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Sample records for aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin

  1. EPR studies of free radicals decay and survival in gamma irradiated aminoglycoside antibiotics: sisomicin, tobramycin and paromomycin.

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    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Pilawa, Barbara; Koprowski, Robert; Wróbel, Zygmunt; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Swakoń, Jan; Olko, Paweł

    2012-02-14

    Radiation sterilization technology is more actively used now that any time because of its many advantages. Gamma radiation has high penetrating power, relatively low chemical reactivity and causes small temperature rise. But on the other hand radiosterilization can lead to radiolytic products appearing, in example free radicals. Free radicals in radiative sterilized sisomicin, tobramycin and paromomycin were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Dose of gamma irradiation of 25kGy was used. Concentrations and properties of free radicals in irradiated antibiotics were studied. EPR spectra were recorded for samples stored in air and argon. For gamma irradiated antibiotics strong EPR lines were recorded. One- and two-exponential functions were fitted to experimental points during testing and researching of time influence of the antibiotics storage to studied parameters of EPR lines. Our study of free radicals in radiosterilized antibiotics indicates the need for characterization of medicinal substances prior to sterilization process using EPR values. We propose the concentration of free radicals and other spectroscopic parameters as useful factors to select the optimal type of sterilization for the individual drug. The important parameters are i.a. the τ time constants and K constants of exponential functions. Time constants τ give us information about the speed of free radicals concentration decrease in radiated medicinal substances. The constant K(0) shows the free radicals concentration in irradiated medicament after long time of storage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Therapeutic drug monitoring by radioimmunoassay: Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics and vancomycin in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaubitt, D.; Drechsler, H.J.; Knoch, K.; Siafarikas, K.

    1984-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin, tobramycin, netilmicin) or vancomycin in plasma may considerably aid to assess their appropriate dosage and, if necessary, to rapidly adjust it to the assumed requirement. Thus the dosage of the antibiotic is kept large enough as to lead to the desired therapeutic result but not as high as to cause side effects. (orig.)

  3. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

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    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  4. In-vivo impact of the MexXY efflux system on aminoglycoside efficacy in an experimental model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia treated with tobramycin.

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    Martha, B; Croisier, D; Durand, D; Hocquet, D; Plesiat, P; Piroth, L; Portier, H; Chavanet, P

    2006-05-01

    Aminoglycosides are of major importance in treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia (PAP). However, their efficacy may be compromised by low-level resistance caused by the inducible MexXY multidrug efflux pump. In the present study, the impact of the MexXY efflux pump was investigated in vivo in an experimental model of PAP in rabbits treated with intravenous tobramycin. Three strains were used to induce PAP in rabbits: PAO1 (wild-type strain; MIC 1 mg/L), mutant 11B (mexX::Tn501; no expression of MexXY; MIC 0.5 mg/L) and mutant MutGR1 (MexZ null; constitutive expression of MexXY; MIC 2 mg/L). Five hours after inoculation, treatment with tobramycin (10 mg/kg) was implemented (peak serum concentration 30 mg/L). The animals were killed humanely 48 h after inoculation, and the residual pulmonary bacterial concentration was determined. Selection of bacteria expressing MexXY was determined by plating lung homogenates on agar plates containing antibiotic. Mean bacterial counts (log(10) CFU/g) for treated vs. untreated rabbits were 6.26 and 8.13 (p system to this low level of tobramycin efficacy is modest. Finally, this model appears to be suitable for the investigation of new anti-pseudomonal therapeutic strategies.

  5. Aminoglycoside antibiotics and autism: a speculative hypothesis

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    Manev Hari

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, it has been suspected that there is a relationship between therapy with some antibiotics and the onset of autism; but even more curious, some children benefited transiently from a subsequent treatment with a different antibiotic. Here, we speculate how aminoglycoside antibiotics might be associated with autism. Presentation We hypothesize that aminoglycoside antibiotics could a trigger the autism syndrome in susceptible infants by causing the stop codon readthrough, i.e., a misreading of the genetic code of a hypothetical critical gene, and/or b improve autism symptoms by correcting the premature stop codon mutation in a hypothetical polymorphic gene linked to autism. Testing Investigate, retrospectively, whether a link exists between aminoglycoside use (which is not extensive in children and the onset of autism symptoms (hypothesis "a", or between amino glycoside use and improvement of these symptoms (hypothesis "b". Whereas a prospective study to test hypothesis "a" is not ethically justifiable, a study could be designed to test hypothesis "b". Implications It should be stressed that at this stage no direct evidence supports our speculative hypothesis and that its main purpose is to initiate development of new ideas that, eventually, would improve our understanding of the pathobiology of autism.

  6. Overcoming Aminoglycoside Enzymatic Resistance: Design of Novel Antibiotics and Inhibitors

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    Sandra G. Zárate

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics has had a profound impact on clinical practice. Despite their powerful bactericidal activity, aminoglycosides were one of the first groups of antibiotics to meet the challenge of resistance. The most prevalent source of clinically relevant resistance against these therapeutics is conferred by the enzymatic modification of the antibiotic. Therefore, a deeper knowledge of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes and their interactions with the antibiotics and solvent is of paramount importance in order to facilitate the design of more effective and potent inhibitors and/or novel semisynthetic aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to modifying enzymes.

  7. Synergistic ototoxicity due to noise exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics.

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    Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic exposure to high intensity and/or prolonged noise causes temporary or permanent threshold shifts in auditory perception, reflected by reversible or irreversible damage in the cochlea. Aminoglycoside antibiotics, used for treating or preventing life-threatening bacterial infections, also induce cytotoxicity in the cochlea. Combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure, particularly in neonatal intensive care units, can lead to auditory threshold shifts greater than simple summation of the two insults. The synergistic toxicity of acoustic exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics is not limited to simultaneous exposures. Prior acoustic insult which does not result in permanent threshold shifts potentiates aminoglycoside ototoxicity. In addition, exposure to subdamaging doses of aminoglycosides aggravates noise-induced cochlear damage. The mechanisms by which aminoglycosides cause auditory dysfunction are still being unraveled, but likely include the following: 1) penetration into the endolymphatic fluid of the scala media, 2) permeation of nonselective cation channels on the apical surface of hair cells, and 3) generation of toxic reactive oxygen species and interference with other cellular pathways. Here we discuss the effect of combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure to identify pivotal synergistic events that can potentiate ototoxicity, in addition to a current understanding of aminoglycoside trafficking within the cochlea. Preventing the ototoxic synergy of noise and aminoglycosides is best achieved by using non-ototoxic bactericidal drugs, and by attenuating perceived noise intensity when life-saving aminoglycoside therapy is required.

  8. Radioimmunological determination of gentamycin and tobramycin in surgical intensive medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaubitt, D.; Drechsler, H.J.; Staedtische Krankenanstalten Krefeld

    1979-01-01

    In 119 patients aged 16-86 who, within the framwork of surgical intensive care because of infections dangerous to life, had been treated with the aminoglucoside antibiotics gentamycin or tobramycin and who partly had renal dysfunction, gentamycin or tobramycin in plasma or in serum were determined radioimmunologically, either daily or at intervals of several days. Efforts were made to keep the concentration of the aminoglycoside antibiotic within the therapeutic range. This control of the therapy was particularly useful in short-term changes of the renal function because it facilitates the quick adaptation of the dosage of gentamycin or tobramycin to the assumed requirements. (orig.) [de

  9. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

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    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-06

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  10. Chitosan conjugation enables intracellular bacteria susceptible to aminoglycoside antibiotic.

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    Mu, Haibo; Niu, Hong; Wang, Dongdong; Sun, Feifei; Sun, Yuelin; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-11-01

    Most chronic infections are difficult to eradicate because bacteria capable of surviving in host-infected cells may be protected from the killing actions of antibiotics, leading to therapy failures and disease relapses. Here we demonstrated that covalent-coupling chitosan to streptomycin significantly improved intracellular bactericidal capacity towards multiple organisms within phagocytic or nonphagocytic cells. Structure-activity relationship investigations indicated that antibiotic contents, molecular size and positive charges of the conjugate were the key to retain this intracellular bactericidal activity. Mechanistic insight demonstrated the conjugate was capable to target and eliminate endocytic or endosomal escaped bacteria through facilitating the direct contact between the antibiotic and intracellular organism. In vivo acute infection models indicated that compared to equal dose of the antibiotic, chitosan-streptomycin (C-S) conjugate and especially the human serum album binding chitosan-streptomycin conjugate (HCS) complex formed by human serum album and C-S conjugate greatly decreased the bacteria burden in the spleen and liver in both wild type and immuno-suppressive mice. Furthermore, the HCS complex remarkably reduced mortality of infected TLR2 deficient mice, mimicking immune-compromised persons who were more susceptible to bacterial infections. These findings might open up a new avenue to combat intracellular bacterial infection by aminoglycosides antibiotics at a lower effective dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Macromolecular mechanisms of sputum inhibition of tobramycin activity.

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    Hunt, B E; Weber, A; Berger, A; Ramsey, B; Smith, A L

    1995-01-01

    Tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, is used in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Tobramycin bioactivity, however, is antagonized by sputum. Glycoproteins (mucins) and high-molecular-weight DNA make up 2 to 3% (P. L. Masson and J. F. Heremans, p. 412-475, In M. J. Dulfano, ed., Sputum: Fundamentals and Clinical Pathology, 1973) and 3 to 10% (W. S. Chernick and G. J. Barbero, Pediatrics 24:739-745, 1959, and R. Picot, I. Das, and L. Reid, Thorax 33:235-242, 1978) of the dry weight of sputum, respectively. tobramycin binds to both mucins and DNA obtained from sputum (R. Ramphal, M. Lhermitte, M. Filliat, and P. Roussel, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 22:483-490, 1988). In vitro, recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) hydrolyzes high-molecular-weight DNA of > 50 kb within sputum to fragments of 2 to 4 kb. Studying dialyzable tobramycin, we examined drug binding to whole sputum and to "mock sputum," which consisted of porcine gastric mucin and calf thymus DNA. We also studied the effects of rhDNase treatments of sputum, mock sputum, and calf thymus DNA on tobramycin binding. We found that treatments of sputum, mock sputum, and calf thymus DNA with rhDNase did not significantly increase the tobramycin bioactivity within the dialysates; surprisingly, sputum binding of tobramycin was increased by rhDNase. We conclude that rhDNase does not increase the bioactivity of tobramycin in sputum.

  12. Identification of aminotransferase genes for biosynthesis of aminoglycoside antibiotics from soil DNA.

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    Nagaya, Atsushi; Takeyama, Satoko; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2005-07-01

    Aminoglycoside has been known as a clinically important antibiotic for a long time, but genetic information for the biosynthesis of aminoglycoside is still insufficient. In this study, we tried to clone aminoglycoside-biosynthetic genes from soil DNA for accumulation of genetic information. We chose the genes encoding L-glutamine:(2-deoxy-)scyllo-inosose aminotransferase as the target, because it is specific for all types of aminoglycoside biosynthesis. By degenerate PCR, we obtained 33 individual clones that were homologous with aminotransferase genes in aminoglycoside biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis and alignment of these genes showed that horizontal gene transfer has occurred in the soil. Among these, several quite interesting genes were obtained. Some genes probably originated from non-actinomycetes, and some were far from the known homologs. These genes can be useful markers for the isolation of entire gene clusters and originating organisms.

  13. Cloning, overexpression, and purification of aminoglycoside antibiotic nucleotidyltransferase (2'')-Ia: conformational studies with bound substrates.

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    Ekman, D R; DiGiammarino, E L; Wright, E; Witter, E D; Serpersu, E H

    2001-06-19

    Aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (2'')-Ia [ANT (2'')-Ia] was cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and purified from overexpressing Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. The first enzyme-bound conformation of an aminoglycoside antibiotic in the active site of an aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase was determined using the purified aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (2' ')-Ia. The conformation of the aminoglycoside antibiotic isepamicin, a psuedo-trisaccharide, bound to aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (2' ')-Ia has been determined using NMR spectroscopy. Molecular modeling, employing experimentally determined interproton distances, resulted in two different enzyme-bound conformations (conformer 1 and conformer 2) of isepamicin. Conformer 1 was by far the major conformer defined by the following average glycosidic dihedral angles: PhiBC = -65.26 +/- 1.63 degrees and PsiBC = -54.76 +/- 4.64 degrees. Conformer 1 was further subdivided into one major (conformer 1a) and two minor components (conformers 1b and 1c) based on the comparison of glycosidic dihedral angles PhiAB and PsiAB. The arrangement of substrates in the enzyme.metal-ATP.isepamicin complex was determined on the basis of the measured effect of the paramagnetic substrate analogue Cr(H2O)4ATP on the relaxation rates of substrate protons which were used to determine relative distances of isepamicin protons to the Cr3+. Both conformers of isepamicin yielded arrangements that satisfied the NOE restraints and the observed paramagnetic effects of Cr(H2O)4ATP. It has been suggested that aminoglycosides use both electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds in binding to RNA and that the contacts made by the A and B rings to RNA are the most important for binding [Fourmy, D., Recht, M. I., Blanchard, S. C., and Puglisi, J. D. (1996) Science 274, 1367-1371]. Comparisons based on the determined conformations of enzyme-bound aminoglycoside antibiotics also suggested that interactions of rings A and B with

  14. Radioimmunoassay and radioenzymatic assay of a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, netilmicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, A.; Strong, J.E.; Pickering, L.K.; Knight, J.; Bodey, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay and a radioenzymatic assay for netilmicin, a new aminoglycoside, were developed in our laboratories to assist in the study of the pharmacology of the drug and establish values for use in its monitoring. The assays are sensitive, precise, and rapid, giving results that correlate (r = 0.90) with each other and with those of a microbiological assay in which Klebsiella pneumoniae is used as the test organism. Preliminary pharmacological studies show the drug to have a biological half-life of 135 min, which is comparable to that for other aminoglycosides

  15. Aminoglycoside Concentrations Required for Synergy with Carbapenems against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Determined via Mechanistic Studies and Modeling.

