Zhao Lihua; Sun Yanhui; Ding Xionghui

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP) (Ad-GFP-HA117), the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MD...

  13. Detection of the common resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria using gene chip technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To design a resistance gene detection chip that could, in parallel, detect common clinical drug resistance genes of Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Seventy clinically significant Gram-negative bacilli (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii were collected. According to the known resistance gene sequences, we designed and synthesized primers and probes, which were used to prepare resistance gene detection chips, and finally we hybridized and scanned the gene detection chips. Results: The results between the gene chip and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were compared. The rate was consistently 100% in the eight kinds of resistance genes tested (TEM, SHV, CTX-M, DHA, CIT, VIM, KPC, OXA-23. One strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa had the IMP, but it was not found by gene chip. Conclusion: The design of Gram-negative bacteria-resistant gene detection chip had better application value.

  14. Occurrence of integrons and resistance genes among sulphonamide-resistant Shigella spp. from Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peirano, G.; Agersø, Yvonne; Aarestrup, Frank Møller;

    2005-01-01

    2214 bp harbouring a gene cassette array conferring resistance to trimethoprim, streptothricin and spectinomycin/streptomycin. The genes coding for resistance to chloramphenicol (catA1), tetracycline [tet(A) and tet(B)] and ampicillin (bla(OXA) and bla(TEM)), were detected in resistant strains...

  15. Effects of F171 Mutations in the 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Type Ib [AAC(6′)-Ib] Enzyme on Susceptibility to Aminoglycosides

    OpenAIRE

    Chavideh, Ramona; Sholly, Steven; Panaite, Doina; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    1999-01-01

    Substitutions at position F171 of 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib cause variable loss of aminoglycoside resistance, indicating that this residue plays an important role in the structure and/or function of the enzyme.

  16. Identification of genes contributing to quantitative disease resistance in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of quantitative disease resistance during a plant’s life, little is known about the molecular basis of this type of host-pathogen interaction, because most of the genes underlying resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are unknown. To identify genes contributing to resistance QTLs in rice, we analyzed the colocalization of a set of characterized rice defense-responsive genes and resistance QTLs against different pathogens. We also examined the expression patterns of these genes in response to pathogen infection in the parents of the mapping populations, based on the strategy of validation and functional analysis of the QTLs. The results suggest that defense-responsive genes are important resources of resistance QTLs in rice. OsWRKY45-1 is the gene contributing to a major resistance QTL.NRR,OsGH3-1,and OsGLP members on chromosome 8 contribute alone or collectively to different minor resistance QTLs. These genes function in a basal resistance pathway or in major disease resistance gene-mediated race-specific pathways.

  17. Molecular markers for leaf rust resistance genes in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełkowski, J; Stepień, L

    2001-01-01

    Over 100 genes of resistance to rust fungi: Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici, (47 Lr - leaf rust genes), P. striiformis (18 Yr - yellow rust genes) and P. graminis f. sp. tritici (41 Sr - stripe rust genes) have been identified in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its wild relatives according to recent papers. Sixteen Lr resistance genes have been mapped using restriction fragments length polymorphism (RFLP) markers on wheat chromosomes. More than ten Lr genes can be identified in breeding materials by sequence tagged site (STS) specific markers. Gene Lrk 10, closely linked to gene Lr 10, has been cloned and its function recognized. Available markers are presented in this review. The STS, cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) markers found in the literature should be verified using Triticum spp. with different genetic background. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers for Lr resistance genes are now also available. PMID:14564046

  18. Horizontal gene transfer—emerging multidrug resistance in hospital bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SenkaDZIDIC; VladimirBEDEKOVIC

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and spectrum of antibiotic resistant infections have increased worldwide during the past few decades. This increase has been attributed to a combination of microbial characteristics, the selective pressure of antimicrobial use, and social and technical changes that enhance the transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance is acquired by mutational changer or by the acquisition of resistance-encoding genetic material which is transfered from another bacteria. The spread of antibiotic resistance genes may be causally related to the overuse of antibiotics in human health care and in animal feeds, increased use of invasive devices and procedures, a greater number of susceptible hosts, and lapses in infection control practices leading to increased transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance gene sequences are integrated by recombination into several classes of naturally occurring gene expression cassettes and disseminated within the microbial population by horizontal gene transfer mechanisms: transformation, conjugation or transduction. In the hospital, widespread use of antimicrobials in the intensive care units (ICU) and for immunocompromised patients has resulted in the selection of multidrug-resistant organisms. Methicilin-resistant Staphylococci, vancomycin resistant Enterococci and extended-spectrum betalactamase(ESBL) producing Gram negative bacilli are identified as major phoblem in nosocomial infections. Recent surveillance studies have demonstrated trend towares more seriously ill patients suffering from multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections. Emergence of multiresistant bacteria and spread of resistance genes should enforce the aplication of strict prevention strategies, including changes in antibiotic treatment regimens, hygiene measures, infection prevention and control of horizontal nosocomial transmission of organisms.

  19. Gene-Drug Interactions and the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Adam Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance is shaped by interactions between genes, the chemical environment, and an antibiotic's mechanism of action. This thesis explores these interactions with experiments, theory, and analysis, seeking a mechanistic understanding of how different interactions between genes and drugs can enhance or constrain the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the chemical decay of an antibiotic. Tetracycline resistant and sensitive bac...

  20. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  1. Aminoglycoside Efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement of Novel Outer Membrane Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, James T. H.; Brinkman, Fiona S.L.; Hancock, Robert E W

    2003-01-01

    The expression of tripartite multidrug efflux pumps such as MexA-MexB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to intrinsic resistance to a wide variety of antimicrobials, including β-lactams, chloramphenicol, macrolides, quinolones, and tetracycline. The MexX-MexY linker-pump combination has been shown to be involved in intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides, but the identity of the cognate outer membrane channel component remains under debate. Fourteen uncharacterized OprM homologs ident...

  2. Plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance: acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, P M

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria have existed on Earth for three billion years or so and have become adept at protecting themselves against toxic chemicals. Antibiotics have been in clinical use for a little more than 6 decades. That antibiotic resistance is now a major clinical problem all over the world attests to the success and speed of bacterial adaptation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria are varied and include target protection, target substitution, antibiotic detoxification and block of intracellular antibiotic accumulation. Acquisition of genes needed to elaborate the various mechanisms is greatly aided by a variety of promiscuous gene transfer systems, such as bacterial conjugative plasmids, transposable elements and integron systems, that move genes from one DNA system to another and from one bacterial cell to another, not necessarily one related to the gene donor. Bacterial plasmids serve as the scaffold on which are assembled arrays of antibiotic resistance genes, by transposition (transposable elements and ISCR mediated transposition) and site-specific recombination mechanisms (integron gene cassettes).The evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance genes in human bacterial pathogens originate from a multitude of bacterial sources, indicating that the genomes of all bacteria can be considered as a single global gene pool into which most, if not all, bacteria can dip for genes necessary for survival. In terms of antibiotic resistance, plasmids serve a central role, as the vehicles for resistance gene capture and their subsequent dissemination. These various aspects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics will be explored in this presentation. PMID:18193080

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    APH(2′′)-Ic is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. gallinarum isolates. Crystals of the wild-type enzyme and three mutants have been prepared and a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal. Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2′′)-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14–20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl2, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg2GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 Å, β = 108.8°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA

  4. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of a diverse set of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and the presence of 38 plasmids among all the isolates were determined. Among the novel plasmids found, there were eight that encoded resistance genes to antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosp...

  5. Determination of rust resistance genes in pakistani bread wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stripe and leaf rusts are the major constraints to bread wheat production in Pakistan. Molecular markers were used to investigate the presence of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance gene cluster Lr34/Yr18 and stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in 52 Pakistani bread wheat cultivars/lines. PCR amplification of DNA fragments using DNA marker csLV-34 showed that 13 of the studied cultivars/lines, namely 03FJ26, NR 337, NR 339, NR 347, NR 350, Manthar, Margalla 99, Iqbal 2000, Saleem 2000, Wafaq 2001, Marwat 2001, Pirsabak 2004 and Fareed 2006 carry leaf rust and stripe rust resistance genes Lr34/Yr18. Stem rust resistance gene Sr2 was observed in 36 Pakistani spring wheat cultivars/lines using stm560.3tgag marker. The slow rusting gene Sr2 needs to be combined with additional stem rust resistance genes to establish durable resistance against Ug99 in modern wheat cultivars. Low frequency of Lr34/Yr18 was found in Pakistani wheats. This gene cluster needs to be incorporated into Pakistani wheats for durable rust resistance. (author)

  6. Physiological and Molecular Pathology of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Su-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The problem of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity, which was recognized within a year of the discovery of streptomycin to combat tuberculosis in 1944, is still of great concern due to the widespread use of these powerful antibacterial agents. These drugs can damage to varying degrees the cochlea and vestibular system. Their primary targets are the…

  7. Selective condensation of DNA by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaczynska, M; Schulz, A; Fraczkowska, K; Kraszewski, S; Podbielska, H; Fuhrhop, J H

    2016-05-01

    The condensing effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the structure of double-stranded DNA was examined. The selective condensation of DNA by small molecules is an interesting approach in biotechnology. Here, we present the interaction between calf thymus DNA and three types of antibiotic molecules: tobramycin, kanamycin, and neomycin. Several techniques were applied to study this effect. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy images, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the interaction of tobramycin with double-stranded DNA caused the rod, toroid, and sphere formation and very strong condensation of DNA strands, which was not observed in the case of other aminoglycosides used in the experiment. Studies on the mechanisms by which small molecules interact with DNA are important in understanding their functioning in cells, in designing new and efficient drugs, or in minimizing their adverse side effects. Specific interactions between tobramycin and DNA double helix was modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation study shows the aminoglycoside specificity to bend DNA double helix, shedding light on the origins of toroid formation. This phenomenon may lighten the ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity issues, but also other adverse reactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the human body. PMID:26646261

  8. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  9. Novel aerobic tetracycline resistance gene that chemically modifies tetracycline.

    OpenAIRE

    Speer, B S; Salyers, A A

    1989-01-01

    A tetracycline resistance gene that was found originally on the Bacteroides plasmid pBF4 confers resistance on Escherichia coli but only when cells are growing aerobically. When E. coli EM24 carrying this aerobic tetracycline resistance (*Tcr) gene is grown in medium containing tetracycline, the resulting spent medium is no longer toxic to tetracycline-sensitive (Tcs) E. coli EM24 (B.S. Speer and A.A. Salyers, J. Bacteriol. 170: 1423-1429, 1988). To determine whether the *Tcr gene product mod...

  10. 核修饰基因与氨基糖甙类药物在母系遗传性聋发病机制及功能研究%Mechanism and Functional Research on Nuclear Modified Gene Associated with Maternally Inherited Aminoglycoside-Induced Deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘日渊; 刘琪; 郝青青; 董思琪; 徐广雨; 赵辉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular genetics and cell functions of non-sensitivity to aminoglycosides and to an-alyze the molecular mechanism in a family with maternally transmitted aminoglycoside-induced non-syndromic deafness. Methods A clinical,molecular,genetic and phylogenic analysis in this Chinese family was performed. Results Sequence analy-sis of mitochondrial DNA in this pedigree identified a homoplastic A-to-G transition at position 1555 (A1555G) in the 12S rRNA gene. Analysis of the complete mtDNA genome revealed that this family belonged to haplotype D5b1b and exhibited high penetrance in contrast with other reported families. There was a variation found in the MTO1 gene: 74202000_74202001insG and 74202003delG, indicating that the MTO1 gene may be the nuclear modified gene in this family. There was no significant mutation in the TRMU gene. Exposure to a high concentration of aminoglycosides caused an increase in dou-bling time in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from one symptomatic individual in this family, while the doubling time of the cell lines from the asymptomatic individual didn’t increase. Conclusion These results suggest that the nuclear background plays a role in the aminoglycoside ototoxicity and in the development of the deafness phenotype associated with the A1555G mutation in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.%目的对同时存在线粒体DNA 12S rRNA基因突变(A1555G突变)和存在个体表现出对氨基糖甙类药物不敏感的家系进行系统的资料收集和分子机制分析工作。方法对此家系进行体格检查、耳鼻咽喉专科检查、听力学检查,并对此家系进行线粒体DNA测定、线粒体单体型分型、氨基糖甙类药物敏感性检测、线粒体DNA相关核修饰基因TRMU和MTO1等研究。结果通过对全体成员的线粒体DNA序列测序分析,该家系的母系成员均有同质性A1555G突变;线粒体单体型分析为D5b1b;对发现的氨基糖甙类药物不敏感

  11. EXPRESSION AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE GENE AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN GENE IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Yong-rong; MA Jie; LU Yu-ying; NU Wei-lin; XIANG Zhi-fu

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression and clinical significance of multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) gene in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of mdr1 and MRP assay in 55 patients with acute leukemia (AL) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results: The mdr1 and MRP gene expression levels in the relapsed AL and the blastic plastic phases of CML were significantly higher than those in the newly diagnostic AL and controls. The mdr1 and MRP gene expression levels in the clinical drug-resistant group were significantly higher than those in the non-drug-resistant group. The complete remission (CR) rate in patients with high mdr1 expression (14.3%) was significantly lower than that with low mdr1 expression (57.5%); similarly the CR rate in patients with high MRP level was also lower than that with low MRP level. Using both high expression of mdr1 and MRP gene as the indicator for evaluating multidrug resistance (MDR),the positive predictive value and accuracy increased in comparison with single gene high expression. Conclusion:Elevated level of mdr1 or MRP gene expression might be unfavorable prognostic factors for AL patient and may be used as an important index for predicting drug-resistance and relapse in AL patient. Measuring both mdr1 and MRP gene expression would increase accuracy and sensibility of evaluating MDR in acute leukemia.

  12. Genes for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic in tropical pumpkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachner, Martin; Paris, Harry S; Lelley, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Four cultigens of Cucurbita moschata resistant to zucchini yellow mosaic virus were crossed with the susceptible 'Waltham Butternut' and with each other in order to clarify the mode of inheritance of resistance and relationships among the genes involved. Five loci were segregating, with genes for resistance Zym-0 and Zym-4 carried by 'Nigerian Local' and one of them also carried by 'Nicklow's Delight,' Zym-1 carried by 'Menina,' and zym-6 carried by 'Soler.' A recessive gene carried by 'Waltham Butternut,' zym-5, is complementary with the dominant Zym-4 of 'Nigerian Local,' that is, the resistance conferred by Zym-4 is only expressed in zym-5/zym-5 individuals. Gene zym-6 appears to be linked to either Zym-0 or Zym-4, and it is also possible that Zym-1 is linked to one of them as well. PMID:21493595

  13. Differential Expression of Salinity Resistance Gene on Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Salinity resistance and differential gene expression associated with salinity in cotton germplasm were studied,because of the large scale area of salinity in China,and its significant negative effects on

  14. [SSR mapping of stripe rust resistance gene from Ae. tauschii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Quan; Jia, Ji-Zeng; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Bao-Shi

    2008-04-01

    A dominant wheat stripe rust resistance gene, temporarily designated as YrY201, was identified in an accession Y201 of Aegilops tauschii. By bulk segregation analysis, three microsatellite markers Xgwm273b, Xgwm37 and Wmc14 were found to be linked to YrY201 with genetic distance of 11.5, 5.8 and 10.9 cM , respectively. According to the locations of the linked markers, the resistance gene was located on chromosome 7DL. Based on the chromosomal location and the resistance pattern of the gene, we proposed that YrY201 was a novel stripe rust resistance gene, and could be selected by marker-assisted selection. PMID:18424421

  15. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and resistance genes in faecal Escherichia coli isolates recovered from healthy pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniela; Poeta, Patricia; Sáenz, Yolanda; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Matos, Manuela; Vinué, Laura; Rodrigues, Jorge; Torres, Carmen

    2008-02-01

    Faecal samples of healthy dogs (n=39) and cats (n=36) obtained in Northern Portugal were seeded on Levine agar plates, and two Escherichia coli isolates per sample were recovered (78 of dogs and 66 of cats). The susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents was tested in this series of 144 E. coli isolates. Almost 20% of them showed tetracycline resistance and 12 and 15% presented ampicillin or streptomycin resistance, respectively. The percentage of resistance to the other antimicrobial agents was in all cases below 4%, and no resistant isolates were detected for ceftazidime, imipenem, cefoxitin or amikacin. Two isolates (from one dog) showed cefotaxime-resistance and harboured both the CTX-M-1 and OXA-30 beta-lactamases. A bla(TEM) gene was detected in 12 of 17 ampicillin-resistant isolates, the aac(3)-II gene in the three gentamicin-resistant isolates, aadA in 7 of 22 streptomycin-resistant isolates, and tet(A) and/or tet(B) gene in all 28 tetracycline-resistant isolates. The gene encoding class 1 integrase was detected in six E. coli isolates, including the four trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant isolates and those two harbouring CTX-M-1 and OXA-30 beta-lactamases; different gene cassette arrangements were identified: dfrA1+aadA1 (two isolates), dfrA12+orfF+aadA2 (two isolates) and bla(OXA30)+aadA1 (two isolates). One amino acid change in GyrA protein (Ser83Leu or Asp87Tyr) was detected in four nalidixic acid-resistant and ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates and two amino acid changes in GyrA (Ser83Leu+Asp87Asn) and one in ParC (Ser80Ile) were identified in one nalidixic acid- and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolate. Faecal E. coli isolates of healthy pets could be a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes. PMID:17870255

  16. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (SC); (Toronto); (UV)

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  17. Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Variants of the Ib Type with Altered Substrate Profile in Clinical Isolates of Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii

    OpenAIRE

    Casin, Isabelle; Bordon, Florence; Bertin, Philippe; Coutrot, Anne; Podglajen, Isabelle; Brasseur, Robert; Collatz, Ekkehard

    1998-01-01

    Three clinical isolates, Enterobacter cloacae EC1562 and EC1563 and Citrobacter freundii CFr564, displayed an aminoglycoside resistance profile evocative of low-level 6′-N acetyltransferase type II [AAC(6′)-II] production, which conferred reduced susceptibility to gentamicin but not to amikacin or isepamicin. Aminoglycoside acetyltransferase assays suggested the synthesis in the three strains of an AAC(6′) which acetylated amikacin practically as well as it acetylated gentamicin in vitro. Bot...

  18. Novel metal resistance genes from microorganisms: a functional metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pastor, José E; Mirete, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Most of the known metal resistance mechanisms are based on studies of cultured microorganisms, and the abundant uncultured fraction could be an important source of genes responsible for uncharacterized resistance mechanisms. A functional metagenomic approach was selected to recover metal resistance genes from the rhizosphere microbial community of an acid-mine drainage (AMD)-adapted plant, Erica andevalensis, from Rio Tinto, Spain. A total of 13 nickel resistant clones were isolated and analyzed, encoding hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions, or well-characterized proteins, but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance. The resistance clones were classified into two groups according to their nickel accumulation properties: those preventing or those favoring metal accumulation. Two clones encoding putative ABC transporter components and a serine O-acetyltransferase were found as representatives of each group, respectively. PMID:20830571

  19. Characterization of Fosfomycin Resistance Gene, fosB, in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunhui; Guo, Yan; Ma, Ying; Yang, Yang; Hu, Fupin; Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Minggui

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence, location and genetic environments of fosfomycin-resistance (fos) genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical strains, 67 fosfomycin-resistant MRSA strains were isolated from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples at a teaching hospital in Shanghai. The presence of fos genes in these clinical strains was detected by PCR and sequencing. The locations of fos genes were determined by Southern blotting and genetic environments were analyzed by primer walking sequencing. Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize genetic diversity. Conjugation was performed to evaluate the transferability of fos genes. Among 67 fosfomycin-resistant MRSA strains, nine high level fosfomycin resistant strains (≥128 μg/ml) were fosB-positive. Three new subtypes of fosB, designated as fosB4, fosB5, and fosB6, were identified. fosB1, fosB4 or fosB6 genes were located on small plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb) and flanked by an analogous replication gene (rep). Differently, the fosB5 gene was surrounded by a shorter rep gene and two copies of a transposon gene (tnp) that shared high identity with the IS257-like transposon. Four MLST types were found among the nine fosB-positive strains. Transconjugants with the fosB genes were resistant to fosfomycin with MIC 64 or 128 μg/ml. In conclusion, different subtypes and genetic environment of fosB genes indicate that gene heterogeneity for fosfomycin resistance in MRSA isolates. PMID:27144405

  20. Characterization of Fosfomycin Resistance Gene, fosB, in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuyingjie Fu

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, location and genetic environments of fosfomycin-resistance (fos genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA clinical strains, 67 fosfomycin-resistant MRSA strains were isolated from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples at a teaching hospital in Shanghai. The presence of fos genes in these clinical strains was detected by PCR and sequencing. The locations of fos genes were determined by Southern blotting and genetic environments were analyzed by primer walking sequencing. Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST was used to characterize genetic diversity. Conjugation was performed to evaluate the transferability of fos genes. Among 67 fosfomycin-resistant MRSA strains, nine high level fosfomycin resistant strains (≥128 μg/ml were fosB-positive. Three new subtypes of fosB, designated as fosB4, fosB5, and fosB6, were identified. fosB1, fosB4 or fosB6 genes were located on small plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb and flanked by an analogous replication gene (rep. Differently, the fosB5 gene was surrounded by a shorter rep gene and two copies of a transposon gene (tnp that shared high identity with the IS257-like transposon. Four MLST types were found among the nine fosB-positive strains. Transconjugants with the fosB genes were resistant to fosfomycin with MIC 64 or 128 μg/ml. In conclusion, different subtypes and genetic environment of fosB genes indicate that gene heterogeneity for fosfomycin resistance in MRSA isolates.

  1. BacMet: antibacterial biocide and metal resistance genes database

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Chandan; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Rensing, Christopher; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D.G. Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a major human health concern due to widespread use, misuse and overuse of antibiotics. In addition to antibiotics, antibacterial biocides and metals can contribute to the development and maintenance of antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities through co-selection. Information on metal and biocide resistance genes, including their sequences and molecular functions, is, however, scattered. Here, we introduce BacMet (http://bacmet.biomedicine.gu.se)—a manua...

  2. Gentamicin resistance genes in environmental bacteria: prevalence and transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuer, H.; Krögerrecklenfort, E.; Wellington, E.M.H.; Egan, S.; Elsas, van J.D.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Collard, J.M.; Guillaume, G.; Karagouni, A.; Nikolakopoulou, D.; Smalla, K.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive multiphasic survey of the prevalence and transfer of gentamicin resistance (Gmr) genes in different non-clinical environments has been performed. We were interested to find out whether Gmr genes described from clinical isolates can be detected in different environmental habitats and

  3. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the...

  4. Hygromycin-resistance vectors for gene expression in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junjie; Nie, Lei; Chen, Biao; Liu, Yingmiao; Kong, Yimeng; Wang, Haibin; Diao, Liuyang

    2014-04-01

    Pichia pastoris is a common host organism for heterologous protein expression and metabolic engineering. Zeocin-, G418-, nourseothricin- and blasticidin-resistance genes are the only dominant selectable markers currently available for selecting P. pastoris transformants. We describe here new P. pastoris expression vectors that confer a hygromycin resistance base on the Klebsiella pneumoniae hph gene. To demonstrate the application of the vectors for intracellular and secreted protein expression, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human serum albumin (HSA) were cloned into the vectors and transformed into P. pastoris cells. The resulting strains expressed GFP and HSA constitutively or inducibly. The hygromycin resistance marker was also suitable for post-transformational vector amplication (PTVA) for obtaining strains with high plasmid copy numbers. A strain with multiple copies of the HSA expression cassette after PTVA had increased HSA expression compared with a strain with a single copy of the plasmid. To demonstrate compatibility of the new vectors with other vectors bearing antibiotic-resistance genes, P. pastoris was transformed with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes GSH1, GSH2 or SAM2 on plasmids containing genes for resistance to Zeocin, G418 or hygromycin. The resulting strain produced glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine at levels approximately twice those of the parent strain. The new hygromycin-resistance vectors allow greater flexibility and potential applications in recombinant protein production and other research using P. pastoris. PMID:24822243

  5. Current Epidemiology and Growing Resistance of Gram-Negative Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Livermore, David M.

    2012-01-01

    In the 1980s, Gram-negative pathogens appeared to have been beaten by oxyimino-cephalosporins, carbapenems, and fluoroquinolones. Yet these pathogens have fought back, aided by their membrane organization, which promotes the exclusion and efflux of antibiotics, and by a remarkable propensity to recruit, transfer, and modify the expression of resistance genes, including those for extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), carbapenemases, aminoglycoside-blocking 16S rRNA methylases, and even a qui...

  6. Consolidating and Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Gene Data Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Das, Anupam J.; Cochrane, Guy;

    2016-01-01

    The unrestricted use of antibiotics has resulted in rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance (AR) and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and their application in understanding MDR pathogen dynamics, it has become...... imperative to unify AR gene data resources for easy accessibility for researchers. However, due to the absence of a centralized platform for AR gene resources, availability, consistency, and accuracy of information vary considerably across different databases. In this article, we explore existing AR gene...... data resources in order to make them more visible to the clinical microbiology community, to identify their limitations, and to propose potential solutions....

  7. Chronopharmacokinetics of once daily dosed aminoglycosides in hospitalized infectious patients

    OpenAIRE

    van Maarseveen, Erik; Man, Wai Hong; Proost, Johannes; Neef, Cees; Touw, Daniël

    2015-01-01

    Background hospitalized patients with serious infections treated with aminoglycosides are at risk of developing nephrotoxicity. Previous clinical studies have shown that the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in humans follow a circadian rhythm. Therefore, the time of administration could have important clinical implications with respect to the risk of developing aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in patients treated with once daily dosing regimens. Objective To examine the effect of t...

  8. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  9. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual fl...

  10. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Aminoglycosides and Modulating the Essential Oil of Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf

    OpenAIRE

    Tintino, Saulo R.; Lucena, Bruno F. F.; Fernando G. Figueredo; Cícera Datiane de M. OLIVEIRA; José J. DOS S. AGUIAR; Edmilson DO N. CARDOSO; Pedro E. A. DE AQUINO; Jacqueline C. ANDRADE; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.; Ednardo F. F. MATIAS

    2014-01-01

     Several works demonstrated the importance of the study of natural products as an alternative source for new antimicrobial drugs or for modulators for these ones. In this point, the aim of this was to investigate the antibacterial activity and the possible interactions between the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus alone and in association with aminoglycosides against standard and clinically isolated strains of multidrug-resistant bacteria such as S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa by mic...

  11. The relationship between codon usage bias and cold resistant genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research is based on synonymous codon usage which has been well-known as a feature that affects typical expression level of protein in an organism. Different organisms prefer different codons for same amino acid and this is called Codon Usage Bias (CUB). The codon usage directly affects the level or even direction of changes in protein expression in responses to environmental stimuli. Cold stress is a major abiotic factor that limits the agricultural productivity of plants. In the recent study CUB has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana cold resistant and housekeeping genes and their homologs in rice (Oryza sativa) to understand the cold stress and housekeeping genes relation with CUB. Six cold resistant and three housekeeping genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and their homologs in rice, were subjected to CUB analysis. The three cold resistant genes (DREB1B, RCI and MYB15) showed more than 50% (52%, 61% and 66% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. On the other hand three cold resistant genes (MPK3, ICE1 and ZAT12) showed less than 50% (38%, 38% and 47% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. The three housekeeping genes (Actin, Tubulin and Ubiquitin) showed 76% similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. This study will help to manage the plant gene expression through codon optimization under the cold stress. (author)

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the aminoglycoside-6′-acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Im

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2012-01-01

    AAC(6′)-Im is an N-acetyltransferase enzyme responsible for aminoglycoside resistance in E. faecium and E. coli isolates. Crystals of the kanamycin complex of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken.

  13. Characterization of Resistance Gene Analogs in Musa acuminata Cultivars Contrasting in Resistance to Biotic Stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of commercial banana cultivars (Musa sp.) have evolved via asexual vegetative propagation, with diversity dependent upon somatic mutation. Restricted variation has resulted in a crops with little resistance to pests and disease, and conventional breeding efforts are limited due to limited viable seed production. Numerous disease resistance genes (R-genes / R-proteins) have been characterized in plants, recognizing and conferring resistance to bacteria, virus, fungi and nematodes. The identification and cloning of R-genes in Musa would contribute to germplasm improvement. To date, five main R-gene classes have been identified, based upon protein domains, with the most abundant coding for nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins. Primers designed from conserved protein motifs have enabled amplification of NBS homologues across diverse plant species. In Musa, our group has identified over 50 distinct NBS-LRR type resistance gene analogs (RGAs) in the resistant wild diploid M. acuminata Calcutta 4. The aim of this work was to characterize RGAs in M. acuminata cultivars contrasting in resistance to Black leaf Streak Disease. PCR amplification was conducted using DNA from M. acuminata cultivars Calcutta 4 (resistant) and Pisang Berlin (susceptible). Degenerate primers targeted sequences homologous to the NBS-LRR R-gene family. Following sequencing and processing of cloned PCR products, 63 out of a total of 136 high quality sequences showed homology to R-genes or RGAs. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted on deduced amino-acid sequences. Degenerate primers were also developed targeting an R-gene family of cytoplasmic serine-threonine (Ser/Thr) receptor-like kinases (RLKs) with extracellular LRRs, for application across cultivars. Studies are also planned for selection and full length sequencing of clones from M. acuminata and M. balbisiana BAC libraries containing novel RGAs characterized in this study, as an approach for complete R-gene

  14. Characterization of resistance gene analogs in Musa acuminata cultivars contrasting in resistance to biotic stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of commercial banana cultivars (Musa sp.) have evolved via asexual vegetative propagation, with diversity dependent upon somatic mutation. Restricted variation has resulted in a crop with little resistance to pests and disease, and conventional breeding efforts are limited due to limited viable seed production. Numerous disease resistance genes (R-genes / R-proteins) have been characterized in plants, recognizing and conferring resistance to bacteria, virus, fungi and nematodes. The identification and cloning of R-genes in Musa would contribute to germplasm improvement. To date, five main R-gene classes have been identified, based upon protein domains, with the most abundant coding for nucleotidebinding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins. Primers designed from conserved protein motifs have enabled amplification of NBS homologues across diverse plant species. In the case of Musa, our group has identified over 50 distinct NBS-LRR type resistance gene analogs (RGAs) in the resistant wild diploid M. acuminata Calcutta 4. The objective of this work was to characterize RGAs in M. acuminata cultivars contrasting in resistance to Black leaf Streak Disease. PCR amplification was conducted using DNA from M. acuminata cultivars Calcutta 4 (resistant) and Pisang Berlin (susceptible). Degenerate primers targeted sequences homologous to the NBS-LRR R-gene family. Following sequencing and processing of cloned PCR products, 63 out of a total of 136 high quality sequences showed homology to R-genes or RGAs. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted on deduced amino-acid sequences. Degenerate primers were also developed targeting an R-gene family of cytoplasmic serine-threonine (Ser/Thr) receptor-like kinases (RLKs) with extracellular LRRs, for application across cultivars. Studies are also planned for selection and full length sequencing of clones from M. acuminata and M. balbisiana BAC libraries containing novel RGAs characterized in this study, as an approach for

  15. Mining metagenomic datasets for antibiotic resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are medicines that are used to kill, slow down, or prevent the growth of susceptible bacteria. They became widely used in the mid 20th century for controlling disease in humans, animals, and plants, and for a variety of industrial purposes. Antibiotic resistance is a broad term. There ...

  16. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi-jia; SongYun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Htl, Htnl and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhml and Rhm2,maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdml, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsml, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2. 1 of tomato, and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i. e. , chromosomesl, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3. 25) except for genes Rhml, Rhm2, Mdml and Wsml which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  17. Phytochemical screening and synergistic interactions between aminoglycosides, selected antibiotics and extracts from the bryophyte Octoblepharum albidum Hedw (Calymperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal C.A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is the first to describe the modulation of antibiotic activity of the bryophyte Octoblepharum albidum Hedw extract. The antibacterial activity of ethanolic extract of O. albidum (EEOa, alone and in association with aminoglycosides, was determined against six bacterial strains by a microdilution test. The results showed a similar inhibitory activity of EEOa against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 33018 (MICs 512 μg/mL. The synergistic effect of the extracts and aminoglycosides was also verified. The most pronounced effects were obtained with EEOa + gentamicin against E. coli and EEOa + kanamycin against K. pneumoniae with MICs reduction (128 to 32 μg/mL. The data from this study are indicative of the antibacterial activity of the bryophyte O. albidum extracts and its potential in modifying the resistance of aminoglycosides analyzed.

  18. Spectrum of Resistance Conferred by ml-o Powdery Mildew Resistance Genes in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1977-01-01

    Ten barley mutants and five Ethiopian barley lines representing 11 independently arisen powdery mildew resistance genes in the ml-o locus were tested at the seedling stage to cultures of the powdery mildew fungus from Europe, Israel, USA. Canada, and Japan. They were resistant with infection type 0...

  19. Plasmid-mediated formaldehyde resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of resistance gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Kümmerle, N; Feucht, H H; Kaulfers, P M

    1996-01-01

    The formaldehyde resistance mechanisms in the formaldehyde-resistant strain Escherichia coli VU3695 were investigated. A large (4.6-kb) plasmid DNA fragment encompassing the formaldehyde resistance gene was sequenced. A single 1,107-bp open reading frame encoding a glutathione- and NAD-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase was identified and sequenced, and the enzyme was expressed in an in vitro assay and purified. Amino acid sequence homology studies showed 62.4 to 63.2% identity with class I...

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance and Resistance Genes in Aerobic Bacteria Isolated from Pork at Slaughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Ye, Lei;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance, integrons, and transferability of resistance markers in 243 aerobic bacteria recovered from pork at slaughter in the People's Republic of China. The organisms belonged to 22 genera of gram...... aerobic bacteria from pork as reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes and mobile genetic elements that can readily be transferred intra- and interspecies....