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    Yadav, Rajbharan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Schneider, Elena K; Shin, Beom Soo; Velkov, Tony; Nation, Roger L; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to systematically identify the aminoglycoside concentrations required for synergy with a carbapenem and characterize the permeabilizing effect of aminoglycosides on the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Monotherapies and combinations of four aminoglycosides and three carbapenems were studied for activity against P. aeruginosa strain AH298-GFP in 48-h static-concentration time-kill studies (SCTK) (inoculum: 10 7.6 CFU/ml). The outer membrane-permeabilizing effect of tobramycin alone and in combination with imipenem was characterized via electron microscopy, confocal imaging, and the nitrocefin assay. A mechanism-based model (MBM) was developed to simultaneously describe the time course of bacterial killing and prevention of regrowth by imipenem combined with each of the four aminoglycosides. Notably, 0.25 mg/liter of tobramycin, which was inactive in monotherapy, achieved synergy (i.e., ≥2-log 10 more killing than the most active monotherapy at 24 h) combined with imipenem. Electron micrographs, confocal image analyses, and the nitrocefin uptake data showed distinct outer membrane damage by tobramycin, which was more extensive for the combination with imipenem. The MBM indicated that aminoglycosides enhanced the imipenem target site concentration up to 4.27-fold. Tobramycin was the most potent aminoglycoside to permeabilize the outer membrane; tobramycin (0.216 mg/liter), gentamicin (0.739 mg/liter), amikacin (1.70 mg/liter), or streptomycin (5.19 mg/liter) was required for half-maximal permeabilization. In summary, our SCTK, mechanistic studies and MBM indicated that tobramycin was highly synergistic and displayed the maximum outer membrane disruption potential among the tested aminoglycosides. These findings support the optimization of highly promising antibiotic combination dosage regimens for critically ill patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D

    1999-01-01

    antibiotics, which also interact with this region of rRNA. Mutations of certain nucleotides in rRNA reduce aminoglycoside binding affinity, as previously demonstrated using a model RNA oligonucleotide system. Here, predictions from the oligonucleotide system were tested in the ribosome by mutation...... for the aminoglycoside paromomycin, whereas no discernible reduction in affinity was observed with 1406 mutant ribosomes. These data are consistent with prior NMR structural determination of aminoglycoside interaction with the decoding region, and further our understanding of how aminoglycoside resistance can...

  17. Evaluation on the Use of β-Lactamase and Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzyme Gene Sequences as Markers for the Early Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Victor A. Doss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of infections including the hospital acquired (Nosocomial infections. Detection of them and their antibiotic resistance profile by conventional method takes about three days. Recently, DNA based diagnostic methods are being used for the identification of the pathogens. Hence we have tested a rapid and sensitive method using DNA sequences as markers for detecting the presence of three genes coding for the enzymes that inactivate the two most commonly used Anti-pseudomonadal drugs such as β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, and its derivatives and Aminoglycosides such as Gentamicin, Tobramycin, Amikacin, Streptomycin. The internal region of these genes were used for designing and synthesizing primers and these primers were used in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to screen for the presence of these genes in the clinical isolates and to label them non-radioactively with Biotin. They in turn were used to detect the presence of the antibiotic resistance genes in the clinical isolates by hybridization. The specificity (ratio of positive results obtained in both methods and the sensitivity (the minimum amount of sample DNA and the labeled probe required for the tests were evaluated.

  18. Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: New Insights into the Biosynthetic Machinery of Old Drugs.

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    Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    2-Deoxystreptamine (2DOS) is the unique chemically stable aminocyclitol scaffold of clinically important aminoglycoside antibiotics such as neomycin, kanamycin, and gentamicin, which are produced by Actinomycetes. The 2DOS core can be decorated with various deoxyaminosugars to make structurally diverse pseudo-oligosaccharides. After the discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters for 2DOS-containing aminoglycoside antibiotics, the function of each biosynthetic enzyme has been extensively elucidated. The common biosynthetic intermediates 2DOS, paromamine and ribostamycin are constructed by conserved enzymes encoded in the gene clusters. The biosynthetic intermediates are then converted to characteristic architectures by unique enzymes encoded in each biosynthetic gene cluster. In this Personal Account, we summarize both common biosynthetic pathways and the pathways used for structural diversification. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Association between the Presence of Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes and In Vitro Activity of Gentamicin, Tobramycin, Amikacin, and Plazomicin against Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase- and Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacter Species.

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    Haidar, Ghady; Alkroud, Ammar; Cheng, Shaoji; Churilla, Travis M; Churilla, Bryce M; Shields, Ryan K; Doi, Yohei; Clancy, Cornelius J; Nguyen, M Hong

    2016-09-01

    We compared the in vitro activities of gentamicin (GEN), tobramycin (TOB), amikacin (AMK), and plazomicin (PLZ) against 13 Enterobacter isolates possessing both Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (KPC+/ESBL+) with activity against 8 KPC+/ESBL-, 6 KPC-/ESBL+, and 38 KPC-/ESBL- isolates. The rates of resistance to GEN and TOB were higher for KPC+/ESBL+ (100% for both) than for KPC+/ESBL- (25% and 38%, respectively), KPC-/ESBL+ (50% and 17%, respectively), and KPC-/ESBL- (0% and 3%, respectively) isolates. KPC+/ESBL+ isolates were more likely than others to possess an aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) (100% versus 38%, 67%, and 5%; P = 0.007, 0.06, and 1 AME than with ≤1 AME. The presence of at least 2/3 of KPC, SHV, and TEM predicted the presence of AMEs. PLZ MICs against all isolates were ≤4 μg/ml, regardless of KPC/ESBL pattern or the presence of AMEs. In conclusion, GEN and TOB are limited as treatment options against KPC+ and ESBL+ Enterobacter PLZ may represent a valuable addition to the antimicrobial armamentarium. A full understanding of AMEs and other aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms will allow clinicians to incorporate PLZ rationally into treatment regimens. The development of molecular assays that accurately and rapidly predict antimicrobial responses among KPC- and ESBL-producing Enterobacter spp. should be a top research priority. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Effects of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, on neuromuscular transmission. I. Presynaptic considerations.

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    Fiekers, J F

    1983-06-01

    The effects of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, were studied in voltage-clamped transected twitch fibers of the costocutaneous muscles of garter snakes (species Thamnophis). The concentration-dependent effects of each antibiotic were quantitated by measuring miniature end-plate currents (mepcs) and evoked end-plate currents (epcs) in a single fiber before and in the presence of a wide range of concentrations of each antibiotic. The amplitude and the kinetics of these currents were studied and estimates of the quantal content of evoked transmitter release determined by the direct method of mean ratios, epc/mepc. A distinct separation was obtained between the concentrations of each antibiotic which demonstrated either pre- or postsynaptic actions. Both streptomycin and neomycin produced a concentration-dependent reduction in epc amplitude at concentrations which did not reduce mepc amplitude. Thus, the primary site of action for these antibiotics was considered of presynaptic origin. Streptomycin was approximately one-tenth as active as neomycin in reducing quantal release of acetylcholine. The marked depression in epc amplitude and quantal content produced by high concentrations of each antibiotic were reversed by elevating the external calcium concentration. Double logarithmic plots of the relationship between external calcium concentration and epc amplitude yielded a slope of approximately 3.8 in control physiological solution. In the presence of blocking concentrations of each antibiotic, increasing the external calcium concentration caused a parallel shift to the right of this relationship. These results suggest that the major mechanism for the neuromuscular depression produced by these aminoglycoside antibiotics is a competitive antagonism with calcium for a common presynaptic site required for evoked transmitter release.

  1. Collateral sensitivity between aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics depends on active proton pumps.

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    Azimi, Leila; Rastegar Lari, Abdolaziz

    2017-11-01

    Selection inversion is the hypothesis for antibiotic resistant inhabitation in bacteria and collateral sensitivity is one of the proposed phenomena for achievement of this hypothesis. The presence of collateral sensitivity associated with the proton motivation pump between the aminoglycosides and beta-lactam group of antibiotics is one of the examples of collateral sensitivity in some studies. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that collateral sensitivity between aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics associated with proton motivation pump may not be true in all cases. In this study, 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa were surveyed. Gentamicin and imipenem-resistant strains were confirmed by disc diffusion method and MIC. Active proton motivation pumps were screened by pumps inhibitor. Semi-quantitative Real-Time PCR assay was used to confirm gene overexpression. Seventy-six and 79 out of 100 strains were resistant to gentamicin and imipenem, respectively. Seventy-five strains were resistant to both gentamicin and imipenem. The results of proton pump inhibitor test showed the involvement of active proton motivation pump in 22 of 75 imipenem- and gentamicin-resistant strains. According to Real - Time PCR assay, mexX efflux gene was overexpressed in the majority of isolates tested. The collateral sensitivity effect cannot explain the involvement of active proton motivation pumps in both imipenem and gentamicin-resistant strains simultaneously. Active and/or inactive proton pump in gentamicin-sensitive and/or resistant strains cannot be a suitable example for explanation of collateral sensitivity between aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Beneficial antimicrobial effect of the addition of an aminoglycoside to a β-lactam antibiotic in an E. coli porcine intensive care severe sepsis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorup, Paul; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Lipcsey, Miklós; Castegren, Markus; Larsson, Anders; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the addition of an aminoglycoside to a ß-lactam antibiotic increases the antimicrobial effect during the early phase of Gram-negative severe sepsis/septic shock. A porcine model was selected that considered each animal's individual blood bactericidal capacity. Escherichia coli, susceptible to both antibiotics, was given to healthy pigs intravenously during 3 h. At 2 h, the animals were randomized to a 20-min infusion with either cefuroxime alone (n = 9), a combination of cefuroxime+tobramycin (n = 9), or saline (control, n = 9). Blood samples were collected hourly for cultures and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Bacterial growth in the organs after 6 h was chosen as the primary endpoint. A blood sample was obtained at baseline before start of bacterial infusion for ex vivo investigation of the blood bactericidal capacity. At 1 h after the administration of the antibiotics, a second blood sample was taken for ex vivo investigation of the antibiotic-induced blood killing activity. All animals developed severe sepsis/septic shock. Blood cultures and PCR rapidly became negative after completed bacterial infusion. Antibiotic-induced blood killing activity was significantly greater in the combination group than in the cefuroxime group (pantibiotic groups compared with the controls (pantibiotic groups. Bacterial growth in the liver was significantly less in the combination group than in the cefuroxime group (pantibiotic-induced blood killing activity and less bacteria in the liver than cefuroxime alone. Individual blood bactericidal capacity may have a significant effect on antimicrobial outcome.

  3. Investigation into complexing of phthalexone S with praseodymium ions and some aminoglycoside antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alykov, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Complex formation of phthalexone S (Phth) with praseodymium ion and some aminoglycoside antibiotics (Ab) in aqueous ethanol solutions (1:1) has been examined photometrically at 619 mm. It has been shown that compounds with the ratios of Ab:Pr:Phth=1:2:8, 1:1:4, 1:1:3 are formed depending on the number of amino groups and structure of the antibiotics. The molar absorptivities and solubility products for the complexes have been calculated. The complex formation scheme is given. A procedure has been developed of determining 0.01-10 μg of antibiotics in 1 ml of a biological material with a relative error of less than 10% [ru

  4. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  5. Potentiation of Tobramycin by Silver Nanoparticles against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash, Marc B; Goodyear, Mara C; Park, Amber J; Surette, Matthew D; Vis, Emily C; Harris, Robert J; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2017-11-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacterial species is a serious public health problem and has prompted research examining the antibacterial effects of alternative compounds and novel treatment strategies. Compounding this problem is the ability of many pathogenic bacteria to form biofilms during chronic infections. Importantly, these communities are often recalcitrant to antibiotic treatments that show effectiveness against acute infection. The antimicrobial properties of silver have been known for decades, but recently silver and silver-containing compounds have seen renewed interest as antimicrobial agents for treating bacterial infections. The goal of this study was to assess the ability of citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of various sizes, alone and in combination with the aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin, to inhibit established Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Our results demonstrate that smaller 10-nm and 20-nm AgNPs were more effective at synergistically potentiating the activity of tobramycin. Visualization of biofilms treated with combinations of 10-nm AgNPs and tobramycin reveals that the synergistic bactericidal effect may be caused by disrupting cellular membranes. Minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) assays using clinical P. aeruginosa isolates shows that small AgNPs are more effective than larger AgNPs at inhibiting biofilms, but that the synergy effect is likely a strain-dependent phenomenon. These data suggest that small AgNPs synergistically potentiate the activity of tobramycin against P. aeruginosa in vitro and may reveal a potential role for AgNP/antibiotic combinations in treating patients with chronic infections in a strain-specific manner. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Parallel pathways in the biosynthesis of aminoglycoside antibiotics [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite their inherent toxicity and the global spread of bacterial resistance, aminoglycosides (AGs, an old class of microbial drugs, remain a valuable component of the antibiotic arsenal. Recent studies have continued to reveal the fascinating biochemistry of AG biosynthesis and the rich potential in their pathway engineering. In particular, parallel pathways have been shown to be common and widespread in AG biosynthesis, highlighting nature’s ingenuity in accessing diverse natural products from a limited set of genes. In this review, we discuss the parallel biosynthetic pathways of three representative AG antibiotics—kanamycin, gentamicin, and apramycin—as well as future directions towards the discovery and development of novel AGs.

  7. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression promotes multi-drug resistance in E. coli following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise eGoltermann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antiobiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and overexpression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of aminoglycoside resistance and multi-drug resistance following sub-lethal aminoglycoside antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistance development.

  8. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, Lori; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Arunachalam, J.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 ± 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected‐area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: ► Method for NaBH 4 reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. ► Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. ► Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. ► Antibiotic conjugated nanoparticles exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity

  9. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Lori; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Arunachalam, J., E-mail: aruncccm@gmail.com

    2012-08-01

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 {+-} 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected-area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for NaBH{sub 4} reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. Black

  10. In vitro studies with UK-18,892, a new aminoglycoside antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevons, S; Cheeseman, H E; Brammer, K W

    1978-09-01

    The antibacterial activity of UK-18,892, a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside, was examined against aminoglycoside-susceptible and aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus aureus. UK-18,892 had a similar degree of activity to those of amikacin and kanamycin A against aminoglycoside-susceptible bacteria but was less potent than gentamicin against all isolates except Providencia spp. UK-18,892 was highly active against aminoglycoside-resistant bacteria, inhibiting 93% of the 268 isolates examined at 12.5 mug/ml. Amikacin was similarly active, whereas gentamicin inhibited only 14% of these isolates at 12.5 mug/ml.

  11. Genetic basis of enzymatic resistance of E. coli to aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojdana, Dominika; Sieńko, Anna; Sacha, Paweł; Majewski, Piotr; Wieczorek, Piotr; Wieczorek, Anna; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2017-07-29

    Over the past years, an increase in resistance to aminoglycosides has been observed among Enterobacteriaceae rods. This resistance development reduces therapeutic options for infections caused by multidrug-resistance organisms. Because of the changing epidemiology of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and resistance to aminoglycosides, we investigated the prevalence of the aac(3)-Ia, aac(6')-Ib, ant(4')-IIa, ant(2")-Ia, and aph(3")-Ib genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli as well as ESBL-non-producing isolates. To understand bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, we estimated resistance phenotypes and the presence of genes responsible for this resistance. The study was conducted on 44 E.coli strains originated from patients hospitalized at University Hospital of Bialystok. MIC values were obtained for gentamicin, amikacin, netilmicin, and tobramycin. Isolates were tested for the presence of the aac(3)-Ia, aac(6')-Ib, ant(4')-IIa, ant(2")-Ia, and aph(3")-Ib genes with the use of the PCR technique. Resistance to aminoglycosides was found in 79.5% of the isolates. The highest percentages of resistance were observed for tobramycin (70,5%) and gentamicin (59%), followed by netilmicin (43.2%) and amikacin (11.4%). PCR assays revealed the presence of aac(6')-Ib among 26 (59.2%) strains, aph(3")-Ib among 16 (36.2%), aac(3)-Ia among 7 (15.9%), and ant(2")-Ia among 2 (4.6%) strains. The enzymatic resistance against aminoglycosides in northeastern Poland among clinical isolates of E. coli is predominantly caused by aac(6')-Ib and aph(3")-Ib. Amikacin may be used for therapy of infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli, because of the low rates of resistance. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Complex pollution of antibiotic resistance genes due to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside use in aquaculture farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baowei; Lin, Lan; Fang, Ling; Yang, Ying; Chen, Enzhong; Yuan, Ke; Zou, Shichun; Wang, Xiaowei; Luan, Tiangang

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance in the modern world has raised global concerns for public health. Establishing relationships between antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential to understanding the dissemination and accumulation of ARGs in a human-impacted environment. In this study, ARG profiles in the sediments from a bullfrog farm, where penicillin and amoxicillin (beta-lactams) and gentamicin (aminoglycoside) were used for prophylactic purposes, were analyzed using metagenomic approaches. Analysis of both extracellular and intracellular DNA (eDNA and iDNA) demonstrated that use of the above-mentioned antibiotics led to complex pollution of ARGs not only related to beta-lactams and aminoglycoside but also to sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and macrolides. Most of the ARGs in the sediments from the bullfrog farm were likely carried by plasmids. A significant correlation was observed between the total abundance of ARG-related plasmids and that of plasmid-carrying ARGs. Approximately 85% of the plasmids likely present in the sediment from the bullfrog farm possessed at least 3 ARG subtypes, which conferred the resistance of bacterial hosts to different antibiotic categories. Our results suggest that antibiotics could lead to complex pollution of ARGs unrelated to those administered due to the concurrence of ARGs in the plasmids. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Carbon Sources Tune Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Control

    OpenAIRE

    Meylan, Sylvain; Porter, Caroline B.M.; Yang, Jason H.; Belenky, Peter; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Lobritz, Michael A.; Park, Jihye; Kim, Sun H.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Collins, James J.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolically dormant bacteria present a critical challenge to effective antimicrobial therapy because these bacteria are genetically susceptible to antibiotic treatment but phenotypically tolerant. Such tolerance has been attributed to impaired drug uptake, which can be reversed by metabolic stimulation. Here, we evaluate the effects of central carbon metabolite stimulations on aminoglycoside sensitivity in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identify fumarate as a tobramycin potentiator...

  14. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3–8 extra nucleotides at the 5’ terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:24489121

  15. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-04-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3-8 extra nucleotides at the 5' terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  16. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertinellys TEIXEIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC, aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD, and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH, is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137 were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, mainly from discharges (96/137. The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively. Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49, followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49. The aac(6´-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  17. Comprehensive study to investigate the role of various aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhalizadeh, Vajihe; Hasani, Alka; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Hasani, Akbar; Ghotaslou, Reza; Goli, Hamid Reza

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic resistance towards most of the current treatment regime by Acinetobacter baumannii has reduced the prescribing antibiotic pattern and option is being re-shifted towards more toxic agents including aminoglycosides. The present investigation aimed at to study various mechanisms towards aminoglycoside non-susceptibility in clinical isolates of A. baumannii. The bacteria were subjected to genetic basis assessment for the presence of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AME), 16S rRNA methylase encoding genes and relative expression of AdeABC and AbeM efflux pumps in relation to their susceptibility to five aminoglycosides. When isolates were subjected to typing by repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR, isolates could be separated into thirteen definite clones. The majority of isolates (94%) were positive for AME encoding genes. Possession of ant(2')-Ia correlated with non-susceptibility towards gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin; while, presence of aph(3')-VIa attributed to resistance towards amikacin, kanamycin; possession of aac(3')-Ia allied with non-susceptibility to amikacin, tobramycin and presence of aac(3')IIa correlated with kanamycin non-susceptibility. Presence of armA was detected in 34.4%, 34.2%, 29.2%, 40.3%, and 64.2% of isolates showing non-susceptibility to gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin and netilmicin, respectively. No isolates were found to carry rmtB or rmtC. Amikacin non-susceptibility in comparison to other aminoglycosides correlated with over production of adeB. Overall, the results represented a definitive correlation between presence of AME encoding genes as well as armA and resistance of A. baumannii towards aminoglycosides. On the other hand, the up-regulation of AdeABC and AbeM systems was found to have only the partial role in development of aminoglycoside resistance. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Effect of oral activated charcoal on tobramycin clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R L; Koup, J R; Roon, R A; Opheim, K E; Smith, A N

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of activated charcoal on aminoglycoside pharmacokinetics, six healthy volunteers received tobramycin intravenously with and without multiple oral doses of activated charcoal. Activated charcoal did not have a statistically significant effect on any pharmacokinetic parameter. We conclude that activated charcoal does not enhance tobramycin clearance in subjects with normal renal function when concentrations in serum are within the therapeutic range. PMID:3364947

  19. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid enhances the activities of aminoglycosides against methicillin- sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eCunningham-Oakes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by methicillin-sensitive (MSSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are prevalent. MRSA infections are difficult to treat and there are no new classes of antibiotics produced to the market to treat infections caused by the resistant bacteria. Therefore, using antibiotic enhancers to rescue existing classes of antibiotics is an attractive strategy. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is an antioxidant compound found in extracts from plant Larrea Tridentata. It exhibits antimicrobial activity and may target bacterial cell membrane. Combination efficacies of NDGA with many classes of antibiotics were examined by chequerboard method against 200 clinical isolates of MRSA and MSSA. NDGA in combination with gentamicin, neomycin and tobramycin was examined by time-kill assays. The synergistic combinations of NDGA and aminoglycosides were tested in vivo using a murine skin infection model. Calculations of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI showed that NDGA when combined with gentamicin, neomycin or tobramycin displayed synergistic activities in more than 97% of MSSA and MRSA, respectively. Time kill analysis demonstrated that NDGA significantly augmented the activities of these aminoglycosides against MRSA and MSSA in vitro and in murine skin infection model. The enhanced activity of NDGA resides on its ability to damage bacterial cell membrane leading to accumulation of the antibiotics inside bacterial cells. We demonstrated that NDGA strongly revived the therapeutic potencies of aminoglycosides in vitro and in vivo. This combinational strategy could contribute major clinical implications to treat antibiotic resistant bacterial infections.

  20. Ribosomal Protein S12 and Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Modulate A-site mRNA Cleavage and Transfer-Messenger RNA Activity in Escherichia coli*

    OpenAIRE

    Holberger, Laura E.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Translational pausing in Escherichia coli can lead to mRNA cleavage within the ribosomal A-site. A-site mRNA cleavage is thought to facilitate transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)·SmpB- mediated recycling of stalled ribosome complexes. Here, we demonstrate that the aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin inhibit A-site cleavage of stop codons during inefficient translation termination. Aminoglycosides also induced stop codon read-through, suggesting that these antibiotics alleviate ribosome pa...

  1. Robustness analysis of culturing perturbations on Escherichia coli colony biofilm beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez-Taracido Lourdes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofilms are ubiquitous. For instance, the majority of medical infections are thought to involve biofilms. However even after decades of investigation, the in vivo efficacy of many antimicrobial strategies is still debated suggesting there is a need for better understanding of biofilm antimicrobial tolerances. The current study's goal is to characterize the robustness of biofilm antibiotic tolerance to medically and industrially relevant culturing perturbations. By definition, robust systems will return similar, predictable responses when perturbed while non-robust systems will return very different and potentially unpredictable responses. The predictability of an antibiotic tolerance response is essential to developing, testing, and employing antimicrobial strategies. Results The antibiotic tolerance of Escherichia coli colony biofilms was tested against beta-lactam and aminoglycoside class antibiotics. Control scenario tolerances were compared to tolerances under culturing perturbations including 1 different nutritional environments 2 different temperatures 3 interruption of cellular quorum sensing and 4 different biofilm culture ages. Here, antibiotic tolerance was defined in terms of culturable biofilm cells recovered after a twenty four hour antibiotic treatment. Colony biofilm antibiotic tolerances were not robust to perturbations. Altering basic culturing parameters like nutritional environment or temperature resulted in very different, non-intuitive antibiotic tolerance responses. Some minor perturbations like increasing the glucose concentration from 0.1 to 1 g/L caused a ten million fold difference in culturable cells over a twenty four hour antibiotic treatment. Conclusions The current study presents a basis for robustness analysis of biofilm antibiotic tolerance. Biofilm antibiotic tolerance can vary in unpredictable manners based on modest changes in culturing conditions. Common antimicrobial testing methods

  2. Glomerular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Salgado, Carlos; Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics worldwide in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, aminoglycosides induce nephrotoxicity in 10-20% of therapeutic courses. Aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by slow rises in serum creatinine, tubular necrosis and marked decreases in glomerular filtration rate and in the ultrafiltration coefficient. Regulation of the ultrafiltration coefficient depends on the activity of intraglomerular mesangial cells. The mechanisms responsible for tubular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides have been intensively reviewed previously, but glomerular toxicity has received less attention. The purpose of this review is to critically assess the published literature regarding the toxic mechanisms of action of aminoglycosides on renal glomeruli and mesangial cells. The main goal of this review is to provide an actualized and mechanistic vision of pathways involved in glomerular toxic effects of aminoglycosides

  3. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis of sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eSegil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the drug of choice for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in nearly one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 hours of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternative pathway regulating gentamicin-induced hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contribute to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside

  4. Aminoglycosides resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from a University Hospital in Bialystok, Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kaczyńska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus obtained from a University Hospital in Poland were characterized in relation to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics and the distribution of the genes encoding the most clinically relevant aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AMEs. Of a total of 118 S. aureus, 45 (38.1% isolates were found to be resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics. All aminoglycoside resistant isolates except one 44 (97.8% were resistant to kanamycin. The majority of strains 37 (82.2% and 32 (71.1% expressed resistance to neomycin and tobramycin, respectively. Eleven strains (24.4% were resistant to gentamicin or amikacin. All S. aureus strains were sensitive to netilmicin. The most prevalent resistance gene was aac(6'-Ie+aph(2' found in 13 (28.9% strains and 12 (26.7% isolates carried ant(4'-Ia gene, whilst aph(3'-IIIa gene was detected in only 7 (15.6% isolates. Additionally, the ant(6-Ia and str genes were detected in 14 (31.1% and 2 (4.4% strains, respectively. Ten (22.2% strains resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, kanamycin or neomycin did not harbor any of the above-noted genes.

  5. Low efficacy of tobramycin in experimental Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C. J.; Christophersen, L. J.; Trøstrup, H.

    2015-01-01

    The empiric treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) varies widely and, in some places, a regimen of penicillin in combination with an aminoglycoside is administered. The increasing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus IE, poor tissue penetration by aminoglycosides and low frequency of penicillin...... into untreated (n = 22) or tobramycin-treated (n = 13) groups. The treatment group received tobramycin once-daily. Animals were evaluated at 1 day post infection (DPI), 2 DPI or 3 DPI. Quantitative bacteriology and cytokine expression were measured for valves, myocardium and serum. A decrease of bacterial load...... was observed at 2 DPI (p ≤ 0.001) but not at 3 DPI. Tobramycin as functional monotherapy only reduced bacterial load and inflammation transiently, and was insufficient in most cases of S. aureus IE....