  1. Soil metatranscriptomics for mining eukaryotic heavy metal resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehembre, Frédéric; Doillon, Didier; David, Elise; Perrotto, Sandrine; Baude, Jessica; Foulon, Julie; Harfouche, Lamia; Vallon, Laurent; Poulain, Julie; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Richaud, Pierre; Colpaert, Jan V; Chalot, Michel; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Blaudez, Damien; Marmeisse, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Heavy metals are pollutants which affect all organisms. Since a small number of eukaryotes have been investigated with respect to metal resistance, we hypothesize that many genes that control this phenomenon remain to be identified. This was tested by screening soil eukaryotic metatranscriptomes which encompass RNA from organisms belonging to the main eukaryotic phyla. Soil-extracted polyadenylated mRNAs were converted into cDNAs and 35 of them were selected for their ability to rescue the metal (Cd or Zn) sensitive phenotype of yeast mutants. Few of the genes belonged to families known to confer metal resistance when overexpressed in yeast. Several of them were homologous to genes that had not been studied in the context of metal resistance. For instance, the BOLA ones, which conferred cross metal (Zn, Co, Cd, Mn) resistance may act by interfering with Fe homeostasis. Other genes, such as those encoding 110- to 130-amino-acid-long, cysteine-rich polypeptides, had no homologues in databases. This study confirms that functional metatranscriptomics represents a powerful approach to address basic biological processes in eukaryotes. The selected genes can be used to probe new pathways involved in metal homeostasis and to manipulate the resistance level of selected organisms. PMID:23663419

  2. [Investigation of Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) in Landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Xu, Jing; Zhao, You-cai; Song, Li-yan

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs), an emerging contaminant, have been detected worldwide in various environments such as sediments and river. However, little is known about ARGs distribution in landfill. In this study, we investigated five ARGs [sulfonamides resistant genes (sulI and sulII), chloramphenicols resistant gene (cat), β-lactams resistant gene (bla-SHV), and tetracyclines resistant gene (tetW)] in refuse samples collected from jiangeungou landfill (Xi'an, China) by real-time PCR. We then correlated the ARGs and physiochemical properties of refuse to examine the link between them. Results showed that all tested ARGs have been detected in all samples, suggesting that landfill served as ARGs reservoir. The highest copies numbers of sulII, sulI, tetW, bla-SHV, and cat were (3.70 ± 0.06) x 10(8) copies · g(-1) ( dry refuse), (9.33 · 0.06) x 10(6) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), (2.27 0.08) x 10(5) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), (3.68 ± 0.09) x 10(4) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), and (1.39 ± 0.10) x 10(4) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), respectively. Further, sulI, sulII, and cat positively correlated to moisture and sulI and cat negatively correlated to pH. PMID:26314129

  3. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated in Antananarivo, Madagascar.

    OpenAIRE

    Rakotonirina, Hanitra C; Garin, Benoît; Randrianirina, Frédérique; Richard, Vincent; Talarmin, Antoine; Arlet, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the molecular characteristics of multidrug-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated in community settings and in hospitals in Antananarivo, Madagascar. RESULTS: Forty-nine E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca and E. cloacae ESBL-producing isolates were studied. In antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, many of the isolates exhibited resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Gene amp...

  4. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated in Antananarivo, Madagascar.

    OpenAIRE

    Rakotonirina, Hanitra C; Garin, Benoît; Randrianirina, Frédérique; Richard, Vincent; Talarmin, Antoine; Arlet, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the molecular characteristics of multidrug-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated in community settings and in hospitals in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Results Forty-nine E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca and E. cloacae ESBL-producing isolates were studied. In antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, many of the isolates exhibited resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Gene ampli...

  5. Low Prevalence of Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria in River Water: Resistance Is Mostly Related to Intrinsic Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacão, Marta; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel S

    2015-10-01

    Carbapenems are last-resort antibiotics to handle serious infections caused by multiresistant bacteria. The incidence of resistance to these antibiotics has been increasing and new resistance mechanisms have emerged. The dissemination of carbapenem resistance in the environment has been overlooked. The main goal of this research was to assess the prevalence and diversity of carbapenem-resistant bacteria in riverine ecosystems. The presence of frequently reported carbapenemase-encoding genes was inspected. The proportion of imipenem-resistant bacteria was on average 2.24 CFU/ml. Imipenem-resistant strains (n=110) were identified as Pseudomonas spp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aeromonas spp., Chromobacterium haemolyticum, Shewanella xiamenensis, and members of Enterobacteriaceae. Carbapenem-resistant bacteria were highly resistant to other beta-lactams such as quinolones, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, tetracyclines, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Carbapenem resistance was mostly associated with intrinsically resistant bacteria. As intrinsic resistance mechanisms, we have identified the blaCphA gene in 77.3% of Aeromonas spp., blaL1 in all S. maltophilia, and blaOXA-48-like in all S. xiamenensis. As acquired resistance mechanisms, we have detected the blaVIM-2 gene in six Pseudomonas spp. (5.45%). Integrons with gene cassettes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aacA and aacC genes), trimethoprim (dfrB1b), and carbapenems (blaVIM-2) were found in Pseudomonas spp. Results suggest that carbapenem resistance dissemination in riverine ecosystems is still at an early stage. Nevertheless, monitoring these aquatic compartments for the presence of resistance genes and its host organisms is essential to outline strategies to minimize resistance dissemination. PMID:26430939

  6. Genomes, diversity and resistance gene analogues in Musa species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, M; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2008-01-01

    Resistance genes (R genes) in plants are abundant and may represent more than 1% of all the genes. Their diversity is critical to the recognition and response to attack from diverse pathogens. Like many other crops, banana and plantain face attacks from potentially devastating fungal and bacterial diseases, increased by a combination of worldwide spread of pathogens, exploitation of a small number of varieties, new pathogen mutations, and the lack of effective, benign and cheap chemical control. The challenge for plant breeders is to identify and exploit genetic resistances to diseases, which is particularly difficult in banana and plantain where the valuable cultivars are sterile, parthenocarpic and mostly triploid so conventional genetic analysis and breeding is impossible. In this paper, we review the nature of R genes and the key motifs, particularly in the Nucleotide Binding Sites (NBS), Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR) gene class. We present data about identity, nature and evolutionary diversity of the NBS domains of Musa R genes in diploid wild species with the Musa acuminata (A), M. balbisiana (B), M. schizocarpa (S), M. textilis (T), M. velutina and M. ornata genomes, and from various cultivated hybrid and triploid accessions, using PCR primers to isolate the domains from genomic DNA. Of 135 new sequences, 75% of the sequenced clones had uninterrupted open reading frames (ORFs), and phylogenetic UPGMA tree construction showed four clusters, one from Musa ornata, one largely from the B and T genomes, one from A and M. velutina, and the largest with A, B, T and S genomes. Only genes of the coiled-coil (non-TIR) class were found, typical of the grasses and presumably monocotyledons. The analysis of R genes in cultivated banana and plantain, and their wild relatives, has implications for identification and selection of resistance genes within the genus which may be useful for plant selection and breeding and also for defining relationships and genome evolution

  7. 迟钝爱德华氏菌耐药表型及 4 种耐药基因检测%Detection of Drug Resistance and Four Drug Resistance Genes in Bacterial Pathogen Edwardsiella tarda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛慕湘; 靳晓敏; 张艳英; 房海; 陈翠珍

    2015-01-01

    The drug-resistance was tested by Kirby-Bauer method ,and four drug-resistant genes including TEM ,ant(3 )-Ⅰ ,Sul3 and tet(A) genes against β-lactamase genotypes ,aminoglycoside ,sulfonamides and tetracyclines were detected in 35 strains (five strains each case) selected from 130 strains isolated from seven cases of Japanese flounder Paralichthys oliv aceus infected by Edw ardsiella tarda by PCR method to investigate the correlation between the drug resistance phenotypes and the drug resistance genotypes in the bacterial pathogen .The results showed that all detected strains had TEM and ant (3 )-Ⅰgenes ,62 .9%(22/35) of the strains carrying Sul3 gene ,and no tet(A) gene was detected in the experiment .All strains were found to be multi-drug resistant ,most of which were resistant to 7—9 antibiotics .There was a close relationship between the drug-resistance phenotype and the related resistance genes ,without entirely cor-responding .%从7起牙鲆迟钝爱德华氏菌感染病例中分离到130株致病菌 ,每个病例挑选5株共计35株 ,用K-B纸片扩散法检测其耐药表型 ;用PCR方法检测b-内酰胺类 T EM 基因、氨基糖苷类ant (3)-Ⅰ基因、磺胺类Sul3基因和四环素类tet(A)基因 ,分析耐药基因与耐药表型间的关系 ,以查明牙鲆源致病性迟钝爱德华氏菌不同类型常见耐药基因的携带状况 ,探讨耐药基因与耐药表型之间的相关性.结果显示 ,所检的35株迟钝爱德华氏菌均携带 TEM 基因和ant(3)-Ⅰ基因 ,62 .9% (22 /35)携带Sul3基因 ,未检出tet (A )基因 ;所有菌株均具有多重耐药性 ,大部分菌株耐抗菌类药物达7~9种 ;耐药基因的携带与耐药表型间存在较密切的相关性 ,但并非完全对应.

  8. The Vf gene for scrab resistance in apple is linked to sub-lethal genes

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Z.S.; Weg, van de, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    V f is the most widely used resistance gene in the breeding for scab resistant apple cultivars. Distorted segregation ratios for V f -resistance have frequently been reported. Here we revealed that sub-lethal genes caused the distorted segregation. The inheritance of V f was examined in six progenies by testing linked molecular markers. Three progenies showed distorted segregations that could be explained by three sub-lethal genes (sl1, sl2 and sl3), of which sl1, sl2 were closely linked to V...

  9. Differential Expression of Salinity Resistance Gene on Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Wu-wei; YU Shu-xun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Salinity resistance and differential gene expression associated with salinity in cotton germplasm were studied,because of the large scale area of salinity in China,and its significant negative effects on the cotton production.The salinityresisted genes and their differential expression were studied under the stress of NaCI on cotton.There were found,under the NaCI stress,1644 genes differentially expressed from the salinity-sensitive cotton and only 817 genes differentially expressed from the salinityresisted cotton.

  10. 铜绿假单胞菌的耐药性及耐药基因研究%The drug resistance and drug resistance genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈璐; 查筑红; 冷应蓉; 程永素; 黄冰; 王敏; 罗光英

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To detect the relationship between drug resistance genes and drug resistance of P .aerugi-nosa isolated from patients with analyzing the drug resistance and probing the drug resistance genes .METHODS Microscan WalkAway 40 system was used to detect the genes and carry on the drug sensitive test .The resistance genes TEM ,CARB ,OXA-10 ,VIM ,VEB ,IMP ,DHA ,aac(6′)-Ⅰb ,aac(6′)-Ⅱ ,ant(2′)-Ⅰ ,qacE△1-sul1 and oprD2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) .RESULTS The drug resistance of 67 strains P . aeruginosa was serious ,which was 100 .0% resistance to piperacillin/tazobactam ,piperacillin ,ticarcillin/clavu-lanic acid .the positive rates of TEM ,CARB ,OXA-10 ,VIM ,VEB ,aac(6′)-Ⅰ b ,aac(6′)-Ⅱ ,ant(2′)-Ⅰ , qacE△1-sul1 ,and op rD2 were 98 .6% ,82 .1% ,88 .1% ,92 .6% ,92 .6% ,71 .7% and 83 .6% ,13 .4% ,and 1 .5% ,respectively .The gene of IMP and DHA were not detected .CONCLUSION The P .aeruginosa were not sensitive to β-lactams because of the combined effect of multi-mechanism .Relations between high detection rate of aminoglycosides modifying enzymes (AM Es ) genes and P .aeruginosa resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics should have further investigation .Most of the P .aeruginosa separated from our hospital were highly resistant to quaternary amine and biguanides disinfectant .%目的:分析临床分离铜绿假单胞菌的耐药性,检测耐药基因,探讨耐药基因与耐药性的关系。方法采用美国德灵Microscan WalkAway 40系统对病原菌进行鉴定及药敏试验;采用PCR扩增技术对临床分离铜绿假单胞菌耐药性相关基因 TEM、CARB、OXA-10、VIM、VEB、IMP、DHA、aac(6′)-Ⅰ b、aac(6′)-Ⅱ、ant(2′)-Ⅰ、qacE△1-sul1、op rD2进行检测。结果67株铜绿假单胞菌耐药严重,对哌拉西林/他唑巴坦、哌拉西林、替卡西林/克拉维酸的耐药率达100.0%;检出 TEM、CARB、OXA-10、aac(6′)-Ⅰ b、aac(6

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å

  12. Performance of resistance gene pyramids to races of rice bacterial blight in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGKangle; ZHUANGJieyun; WANGHanrong

    1998-01-01

    The effect of gene pyramiding on resistance to bacterial blight (BB) in rice was evahlated among the IR24-based near isogenic lines conraining single resistance gene and gene pyramids containing two, three or lour resistancegenes (see table).

  13. Clustering of Major Genes Conferring Blast Resistance in a Durable Resistance Rice Cultivar Gumei 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-li; CHAI Rong-yao; FAN Ye-yang; LI De-bao; ZHENG Kang-le; Hei LEUNG; ZHUANG Jie-yun

    2004-01-01

    By using 304 recombinant inbred lines derived from indica rice cross Zhong 156/Gumei 2, a linkage map consisting of 177 marker loci and covering 12 rice chromosomes was constructed and employed for mapping genes conferring blast resistance in rice. Genomic location of gene Pi25(t) conferring neck blast resistance to the Chinese isolate 92-183 (race ZC15) was verified to be located between markers A7 and RG456 on chromosome 6, with genetic distances of 1.7 cM and 1.5 cM to A7 and RG456,respectively. Leaf blast resistance of Gumei 2 to the Philippine isolate Ca89 (lineage 4) was found to be controlled by a single gene. The gene tentatively designated as Pi26(t) was located between makers B10 and R674 on chromosome 6, with genetic distances of 5.7 cM and 25.8 cM to B10 and R674 respectively. Resistant alleles at both gene loci were derived from Gumei 2,indicating an existence of resistance gene cluster in Gumei 2.

  14. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l(-1) and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1(R) allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1(R) and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1(V) or the duplicated ace-1(D) allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects. PMID:26463842

  15. Transfer patterns of integron-associated and antibiotic resistance genes in S. flexneri during different time intervals in Tianjin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shigella is one of the common genera of pathogens responsible for bacterial diarrhoea in humans. According to World Health Organisation (WHO, 800,000-1,700,000 patients in China were infected with Shigella spp. in 2000, and Shigella flexneri is the most common serotype (86%. Objectives: We investigated the transfer patterns of integron-associated and antibiotic resistance genes in S. flexneri during different time intervals in the city of Tianjin in the People′s Republic of China. Materials and Methods: The integrase-encoding and variable regions of the integrons of the bacterial strains were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, followed by gene sequencing. Fifty-six S. flexneri strains, 32 of which were stored in our laboratory and the other 24 were isolated from tertiary hospitals in Tianjin during different time intervals, were tested for their sensitivity to 12 antibiotics by using the Kirby-Bauer antibiotic testing method (K-B method. Results and Conclusion: Of the 32 strains of S. flexneri isolated from 1981 to 1983 and stored in our laboratory, class 1 integron was detected in 28 strains (87.50%, while 27 strains (84.37% harboured an aminoglycoside resistance gene, aadA, in the variable region of their integrons. Class 1 integron was identified in 22 (91.67% of the 24 S. flexneri strains isolated from 2009 to 2010, whereas the variable region and 3′-end amplification were not present in any of the strains. Class 2 integron was not found in the 1981-1983 group (group A of strains; although 19 (79.17% of the 24 strains in the 2009-2010 group (group B possessed class 2 integron, and the variable region of the integron harboured dfrA1 + sat1 + aadA1 genes, which, respectively, mediate antibiotic resistance to trimethoprim, streptothricin and streptomycin. Seventeen strains of the total 56 possessed both class 1 and 2 integrons. Strains belonging to group A were highly resistant to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and a

  16. Comparative genome analysis and resistance gene mapping in grain legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using, DNA markers and genome organization, several important disease resistance genes have been analyzed in mungbean (Vigna radiata), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and soybean (Glycine max). In the process, medium-density linkage maps consisting of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers were constructed for both mungbean and cowpea. Comparisons between these maps, as well as the maps of soybean and common bean, indicate that there is significant conservation of DNA marker order, though the conserved blocks in soybean are much shorter than in the others. DNA mapping results also indicate that a gene for seed weight may be conserved between mungbean and cowpea. Using the linkage maps, genes that control bruchid (genus Callosobruchus) and powdery mildew (Erysiphe polygoni) resistance in mungbean, aphid resistance in cowpea (Aphis craccivora), and cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) resistance in soybean have all been mapped and characterized. For some of these traits resistance was found to be oligogenic and DNA mapping uncovered multiple genes involved in the phenotype. (author)

  17. Changes of resistome, mobilome and potential hosts of antibiotic resistance genes during the transformation of anaerobic digestion from mesophilic to thermophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Min

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to reveal how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their horizontal and vertical transfer-related items (mobilome and bacterial hosts) respond to the transformation of anaerobic digestion (AD) from mesophilic to thermophilic using one-step temperature increase. The resistomes and mobilomes of mesophilic and thermophilic sludge were investigated using metagenome sequencing, and the changes in 24 representative ARGs belonging to three categories, class 1 integron and bacterial genera during the transition period were further followed using quantitative PCR and 454-pyrosequencing. After the temperature increase, resistome abundance in the digested sludge decreased from 125.97 ppm (day 0, mesophilic) to 50.65 ppm (day 57, thermophilic) with the reduction of most ARG types except for the aminoglycoside resistance genes. Thermophilic sludge also had a smaller mobilome, including plasmids, insertion sequences and integrons, than that of mesophilic sludge, suggesting the lower horizontal transfer potential of ARGs under thermophilic conditions. On the other hand, the total abundance of 18 bacterial genera, which were suggested as the possible hosts for 13 ARGs through network analysis, decreased from 23.27% in mesophilic sludge to 11.92% in thermophilic sludge, indicating fewer hosts for the vertical expansion of ARGs after the increase in temperature. These results indicate that the better reduction of resistome abundance by thermophilic AD might be associated with the decrease of both the horizontal and vertical transferability of ARGs. PMID:27108212

  18. Dissemination of metal resistance genes among animal methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, M Angeles; Butaye, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The use of metals as feed supplement has been recognized as a potential driver for co-selection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs. However, the prevalence of these determinants in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) is largely unknown. In this study, a collection of 130 MRCoNS from pigs and veal calves were investigated for the presence of metal-resistance genes (czrC, copB, cadD, arsA) associated to SCCmec. Near half of the isolates carried metal resistance genes (czrC 5.4%, copB 38.5%, cadD 7.7%, arsA 26.2%) regardless of their SCCmec type. The increased use of metals in livestock animals, especially zinc in pigs in several European countries may co-select for methicillin-resistance in several staphylococcal species. PMID:27033931

  19. Analysis of rice blast resistance genes by QTL mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jichen; WANG Jiulin; LING Zhongzhuan; ZHU Lihuang

    2004-01-01

    Resistance to rice blast pathogen mostly shows a quantitative trait controlled by several minor genes. Its complexity and the mutable characteristic of rice blast isolates both hinder the development of the blast resistance research. The article here tried to explore the resistance gene distribution on rice chromosomes and the way of function. Totally 124 QTLs have been identified against 20 isolates using Cartographer software with a ZYQ8/JX17 DH population, which separately are at 100 loci of 72 marker intervals on 12 rice chromosomes. Of them, 16 QTLs were determined by the isolate HB-97-36-1. 82 QTLs (66.13%) are from the resistant parent alleles, ZYQ8, while 42 QTLs (33.87%) are from the susceptible parent alleles, JX17. In comparison of their positions on chromosome, most QTLs are clustered together and distributed nearby the major genes especially the regions on chromosomes 1, 2, 8, 10 and 12. Each QTL could account for the resistance variation between 3.52%-68.64%. And, a positional QTL might display the resistance to several different isolates with different contributions.

  20. Molecular evolution of the disease resistance gene Rx in Solanum

    OpenAIRE

    Butterbach, P.B.E.

    2007-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum) is the fourth most important food crop with an annual yield of about 300 million tons over the world. The history of the domestication of potato shows that disease-causing agents followed the tracks of potato cultivation in temperate climates across continents, resulting in substantial crop losses. Plants including potato have evolved defence mechanisms against pathogens, of which the pathotype-specific system involving resistance genes (R genes) is v...

  1. Natural selection mapping of the warfarin-resistance gene

    OpenAIRE

    Kohn, Michael H.; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Wayne, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    In theory, genes under natural selection can be revealed by unique patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and polymorphism at physically linked loci. However, given the effects of recombination and mutation, the physical extent and persistence of LD patterns in natural populations is uncertain. To assess the LD signature of selection, we survey variation in 26 microsatellite loci spanning an ≈32-cM region that includes the warfarin-resistance gene (Rw) in five wild rat populations having res...

  2. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eKyselkova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1-2 weeks, likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W, tet(Q and tet(M in fresh excrements of calves was about 1-2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O, tet(Q and tet(W representing a ‘core TC-resistome’ of the farm, and tet(A, tet(M, tet(Y and tet(X occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A, tet(M, tet(Y and tet(X were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes.

  3. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r) genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository) is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1-2 weeks), likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W), tet(Q), and tet(M) in fresh excrements of calves was about 1-2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W) representing a "core TC-resistome" of the farm, and tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26074912

  4. Methods to predict antibiotic resistance: From genes to metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Biología Molecular. Fecha de lectura: 21-10-2015 As many antibiotics exist as many mechanisms of resistance will rise. Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem and deserves all sort of attention and dedication to identify the critical points which might promote or facilitate the emergence of novel resistance genes in one community, as well the propagation of the already kno...

  5. 耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌耐药基因及其相关因素分析%Analysis on drug resistance gene and correlation factors of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晨; 安云庆; 吕哲; 马岳珠; 董云英; 陈惠

    2008-01-01

    目的 了解耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA)耐药现状,加强临床MRSA的监控.方法 回顾性分析临床46株MRSA耐药性,并用PCR法对MRSA进行β-内酰胺类耐药相关基因mecA、氨基糖甙类耐药相关基因aac(6')/aph(2")、红霉素类耐药基因emr和耐消毒剂基因qac(A/B)检测.结果 46株MRSA表现多重耐药和高度耐药性,并检测出相关的耐药基因.结论 在临床工作中加强MRSA的监测、合理使用抗生素、严格消毒隔离制度是控制MRSA医院感染的关键.%Objective To investigate the drug resistance status of methicillin-resistant Staphylo-coccus aureus (MRSA), strengthen the monitoring of MRSA. Methods Drug resistance of 46 strains of MRSA was retrospectively analyzed. β-lactams resistance gene mecA, aminoglycosides resistance gene sac (6') / aph (2"), erythromyeins resistance gene emr and antiseptics resistance gene qac (A/B) were tested in 46 strains of MRSA by applying PCR. Results Most of MRSA strains were highly and multidrug-resistant, and related resistant genes of MRSA were detected. Conclusion Enhancement of MRSA monitoring, rational use of antibiotics and strict disinfection/insulation in clinic are the key to control of MRSA hospital infection.

  6. NBS-LRR resistance gene homologues in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Twenty three DNA fragments with a size of about 520 bp have been cloned from rice genome by PCR amplification using primers designed according to the conserved region of most plant resistance (R) genes which have Nucleotide Binding Site (NBS) and Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) domains. Homologous comparison showed that these fragments contained typical motifs of the NBS-LRR resistance gene class, kinase 1a, kinase 2a, kinase 3a and domain 2. Thus they were named R gene homologous sequences (RS). These RS were divided into 4 groups by clustering analysis and mapped onto chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, respectively, by genetic mapping. Ten RS were located in the chromosomal intervals where known R genes had been mapped. Further RFLP analysis of an RS, RS13, near the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa4 locus on chromosome 11 among near isogenic lines and pyramiding lines of Xa4 showed that RS13 was possibly amplified from the gene family of Xa4.

  7. Bacterial metal resistance genes and metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bacteria a metal may be defined as bioavailable if it crosses the cytoplasmic membrane to reach the cytoplasm. Once inside the cell, specific metal resistance systems may be triggered. In this research, specific metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediment microbial communities. Gene levels were measured by quantitative PCR and correlated to metals in sediments using five different protocols to estimate dissolved, particle-adsorbed and occluded metals. The best correlations were obtained with czcA (a Cd/Zn/Co efflux pump) and Cd/Zn adsorbed or occluded in particles. Only adsorbed Co was correlated to czcA levels. We concluded that the measurement of czcA gene levels by quantitative PCR is a promising tool which may complement the classical approaches used to estimate Cd/Zn/Co bioavailability in sediment compartments. - Highlights: • Metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediments. • Gene levels were correlated to metals using 5 different metal extraction protocols. • CzcA gene levels determined by quantitative PCR is a promising tool for Cd/Zn/Co. - Capsule Bacterial czcA is a potential biomarker of Cd, Zn and Co bioavailability in aquatic sediments as shown by quantitative PCR and sequential metal extraction

  8. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in ‘Thatcher’ Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Colin W.; Kolmer, James A.; McCartney, Curt A.; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N.; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. ‘Thatcher’ wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in ‘Thatcher’ and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for ‘Thatcher’-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  9. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Colin W; Kolmer, James A; McCartney, Curt A; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  10. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  11. Genetic control of resistance to Coccidioides immitis: a single gene that is expressed in spleen cells determines resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously reported that inbred mice vary widely in their resistance to Coccidioides immitis peritonitis. To investigate the number of genes controlling resistance, (susceptible X resistant)F1 X susceptible backcross mice were tested for resistance to infection. A 1:1 ratio of resistant:susceptible offspring was observed, which is consistent with a single dominant gene determining resistance. To find out whether this gene, which was designated Cms, is expressed in the immune and/or the inflammatory responses, radiation chimeras were constructed by transplanting spleen cells from the resistant F1 mice into the susceptible parental strain. These chimeras were consistently more resistant to infection than the susceptible parental strain. The authors concluded that resistance to C. immitis is determined primarily by a single gene, and that this gene is expressed by spleen cells

  12. Fine Genetic Mapping Localizes Cucumber Scab Resistance Gene Ccu into an R Gene Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The scab caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F9 recombination inbreeding lines (RILs) and 1,944 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucum...

  13. Efficacy of Ampicillin plus Arbekacin in Experimental Rabbit Endocarditis Caused by an Enterococcus faecalis Strain with High-Level Gentamicin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Vivek; Donabedian, Susan M.; Zervos, Marcus J.; Kariyama, Reiko; Kumon,Hiromi; Chow, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis LC40 is an ampicillin-susceptible clinical isolate with high-level gentamicin resistance due to the aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2")-Ia aminoglycoside resistance gene. The combination of ampicillin plus arbekacin reduced mean bacterial vegetation counts significantly more than ampicillin alone or ampicillin plus gentamicin in a rabbit model of aortic-valve endocarditis caused by E. faecalis LC40.

  14. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  15. ERG11 mutations and expression of resistance genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghao; Sheng, Fang; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Lamei; Li, Chunyang

    2015-11-01

    Azole resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans poses significant challenges for its antibiotic treatment. The conformational change of the target enzyme 14 alpha-demethylase (Erg11p) due to ERG11 gene mutations is one of the mechanisms resulting in the azole resistance. ERG11 of 23 isolates (8 susceptible and 15 resistant) and 6 standard strains of Candida albicans were amplified and sequenced. Nineteen missense mutations were detected. Two mutations, G487T (A114S) and T916C (Y257H), coexisted exclusively in 14 fluconazole-resistant isolates. To identify the resistance mechanisms in the isolates with G487T and T916C mutations, we compared the expression of 5 resistance-related genes in the 14 azole-resistant isolates with those in the susceptible type strain ATCC 10231, Saccharomyces cerevisiae AD/CDR1 and AD/CDR2. The tested values of mRNA transcription of CDR1 and CDR2 were higher than that of control strain, while the semi-quantified Cdr1p values were not higher in all of the 14 resistant isolates. And the data analyzed with t test suggest that both of the differences are significant (P ERG11, MDR1, and FLU1 varied in these isolates. These data suggested that overexpression of the five genes might not be the reason of resistance in the 14 isolates with G487T and T916C, especially in the 5 isolates (GZ09, GZ15, GZ16, GZ58, and 4263) in which neither translation of Cdr1p/Cdr2p nor transcription of ERG11, MDR1, or FLU1 was detected up-regulated. The results suggest that Erg11p conformational change due to the point mutations is most likely responsible for the azole resistance in these isolates. PMID:26349561

  16. Construction of Yeast Vectors with Resistance to Geneticin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林会兰; 张广; 周全; 陈国强

    2002-01-01

    Two Escherichia coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae shuttle vectors containing a resistance marker to geneticin (G418) are constructed. Both vectors contain a kanamycin-resistant marker (KanMX4) module coding aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase (APH) that renders E. coli resistant to kanamycin and S. cerevisiae to geneticin. These vectors overcome the shortage of the conventional yeast vectors bearing HIS3, TRP1, LEU2, and URA3 modules as selection markers, which require hosts to be auxotrophic. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is used as the reporter to examine the functions of the vectors. The vectors are powerful tools for the convenient cloning and controlled expression of genes in most S. cerevisiae strains.

  17. Cholera in Vietnam: Changes in Genotypes and Emergence of Class I Integrons Containing Aminoglycoside Resistance Gene Cassettes in Vibrio cholerae O1 Strains Isolated from 1979 to 1996

    OpenAIRE

    Dalsgaard, A; Forslund, A; Tam, N. V.; Vinh, D. X.; Cam, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    The number of cholera cases and the mortality rates reported from different regions of Vietnam varied considerably in the period from 1979 to 1996, with between 2,500 and 6,000 cases reported annually from 1992 to 1995. Annual mortality rates ranged from 2.0 to 9.6% from 1979 to 1983 to less than 1.8% after 1983. Major cholera outbreaks were reported from the High Plateau region for the first time in 1994 and 1995; this is an area with limited access to health services and safe drinking-water...

  18. Putative resistance genes in the CitEST database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Guidetti-Gonzalez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease resistance in plants is usually associated with the activation of a wide variety of defense responses to prevent pathogen replication and/or movement. The ability of the host plant to recognize the pathogen and to activate defense responses is regulated by direct or indirect interaction between the products of plant resistance (R and pathogen avirulence (Avr genes. Attempted infection of plants by avirulent pathogens elicits a battery of defenses often followed by the collapse of the challenged host cells. Localized host cell death may help to prevent the pathogen from spreading to uninfected tissues, known as hypersensitive response (HR. When either the plant or the pathogen lacks its cognate gene, activation of the plant’s defense responses fails to occur or is delayed and does not prevent pathogen colonization. In the CitEST database, we identified 1,300 reads related to R genes in Citrus which have been reported in other plant species. These reads were translated in silico, and alignments of their amino acid sequences revealed the presence of characteristic domains and motifs that are specific to R gene classes. The description of the reads identified suggests that they function as resistance genes in citrus.

  19. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia;

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with...... effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be...... methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio...

  20. Distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance in Vibrio harveyi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Mendez, D.; Anto, C.

    environments for understanding the distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance. The putative genes targeted for PCR detection included four reversible toxin (Rtx)/hemolysin genes, a gene encoding homologue of Vibrio cholerae...

  1. Removal characteristics of tetracyclines resistant bacteria and tetracycline resistance genes in sludge deep dehydration

    OpenAIRE

    TAN Guogan; DU Yongli; HUANG Manhong; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the removal characteristics of Tetracyclines Resistant Bacteria (TRB) and Tetracycline Resistance Genes (TRGs) in sludge deep dehydration,Dilution plate coating method and Real-Time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to detected the numbers of TRB and four tet genes (tetA、tetB、tetM and tetX) abundant before and after sludge dehydration,and then TRB and TRGs removal characteristics before and after sludge deep dehydration were analyzed.Results showed that:both...

  2. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tingfu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP (Ad-GFP-HA117, the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MDR1 or GFP (Ad-GFP was respectively carried out. The transduction efficiency and the multiplicity of infection (MOI were detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The transcription of HA117 gene and MDR1 gene were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Western blotting analysis was used to detect the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp but the expression of HA117 could not be analyzed as it is a novel gene and its antibody has not yet been synthesized. The drug-excretion activity of HA117 and MDR1 were determined by daunorubicin (DNR efflux assay. The drug sensitivities of 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 to chemotherapeutic agents were detected by Methyl-Thiazolyl-Tetrazolium (MTT assay. Results The transducted efficiency of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 were 75%-80% when MOI was equal to 50. The transduction of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 could increase the expression of HA117 and MDR1. The drug resistance index to Adriamycin (ADM, vincristine (VCR, paclitaxel (Taxol and bleomycin (BLM increased to19.8050, 9.0663, 9.7245, 3.5650 respectively for 4T1/HA117 and 24.2236, 11.0480, 11.3741, 0.9630 respectively for 4T1/MDR1 as compared to the control cells. There were no significant differences in drug sensitivity between 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 for the P-gp substrates (ADM, VCR and Taxol (P Conclusions These results confirm that HA117 is a strong MDR gene in both HL-60 and 4T1 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the MDR

  3. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, M Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta; Alba, Patricia; Agerso, Yvonne; Cavaco, Lina; Butaye, Patrick; Porrero, M Concepción; Battisti, Antonio; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Fetsch, Alexandra; Guerra, Beatriz

    2016-08-15

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC) 398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus collection [n=554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n=456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic compounds), cadD (cadmium), copB (copper) and czrC (zinc/cadmium) resistance genes, respectively. In contrast, among the LA-MRSA non-CC398 isolates (n=86), 1.2%, 18.6% and 16.3% were positive for the cadD, copB and czrC genes, respectively, and none were positive for arsA. Of the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398 and non-CC398 LA-MRSA isolates from different sources. Regarding the LA-MSSA isolates (n=12), some (n=4) were also positive for metal-resistance genes. This study shows that genes potentially conferring metal-resistance are frequently present in LA-MRSA. PMID:27374912

  4. Isolation, characterization, and cloning of a plasmid-borne gene encoding a phosphotransferase that confers high-level amikacin resistance in enteric bacilli.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaynes, R.; Groisman, E; Nelson, E.; Casadaban, M; Lerner, S A

    1988-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Serratia marcescens at a hospital that had used amikacin as its principal aminoglycoside for the preceding 42 months demonstrated high-level resistance to amikacin (greater than or equal to 256 micrograms/ml), kanamycin (greater than or equal to 256 micrograms/ml), gentamicin (greater than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml), netilmicin (64 micrograms/ml), and tobramycin (greater than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml). The resistant strains contained an id...