  6. Synergy of aminoglycoside antibiotics by 3-Benzylchroman derivatives from the Chinese drug Caesalpinia sappan against clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, G Y; Han, Z Q; Hao, X Y; Han, J; Li, Z S; Wang, G C

    2014-06-15

    The in vitro antimicrobial activities of three 3-Benzylchroman derivatives, i.e. Brazilin (1), Brazilein (2) and Sappanone B (3) from Caesalpinia sappan L. (Leguminosae) were assayed, which mainly dealt with synergistic evaluation of aminoglycoside and other type of antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the three compounds through the Chequerboard and Time-kill curve methods. The results showed that Compounds 1-3 alone exhibited moderate to weak activity against methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other standard strains by MICs/MBCs ranged from 32/64 to >1024/>1024 μg/ml, with the order of activity as 1>2>3. Chequerboard method showed significant anti-MRSA synergy of 1/Aminoglycosides (Gentamicin, Amikacin, Etimicin and Streptomycin) combinations with (FICIs)50 at 0.375-0.5. The combined (MICs)50 values (μg/ml) reduced from 32-128/16-64 to 4-8/4-16, respectively. The percent of reduction by MICs ranged from 50% to 87.5%, with a maximum of 93.8% (1/16 of the alone MIC). Combinations of 2 and 3 with Aminoglycosides and the other antibiotics showed less potency of synergy. The dynamic Time-killing experiment further demonstrated that the combinations of 1/aminoglycoside were synergistically bactericidal against MRSA. The anti-MRSA synergy results of the bacteriostatic (Chequerboard method) and bactericidal (time-kill method) efficiencies of 1/Aminoglycoside combinations was in good consistency, which made the resistance reversed by CLSI guidelines. We concluded that the 3-Benzylchroman derivative Brazilin (1) showed in vitro synergy of bactericidal activities against MRSA when combined with Aminoglycosides, which might be beneficial for combinatory therapy of MRSA infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Subcellular mechanisms involved in apoptosis induced by aminoglycoside antibiotics: Insights on p53, proteasome and endoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denamur, Sophie; Boland, Lidvine; Beyaert, Maxime; Verstraeten, Sandrine L.; Fillet, Marianne; Tulkens, Paul M.; Bontemps, Françoise; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Gentamicin, an aminoglycoside used to treat severe bacterial infections, may cause acute renal failure. In the renal cell line LLC-PK1, gentamicin accumulates in lysosomes, induces alterations of their permeability, and triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis via activation of caspase-9 and -3 and changes in Bcl-2 family proteins. Early ROS production in lysosomes has been associated with gentamicin induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In order to better understand the multiple interconnected pathways of gentamicin-induced apoptosis and ensuing renal cell toxicity, we investigated the effect of gentamicin on p53 and p21 levels. We also studied the potential effect of gentamicin on proteasome by measuring the chymotrypsin-, trypsin- and caspase-like activities, and on endoplasmic reticulum by determining phopho-eIF2α, caspase-12 activation and GRP78 and 94. We observed an increase in p53 levels, which was dependent on ROS production. Accumulation of p53 resulted in accumulation of p21 and of phospho-eIF2α. These effects could be related to an impairment of proteasome as we demonstrated an inhibition of trypsin-and caspase-like activities. Moderate endoplasmic reticulum stress could also participate to cellular toxicity induced by gentamicin, with activation of caspase-12 without change in GRP74 and GRP98. All together, these data provide new mechanistic insights into the apoptosis induced by aminoglycoside antibiotics on renal cell lines. - Highlights: • Gentamicin induces apoptosis through p53 pathway. • Gentamicin inhibits proteosomal activity. • Gentamicin activates caspase-12.

  8. Tolerance of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) embryogenic tissue to penicillin, carbapenem and aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, J.; Pavingerová, Daniela; Cvrčková, H.; Bříza, Jindřich; Dostál, J.; Šíma, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2009), s. 156-161 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : somatic embryogenesis * Norway spruce * penicillin antibiotics * Agrobacterium tumefaciens * carbapenem antibiotics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  9. Assessment of tobramycin RIA for drug monitoring and dosage regimen. Comparison with other assay technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.; Shinozaki, K.; Tsujino, D.; Ohhara, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Arai, S.; Someya, K.; Sasaki, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Because of wide range of inter-individual difference of pharmacokinetic parameter, importance of monitoring blood concentration of aminoglycoside antibiotics in each patient has been recognized. With the purpose to use for monitoring of serum tobramycin (TOB) levels and for adequate dosage regimen RIA of TOB was evaluated in comparison with other assay technics. Gamma Coat TOB RIA kits (Clinical Assay-Travenol Japan) were used for RIA of TOB. The TOB concentrations in the same samples were also measured by two kinds of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (EMIT EIA and SLFIA EIA), High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and bioassay (BA). RIA of TOB is a useful assay method with high sensitivity and reasonably good precision to be used for drug monitoring and adequate dosage regimen. Modification of the method for rapid assay of a small number of samples will increase the clinical usefulness in individualized drug monitoring

  10. Enzymatic method for inactivation of aminoglycosides during measurement of postantibiotic effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. den Hollander (Jan); J.W. Mouton (Johan); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma); F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); M.P.J. van Goor (Marie-Louise); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTo determine the postantibiotic effect of aminoglycosides, two methods are currently being used to remove the test drug: repeated washing and dilution. An enzymatic inactivation method of removing gentamicin and tobramycin was developed and compared with the dilution

  11. Simple measurement of isepamicin, a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, in guinea pig and human plasma, using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionisotti, S.; Bamonte, F.; Scaglione, F.; Ongini, E.

    1991-01-01

    Isepamicin, the 1-N-(S-alpha-hydroxy-beta-aminopropionyl) derivative of gentamicin B, is a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, which not only has most of the properties of amikacin but also is effective against several amikacin-resistant strains of bacteria. The drug was assayed in guinea-pig and human plasma with a high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure using precolumn derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and ultraviolet detection. Linearity was established over the range 0.5-40 micrograms/ml using 50 microliters of plasma. Accuracy has a mean relative error of less than 3% and precision a mean coefficient of variation of 5%. Isepamicin was determined without interference from plasma constituents or other drugs commonly prescribed during aminoglycoside therapy. This procedure correlates well with radioimmunoassay and can be used either in experimental studies or therapeutic monitoring of plasma levels

  12. Simple measurement of isepamicin, a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, in guinea pig and human plasma, using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionisotti, S.; Bamonte, F.; Scaglione, F.; Ongini, E. (Research Lab., Schering-Plough S.P.A., Comazzo, Milan (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    Isepamicin, the 1-N-(S-alpha-hydroxy-beta-aminopropionyl) derivative of gentamicin B, is a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, which not only has most of the properties of amikacin but also is effective against several amikacin-resistant strains of bacteria. The drug was assayed in guinea-pig and human plasma with a high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure using precolumn derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and ultraviolet detection. Linearity was established over the range 0.5-40 micrograms/ml using 50 microliters of plasma. Accuracy has a mean relative error of less than 3% and precision a mean coefficient of variation of 5%. Isepamicin was determined without interference from plasma constituents or other drugs commonly prescribed during aminoglycoside therapy. This procedure correlates well with radioimmunoassay and can be used either in experimental studies or therapeutic monitoring of plasma levels.

  13. Combinations of β-Lactam or Aminoglycoside Antibiotics with Plectasin Are Synergistic against Methicillin-Sensitive and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Vaudrey, James; Vaiciunaite, Brigita; Moigboi, Christiana; McTavish, Sharla M.; Kearns, Angela; Coates, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101) and MRSA (n = 115). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin) displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin) in 87–89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA infections. We

  14. Chromosomal mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S; Oh, H; Jalal, S; Karpati, F; Ciofu, O; Høiby, N; Wretlind, B

    2009-01-01

    In total, 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were included in this study. Twenty of these were collected in 1994 and 1997, from six CF patients, and the rest were collected from different CF patients in 2000 and 2001. The relative expression of mRNA for the efflux pump protein MexY was determined by real-time PCR and correlated with susceptibilities to amikacin and tobramycin. The chromosomal genes mexZ, rplY, galU, PA5471 and nuoG, which were found to have a role in the gradual increase in MICs of aminoglycoside antibiotics in laboratory mutants of P. aeruginosa, were analysed. MexY mRNA overproduction was found in 17/20 isolates collected in 1994 and 1997, and was correlated with decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Alteration of the MexXY-OprM efflux system has been the main mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in CF P. aeruginosa isolates over the 3-year period. In several isolates, expression of the PA5471 gene product might have some effect on elevated MICs of aminoglycosides. Inactivation of rplY, galU and/or nuoG may explain the gradual increase in MICs of aminoglycosides in laboratory mutants but probably not in the CF environment, as rplY and galU were unaltered in all isolates, and nuoG was not expressed in only one isolate. No 16S rRNA A-site mutations were found in any of the four copies of the gene in 13 investigated isolates.

  15. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of Aeromonas spp. isolates from food in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Mohammad Bashir; Maqbool, Ahmed; Bari, Abdul; Krovacek, Karel

    2009-01-01

    A total of 57 Aeromonas isolates from food samples such as fresh and frozen chicken, game birds, pasteurized milk, baby food, bakery products, fruit and vegetables, fish, and water from Abu Dahbi, UAE were investigated for antibiotic susceptibility profile. Most strains were resistant to penicillins (ticarcillin, mezlocillin, oxacillin, piperacillin), sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and macrolides (erythromycin, vancomycin, clindamycin) but sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin), cephalosporins (cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, cefazolin, cephalexin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime), quinolone (ciprofloxacin), colistin sulphate and SXT (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). On the other hand, many antibiotics showed excellent inhibitory activity (>75% strains were sensitive to them) against all the strains tested. These include cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, ciprofloxacin, colistin, amikacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime and tobramycin. In conclusion, the results show a detailed pattern of sensitivity of the various Aeromonas spp. isolates to a variety of antibiotics and provide useful information in the context of selective isolation and phenotypic identification of the aeromonads from food.

  16. Aminoglycoside detection using a universal ELISA binding procedure onto polystyrene microtiter plates in comparison with HPLC analysis and microbiological agar-diffusion assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachetelli, S; Beaulac, C; Lagacé, J

    1998-01-08

    The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of aminoglycosides has been hindered due to low molecular weight compound adsorption to solid phases. Here, we describe an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the treatment of polystyrene microtiter plates with Alcian blue prepared in acetic acid prior to coating with the antibiotic. Whereas no detection of tobramycin was possible on commercially treated or untreated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates, the Alcian blue treatment permitted detection of 0.025 and 0.05 microg ml(-1) of tobramycin respectively using 0.05 and 0.1% of Alcian blue with a coefficient of variation of 1.85 and 7.69%, respectively. Comparative studies of five tobramycin samples of unknown quantity using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high-performance liquid chromatography gave equivalent results while those done via microbiological agar-diffusion assay were an overestimation of the actual quantity. The use of the Alcian blue pretreatment enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure has permitted, in previous studies, the measure of antibodies against synthetic peptides and phospholipids. Subsequently, our demonstration of the sensitivity and reliability of this method in the quantification of tobramycin strongly suggests that the use of Alcian blue pretreatment in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay can be applied universally to avert molecule immobilization problems on solid phases.

  17. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  18. In vitro effect of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A viable isolate of coagulase positive and pigment forming Staphylococcus aureus obtained from conjunctival swabs used in the study was treated with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, 0.3%, and tobramycin bramycin, 0.3%, ophthalmic solution) and fluoroquinolones (gatifloxacin 0.3% and moxifloxacin, 0.3% ophthalmic ...

  19. Free and Nanoencapsulated Tobramycin: Effects on Planktonic and Biofilm Forms of Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulalia Sans-Serramitjana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a genetic disorder in which frequent pulmonary infections develop secondarily. One of the major pulmonary pathogens colonizing the respiratory tract of CF patients and causing chronic airway infections is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although tobramycin was initially effective against P. aeruginosa, tobramycin-resistant strains have emerged. Among the strategies for overcoming resistance to tobramycin and other antibiotics is encapsulation of the drugs in nanoparticles. In this study, we explored the antimicrobial activity of nanoencapsulated tobramycin, both in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN and in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC, against clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from CF patients. We also investigated the efficacy of these formulations in biofilm eradication. In both experiments, the activities of SLN and NLC were compared with that of free tobramycin. The susceptibility of planktonic bacteria was determined using the broth microdilution method and by plotting bacterial growth. The minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC was determined to assess the efficacy of the different tobramycin formulations against biofilms. The activity of tobramycin-loaded SLN was less than that of either tobramycin-loaded NLC or free tobramycin. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and MBEC of nanoencapsulated tobramycin were slightly lower (1–2 logs than the corresponding values of the free drug when determined in tobramycin-susceptible isolates. However, in tobramycin-resistant strains, the MIC and MBEC did not differ between either encapsulated form and free tobramycin. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of nanoencapsulated formulations in killing susceptible P. aeruginosa from CF and from other patients.

  20. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Abdul Rouf; Bashir, Yasir; Dar, Firdous Ahmad; Sekhar, M

    This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45%) isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55%) as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients.

  1. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45% isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55% as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients.

  2. Incorporation of tobramycin into biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, M; de Groot, K; Layrolle, P

    2002-10-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings containing an antibiotic were produced on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) implants using a biomimetic approach. Thin, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) coatings were first deposited onto Ti6Al4V plates by immersion in 5 times concentrated simulated body fluid (SBF), for 24h at 37 degrees C. The ACP-coated implants were then immersed in a supersaturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solution containing 0, 100, 200, 400, 600 or 800 mg/l of tobramycin for 48 h at 37 degrees C. A carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) layer, approximately 40 microm thick, was formed. Approximately 3 microg/mg of tobramycin was co-precipitated with the CHA crystals onto titanium alloy plates, using 800mg/l tobramycin in the coating solution. For comparison, plasma-sprayed calcium phosphate coatings were also immersed in solutions containing 100, 200, 400 or 1,000 mg/l of tobramycin for 10, 40 min, or 48 h. A maximum of about 0.3 microg/mg could be adsorbed onto the plasma-sprayed calcium phosphate coating with the comparable concentration of 800 mg/l in solution. The dissolution of coating and release of tobramycin were also measured in vitro using saline solution buffered at pH 5.0 or 7.3 at 37 degrees C. The release rate of tobramycin was faster at pH 7.3 than at pH 5, with 50 and 4 microg/ml/min, respectively. Tobramycin released from the biomimetic-coated plates could inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The result of this study, therefore, indicates that the biomimetic CHA coatings containing antibiotics could be used to prevent post-surgical infections in orthopaedic or trauma.

  3. Carbon Sources Tune Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Sylvain; Porter, Caroline B M; Yang, Jason H; Belenky, Peter; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Lobritz, Michael A; Park, Jihye; Kim, Sun H; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Collins, James J

    2017-02-16

    Metabolically dormant bacteria present a critical challenge to effective antimicrobial therapy because these bacteria are genetically susceptible to antibiotic treatment but phenotypically tolerant. Such tolerance has been attributed to impaired drug uptake, which can be reversed by metabolic stimulation. Here, we evaluate the effects of central carbon metabolite stimulations on aminoglycoside sensitivity in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identify fumarate as a tobramycin potentiator that activates cellular respiration and generates a proton motive force by stimulating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In contrast, we find that glyoxylate induces phenotypic tolerance by inhibiting cellular respiration with acetyl-coenzyme A diversion through the glyoxylate shunt, despite drug import. Collectively, this work demonstrates that TCA cycle activity is important for both aminoglycoside uptake and downstream lethality and identifies a potential strategy for potentiating aminoglycoside treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A rapid SPE-based analytical method for UPLC/MS/MS determination of aminoglycoside antibiotic residues in bovine milk, muscle, and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael S; van Tran, Kim; Goh, Evelyn; Shia, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    An SPE-based cleanup protocol was developed for ultra-performance LC (UPLC)/MS/MS determination of residues of the common aminoglycoside antibiotics streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, neomycin, and gentamicin in bovine milk, kidney, and muscle. Recoveries for all compounds except neomycin ranged from 80 to 104% for all matrixes studied; recoveries for neomycin ranged from 71 to 84%. Intraday and interday precision data were under 15% for all sample matrixes. Compared with other recently reported cleanup methods, less sample is required, the use of potentially dangerous reagents is minimized, and fewer manipulations are required by the analyst. A high throughput 96-well plate format was used for SPE cleanup and UPLC/MS analysis.

  5. Kinetic and mutagenic characterization of the chromosomally encoded Salmonella enterica AAC(6')-Iy aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, S; Lambert, T; Courvalin, P; Blanchard, J S

    2001-03-27

    The chromosomally encoded aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iy, from Salmonella enterica confers resistance toward a number of aminoglycoside antibiotics. The structural gene was cloned and expressed and the purified enzyme existed in solution as a dimer of ca. 17 000 Da monomers. Acetyl-CoA was the preferred acyl donor, and most therapeutically important aminoglycosides were substrates for acetylation. Exceptions are those aminoglycosides that possess a 6'-hydroxyl substituent (e.g., lividomycin). Thus, the enzyme exhibited regioselective and exclusive acetyltransferase activity to 6'-amine-containing aminoglycosides. The enzyme exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics for some aminoglycoside substrates but "substrate activation" with others. Kinetic studies supported a random kinetic mechanism for the enzyme. The enzyme was inactivated by iodoacetamide in a biphasic manner, with half of the activity being lost rapidly and the other half more slowly. Tobramycin, but not acetyl-CoA, protected against inactivation. Each of the three cysteine residues (C70, C109, C145) in the wild-type enzyme were carboxamidomethylated by iodoacetamide. Cysteine 109 in AAC(6')-Iy is conserved in 12 AAC(6') enzyme sequences of the major class I subfamily. Surprisingly, mutation of this residue to alanine neither abolished activity nor altered the biphasic inactivation by iodoacetamide. The maximum velocity and V/K values for a number of aminoglycosides were elevated in this single mutant, and the kinetic behavior of substrates exhibiting linear vs nonlinear kinetics was reversed. Cysteine 70 in AAC(6')-Iy is either a cysteine or a threonine residue in all 12 AAC(6') enzymes of the major class I subfamily. The double mutant, C109A/C70A, was not inactivated by iodoacetamide. The double mutant exhibited large increases in the K(m) values for both acetyl-CoA and aminoglycoside substrates, and all aminoglycoside substrates exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Solvent kinetic isotope

  6. Ribosomal Protein S12 and Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Modulate A-site mRNA Cleavage and Transfer-Messenger RNA Activity in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holberger, Laura E.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Translational pausing in Escherichia coli can lead to mRNA cleavage within the ribosomal A-site. A-site mRNA cleavage is thought to facilitate transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)·SmpB- mediated recycling of stalled ribosome complexes. Here, we demonstrate that the aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin inhibit A-site cleavage of stop codons during inefficient translation termination. Aminoglycosides also induced stop codon read-through, suggesting that these antibiotics alleviate ribosome pausing during termination. Streptomycin did not inhibit A-site cleavage in rpsL mutants, which express streptomycin-resistant variants of ribosomal protein S12. However, rpsL strains exhibited reduced A-site mRNA cleavage compared with rpsL+ cells. Additionally, tmRNA·SmpB-mediated SsrA peptide tagging was significantly reduced in several rpsL strains but could be fully restored in a subset of mutants when treated with streptomycin. The streptomycin-dependent rpsL(P90K) mutant also showed significantly lower levels of A-site cleavage and tmRNA·SmpB activity. Mutations in rpsD (encoding ribosomal protein S4), which suppressed streptomycin dependence, were able to partially restore A-site cleavage to rpsL(P90K) cells but failed to increase tmRNA·SmpB activity. Taken together, these results show that perturbations to A-site structure and function modulate A-site mRNA cleavage and tmRNA·SmpB activity. We propose that tmRNA·SmpB binds to streptomycin-resistant rpsL ribosomes less efficiently, leading to a partial loss of ribosome rescue function in these mutants. PMID:19776006

  7. Ribosomal protein S12 and aminoglycoside antibiotics modulate A-site mRNA cleavage and transfer-messenger RNA activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holberger, Laura E; Hayes, Christopher S

    2009-11-13

    Translational pausing in Escherichia coli can lead to mRNA cleavage within the ribosomal A-site. A-site mRNA cleavage is thought to facilitate transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA).SmpB- mediated recycling of stalled ribosome complexes. Here, we demonstrate that the aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin inhibit A-site cleavage of stop codons during inefficient translation termination. Aminoglycosides also induced stop codon read-through, suggesting that these antibiotics alleviate ribosome pausing during termination. Streptomycin did not inhibit A-site cleavage in rpsL mutants, which express streptomycin-resistant variants of ribosomal protein S12. However, rpsL strains exhibited reduced A-site mRNA cleavage compared with rpsL(+) cells. Additionally, tmRNA.SmpB-mediated SsrA peptide tagging was significantly reduced in several rpsL strains but could be fully restored in a subset of mutants when treated with streptomycin. The streptomycin-dependent rpsL(P90K) mutant also showed significantly lower levels of A-site cleavage and tmRNA.SmpB activity. Mutations in rpsD (encoding ribosomal protein S4), which suppressed streptomycin dependence, were able to partially restore A-site cleavage to rpsL(P90K) cells but failed to increase tmRNA.SmpB activity. Taken together, these results show that perturbations to A-site structure and function modulate A-site mRNA cleavage and tmRNA.SmpB activity. We propose that tmRNA.SmpB binds to streptomycin-resistant rpsL ribosomes less efficiently, leading to a partial loss of ribosome rescue function in these mutants.

  8. Aminoglycoside induced ototoxicity associated with mitochondrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Joseph Foster II, Mustafa Tekin. Abstract. Despite the risk of permanent ototoxic effects, aminoglycosides remain commonly utilized antibiotics worldwide due to low cost and efficiency in treating severe infections. Over the last two decades, ...

  9. In vitro activity of ceftriaxone alone and in combination with gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Watanakunakorn, C

    1983-01-01

    The in vitro activity of ceftriaxone alone and in combination with gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin against 50 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was studied by the broth dilution method and the time-kill curve method. The majority of the P. aeruginosa strains tested were resistant to ceftriaxone. Combining ceftriaxone with the aminoglycosides resulted in synergism, antagonism, or indifference.

  10. Azithromycin May Antagonize Inhaled Tobramycin When Targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Jerry A.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Chmiel, James F.; Forssén, Anna V.; Kim, Sun Ho; Saavedra, Milene T.; Saiman, Lisa; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Recent studies of inhaled tobramycin in subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) find less clinical improvement than previously observed. Nonhuman data suggest that in some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, azithromycin can antagonize tobramycin. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that concomitant azithromycin use correlates with less improvement in key outcome measures in subjects receiving inhaled tobramycin while not affecting those receiving a comparative, nonaminoglycoside inhaled antibiotic. Methods: We studied a cohort of 263 subjects with CF enrolled in a recent clinical trial comparing inhaled tobramycin with aztreonam lysine. We performed a secondary analysis to examine key clinical and microbiologic outcomes based on concomitant, chronic azithromycin use at enrollment. Measurements and Main Results: The cohort randomized to inhaled tobramycin and reporting azithromycin use showed a significant decrease in the percent predicted FEV1 after one and three courses of inhaled tobramycin when compared with those not reporting azithromycin use (28 d: −0.51 vs. 3.43%, P azithromycin and inhaled tobramycin use was also associated with earlier need for additional antibiotics, lesser improvement in disease-related quality of life, and a trend toward less reduction in sputum P. aeruginosa density. Subjects randomized to inhaled aztreonam lysine had significantly greater improvement in these outcome measures, which were unaffected by concomitant azithromycin use. Outcomes in those not using azithromycin who received inhaled tobramycin were not significantly different from subjects receiving aztreonam lysine. Azithromycin also antagonized tobramycin but not aztreonam lysine in 40% of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested in vitro. Conclusions: Oral azithromycin may antagonize the therapeutic benefits of inhaled tobramycin in subjects with CF with P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:24476418

  11. Alterations in ocular pathogen susceptibility to gentamicin and tobramycin Alterações na sensibilidade dos patógenos oculares à gentamicina e à tobramicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Tobias de Aguiar Moeller

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate and compare the "in vitro" susceptibility of ocular bacterial isolates to aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin and tobramycin and to analyze the alteration in susceptibility after 14 years of introduction of tobramycin in Brazilian ophthalmic practice. Methods: The results of antibiotic susceptibility tests in a period of three years with 887 bacterial strains (Study "A" were retrospectively analyzed and then compared with the results obtained fourteen years ago with 124 microorganisms (Study "B", when tobramycin was first tested in Brazil for isolated eye strains. In both studies, the data analyzed were from the files of the Ocular Microbiology Laboratory of the Federal University of São Paulo. Results: The "in vitro" effectiveness of both antibiotics regarding the total number of positive isolates was significantly higher for tobramycin in both studies. An increase in the Staphylococcus aureus strains resistant to tobramycin and only a decreasing trend in the number of microorganisms resistant to gentamicin was observed. With Pseudomonas sp, a strong tendency to the increase of susceptibility to gentamicin and to the appearance of strains resistant to tobramycin occurred. Conclusions: The introduction of tobramycin in the treatment of ocular infections and the possible decrease in number of gentamicin prescriptions during the last fourteen years might be the cause of modifications in the susceptibility observed in the total of positive isolates mainly Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. For the isolated microorganisms from the conjunctiva, the sensitivity to both antibiotics was equivalent.Objetivos: Avaliar e comparar a sensibilidade "in vitro" de bactérias isoladas do olho humano aos aminoglicosídeos gentamicina e tobramicina, e analisar a mudança de sensibilidade ocorrida após quatorze anos de uso. Métodos: Os resultados dos antibiogramas realizados no período de três anos com 887 bactérias (Estudo "A

  12. Heterologous production of kasugamycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic from Streptomyces kasugaensis, in Streptomyces lividans and Rhodococcus erythropolis L-88 by constitutive expression of the biosynthetic gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Kano; Sasaki, Akira; Matsuo, Takashi; Yamamoto, Chika; Minato, Yuiko; Kuwahara, Naoya; Fujii, Chikako; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Agematu, Hitosi; Tamura, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Jun; Ikeda, Haruo; Kojima, Ikuo

    2017-05-01

    Kasugamycin (KSM), an aminoglycoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces kasugaensis cultures, has been used against rice blast disease for more than 50 years. We cloned the KSM biosynthetic gene (KBG) cluster from S. kasugaensis MB273-C4 and constructed three KBG cassettes (i.e., cassettes I-III) to enable heterologous production of KSM in many actinomycetes by constitutive expression of KBGs. Cassette I comprised all putative transcriptional units in the cluster, but it was placed under the control of the P neo promoter from Tn5. It was not maintained stably in Streptomyces lividans and did not transform Rhodococcus erythropolis. Cassette II retained the original arrangement of KBGs, except that the promoter of kasT, the specific activator gene for KBG, was replaced with P rpsJ , the constitutive promoter of rpsJ from Streptomyces avermitilis. To enhance the intracellular concentration of myo-inositol, an expression cassette of ino1 encoding the inositol-1-phosphate synthase from S. avermitilis was inserted into cassette II to generate cassette III. These two cassettes showed stable maintenance in S. lividans and R. erythropolis to produce KSM. Particularly, the transformants of S. lividans induced KSM production up to the same levels as those produced by S. kasugaensis. Furthermore, cassette III induced more KSM accumulation than cassette II in R. erythropolis, suggesting an exogenous supply of myo-inositol by the ino1 expression in the host. Cassettes II and III appear to be useful for heterologous KSM production in actinomycetes. Rhodococcus exhibiting a spherical form in liquid cultivation is also a promising heterologous host for antibiotic fermentation.

  13. Polymer-controlled release of tobramycin from bone graft void filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Amanda E; Brooks, Benjamin D; Davidoff, Sherry N; Hogrebe, Paul C; Fisher, Mark A; Grainger, David W

    2013-12-01

    Despite clinical, material, and pharmaceutical advances, infection remains a major obstacle in total joint revision surgery. Successful solutions must extend beyond bulk biomaterial and device modifications, integrating locally delivered pharmaceuticals and physiological cues at the implant site, or within large bone defects with prominent avascular spaces. One approach involves coating clinically familiar allograft bone with an antibiotic-releasing rate-controlling polymer membrane for use as a matrix for local drug release in bone. The kinetics of drug release from this system can be tailored via alterations in the substrate or the polymeric coating. Drug-loaded polycaprolactone coating releases bioactive tobramycin from both cadaveric-sourced cancellous allograft fragments and synthetic hybrid coralline ceramic bone graft fragments with similar kinetics over a clinically relevant 6-week timeframe. However, micron-sized allograft particulate provides extended bioactive tobramycin release. Addition of porogen polyethylene glycol to the polymer coating formulation changes tobramycin release kinetics without significant impact on released antibiotic bioactivity. Incorporation of oil-microencapsulated tobramycin into the polymer coating did not significantly modify tobramycin release kinetics. In addition to releasing inhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, antibiotic-loaded allograft bone provides recognized beneficial osteoconductive potential, attractive for decreasing orthopedic surgical infections with improved filling of dead space and new bone formation.