  5. Multi drug resistance to cancer chemotherapy: Genes involved and blockers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last three decades, important and considerable research efforts had been performed to investigate the mechanism through which cancer cells overcome the cytotoxic effects of a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. Most of the previously published work has been focused on the resistance of tumor cells to those anticancer drugs of natural source. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cellular cross-resistance to a broad spectrum of natural products used in cancer chemotherapy and is believed to be the major cause of the therapeutic failures of the drugs belonging to different naturally obtained or semisynthetic groups including vinca alkaloids, taxans, epipodophyllotoxins and certain antibiotics. This phenomenon results from overexpression of four MDR genes and their corresponding proteins that act as membrane-bound ATP consuming pumps. These proteins mediate the efflux of many structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs of natural source. MDR may be intrinsic or acquired following exposure to chemotherapy. The existence of intrinsically resistant tumor cell clone before and following chemotherapeutic treatment has been associated with a worse final outcome because of increased incidence of distant metasis. In view of irreplaceability of natural product anticancer drugs as effective chemotherapeutic agents, and in view of MDR as a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy, this review is aimed to highlight the genes involved in MDR, classical MDR blockers and gene therapy approaches to overcome MDR. (author)

  6. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis of sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eSegil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the drug of choice for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in nearly one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 hours of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternative pathway regulating gentamicin-induced hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contribute to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside

  7. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick I. Mackie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  8. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  9. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, H.; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, may (2015), s. 536. ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/2077; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : antibiotic resistance spread * animal manure * cattle intestinal microflora * chlortetracycline * dairy cattle * dairy farm * heavy metals * tetracycline resistance genes Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 3.989, year: 2014

  10. Multiple resistance to sulfonylureas and imidazolinones conferred by an acetohydroxyacid synthase gene with separate mutations for selective resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, J; Rutledge, R; Labbé, H; Brown, D; Sunohara, G; Miki, B

    1992-03-01

    The acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) gene from the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant line GH90 carrying the imidazolinone resistance allele imr1 was cloned. Expression of the AHAS gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco resulted in selective imidazolinone resistance, confirming that the single base-pair change found near the 3' end of the coding region of this gene is responsible for imidazolinone resistance. A chimeric AHAS gene containing both the imr1 mutation and the csr1 mutation, responsible for selective resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, was constructed. It conferred on transgenic tobacco plants resistance to both sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides. The data illustrate that a multiple-resistance phenotype can be achieved in an AHAS gene through combinations of separate mutations, each of which individually confers resistance to only one class of herbicides. PMID:1557022

  11. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Fagade, Obasola E.; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    %, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), str...

  12. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shao-Kuang; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Wei, Hen-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  13. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance and characterization of resistant genes and integrons in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao-Chang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are still widely applied in animal husbandry to prevent diseases and used as feed additives to promote animal growth. This could result in antibiotic resistance to bacteria and antibiotic residues in animals. In this paper, Enterobacteriaceae isolated from four integrated fish farms in Zhongshan, South China were tested for antibiotic resistance, tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and class 1 integrons. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were carried out to test antibiotic susceptibility and resistance genes, respectively. Relatively high antibiotic resistance frequencies were found, especially for ampicillin (80%), tetracycline (52%), and trimethoprim (50%). Out of 203 Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 98.5% were resistant to one or more antibiotics tested. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) was found highest in animal manures with a MAR index of 0.56. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet(A), tet(C)) and sulfonamide resistance genes (sul2) were detected in more than 50% of the isolates. The intI1 gene was found in 170 isolates (83.7%). Both classic and non-classic class 1 integrons were found. Four genes, aadA5, aadA22, dfr2, and dfrA17, were detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report for molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms in China and the first time that gene cassette array dfrA17-aadA5 has been detected in such fish farms. Results of this study indicated that fish farms may be a reservoir of highly diverse and abundant antibiotic resistant genes and gene cassettes. Integrons may play a key role in multiple antibiotic resistances posing potential health risks to the general public and aquaculture.

  14. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li-jia; Song Yun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Ht1, Htn1 and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhm1 and Rhm2, maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdm1, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm1, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2.1 of tomato,and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes1, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3.25) except for genes Rhm1, Rhm2, Mdm1 and Wsm1 which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  15. Comparative analysis of drought resistance genes in Arabidopsis and rice

    OpenAIRE

    Trijatmiko, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords: rice, Arabidopsis, drought, genetic mapping,microarray, transcription factor, AP2/ERF, SHINE, wax, stomata, comparative genetics, activation tagging, Ac/Ds, En/IThis thesis describes the use of genomics information and tools from Arabidopsis and rice to understand the mechanisms controlling drought resistance. Genetic mapping in a rice population revealed that around 30% of variation for grain yield under drought was controlled by a locus close to the dwarfing gene responsible for t...

  16. Detection of Multi-drug Resistant Acinetobacter Lwoffii Isolated from Soil of Mink Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Wen, Yong Jun; Zhang, Shu Qin; Zhu, Hong Wei; Guo, Li; Wang, Feng Xue; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Hong Xia; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2016-07-01

    There were 4 Acinetobacter lwoffii obtained from soil samples. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains to 16 antimicrobial agents was investigated using K-B method. Three isolates showed the multi-drug resistance. The presence of resistance genes and integrons was determined using PCR. The aadA1, aac(3')-IIc, aph(3')-VII, aac(6')-Ib, sul2, cat2, floR, and tet(K) genes were detected, respectively. Three class 1 integrons were obtained. The arr-3-aacA4 and blaPSE-1 gene cassette, which cause resistance to aminoglycoside and beta-lactamase antibiotics. Our results reported the detection of multi-drug resistant and carried resistant genes Acinetobacter lwoffii from soil. The findings suggested that we should pay close attention to the prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacterial species of environment. PMID:27554122

  17. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WU Chao; LIU Mei; LIU Xu-ri; Hu Guo-cheng; SI Hua-min; SUN Zong-xiu; LIU Wen-zhen; Fu Ya-ping

    2011-01-01

    Antimierobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity.Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis) were integrated into Oryza sativa L.subsp.japonica cv.Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system.PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation,respectively.RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial peptide genes were expressed in T1 generation,and there was no obvious difference in agronomic traits between transgenic plants and non-transgenic plants.Four Np3 and Np5 transgenic lines in T1 generation were inoculated with ×anthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae strain CR4,and all the four transgenic lines had significantly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by the strain CR4.The Np5 transgenic lines also showed higher resistance to bacterial blight caused by strains JS97-2,Zhe 173 and OS-225.It is suggested that transgenic lines with Np5 gene might possess broad spectrum resistance to rice bacterial blight.

  18. Novel streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance gene as a gene cassette within a class 1 integron isolated from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aadA genes, encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin, have been found as gene cassettes in different gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial species. The present study has revealed the sequence of a new gene, aadA5, integrated as a gene cassette together with the trimethoprim r...... resistance gene dfr7 in a class 1 integron. The integron was located on a plasmid and was identified in a pathogenic porcine Escherichia coli isolate....

  19. Microplate phosphocellulose binding assay for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooksey, R C; Metchock, B G; Thornsberry, C

    1986-01-01

    We modified the phosphocellulose binding assay for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) by use of microdilution plates and a multichannel micropipette. Batteries of aminoglycoside substrates for screening organisms for the presence of AMEs as well as for subclassifying enzymes were prepared and stored in microdilution plates. When tested in parallel with the conventional tube reaction assay, the microplate assay yielded comparable radioactive counts and therefore equally correct identifica...

  20. Characterization of Resistance Gene Analog Polymorphisms in sugarcane cultivars with varying levels of red rot resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jayashree, A. Selvi and N.V. Nair

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance Gene Analog (RGA strategy is being exploited perfectly for the identification, tagging and mapping of majorgenes or Quantitative Trait Loci for disease resistance. About 29 RGA primers designed from the conserved domains ofresistance proteins, were used to analyse the genetic diversity among the 40 sugarcane cultivars that vary in their resistanceto red rot disease. The genetic similarity values ranged from 58.4 - 90% with the mean genetic similarity of 74.2%. Clusteranalysis resulted in a dendrogram with 3 major clusters and a clear distinction of resistant and susceptible varieties wasobserved. A total of 25 specific fragments amplified by 14 primers were identified to be associated with resistance and 8specific fragments amplified by 8 primers were associated with susceptibility. The primers RGA – 137, RGA 396, RGA-231 and RGA-118 amplified maximum number of resistant or susceptible specific fragments (3. Amplification of the red rotresistant variety Bo 91 and the red rot susceptible variety CoC 671 with the twenty nine RGA primers, followed bysequencing and homology analysis revealed significant homologies with the RGA’s of rice, maize and sugarcane. TheseRGA’s that were found to be associated with red rot resistant/ susceptible varieties are a valuable source of markers that canbe tested for screening red rot resistance in breeding programs

  1. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes. PMID:26530637

  2. Genetic analysis of leaf rust resistance genes and associated markers in the durable resistant wheat cultivar Sinvalocho MA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingala, L; López, M; Darino, M; Pergolesi, M F; Diéguez, M J; Sacco, F

    2012-05-01

    In the cross of the durable leaf rust resistant wheat Sinvalocho MA and the susceptible line Gama6, four specific genes were identified: the seedling resistance gene Lr3, the adult plant resistance (APR) genes LrSV1 and LrSV2 coming from Sinvalocho MA, and the seedling resistance gene LrG6 coming from Gama6. Lr3 was previously mapped on 6BL in the same cross. LrSV1 was mapped on chromosome 2DS where resistance genes Lr22a and Lr22b have been reported. Results from rust reaction have shown that LrSV1 from Sinvalocho is not the same allele as Lr22b and an allelism test with Lr22a showed that they could be alleles or closely linked genes. LrSV1 was mapped in an 8.5-cM interval delimited by markers gwm296 distal and gwm261 proximal. Adult gene LrSV2 was mapped on chromosome 3BS, cosegregating with gwm533 in a 7.2-cM interval encompassed by markers gwm389 and gwm493, where other disease resistance genes are located, such as seedling gene Lr27 for leaf rust, Sr2 for stem rust, QTL Qfhs.ndsu-3BS for resistance to Fusarium gramineum and wheat powdery mildew resistance. The gene LrG6 was mapped on chromosome 2BL, with the closest marker gwm382 at 0.6 cM. Lines carrying LrSV1, LrSV2 and LrG6 tested under field natural infection conditions, showed low disease infection type and severity, suggesting that this kind of resistance can be explained by additive effects of APR and seedling resistance genes. The identification of new sources of resistance from South American land races and old varieties, supported by modern DNA technology, contributes to sustainability of agriculture through plant breeding. PMID:22278178

  3. Study on drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by drug resistance gene detecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in different age group, compare detecting effect of two methods and evaluate their the clinical application value, all of the strains of mycobacterium tuberculosis were tested for resistance to RFP, INH SM PZA and EMB by the absolute concentration method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and the mutation of the rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB resistance genes in M. tuberculosis was tested by PCR-SSCP. In youth, middle and old age group, the rate of acquired drug resistance was 89.2%, 85.3% and 67.6% respectively, the gene mutation rate was 76.2%, 81.3% and 63.2% respectively. The rate of acquired drug resistance and multiple drug resistance in youth group was much higher than those in other groups. The gene mutation was correlated with drug resistance level of mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene mutation rate was higher in strains isolated from high concentration resistance than those in strains isolated from low concentration resistance. The more irregular treatment was longer, the rate of drug resistance was higher. Acquired drug resistance varies in different age group. It suggested that surveillance of drug resistence in different age group should be taken seriously, especially in youth group. PCR - SSCP is a sensitive and specific method for rapid detecting rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB genes mutations of MTB. (authors)

  4. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice. PMID:26471973

  5. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Summary A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  6. Synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T; Auclair, Karine

    2011-03-01

    A convenient synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4'-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  7. Prognostic Significance of Multidrug Resistance Gene 1 (MDR1), Multidrug Resistance-related Protein (MRP) and Lung Resistance Protein (LRP) mRNA Expression in Acute Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Hee Jin; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Jang, Seongsoo; Seo, Eul-Ju; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Seo, Jong Jin; Moon, Hyung Nam; Ghim, Thad

    2006-01-01

    The prognostic significance of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression is controversial. We investigated whether multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) mRNA expression are associated with outcomes in acute leukemia patients. At diagnosis we examined MDR1, MRP and LRP mRNA expression in bone marrow samples from 71 acute leukemia patients (39 myeloid, 32 lymphoblastic) using nested RT-PCR. The expression of each of the...

  8. Zinc-resistance gene CzrC identified in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus hyicus isolated from pigs with exudative epidermitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifierz, Mackenzie J; Park, Jeonghwa; Friendship, Robert M; Weese, J Scott

    2014-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus hyicus (MRSH) was investigated for czrC, a gene conferring zinc-resistance. The czrC gene was identified in 50% (14/28) of MRSH isolates, representing 14 pigs with exudative epidermitis from 8 farms. Newly weaned pigs, which are particularly susceptible to exudative epidermitis, are commonly fed high levels of zinc oxide. PMID:24790238

  9. Evolution by Pervasive Gene Fusion in Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Synthesizing Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic (tree-based approaches to understanding evolutionary history are unable to incorporate convergent evolutionary events where two genes merge into one. In this study, as exemplars of what can be achieved when a tree is not assumed a priori, we have analysed the evolutionary histories of polyketide synthase genes and antibiotic resistance genes and have shown that their history is replete with convergent events as well as divergent events. We demonstrate that the overall histories of these genes more closely resembles the remodelling that might be seen with the children’s toy Lego, than the standard model of the phylogenetic tree. This work demonstrates further that genes can act as public goods, available for re-use and incorporation into other genetic goods.

  10. DNA tagging of blast resistant gene(s in three Brazilian rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Sandhu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast is the most important fungal disease of rice and is caused by Pyricularia oryzae Sacc. (Telomorph Magnoporthe grisea Barr.. Seven randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers OPA5, OPG17, OPG18, OPG19, OPF9, OPF17 and OPF19 showed very clear polymorphism in resistant cultivar lines which differed from susceptible lines. By comparing different susceptible lines, nine DNA amplifications of seven primers (OPA5(1000, OPA5(1200, OPG17(700, OPG18(850, OPG19(500, OPG19(600, OPF9(600, OPF17(1200 and OPF19(600 were identified as dominant markers for the blast resistant gene in resistant cultivar lines. These loci facilitate the indirect scoring of blast resistant and blast susceptible genotypes. The codomine RAPDs markers will facilitate marker-assisted selection of the blast resistant gene in two blast resistant genotypes of rice (Labelle and Line 11 and will be useful in rice breeding programs.

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance and Resistance Genes in Aerobic Bacteria Isolated from Pork at Slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Ye, Lei; Yan, He; Nie, Qing; Meng, Hecheng; Shi, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance, integrons, and transferability of resistance markers in 243 aerobic bacteria recovered from pork at slaughter in the People's Republic of China. The organisms belonged to 22 genera of gram-negative bacteria (92.2%) and gram-positive bacteria (7.8%). High levels of resistance were detected to tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and ampicillin (36.2 to 54.3%), and lower levels were detected to nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol (7.8 to 29.2%). Across species, genes conferring antimicrobial resistance were observed with the following frequencies: blaTEM, 40.7%; blaCMY-2, 15.2%; blaCTX-M, 11.5%; sul2, 27.2%; sul1, 14.4%; tet(A), 5.4%; tet(L), 5.4%; tet(M), 5.0%; tet(E), 3.7%; tet(C), 3.3%; tet(S), 2.5%; and tet(K), 0.8%. Various antimicrobial resistance genes were found in new carriers: blaTEM in Lactococcus garvieae, Myroides odoratimimus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus sciuri, Raoultella terrigena, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Acinetobacter ursingii, Sphingobacterium sp., and Oceanobacillus sp.; blaCMY-2 in Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Myroides phaeus; tet(L) in M. caseolyticus; sul1 in Vibrio cincinnatiensis; sul2 in Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and V. cincinnatiensis; and the class 1 integron and gene cassette aadA2 in V. cincinnatiensis. Approximately 6.6% of isolates contained class 1 integrons, and one isolate harbored class 2 integrons. Plasmid associated intI1 and androgen receptor- encoding genes were transferred into Escherichia coli J53 and E. coli DH5α by conjugation and transformation experiments, respectively. Our study highlights the importance of aerobic bacteria from pork as reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes and mobile genetic elements that can readily be transferred intra- and interspecies. PMID:27052863

  12. Monitoring and Comparison of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Their Resistance Genes in Municipal and Hospital Wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Aali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human exposure to antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB is a public health concern which could occur in a number of ways. Wastewaters seem to play an important role in the dissemination of bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs in our environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of three groups of ARB and their resistance genes in hospital and municipal wastewaters (MWs as possible sources. Methods: A total of 66 samples were collected from raw MWs and hospital wastewaters (HWs and final effluents of related wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. Samples were analyzed for the detection of three groups of ARB including gentamicin (GM, chloramphenicol (CHL and ceftazidime resistant bacteria and their ARGs (aac (3-1, cmlA1 and ctx-m-32, respectively. Results: The mean concentration of GM, CHL and ceftazidime resistant bacteria in raw wastewater samples was 1.24 × 10 7 , 3.29 × 10 7 and 5.54 × 10 7 colony forming unit/100 ml, respectively. There is a variation in prevalence of different groups of ARB in MWs and HWs. All WWTPs decreased the concentration of ARB. However, high concentration of ARB was found in the final effluent of WWTPs. Similar to ARB, different groups of ARGs were found frequently in both MWs and HWs. All genes also detected with a relative high frequency in effluent samples of MWs WWTPs. Conclusions: Discharge of final effluent from conventional WWTPs is a potential route for dissemination of ARB and ARGs into the natural environment and poses a hazard to environmental and public health.

  13. Mapping of QTL for resistance to powdery mildew and resistance gene analogues in perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, B; Jensen, L B; Asp, T; Xing, Y; Lübberstedt, T

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to map resistance gene analogues (RGA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for powdery mildew resistance in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The mapping population consisted of 184 F2 genotypes produced from a cross between one genotype of a synthetic perennial...... the heritability was 71.7%. In total, two QTL for powdery mildew resistance were identified, and mapped to linkage groups (LG) LG3 and LG7. Individually, these QTL explained between 7.5% and 22.1% of the total phenotypic variation. Six RGA and three laccases were mapped to LG2, LG3, LG4, LG5 and LG7...

  14. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argudin, Maria Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta;

    2016-01-01

    substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus...... collection [n = 554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n = 456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic......Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC)398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other...

  15. Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica Isolated from Animals and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) foodborne bacteria are a concern in animal and human health. Identification of resistance genes in foodborne pathogens is necessary to determine similarities of resistance mechanisms in animal, food and human clinical isolates. This information will help us ...

  16. A review of the influence of treatment strategies on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virender K; Johnson, Natalie; Cizmas, Leslie; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the aquatic environment have become an emerging contaminant issue, which has implications for human and ecological health. This review begins with an introduction to the occurrence of ARB and ARG in different environmental systems such as natural environments and drinking water resources. For example, ARG or ARB with resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, quinolone, vancomycin, or tetracycline (e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(G), tet(O), tet(M), tet(W), sul I, and sul II) have been detected in the environment. The development of resistance may be intrinsic, may be acquired through spontaneous mutations (de novo), or may occur due to horizontal gene transfer from donor bacteria, phages, or free DNA to recipient bacteria. An overview is also provided of the current knowledge regarding inactivation of ARB and ARG, and the mechanism of the effects of different disinfection processes in water and wastewater (chlorination, UV irradiation, Fenton reaction, ozonation, and photocatalytic oxidation). The effects of constructed wetlands and nanotechnology on ARB and ARG are also summarized. PMID:26775188

  17. Fate of antibiotic resistant cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhe; Han, Bing; Gu, Ju; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ma, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashun; He, Zhenli

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants of environmental concern. Heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge have an important role in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, the fate of cultivable heterotrophic ARB and ARGs in WWPTs process remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antibiotic-resistant phenotypes of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria from influent and effluent water of three WWTPs and analysed thirteen ARGs in ARB and in activated sludge from anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic compartments. From each influent or effluent sample of the three plants, 200 isolates were randomly tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. In these samples, between 5% and 64% isolates showed resistance to >9 antibiotics and the proportion of >9-drug-resistant bacteria was lower in isolates from effluent than from influent. Eighteen genera were identified in 188 isolates from influent (n=94) and effluent (n=94) of one WWTP. Six genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium, Providencia, and Staphylococcus) were detected in both influent and effluent samples. Gram-negative and -positive isolates dominated in influent and effluent, respectively. The 13 tetracycline-, sulphonamide-, streptomycin- and β-lactam-resistance genes were detected at a higher frequency in ARB from influent than from effluent, except for sulA and CTX-M, while in general, the abundances of ARGs in activated sludge from two of the three plants were higher in aerobic compartments than in anoxic ones, indicating abundant ARGs exit in the excess sledges and/or in uncultivable bacteria. These findings may be useful for elucidating the effect of WWTP on ARB and ARGs. PMID:25950407

  18. Novel Selection for Isoniazid (INH) Resistance Genes Supports a Role for NAD+-Binding Proteins in Mycobacterial INH Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, PING; Bishai, William R.

    1998-01-01

    The genetic basis of isoniazid (INH) resistance remains unknown for a significant proportion of clinical isolates. To identify genes which might confer resistance by detoxifying or sequestering INH, we transformed the Escherichia coli oxyR mutant, which is relatively sensitive to INH, with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis plasmid library and selected for INH-resistant clones. Three genes were identified and called ceo for their ability to complement the Escherichia coli oxyR mutant. ceoA was the ...

  19. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Kailong Huang; Junying Tang; Xu-Xiang Zhang; Ke Xu; Hongqiang Ren

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera cons...

  20. Generation of broad-spectrum disease resistance by overexpression of an essential regulatory gene in systemic acquired resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Hui; Li, Xin; Dong, Xinnian

    1998-01-01

    The recently cloned NPR1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is a key regulator of acquired resistance responses. Upon induction, NPR1 expression is elevated and the NPR1 protein is activated, in turn inducing expression of a battery of downstream pathogenesis-related genes. In this study, we found that NPR1 confers resistance to the pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Peronospora parasitica in a dosage-dependent fashion. Overexpression of NPR1 leads to enhanced resistance with no obvious detrimental...

  1. Genes for resistance to wheat powdery mildew in derivatives of Triticum Timopheevi and T. Carthlicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Jensen, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    and/or Ml designated genes; a temporary designation, Ml f ,is proposed for this gene. Gene Ml f is closely associated with a gene conditioning resistance to the stem rust fungus (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici), probably gene Sr9c. The winter wheat line TP 229 derived from Triticum carthlicum has......The winter wheat line TP 114 derived from CI 12633, a Triticum timopheevi derivative, has two unlinked dominant genes conditioning resistance to the powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f. sp. tritici). One of the genes is identical to gene Pm2 (Ml u ). The other gene differs from the eleven Pm...

  2. Diversity of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci from veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this study we determined whether methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus (MRNAS) from veal calves may be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes. Fifty-eight MRNAS were studied by means of DNA-microarray and PCR for detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. The isolates carried a variety of antimicrobial-resistance genes [aacA-aphD, aadD, aph3, aadE, sat, spc, ampA, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), lnu(A), msr(A)-msr(B), vga(A), mph(C), tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), cat, fexA, dfrA, dfrD, dfrG, dfrK, cfr, fusB, fosB, qacA, qacC, merA-merB]. Some isolates carried resistance genes without showing the corresponding resistance phenotype. Most MRNAS carried typical S. aureus virulence factors like proteases (sspP) and enterotoxins (seg) genes. Most Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carried the arginine catabolic element, and nearly 40% of the Staphylococcus sciuri isolates carried leukocidins, and/or fibronectin-binding protein genes. MRNAS were highly multi-resistant and represent an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. PMID:25637268

  3. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  4. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  5. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zijian; Lai, Wei; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistantNeisseria gonorrhoeaeis currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance inNeisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation inpenA(A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutatedpenAgene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutatedftsXincreased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, whilepilM,pilN, andpilQwere downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeto ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry. PMID:26787702

  6. Linezolid Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus: Gene Dosage Effect, Stability, Fitness Costs, and Cross-Resistances▿

    OpenAIRE

    Besier, Silke; Ludwig, Albrecht; Zander, Johannes; Brade, Volker; Wichelhaus, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Linezolid resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is typically associated with mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. Here we show that the accumulation of a single point mutation, G2576T, in the different copies of this gene causes stepwise increases in resistance, impairment of the biological fitness, and cross-resistance to quinupristin-dalfopristin and chloramphenicol.

  7. Rapidly evolving R genes in diverse grass species confer resistance to rice blast disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qijun; Huang, Ju; Chen, Jian-Qun; Hartl, Daniel L.; Tian, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    We show that the genomes of maize, sorghum, and brachypodium contain genes that, when transformed into rice, confer resistance to rice blast disease. The genes are resistance genes (R genes) that encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains (NBS–LRR proteins). By using criteria associated with rapid molecular evolution, we identified three rapidly evolving R-gene families in these species as well as in rice, and transformed a randomly chosen subset ...

  8. High throughput LSPR and SERS analysis of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeating, Kristy S; Couture, Maxime; Dinel, Marie-Pier; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2016-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, and are often dispensed only in severe cases due to their adverse side effects. Patients undergoing treatment with these antibiotics are therefore commonly subjected to therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) to ensure a safe and effective personalised dosage. The ability to detect these antibiotics in a rapid and sensitive manner in human fluids is therefore of the utmost importance in order to provide effective monitoring of these drugs, which could potentially allow for a more widespread use of this class of antibiotics. Herein, we report on the detection of various aminoglycosides, by exploiting their ability to aggregate gold nanoparticles. The number and position of the amino groups of aminoglycoside antibiotics controlled the aggregation process. We investigated the complementary techniques of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) for dual detection of these aminoglycoside antibiotics and performed an in-depth study of the feasibility of carrying out TDM of tobramycin using a platform amenable to high throughput analysis. Herein, we also demonstrate dual detection of tobramycin using both LSPR and SERS in a single platform and within the clinically relevant concentration range needed for TDM of this particular aminoglycoside. Additionally we provide evidence that tobramycin can be detected in spiked human serum using only functionalised nanoparticles and SERS analysis. PMID:27412506

  9. Gene expression patterns of wheat rust resistance gene Lr34/Yr18 indicate novel mode of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lr34/Yr18 resistance gene provides durable, adult-plant, slow-rusting resistance to leaf rust and yellow rust of wheat. Patterns of gene expression were examined by microarray analysis in inoculated and mock-inoculated flag leaves of two pairs of near isogenic lines for Lr34/Yr18 (Thatcher/Thatc...

  10. Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal RNA A1555G Mutation Associated with Cardiomyopathy and Hearing Loss following High-Dose Chemotherapy and Repeated Aminoglycoside Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Anne-Sofie; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Jensen, Tim;

    2014-01-01

    A 19-month-old girl with the A1555G mitochondrial mutation in the 12S ribosomal RNA gene and acute myelogenous leukemia developed dilated cardiomyopathy and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss before undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. She had received gentamicin during episodes of ...... febrile neutropenia. Testing for the A1555G mutation is recommended in patients frequently treated with aminoglycosides....

  11. Can chlorination co-select antibiotic-resistance genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Selective pressures, such as chemical or heavy metal pollution, may co-select for bacterial antibiotic resistance in the environment. However, whether chlorination in water treatment can co-select antibiotic-resistant bacteria is controversial. In this study, high capacity quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was applied to target almost all known antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) (282 types) and 13 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in bacteria detected in secondary effluents from a municipal wastewater treatment plant after chlorination. The results revealed that 125 unique ARGs were detected in non-chlorinated samples, and the number decreased (79-91 types) as the chlorine concentration was increased. Moreover, 7.49 × 10(4)-3.92 × 10(7) copies/100 ml water reduction of ARGs occurred with 4 mg Cl2/l. Considering the relative abundance of ARGs (i.e., ARG copies normalized to 16S rRNA gene copies), 119 ARGs decreased in response to chlorination, whereas only six ARGs, such as dfrA1, tetPB-03, tetPA, ampC-04, tetA-02, and erm(36), were potentially enriched by 10.90-, 10.06-, 8.63-, 6.86-, 3.77-, and 1.09-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the relative abundance of 12 detected MGEs was lower after chlorination. Therefore, chlorination was effective in reducing ARGs and MGEs rather than co-selecting them. PMID:27192478

  12. QTL Mapping and Gene Cloning of Durable Resistance to Blast in Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Kazutoshi Okuno

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast, caused by Pyricularia grisea Sacc., is a destructive disease of rice in most rice growing areas around the world. Breeding efforts have been made to introduce genes for blast resistance into desirable genetic background. Resistance to rice blast is categorized two types, complete (true) and incomplete (field resistance). Complete resistance is a hypersensitive reaction, often a complete form of resistance, and is characterized by a resistant infection type. More than 20 loci for c...

  13. Detection of antibiotic resistance and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the Pearl rivers in South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Ran [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guangguo.ying@gmail.co [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Su Haochang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou Hongwei [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, 1838 North Guangzhou Street, Baiyun District, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Sidhu, Jatinder P.S. [CSIRO Land and Water, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia QLD 4067 (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigated antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae family isolates from the Pearl rivers. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates were tested for susceptibility to seven antibiotics ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, tetracycline and trimethoprim. In Liuxi reservoir, with an exception to ampicillin resistant strains (11%) no other antibiotic resistance bacterial strains were detected. However, multiple drug resistance in bacterial isolates from the other sites of Pearl rivers was observed which is possibly due to sewage discharge and input from other anthropogenic sources along the rivers. Four tetracycline resistance genes tet A, tet B, tet C and tet D were detected in the isolates from the rivers. The genes tet A and tet B were widely detected with the detection frequencies of 43% and 40% respectively. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin resistant enteric bacteria were also isolated from the pig and duck manures which suggest a wider distribution of human specific drugs in the environment. This investigation provided a baseline data on antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in the Pearl rivers delta. - High rates of antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae from river water are attributed to wastewater contamination.

  14. Detection of antibiotic resistance and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the Pearl rivers in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae family isolates from the Pearl rivers. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates were tested for susceptibility to seven antibiotics ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, tetracycline and trimethoprim. In Liuxi reservoir, with an exception to ampicillin resistant strains (11%) no other antibiotic resistance bacterial strains were detected. However, multiple drug resistance in bacterial isolates from the other sites of Pearl rivers was observed which is possibly due to sewage discharge and input from other anthropogenic sources along the rivers. Four tetracycline resistance genes tet A, tet B, tet C and tet D were detected in the isolates from the rivers. The genes tet A and tet B were widely detected with the detection frequencies of 43% and 40% respectively. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin resistant enteric bacteria were also isolated from the pig and duck manures which suggest a wider distribution of human specific drugs in the environment. This investigation provided a baseline data on antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in the Pearl rivers delta. - High rates of antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae from river water are attributed to wastewater contamination.

  15. Evaluation of bacterial wilt resistance in tomato lines nearly isogenic for the Mi gene for resistance to root-knot

    OpenAIRE

    Deberdt, P.; Olivier, J; Thoquet, P; Quénéhervé, Patrick; Prior, P

    1999-01-01

    Resistance to bacterial wilt, caused by #Ralstonia solancearum$, in tomato lines CRA 66 and Caraïbo is reported to be decreased by root-knot nematode galling and by introduction of the #Mi$ gene for nematode resistance. The #Mi$ gene is located on tomato chromosome 6, which also carries a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance to bacterial wilt. Bacterial wilt resistance was evaluated in F3-progenies derived from two crosses between near-isogenic lines Caraïbo x Carmido and CRA 6...

  16. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'- acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) were defined to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical standard curves at six different concentrations resulted in a correlation coefficient (r value) of greater than 0.99 for each aminoglycoside. The radioenzymatic assay correlates well with the bioassay (tobramycin and netilmicin) and radioimmunoassay (amikacin and kanamycin); the correlation coefficient is greater than 0.90 for all. The authors conclude that the radioenzymatic assay utilizing kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase is feasible for all commercially available parenterally administered aminoglycosides

  17. Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berglund

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intI1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.8 × 10(4 copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

  18. Fine genetic mapping localizes cucumber scab resistance gene Ccu into an R gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Houxiang; Weng, Yiqun; Yang, Yuhong; Zhang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Shengping; Mao, Zhenchuan; Cheng, Guohua; Gu, Xingfang; Huang, Sanwen; Xie, Bingyan

    2011-03-01

    Scab, caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F(9) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and 1,944 F(2) plants derived from the resistant cucumber inbred line 9110Gt and the susceptible line 9930, whose draft genome sequence is now available. A framework linkage map was first constructed with simple sequence repeat markers placing Ccu into the terminal 670 kb region of cucumber Chromosome 2. The 9110Gt genome was sequenced at 5× genome coverage with the Solexa next-generation sequencing technology. Sequence analysis of the assembled 9110Gt contigs and the Ccu region of the 9930 genome identified three insertion/deletion (Indel) markers, Indel01, Indel02, and Indel03 that were closely linked with the Ccu locus. On the high-resolution map developed with the F(2) population, the two closest flanking markers, Indel01 and Indel02, were 0.14 and 0.15 cM away from the target gene Ccu, respectively, and the physical distance between the two markers was approximately 140 kb. Detailed annotation of the 180 kb region harboring the Ccu locus identified a cluster of six resistance gene analogs (RGAs) that belong to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) type R genes. Four RGAs were in the region delimited by markers Indel01 and Indel02, and thus were possible candidates of Ccu. Comparative DNA analysis of this cucumber Ccu gene region with a melon (C. melo) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone revealed a high degree of micro-synteny and conservation of the RGA tandem repeats in this region. PMID:21104067

  19. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getahun E Agga

    Full Text Available This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie. Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and Gram-positive (enterococci bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174. The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44 by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine, low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05 in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  20. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Vasudevan; Wilhelm Gruissem; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are...