  14. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ellen G.; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky G.

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2× the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 μg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity. However, all eight strains became resistant to gentamicin (up to 16-fold increase in MIC) after exposure to sublethal triclosan concentrations. Gentamicin-resistant isolates of strains N53-1 and 4446 were also resistant to other aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin. Gentamicin resistance remained at a high level also after five subcultures without triclosan or gentamicin. Aminoglycoside resistance can be caused by mutations in the target site, the 16S rRNA gene. However, such mutations were not detected in the N53-1-resistant isolates. A combination of gentamicin and ampicillin is commonly used in listeriosis treatment. The triclosan-induced resistance is, hence, of great concern. Further investigations are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of triclosan. PMID:21746948

  15. Delivery of tobramycin coupled to iron oxide nanoparticles across the biofilm of mucoidal Pseudonomas aeruginosa and investigation of its efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Kopciuch, Michael; Olszá½¹wka, Zuzia; Wawrzyniec, Stephen J.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Plumley, John B.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Huber, Dale L.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterium is a deadly pathogen, leading to respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis and nosocomial pneumonia, and responsible for high mortality rates in these diseases. P. aeruginosa has inherent as well as acquired resistance to many drug classes. In this paper, we investigate the effectiveness of two classes; aminoglycoside (tobramycin) and fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin) administered alone, as well as conjugated to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles. P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to quickly alter its genetics to impart resistance to the presence of new, unrecognized treatments. As a response to this impending public health threat, we have synthesized and characterized magnetite nanoparticles capped with biodegradable short-chain carboxylic acid derivatives conjugated to common antibiotic drugs. The functionalized nanoparticles may carry the drug past the mucus and biofilm layers to target the bacterial colonies via magnetic gradient-guided transport. Additionally, the magnetic ferrofluid may be used under application of an oscillating magnetic field to raise the local temperature, causing biofilm disruption, slowed growth, and mechanical disruption. These abilities of the ferrofluid would also treat multi-drug resistant strains, which appear to be increasing in many nosocomial as well as acquired opportunistic infections. In this in vitro model, we show that the iron oxide alone can also inhibit bacterial growth and biofilm formation.

  16. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Antibiotic combination therapy might be more efficient than single antibiotics to combat Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis. We tested the ability of colistin sulphatetobramycin combinations and single antibiotics to kill P. aeruginosa...... biofilms. Methods. P. aeruginosa biofilms were generated in vitro and in rat lungs. In a pilot study, 5 patients with cystic fibrosis inhaled colistin and then tobramycin for 4 weeks. The changes in P. aeruginosa counts and lung function were assessed before and after therapy. Results. Antibiotic...... significantly lower after 7 days in animals receiving antibiotic combination than in animals receiving single antibiotics. In patients with cystic fibrosis, inhaled colistin-tobramycin was well tolerated and resulted in a mean decrease of 2.52 +/- 2.5 cfu of P. aeruginosa per milliliter of sputum (P = .027...

  17. Safety and effectiveness of colistin compared with tobramycin for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Karen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nosocomial infections due to multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are often treated with colistin, but there are few data comparing its safety and efficacy with other antimicrobials. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients treated with colistin or tobramycin for A. baumannii infections in intensive care units (ICUs at Groote Schuur hospital. Colistin was used for A. baumannii isolates which were resistant to all other available antimicrobials. In the tobramycin group, 53% of the isolates were only susceptible to tobramycin and colistin. We assessed ICU mortality, nephrotoxicity and time to the first negative culture. Results 32 patients, with similar admission APACHE scores and serum creatinine, were treated with each antimicrobial. There were no significant differences between the colistin and tobramycin groups in ICU mortality (p = 0.54, nephrotoxicity (p = 0.67, change in creatinine from baseline to highest subsequent value (p = 0.11 and time to microbiological clearance (p = 0.75. The hazard ratio for total in-hospital survival in patients treated with colistin compared to tobramycin was 0.43 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.99. Conclusion Our study suggests that colistin and tobramycin have similar risks of nephrotoxicity and are equally efficacious. Colistin is an acceptable antibiotic for the treatment of A. baumanii infections when the organism is resistant to other available antimicrobials.

  18. Impact of azithromycin on the clinical and antimicrobial effectiveness of tobramycin in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Dave P; Happoldt, Carrie L; Bratcher, Preston E; Caceres, Silvia M; Chmiel, James F; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Saavedra, Milene T; Saiman, Lisa; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Nick, Jerry A

    2017-05-01

    Concomitant use of oral azithromycin and inhaled tobramycin occurs in approximately half of US cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Recent data suggest that this combination may be antagonistic. Test the hypothesis that azithromycin reduces the clinical benefits of tobramycin by analyses of clinical trial data, in vitro modeling of P. aeruginosa antibiotic killing, and regulation of the MexXY efflux pump. Ongoing administration of azithromycin associates with reduced ability of inhaled tobramycin, as compared with aztreonam, to improve lung function and quality of life in a completed clinical trial. In users of azithromycin FEV 1 (L) increased 0.8% during a 4-week period of inhaled tobramycin and an additional 6.4% during a subsequent 4-week period of inhaled aztreonam (Pazithromycin had similar improvement in lung function and quality of life scores during inhaled tobramycin and inhaled aztreonam. In vitro, azithromycin selectively reduced the bactericidal effects tobramycin in cultures of clinical strains of P. aeruginosa, while up regulating antibiotic resistance through MexXY efflux. Azithromycin appears capable of reducing the antimicrobial benefits of tobramycin by inducing adaptive bacterial stress responses in P. aeruginosa, suggesting that these medications together may not be optimal chronic therapy for at least some patients. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamics of aminoglycoside and acyl-coenzyme A binding to the Salmonella enterica AAC(6')-Iy aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Subray S; Dam, Tarun K; Brewer, C Fred; Blanchard, John S

    2002-06-11

    Kinetic and mechanistic studies on the chromosomally encoded aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iy, of Salmonella enterica that confers resistance toward aminoglycosides have been previously reported [Magnet et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 3700-3709]. In the present study, equilibrium binding and the thermodynamic parameters of binding of aminoglycosides and acyl-coenzyme A derivatives to AAC(6')-Iy and of two mutants, C109A and the C109A/C70A double mutant, have been studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Association constants for different aminoglycosides varied greatly (4 x 10(4)-150 x 10(4)) while the association constants of several acyl-coenzyme A derivatives were similar (3.2 x 10(4)-4.5 x 10(4)). The association constants and van't Hoff enthalpy changes derived from intrinsic protein fluorescence changes were in agreement with independently measured values from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. Binding of both aminoglycosides and acyl-coenzyme A derivatives is strongly enthalpically driven and revealed opposing negative entropy changes, resulting in enthalpy-entropy compensation. The acetyltransferase exhibited a temperature-dependent binding of tobramycin with a negative heat capacity value of 410 cal mol(-1) K(-1). Isothermal titration studies of acetyl-coenzyme A and tobramycin binding to mutant forms of the enzyme indicated that completely conserved C109 does not play any direct role in the binding of either of the substrates, while C70 is directly involved in aminoglycoside binding. These results are discussed and compared with previous steady-state kinetic studies of the enzyme.

  20. Revisiting the Nucleotide and Aminoglycoside Substrate Specificity of the Bifunctional Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (kcat/Km = 105-107 m−1 s−1). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. PMID:23115238

  1. Killing curve activity of ciprofloxacin is comparable to synergistic effect of beta-lactam-tobramycin combinations against Haemophilus species endocarditis strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, H; Frimodt-Møller, N; Gutschik, E

    1992-01-01

    Nine Haemophilus species strains, all beta-lactamase negative, isolated from patients with endocarditis were tested in killing curve experiments. Antibiotics used were penicillin, amoxicillin, aztreonam alone and in combination with tobramycin, as well as ciprofloxacin alone. Synergism between beta...

  2. Killing curve activity of ciprofloxacin is comparable to synergistic effect of beta-lactam-tobramycin combinations against Haemophilus species endocarditis strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, H; Frimodt-Møller, N; Gutschik, E

    1992-01-01

    Nine Haemophilus species strains, all beta-lactamase negative, isolated from patients with endocarditis were tested in killing curve experiments. Antibiotics used were penicillin, amoxicillin, aztreonam alone and in combination with tobramycin, as well as ciprofloxacin alone. Synergism between beta......-lactams and tobramycin with reduction of colony counts to zero was seen after 24 h for H. influenzae, H. parainfluenzae and H. segnis strains. Ciprofloxacin was as effective as beta-lactam-tobramycin combinations. The H. aphrophilus strain was not killed as effectively as other strains by any of the antibiotics....

  3. Ultrathin antibiotic walled microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopade, Ajay J; Arulsudar, N; Khopade, Surekha A; Hartmann, J

    2005-01-01

    Ultrathin microcapsules comprised of anionic polyelectrolytes (PE) and a polycationic aminoglycoside (AmG) antibiotic drug were prepared by depositing PE/AmG multilayers on zinc oxide (ZnO) colloid particles using the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique and subsequently dissolving the ZnO templated cores. The polyelectrolytes, dextran sulfate sodium (DxS) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS), were selected owing to their different backbone structure. An aminoglycoside, tobramycin sulfate (TbS), was used for studying DxS/TbS or PSS/TbS multilayer films. The multilayer growth on ZnO cores was characterized by alternating zeta potential values that were different for the DxS/TbS and PSS/TbS multilayers due to the PE chemistry and its interaction with Zn(2+) ions. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy provide evidence of PE/TbS multilayer coating on ZnO core particles. The slow acid-decomposition of the ZnO cores using weak organic acids and the presence of sufficient quantity of Zn(2+) in the dispersion were required to produce antibiotic multilayer capsules. There was no difference in the morphological characteristics of the two types of capsules; although, the yield for [PSS/TbS](5) capsules was significantly higher than for [DxS/TbS](5) capsules which was related to the physicochemical properties of DxS/TbS/Zn(2+) and PSS/TbS/Zn(2+) complexes forming the capsule wall. The TbS quantity in the multilayer films was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance and high performance liquid chromatography techniques which showed less TbS loading in both, capsules and multilayers on planar gold substrate, than the theoretical DxS:TbS or PSS:TbS stoichiometric ratio. The decomposition of the [PE/TbS](6) multilayers was fastest in physiological buffer followed by mannitol and water. The decomposition rate of the [PSS/TbS](6) multilayers was slower than [DxS/TbS](6) monolayers. The incomplete decomposition of DxS/TbS under saline conditions suggests the major role of

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are more susceptible to ciprofloxacin than to tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, C A; Khoury, A E; Reid, G; Bruce, A W; Costerton, J W

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and compare the biofilm elimination concentrations (BEC: the concentration which reduced the viability of biofilm organisms by at least 99.9%) of ciprofloxacin and tobramycin for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common cause of nosocomial biomaterial-related infections. Bacterial biofilms were produced in the modified. Robbins device using continuous culture flow at 60 ml/h for 40-44 h, and the sessile organisms were then exposed to either ciprofloxacin or tobramycin at a range of concentrations for 12 or 36h. The BEC of ciprofloxacin was 5 mug/ml for the 12 and 36 h treatments, a value 10 x greater than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). In contrast, the BEC of tobramycin was > 100 mu/ml after 12h and 75 ug/ml following 36 h of drug exposure, that is 75-100 x the MIC and MBC. The results demonstrated that the BEC is a more suitable indicator of the antibiotic susceptibility of P. aeruginosa biofilms than the MIC and MBC. Ciprofloxacin was significantly more effective than tobramycin in the treatment of P. aeruginosa adherent to biomaterials. With respect to clinical application, if the intention of antibiotic use is to eradicate bacteria adherent to devices, only biofilm-active agents should be used.

  5. Histological study on the effect of tobramycin dosage regimens on renal proximal tubular cells in the rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, M.; Motabagani, A.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to show the potential nephrotoxicity of tobramycin, given in two different dosage regimens, on the proximal convoluted tubules by using the light and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Thirty-five rats were divided into three groups: Group I served as control, Group II received tobramycin at 4mg/Kg of body weight intraperitoneally every 8 hours for ten days, and Group III received once-daily dosing of intraperitoneal injection of tobramycin at 12mg/Kg of body weight for ten days. The rats were sacrificed 3 days after the last injection. Small pieces of the right kidneys of all the animals were processed for light and electron microscopic examination. The study showed that tobramycin resulted in certain structural and ultrastructural changes in the proximal convoluted tubules. These changes included vacuolar degeneration in the epithelial cells, increased number of lysosomes with variably sized myeloid bodies, mitochondrial oedema, and loss of apical microvilli. These changes were clearly evident following multiple-daily dosing and were less obvious following once-daily dosing. Furthermore, regenerating tubular epithelial cells were evident following once-daily dosing administration. The experimental tobramycin toxicity can be reduced by administering equivalent amounts of the antibiotic in a once-daily dosing as opposed to multiple-daily injections. It is hoped that this study will contribute in the selection of a more appropriate dosing regimen for tobramycin in human beings. (author)

  6. Co-precipitation of tobramycin into biomimetically coated orthopedic fixation pins employing submicron-thin seed layers of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Jan H; Lilja, Mirjam; Åstrand, Maria; Sörensen, Torben C; Procter, Philip; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    The migration, loosening and cut-out of implants and nosocomial infections are current problems associated with implant surgery. New innovative strategies to overcome these issues are emphasized in today's research. The current work presents a novel strategy involving co-precipitation of tobramycin with biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) formation to produce implant coatings that control local drug delivery to prevent early bacterial colonization of the implant. A submicron- thin HA layer served as seed layer for the co-precipitation process and allowed for incorporation of tobramycin in the coating from a stock solution of antibiotic concentrations as high as 20 mg/ml. Concentrations from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml tobramycin and process temperatures of 37 °C and 60 °C were tested to assess the optimal parameters for a thin tobramycin- delivering HA coating on discs and orthopedic fixation pins. The morphology and thickness of the coating and the drug-release profile were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The coatings delivered pharmaceutically relevant amounts of tobramycin over a period of 12 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest release period ever observed for a fast-loaded biomimetic implant coating. The presented approach could form the foundation for development of combination device/antibiotic delivery vehicles tailored to meet well-defined clinical needs while combating infections and ensuring fast implant in-growth.