  1. [Classification and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnr genes in China--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Xu, Hai

    2016-02-01

    Quinolone antibacterial drugs, developing from the treatment of urinary tract infection in early time and now from the treatment of intestinal infection and respiratory infection, have been widely used in clinical, animal husbandry and aquaculture. Bacteria gradually become resistant to them and resistance mechanism is more and more complicated. Quinolone resistance mechanism is mainly divided into chromosome mediated resistance and plasmid mediated resistance, the latter plays an important role in spreading of antibiotic resistance. In 1998, plasmid mediated quinolone resistance mechanism was reported for the first time, namely the qnr gene mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism. qnr genes can spread rapidly in different bacteria, which causes the infection difficult to control, makes the nosocomial infection popular in a wide range. In addition, qnr genes are usually associated with β-lactamase resistance gene. They exist in complex integron and integrate with the other varieties of resistance genes, which narrows the space of clinical medicine choose or drug combinations use to treat related bacterial infection and brings us a serious challenge. In this review, we provide a detailed overview for the historical discovery, classification, the resistance mechanisms of qnr genes, and the prevalence of those genes in China. PMID:27373065

  2. Strategy of gene silencing in cassava for validation of resistance genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a major source of food for more than 1000 million people in the world and constitutes an important staple crop. Cassava bacterial blight, caused by the gram negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis, is one of the most important constraints for this crop. A candidate resistance gene against cassava bacterial blight, named RXam1, has been identified previously. In this work, we employed the gene silencing approach using the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) to validate the function of the RXam1 gene. We used as positive control the su gen, which produce photo blanching in leaves when is silenced. Plants from the SG10735 variety were bombardment with the ACMV-A-SU+ACMV-B y ACMV-A-RXam1+ACMV-B constructions. The silencing efficiency employing the su gene was low, only one of seven plants showed photo blanching. In the putative silenced plants for the RXam1 gene, no presence of siRNAs corresponding to RXam1 was observed; although a low diminution of the RXam1 gene expression was obtained. The growth curves for the Xam strain CIO136 in cassava plants inoculated showing a little but no significance difference in the susceptibility in the silenced plants compared to not silenced

  3. 牙菌斑培养菌群宏基因组文库构建及抗生素耐药基因筛选%Screening antibiotic resistance genes of cultured dental plaque with a metagenomic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丹; 程功; 李晶; 朱宝利; 魏世成

    2013-01-01

    [目的]构建牙菌斑培养菌群宏基因组文库,筛选牙菌斑生物膜中细菌的抗生素耐药基因.[方法]采集20例无龋健康人的集合牙菌斑并进行厌氧培养.提取牙菌斑培养菌群宏基因组构建Fosmid文库.用卡那霉素、四环素及氨苄西林对文库进行筛选,并对筛选到的抗性Fosmid克隆进行末端测序、亚克隆构建、亚克隆测序和序列分析.[结果]构建了牙菌斑培养菌群宏基因组Fosmid文库,插入片段长度在36-48 kb间约有15 120个克隆,插入片段长度小于36 kb的约有3 360个克隆.筛选获得一个氨基糖苷类双功能修饰酶AacA-AphD基因、一个核糖体保护蛋白型四环素耐药基因tet (M)及一个C家族β-内酰胺酶基因.[结论]证实了可以通过构建宏基因组文库的方法来筛选牙菌斑培养菌群中的抗生素耐药基因.%[Objective] Fosmid library of cultured human dental plaque samples was constructed and screened for antibiotic resistance genes.[Methods] Dental plaques from 20 individuals were obtained and cultured anaerobically in vitro.Bacteria DNA was extracted and Fosmid library was constructed.Antibiotic resistant clones were selected by plating on LB agar containing one of the three antibiotics:kanamycin,tetracycline,and ampicillin.Inserts conferring resistance were sequenced and annotated.[Results] A metagenomic Fosmid library was generated,which contained approximately 18 480 clones.Three antibiotic resistance genes were obtained through functional screening,including one kanamycin resistance gene encoding bifunctional aminoglycoside modifying enzyme AacA-AphD,one tetracycline resistance gene tet (M) and one ampicillin resistance gene encoding class C beta-lactamase.[Conclusion] It turns out that it is possible to construct fosmid libraries using cultivated dental plaque samples to screen antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. Microarray-Based Detection of 90 Antibiotic Resistance Genes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Perreten, Vincent; Vorlet-Fawer, Lorianne; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    A disposable microarray was developed for detection of up to 90 antibiotic resistance genes in gram-positive bacteria by hybridization. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by two specific oligonucleotides chosen from consensus sequences of gene families, except for nine genes for which only one specific oligonucleotide could be developed. A total of 137 oligonucleotides (26 to 33 nucleotides in length with similar physicochemical parameters) were spotted onto the microarray. The mi...

  5. Class 1 and 2 integrons, sul resistance genes and antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from Dongjiang River, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibiotic susceptibility, detection of sul gene types and presence of class 1, 2 and 3 integrons and gene cassettes using PCR assays were investigated in 3456 Escherichia coli isolates obtained from 38 sampling sites of the Dongjiang River catchment in the dry and wet seasons. 89.1% of the isolates were resistant and 87.5% showed resistance to at least three antibiotics. sul2 was detected most frequently in 89.2% of 1403 SXT-resistant isolates. The presence of integrons (class 1 and 2) was frequently observed (82.3%) while no class 3 integron was found. In these integrons, 21 resistance genes of 14 gene cassette arrays and 10 different families of resistance genes were identified. Three gene cassette arrays, aac(6')-Ib-cr-aar-3-dfrA27-aadA16, aacA4-catB3-dfrA1 and aadA2-lnuF, were detected for the first time in surface water. The results showed that bacterial resistance in the catchment was seriously influenced by human activities, especially discharge of wastewater. Highlights: ► Antibiotic resistance was investigated for a river catchment of southern China. ► 87.5% of E coli isolates showed resistance to at least three antibiotics. ► The presence of integrons (class 1 and 2) was frequently observed (82.3%). ► Bacterial resistance in the catchment was seriously influenced by human activities. - Bacterial resistance to antibiotics in a catchment is related to the discharge of wastewater into the aquatic environment.

  6. Mapping of the oat crown rust resistance gene Pc91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, C A; Stonehouse, R G; Rossnagel, B G; Eckstein, P E; Scoles, G J; Zatorski, T; Beattie, A D; Chong, J

    2011-02-01

    Crown rust is an important disease of oat caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks. Crown rust is efficiently and effectively managed through the development of resistant oat varieties. Pc91 is a seedling crown rust resistance gene that is highly effective against the current P. coronata population in North America. The primary objective of this study was to develop DNA markers linked to Pc91 for purposes of marker-assisted selection in oat breeding programs. The Pc91 locus was mapped using a population of F7-derived recombinant inbred lines developed from the cross 'CDC Sol-Fi'/'HiFi' made at the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan. The population was evaluated for reaction to P. coronata in field nurseries in 2008 and 2009. Pc91 mapped to a linkage group consisting of 44 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers. DArTs were successfully converted to sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. Five robust SCARs were developed from three non-redundant DArTs that co-segregated with Pc91. SCAR markers were developed for different assay systems, such that SCARs are available for agarose gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and Taqman single nucleotide polymorphism detection. The SCAR markers accurately postulated the Pc91 status of 23 North American oat breeding lines. PMID:20862449

  7. Spread of Enterobacter cloacae carrying blaNDM-1, blaCTX-M-15, blaSHV-12 and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in a surgical intensive care unit in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosillo, N; Vranić-Ladavac, M; Feudi, C; Villa, L; Fortini, D; Barišić, N; Bedenić, B; Ladavac, R; D'Arezzo, S; Andrašević, A Tambić; Capone, A

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a hospital cluster of NDM-1-producing Enterobacter cloacae infections observed in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary-care hospital at Pula, Croatia. NDM-1-producing E. cloacae strains isolated from clinical samples were screened by PCR for the presence of carbapenemases. Genetic relatedness of NDM-1-producing E. cloacae strains was determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). During the period October 2013 to April 2014, four patients, with overlapping hospital stay in the surgical ICU, developed severe infections caused by E. cloacae demonstrated to produce carbapenemases. According to MLST, all strains belonged to ST133 and were positive by PCR for the blaNDM-1 carbapenemase gene, for blaCTX-M-15 and blaSHV-12 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes, and for blaTEM-1 and blaOXA-1 narrow-spectrum β-lactamase genes. They were negative for other carbapenemases genes including blaOXA-48, blaVIM and blaKPC as well as for AmpC and the armA and rmtB aminoglycoside resistance genes. All strains were positive for the HI2 replicon, suggesting that an IncHI2 plasmid is likely the plasmid carrying the blaNDM-1 gene. Infection control measures were implemented after the first case although they were not effective in avoiding spread of this organism to other patients in the surgical ICU. In conclusion, the evolving epidemiology of NDM-producing micro-organisms and the interspecies diffusion of this resistance mechanism to emerging pathogens such as E. cloacae necessitate the setting up of strong and urgent joint measures to control the spread of NDM carbapenemase especially in the ICU setting. PMID:27436392

  8. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria And Their Associated Resistance Genes in a Conventional Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2013-12-01

    With water scarcity as a pressing issue in Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries, the treatment and reuse of municipal wastewater is increasingly being used as an alternative water source to supplement country water needs. Standards are in place to ensure a safe treated wastewater quality, however they do not regulate pathogenic bacteria and emerging contaminants. Information is lacking on the levels of risk to public health associated with these factors, the efficiency of conventional treatment strategies in removing them, and on wastewater treatment in Saudi Arabia in general. In this study, a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia is investigated to assess the efficiency of conventional treatment in meeting regulations and removing pathogens and emerging contaminants. The study found pathogenic bacterial genera, antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotic resistant bacteria, many of which were multi-resistant in plant discharges. It was found that although the treatments are able to meet traditional quality guidelines, there remains a risk from the discussed contaminants with wastewater reuse. A deeper understanding of this risk, and suggestions for more thorough guidelines and monitoring are needed.

  9. Gene duplication and hypermutation of the pathogen Resistance gene SNC1 in the Arabidopsis bal variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hankuil; Richards, Eric J

    2009-12-01

    The bal defect in the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia strain was spontaneously generated in an inbred ddm1 (decrease in DNA methylation 1) mutant background in which various genetic and epigenetic alterations accumulate. The bal variant displays short stature and curled leaves due to the constitutive activation of defense signaling. These bal phenotypes are metastable and phenotypic suppression is evident in more than one-third of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated bal M(1) plants. The semidominant bal allele maps to the RPP5 (recognition of Peronospora parasitica 5) locus, which includes a cluster of disease Resistance (R) genes, many of which show an increase in steady-state expression levels in the bal variant. Here, we report that activation of RPP5 locus R genes and dwarfing in the bal variant are caused by a 55-kb duplication within the RPP5 locus. Although many RPP5 locus R genes are duplicated in the bal variant, the duplication of SNC1 alone is necessary and sufficient for the phenotypic changes in the bal variant. Missense mutations in the SNC1 gene were identified in all three phenotypically suppressed EMS-treated bal lines investigated, indicating that the high-frequency phenotypic instability induced by EMS treatment is caused by a genetic mechanism. We propose that the high degree of variation in SNC1-related sequences among Arabidopsis natural accessions follows the two-step mechanism observed in the bal variant: gene duplication followed by hypermutation. PMID:19797048

  10. Cloning and characterization of gene-resistant analogs (RGAs) involved in rust (Puccinia psidii) resistance in Eucalyptus grandis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcelo Luiz Laia; Acelino Couto Alfenas; Sergio Hermnio Brommonschenkel; Shinitiro Oda; Eduardo Jose de Melo; Inae Marie de Arau jo Silva; Janana Fernandes Goncalves; Ariadne Marques

    2015-01-01

    Disease-resistant genes play an important role in defending against a variety of pathogens and insect pests in plants. Most of the disease-resistant genes encode pro-teins with conserved leucine rich repeat and nucleotide binding site domains. In this study, we cloned and char-acterized gene-resistant analogs (RGAs) from Eucalyptus grandis using degenerate PCR, with primers specifically targeting these two domains. The amplified fragments were cloned into the pGEM-T vector and transformed into Escherichia coli. Among the 90 clones obtained, 13 were sequenced and compared with each other and with previ-ously identified gene-resistant diseases. A BLASTX search in GenBank revealed high similarities among the con-served domains of these cloned genes with RGA genes. Some clones, however, showed no significant similarity with DNA sequences in GenBank. Southern blotting ana-lysis identified several polymorphic RFLP loci between distinct genotypes. However, none of them co-segregated with the Puccinia psidii Winter resistance gene 1 (Ppr1) in a population study.

  11. Soybean Resistance Genes Specific for Different Pseudomonas Syringae Avirulence Genes Are Allelic, or Closely Linked, at the Rpg1 Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Ashfield, T.; Keen, N. T.; Buzzell, R. I.; Innes, R W

    1995-01-01

    RPG1 and RPM1 are disease resistance genes in soybean and Arabidopsis, respectively, that confer resistance to Pseudomonas syringae strains expressing the avirulence gene avrB. RPM1 has recently been demonstrated to have a second specificity, also conferring resistance to P. syringae strains expressing avrRpm1. Here we show that alleles, or closely linked genes, exist at the RPG1 locus in soybean that are specific for either avrB or avrRpm1 and thus can distinguish between these two avirulenc...

  12. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão Rodrigues, Fabíola Fernandes; Costa, José Galberto Martins; Rodrigues, Fábio Fernandes Galvao; Campos, Adriana Rolim

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%-P. amboinicus) and eugenol (22.9%-P. ornatus e 25.1%-P. barbatus). In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant) using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23662150

  13. Who Possesses Drug Resistance Genes in the Aquatic Environment? : Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) Resistance Genes among the Bacterial Community in Water Environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru eSuzuki; Mitsuko eOgo; Miller, Todd W.; Akiko eShimizu; Hideshige eTakada; Maria Auxilia eSiringan

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in “colony forming bacterial assemblages” and “natural bacterial assemblages.” Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination r...

  14. Allele-mining and natural diversity in wheat powdery mildew resistance genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using map-based cloning, we have isolated the Pm3b powdery mildew resistance gene from hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Based on haplotype studies, we have developed molecular tools to isolate all the 10 known Pm3 genes conferring resistance. We found that the Pm3 genes form a true allelic series and that they are highly conserved at the molecular level. The molecular work on Pm3 resistance genes has lead to very diagnostic tools for these genes which support the cloning of new functional alleles from this locus by allele-mining. We have used these tools to screen for new Pm3 alleles in the gene pools of (i) wild and domesticated tetraploid accessions and (ii) hexaploid wheat landraces. The Pm3 locus is conserved in tetraploid wheat, allowing a comparative evolutionary study of the same resistance locus in a domesticated species and one of its wild ancestors. We have identified 61 Pm3 allelic sequences from wild and domesticated tetraploid wheat subspecies. These alleles showed low sequence diversity, differing by few polymorphic sequence blocks that were further reshuffled between alleles by gene conversion and recombination. A new functional gene was identified in a wild wheat accession from Syria. This gene, Pm3k, conferred intermediate resistance to powdery mildew and consists of a mosaic of gene segments derived from non-functional alleles. From the hexaploid wheat gene pool, a set of 1320 landraces, mostly from Asia, was screened for powdery mildew resistance and the presence of a Pm3 haplotype. Most of these lines were found to contain a susceptible Pm3 allele which is closely related to the functional Pm3 resistance genes. We have also identified resistant lines with new types of Pm3 allelic sequences, resulting from point mutations, gene conversion and illegitimate recombination events. These new alleles are currently tested for resistance activity in a transient expression assay. (author)

  15. Natural variation of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in Oryza species and its corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pi-ta gene prevents the infections of M. oryzae races containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita in a gene-for-gene manner. Pi-ta is a putative NBS type major resistance gene, and can directly recognize the AVR-Pita putative metalloprotease in triggering effective resistance. We hav...

  16. Sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and their resistance genes in soils fertilized with manures from Jiangsu Province, Southeastern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wang

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes are recognized as new environmental pollutants that warrant special concern. There were few reports on veterinary antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes in China. This work systematically analyzed the prevalence and distribution of sulfonamide resistance genes in soils from the environments around poultry and livestock farms in Jiangsu Province, Southeastern China. The results showed that the animal manure application made the spread and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs increasingly in the soil. The frequency of sulfonamide resistance genes was sul1 > sul2 > sul3 in pig-manured soil DNA and sul2 > sul1 > sul3 in chicken-manured soil DNA. Further analysis suggested that the frequency distribution of the sul genes in the genomic DNA and plasmids of the SR isolates from manured soil was sul2 > sul1 > sul3 overall (p<0.05. The combination of sul1 and sul2 was the most frequent, and the co-existence of sul1 and sul3 was not found either in the genomic DNA or plasmids. The sample type, animal type and sampling time can influence the prevalence and distribution pattern of sulfonamide resistance genes. The present study also indicated that Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Shigella were the most prevalent sul-positive genera in the soil, suggesting a potential human health risk. The above results could be important in the evaluation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes from manure as sources of agricultural soil pollution; the results also demonstrate the necessity and urgency of the regulation and supervision of veterinary antibiotics in China.

  17. Indigenous and acquired modifications in the aminoglycoside binding sites of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Belen; Douthwaite, Stephen Roger; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    of 16S rRNA helix 44 with a secondary target in 23S rRNA helix 69. Here, we have mapped P. aeruginosa rRNAs using MALDI mass spectrometry and reverse transcriptase primer extension to identify nucleotide modifications that could influence aminoglycoside interactions. Helices 44 and 45 contain...... indigenous (housekeeping) modifications at m (4)Cm1402, m (3)U1498, m (2)G1516, m (6) 2A1518, and m (6) 2A1519; helix 69 is modified at m (3)Ψ1915, with m (5)U1939 and m (5)C1962 modification in adjacent sequences. All modifications were close to stoichiometric, with the exception of m (3)Ψ1915, where about...... 80% of rRNA molecules were methylated. The modification status of a virulent clinical strain expressing the acquired methyltransferase RmtD was altered in two important respects: RmtD stoichiometrically modified m (7)G1405 conferring high resistance to the aminoglycoside tobramycin and, in doing so...

  18. SYNTHESIS AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF NEW 5H-INDOLO[2,3-B]QUINOLINE O-AMINOGLYCOSIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowska-Rosłonek, Katarzyna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Switalska, Marta; Piskozub, Małgorzata; Peczyńska-Czoch, Wanda; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    Novel 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline O-aminoglycosides were synthesized in order to check the hypothesis that the construction of hybrids composed of the active 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline chromophore and daunosaminyl or acosaminyl moiety may result in the cytotoxic activity of the obtained derivatives that is much higher than the one of the parent DIMIQ (5,11-dimethyl-5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline) and 6H-indoloquinoline analogs. Actually, 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides showed the anti-proliferative activity in vitro against human lung adenocarcinoma A549, breast cancer MCF-7, melanoma Hs294T, promyelocytic leukemia HL-60, uterine sarcoma MES-SA and colon cancer LoVo cell lines, which was 10 times higher than that of the 6H-analogs and comparable to the one of the referential DIMIQ. Unexpectedly, it appeared that except for HL-60/MX2 (P-gp-independent and topoisomerase II-dependent resistance), other MDR tumor cell lines (LoVo/DX. P-gp-dependent, MRP-, LRP-dependent multidrug resistance) and MES-SA/DX5 (P-gp-dependent resistance to doxorubicin) are also resistant to the 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides tested. This is surprising because 6H-analogs, in general, 10 times less active against non-MDR tumor cell lines, as well as the DIMIQ itself, are able to overcome drug resistance in all MDR cell lines examined. The cytotoxicity of the tested compounds against tumor cell lines and against normal cells (mice fibroblasts BALB/3T3) was comparable. PMID:27476287

  19. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Jadali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss.

  20. Blast resistant gene on rice mutant R917 and it translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R917 is a new rice variety with strong blast disease resistance. The resistance genes of R917 and its parents, Chengte 232 and Xiushui 37, were analysed with blast races of Pyricularia oryzae ZB13, ZC15 and ZE3. The results showed that only one dominant gene controlled the resistance to the three blast races in R917. Allelism test indicated that the resistant gene of R917 was non-allelic with its parents. The blast resistance was tested by inoculating with 7 Japanese strains. R917 was highly resistant to the all. The allelism test also indicated that the resistant gene of R917 was non-allelic with Toride 1. The reaction with some strains between R917 and Toride 1 indicated that the blast resistant gene of R917 is different with the 14 genes that was reported in Japan. The identification of the disease resistance for the progenies of R917 crosses with XS861 showed that R917 could be used as a good material for resistance to rice blast in rice breeding

  1. Natural variation of rice blast resistance gene Pi-d2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studying natural variation of rice resistance (R) genes in cultivated and wild rice relatives can predict resistance stability to rice blast fungus. In the present study, the protein coding regions of rice R gene Pi-d2 in 35 rice accessions of subgroups, aus (AUS), indica (IND), temperate japonica (...

  2. Presence of tetracycline resistance genes in ecosystems with distinct levels of human impact

    OpenAIRE

    STEHLÍKOVÁ, Zuzana

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of tetracycline resistance genes in the environments with different levels of human impact were compared in this work. The experimental part included detection of eight tetracycline resistance genes in soils from manured and non-manured farms (representing man-affected environment) and soils from national parks (representing non-affected environment).

  3. PEDIGREE AND DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF BLAST RESISTANCE GENES IN US RICE GERMPLASM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blast resistance genes have been effectively used in southern US rice germplasm to reduce crop losses from this serious disease threat. Historical records indicate the most common blast resistance genes in USA rice germplasm are Pi-z and Pi-ks in medium grain and Pi-kh and Pi-ta2 in long grain varie...

  4. mmr, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Gene Conferring Resistance to Small Cationic Dyes and Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    De Rossi, Edda; Branzoni, Manuela; Cantoni, Rita; Milano, Anna; Riccardi, Giovanna; Ciferri, Orio

    1998-01-01

    The mmr gene, cloned from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was shown to confer to Mycobacterium smegmatis resistance to tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP), erythromycin, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, safranin O, and pyronin Y. The gene appears to code for a protein containing four transmembrane domains. Studies of [3H]TPP intracellular accumulation strongly suggest that the resistance mediated by the Mmr protein involves active extrusion of TPP.

  5. DNA Microarray Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Bacteria Co-Cultured from Swine Feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    One factor leading to the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AR) in bacteria is the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. To study this, a DNA microarray was recently developed to detect these genes. To maximize the capability of this microarray, probes were designed and added to detect all AR g...

  6. Molecular ecology of tetracycline resistance: development and validation of primers for detection of tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, R I; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N; Mackie, R I

    2001-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of tetracycline resistance genes encoding the ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs) revealed the monophyletic origin of these genes. The most deeply branching class, exemplified by tet and otrA, consisted of genes from the antibiotic-producing organisms Streptomyces rimosus and Streptomyces lividans. With a high degree of confidence, the corresponding genes of the other seven classes (Tet M, Tet S, Tet O, Tet W, Tet Q, Tet T, and TetB P) formed phylogenetically distinct separate clusters. Based on this phylogenetic analysis, a set of PCR primers for detection, retrieval, and sequence analysis of the corresponding gene fragments from a variety of bacterial and environmental sources was developed and characterized. A pair of degenerate primers targeted all tetracycline resistance genes encoding RPPs except otrA and tet, and seven other primer pairs were designed to target the specific classes. The primers were used to detect the circulation of these genes in the rumina of cows, in swine feed and feces, and in swine fecal streptococci. Classes Tet O and Tet W were found in the intestinal contents of both animals, while Tet M was confined to pigs and Tet Q was confined to the rumen. The tet(O) and tet(W) genes circulating in the microbiota of the rumen and the gastrointestinal tract of pigs were identical despite the differences in animal hosts and antibiotic use regimens. Swine fecal streptococci uniformly possessed the tet(O) gene, and 22% of them also carried tet(M). This population could be considered one of the main reservoirs of these two resistance genes in the pig gastrointestinal tract. All classes of RPPs except Tet T and TetB P were found in the commercial components of swine feed. This is the first demonstration of the applicability of molecular ecology techniques to estimation of the gene pool and the flux of antibiotic resistance genes in production animals. PMID:11133424

  7. Sequence and gene expression of chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt in the association of in vitro drugs resistance of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Patrick G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance (CQR transporter protein (PfCRT is known to be the important key of CQR. Recent studies have definitively demonstrated a link between mutations in the gene pfcrt and resistance to chloroquine in P. falciparum. Although these mutations are predictive of chloroquine resistance, they are not quantitatively predictive of the degree of resistance. Methods In this study, a total of 95 recently adapted P. falciparum isolates from Thailand were included in the analysis. Parasites were characterized for their drug susceptibility phenotypes and genotypes with respect to pfcrt. From the original 95 isolates, 20 were selected for complete pfcrt sequence analysis. Results Almost all of the parasites characterized carried the previously reported mutations K76T, A220S, Q271E, N326S, I356T and R371I. On complete sequencing, isolates were identified with novel mutations at K76A and E198K. There was a suggestion that parasites carrying E198K were less resistant than those that did not. In addition, pfcrt and pfmdr1 gene expression were investigated by real-time PCR. No relationship between the expression level of either of these genes and response to drug was observed. Conclusion Data from the present study suggest that other genes must contribute to the degree of resistance once the resistance phenotype is established through mutations in pfcrt.

  8. QTL Mapping and Gene Cloning of Durable Resistance to Blast in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Okuno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast, caused by Pyricularia grisea Sacc., is a destructive disease of rice in most rice growing areas around the world. Breeding efforts have been made to introduce genes for blast resistance into desirable genetic background. Resistance to rice blast is categorized two types, complete (true and incomplete (field resistance. Complete resistance is a hypersensitive reaction, often a complete form of resistance, and is characterized by a resistant infection type. More than 20 loci for complete blast resistance have been identified.

  9. Accumulations of genes for durable resistance to wheat leaf rust pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The individual use of single race-specific resistance genes with major phenotypic effects has rarely provided lasting resistance. However, breeding and combining or pyramiding of resistance genes into individual cultivars has had considerable success, particularly in situation where the pathogen does not reproduce sexually, as in the case of wheat leaf rust pathogen. Within international leaf rust of wheat investigations it was necessary, to create by breeding new resistant wheat lines to Puccinia recondita tritici for differentiation of pathogen population, as well as for sources of resistance in European-Mediterranean regions. In the beginning 18 donors of resistance had been selected after an extensive screening test of several International Rust Nurseries, to be crosses with recur- rent parents varieties Princ and Starke. These tests proved that in those lines were present new resistant genes. Eighth genetically different hybrids of the first back-cross had been selected and tested in the seedling stage with three international pathogen cultures (YU-13-19-1; H-13-9-1 and C2-13-Ar-3. Considerable influence of recurrent parent to the number of resistant genes in donors used was demonstrated. On the other side, it was established considerable influence of the pathogen culture to the number of resistant genes in donors used. The same crossing combinations tested with one pathogen culture results in presence of two resistance genes, but with another culture three or one resistant gene. In order to enhancement resistance and pyramiding genes in these hybrids, eight selected the most interesting lines have been crossed with only effective isogenic containing the strong genes Lr9, Lr19 and Lr24.The genetic analysis of twenty two crossing combinations have been realized by testing with three pathotypes of Puccinia recondita tritici ( Bg.s. 12/89; Is.w 8/89 and Chl.w. 14/89. On the base of different segregation ratios of all crossing combinations it

  10. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and both genes were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 was identified previously and encodes a S-receptor-like kinase, but li...

  11. Genes for resistance to stripe rust on chromosome 2B and their application in wheat breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peigao Luo; Xueyun Hu; Huaiyu Zhang; Zhenglong Ren

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust,caused by Puccinia striiformis f.sp.tritici,is one of the most damaging diseases of wheat worldwide.Growing resistant cultivars is the most economic and environmental friendly way to control the disease.There are many resistance genes to stripe rust located on wheat chromosome 2B.Here,we propose a strategy to construct the recombinant wheat chromosome 2B with multiple resistances to stripe rust by making crosses between wheat lines or cultivars carrying Yr genes and using marker-assisted selection,based on the reported information about resistance spectrum,chromosomal location,and linked markers of the genes.Pyramiding the resistance genes on 2B would afford a valuable strategy to control the disease by cultivating varieties with durable resistance.The possibility,efficiency,and prospect of the suggested strategy are reviewed in the paper.

  12. Detection of sulfonamide resistance genes via in situ PCR-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnida, Anna; Kunda, Katarzyna; Ziembińska, Aleksandra; Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Felis, Ewa; Surmacz-Górska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rising use of antibiotics and as a consequence of their concentration in the environment an increasing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria is observed. The phenomenon has a hazardous impact on human and animal life. Sulfamethoxazole is one of the sulfonamides commonly detected in surface waters and soil. The aim of the study was to detect sulfamethoxazole resistance genes in activated sludge biocenosis by use of in situ PCR and/or hybridization. So far no FISH probes for the detection of SMX resistance genes have been described in the literature. We have tested common PCR primers used for SMX resistance genes detection as FISH probes as well as a combination of in situ PCR and FISH. Despite the presence of SMX resistance genes in activated sludge confirmed via traditional PCR, the detection of the genes via microscopic visualization failed. PMID:25115110

  13. Recent Advances in Cloning and Characterization of Disease Resistance Genes in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Ying Dai; Xiong-Lun Liu; Ying-Hui Xiao; Guo-Liang Wang

    2007-01-01

    Rice diseases caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses are one of the major constraints for sustainable rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. The use of resistant cultivars is considered the most economical and effective method to control rice diseases. In the last decade, a dozen resistance genes against the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae have been cloned. Approximately half of them encode nuclear binding site (NBS) and leucine rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins, the most common type of cloned plant resistance genes. Interestingly, four of them encode novel proteins which have not been identified in other plant species, suggesting that unique mechanisms might be involved in rice defense responses. This review summarizes the recent advances in cloning and characterization of disease resistance genes in rice and presents future perspectives for in-depth molecular analysis of the function and evolution of rice resistance genes and their interaction with avirulence genes in pathogens.

  14. The tetracycline resistance determinant Tet 39 and the sulphonamide resistance gene sulII are common among resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolated from integrated fish farms in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Petersen, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the genetic basis for tetracycline and sulphonamide resistance and the prevalence of class I and II integrons in oxytetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from integrated fish farms in Thailand. Methods: A total of 222 isolates were screened for tetracycline resistance...... Southern blots with sulII and tet(39) probes were performed on selected isolates. Results: The recently identified tetracycline resistance gene tet(39) was demonstrated in 75% (166/222) of oxytetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from integrated fish farms in Thailand. Isolates that were also...

  15. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P waste streams, but a higher diversity of antimicrobial resistance genes are present in treated human waste discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants than in

  16. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D;

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA-dam...

  17. Potentiation of Aminoglycoside Activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Targeting the AmgRS Envelope Stress-Responsive Two-Component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Keith; Gilmour, Christie; Farha, Maya A; Mullen, Erin; Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Brown, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    A screen for agents that potentiated the activity of paromomycin (PAR), a 4,5-linked aminoglycoside (AG), against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa identified the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampin (RIF). RIF potentiated additional 4,5-linked AGs, such as neomycin and ribostamycin, but not the clinically important 4,6-linked AGs amikacin and gentamicin. Potentiation was absent in a mutant lacking the AmgRS envelope stress response two-component system (TCS), which protects the organism from AG-generated membrane-damaging aberrant polypeptides and, thus, promotes AG resistance, an indication that RIF was acting via this TCS in potentiating 4,5-linked AG activity. Potentiation was also absent in a RIF-resistant RNA polymerase mutant, consistent with its potentiation of AG activity being dependent on RNA polymerase perturbation. PAR-inducible expression of the AmgRS-dependent genes htpX and yccA was reduced by RIF, suggesting that AG activation of this TCS was compromised by this agent. Still, RIF did not compromise the membrane-protective activity of AmgRS, an indication that it impacted some other function of this TCS. RIF potentiated the activities of 4,5-linked AGs against several AG-resistant clinical isolates, in two cases also potentiating the activity of the 4,6-linked AGs. These cases were, in one instance, explained by an observed AmgRS-dependent expression of the MexXY multidrug efflux system, which accommodates a range of AGs, with RIF targeting of AmgRS undermining mexXY expression and its promotion of resistance to 4,5- and 4,6-linked AGs. Given this link between AmgRS, MexXY expression, and pan-AG resistance in P. aeruginosa, RIF might be a useful adjuvant in the AG treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27021319

  18. Antibiotic resistance genes detected in the marine sponge Petromica citrina from Brazilian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, Marinella Silva; Pontes, Paula Veronesi Marinho; Dos Santos, Daniela Silva; Santos-Gandelman, Juliana de Fátima; Muricy, Guilherme; Bauwens, Mathieu; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; George, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Although antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health, the environmental reservoirs of the resistance determinants are still poorly understood. This study reports the detection of resistance genes (ermB, mecA, mupA, qnrA, qnrB and tetL) to antibiotics among certain culturable and unculturable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Petromica citrina. The antimicrobial activities elicited by P. citrina and its associated bacteria are also described. The results indicate that the marine environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria. PMID:27287338

  19. Detection of the mcr-1 Colistin Resistance Gene in Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae from Different Hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua; Qu, Fen; Shan, Bin; Huang, Bin; Jia, Wei; Chen, Cha; Li, Aiqing; Miao, Minhui; Zhang, Xin; Bao, Chunmei; Xu, Yunmin; Chavda, Kalyan D; Tang, Yi-Wei; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Du, Hong; Chen, Liang

    2016-08-01

    The spread of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, into carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) clinical isolates poses a significant threat to global health. Here we report the identification of three mcr-1-harboring carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli strains, collected from three patients in two provinces in China. Our results show that mcr-1-harboring CRE strains have started to spread in different hospitals in China. In addition, this report presents the first description of chromosomal integration of mcr-1 into a carbapenem-resistant E. coli strain. PMID:27216058

  20. Statistical Inference of Selection and Divergence of the Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pi-ta

    OpenAIRE

    Amei, Amei; Lee, Seonghee; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Jia, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The resistance gene Pi-ta has been effectively used to control rice blast disease, but some populations of cultivated and wild rice have evolved resistance. Insights into the evolutionary processes that led to this resistance during crop domestication may be inferred from the population history of domesticated and wild rice strains. In this study, we applied a recently developed statistical method, time-dependent Poisson random field model, to examine the evolution of the Pi-ta gene in cultiv...

  1. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A.K.; Singh, P. K.; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N K; U S Singh

    2015-01-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions I...