  7. In vitro approach to study the synergistic effects of tobramycin and clarithromycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using prokaryotic or eukaryotic culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thellin, Olivier; Zorzi, Willy; Jolois, Olivier; Elmoualij, Benaïssa; Duysens, Guérin; Cahay, Bernard; Streel, Bruno; Charif, Mounia; Bastin, Renaud; Heinen, Ernst; Quatresooz, Pascale

    2015-07-01

    Recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections involving biofilm formation are frequent in cystic fibrosis, aggravating the respiratory distress. Co-administration of clarithromycin and classical tobramycin could improve the health status of patients. Antibiotic toxicity was assessed on epithelial (CFBE41o(-)) and macrophagic (THP-1) cell lines. Non-toxic concentrations of antibiotics alone or in combination were applied twice daily for 12 days on mature (12-day-old) biofilms of three P. aeruginosa strains, developed either in prokaryotic culture broth [tryptic soy broth (TSB)] or in a eukaryotic cell culture medium (RPMI-FCS) more similar to an in vivo environment. The antibiofilm and bactericidal effects of antibiotics were assessed. No toxicity of tobramycin was observed on eukaryotic cell lines at concentrations up to 500μg/mL, whilst 100μg/mL was selected as the clarithromycin upper safe limit. The amount of biofilm was strongly reduced by 100μg/mL and 500μg/mL tobramycin for each strain in both media, whilst clarithromycin was only effective in RPMI-FBS, with synergistic (PAO1 strain) and additive (PYO2 strain) effects detected when combining tobramycin 4μg/mL and clarithromycin 100μg/mL. Finally, tobramycin at ≥100μg/mL exerted strong bactericidal effects on each strain in both media. Clarithromycin also exerted bactericidal effects on each strain in both media; its effect was weaker than tobramycin in TSB but was similar in RPMI-FBS. Synergistic effects were observed on PAO1 and MUCO biofilms, e.g. when combining tobramycin 4μg/mL and clarithromycin 100μg/mL. These in vitro data show that co-administration of clarithromycin and tobramycin acts synergistically against in vitro P. aeruginosa biofilms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. In vitro activity of aminoglycosides against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii complex and other nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli causing healthcare-associated bloodstream infections in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jyh-You; Wang, Fu-Der; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Liu, Jien-Wei; Wang, Jann-Tay; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hseuh, Po-Ren; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2016-12-01

    Aminoglycosides possess in vitro activity against aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli. However, nationwide surveillance on susceptibility data of Acinetobacter baumannii complex and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to aminoglycosides was limited, and aminoglycoside resistance has emerged in the past decade. We study the in vitro susceptibility of A. baumannii complex and other nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB) to aminoglycosides. A total of 378 NFGNB blood isolates causing healthcare-associated bloodstream infections during 2008 and 2013 at four medical centers in Taiwan were tested for their susceptibilities to four aminoglycosides using the agar dilution method (gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin, and isepamicin) and disc diffusion method (isepamicin). A. baumannii was highly resistant to all four aminoglycosides (range of susceptibility, 0-4%), whereas >80% of Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii blood isolates were susceptible to amikacin (susceptibility: 96% and 91%, respectively), tobramycin (susceptibility: 92% and 80%, respectively), and isepamicin (susceptibility: 96% and 80%, respectively). All aminoglycosides except gentamicin possessed good in vitro activity (>94%) against P. aeruginosa. Amikacin has the best in vitro activity against P. aeruginosa (susceptibility, 98%), followed by A. nosocomialis (96%), and A. pittii (91%), whereas tobramycin and isepamicin were less potent against A. pittii (both 80%). Aminoglycoside resistances were prevalent in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Burkholderia cepacia complex blood isolates in Taiwan. Genospecies among the A. baumannii complex had heterogeneous susceptibility profiles to aminoglycosides. Aminoglycosides, except gentamicin, remained good in vitro antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further in vivo clinical data and continuous resistance monitoring are warranted for clinical practice guidance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Phenotypic and Genotypic Antibiotic Resistance of Salmonella from Chicken Carcasses Marketed at Ibague, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Cortes Vélez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica is responsible for alimentary toxic infections associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry products and the antimicrobial resistant patterns of Salmonella circulating in the Tolima region are currently unknown. To address this issue, both the phenotype and genotype antibiotic resistance patterns of 47 Salmonella isolated from raw chicken carcasses sold at the Ibague city were analyzed by the disc diffusion, microdilution and PCR assays. All 47 Salmonella isolates showed resistance to five or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to Ampicillin (AMP, Amikacin (AMK, Gentamicin (GEN, Tobramycin (TOB, Cefazoline (CFZ, Cefoxitin (FOX, Nitrofurantoin (NIT, Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (SXT, Tetracycline (TET, Ciprofloxacin (CIP and Enrofloxacin (ENR was observed in 42.35% of Salmonella isolates. All tested S. Paratyphi B var Java isolates showed resistance to at least 12 antibiotics. S. Hvittingfoss showed resistance to 5 antibiotics, whereas S. Muenster showed resistance to seven antibiotics. Amplification of a number of antibiotic resistance genes showed that blaTEM (100% correlated well with resistance to Ampicilin and Cephalosporin, whereas aadB (87% correlated well with resistance to Aminoglycosides. It is concluded that Salmonella isolated from raw chicken meat marketed at Ibague showed MDR by both phenotypic and genotypic methods and they may represent an important threat to human health. Additional studies are needed to establish the relationship between antibiotic resistance in Salmonella from poultry products and clinical isolates.

  10. Drug loading and release of Tobramycin from hydroxyapatite coated fixation pins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Mirjam; Sörensen, Jan Henrik; Brohede, Ulrika; Astrand, Maria; Procter, Philip; Arnoldi, Jörg; Steckel, Hartwig; Strømme, Maria

    2013-09-01

    This paper evaluates the loading and release properties of Tobramycin incorporated by adsorptive loading from a solution into plasma sprayed and biomimetically coated Hydroxyapatite (HA) fixation pins. The aim of this study is to contribute towards designing a functional implant surface offering local release of the antibiotic agent to prevent post-surgical infections. Cathodic arc deposition is used to coat stainless steel fixation pins with a bioactive, anatase phase dominated, TiO₂ coating onto which a HA layer is grown biomimetically. The loading and release properties are evaluated by studying the subsequent release of Tobramycin using high performance liquid chromatography and correlated to the differences in HA coating microstructure and the physical conditions under loading. The results from these studies show that a dual loading strategy consisting of a solution temperature of 90 °C and a pressure of 6 bar during a loading time of 5 min release a sufficient amount of Tobramycin to guarantee the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus up to 2 days for plasma sprayed HA coatings and for 8 days for biomimetic coatings. The present study emphasizes the advantages of the nanoporous structure of biomimetically deposited HA over the more dense structure of plasma sprayed HA coatings in terms of antibiotic incorporation and subsequent sustained release and provides a valuable outline for the design of implant surfaces aiming for a fast-loading and controlled, local drug administration.

  11. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment augments tobramycin efficacy in experimental staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C J; Christophersen, L J; Kolpen, M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: S. aureus infective endocarditis (IE) is a serious disease an in-hospital mortality of up to 40%. Improvements of effects of antibiotics and host responses could potentially benefit outcomes. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) represents an adjunctive therapeutic option. We evaluated...... the efficacy of HBOT in combination with tobramycin in S. aureus IE. METHODS: A rat model of S. aureus IE mimicking the bacterial load in humans was used. Infected rats treated with tobramycin were randomized into two groups, 1) HBOT (b.i.d) or 2) normobaric air breathing (non-HBOT). Quantitative bacteriology......, cytokine expression, valve vegetation size and clinical status were assessed 4 days post infection. RESULTS: Adjunctive HBOT (n=13) reduced bacterial load in the aortic valves, myocardium and spleen compared to the non-HBOT group (n=17) (p=.04, p

  13. Resistance pattern of clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus against five groups of antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzana, K.; Hameed, A.

    2006-01-01

    Among the samples received in pathology laboratory, Pakistan institute of Medical Science, Islamabad, 5069 samples had bacterial growth, among these 2580 (51%) samples were Gram-positive cocci and 1688 were Staphylococcus aureus during a period of two years. Out of these Gram-positive cocci 56% were resistant to penicillin group, 27% were resistant to cephalosporin group, 22% were resistant to aminoglycoside group 15% were resistant to quinolone group and 31% were resistant to other antibiotics (cotrimaxazole, erythromycin, aztreonam, vancomycin, nitrofurantion and meropenam). Antibio-grams of Gram-positive cocci were determined against various antibiotics by disc diffusion method. The rate of resistance to most of the antibiotics such as ampicillin, piperacillin, carbenicillin, penicillin, cephradine, cefotaxime, erythromycin, ceclor, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimexazole (septran), gentamicin, meropenem, ceftazidime, erythromycin, tobramycin, enoxacin was higher when tested against the isolates collected from pus as compared to those from blood and urine. Antibiotic resistant strains were more prevalent in pus samples than other clinical isolates (blood and urine). The randomly selected 155 strains of Staphylococcus aureus when tested against five groups of antibiotics showed resistance rate against ampicillin (92%), cephradine (92%), cephradine (60%), and gentamicin (58%). However intermediate resistance was found in case of vancomicin (38%), in hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. (author)

  14. Identification of a Novel 6′-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase, AAC(6′)-Iak, from a Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Dahal, Rajan K.; Mishra, Shyam K.; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Pokhrel, Bharat M.

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IOMTU250 has a novel 6′-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6′)-Iak. The encoded protein, AAC(6′)-Iak, consists of 153 amino acids and has 86.3% identity to AAC(6′)-Iz. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing aac(6′)-Iak exhibited decreased susceptibility to arbekacin, dibekacin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6′)-Iak acetylated amikacin, arbekacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not apramycin, gentamicin, or lividomycin. PMID:25092711

  15. Identification of a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iak, from a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2014-10-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IOMTU250 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Iak. The encoded protein, AAC(6')-Iak, consists of 153 amino acids and has 86.3% identity to AAC(6')-Iz. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing aac(6')-Iak exhibited decreased susceptibility to arbekacin, dibekacin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Iak acetylated amikacin, arbekacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not apramycin, gentamicin, or lividomycin. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. A minimum structure of aminoglycosides that causes an initiation shift of trans-translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Toshiharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2004-01-01

    Trans-translation is an unusual translation in which transfer-messenger RNA plays a dual function--as a tRNA and an mRNA--to relieve the stalled translation on the ribosome. It has been shown that paromomycin, a typical member of a 4,5-disubstituted class of aminoglycosides, causes a shift of the translation-resuming point on the tmRNA by -1 during trans-translation. To address the molecular basis of this novel effect, we examined the effects of various aminoglycosides that can bind around the A site of the small subunit of the ribosome on trans-translation in vitro. Tobramycin and gentamicin, belonging to the 4,6-disubstituted class of aminoglycosides having rings I and II similar to those in the 4,5-disubstituted class, possess similar effects. Neamine, which has only rings I and II, a common structure shared by 4,5- and 4,6-disubstituted classes of aminoglycosides, was sufficient to cause an initiation shift of trans-translation. In contrast, streptomycin or hygromycin B, lacking ring I, did not cause an initiation shift. The effect of each aminoglycoside on trans-translation coincides with that on conformational change in the A site of the small subunit of the ribosome revealed by recent structural studies: paromomycin, tobramycin and geneticin which is categorized into the gentamicin subclass, but not streptomycin and hygromycin B, flip out two conserved adenine bases at 1492 and 1493 from the A site helix. The pattern of initiation shifts by paromomycin fluctuates with variation of mutations introduced into a region upstream of the initiation point.

  17. Resistance development of cystic fibrosis respiratory pathogens when exposed to fosfomycin and tobramycin alone and in combination under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Gerard; Diamond, Paul; Elborn, J Stuart; McKevitt, Matt; Tunney, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    Although antibiotics from different classes are frequently prescribed in combination to prevent the development of resistance amongst Cystic Fibrosis (CF) respiratory pathogens, there is a lack of data as to the efficacy of this approach. We have previously shown that a 4:1 (w/w) combination of fosfomycin and tobramycin (F:T) has excellent activity against CF pathogens with increased activity under physiologically relevant anaerobic conditions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether F:T could delay or prevent the onset of resistance compared to either fosfomycin or tobramycin alone under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The frequency of spontaneous mutants arising following exposure to fosfomycin, tobramycin and F:T was determined for clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA isolates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of fosfomycin, tobramycin and F:T on the induction of resistance was also investigated, with the stability of resistance and fitness cost associated with resistance assessed if it developed. P. aeruginosa and MRSA isolates had a lower frequency of spontaneous mutants to F:T compared to fosfomycin and tobramycin under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. There was a maximum two-fold increase in F:T MICs when P. aeruginosa and MRSA isolates were passaged in sub-inhibitory F:T for 12 days. In contrast, sequential resistance to fosfomycin and tobramycin developed quickly (n = 3 days for both) after passage in sub-inhibitory concentrations. Once developed, both fosfomycin and tobramycin resistance was stable and not associated with a biological fitness cost to either P. aeruginosa or MRSA isolates. The results of this study suggest that F:T may prevent the development of resistance compared to fosfomycin or tobramycin alone under aerobic and physiologically relevant anaerobic conditions. F:T may be a potential treatment option in CF patients chronically colonised by MRSA and/or P

  18. Effectiveness of tobramycin conjugated to iron oxide nanoparticles in treating infection in cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Armijo, Leisha M.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Plumley, John B.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited childhood-onset life-shortening disease. It is characterized by increased respiratory production, leading to airway obstruction, chronic lung infection and inflammatory reactions. The most common bacteria causing persisting infections in people with CF is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated to the antibiotic (tobramycin), guided by a gradient of the magnetic field or subjected to an oscillating magnetic field, show promise in improving the drug delivery across the mucus and P. aeruginosa biofilm to the bacteria. The question remains whether tobramycin needs to be released from the NPs after the penetration of the mucus barrier in order to act upon the pathogenic bacteria. We used a zero-length 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) crosslinking agent to couple tobramycin, via its amine groups, to the carboxyl groups on Fe3O4 NPs capped with citric acid. The therapeutic efficiency of Fe3O4 NPs attached to the drug versus that of the free drug was investigated in P. aeruginosa culture.