  2. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Hansen, Martin Asser; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Permpikul, Chairat; Rongrungruang, Yong; Tribuddharat, Chanwit

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven inpatients at Siriraj Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) and were compared with a sample from a healthy volunteer. Plasmids from the gut microbiomes extracted from the stool samples were subjected to high-throughput DNA sequencing (GS Junior). Newbler-assembled DNA reads were categorised into known and unknown sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several antibiotic resistance genes were shared by the patients; interestingly, most were reported previously in food animals and healthy humans. Four antibiotic resistance genes were found in the healthy subject. One gene (aph3-III) was identified in the patients and the healthy subject and was related to that in cattle. Uncommon genes of hospital origin such as blaTEM-124-like and fosA, which confer resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams and fosfomycin, respectively, were identified. The resistance genes did not match the patients' drug treatments. In conclusion, several plasmid types were identified in the gut microbiome; however, it was difficult to link these to the antibiotic resistance genes identified. That the antibiotic resistance genes came from hospital and community environments is worrying. PMID:27530840

  3. In vitro read-through of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) nonsense mutations using aminoglycosides: a potential therapy for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gladys; Reichardt, Juergen; Christodoulou, John

    2013-11-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU, OMIM 261600) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of phenylalanine metabolism, predominantly caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Approximately 10% of patients carry a nonsense mutation, which results in an inactive or unstable truncated protein. In some genetic disorders, including cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, restoration of full-length protein has been achieved by aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin and G-418 (Geneticin). More recently, nonsense read-through has been induced at greater rates using a non-aminoglycoside drug, PTC124 (Ataluren), which has the advantage of being non-toxic in contrast to the antibiotics. The efficacy of read-through induced by three compounds, aminoglycosides G418 and gentamicin, and PTC124 were evaluated for four nonsense mutations of PAH in an in vitro expression system in two mammalian cell lines (COS-7 and HEK293). The production of full-length PAH was investigated using western blotting and the functionality confirmed by enzyme activity. Gentamicin and G-418 induced read-through of nonsense PAH mutations in HEK293 cells. The read-through product partially restored enzymatic activity, which was significantly less than that of wild-type, but comparable to a missense mutation of PAH associated with less severe forms of PKU. Treatment with PTC124 up to 100 μM did not result in full-length PAH polypeptide. Nonsense read-through drugs are a potential form of treatment for PKU, although the high dosage of aminoglycosides used is not appropriate in a clinical setting. In vitro studies with new non-toxic read-through agents as well as in vivo studies would also be essential to determine the extent of read-through required to restore normal phenylalanine levels. PMID:23532445

  4. Genes Expressed Differentially in Hessian Fly Larvae Feeding in Resistant and Susceptible Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Shun; Liu, Sanzhen; Wang, Haiyan; Cheng, Xiaoyan; El Bouhssini, Mustapha; Whitworth, R. Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat worldwide and mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars. In this study, we investigated the genes that were expressed differentially between larvae in resistant plants and those in susceptible plants through RNA sequencing on the Illumina platform. Informative genes were 11,832, 14,861, 15,708, and 15,071 for the comparisons between larvae in resistant versus susceptible plants for 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 days, respectively, after larvae had reached the feeding site. The transcript abundance corresponding to 5401, 6902, 8457, and 5202 of the informative genes exhibited significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the respective paired comparisons. Overall, genes involved in nutrient metabolism, RNA and protein synthesis exhibited lower transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants, indicating that resistant plants inhibited nutrient metabolism and protein production in larvae. Interestingly, the numbers of cytochrome P450 genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants were comparable to, or higher than those with lower transcript abundance, indicating that toxic chemicals from resistant plants may have played important roles in Hessian fly larval death. Our study also identified several families of genes encoding secreted salivary gland proteins (SSGPs) that were expressed at early stage of 1st instar larvae and with more genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants. Those SSGPs are candidate effectors with important roles in plant manipulation. PMID:27529231

  5. Identification of an integron containing the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 in Shewanella xiamenensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Mu, Xiao-dong; Zhu, Yuan-qi; Xi, Lijun; Xiao, Zijun

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated multidrug resistance in Shewanella xiamenensis isolated from an estuarine water sample in China during 2014. This strain displayed resistance or decreased susceptibility to ampicillin, aztreonam, cefepime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, kanamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The antimicrobial resistance genes aacA3, blaOXA-199, qnrA1 and sul1 were identified by PCR amplification and by sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA hybridization experiments showed that the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 was chromosomally located. qnrA1 was located in a complex class 1 integron, downstream from an ISCR1, and bracketed by two copies of qacEΔ1-sul1 genes. This integron is similar to In825 with four gene cassettes aacA3, catB11c, dfrA1z and aadA2az. An IS26-mel-mph2-IS26 structure was also detected in the flanking sequences, conferring resistance to macrolides. This is the first identification of the class 1 integron in S. xiamenensis. This is also the first identification of the qnrA1 gene and IS26-mediated macrolide resistance genes in S. xiamenensis. Presence of a variety of resistance genetic determinants in environmental S. xiamenensis suggests the possibility that this species may serve as a potential vehicle of antimicrobial resistance genes in aquatic environments. PMID:26316545

  6. Integration and bioinformatics analysis of DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, BINGBING; YIN, FUQIANG; WANG, QI; ZHANG, WEI; LI, LI

    2016-01-01

    The main obstacle to the successful treatment of ovarian cancer is the development of drug resistance to combined chemotherapy. Among all the factors associated with drug resistance, DNA methylation apparently plays a critical role. In this study, we performed an integrative analysis of the 26 DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and the genes were further evaluated by comprehensive bioinformatics analysis including gene/protein interaction, biological process enrichment and annotation. The results from the protein interaction analyses revealed that at least 20 of these 26 methylated genes are present in the protein interaction network, indicating that they interact with each other, have a correlation in function, and may participate as a whole in the regulation of ovarian cancer drug resistance. There is a direct interaction between the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene and at least half of the other genes, indicating that PTEN may possess core regulatory functions among these genes. Biological process enrichment and annotation demonstrated that most of these methylated genes were significantly associated with apoptosis, which is possibly an essential way for these genes to be involved in the regulation of multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of clinical factors revealed that the methylation level of genes that are associated with the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer was significantly correlated with the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Overall, this study preliminarily explains the potential correlation between the genes with DNA methylation and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. This finding has significance for our understanding of the regulation of resistant ovarian cancer by methylated genes, the treatment of ovarian cancer, and improvement of the prognosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347118

  7. Detection and Characterizations of Genes Resistant to Tetracycline and Sulfa among the Bacteria in Mariculture Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, L.; Li, Y.; Zhu, P.

    2013-12-01

    One hundred and thirty-five bacteria from maricultural environments were tested for sensitivity to tetracycline and sulfa. Result show that 72% of the bacteria were sulfa-resistant, 36% of the bacteria were tetracycline-resistant, and 16.5% of bacteria showed resistance to both tetracyclines and sulfa ,indicating that the proportion of sulfa and tetracycline resistance bacteria isvery large in the maricultural environments. PCR methods were used to detect if these resistant bacteria carry tetracycline and sulfa resistance genes. Out of the 33 tetracycline-resistant bacteria screened, 3 were positive for tetA, 6 were positive for tetB and no isolate wasboth positive for tetA and tetB. Of the 97 sulfa-resistant bacteria screened, 9 were positive for sul2, 6 were positive for sul1, 1 isolate was positive for bothsul1 and sul2. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tetracycline for tetA-carrying isolates were higher than those tetB-carrying isolates.while The MIC of sulfa for sul2-carrying isolates were higher than those sul1-carrying isolates. Indicating that tetA and sul2 gene may play ubknown roles in resisting tetracycline and sulfa than tetB and sul1 genes. The results showed the 4 kinds of genes (tetA,tetB,sul1,sul2) has no host specificity. All these 16S sequence are from the isolates which are positive for the above genes, it indicated the above antibiotic resistance genes are widespread in the environment regardless of the host. While the DNA sequence of these four genes showed tetA, sul1, sul2 genes are conservative in different bacteria , etB gene conserved poorly. The research aim is to get a preliminary understanding of resistance mechanism related to the resistant bacteria and the resistance genes in marine aquaculture environment through the analysis of resistant genes, providing research base for the prevention and treatment of drug-resistant bacteria so as to reduce the threat to the ecological environment, aquaculture and human health.

  8. Genome-wide identification of NBS-encoding resistance genes in Brassica rapa

    OpenAIRE

    Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Yu, Hee-Ju; Park, Soomin; Park, Beom-Seok

    2009-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance genes are key plant disease-resistance genes and are abundant in plant genomes, comprising up to 2% of all genes. The availability of genome sequences from several plant models enables the identification and cloning of NBS-encoding genes from closely related species based on a comparative genomics approach. In this study, we used the genome sequence of Brassica rapa to identify NBS-encoding genes in the Brassica genome. We identified 92 non-re...

  9. Application of genomic and quantitative genetic tools to identify candidate resistance genes for brown rot resistance in peach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J Martínez-García

    Full Text Available The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar 'Dr. Davis' and a brown rot resistant introgression line, 'F8,1-42', derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI and effector-triggered immunity (ETI responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot.

  10. Application of genomic and quantitative genetic tools to identify candidate resistance genes for brown rot resistance in peach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Pedro J; Parfitt, Dan E; Bostock, Richard M; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A; Gradziel, Thomas M; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar 'Dr. Davis' and a brown rot resistant introgression line, 'F8,1-42', derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot. PMID:24244329

  11. Risk assessment for Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance on dual-gene versus single-gene corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent changes in EPA regulations have prompted concern in some experts that transgenic corn expressing two lepidopteran-active genes from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) (dual-gene) may result in more rapid selection for resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) than corn expressing a s...

  12. Natural variation of rice blast resistant gene Pi-ta in Oryza species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice is a putative NBS type cytoplasmic receptor conferring resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae in a gene-for-gene manner. A Functional Nucleotide Polymorphism (FNP) change resulting in an amino acid substitution of Alanine to Serine at position 918 (nucleotide G to T at posi...

  13. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1998-01-01

    the sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-1 beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these...

  14. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3 ")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-l beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these two...

  15. Resistance to Ag(I) Cations in Bacteria: Environments, Genes and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, Simon; Gupta, Amit; Matsui, Kazuaki; Lo, Jeng-Fan

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to Ag(I) has been reported periodically with isolates from many environments where toxic levels of silver might be expected to occur, but initial reports were limited to the occurrence of resistant bacteria. The availability of silver-resistance conferring DNA sequences now allow genetic and mechanistic studies that had basically been missing. The genes determining Ag(I) resistance were sequenced from a plasmid found in a burn ward isolate. The 14.2 kb determinant contain...

  16. Functional Analysis of Esterase TCE2 Gene from Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) involved in Acaricide Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Li Shi; Peng Wei; Xiangzun Wang; Guangmao Shen; Jiao Zhang; Wei Xiao; Zhifeng Xu; Qiang Xu; Lin He

    2016-01-01

    The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus is an important pest of crops and vegetables worldwide, and it has the ability to develop resistance against acaricides rapidly. Our previous study identified an esterase gene (designated TCE2) over-expressed in resistant mites. To investigate this gene’s function in resistance, the expression levels of TCE2 in susceptible, abamectin-, fenpropathrin-, and cyflumetofen-resistant strains were knocked down (65.02%, 63.14%, 57.82%, and 63.99%, res...

  17. Cloning, characterization and expression analysis of NBS-LRR-type resistance gene analogues (RGAs) in coconut

    OpenAIRE

    Rachana, Kaitheri Edathil; NAGANEESWARAN, SUDALAIMUTHU ASARI; Fayas, Thayale Purayil; Thomas, Regi Jacob; RAJESH, MULIYAR KRISHNA

    2016-01-01

    Coconut palms are highly susceptible to diseases caused by different pathogens, and replanting with resistant varieties is the best way to manage them. Obtaining a collection of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) is an effective strategy to identify genomic regions linked to disease resistance. We have successfully used a comparative genomics approach to amplify putative RGAs from the coconut root (wilt) disease resistant cultivar Chowghat Green Dwarf (CGD) by using primers designed based on co...

  18. Carbapenemase Genes among Multidrug Resistant Gram Negative Clinical Isolates from a Tertiary Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is rapidly growing across antibiotic classes, with increased detection of isolates resistant to carbapenems. Data on the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in developing countries is limited; therefore, in this study, we determined the prevalence of carbapenemase genes among multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) isolated from clinical specimens in a tertiary hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total of 227 MDR-GNB isolates were analyzed...

  19. The Chromosomal Arsenic Resistance Genes of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans Have an Unusual Arrangement and Confer Increased Arsenic and Antimony Resistance to Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Butcher, Bronwyn G.; Deane, Shelly M.; Rawlings, Douglas E.

    2000-01-01

    The chromosomal arsenic resistance genes of the acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, biomining bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were cloned and sequenced. Homologues of four arsenic resistance genes, arsB, arsC, arsH, and a putative arsR gene, were identified. The T. ferrooxidans arsB (arsenite export) and arsC (arsenate reductase) gene products were functional when they were cloned in an Escherichia coli ars deletion mutant and conferred increased resistance to arsenite, arsenate, and anti...

  20. The LBP Gene and Its Association with Resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in Tilapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Hong Fu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to pathogens is important for the sustainability and profitability of food fish production. In immune-related genes, the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP gene is an important mediator of the inflammatory reaction. We analyzed the cDNA and genomic structure of the LBP gene in tilapia. The full-length cDNA (1901 bp of the gene contained a 1416 bp open reading frame, encoding 471 amino acid residues. Its genomic sequence was 5577 bp, comprising 15 exons and 14 introns. Under normal conditions, the gene was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues. The highest expression was detected in intestine and kidney. We examined the responses of the gene to challenges with two bacterial pathogens Streptcoccus agalactiae and Aeromonas hydrophila. The gene was significantly upregulated in kidney and spleen post-infection with S. agalactiae and A. hydrophila, respectively. However, the expression profiles of the gene after the challenge with the two pathogens were different. Furthermore, we identified three SNPs in the gene. There were significant associations (p < 0.05 of two of the three SNPs with the resistance to A. hydrophila, but not with the resistance to S. agalactiae or growth performance. These results suggest that the LBP gene is involved in the acute-phase immunologic response to the bacterial infections, and the responses to the two bacterial pathogens are different. The two SNPs associated with the resistance to A. hydrophila may be useful in the selection of tilapia resistant to A. hydrophila.

  1. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  2. Isolation and Linkage Mapping of NBS-LRR Resistance Gene Analogs in Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and Classification Among 269 Rosaceae NGS-LRR Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant R genes are known to confer resistance to a variety of pathogens in a gene-for-gene mode. Seventy-five putative resistance gene analogs (RGAs) containing conserved domains were cloned and sequenced from the red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) cultivar ‘Latham’ using degenerate primers based on RGA...

  3. Carbapenemase Genes among Multidrug Resistant Gram Negative Clinical Isolates from a Tertiary Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha F. Mushi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR is rapidly growing across antibiotic classes, with increased detection of isolates resistant to carbapenems. Data on the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in developing countries is limited; therefore, in this study, we determined the prevalence of carbapenemase genes among multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR-GNB isolated from clinical specimens in a tertiary hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total of 227 MDR-GNB isolates were analyzed for carbapenem resistance genes. For each isolate, five different PCR assays were performed, allowing for the detection of the major carbapenemase genes, including those encoding the VIM-, IMP-, and NDM-type metallo-beta-lactamases, the class A KPC-type carbapenemases, and the class D OXA-48 enzyme. Of 227 isolates, 80 (35% were positive for one or more carbapenemase gene. IMP-types were the most predominant gene followed by VIM, in 49 (21.59% and 28 (12% isolates, respectively. Carbapenemase genes were most detected in K. pneumoniae 24 (11%, followed by P. aeruginosa 23 (10%, and E. coli with 19 isolates (8%. We have demonstrated for the first time a high prevalence of MDR-GNB clinical isolates having carbapenem resistance genes in Tanzania. We recommend routine testing for carbapenem resistance among the MDR-GNB particularly in systemic infections.

  4. The gene Sr33, an ortholog of barley Mla genes, encodes resistance to wheat stem rust race Ug99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Sambasivam; Moore, John; Ayliffe, Michael; Bansal, Urmil; Wang, Xiaojing; Huang, Li; Deal, Karin; Luo, Mingcheng; Kong, Xiuying; Bariana, Harbans; Mago, Rohit; McIntosh, Robert; Dodds, Peter; Dvorak, Jan; Lagudah, Evans

    2013-08-16

    Wheat stem rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, afflicts bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). New virulent races collectively referred to as "Ug99" have emerged, which threaten global wheat production. The wheat gene Sr33, introgressed from the wild relative Aegilops tauschii into bread wheat, confers resistance to diverse stem rust races, including the Ug99 race group. We cloned Sr33, which encodes a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat protein. Sr33 is orthologous to the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Mla mildew resistance genes that confer resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The wheat Sr33 gene functions independently of RAR1, SGT1, and HSP90 chaperones. Haplotype analysis from diverse collections of Ae. tauschii placed the origin of Sr33 resistance near the southern coast of the Caspian Sea. PMID:23811228

  5. Small RNAs and Gene Network in a Durable Disease Resistance Gene--Mediated Defense Responses in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanming Hong

    Full Text Available Accumulating data have suggested that small RNAs (sRNAs have important functions in plant responses to pathogen invasion. However, it is largely unknown whether and how sRNAs are involved in the regulation of rice responses to the invasion of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, which causes bacterial blight, the most devastating bacterial disease of rice worldwide. We performed simultaneous genome-wide analyses of the expression of sRNAs and genes during early defense responses of rice to Xoo mediated by a major disease resistance gene, Xa3/Xa26, which confers durable and race-specific qualitative resistance. A large number of sRNAs and genes showed differential expression in Xa3/Xa26-mediated resistance. These differentially expressed sRNAs include known microRNAs (miRNAs, unreported miRNAs, and small interfering RNAs. The candidate genes, with expression that was negatively correlated with the expression of sRNAs, were identified, indicating that these genes may be regulated by sRNAs in disease resistance in rice. These results provide a new perspective regarding the putative roles of sRNA candidates and their putative target genes in durable disease resistance in rice.

  6. Frequency of conjugative transfer of plasmid-encoded ISEcp1 - blaCTX-M-15 and aac(6'-lb-cr genes in Enterobacteriaceae at a tertiary care center in Lebanon - role of transferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araj George F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of transfer of genes encoding resistance to antimicrobial agents was determined by conjugation in ESBL-producing and/or fluoroquinolone or aminoglycoside resistant Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates at a tertiary care center in Lebanon. In addition, the role of tra genes encoding transferases in mediating conjugation was assessed. Methods Conjugation experiments were done on 53 ESBL-producing and/or fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae and ESBL-producing S. sonnei isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing on parent and transconjugant isolates, and PCR amplifications on plasmid extracts of the resistance-encoding genes: blaCTX-M-15 with the ISEcp1 insertion sequence, the aac(6'-lb-cr and qnrS genes, as well as tra encoding transferases genes were done. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed to demonstrate whether conjugative isolates are clonal and whether they are linked epidemiologically to a particular source. Results Antimicrobial susceptibility testing on transconjugants revealed that 26 out of 53 (49% ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to the recipients. Transfer of high-level resistance to the transconjugants encoded by the blaCTX-M-15 gene downstream the ISEcp1 insertion sequence against 3rd generation cephalosporins, and of low-level resistance against ciprofloxacin, and variable levels of resistance against aminoglycosides encoded by aac(6'-lb-cr gene, were observed in transconjugants. tra encoding transferase genes were detected exclusively in conjugative isolates. Conclusion In conclusion, the frequency of transfer of antimicrobial resistance in non clonal Enterobacteriaceae at the tertiary care center by conjugation was 49%. Conjugation occurred in isolates expressing the tra encoding transferase genes. Multiple conjugative strains harboring the plasmid encoded antimicrobial resistant genes were circulating in

  7. Molecular mapping of a gene for stripe rust resistance in spring wheat cultivar IDO377s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, P; Chen, X M

    2010-06-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. The best strategy to control stripe rust is to grow resistant cultivars. One such cultivar resistant to most races in North America is 'IDO377s'. To study the genetics of its resistance this spring wheat cultivar was crossed with 'Avocet Susceptible' (AvS). Seedlings of the parents, F(2) plants, and F(3) lines were tested under controlled greenhouse conditions with races PST-43 and PST-45 of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. IDO377s carries a single dominant gene for resistance. Resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) techniques were used to identify molecular markers linked to the resistance gene. A total of ten markers were identified, two of which flanked the locus at 4.4 and 5.5 cM. These flanking RGAP markers were located on chromosome 2B with nulli-tetrasomic lines of 'Chinese Spring'. Their presence in the ditelosomic 2BL line localized them to the long arm. The chromosomal location of the resistance gene was further confirmed with two 2BL-specific SSR markers and a sequence tagged site (STS) marker previously mapped to 2BL. Based on the chromosomal location, reactions to various races of the pathogen and tests of allelism, the IDO377s gene is different from all previously designated genes for stripe rust resistance, and is therefore designated Yr43. A total of 108 wheat breeding lines and cultivars with IDO377s or related cultivars in their parentage were assayed to assess the status of the closest flanking markers and to select lines carrying Yr43. The results showed that the flanking markers were reliable for assisting selection of breeding lines carrying the resistance gene. A linked stripe rust resistance gene, previously identified as YrZak, in cultivar Zak was designated Yr44. PMID:20198466

  8. Environmental effects on resistance gene expression in milk stage popcorn kernels and associations with mycotoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T

    2015-05-01

    Like other forms of maize, popcorn is subject to increased levels of contamination by a variety of different mycotoxins under stress conditions, although levels generally are less than dent maize under comparable stress. Gene array analysis was used to determine expression differences of disease resistance-associated genes in milk stage kernels from commercial popcorn fields over 3 years. Relatively lower expression of resistance gene types was noted in years with higher temperatures and lower rainfall, which was consistent with prior results for many previously identified resistance response-associated genes. The lower rates of expression occurred for genes such as chitinases, protease inhibitors, and peroxidases; enzymes involved in the synthesis of cell wall barriers and secondary metabolites; and regulatory proteins. However, expression of several specific resistance genes previously associated with mycotoxins, such as aflatoxin in dent maize, was not affected. Insect damage altered the spectrum of resistance gene expression differences compared to undamaged ears. Correlation analyses showed expression differences of some previously reported resistance genes that were highly associated with mycotoxin levels and included glucanases, protease inhibitors, peroxidases, and thionins. PMID:25512225

  9. Postulation of Leaf Rust Resistance Genes in Seven Chinese Spring Wheat Cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Li-hong; ZHANG Na; HU Ya-ya; WEI Xue-jun; YANG Wen-xiang; LIU Da-qun

    2013-01-01

    To detect the leaf rust resistance genes in the 7 Chinese spring wheat clultivars Shenmian 99025, Shenmia 99042, Shenmian 85, Shenmian 91, Shenmian 96, Shenmian 1167 and Shenmian 962, Thatcher, Thatcher backgrounded near-isogenic lines and 15 pathotypes of P. triticina were used for gene postulate at the seedling stage, and 9 of the 15 pathotypes were used in the field tests. Molecular markers closely linked to, or co-segregated with resistance genes Lr1, Lr9, Lr10, Lr19, Lr20, Lr21, Lr24, Lr26, Lr28, Lr29, Lr32, Lr34, Lr35, Lr37, Lr38, and Lr47 were screened to assist detection of the resistance genes. As results, 4 known resistance genes, including Lr1, Lr9, Lr26, and Lr34, and other unknown resistance genes were postulated singly or in combination in the tested cultivars. Shenmian 85, Shenmian 91, Shenmian 96, Shenmian 962, Shenmian 1167, and Shenmian 99042 are potentially useful for wheat production and breeding programs. The result suggested that combining gene postulation, molecular markers and pedigrees is effective and more accuracy method to know the resistance genes in cultivars.

  10. Detection of resistance genes and evaluation of water quality at zoo lakes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Silva de Faria

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The investigation of the presence of antibiotic-resistance genes in aquatic environments is important to identify possible reservoirs of resistant microorganisms that could be a threat to human and animal health. The aims of this study were to analyze the presence of genes conferring resistance to antimicrobials in the aquatic environment and to assess the quality of water in zoo lakes. Results showed a pattern of genes conferring resistance to multiple antibiotics and turbidity, which was expected to be due to the presence of contaminants. The most frequent genes were sul I and sul II (sulfonamides, which were present in all the lakes, followed by genes encoding β-lactamases such as blaPSE I (77.8% and ampC (66.7%. However, tet(K, tet(M, and ermC genes were not detected. There was a positive correlation between the number of Enterobacteriaceae and resistance genes. In conclusion, the source of contamination of all lakes was probably the neighboring urban sewage or wastewater that increased the frequency of the total coliforms and resistance genes, which in turn posed a threat to the conservation of the animal life inhabiting the zoo.

  11. Discovery of clubroot-resistant genes in Brassica napus by transcriptome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S W; Liu, T; Gao, Y; Zhang, C; Peng, S D; Bai, M B; Li, S J; Xu, L; Zhou, X Y; Lin, L B

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot significantly affects plants of the Brassicaceae family and is one of the main diseases causing serious losses in B. napus yield. Few studies have investigated the clubroot-resistance mechanism in B. napus. Identification of clubroot-resistant genes may be used in clubroot-resistant breeding, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind B. napus clubroot-resistance. We used three B. napus transcriptome samples to construct a transcriptome sequencing library by using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. In total, 171 million high-quality reads were obtained, containing 96,149 unigenes of N50-value. We aligned the obtained unigenes with the Nr, Swiss-Prot, clusters of orthologous groups, and gene ontology databases and annotated their functions. In the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes database, 25,033 unigenes (26.04%) were assigned to 124 pathways. Many genes, including broad-spectrum disease-resistance genes, specific clubroot-resistant genes, and genes related to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) signal transduction, cytokinin synthesis, and myrosinase synthesis in the Huashuang 3 variety of B. napus were found to be related to clubroot-resistance. The effective clubroot-resistance observed in this variety may be due to the induced increased expression of these disease-resistant genes and strong inhibition of the IAA signal transduction, cytokinin synthesis, and myrosinase synthesis. The homology observed between unigenes 0048482, 0061770 and the Crr1 gene shared 94% nucleotide similarity. Furthermore, unigene 0061770 could have originated from an inversion of the Crr1 5'-end sequence. PMID:27525940

  12. Application of Genomic and Quantitative Genetic Tools to Identify Candidate Resistance Genes for Brown Rot Resistance in Peach

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Parfitt, Dan E; Bostock, Richard M.; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some culti...

  13. Prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes among multi-drug resistant bacteria from selected water distribution systems in southwestern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Adesoji, Ayodele. T.; Ogunjobi, Adeniyi. A.; Olatoye, Isaac. O.; Douglas, Douglas. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance genes [ARGs] in aquatic systems have drawn increasing attention they could be transferred horizontally to pathogenic bacteria. Water treatment plants (WTPs) are intended to provide quality and widely available water to the local populace they serve. However, WTPs in developing countries may not be dependable for clean water and they could serve as points of dissemination for antibiotic resistant bacteria. Only a few studies have investigated the occurrence of ...

  14. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rubio

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925, which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  15. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance. PMID:26658051

  16. Phylogenetic analyses of peanut resistance gene candidates and screening of different genotypes for polymorphic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Osman E; Ahmed, Talaat A; Knapp, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich-repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding gene family has attracted much research interest because approximately 75% of the plant disease resistance genes that have been cloned to date are from this gene family. Here, we describe a collection of peanut NBS-LRR resistance gene candidates (RGCs) isolated from peanut (Arachis) species by mining Gene Bank data base. NBS-LRR sequences assembled into TIR-NBS-LRR (75.4%) and non-TIR-NBS-LRR (24.6%) subfamilies. Total of 20 distinct clades were identified and showed a high level of sequence divergence within TIR-NBS and non-TIR-NBS subfamilies. Thirty-four primer pairs were designed from these RGC sequences and used for screening different genotypes belonging to wild and cultivated peanuts. Therefore, peanut RGC identified in this study will provide useful tools for developing DNA markers and cloning the genes for resistance to different pathogens in peanut. PMID:23961057

  17. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, A; Smith, A L; Opheim, K E

    1985-01-01

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, we defined the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical...

  18. DETERMINATION OF AMINOGLYCOSIDES IN FOOD BY FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION IMMUNOASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARAFONOVA O.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodic for quantitative determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, amikacin, neomycin in food by polarization fluorescent immunoassay (FPIA is developed. The size and structure influence of a fluorescent molecule on a fluorescence polarization degree is analyzed. Affinity constants of antibodies to compounds and tracers were estimated, optimized working concentration of tracers and antibodies that provide the maximum value of analytical signal. Methods were tested in the antibiotics identification in milk, eggs and chicken.

  19. UK31214, a new aminoglycoside and derivative of kanamycin B.

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, R.; Andrews, J. M.; Bedford, K A

    1980-01-01

    The in vitro activity of UK31214, a kanamycin B derivative, was studied against 250 recent isolates and compared with other aminoglycosides. Against the Enterobacteriaceae (with the exception of Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii) UK31214 and amikacin had similar degrees of activity (mode minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], 1 microgram/ml). Proteus mirabilis and P. stuartii strains were four- to eight-fold more susceptible to amikacin than to UK31214. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain...

  20. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Cheng-Wei T Chang; Meissner, Nicole; Oblad, John; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Sorensen, Kevin N.; Michelle M. Grilley; Jon Y Takemoto

    2014-01-01

    K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20′s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were de...

  1. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Cheng-Wei Tom Chang; Nicole eMeissner; John eOblad; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Sorensen, Kevin N.; Michelle M. Grilley; Jon Y Takemoto

    2014-01-01

    K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20’s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were d...

  2. The Am Gene Controlling Resistance to Alfalfa mosaic virus in Tomato Is Located in the Cluster of Dominant Resistance Genes on Chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Moretti, André; Gognalons, Patrick; Lesage, Marie-Laure; Marchoux, George; Gebre-Selassie, Kashay; Caranta, Carole

    2004-04-01

    ABSTRACT The dominant gene Am from Lycopersicon hirsutum f. sp. glabratum PI134417 confers resistance to most strains of Alfalfa mosaic virus, including the recently identified necrotic strains. The phenotypic response includes a lack of symptom development following mechanical inoculation of leaves. To study the resistance mechanism controlled by Am, biological (back-inoculation to susceptible hosts), serological (double-antibody sandwich, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and molecular (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization with specific riboprobes) methods of virus detection have been conducted on mechanically inoculated PI134417 leaves. The virus was never recovered, indicating that Am acts by an inhibition of viral accumulation during the early events of the virus life cycle. Am has been mapped genetically to the short arm of tomato chromosome 6 in the resistance hotspot, which includes the R-genes Mi and Cf-2/Cf-5 and the quantitative resistance factors Ty-1, Ol-1, and Bw-5. PMID:18944110

  3. Evaluation of Aminoglycoside and Non-Aminoglycoside Compounds for Stop-Codon Readthrough Therapy in Four Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gómez-Grau

    Full Text Available Nonsense mutations are quite prevalent in inherited diseases. Readthrough drugs could provide a therapeutic option for any disease caused by this type of mutation. Geneticin (G418 and gentamicin were among the first to be described. Novel compounds have been generated, but only a few have shown improved results. PTC124 is the only compound to have reached clinical trials. Here we first investigated the readthrough effects of gentamicin on fibroblasts from one patient with Sanfilippo B, one with Sanfilippo C, and one with Maroteaux-Lamy. We found that ARSB activity (Maroteaux-Lamy case resulted in an increase of 2-3 folds and that the amount of this enzyme within the lysosomes was also increased, after treatment. Since the other two cases (Sanfilippo B and Sanfilippo C did not respond to gentamicin, the treatments were extended with the use of geneticin and five non-aminoglycoside (PTC124, RTC13, RTC14, BZ6 and BZ16 readthrough compounds (RTCs. No recovery was observed at the enzyme activity level. However, mRNA recovery was observed in both cases, nearly a two-fold increase for Sanfilippo B fibroblasts with G418 and around 1.5 fold increase for Sanfilippo C cells with RTC14 and PTC124. Afterwards, some of the products were assessed through in vitro analyses for seven mutations in genes responsible for those diseases and, also, for Niemann-Pick A/B. Using the coupled transcription/translation system (TNT, the best results were obtained for SMPD1 mutations with G418, reaching a 35% recovery at 0.25 μg/ml, for the p.W168X mutation. The use of COS cells transfected with mutant cDNAs gave positive results for most of the mutations with some of the drugs, although to a different extent. The higher enzyme activity recovery, of around two-fold increase, was found for gentamicin on the ARSB p.W146X mutation. Our results are promising and consistent with those of other groups. Further studies of novel compounds are necessary to find those with more

  4. The effect of pharmacy intervention on aminoglycoside costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, R T; Nakagawa, R S

    1987-04-01

    Antibiotics constitute a large percentage of every hospital's drug budget. In an effort to control the escalating costs of antimicrobial therapy, we focused on the usage of aminoglycosides at our institution. The aminoglycosides, gentamicin and tobramycin, are similar in terms of antimicrobial spectra and toxicities. Since gentamicin is much less expensive, it was felt that significant cost savings would be realized if gentamicin were to be used preferentially over tobramycin. Specific criteria for the use of tobramycin were developed and approved by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. All patients prescribed parenteral tobramycin during the five week data collection period were entered into the study. We chose to use direct verbal intervention as our method for altering physician's prescribing patterns. An educational program of intervention was set up such that when a physician prescribed tobramycin, the patient's chart was immediately reviewed. If tobramycin was prescribed for a purpose other than those in the approved criteria for tobramycin use, the physician was contacted personally to discuss the cost-effectiveness of gentamicin use. Utilization figures from the previous six months showed that our interventions would save approximately $32,000 over a one year period. Our interventions on aminoglycoside prescribing represents a highly successful, cost-effective and educational method for altering physician's prescribing patterns. PMID:10282090

  5. Identification of DNA markers linked to a blast resistance gene in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification of DNA markers closely linked to a blast (Pyricularia oryzae Cav.) resistance gene and establishment of an indirect selection method for the blast resistance gene based on linked DNA markers are reported. A pair of near isogenic lines, K80R and K79S, were developed using a local Chinese indica rice cultivar, Hong-jiao-zhan, as the resistant donor and IR24 as the recurrent parent. Ten putatitvely positive markers were identified by screening 177 mapped DNA markers. Using 143 plants composed of the F2 population of K80R/K79S, three restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers (RG81, RG869 and RZ397) on chromosome 12 of rice were verified to be closely linked to the blast resistance gene. The resistance genotypes of each F2 resistant individual were determined by inoculation of the F3 lines. RG869 was found to be most closely linked to the resistance gene, with a genetic distance of 5.1 cM. To fine map this gene with more DNA markers, the bulk segregation analysis procedure was employed to identify the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers linked to the resistance gene. Six of 199 arbitrary primers were able to produce positive RAPD bands. Tight linkage between the resistance gene and the three RAPD bands, each from a different primer, was confirmed after amplification of the DNA of all the F2 individuals. The linked DNA fragments were cloned and sequenced. The results of specific amplification were in agreement with those of RAPD analysis. The half-seed RAPD analysis procedure for blast resistance detection was established. The amplified DNA patterns on the extract from the endosperm half of the mature seeds were identical to those of the total DNA from the leaves. (author). 13 refs, 3 figs

  6. Paradoxical DNA repair and peroxide resistance gene conservation in Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Gioia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus spores are notoriously resistant to unfavorable conditions such as UV radiation, gamma-radiation, H2O2, desiccation, chemical disinfection, or starvation. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 survives standard decontamination procedures of the Jet Propulsion Lab spacecraft assembly facility, and both spores and vegetative cells of this strain exhibit elevated resistance to UV radiation and H2O2 compared to other Bacillus species. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was sequenced and annotated. Lists of genes relevant to DNA repair and the oxidative stress response were generated and compared to B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. Differences in conservation of genes, gene order, and protein sequences are highlighted because they potentially explain the extreme resistance phenotype of B. pumilus. The B. pumilus genome includes genes not found in B. subtilis or B. licheniformis and conserved genes with sequence divergence, but paradoxically lacks several genes that function in UV or H2O2 resistance in other Bacillus species. SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies several candidate genes for further research into UV and H2O2 resistance. These findings will help explain the resistance of B. pumilus and are applicable to understanding sterilization survival strategies of microbes.

  7. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent. PMID:26519797

  8. The sul1 gene in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with high-level resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Sun; Kim, Kyeongmi; Hong, Sang Sook; Hong, Seong Geun; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-03-01

    Emerging resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) poses a serious threat to the treatment of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections. We determined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of acquired SXT resistance in recent clinical S. maltophilia isolates obtained from Korea. A total of 252 clinical isolates of S. maltophilia were collected from 10 university hospitals in Korea between 2009 and 2010. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by using the CLSI agar dilution method. The sul1, sul2, and sul3 genes, integrons, insertion sequence common region (ISCR) elements, and dfrA genes were detected using PCR. The presence of the sul1 gene and integrons was confirmed through sequence analysis. Among the 32 SXT-resistant isolates, sul1 was detected in 23 isolates (72%), all of which demonstrated high-level resistance (≥64 mg/L) to SXT. The sul1 gene (varying in size and structure) was linked to class 1 integrons in 15 of the 23 isolates (65%) harboring this gene. None of the SXT-susceptible isolates or the SXT-resistant isolates with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 4 and 8 mg/L were positive for sul1. Moreover, the sul2, sul3, and dfrA genes or the ISCR elements were not detected. The sul1 gene may play an important role in the high-level SXT resistance observed in S. maltophilia. PMID:25729729

  9. A genome-wide survey reveals abundant rice blast R genes in resistant cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Jiao; Jia, Yanxiao; Huang, Ju; Tan, Shengjun; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Ling; Gu, Longjiang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Pan, Qinghua; Bergelson, Joy; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-10-01

    Plant resistance genes (R genes) harbor tremendous allelic diversity, constituting a robust immune system effective against microbial pathogens. Nevertheless, few functional R genes have been identified for even the best-studied pathosystems. Does this limited repertoire reflect specificity, with most R genes having been defeated by former pests, or do plants harbor a rich diversity of functional R genes, the composite behavior of which is yet to be characterized? Here, we survey 332 NBS-LRR genes cloned from five resistant Oryza sativa (rice) cultivars for their ability to confer recognition of 12 rice blast isolates when transformed into susceptible cultivars. Our survey reveals that 48.5% of the 132 NBS-LRR loci tested contain functional rice blast R genes, with most R genes deriving from multi-copy clades containing especially diversified loci. Each R gene recognized, on average, 2.42 of the 12 isolates screened. The abundant R genes identified in resistant genomes provide extraordinary redundancy in the ability of host genotypes to recognize particular isolates. If the same is true for other pathogens, many extant NBS-LRR genes retain functionality. Our success at identifying rice blast R genes also validates a highly efficient cloning and screening strategy. PMID:26248689

  10. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Nikolaus; Beate Strehlitz

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminog...

  11. Overexpression of multiple detoxification genes in deltamethrin resistant Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén, is one of the major rice pests in Asia and has developed resistance to multiple classes of insecticides. Understanding resistance mechanisms is essential to the management of this pest. Biochemical and molecular assays were performed in this study to systematically characterize deltamethrin resistance mechanisms with laboratory-selected resistant and susceptible strains of SBPH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Deltamethrin resistant strains of SBPH (JH-del were derived from a field population by continuously selections (up to 30 generations in the laboratory, while a susceptible strain (JHS was obtained from the same population by removing insecticide pressure for 30 generations. The role of detoxification enzymes in the resistance was investigated using synergism and enzyme activity assays with strains of different resistant levels. Furthermore, 71 cytochrome P450, 93 esterases and 12 glutathione-S-transferases cDNAs were cloned based on transcriptome data of a field collected population. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR screening analysis of 176 identified detoxification genes demonstrated that multiple P450 and esterase genes were overexpressed (>2-fold in JH-del strains (G4 and G30 when compared to that in JHS, and the results of quantitative PCR coincided with the semi-quantitative RT-PCR results. Target mutation at IIS3-IIS6 regions encoded by the voltage-gated sodium channel gene was ruled out for conferring the observed resistance. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: As the first attempt to discover genes potentially involved in SBPH pyrethroid resistance, this study putatively identified several candidate genes of detoxification enzymes that were significantly overexpressed in the resistant strain, which matched the synergism and enzyme activity testing. The biochemical and molecular evidences suggest that the high level pyrethroid resistance in L. striatellus could be due to

  12. Transcriptome Profiling Revealed Stress-Induced and Disease Resistance Genes Up-Regulated in PRSV Resistant Transgenic Papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingping; Lin, Aiting; Qiu, Weijing; Cai, Hanyang; Umar, Muhammad; Chen, Rukai; Ming, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Papaya is a productive and nutritious tropical fruit. Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRSV) is the most devastating pathogen threatening papaya production worldwide. Development of transgenic resistant varieties is the most effective strategy to control this disease. However, little is known about the genome-wide functional changes induced by particle bombardment transformation. We conducted transcriptome sequencing of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya SunUp and its PRSV susceptible progenitor Sunset to compare the transcriptional changes in young healthy leaves prior to infection with PRSV. In total, 20,700 transcripts were identified, and 842 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) randomly distributed among papaya chromosomes. Gene ontology (GO) category analysis revealed that microtubule-related categories were highly enriched among these DEGs. Numerous DEGs related to various transcription factors, transporters and hormone biosynthesis showed clear differences between the two cultivars, and most were up-regulated in transgenic papaya. Many known and novel stress-induced and disease-resistance genes were most highly expressed in SunUp, including MYB, WRKY, ERF, NAC, nitrate and zinc transporters, and genes involved in the abscisic acid, salicylic acid, and ethylene signaling pathways. We also identified 67,686 alternative splicing (AS) events in Sunset and 68,455 AS events in SunUp, mapping to 10,994 and 10,995 papaya annotated genes, respectively. GO enrichment for the genes displaying AS events exclusively in Sunset was significantly different from those in SunUp. Transcriptomes in Sunset and transgenic SunUp are very similar with noteworthy differences, which increased PRSV-resistance in transgenic papaya. No detrimental pathways and allergenic or toxic proteins were induced on a genome-wide scale in transgenic SunUp. Our results provide a foundation for unraveling the mechanism of PRSV resistance in transgenic papaya. PMID:27379138

  13. Benchmarking of methods for identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacterial whole genome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Philip T. L. C.; Zankari, Ea; Aarestrup, Frank Møller;

    2016-01-01

    two different methods in current use for identification of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial WGS data. A novel method, KmerResistance, which examines the co-occurrence of k-mers between the WGS data and a database of resistance genes, was developed. The performance of this method was compared...... with two previously described methods; ResFinder and SRST2, which use an assembly/BLAST method and BWA, respectively, using two datasets with a total of 339 isolates, covering five species, originating from the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust and Danish pig farms. The predicted resistance was...... compared with the observed phenotypes for all isolates. To challenge further the sensitivity of the in silico methods, the datasets were also down-sampled to 1% of the reads and reanalysed. The best results were obtained by identification of resistance genes by mapping directly against the raw reads. This...

  14. Phylogenetic relatedness determined between antibiotic resistance and 16S rRNA genes in actinobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ságová-Marečková, M.; Ulanová, Dana; Šanderová, P.; Omelka, M.; Kameník, Zdeněk; Olšovská, J.; Kopecký, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, APR 2015 (2015). ISSN 1471-2180 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Actinobacteria * 16S rRNA diversity * Resistance genes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology , Virology Impact factor: 2.729, year: 2014

  15. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant–pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future.

  16. In vitro activities of aztreonam, piperacillin, and ticarcillin combined with amikacin against amikacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. cepacia isolates from children with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Aronoff, S C; Klinger, J D

    1984-01-01

    Amikacin, combined with aztreonam, piperacillin, or ticarcillin, synergistically inhibited amikacin-resistant sputum isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. cepacia from children with cystic fibrosis. Ticarcillin-amikacin was the least active combination. Aminoglycoside resistance should not preclude the use of beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combinations in the treatment of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis.

  17. Environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and correlation to anthropogenic contamination with antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berglund

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem which threatens modern healthcare globally. Resistance has traditionally been viewed as a clinical problem, but recently non-clinical environments have been highlighted as an important factor in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT events are likely to be common in aquatic environments; integrons in particular are well suited for mediating environmental dissemination of ARGs. A growing body of evidence suggests that ARGs are ubiquitous in natural environments. Particularly, elevated levels of ARGs and integrons in aquatic environments are correlated to proximity to anthropogenic activities. The source of this increase is likely to be routine discharge of antibiotics and resistance genes, for example, via wastewater or run-off from livestock facilities and agriculture. While very high levels of antibiotic contamination are likely to select for resistant bacteria directly, the role of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in environmental antibiotic resistance dissemination remains unclear. In vitro studies have shown that low levels of antibiotics can select for resistant mutants and also facilitate HGT, indicating the need for caution. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that the environment plays an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance; further studies are needed to elucidate key aspects of this process. Importantly, the levels of environmental antibiotic contamination at which resistant bacteria are selected for and HGT is facilitated at should be determined. This would enable better risk analyses and facilitate measures for preventing dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  18. Tagging of blast resistance gene(s) to DNA markers and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in rice improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports progress made on the tagging of blast resistance gene(s) to DNA markers and on the initiation of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for blast resistance in rice improvement. A pair of near isogenic lines, K8OR and K79S, were developed using a Chinese landrace Hong-jiao-zhan as the resistance donor. Ten putatively positive markers were identified by screening 177 mapped DNA markers. Using the F2 population of 143 plants and the derived F3 lines, three Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) markers (RG81, RG869 and RZ397) on chromosome 12 of rice were identified to be closely linked to the blast resistance gene Pi-12(t). The genetic distance between Pi-12(t) and the closest marker RG869 was 5.1 cM. By employing the bulk segregant analysis (BSA) procedure, six of 199 arbitrary primers were found to produce positive Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) bands. Tight linkage between Pi-12(t) and three RAPD bands, each from a different primer, was confirmed after amplification of DNA of all F2 individuals. Two fragments were cloned and sequenced, and two sequence characterised amplified re-ion (SCAR) markers were established. In two other F3 populations, Xian-feng I/Tetep and Xian-feng, 1/Hong-jiao-zhan, the blast resistance was found to be controlled by interactions of two or more genes. One resistance gene was located in the vicinity of RG81 in both populations. Work to identify other gene(s) is currently under way. Marker assisted selection for blast resistance was initiated. Crosses were made between elite varieties and blast resistance donors to develop populations for DNA marker-assisted selection of blast resistance. In addition, 48 varieties widely used in current rice breeding programs were provided by rice breeders. DNA marker-based polymorphism among, these varieties and resistance donors were analysed to produce a database for future MAS program. (author)

  19. Does human activity impact the natural antibiotic resistance background? Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in 21 Swiss lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekalski, Nadine; Sigdel, Radhika; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging environmental contaminants, known to be continuously discharged into the aquatic environment via human and animal waste. Freshwater aquatic environments represent potential reservoirs for ARG and potentially allow sewage-derived ARG to persist and spread in the environment. This may create increased opportunities for an eventual contact with, and gene transfer to, human and animal pathogens via the food chain or drinking water. However, assessment of this risk requires a better understanding of the level and variability of the natural resistance background and the extent of the human impact. We have analyzed water samples from 21 Swiss lakes, taken at sampling points that were not under the direct influence of local contamination sources and analyzed the relative abundance of ARG using quantitative real-time PCR. Copy numbers of genes mediating resistance to three different broad-spectrum antibiotic classes (sulfonamides: sul1, sul2, tetracyclines: tet(B), tet(M), tet(W) and fluoroquinolones: qnrA) were normalized to copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We used multiple linear regression to assess if ARG abundance is related to human activities in the catchment, microbial community composition and the eutrophication status of the lakes. Sul genes were detected in all sampled lakes, whereas only four lakes contained quantifiable numbers of tet genes, and qnrA remained below detection in all lakes. Our data indicate higher abundance of sul1 in lakes with increasing number and capacity of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the catchment. sul2 abundance was rather related to long water residence times and eutrophication status. Our study demonstrates the potential of freshwater lakes to preserve antibiotic resistance genes, and provides a reference for ARG abundance from lake systems with low human impact as a baseline for assessing ARG contamination in lake water. PMID:25913323

  20. tcrB, a gene conferring transferable copper resistance in Enterococcus faecium: occurrence, transferability, and linkage to macrolide and glycopeptide resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2002-01-01

    B protein from Enterococcus hirae. The tcrB gene was found in E. faecium isolated from pigs (75%), broilers (34%), calves (16%), and humans (10%) but not in isolates from sheep. Resistant isolates, containing the tcrB gene, grew on brain heart infusion agar plates containing up to 28 mM CuSO4 compared to...... only 4 mM for the susceptible isolates. Copper resistance, and therefore the presence of the tcrB gene, was strongly correlated to macrolide and glycopeptide resistance in isolates from pigs, and the tcrB gene was shown to be located on the same conjugative plasmid as the genes responsible for...... resistance to these two antimicrobial agents. The frequent occurrence of this new copper resistance gene in isolates from pigs, where copper sulfate is being used in large amounts as feed additive, suggests that the use of copper has selected for resistance....

  1. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP sludge.

  2. Genetic diversity analysis in a set of Caricaceae accessions using resistance gene analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Samik; Das, Basabdatta; Acharyya, Pinaki; Prasad, Manoj; Ghose, Tapas Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to assess genetic diversity of a set of 41 Caricaceae accessions, this study used 34 primer pairs designed from the conserved domains of bacterial leaf blight resistance genes from rice, in a PCR based approach, to identify and analyse resistance gene analogues from various accessions of Carica papaya, Vasconcellea goudotiana, V. microcarpa, V. parviflora, V. pubescens, V. stipulata and, V. quercifolia and Jacaratia spinosa. Results Of the 34 primer pairs fourteen gave amp...

  3. ABCB1 gene polymorphisms is not associated with drug-resistant epilepsy in Romanian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butila Anamaria Todoran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: P-glycoprotein (P-gp, a drug efflux transporter, encoded by the gene MDR1 ABCB1 multidrug resistant, reduces the penetration through the brain by the AEDs. Overexpression of Pgp in blood-brain barrier in epileptic patients play an important rol in pharmacoresistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible association between C1236T and G2677T ABCB1 gene polymorphisms and drug-resistant epilepsy in Romanian children.

  4. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-01-01

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of re...

  5. Novel nickel resistance genes from the rhizosphere metagenome of plants adapted to acid mine drainage

    OpenAIRE

    Mirete, Salvador; González de Figueras, Carolina; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Metal resistance determinants have traditionally been found in cultivated bacteria. To search for genes involved in nickel resistance, we analyzed the bacterial community of the rhizosphere of Erica andevalensis, an endemic heather which grows at the banks of the Tinto River, a naturally metal-enriched and extremely acidic environment in southwestern Spain. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of rhizosphere DNA revealed the presence of members of five phylogenetic groups of Bacteria and the two m...

  6. Use of the lambda Red recombinase system to produce recombinant prophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jofre Juan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red recombinase system of bacteriophage lambda has been used to inactivate chromosomal genes in E. coli K-12 through homologous recombination using linear PCR products. The aim of this study was to induce mutations in the genome of some temperate Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages. When phage genes are in the prophage state, they behave like chromosomal genes. This enables marker genes, such as antibiotic resistance genes, to be incorporated into the stx gene. Once the phages' lytic cycle is activated, recombinant Shiga toxin converting phages are produced. These phages can transfer the marker genes to the bacteria that they infect and convert. As the Red system's effectiveness decreased when used for our purposes, we had to introduce significant variations to the original method. These modifications included: confirming the stability of the target stx gene increasing the number of cells to be transformed and using a three-step PCR method to produce the amplimer containing the antibiotic resistance gene. Results Seven phages carrying two different antibiotic resistance genes were derived from phages that are directly involved in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-producing strains, using this modified protocol. Conclusion This approach facilitates exploration of the transduction processes and is a valuable tool for studying phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  7. [Effects of Thermophilic Composting on Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) of Swine Manure Source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ning-guo; Huang, Nan; Wang, Wei-wei; Yu, Man; Chen, Xiao-yang; Yao, Yan-lai; Wang, Wei-ping; Hong, Chun-lai

    2016-05-15

    To investigate the effects of thermophilic composting process on antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of swine manure source at a field scale, the abundance of four erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and ermF), three β-lactam resistance genes (blaTEM, blaCTX and blaSHV) and two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS) were quantified by quantitative PCR ( qPCR) during the composting process. The results suggested that the erm genes' copy numbers were significantly higher than those of the bla and qnr genes in the early stage of composting (P < 0.01). The maximum abundance of erm genes was ermB (9.88 x 10⁸ copies · g⁻¹), following by ermF (9.4 x 10⁸ copies · g⁻¹). At the end of the composting process, bla and qnr genes were at low levels, while erm genes were still at high levels. Even through ermF was proliferated comparing with the initial copies. These results indicated that thermophilic composting process could not effectively remove all ARGs. For some ARGs, compost may be a good bioreactor resulting in their proliferation. Application of composting products on farmland may cause transference of ARGs. PMID:27506057

  8. Metagenomic Evidence of the Prevalence and Distribution Patterns of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Dairy Agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, Dipti W; Dou, Zhengxia; Kumar, Sanjay; Indugu, Nagaraju; Toth, John Daniel; Vecchiarelli, Bonnie; Bhukya, Bhima

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) is a global problem with serious implications for public health. AR genes are frequently detected on animal farms, but little is known about their origin and distribution patterns. We hypothesized that AR genes can transfer from animal feces to the environment through manure, and to this end, we characterized and compared the resistomes (collections of AR genes) of animal feces, manure, and soil samples collected from five dairy farms using a metagenomics approach. Resistomes constituted only up to 1% of the total gene content, but were variable by sector and also farm. Broadly, the identified AR genes were associated with 18 antibiotic resistances classes across all samples; however, the most abundant genes were classified under multidrug transporters (44.75%), followed by resistance to vancomycin (12.48%), tetracycline (10.52%), bacitracin (10.43%), beta-lactam resistance (7.12%), and MLS efflux pump (6.86%) antimicrobials. The AR gene profiles were variable between farms. Farm 09 was categorized as a high risk farm, as a greater proportion of AR genes were common to at least three sectors, suggesting possible horizontal transfer of AR genes. Taxonomic characterization of AR genes revealed that a majority of AR genes were associated with the phylum Proteobacteria. Nonetheless, there were several members of Bacteroidetes, particularly Bacteroides genus and several lineages from Firmicutes that carried similar AR genes in different sectors, suggesting a strong potential for horizontal transfer of AR genes between unrelated bacterial hosts in different sectors of the farms. Further studies are required to affirm the horizontal gene transfer mechanisms between microbiomes of different sectors in animal agroecosystems. PMID:27046731

  9. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem resulting from the pressure of antibiotic usage, greater mobility of the population, and industrialization. Many antibiotic resistance genes are believed to have originated in microorganisms in the environment, and to have been transferred to other bacteria through mobile genetic elements. Among others, β-lactam antibiotics show clinical efficacy and low toxicity, and they are thus widely used as antimicrobials. Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is conferred by β-lactamase genes and penicillin-binding proteins, which are chromosomal- or plasmid-encoded, although there is little information available on the contribution of other mobile genetic elements, such as phages. This study is focused on three genes that confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, namely two β-lactamase genes (blaTEM and blaCTX-M9) and one encoding a penicillin-binding protein (mecA) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from environmental water samples. The three genes were quantified in the DNA isolated from bacteriophages collected from 30 urban sewage and river water samples, using quantitative PCR amplification. All three genes were detected in the DNA of phages from all the samples tested, in some cases reaching 104 gene copies (GC) of blaTEM or 102 GC of blaCTX-M and mecA. These values are consistent with the amount of fecal pollution in the sample, except for mecA, which showed a higher number of copies in river water samples than in urban sewage. The bla genes from phage DNA were transferred by electroporation to sensitive host bacteria, which became resistant to ampicillin. blaTEM and blaCTX were detected in the DNA of the resistant clones after transfection. This study indicates that phages are reservoirs of resistance genes in the environment. PMID:21390233

  10. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Subjects with Successful and Failing Dental Implants. A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukos, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Christos; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Sakellari, Dimitra; Arsenakis, Minas; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : To investigate the prevalence of the bacterial genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracyclines and metronidazole respectively, in subjects with successful and failing dental implants and to assess the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA gene encoding for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the same samples. Materials and Methodology: The subject sample included 20 participants with clinically healthy osseointegrated implants and 20 participants with implants exhibiting peri-implantitis. Clinical parameters were assessed with an automated probe, samples were collected from the peri-implant sulcus or pocket and analyzed with Polymerase Chain Reaction for blaTEM, tetM, tetQ and nim genes, S. aureus and MRSA using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. Results: Findings have shown high frequencies of detection for both groups for the tetracycline resistance genes tetM (>30%), tetQ (>65%) with no statistical differences between them (z-test with Bonferroni corrections, p<0.05). The blaTEM gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactams, was detected in <15% of the samples. The nim gene, which encodes resistance to metronidazole, S.aureus and the mecA gene encoding for MRSA were not detected in any of the analyzed samples. Conclusions: Healthy peri-implant sulci and peri-implantitis cases often harbor bacterial genes encoding for resistance to the tetracyclines and less often for beta-lactams. Thus, the antimicrobial activity of the tetracyclines and to a lower extent to beta-lactams, might be compromised for treatment of peri-implantitis. Since no metronidazole resistance genes were detected in the present study, its clinical use is supported by the current findings. S.aureus may not participate in peri-implant pathology. PMID:25646133

  11. Gene interactions and genetics of blast resistance and yield attributes in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Divya; A. Biswas; S. Robin; R. Rabindran; A. John Joel

    2014-08-01

    Blast disease caused by the pathogen Pyricularia oryzae is a serious threat to rice production. Six generations viz., P1, P2, F1, F2, B1 and B2 of a cross between blast susceptible high-yielding rice cultivar ADT 43 and resistant near isogenic line (NIL) CT13432-3R, carrying four blast resistance genes Pi1, Pi2, Pi33 and Pi54 in combination were used to study the nature and magnitude of gene action for disease resistance and yield attributes. The epistatic interaction model was found adequate to explain the gene action in most of the traits. The interaction was complementary for number of productive tillers, economic yield, lesion number, infected leaf area and potential disease incidence but duplicate epistasis was observed for the remaining traits. Among the genotypes tested under epiphytotic conditions, gene pyramided lines were highly resistant to blast compared to individuals with single genes indicating that the nonallelic genes have a complementary effect when present together. The information on genetics of various contributing traits of resistance will further aid plant breeders in choosing appropriate breeding strategy for blast resistance and yield enhancement in rice.

  12. Transferring Sclerotinia stalk rot resistance genes from wild Helianthus species into cultivated sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Replicated field tests of 313 progeny families screened for stalk rot resistance at Carrington, ND in 2009 showed good introgression of resistance genes. These materials were planted again in 2010 for a second year of field evaluation, as well as the new families with seed increased in 2009. In 2010...

  13. Analysis of rice PDR-like ABC transporter genes in sheath blight resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most damaging diseases of rice worldwide. To understand the molecular mechanism of resistance, we identified 450 differentially expressed genes in a resistant rice cultivar Jasmine 85 after R. solani infection with a combination of DNA microar...

  14. Molecular mapping of greenbug (Schizaphis graminum) resistance gene Rsg1 in barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) is an extremely damaging aphid pest of barley (Hordeum vulgare L., 2n = 2x =14 L.) particularly in the southern Great Plains of the US. The simply inherited, dominant resistance gene Rsg1 is presented in all greenbug-resistant US barley cultivars, includi...

  15. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Yan, Wang-Ming; Bao, Xue-Zhen

    1994-01-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host.

  16. Isolation, Sequence Analysis, and Linkage Mapping of NBS-LRR Disease Resistance Gene Analogs in Watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultivated watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) is susceptible to a wide range of pathogens. Sixty-six watermelon resistance gene homologs were cloned from ‘Calhoun Gray’, PI 296341, and PI 595203 using degenerate primers to select for the nucleotide binding site (NBS) from the NBS-LRR resist...

  17. An accurate DNA marker assay for stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stem rust resistance gene Sr2 has provided broad-spectrum protection against stem rust (Puccinia graminis) since its wide spread deployment in wheat from the 1940s. Because Sr2 confers partial resistance which is difficult to select under field conditions, a DNA marker is desirable that accurate...

  18. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  19. Resistance training alters cytokine gene expression in skeletal muscle of adults with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance training results in muscle hypertrophy and improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether resistance training modulates inflammation in muscles of diabetic patients remains unknown. We examined the expression of genes encoding the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-al...

  20. Dissemination of tetracycline resistance genes from a convential dairy farm via manure into field soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elhottová, Dana; Slaninová Kyselková, Martina; Chroňáková, Alica; Jirout, Jiří; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Schmitt, H.; Smalla, K.

    Braunschweig: Julius Kühn-Institut, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, 2015. s. 48. [EDAR 3 - International Symposium on the Environmental Dimension of Antibiotic Resistance /3./. 17.05.2015-21.05.2015, Wernigerode] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dissemination * tetracycline resistance genes * dairy farm Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  1. Fine genetic mapping of greenbug aphid resistance gene Gb3 in Aegilops tauschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    The greenbug is a serious aphid pest of wheat and sorghum in the southern High Plains of the US. The greenbug resistant gene Gb3 originated from the goatgrass has shown consistent and durable resistance against prevailing greenbug biotypes in wheat fields for moer than 30 years. Our goal is to clone...

  2. Aerobic digestion reduces the quantity of antibiotic resistance genes in residual municipal wastewater solids

    OpenAIRE

    Burch, Tucker R.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; LaPara, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous initiatives have been undertaken to circumvent the problem of antibiotic resistance, including the development of new antibiotics, the use of narrow spectrum antibiotics, and the reduction of inappropriate antibiotic use. We propose an alternative but complimentary approach to reduce antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) by implementing more stringent technologies for treating municipal wastewater, which is known to contain large quantities of ARB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs)...

  3. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Krapac, I.J.; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N.; Mackie, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance [tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA] were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These determinants were found to be seeping into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. The identities and origin of these genes in groundwater were confirmed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses. Tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates from groundwater harbored the tet(M) gene, which was not predominant in the environmental samples and was identical to tet(M) from the lagoons. The presence of this gene in some typical soil inhabitants suggests that the vector of antibiotic resistance gene dissemination is not limited to strains of gastrointestinal origin carrying the gene but can be mobilized into the indigenous soil microbiota. This study demonstrated that tet genes occur in the environment as a direct result of agriculture and suggested that groundwater may be a potential source of antibiotic resistance in the food chain.

  4. Metagenomic profiling of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in a tannery wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wang

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP. Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns.

  5. Streptomycin use in apple orchards did not increase abundance of mobile resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Brion; Holliger, Eduard; Walsh, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Streptomycin is used as a first-line defense and tetracycline as a second-line defense, in the fight against fire blight disease in apple and pear orchards. We have performed the first study to quantitatively analyze the influence of streptomycin use in agriculture on the abundance of streptomycin and tetracycline resistance genes in apple orchards. Flowers, leaves, and soil were collected from three orchard sites in 2010, 2011, and 2012. Gene abundance distribution was analyzed using two-way anova and principal component analysis to investigate relationships between gene abundance data over time and treatment. The mobile antibiotic resistance genes, strA, strB, tetB, tetM, tetW, and the insertion sequence IS1133, were detected prior to streptomycin treatment in almost all samples, indicating the natural presence of these resistance genes in nature. Statistically significant increases in the resistance gene abundances were occasional, inconsistent, and not reproducible from one year to the next. We conclude that the application of streptomycin in these orchards was not associated with sustained increases in streptomycin or tetracycline resistance gene abundances. PMID:24164283

  6. Genetic mapping of stem rust resistance gene Sr13 in tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, K; Abate, Z.; Chao, S; Zhang, W.; Rouse, M; Jin, Y.; Elias, E; Dubcovsky, J

    2011-01-01

    Wheat stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, can cause significant yield losses. To combat the disease, breeders have deployed resistance genes both individually and in combinations to increase resistance durability. A new race, TTKSK (Ug99), identified in Uganda in 1999 is virulent on most of the resistance genes currently deployed, and is rapidly spreading to other regions of the world. It is therefore important to identify, map, and deploy resistance genes that are still eff...

  7. Dynamic evolution of resistance gene analogs in the orthologous genomic regions of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 in Triticum dicoccoides and Aegilops tauschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat is one of the most important staple grain crops in the world. Powdery mildew disease caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici can result in significant losses in both grain yield and quality in wheat. In this study, the wheat powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 locus located on the short ...

  8. Analysis of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from the surface microlayer and underlying water of an estuarine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Juliana S N; Araújo, Susana; Oliveira, Cláudia S; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    We compared the prevalence of cultivable antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes in the surface microlayer (SML) and underlying waters (UW) of an estuary. Prevalence of resistant bacteria was determined in antibiotic-supplemented agar. Bacterial isolates from the UW (n=91) and SML (n=80), selected in media without antibiotic, were characterized concerning susceptibility against nine antibiotics. The presence of genes bla(TEM), bla(OXA-B), bla(SHV), bla(IMP), tet(A), tet(B), tet(E), tet(M), cat, sul1, sul2, sul3, aadA, IntI1, IntI2, and IntI3 was assessed by PCR. The variable regions of integrons were sequenced. Ampicillin- and streptomycin-resistant bacteria were significantly more prevalent in SML. Resistance levels among the bacterial collections were generally low, preventing detection of significant differences between SML and UW. The tet(E) gene was detected in two Aeromonas isolates and tet(M) was detected in a Pseudomonas isolate. Gene sul1 was amplified from three Aeromonas isolates. Prevalence of intI genes was 2.11%. Cassette arrays contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides and chloramphenicol. A higher prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the SML, although only detectable when bacteria were selected in antibiotic-supplemented agar, suggests that SML conditions select for antibiotic resistance. Results also showed that antibiotic resistance was uncommon among estuarine bacteria and the resistance mechanisms are probably predominantly intrinsic. PMID:23067198

  9. Functional metagenomics reveals previously unrecognized diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in gulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AdamCamilloMartiny

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife may facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR between human-dominated habitats and the surrounding environment. Here, we use functional metagenomics to survey the diversity and genomic context of AR genes in gulls. Using this approach, we found a variety of AR genes not previously detected in gulls and wildlife, including class A and C beta-lactamases as well as six tetracycline resistance gene types. An analysis of the flanking sequences indicates that most of these genes are present in Enterobacteraceae and various gram positive bacteria. In addition to finding known gene types, we detected thirty-one previously undescribed AR genes. These undescribed genes include one most similar to an uncharacterized gene in Verrucomicrobium and another to a putative DNA repair protein in Lactobacillus. Overall, the study more than doubled the number of clinically relevant AR gene types known to be carried by gulls or by wildlife in general. Together with the propensity of gulls to visit human-dominated habitats, this high diversity of AR gene types suggests that gulls could facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  10. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.513 Potato Leaf Roll... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all...

  11. Reprogramming resistant genes: in-depth comparison of gene expressions among iPS, ES and somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia ePolouliakh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor based reprogramming reverts adult cells to an embryonic state, yielding potential for generating different tissue types. However, recent reports indicated the substantial differences in pattern of gene expression between induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells and embryonic stem (ES cells. In this study we compare gene expression signatures of different iPS and ES cell lines and relate expression profiles of differently expressed genes to their expression status in somatic cells. As a result, we discovered that genes resistant to reprogramming comprise two major clusters, which are reprogramming dependent ‘Induced Genes’ and somatic origin ‘Inherited Genes’, both exhibiting preferences in methylation marks. Closer look into the Induced Genes by means of the transcription regulation analysis predicted several groups of genes with various roles in reprogramming and transgene DNA binding model. We believe that our results are a helpful source for biologists for further improvement of iPS cell technology.

  12. EVALUATION OF MACROLIDE RESISTANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF RESISTANT GENES IN STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BETWEEN, 2010 – 2013; A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMAD REZA HAVASIAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Staphylococci aureus and Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS are a major source of infections associated with indwelling medical devices. Macrolide antimicrobial agents are widely used across the world to protect against bacterial infection. Methods: This is a systematic review study valuating all pubmed, science direct, Scopus and Google scholar articles about the Evaluation of macrolide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus between 2010 – 2013 using analytical statistical analysis. Data were collected and the related information extracted and put in statistical package and analyzed. Results: According the result of this study prevalence of macrolide resistant in some of region was more than other region and it caused by different conditions. The most common genes in macrolide resistant was erm(A but could not be found in regulatory region of the isolates. Conclusion: We should try to reduce the resistant to antimicrobial drug by set the healthy plane and reduce using of antimicrobial drug.

  13. Infectious drug resistance during an outbreak of salmonellosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sudden acquisition of aminoglycoside resistance among Salmonella group C1 isolates causing summer diarrhoea raised the possibility of plasmid-mediated resistance. The demonstration of circular DNA species in the resistant, but not in the sensitive salmonellae and the transfer by conjugation of antibiotic resistance to a sensitive strain of Escherichia coli, was consistent with plasmid-mediated resistance

  14. New Marker Development for the Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pi-km

    Science.gov (United States)

    The blast resistance (R) gene Pi-km protects rice against specific races of the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. The use of blast R genes remains the most cost-effective method of disease control. To facilitate the breeding process, we developed a Pi-km specific molecular marker. For this purp...

  15. The Order Bacillales Hosts Functional Homologs of the Worrisome cfr Antibiotic Resistance Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lykke H.; Planellas, Mercè H.; Long, Katherine S.; Vester, Birte

    2012-01-01

    coli, and MICs for selected antibiotics indicate that the cfr-like genes confer resistance to PhLOPSa (phenicol, lincosamide, oxazolidinone, pleuromutilin, and streptogramin A) antibiotics in the same way as the cfr gene. In addition, modification at A2503 on 23S rRNA was confirmed by primer extension...

  16. Colistin Resistance mcr-1-Gene-Bearing Escherichia coli Strain from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladely, Scott R.; Plumblee, Jodie R.; Hall, M. Carolina; Simpson, Sheron A.; Ballard, Linda L.; Scheffler, Brian E.; Genzlinger, Linda L.; Cook, Kimberly L.

    2016-01-01

    Transmissible colistin resistance in the form of an mcr-1-gene-bearing plasmid has been recently reported in Enterobacteriaceae in several parts of the world. We report here the completed genome sequence of an Escherichia coli strain isolated from swine in the United States that carried the mcr-1 gene on an IncI2-type plasmid. PMID:27587816

  17. Prevalence of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Oral Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Villedieu, A.; Diaz-Torres, M. L.; Hunt, N; McNab, R; Spratt, D. A.; Wilson, M.; Mullany, P.

    2003-01-01

    Tetracycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in humans, animals, and aquaculture; therefore, many bacteria from different ecosystems are exposed to this antibiotic. In order to determine the genetic basis for resistance to tetracycline in bacteria from the oral cavity, saliva and dental plaque samples were obtained from 20 healthy adults who had not taken antibiotics during the previous 3 months. The samples were screened for the presence of bacteria resistant to tetracycline, and the tet...

  18. Analysis of drought resistance HVA1 gene under drought stress in different Poa pratensis cultivars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yanhua; CHEN Yajun; SHEN Fengjuan; SUN Xiaoyan

    2007-01-01

    Total RNA from leaves of Poa pratensis cultivars under drought stress was extracted for reversing transcription to cDNA and then cDNA as template for PCR reaction by designing primer of cds of Hordeum valgare HVA1 drought resistance gene from GenBank. The amplified products were positive recon identified by using procedures of recovery, connection, transformation and enzyme separation. The length of cloned gene sequence was 324 bp, identity reached 79.27% with Barley HVA1 gene that meaned the cloned gene sequence was the partial HVA1 gene of Poa pratensis.

  19. Functional Characterization of Mi, a Root-knot Nematode Resistance Gene from Tomato( Lycopersicon esculentum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Gang Chen; Li-Ying Zhang; Jun-Hong Zhang; Wei Zhang; Xue Wang; Bo Ouyang; Han-Xia Li; Zhi-Biao Ye

    2006-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) cause major economic damage to numerous crop species around the world. Plant resistance is the most important attribute that is able to suppress invasion by the rootknot nematodes. In the present study, a candidate root-knot nematode resistance gene (Mi) was isolated from the resistant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) line RN-1. Expression profiling analysis revealed that this gene was expressed specifically in the roots, stems, and leaves, but not in the flowers or fruits.To verify the real function of this candidate gene, both sense and inteference RNA (RNAi) vectors were constructed. We obtained 31 transgenic plants with between one and seven copies of T-DNA inserts of sense Mi from two nematode-susceptible tomato cultivars as assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)and Southern blotting analysis. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that expression levels of the Mi gene varied in different transgenic plants. Nematode assays showed that the resistance to root-knot nematodes was significantly improved in some transgenic lines compared with untransformed susceptible controls and that the resistance was heritable in selfed progeny. Loss of function via RNAi further confirmed the role of the Mi gene and the original resistant lines became susceptible to root-knot nematodes.

  20. Role of a qnr-Like Gene in the Intrinsic Resistance of Enterococcus faecalis to Fluoroquinolones▿

    OpenAIRE

    Arsène, Stéphanie; Leclercq, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are poorly active against enterococci. Recently, plasmid-borne resistance to fluoroquinolones due to the qnr gene was reported in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The gene encodes a pentapeptide repeat protein that protects DNA gyrase from inhibition by fluoroquinolones. We have identified in the genome of Enterococcus faecalis V583 a qnr-like gene, named E. faecalis qnr (qnrE. faecalis), encoding a putative pentapeptide repeat protein that shares 25% identity with Q...

  1. Fast and Accurate Large-Scale Detection of β-Lactamase Genes Conferring Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Jung Hun; Kwon, Dae Beom; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Park, Kwang Seung; Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Fast detection of β-lactamase (bla) genes allows improved surveillance studies and infection control measures, which can minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although several molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to detect limited bla gene types, these methods have significant limitations, such as their failure to detect almost all clinically available bla genes. We developed a fast and accurate molecular method to overcome these limitations using 62 primer pairs, which we...

  2. Quantitative gene monitoring of microbial tetracycline resistance using magnetic luminescent nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Ahjeong; Kennedy, Ian M.; Scow, Kate M.; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2010-01-01

    A magnetic/luminescent nanoparticles (MLNPs) based DNA hybridization method was developed for quantitative monitoring of antibiotic resistance genes and gene-expression in environmental samples. Manipulation of magnetic field enabled the separation of the MLNPs-DNA hybrids from the solution and the fluorescence of MLNPs normalized the quantity of target DNA. In our newly developed MLNPs-DNA assay, linear standard curves (R2 = 0.99) of target gene was determined with the detection limit of 620...

  3. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of the Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 gene encoding ampicillin resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Verreth, C; Cammue, B; Swinnen, P; Crombez, D; Michielsen, A; Michiels, K.; Gool, A. van; Vanderleyden, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense ATCC 29145 gene coding for beta-lactamase was cloned in Escherichia coli. The gene was expressed in E. coli from its own promoter as a 30-kilodalton protein, conferring resistance to high levels of beta-lactam antibiotics. The DNA sequence containing the beta-lactamase gene was found to be highly amplified in the Azospirillum genome, scattered in the chromosomal as well as in the plasmidic DNA.

  4. Introgression of a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops caudata to bread wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amandeep Kaur Riar; Satinder Kaur; H. S. Dhaliwal; Kuldeep Singh; Parveen Chhuneja

    2012-08-01

    Rusts are the most important biotic constraints limiting wheat productivity worldwide. Deployment of cultivars with broad spectrum rust resistance is the only environmentally viable option to combat these diseases. Identification and introgression of novel sources of resistance is a continuous process to combat the ever evolving pathogens. The germplasm of nonprogenitor Aegilops species with substantial amount of variability has been exploited to a limited extent. In the present investigation introgression, inheritance and molecular mapping of a leaf rust resistance gene of Ae. caudata (CC) acc. pau3556 in cultivated wheat were undertaken. An F2 population derived from the cross of Triticum aestivum cv.WL711 – Ae. caudata introgression line T291-2 with wheat cultivar PBW343 segregated for a single dominant leaf rust resistance gene at the seedling and adult plant stages. Progeny testing in F3 confirmed the introgression of a single gene for leaf rust resistance. Bulked segregant analysis using polymorphic D-genome-specific SSR markers and the cosegregation of the 5DS anchored markers (Xcfd18, Xcfd78, Xfd81 and Xcfd189) with the rust resistance in the F2 population mapped the leaf rust resistance gene (LrAC) on the short arm of wheat chromosome 5D. Genetic complementation and the linked molecular markers revealed that LrAC is a novel homoeoallele of an orthologue Lr57 already introgressed from the 5M chromosome of Ae. geniculata on 5DS of wheat.

  5. Overcoming doxorubicin resistance of cancer cells by Cas9-mediated gene disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Seong Ha; Juyoung Byun; Dae-Ro Ahn

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Cas9 system was employed to down-regulate mdr1 gene for overcoming multidrug resistance of cancer cells. Disruption of the MDR1 gene was achieved by delivery of the Cas9-sgRNA plasmid or the Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complex using a conventional gene transfection agent and protein transduction domain (PTD). Doxorubicin showed considerable cytotoxicity to the drug-resistant breast cancer cells pre-treated with the RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN) systems, whereas virtually non-...

  6. Bacteriophages Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Fecal Waste from Cattle, Pigs, and Poultry▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Imamovic, Lejla; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the occurrence of bacteriophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes in animal environments. blaTEM, blaCTX-M (clusters 1 and 9), and mecA were quantified by quantitative PCR in 71 phage DNA samples from pigs, poultry, and cattle fecal wastes. Densities of 3 to 4 log10 gene copies (GC) of blaTEM, 2 to 3 log10 GC of blaCTX-M, and 1 to 3 log10 GC of mecA per milliliter or gram of sample were detected, suggesting that bacteriophages can be environmental vectors for the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:21807968

  7. Transgenic Rape with hrf2 Gene Encoding HarpinXooc Resistant to Sclerotinia sclerotinorium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ling-li; HUO Rong; GAO Xue-wen; HE Dan; SHAO Min; WANG Qi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to increase the resistance of rape using the method of transformation. The gene hrf2 derived from Xathomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola encoding harpinXooc protein was constructed into transgenic vector pCAMBIA1301. The cotyledonal petiole segments from rapeseed variety Yangyou 4 were infected by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404/pCAMBIA1301-hrf2. Hygromycin-resistant green shoots were obtained. Successful integration of the foreign gene into the genome of the rapeseed variety Yangyou 4 was confirmed by PCR, RT-PCR, and β-glucuronidase analyses. Disease bioassays of transgenic plants revealed an improved resistance of transgenic plants to Rape sclerotiniose. In brief, the hrf2 gene can be transferred into rape using the method of Agrobacterium-medmted transformation, which increased the resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotinorium in the transgenic plant.

  8. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke;

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven...... inpatients at Siriraj Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) and were compared with a sample from a healthy volunteer. Plasmids from the gut microbiomes extracted from the stool samples were subjected to high-throughput DNA sequencing (GS Junior). Newbler-assembled DNA reads were categorised into known and unknown...... sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several...

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of an Anthracnose-Resistant Tea Plant Cultivar Reveals Genes Associated with Resistance to Colletotrichum camelliae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    Full Text Available Tea plant breeding is a topic of great economic importance. However, disease remains a major cause of yield and quality losses. In this study, an anthracnose-resistant cultivar, ZC108, was developed. An infection assay revealed different responses to Colletotrichum sp. infection between ZC108 and its parent cultivar LJ43. ZC108 had greater resistance than LJ43 to Colletotrichum camelliae. Additionally, ZC108 exhibited earlier sprouting in the spring, as well as different leaf shape and plant architecture. Microarray data revealed that the genes that are differentially expressed between LJ43 and ZC108 mapped to secondary metabolism-related pathways, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways. In addition, genes involved in plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling as well as plant-pathogen interaction pathways were also changed. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the expression of 27 selected genes in infected and uninfected tea plant leaves. Genes encoding a MADS-box transcription factor, NBS-LRR disease-resistance protein, and phenylpropanoid metabolism pathway components (CAD, CCR, POD, beta-glucosidase, ALDH and PAL were among those differentially expressed in ZC108.

  10. Identification and characterization of potential NBS-encoding resistance genes and induction kinetics of a putative candidate gene associated with downy mildew resistance in Cucumis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Hongjian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the variation and mutation of the races of Pseudoperonospora cubensis, downy mildew has in recent years become the most devastating leaf disease of cucumber worldwide. Novel resistance to downy mildew has been identified in the wild Cucumis species, C. hystrix Chakr. After the successful hybridization between C. hystrix and cultivated cucumber (C. sativus L., an introgression line (IL5211S was identified as highly resistant to downy mildew. Nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR genes are the largest class of disease resistance genes cloned from plant with highly conserved domains, which can be used to facilitate the isolation of candidate genes associated with downy mildew resistance in IL5211S. Results Degenerate primers that were designed based on the conserved motifs in the NBS domain of resistance (R proteins were used to isolate NBS-type sequences from IL5211S. A total of 28 sequences were identified and named as cucumber (C. sativus = CS resistance gene analogs as CSRGAs. Polygenetic analyses separated these sequences into four different classes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis showed that these CSRGAs expressed at different levels in leaves, roots, and stems. In addition, introgression from C. hystrix induced expression of the partial CSRGAs in cultivated cucumber, especially CSRGA23, increased four-fold when compared to the backcross parent CC3. Furthermore, the expression of CSRGA23 under P. cubensis infection and abiotic stresses was also analyzed at different time points. Results showed that the P. cubensis treatment and four tested abiotic stimuli, MeJA, SA, ABA, and H2O2, triggered a significant induction of CSRGA23 within 72 h of inoculation. The results indicate that CSRGA23 may play a critical role in protecting cucumber against P. cubensis through a signaling the pathway triggered by these molecules. Conclusions Four classes of NBS-type RGAs were

  11. Factors impacting the aminoglycoside-induced UGA stop codon readthrough in selenoprotein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martitz, Janine; Hofmann, Peter Josef; Johannes, Jörg; Köhrle, Josef; Schomburg, Lutz; Renko, Kostja

    2016-09-01

    Aminoglycosides (AG) are oligosaccharide antibiotics that interfere with the small ribosomal subunit in aerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, causing pathogen-destructing error rates in their protein biosynthesis. Aminoglycosides also induce mRNA misinterpretation in eukaryotic cells, especially of the UGA (Opal)-stop codon, albeit to a lower extent. UGA recoding is essentially required for the incorporation of selenocysteine (Sec) into growing selenoproteins during translation. Selenocysteine incorporation requires the presence of a selenoprotein-specific stem-loop structure within the 3'-untranslated region of the mRNA, the so-called Sec-insertion sequence (SECIS) element. Interestingly, selenoprotein genes differ in their SECIS-element sequence and in their UGA base context. We hypothesized that the SECIS-element and the specific codon context synergize in controlling the effects of AG on stop codon readthrough. To this end, the SECIS-elements of glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione peroxidase 4 and selenoprotein P transcripts were cloned into a reporter system and analyzed in combination with different UGA codon contexts. Our results indicate that a cytosine in position 4 (directly downstream of UGA) confers strongest effects on both the Se- and AG-dependent readthrough. Overall selenoprotein biosynthesis rate depends on the Se-status, AG concentration and the specific SECIS-element present in the transcript. These findings help to get a better understanding for the susceptibility of different transcripts towards AG-mediated interference with the biosynthesis of functional Se-containing selenoproteins, and highlight the importance of the Se-status for successful selenoprotein biosynthesis under antibiotic therapy. PMID:27157664

  12. Azobenzene-aminoglycoside: Self-assembled smart amphiphilic nanostructures for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Yadav, Santosh; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Here, we have designed and synthesized a novel cationic amphiphilic stimuli-responsive azobenzene-aminoglycoside (a small molecule) conjugate, Azo-AG 5, and characterized it by UV and FTIR. Light responsive nature of Azo-AG 5 was assessed under UV-vis light. Self- assembly of Azo-AG 5 in aqueous solutions into nanostructures and their ability to act as drug carrier were also investigated. The nanostructures of Azo-AG 5 showed average hydrodynamic diameter of ∼ 255 nm with aminoglycoside moiety (neomycin) and 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene forming hydrophilic shell and hydrophobic core, respectively. In the hydrophobic core, eosin and aspirin were successfully encapsulated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements demonstrated that the nanoassemblies showed expansion and contraction on successive UV and visible light irradiations exhibiting reversible on-off switch for controlling the drug release behavior. Similar behavior was observed when these nanostructures were subjected to pH-change. In vitro drug release studies showed a difference in UV and visible light-mediated release pattern. It was observed that the release rate under UV irradiation was comparatively higher than that observed under visible light. Further, azoreductase-mediated cleavage of the azo moiety in Azo-AG 5 nanoassemblies resulted in the dismantling of the structures into aggregated microstructures. Azo-AG 5 nanostructures having positive surface charge (+9.74 mV) successfully interacted with pDNA and retarded its mobility on agarose gel. Stimuli responsiveness of nanostructures and their on-off switch like behavior ensure the great potential as controlled drug delivery systems and in other biomedical applications such as colon-specific delivery and gene delivery. PMID:26255160

  13. Chaperonins fight aminoglycoside-induced protein misfolding and promote short-term tolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Good, Liam; Bentin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    survival, whereas inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria. Overexpression of the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE chaperone system similarly facilitated survival but did not promote growth of aminoglycoside-treated bacteria. Inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria to aminoglycosides as...

  14. Unusual regioversatility of acetyltransferase Eis, a cause of drug resistance in XDR-TB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wenjing; Biswas, Tapan; Porter, Vanessa R.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie (Michigan)

    2011-09-06

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a serious global threat. Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used as a last resort to treat XDR-TB. Resistance to the aminoglycoside kanamycin is a hallmark of XDR-TB. Here, we reveal the function and structure of the mycobacterial protein Eis responsible for resistance to kanamycin in a significant fraction of kanamycin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates. We demonstrate that Eis has an unprecedented ability to acetylate multiple amines of many aminoglycosides. Structural and mutagenesis studies of Eis indicate that its acetylation mechanism is enabled by a complex tripartite fold that includes two general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase regions. An intricate negatively charged substrate-binding pocket of Eis is a potential target of new antitubercular drugs expected to overcome aminoglycoside resistance.

  15. Fine mapping of the Ht2 (Helminthosporium turcicum resistance 2) gene in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Fine mapping of Helminthosporium turcicum resistance gene Ht2 is extremely valuable for map-based cloning of the Ht2 gene, gaining a better knowledge of the distribution of resistance genes in maize genome and marker-assisted selection in maize breeding. An F2 mapping population was developed from a cross between a resistant inbred line 77Ht2 and a susceptible inbred line Huobai. With the aid of RFLP marker analyses, the Ht2 gene was mapped between the RFLP markers UMC89 and BNL2.369 on chromosome 8, with a genetic distance of 0.9 cM to BNL2.369. There was a linkage between SSR markers UMC1202, BNLG1152, UMC1149 and the Ht2 gene by SSR assay. Among the SSR markers, the genetic distance between UMC1149 and the Ht2 gene was 7.2 cM. By bulked segregant analysis 7 RAPD-amplified products which were probably linked to the Ht2 gene were selected after screening 450 RAPD primers and converted the single-copy ones into SCAR markers. Linkage analysis showed that the genetic distance between the SCAR marker SD-06633 and the Ht2 gene was 0.4 cM. From these results, a part of linkage map around the Ht2 gene was constructed.

  16. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  17. Transcriptomic Analysis and the Expression of Disease-Resistant Genes in Oryza meyeriana under Native Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana (O. meyeriana, with a GG genome type (2n = 24, accumulated plentiful excellent characteristics with respect to resistance to many diseases such as rice shade and blast, even immunity to bacterial blight. It is very important to know if the diseases-resistant genes exist and express in this wild rice under native conditions. However, limited genomic or transcriptomic data of O. meyeriana are currently available. In this study, we present the first comprehensive characterization of the O. meyeriana transcriptome using RNA-seq and obtained 185,323 contigs with an average length of 1,692 bp and an N50 of 2,391 bp. Through differential expression analysis, it was found that there were most tissue-specifically expressed genes in roots, and next to stems and leaves. By similarity search against protein databases, 146,450 had at least a significant alignment to existed gene models. Comparison with the Oryza sativa (japonica-type Nipponbare and indica-type 93-11 genomes revealed that 13% of the O. meyeriana contigs had not been detected in O. sativa. Many diseases-resistant genes, such as bacterial blight resistant, blast resistant, rust resistant, fusarium resistant, cyst nematode resistant and downy mildew gene, were mined from the transcriptomic database. There are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes (Xa1 and Xa26 differentially or specifically expressed in O. meyeriana. The 4 Xa1 contigs were all only expressed in root, while three of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression level in leaves, two of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression profile in stems and one of Xa26 contigs was expressed dominantly in roots. The transcriptomic database of O. meyeriana has been constructed and many diseases-resistant genes were found to express under native condition, which provides a foundation for future discovery of a number of novel genes and provides a basis for studying the molecular mechanisms associated with disease

  18. Aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for molecular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, Bhavani; Godeshala, Sudhakar; Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Christensen, Matthew D; Tian, Yanqing; Rege, Kaushal

    2016-10-01

    The development of effective drug carriers can lead to improved outcomes in a variety of disease conditions. Aminoglycosides have been used as antibacterial therapeutics, and are attractive as monomers for the development of polymeric materials in various applications. Here, we describe the development of novel aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for drug delivery, with an eye towards ablation of cancer cells. The aminoglycoside paromomycin was first cross-linked with resorcinol diglycidyl ether leading to the formation of a poly (amino ether), PAE. PAE molecules were further derivatized with methoxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) or mPEG resulting in the formation of mPEG-PAE polymer, which self-assembled to form nanoparticles. Formation of the mPEG-PAE amphiphile was characterized using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and FTIR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the polymer into nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyses, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the pyrene fluorescence assay. mPEG-PAE nanoparticles were able to carry significant amounts of doxorubicin (DOX), presumably by means of hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the core. Cell-based studies indicated that mPEG-PAE nanoparticles, loaded with doxorubicin, were able to induce significant loss in viabilities of PC3 human prostate cancer, MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer, and MB49 murine bladder cancer cells; empty nanoparticles resulted in negligible losses of cell viability under the conditions investigated. Taken together, our results indicate that the mPEG-PAE nanoparticle platform is attractive for drug delivery in different applications, including cancer. PMID:27472455

  19. Genetic Analysis of Major and Minor Gene(s) Resistant to Stripe Rust in Important Resource Wheat Line Jinghe891-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shi-chang; ZHANG Jing-yuan; ZHAO Wen-sheng; WU Li-ren; ZHANG Ji-xin; YUAN Zhen-dong

    2002-01-01

    Inheritance of line Jinghe891-1 resistant to pathotype of Puccinia striiformis in two patterns of temperature (Normal: day 18℃/night 10℃, High: day 24℃/night 15℃ )was studied in this paper. The results showed that there were at least two pairs of dominant major genes and one pair of recessive minor genes in Jinghe 891-1. The two pairs of major genes that conferred resistance to CY31 were allelic or linked closely with resistance gene in Jubilejna Ⅱ , Kangyin655 and T. spelta Album. They were novel resistance genes and were inherited in a repeated or independent mode. The minor genes, which could modify the major genes,were sensitive to temperature and conferred resistance to all pathotypes of Puccinia striiformis in China. It is recommended that this line can be used as an important resource stock.

  20. Who possesses drug resistance genes in the aquatic environment?: sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistance genes among the bacterial community in water environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Miller, Todd W.; Shimizu, Akiko; Takada, Hideshige; Siringan, Maria Auxilia T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in “colony forming bacterial assemblages” and “natural bacterial assemblages.” Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a major contaminant in aquatic environments of Metro-Manila, which would have been derived from human and animal use, and subsequently decreased through the process of outflow from source to the sea. The SMX-resistant bacterial rate evaluated by the colony forming unit showed 10 to 86% of the total colony numbers showed higher rates from freshwater sites compared to marine sites. When sul genes were quantified by qPCR, colony-forming bacteria conveyed sul1 and sul2 genes in freshwater and seawater (10−5–10−2 copy/16S) but not sul3. Among the natural bacterial assemblage, all sul1, sul2, and sul3 were detected (10−5–10−3 copy/16S), whereas all sul genes were at an almost non-detectable level in the freshwater assemblage. This study suggests that sul1 and sul2 are main sul genes in culturable bacteria, whereas sul3 is conveyed by non-culturable bacteria in the sea. As a result marine bacteria possess sul1, sul2 and sul3 genes in the marine environment. PMID:23641240

  1. RETROVIRAL MEDIATED EFFICIENT TRANSFER ANDEXPRESSION OF MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE GENE TO HUMAN LEUKEMIC CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human multidrug resistance (MDR) gene MDR1 in leukemic cells. Methods: Human myeloid cells, K562 and NB4, were infected by MDR retrovirus from the producer PA317/HaMDR, and the resistant cells were selected with cytotoxic drug. The transfer and expression of MDR1 gene was analyzed by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry (FCM) and semisolid colonies cultivation. Results: The resistant cells, K562/MDR and NB4/MDR, in which integration of the exogenous MDR1 gene was confirmed by PCR analysis, displayed a typical MDR phenotype. The expression of MDR1 transgene was detected on truncated as well as full-length transcripts. Moreover, the resistant cells were P-glycoprotein postiive at 78.0% to 98.7% analyzed with FCM. The transduction efficieny in K562 cells was studied on suspension cultures and single-cell colonies. The transduction was more efficient in coculture system (67.9%~ 72.5%) than in supernatant system (33.1%~ 46.8%), while growth factors may improve the efficiency. Conclusion: Retrovirus could allow a functional transfer and expression of MDR1 gene in human leukemia cells, and MDR1 might act as a dominant selectable gene for coexpression with the genes of interest in gene therapy.

  2. High-throughput quantification of antibiotic resistance genes from an urban wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkman, Antti; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance among bacteria is a growing problem worldwide, and wastewater treatment plants have been considered as one of the major contributors to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance to the environment. There is a lack of comprehensive quantitative molecular data on extensive numbers of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in different seasons with a sampling strategy that would cover both incoming and outgoing water together with the excess sludge that is removed from the process. In order to fill that gap we present a highly parallel quantitative analysis of ARGs and horizontal gene transfer potential over four seasons at an urban wastewater treatment plant using a high-throughput qPCR array. All analysed transposases and two-thirds of primer sets targeting ARGs were detected in the wastewater. The relative abundance of most of the genes was highest in influent and lower in effluent water and sludge. The resistance profiles of the samples cluster by sample location with a shift from raw influent through the final effluents and dried sludge to the sediments. Wastewater discharge enriched only a few genes, namely Tn25 type transposase gene and clinical class 1 integrons, in the sediment near the discharge pipe, but those enriched genes may indicate a potential for horizontal gene transfer. PMID:26832203

  3. Understanding the coevolution of rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta and Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence gene AVR-Pita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice blast disease caused by the filamentous ascomycetous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae remains to be one of the most serious threats for food security globally. Using resistance (R) genes in integrated cultural practices has been the most powerful practice for rice crop protection. Genetic analysis s...

  4. Allele characterization of genes required for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance identifies Rpg5 as the R gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, D; Gross, T; Brueggeman, R

    2013-11-01

    A highly virulent form of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK is virulent on both wheat and barley, presenting a major threat to world food security. The recessive and temperature-sensitive rpg4 gene is the only effective source of resistance identified in barley (Hordeum vulgare) against P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. Efforts to position clone rpg4 localized resistance to a small interval on barley chromosome 5HL, tightly linked to the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) resistance (R) gene Rpg5. High-resolution genetic analysis and post-transcriptional gene silencing of the genes at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus determined that three tightly linked genes (Rpg5, HvRga1, and HvAdf3) are required together for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance. Alleles of the three genes were analyzed from a diverse set of 14 domesticated barley lines (H. vulgare) and 8 wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum) to characterize diversity that may determine incompatibility (resistance). The analysis determined that HvAdf3 and HvRga1 code for predicted functional proteins that do not appear to contain polymorphisms determining the compatible (susceptible) interactions with the wheat stem rust pathogen and were expressed at the transcriptional level from both resistant and susceptible barley lines. The HvAdf3 alleles shared 100% amino acid identity among all 22 genotypes examined. The P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines with HvRga1 alleles containing the limited amino acid substitutions unique to the susceptible varieties also contained predicted nonfunctional rpg5 alleles. Thus, susceptibility in these lines is likely due to the nonfunctional RPG5 proteins. The Rpg5 allele analysis determined that 9 of the 13 P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines contain alleles that either code for predicted truncated proteins as the result of a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a

  5. dfrA25, a novel trimethoprim resistance gene from Salmonella Agona isolated from a human urine sample in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Peirano, Gisele; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To describe a novel trimethoprim resistance gene, designated dfrA25, which was detected as a gene cassette within a class 1 integron in Salmonella Agona. Methods: The gene was cloned into Escherichia coli MT102 and resistance to 10 different antimicrobial drugs was measured. A...

  6. Coral thermal tolerance: tuning gene expression to resist thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Bellantuono

    Full Text Available The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs

  7. SSTAR, a Stand-Alone Easy-To-Use Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Predictor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbago, Brandi M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the easy-to-use Sequence Search Tool for Antimicrobial Resistance, SSTAR. It combines a locally executed BLASTN search against a customizable database with an intuitive graphical user interface for identifying antimicrobial resistance (AR) genes from genomic data. Although the database is initially populated from a public repository of acquired resistance determinants (i.e., ARG-ANNOT), it can be customized for particular pathogen groups and resistance mechanisms. For instance, outer membrane porin sequences associated with carbapenem resistance phenotypes can be added, and known intrinsic mechanisms can be included. Unique about this tool is the ability to easily detect putative new alleles and truncated versions of existing AR genes. Variants and potential new alleles are brought to the attention of the user for further investigation. For instance, SSTAR is able to identify modified or truncated versions of porins, which may be of great importance in carbapenemase-negative carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. SSTAR is written in Java and is therefore platform independent and compatible with both Windows and Unix operating systems. SSTAR and its manual, which includes a simple installation guide, are freely available from https://github.com/tomdeman-bio/Sequence-Search-Tool-for-Antimicrobial-Resistance-SSTAR-. IMPORTANCE Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is quickly becoming a routine method for identifying genes associated with antimicrobial resistance (AR). However, for many microbiologists, the use and analysis of WGS data present a substantial challenge. We developed SSTAR, software with a graphical user interface that enables the identification of known AR genes from WGS and has the unique capacity to easily detect new variants of known AR genes, including truncated protein variants. Current software solutions do not notify the user when genes are truncated and, therefore, likely nonfunctional, which makes phenotype predictions less

  8. Adaptive Landscapes of Resistance Genes Change as Antibiotic Concentrations Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Portia M; Meza, Juan C; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on the evolution of antibiotic resistance are focused on selection for resistance at lethal antibiotic concentrations, which has allowed the detection of mutant strains that show strong phenotypic traits. However, solely focusing on lethal concentrations of antibiotics narrowly limits our perspective of antibiotic resistance evolution. New high-resolution competition assays have shown that resistant bacteria are selected at relatively low concentrations of antibiotics. This finding is important because sublethal concentrations of antibiotics are found widely in patients undergoing antibiotic therapies, and in nonmedical conditions such as wastewater treatment plants, and food and water used in agriculture and farming. To understand the impacts of sublethal concentrations on selection, we measured 30 adaptive landscapes for a set of TEM β-lactamases containing all combinations of the four amino acid substitutions that exist in TEM-50 for 15 β-lactam antibiotics at multiple concentrations. We found that there are many evolutionary pathways within this collection of landscapes that lead to nearly every TEM-genotype that we studied. While it is known that the pathways change depending on the type of β-lactam, this study demonstrates that the landscapes including fitness optima also change dramatically as the concentrations of antibiotics change. Based on these results we conclude that the presence of multiple concentrations of β-lactams in an environment result in many different adaptive landscapes through which pathways to nearly every genotype are available. Ultimately this may increase the diversity of genotypes in microbial populations. PMID:26113371

  9. PCR detection of oxytetracycline resistance genes otr(A) and otr(B) in tetracycline-resistant streptomycete isolates from diverse habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolakopoulou, T; Egan, S; van Overbeek, L; Guillaume, G; Heuer, H; Wellington, EMH; van Elsas, JD; Collard, JM; Smalla, K; Karagouni, A

    2005-01-01

    A range of European habitats was screened by PCR for detection of the oxytetracycline resistance genes otr(A) and otr(B), found in the oxytetracycline-producing strain Streptomyces rimosus. Primers were developed to detect these otr genes in tetracycline-resistant (Tc-R) streptomycete isolates from

  10. Genetic engineering in insects: Cloning and transformation of genes conferring resistance to insecticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic engineering and transformation offer the possibility of modifying the genetic material of insects. These techniques will make it possible, for example, to transfer genes conferring resistance to insecticides into the genome of beneficial species, or to develop new methods of combating insect pests and disease carrying insects. We cloned two genes which contain the code for proteins that detoxify insecticides. The first, esterase B1 from Culex quinquefasciatus, is amplified approximately 250 times in Californian mosquitoes resistant to organic phosphate insecticides. A second esterase gene was cloned from bacteria which break down various organic phosphates. Experiments are in progress to transfer these genes to Drosophila and beneficial insects. These same genes could also serve as selection markers for the purpose of developing transformation techniques for different insects whose genome one wishes to modify using genetic engineering techniques. (author). 5 refs

  11. Rapid cloning of disease-resistance genes in plants using mutagenesis and sequence capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuernagel, Burkhard; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Witek, Kamil; Rouse, Matthew N; Yu, Guotai; Hatta, Asyraf; Ayliffe, Mick; Bariana, Harbans; Jones, Jonathan D G; Lagudah, Evans S; Wulff, Brande B H

    2016-06-01

    Wild relatives of domesticated crop species harbor multiple, diverse, disease resistance (R) genes that could be used to engineer sustainable disease control. However, breeding R genes into crop lines often requires long breeding timelines of 5-15 years to break linkage between R genes and deleterious alleles (linkage drag). Further, when R genes are bred one at a time into crop lines, the protection that they confer is often overcome within a few seasons by pathogen evolution. If several cloned R genes were available, it would be possible to pyramid R genes in a crop, which might provide more durable resistance. We describe a three-step method (MutRenSeq)-that combines chemical mutagenesis with exome capture and sequencing for rapid R gene cloning. We applied MutRenSeq to clone stem rust resistance genes Sr22 and Sr45 from hexaploid bread wheat. MutRenSeq can be applied to other commercially relevant crops and their relatives, including, for example, pea, bean, barley, oat, rye, rice and maize. PMID:27111722

  12. Screening for metronidazole-resistance associated gene fragments of H pylori by suppression subtractive hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Qing Li; Ning Dai; Jie Yan; Yong-Liang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To screen for metronidazole (MTZ)-resistance associated gene fragments of H pylori by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).METHODS:Five MTZ-resistant (tester,T) and 1 MTZ-susceptible (driver,D) clinical H pylori isolates were selected. Genomic DMAs were prepared and submitted to Rsa I digestion. Then two different adaptors were ligated respectively to the 5'-end of two aliquots of the tester DNA fragments and SSH was made between the tester and driver DNAs. The specific inserts of tester strains were screened and MTZ-resistance related gene fragments were identified by dot blotting.RESULTS:Among the randomly selected 120 subtractive colonies,37 DNA fragments had a different number of DNA copies (≥2 times) in resistant and susceptible strains and 17 of them had a significantly different number of DNA copies (≥3 times). Among the sequences obtained from the 17 DNA fragments,new sequences were found in 10 DNA fragments and duplicated sequences in 7 DNA fragments,representing respectively the sequences of depeptide ABC transporter periplasmic dipeptide-binding protein (dppA),permease protein (dppB),ribosomal protein S4 (rps4),ribonuclease in (rnc),protease (pqqE),diaminopimelate epimerase (dapF),acetatekinase (ackA),H pylori plasmid pHPSl and H pylori gene 1334.CONCLUSION:Gene fragments specific to MTZ-resistant H pylori strains can be screened by SSH and may be associated with MTZ-resistant H pylori.

  13. Ibuprofen reverts antifungal resistance on Candida albicans showing overexpression of CDR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Elisabete; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Dias, Ana Silva; Guerra, José; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2009-06-01

    Several mechanisms may be associated with Candida albicans resistance to azoles. Ibuprofen was described as being able to revert resistance related to efflux activity in Candida. The aim of this study was to uncover the molecular base of antifungal resistance in C. albicans clinical strains that could be reverted by ibuprofen. Sixty-two clinical isolates and five control strains of C. albicans were studied: the azole susceptibility phenotype was determined according to the Clinical Laboratory for Standards Institute, M27-A2 protocol and minimal inhibitory concentration values were recalculated with ibuprofen (100 microg mL(-1)); synergistic studies between fluconazole and FK506, a Cdr1p inhibitor, were performed using an agar disk diffusion assay and were compared with ibuprofen results. Gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR, with and without ibuprofen, regarding CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, encoding for efflux pumps, and ERG11, encoding for azole target protein. A correlation between susceptibility phenotype and resistance gene expression profiles was determined. Ibuprofen and FK506 showed a clear synergistic effect when combined with fluconazole. Resistant isolates reverting to susceptible after incubation with ibuprofen showed CDR1 and CDR2 overexpression especially of the latter. Conversely, strains that did not revert displayed a remarkable increase in ERG11 expression along with CDR genes. Ibuprofen did not alter resistance gene expression significantly (P>0.05), probably acting as a Cdrp blocker. PMID:19416368

  14. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  15. Genetic and physical localization of an anthracnose resistance gene in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengming; Gao, Muqiang; Deshpande, Shweta; Lin, Shaoping; Roe, Bruce A; Zhu, Hongyan

    2007-12-01

    Anthracnose of alfalfa, caused by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum trifolii, is one of the most destructive diseases of alfalfa worldwide. An improved understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying host resistance will facilitate the development of resistant alfalfa cultivars, thus providing the most efficient and environmentally sound strategy to control alfalfa diseases. Unfortunately, cultivated alfalfa has an intractable genetic system because of its tetrasomic inheritance and out-crossing nature. Nevertheless, the model legume Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa, has the potential to serve as a surrogate to map and clone the counterparts of agronomically important genes in alfalfa -- particularly, disease resistance genes against economically important pathogens. Here we describe the high-resolution genetic and physical mapping of RCT1, a host resistance gene against C. trifolii race 1 in M. truncatula. We have delimited the RCT1 locus within a physical interval spanning approximately 200 kb located on the top of M. truncatula linkage group 4. RCT1 is part of a complex locus containing numerous genes homologous to previously characterized TIR-NBS-LRR type resistance genes. The result presented in this paper will facilitate the positional cloning of RCT1 in Medicago. PMID:17891371

  16. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment. PMID:27312355

  17. Horizontal Transfer of Plasmid-Mediated Cephalosporin Resistance Genes in the Intestine of Houseflies (Musca domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Akira; Usui, Masaru; Okubo, Torahiko; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Houseflies are a mechanical vector for various types of bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB). If the intestine of houseflies is a suitable site for the transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), houseflies could also serve as a biological vector for ARB. To clarify whether cephalosporin resistance genes are transferred efficiently in the housefly intestine, we compared with conjugation experiments in vivo (in the intestine) and in vitro by using Escherichia coli with eight combinations of four donor and two recipient strains harboring plasmid-mediated cephalosporin resistance genes and chromosomal-encoded rifampicin resistance genes, respectively. In the in vivo conjugation experiment, houseflies ingested donor strains for 6 hr and then recipient strains for 3 hr, and 24 hr later, the houseflies were surface sterilized and analyzed. In vitro conjugation experiments were conducted using the broth-mating method. In 3/8 combinations, the in vitro transfer frequency (Transconjugants/Donor) was ≥1.3 × 10(-4); the in vivo transfer rates of cephalosporin resistance genes ranged from 2.0 × 10(-4) to 5.7 × 10(-5). Moreover, cephalosporin resistance genes were transferred to other species of enteric bacteria of houseflies such as Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescens. These results suggest that houseflies are not only a mechanical vector for ARB but also a biological vector for the occurrence of new ARB through the horizontal transfer of ARGs in their intestine. PMID:26683492

  18. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Burt

    Full Text Available Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. Alleles at the Co-4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08 where Co-4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co-4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK-4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co-4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases.

  19. Developing transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) with insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance by fusion gene transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN He; LANG Zhi-hong; LU Wei; ZHANG Jie; HE Kang-lai; ZHU Li; LIN Min; HUANG Da-fang

    2015-01-01

    Using linker peptide LP4/2A for multiple gene transformation is considered to be an effective method to stack or pyramid several traits in plants. Bacil us thuringiensis (Bt) cry gene and epsps (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene are two important genes for culturing pest-resistant and glyphosate-tolerant crops. We used linker peptide LP4/2A to connect the Bt cry1Ah gene with the 2mG2-epsps gene and combined the wide-used manA gene as a selective marker to construct one coordinated expression vector cal ed p2EPUHLAGN. The expression vector was transferred into maize by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, and 60 plants were obtained, 40%of which were positive transformants. Molecular detection demonstrated that the two genes in the fusion vector were expressed simultaneously and spliced correctly in translation processing;meanwhile bioassay detection proved the transgenic maize had preferable pest resistance and glyphosate tolerance. Therefore, linker peptide LP4/2A provided a simple and reliable strategy for producing gene stacking in maize and the result showed that the fusion gene transformation system of LP4/2A was feasible in monocot plants.

  20. Research on the new resistance mechanism of quinolones mediated by aac(6')-Ib-cr%aac(6')-Ib-cr介导的喹喏酮类新耐药机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙攀; 殷瑜; 陈代杰

    2009-01-01

    AAC(6')- Ib are important aminoglycoside acetyltransferases.The variable gene aac(6')-Ib-cr acts on both quinolones and aminoglycosides, which belong to different classes of antibiotics based on their chemical structures, leading to the bacteria resistance. This paper briefly reviews the new resisitant mechanism of quinolones mediated by aac(6')-Ib-cr.%AAC(6')-Ib是重要的氨基糖苷乙酰基团转移酶,其变异基因aac(6')-Ib-cr可同时作用于氨基糖苷类和氟喹诺酮类两类结构不同的抗生素,是引起细菌耐药性的一种重要作用机制.该文主要对aac(6')-Ib-cr介导的喹诺酮类新耐药机制相关研究进行综述.

  1. Identification of a new locus, Ptr(t), required for rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta-mediated resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yulin; Martin, Rodger

    2008-04-01

    Resistance to the blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is proposed to be initiated by physical binding of a putative cytoplasmic receptor encoded by a nucleotide binding site-type resistance gene, Pi-ta, to the processed elicitor encoded by the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Here, we report the identification of a new locus, Ptr(t), that is required for Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. A Pi-ta-expressing susceptible mutant was identified using a genetic screen. Putative mutations at Ptr(t) do not alter recognition specificity to another resistance gene, Pi-k(s), in the Pi-ta homozygote, indicating that Ptr(t) is more likely specific to Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. Genetic crosses of Pi-ta Ptr(t) and Pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes suggest that Ptr(t) segregates as a single dominant nuclear gene. A ratio of 1:1 (resistant/susceptible) of a population of BC1 of Pi-ta Ptr(t) with pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes indicates that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are linked and cosegregate. Genotyping of mutants of pi-ta ptr(t) and Pi-ta Ptr(t) homozygotes using ten simple sequence repeat markers at the Pi-ta region determined that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are located within a 9-megabase region and are of indica origin. Identification of Ptr(t) is a significant advancement in studying Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition and transduction. PMID:18321185

  2. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-05-15

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of recombinant bacteria harboring the desired chimeric plasmid are limited, making the construction of a chimeric plasmid more difficult. We describe a rapid and easy cloning method for markerless gene deletion in A. baumannii, which has no limitation in the availability of restriction sites and allows for easy selection of the clones carrying the desired chimeric plasmid. Notably, it is not necessary to construct new vectors in our method. This method utilizes direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments, in which upstream and downstream regions of the target gene are fused with an antibiotic resistance cassette via overlap extension PCR and are inserted into a blunt-end suicide vector developed for blunt-end cloning. Importantly, the antibiotic resistance cassette is placed outside the downstream region in order to enable easy selection of the recombinants carrying the desired plasmid, to eliminate the antibiotic resistance cassette via homologous recombination, and to avoid the necessity of constructing new vectors. This strategy was successfully applied to functional analysis of the genes associated with iron acquisition by A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and to ompA gene deletion in other A. baumannii strains. Consequently, the proposed method is invaluable for markerless gene deletion in multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:25746991

  3. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulund Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. Results In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. Conclusions The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  4. Impact of major gene resistance management for sunflower on fitness of Plasmopara halstedii (downy mildew populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourvieille de Labrouhe Denis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in virulence of Plasmopara halstedii populations under different major gene (Pl management strategies were studied over 5 years continuous cropping of one sunflower hybrid under netting cages. Strategies were monoculture of forms of the hybrid with 1 gene or with combinations of 2 genes, alternation of different genes, and mixtures of several different forms of the hybrid. Monoculture with single resistance genes led to loss of efficient resistance after 3 years, with high levels of disease and increased variability of the pathogen, whatever the Pl gene used. Combinations of genes, alternation and mixtures gave longer term control of downy mildew. In particular, combinations of resistance genes coming from both female and male parents of the hybrid (such that even impurities had a resistance gene gave the best control and least variation in pathogen virulence. Results are discussed with the object of durable control of downy mildew by all methods available.

  5. Resistance gene expression determines the in vitro chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Khalid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NSCLC exhibits considerable heterogeneity in its sensitivity to chemotherapy and similar heterogeneity is noted in vitro in a variety of model systems. This study has tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of the observed in vitro chemosensitivity of NSCLC lies within the known resistance mechanisms inherent to these patients' tumors. Methods The chemosensitivity of a series of 49 NSCLC tumors was assessed using the ATP-based tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA and compared with quantitative expression of resistance genes measured by RT-PCR in a Taqman Array™ following extraction of RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. Results There was considerable heterogeneity between tumors within the ATP-TCA, and while this showed no direct correlation with individual gene expression, there was strong correlation of multi-gene signatures for many of the single agents and combinations tested. For instance, docetaxel activity showed some dependence on the expression of drug pumps, while cisplatin activity showed some dependence on DNA repair enzyme expression. Activity of both drugs was influenced more strongly still by the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes by the tumor for both docetaxel and cisplatin. The doublet combinations of cisplatin with gemcitabine and cisplatin with docetaxel showed gene expression signatures incorporating resistance mechanisms for both agents. Conclusion Genes predicted to be involved in known mechanisms drug sensitivity and resistance correlate well with in vitro chemosensitivity and may allow the definition of predictive signatures to guide individualized chemotherapy in lung cancer.

  6. Breeding and Identification of Insect-Resistant Rice by Transferring Two Insecticidal Genes, sbk and sck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi-jun; LI Cong; LIU Shao-kui; LAI Dong; QI Qing-ming; LU Chuan-gen

    2013-01-01

    The plasmid of pCDMARUBA-Hyg,which contained two insect-resistance genes,sbk (modified from Cry1A(c)) and sck (modified from CpTI),was transformed into an Agrobacterium EHA105 for infection of the calli of a super japonica rice Nanjing 45.Primarily,using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection with the primers of sbk and sck genes,42 positive transgenic plants that were marker-free and contained the two target genes were selected from 97 regenerated plants.Results of southern-blotting indicated that 23,11,5,2 and 1 plants had one,two,three,four and five copies of the transformed genes,respectively.Analysis of reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Bt gene testing paper showed that 28 T3 generation plants derived from four transgenic plants having a single copy were insect-resistant.Feeding experiment with rice stem borer revealed that the insect resistance was greatly increased with the larva mortality ranging from 94% to 100%.In addition,among the transgenic plants,three T3 transgenic plants possessed some desirable characteristics for breeding and production,such as plant height,seed-setting rate,1000-grain weight and larva mortality.The mechanism of insect resistance of Bt gene and its application in rice transgenic research were also briefly discussed.

  7. The barley stem rust-resistance gene Rpg1 is a novel disease-resistance gene with homology to receptor kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Brueggeman, R.; Rostoks, N.; Kudrna, D.; Kilian, A.; Han, F.; Chen, J; Druka, A.; Steffenson, B.; Kleinhofs, A

    2002-01-01

    Stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici was among the most devastating diseases of barley in the northern Great Plains of the U.S. and Canada before the deployment of the stem rust-resistance gene Rpg1 in 1942. Since then, Rpg1 has provided durable protection against stem rust losses in widely grown barley cultivars (cvs.). Extensive efforts to clone Rpg1 by synteny with rice provided excellent flanking markers but failed to yield the gene because it does ...

  8. Identification of Wheat Gene Sr35 that Confers Resistance to Ug99 Stem Rust Race Group

    OpenAIRE

    Saintenac, Cyrille; Zhang, Wenjun; Salcedo, Andres; Rouse, Matthew N.; Trick, Harold N.; Akhunov, Eduard; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A new Pgt race designated Ug99 has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is threatening major wheat production areas. Here we demonstrate that the Sr35 gene from Triticum monococcum is a coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat gene that confers near-immunity to Ug99 and related races. This gene is absent in the A-genome diploid donor and in...

  9. Identification of wheat gene Sr35 that confers resistance to Ug99 stem rust race group

    OpenAIRE

    Saintenac, C; Zhang, W.; Salcedo, A.; Rouse, MN; Trick, HN; Akhunov, E.; Dubcovsky, J

    2013-01-01

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A previously uncharacterized Pgt race, designated Ug99, has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is threatening major wheat production areas. Here, we demonstrate that the Sr35 gene from Triticum monococcum is a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat gene that confers near immunity to Ug99 and related races. This gene is absent in the A...

  10. Erythromycin-resistant genes in group A β-haemolytic Streptococci in Chengdu, Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The management of Group A β-haemolytic Streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes or GAS infection include the use of penicillins, cephalosporins or macrolides for treatment. A general increase in macrolides resistance in GAS has been observed in recent years. Differences in rates of resistance to these agents have existed according to geographical location and investigators. Aims: To investigate the antibiotic pattern and erythromycin-resistant genes of GAS isolates associated with acute tonsillitis and scarlet fever in Chengdu, southwestern China. Settings and Design: To assess the macrolide resistance, phenotype, and genotypic characterization of GAS isolated from throat swabs of children suffering from different acute tonsillitis or scarlet fever between 2004 and 2011 in the city of Chengdu, located in the southwestern region of China. Materials and Methods: Minimal inhibitory concentration with seven antibiotics was performed on 127 GAS isolates. Resistance phenotypes of erythromycin-resistant GAS isolates were determined by the double-disk test. Their macrolide-resistant genes (mefA, ermB and ermTR were amplified by PCR. Results: A total of 98.4% (125/127 of the isolates exhibited resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G and cefotaxime. Moreover, 113 ermB-positive isolates demonstrating the cMLS phenotype of erythromycin resistance were predominant (90.4% and these isolates showed high-level resistance to both erythromycin and clindamycin (MIC 90 > 256 μg/ml; 12 (9.6% isolates demonstrating the MLS phenotype of erythromycin resistance carried the mefA gene, which showed low-level resistance to both erythromycin (MIC 90 = 8 μg/ml and clindamycin (MIC 90 = 0.5 μg/ml; and none of the isolates exhibited the M phenotype. Conclusions: The main phenotype is cMLS, and the ermB gene code is the main resistance mechanism against macrolides in GAS. Penicillin is the most beneficial

  11. Creating mutations in plant resistance genes to parasitic weed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parasitic weed Orobanche crenata Forsk. (crenate broomrape, Scrophulariaceae) represents a major limiting factor for production of food legumes. Current management methods are not ideal. Indeed herbicide selectivity remains insufficient to control the parasite without decreasing crop yield significantly. Creating such mutant legumes, by mutagenesis has become an important tool to have resistance to broomrape. Gamma radiation from cobalt 60 source was selected as the mutagen to create such mutant plants. Seeds were exposed to the radioactive source to determine the proper dose of radioactivity for mutagenesis. A kill curve has been generated using doses exposures ranging from 0 to 200 Gy. The kill curve data was used to expose legumes seeds to enough radiation to create a survival rate of 50%. The surviving plants will be exposed to the parasitic plant Orobanche crenata and scored for resistance to infection. All phenotypic plant mutations will be logged for future reference. (author)

  12. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Results Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. Conclusion The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis

  13. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis and further intervention in cisplatin resistance

  14. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms may determine Crohn's disease behavior in patients from Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa P. Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Conflicting data from studies on the potential role of multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease may result from the analysis of genetically and geographically distinct populations. Here, we investigated whether multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in patients from Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: We analyzed 123 Crohn's disease patients and 83 ulcerative colitis patients to determine the presence of the multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms C1236T, G2677T and C3435T. In particular, the genotype frequencies of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were analyzed. Genotype-phenotype associations with major clinical characteristics were established, and estimated risks were calculated for the mutations. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in the genotype frequencies of the multidrug resistance 1 G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. In contrast, the C1236T polymorphism was significantly more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (p = 0.047. A significant association was also found between the multidrug resistance 1 C3435T polymorphism and the stricturing form of Crohn's disease (OR: 4.13; p = 0.009, whereas no association was found with penetrating behavior (OR: 0.33; p = 0.094. In Crohn's disease, a positive association was also found between the C3435T polymorphism and corticosteroid resistance/refractoriness (OR: 4.14; p = 0.010. However, no significant association was found between multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and UC subphenotypic categories. CONCLUSION: The multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism C3435T is associated with the stricturing phenotype and an inappropriate response to therapy in Crohn's disease. This association with Crohn's disease may support additional pathogenic roles for the multidrug resistance 1 gene in regulating gut

  15. Dihydropteroate Synthase Gene Mutations in Pneumocystis and Sulfa Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Haung, L.; Crothers, K. A.; Atzori, C.; Benfield, T.; Miller, R.; Rabodonirina, M; Helweg-Larsen, J.

    2004-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug r...

  16. Porcine E. coli: virulence-associated genes, resistance genes and adhesion and probiotic activity tested by a new screening method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC. 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars.

  17. Co-occurrence of resistance genes to antibiotics, biocides and metals reveals novel insights into their co-selection potential

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Chandan; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibacterial biocides and metals can co-select for antibiotic resistance when bacteria harbour resistance or tolerance genes towards both types of compounds. Despite numerous case studies, systematic and quantitative data on co-occurrence of such genes on plasmids and chromosomes is lacking, as is knowledge on environments and bacterial taxa that tend to carry resistance genes to such compounds. This effectively prevents identification of risk scenarios. Therefore, we aimed to ide...

  18. Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance Gene Abundance and Microbiota Composition in Feces of Organic and Conventional Pigs from Four EU Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerzova, Lenka; Babak, Vladimir; Sedlar, Karel;

    2015-01-01

    to our expectations, there were no extensive differences between the abundance of tested antibiotic resistance genes in microbiota originating from organic or conventionally housed pigs within individual countries. There were also no differences in the microbiota composition of organic and conventional...... pigs. The only significant difference was the difference in the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in the samples from different countries. Fecal microbiota in the samples originating from southern European countries (Italy, France) exhibited significantly higher antibiotic resistance gene...

  19. Selective killing of methotrexate-resistant cells carrying amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the selective killing of methotrexate (MTX)-resistant cells has been developed. The selection is based on the incorporation of tritiated deoxyuridine into the DNA of MTX-resistant cells but not normal MTX-sensitive cells in the presence of the drug. A Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant that overproduces dihydrofolate reductase was used as an example of a MTX-resistant cell line. In this system, a 10,000-fold enrichment for wild-type MTX-sensitive cells could be achieved after 24 hr of exposure to the drug combination. This selection technique was applied to the isolation of MTX-sensitive segregants from hybrid cells formed between the MTX-resistant mutant and wild-type cells. The loss of MTX resistance and dihydrofolate reductase overproduction was always accompanied by the loss of a homogeneously staining region on chromosome 2 of the resistant parent that contains the amplified genes specifying this enzyme. While this region is always lost, other parts of chromosome 2 are almost always retained, suggesting that deletion rather than chromosome loss underlies marker segregation in this case. When the selection was applied to the resistant mutant itself, no MTX-sensitive revertants were obtained among 10(5) cells screened, attesting to the stability of gene amplification in this clone. It is suggested that this combination of drugs may be useful for the elimination of MTX-resistant tumor cells that develop after MTX chemotherapy

  20. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of transient transformation in Frankia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ken-ichi Kucho; Kentaro Kakoi; Masatoshi Yamaura; Mari Iwashita; Mikiko Abe; Toshiki Uchiumi

    2013-11-01

    Frankia is a unique actinobacterium having abilities to fix atmospheric dinitrogen and to establish endosymbiosis with trees, but molecular bases underlying these interesting characteristics are poorly understood because of a lack of stable transformation system. Extremely high GC content of Frankia genome (> 70%) can be a hindrance to successful transformation. We generated a synthetic gentamicin resistance gene whose codon usage is optimized to Frankia (fgmR) and evaluated its usefulness as a selection marker using a transient transformation system. Success rate of transient transformation and cell growth in selective culture were significantly increased by use of fgmR instead of a native gentamicin resistance gene, suggesting that codon optimization improved translation efficiency of the marker gene and increased antibiotic resistance. Our result shows that similarity in codon usage pattern is an important factor to be taken into account when exogenous transgenes are expressed in Frankia cells.

  1. Mapping of Defense Response Gene Homologs and Their Association with Resistance Loci in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Defense response genes in higher plant species are involved in a variety of signal tranaduction pathways and biochemical reactions to counterattack invading pathogens. In this study, a total of 366 non-redundant defense response gene homologs (DRHs), Including 124 unigenes/expressed sequence tags, 226 tentative consensuses, and 16 DRH contigs have been identified by mining the Maize Genetics and Genomics and The Institute for Genomic Research maize databases using 35 essential defense response genes. Of 366 DRHs, 202 are mapped to 152 loci across ten maize chromosomes via both the genetic and in silico mapping approaches. The mapped DRHs seem to cluster together rather than be evenly distributed along the maize genome. Approximately half of these DHRs are located in regions harboring either major resistance genes or quantitative trait loci(QTL). Therefore, this comprehensive DRH linkage map will provide reference sequences to Identify either positional candidate genes for resistance genes and/or QTLs or to develop makers for fine-mapping and marker-assisted selection of resistance genes and/or QTLs.

  2. Specific myeloprotection via multidrug resistance 1 gene controlled by aminopeptidase N myeloid promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the treatment of tumor patients introduction of multidrug resistance genes into hematopoietic cells has been reported as an approach for reducing myelotoxicity created by antitumor drugs. However, the nonspecific expression of the genes can also increase the chemoresistance of the tumor cells invaded into bone marrow, which influences seriously the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this study, a new strategy is described for specific myeloprotection. The recombinant retroviral vector containing multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene regulated by aminopeptidase N (APN) myeloid promoter was constructed and then introduced into myeloblastic cells KG1a and tumor cell line BEL7402. The specific transcript of MDR1 was detected in KG1a cells transduced with MDR1 gene and rhodamine 123 was effectively extruded by Pgp, the protein of MDR1 gene. The resistance elevated markedly by 10.6, 10.4, 11.2, 4.2 and 14.2 folds in MDR1 gene-transduced KG1a cells to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cochicine, VP-16, vincristine, doxorubi- cin and paclitaxel, respectively. In contrast, the chemoresistance had no significant changes in BEL7402 cells transduced with MDR1 gene. Expression of MDR1 directed by APN myeloid promoter resulted in myelospecific protection during the killing of tumor cells treated with antitumor drugs. The study would provide a new mean for circumventing myelosuppression of tumor patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  3. Analysis of the Resistance Gene Analogue for Rice Cultivars in Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yan; WANG Yun-yue; HE Yue-qiu; FAN Jing-hua; CHEN Jian-bin; ZHU You-yong

    2002-01-01

    Genetic diversity of commercial and local rice cultivars in Yunnan Province was studied using the resistance gene analogue (RGA) based on resistance gene conserved sequences. The RGA analysis of 137cultivars was conducted by PCR amplification using three primers, i.e. S1/AS3, XLRR for/XLRR rev, and Pto-kin1/Pto-kin2, respectively. The results showed that both Indica and Japonica cultivars were genetically highly diverse. All cultivars were divided into 3 lineages according to the DNA band data at 96% dissimilarity,and into 20 lineages at 60% dissimilarity. The lineages were related to their genetic background and blast disease resistance with only a few exceptions. The RGA data can be useful in rice production by mixed-planting of different cultivars in the field and breeding of resistance cultivars by selecting different parental cultivars with great genetic diversity.

  4. Identification of two new genes conferring resistance to Colletotrichum acutatum in Capsicum baccatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasuk, P; Taylor, P W J; Mongkolporn, O

    2009-09-01

    Resistance to anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum capsici and C. acutatum, was investigated in Capsicum baccatum PBC80 and PBC1422 and C. chinense PBC932. Mature green and ripe fruit were inoculated with 13 isolates of the two Colletotrichum species PBC80 contained the broadest spectrum of resistance to both Colletotrichum species because none of the isolates were able to infect the genotype. At both fruit maturity stages, PBC1422 was infected by only Colletotrichum acutatum. PBC932 at ripe fruit stage was infected by both C. capsici and C. acutatum, except for one isolate, 158ci, that did not infect PBC932. PBC932 at the mature green fruit stage was infected by only C. acutatum. An intraspecific cross between PBC80 and PBC1422 was developed to determine inheritance of resistance to C. acutatum. Anthracnose resistance was assessed at mature green and ripe fruit stages using 0 to 9 disease severity scores. Frequency distribution of the disease scores in the F(2) and BC(1) populations suggested a single recessive gene responsible for the resistance at mature green fruit stage and a single dominant gene for the resistance at ripe fruit stage. Linkage analysis between the two genes identified in both fruit maturity stages showed the genes to be independent. Based on phenotypic data, the two newly identified genes, co4 and Co5, from PBC80 appeared to be different loci from the co1 and co2 previously identified from PBC932 and will be valuable sources of resistance to anthracnose in chili breeding programs. PMID:19671013

  5. Detection of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant – molecular and classical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziembińska-Buczyńska Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are a group of substances potentially harmful to the environment. They can play a role in bacterial resistance transfer among pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. In this experiment three representatives of medically important chemotherapeutics, confirmed to be present in high concentrations in wastewater treatment plants with HPLC analysis were used: erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Erythromycin concentration in activated sludge was not higher than 20 ng L−1. N-acetylo-sulfamethoxazole concentration was 3349 ± 719 in winter and 2933 ± 429 ng L−1 in summer. Trimethoprim was present in wastewater at concentrations 400 ± 22 and 364 ± 60 ng L−1, respectively in winter and summer. Due to a wide variety of PCR-detectable resistance mechanisms towards these substances, the most common found in literature was chosen. For erythromycin: erm and mef genes, for sulfamethoxazole: sul1, sul2, sul3 genes, in the case of trimethoprim resistance dhfrA1 and dhfr14 were used in this study. The presence of resistance genes were analyzed in pure strains isolated from activated sludge and in the activated sludge sample itself. The research revealed that the value of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC did not correspond with the expected presence of more than one resistance mechanisms. Most of the isolates possessed only one of the genes responsible for a particular chemotherapeutic resistance. It was confirmed that it is possible to monitor the presence of resistance genes directly in activated sludge using PCR. Due to the limited isolates number used in the experiment these results should be regarded as preliminary.

  6. Characterization of broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment reactors through metagenomic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ying; 楊穎

    2014-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have attracted great concerns worldwide. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are reservoirs of ARGs while wastewater/sludge treatment processes are considered as important means to control these emerging biological pollutants. However, the full profiles of ARGs in WWTPs or the removal efficiency of ARGs by wastewater/sludge treatment process was not well characterized yet. Thus, the major tasks in this st...

  7. Excretion of Antibiotic Resistance Genes by Dairy Calves Fed Milk Replacers with Varying Doses of Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Thames, Callie H; Pruden, Amy; James, Robert E.; Ray, Partha P.; Knowlton, Katharine F.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil and water have been linked to livestock farms and in some cases feed antibiotics may select for antibiotic resistant gut microbiota. The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of ARGs in the feces of calves receiving milk replacer containing no antibiotics versus subtherapeutic or therapeutic doses of tetracycline and neomycin. The effect of antibiotics on calf health was also of interest. Twenty-eight male and fema...

  8. Mutations in the 16S rRNA Genes of Helicobacter pylori Mediate Resistance to Tetracycline

    OpenAIRE

    Trieber, Catharine A.; Taylor, Diane E.

    2002-01-01

    Low-cost and rescue treatments for Helicobacter pylori infections involve combinations of several drugs including tetracycline. Resistance to tetracycline has recently emerged in H. pylori. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of two tetracycline-resistant clinical isolates (MIC = 64 μg/ml) were determined and compared to the consensus H. pylori 16S rRNA sequence. One isolate had four nucleotide substitutions, and the other had four substitutions and two deletions. Natural transformation with the 16S ...

  9. BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTED RESISTANCE TRAINING ATTENUATES MYOSTATIN GENE EXPRESSION IN A PATIENT WITH INCLUSION BODY MYOSITIS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion body myositis is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that produces extreme muscle weakness. Blood flow restricted resistance training has been shown to improve muscle strength and muscle hypertrophy in inclusion body myositis. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a resistance training programme on the expression of genes related to myostatin (MSTN) signalling in one inclusion body myositis patient. Methods: A 65-year-old man with inclusion body myositi...

  10. Epigenetic modulation of the drug resistance genes MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Oberstadt, Moritz C.; Bien-Möller, Sandra; Weitmann, Kerstin; Herzog, Susann; Hentschel, Katharina; Rimmbach, Christian; Vogelgesang, Silke; Balz, Ellen; Fink, Matthias; Michael, Heike; Zeden, Jan-Philip; Bruckmüller, Henrike; Werk, Anneke N.; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance of the highly aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to drug therapy is a major clinical problem resulting in a poor patient’s prognosis. Beside promoter methylation of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene the efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 have been suggested as pivotal factors contributing to drug resistance, but the methylation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 has not been assessed before in GBM. Methods Therefore, we evaluated the proportion and pr...

  11. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J B; Yan, W M; Bao, X Z

    1994-07-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host. PMID:16349341

  12. Gene Expression Noise Facilitates Adaptation and Drug Resistance Independently of Mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Charlebois, Daniel A; Kaern, Mads

    2011-01-01

    We show that the effect of stress on the reproductive fitness of noisy cell populations can be modelled as first-passage time problem, and demonstrate that even relatively short-lived fluctuations in gene expression can ensure long-term survival of a drug-resistant population. We examine how this effect contributes to the development of drug-resistant cancer cells, and demonstrate that permanent immunity can arise independently of mutations.

  13. A Corynebacterium glutamicum gene conferring multidrug resistance in the heterologous host Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, W; Kalinowski, J.; Pühler, A

    1997-01-01

    A chromosomal DNA fragment from the erythromycin-sensitive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was shown to mediate resistance against erythromycin, tetracycline, puromycin, and bleomycin in Escherichia coli. Multicopy cloning of the fragment did not cause a resistance phenotype in C. glutamicum. The corresponding gene encodes a hydrophobic protein with 12 potential transmembrane-spanning ex-helical segments showing similarity to drug-H+ antiporters.

  14. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Fernandes Galvão Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%—P. amboinicus and eugenol (22.9%—P. ornatus e 25.1%—P. barbatus. In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  15. Andrographolide: A potent antituberculosis compound that targets Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Amudha; Hassan, Sameer; Prabuseenivasan; Shainaba, A S; Hanna, L E; Kumar, Vanaja

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a major challenging infectious disease. The increased rate of emergence of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism has further complicated the situation, resulting in an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Antimycobacterial activity of Andrographis paniculata was evaluated using a rapid LRP assay and the probable targets were identified by docking analysis. The methanolic extract of A. paniculata showed maximum antimycobacterial activity at 250μg/ml against all the tested strains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv, MDR, and drug sensitive). Based on bioassay guided fractionation, andrographolide was identified as the potent molecule. With the docking analysis, both ICDH (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase) and AAC (Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase) were predicted as targets of andrographolide in M. tuberculosis. Molecular simulation revealed that, ICDH showed low binding affinity to andrographolide. However, for AAC, the andrographolide was observed to be well within the active site after 10ns of molecular simulation. This suggests that ACC (PDB ID 1M4I) could be the probable target for andrographolide. PMID:26245695

  16. Potentiation of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity using the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor

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    Felipe S. Ferreira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Boa constrictor is widely used in traditional communities in many different folk remedies and products derived from it are sold in public markets throughout northeastern Brazil and as its body fat has many different therapeutic indications as a folk remedy. The present work evaluates the antibacterial activity of the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor when employed either alone or in combination with antibiotics and discusses the ecological implications of the use of this traditional remedy. Oil (OBC was extracted from body fat located in the ventral region of B. constrictor using hexane as a solvent. The antibacterial activity of OBC was tested against standard as well as multi-resistant lines, either alone and in combination with antibiotics. OBC did not demonstrate any relevant antibacterial activity against standard or multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. OBC showed synergistic activity when combined with the aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results indicate that the body fat of Boa constrictor does not possess bactericidal activity, from the clinical point of view, but when combined with an antibiotic, the fat demonstrated a significant synergistic activity.

  17. Surveillance of multidrug resistance-associated genes in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients

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    Zhe DONG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the status of multidrug resistance-associated genes carried by Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients in our hospital in order to provide a basis for surveillance of drug-resistance and inflection control. Methods One hundred and twenty A. baumannii isolates were collected from elderly patients between 2008 and 2010. The mean age of the patients was 85 (65 to 95 years. Whonet 5.6 software was used to analyze the resistance rate of 16 antimicrobial agents. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and the sequencing method were adopted to detect 10 kinds of resistance genes (blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA- 23-like, blaOXA-24-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1, intI 1, and intI 2. The corresponding resistance gene profiling(RGP was analyzed and designated according to the status of resistance genes. Results The resistance rates to the remaining 15 kinds of antibiotics varied between 70.8% and 97.5%, with the exception of the sensitivity rate to polymyxin B by up to more than 90%. The positivity rates of blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1 and intI 1 were 100%, 81.7%, 0.8%, 10.8%, 91.7%, 81.7%, 86.7%, and 83.3% respectively. A total of 18 kinds of drug-resistant gene maps were found, but blaOXA-24-like and intI 2 were not detected. Among these gene maps, the rate of RGP1 (blaOXA-23-like+blaampC+armA+ISAba1+ intI 1 was as high as 60.8%. Conclusions A. baumannii isolates from elderly patients have a higher carrying rate of drug-resistant genes, resulting in severe multidrugresistant conditions. Therefore, full-time infection control personnel and clinical physicians should actively participate in the surveillance, prevention, and control of infections caused by A. baumannii in the elderly.

  18. Genetic mapping of two genes conferring resistance to powdery mildew in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vega, Elena; Trabanco, Noemí; Campa, Ana; Ferreira, Juan José

    2013-06-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a serious disease in many legume species, including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This study investigated the genetic control behind resistance reaction to PM in the bean genotype, Cornell 49242. The results revealed evidence supporting a qualitative mode of inheritance for resistance and the involvement of two independent genes in the resistance reaction. The location of these resistance genes was investigated in a linkage genetic map developed for the XC RIL population. Contingency tests revealed significant associations for 28 loci out of a total of 329 mapped loci. Fifteen were isolated or formed groups with less than two loci. The thirteen remaining loci were located at three regions in linkage groups Pv04, Pv09, and Pv11. The involvement of Pv09 was discarded due to the observed segregation in the subpopulation obtained from the Xana genotype for the loci located in this region. In contrast, the two subpopulations obtained from the Xana genotype for the BM161 locus, linked to the Co-3/9 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv04), and from the Xana genotype for the SCAReoli locus, linked to the Co-2 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv11), exhibited monogenic segregations, suggesting that both regions were involved in the genetic control of resistance. A genetic dissection was carried out to verify the involvement of both regions in the reaction to PM. Two resistant recombinant lines were selected, according to their genotypes, for the block of loci included in the Co-2 and Co-3/9 regions, and they were crossed with the susceptible parent, Xana. Linkage analysis in the respective F2 populations supported the hypothesis that a dominant gene (Pm1) was located in the linkage group Pv11 and another gene (Pm2) was located in the linkage group Pv04. This is the first report showing the localization of resistance genes against powdery mildew in Phaseolus vulgaris and the results offer the opportunity to increase the efficiency of breeding

  19. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  20. Towards a tolerance toolkit: Gene expression signatures enabling the emergence of resistant bacterial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to rapidly acquire tolerance to chemical toxins. Developing next-generation antibiotics that impede the emergence of resistance will help avoid a world-wide health crisis. Conversely, the ability to induce rapid tolerance gains could lead to high-yielding strains for sustainable production of biofuels and commodity chemicals. Achieving these goals requires an understanding of the general mechanisms allowing microbes to become resistant to diverse toxins. We apply top-down and bottom-up methodologies to identify biological network changes leading to adaptation and tolerance. Using a top-down approach, we perform evolution experiments to isolate resistant strains, collect samples for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis, and use the omics data to inform mathematical gene regulatory models. Using a bottom-up approach, we build and test synthetic genetic devices that enable increased or decreased expression of selected genes. Unique patterns in gene expression are identified in cultures actively gaining resistance, especially in pathways known to be involved with stress response, efflux, and mutagenesis. Genes correlated with tolerance could potentially allow the design of resistance-free antibiotics or robust chemical production strains.