  19. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian May

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin in combination with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics including colistin were used. Several instillations of tobramycin into the abdominal cavity along with concomitant IV administration of colistin, ceftazidime and tobramycin and per os colistin, tobramycin and nystatin resulted in the clearance of the pseudomonal infection without any evidence of toxicity from the treatment. Intra-abdominal tobramycin with parenteral colistin therapy can be used in complicated clinical settings with appropriate nephroprotection.

  20. Entry of aminoglycosides into renal tubular epithelial cells via endocytosis-dependent and endocytosis-independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa

    2014-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics such as gentamicin and amikacin are well recognized as a clinically important antibiotic class because of their reliable efficacy and low cost. However, the clinical use of aminoglycosides is limited by their nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Nephrotoxicity is induced mainly due to high accumulation of the antibiotics in renal proximal tubular cells. Therefore, a lot of studies on characterization of the renal transport system for aminoglycosides so far reported involved various in-vivo and in-vitro techniques. Early studies revealed that aminoglycosides are taken up through adsorptive endocytosis in renal epithelial cells. Subsequently, it was found that megalin, a multiligand endocytic receptor abundantly expressed on the apical side of renal proximal tubular cells, can bind aminoglycosides and that megalin-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in renal accumulation of aminoglycosides. Therefore, megalin has been suggested to be a promising molecular target for the prevention of aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity. On the other hand, recently, some reports have indicated that aminoglycosides are transported via a pathway that does not require endocytosis, such as non-selective cation channel-mediated entry, in cultured renal tubular cells as well as cochlear outer hair cells. In this commentary article, we review the cellular transport of aminoglycosides in renal epithelial cells, focusing on endocytosis-dependent and -independent pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V; Bentin, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short...

  2. Intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Enterococcus faecium is conferred by the 16S rRNA m5C1404-specific methyltransferase EfmM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galimand, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Panvert, Michel

    2011-01-01

    methyltransferase, as well as by the previously characterized aac(6')-Ii that encodes a 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase. Inactivation of efmM in E. faecium increases susceptibility to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and tobramycin, and, conversely, expression of a recombinant version of efmM in Escherichia coli...... confers resistance to these drugs. The EfmM protein shows significant sequence similarity to E. coli RsmF (previously called YebU), which is a 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) methyltransferase modifying 16S rRNA nucleotide C1407. The target for EfmM is shown by mass spectrometry to be a neighboring 16S r...

  3. Aminoglycoside interactions and impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, Irina; Altman, Roger B.; Djumagulov, Muminjon; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Ferguson, Angelica; Chang, Cheng-Wei Tom; Yusupov, Marat; Blanchard, Scott C.; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are chemically diverse, broad-spectrum antibiotics that target functional centers within the bacterial ribosome to impact all four principle stages (initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling) of the translation mechanism. The propensity of aminoglycosides to induce miscoding errors that suppress the termination of protein synthesis supports their potential as therapeutic interventions in human diseases associated with premature termination codons (PTCs). However, the sites of interaction of aminoglycosides with the eukaryotic ribosome and their modes of action in eukaryotic translation remain largely unexplored. Here, we use the combination of X-ray crystallography and single-molecule FRET analysis to reveal the interactions of distinct classes of aminoglycosides with the 80S eukaryotic ribosome. Crystal structures of the 80S ribosome in complex with paromomycin, geneticin (G418), gentamicin, and TC007, solved at 3.3- to 3.7-Å resolution, reveal multiple aminoglycoside-binding sites within the large and small subunits, wherein the 6′-hydroxyl substituent in ring I serves as a key determinant of binding to the canonical eukaryotic ribosomal decoding center. Multivalent binding interactions with the human ribosome are also evidenced through their capacity to affect large-scale conformational dynamics within the pretranslocation complex that contribute to multiple aspects of the translation mechanism. The distinct impacts of the aminoglycosides examined suggest that their chemical composition and distinct modes of interaction with the ribosome influence PTC read-through efficiency. These findings provide structural and functional insights into aminoglycoside-induced impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome and implicate pleiotropic mechanisms of action beyond decoding. PMID:29208708

  4. Prophylaxis of infection and effects on osseointegration using a tobramycin-periapatite coating on titanium implants--an experimental study in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Vogely, H Charles; Fleer, André; Nikkels, Peter G J; Higham, Paul A; Verbout, Abraham J; Castelein, René M; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2009-06-01

    No options are available for local antibiotic delivery from uncemented implants. By loading a porous titanium implant with a biomimetic HA-coating (PeriApatite, PA) with antibiotics, we could obtain adequate local antibiotic concentrations and reduce infection susceptibility. This study investigated the efficacy of a tobramycin-loaded PA-coated titanium foam implant in preventing infection, as well as the effects on osseointegration. In 72 New Zealand White rabbits, an uncoated (Ti), PA-coated (PA), or Tobramycin-PA-coated (PA-tobra) titanium foam rod was implanted intramedullary in the left tibiae after contamination of the implant bed with none (control), 10(3), 10(4) or 10(5) CFU Staphylococcus aureus. PA-tobra implants were loaded with 2.4 mg tobramycin. After 28 days analysis was done by bacteriology, histopathology and histomorphometry. Six percent of the contaminated PA-tobra rabbits were infected, whereas this was 53 and 67% for PA and Ti, respectively (p tobramycin to PA-coated titanium foam implants appears to be an effective local antibiotic strategy for uncemented implants for infection prophylaxis and has a beneficial effect on implant fixation, which will result in improved long-term implant survival. Copyright 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society

  5. Chaperonins fight aminoglycoside-induced protein misfolding and promote short-term tolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Good, Liam; Bentin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    For almost half of a century, we have known that aminoglycoside antibiotics corrupt ribosomes, causing translational misreading, yet it remains unclear whether or not misreading triggers protein misfolding, and possible effects of chaperone action on drug susceptibilities are poorly understood...... as measured by reduced minimum inhibitory concentrations, whereas GroEL/GroES overexpression did not increase minimum inhibitory concentrations. Our observations establish misfolding of cytosolic proteins as an effect of aminoglycoside action and reveal that chaperones, chaperonins in particular, help...

  6. Sound waves effectively assist tobramycin in elimination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; Harb, A; Kolacny, D; Martins, P; Smyth, H D C

    2014-12-01

    Microbial biofilms are highly refractory to antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of low-frequency vibration therapy (20-20 kHz) on antibiotic-mediated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm eradication. In screening studies, low-frequency vibrations were applied on model biofilm compositions to identify conditions in which surface standing waves were observed. Alginate surface tension and viscosity were also measured. The effect of vibration on P. aeruginosa biofilms was studied using a standard biofilm assay. Subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC) of tobramycin (5 μg/ml) were added to biofilms 3 h prior, during, and immediately after vibration and quantitatively assessed by (2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay (XTT) and, qualitatively, by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The standing waves occurred at frequencies sound waves together with antibiotics are a promising approach in eliminating pathogenic biofilms.

  7. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atqah AbdulWahab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA is an important and growing issue in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the frequency of MDR-PA recovered from the lower respiratory samples of pediatric and adult CF patients, and its antibiotic resistance pattern to commonly used antimicrobial agents including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. Materials and Methods: The lower respiratory isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from inpatients and outpatients CF clinics from a tertiary care teaching hospital for the period from October 2014 to September 2015. The identification and antimicrobial susceptibility for all the isolates were performed by using the BD Phoenix™ and E-test in compliance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: A total of 61 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from thirty CF patients from twenty families. Twelve sputum samples were positive for MDR-PA (seven nonmucoid and five mucoid isolates from five CF patients (five families with moderate-to-very severe lung disease given MDR-PA frequency of 19.7%. The median age of the study group was 20 (range 10–30 years. Three CF patients were on chronic inhaled tobramycin and two on nebulized colistin. The antimicrobial patterns of isolates MDR-PA showed the highest rate of resistance toward each gentamycin, amikacin, and cefepime (100%, followed by 91.7% to ciprofloxacin, 75% to tobramycin, 58.3% to meropenem, and 50% to piperacillin-tazobactam. None of the isolates were resistant to colistin during the study period. Conclusion: The study results emphasize that the emergence of a significant problem in the clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in CF patients that dictate appropriate attention to the antibiotic management after proper surveillance.

  8. Appropriateness of aminoglycoside prescriptions in a French university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, A; Leroy, J; Patry, I; Hénon, T; Hocquet, D; Chirouze, C; Bertrand, X

    2016-09-01

    Aminoglycosides are a major class of antibiotics. Their use is particularly interesting in the treatment of severe infections but their toxicity is well known. They are mostly prescribed combined with other agents and as first-line treatments. We aimed to assess the appropriateness of aminoglycoside prescriptions in a French university hospital on the basis of the latest French recommendations published in 2011. We conducted a prospective study between January 17th and February 4th, 2014 to assess prescription modalities of aminoglycosides on the basis of the following criteria: indication, duration of treatment, dosing schedule, administration modalities, and drug level monitoring. Prescriptions were then compared to the 2011 national guidelines. A total of 68 consecutive prescriptions were analyzed and only 47.8% complied with guidelines. Most physicians complied with recommendations, particularly with the indication for severe infections (95.6%), the administration of a single daily dose (92.6%), and the slow intravenous infusion (30minutes) administration (84%). However, physicians tended to prescribe lower doses than recommended (40.3%), especially to patients presenting with renal insufficiency, and drug level monitoring was not optimal. Although new and accurate national recommendations were recently published, aminoglycoside prescription is still not optimal, in particular for dosing and plasma concentration monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of aminoglycoside residues in milk and muscle based on a simple and fast extraction procedure followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Jank, Louíse; Martins, Magda Targa; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Sirtori, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in veterinary medicine mainly for treatment and prevention of diseases. The aminoglycosides are one of the antibiotics classes that have been extensively employed in animal husbandry for the treatment of bacterial infections, but also as growth promotion. The European Union has issued strict Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for aminoglycosides in several animal origin products including bovine milk, bovine, swine and poultry muscle. This paper describes a fast and simple analytical method for the determination of ten aminoglycosides (spectinomycin, tobramycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, hygromycin, apramycin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, amikacin and neomycin) in bovine milk and bovine, swine and poultry muscle. For sample preparation, an extraction method was developed using trichloroacetic acid and clean up with low temperature precipitation and C18 bulk. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to carry out quantitative analysis and liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) was used to screening purposes. Both methods were validated according to the European Union Commission Directive 2002/657/EC. Good performance characteristics were obtained for recovery, precision, calibration curve, specificity, decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) in all matrices evaluated. The detection limit (LOD) and quantification limit (LOQ) were ranging from 5 to 100ngg(-1) and 12.5 to 250ngg(-1), respectively. Good linearity (r)-above 0.99-was achieved in concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 2.0×MRL. Recoveries ranged from 36.8% to 98.0% and the coefficient of variation from 0.9 to 20.2%, noting that all curves have been made into their own matrices in order to minimize the matrix effects. The CCβ values obtained in qualitative method were between 25 and 250ngg(-1). The proposed method showed to be simple, easy, and adequate for high-throughput analysis of a large

  10. High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance and Distribution of Aminoglycoside Resistant Genes among Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus Species in Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elango Padmasini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR by MIC for gentamicin (GM, streptomycin (SM and both (GM + SM antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia; aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id and aph(3′-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3′-IIIa gene. aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia and aph(3′-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai.

  11. Biomechanical and antibacterial properties of Tobramycin loaded hydroxyapatite coated fixation pins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Jan Henrik; Lilja, Mirjam; Sörensen, Torben Christian; Åstrand, Maria; Procter, Philip; Fuchs, Sabine; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigates the use of nanoporous, biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings deposited on TiO₂ coated fixation pins as functional implant surfaces for the local release of Tobramycin in order to prevent bacterial colonization. The impact of HA-coating thickness, coating morphology and biomechanical forces during insertion into synthetic bone on the drug loading and release properties are analyzed. The coatings are shown to exhibit bactericidal effects against Staphylococcus aureus in agar medium for a duration of 6 days after loading by adsorption with Tobramycin for only 5 min at elevated temperature and pressure. Furthermore, high performance liquid chromatography analysis shows a drug release in phosphate buffered saline for 8 days with antibiotic concentration remaining above the minimal inhibitory concentration for S. aureus during the entire release period. Biomechanical insertion tests into synthetic bone and conventional scratch testing demonstrate adhesive strength at the HA/TiO₂ interface. Biocompatibility is verified by cell viability tests. Outgrowth endothelial cells, as well as primary osteoblasts, are viable and firmly attached to both HA and TiO₂ surfaces. The results presented are encouraging and support the concept of functional HA coatings as local drug delivery vehicles for biomedical applications to treat as well as to prevent post-surgical infections. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Formulation and characterization of lipid-coated tobramycin particles for dry powder inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcer, Gabrielle; Sebti, Thami; Amighi, Karim

    2006-05-01

    This study was conducted to develop and evaluate the physicochemical and aerodynamic characteristics of lipid-coated dry powder formulations presenting particularly high lung deposition. Lipid-coated particles were prepared by spray-drying suspensions with different concentrations of tobramycin and lipids. The solid-state properties of the formulations, including particle size and morphology, were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction. Aerosol performance was studied by dispersing the powders into a Multistage Liquid Impinger and determining drug deposition by high-performance liquid chromatography. Particle size distributions of the formulations were unimodal, narrow with more than 90% of the particles having a diameter of less than 2.8 microm. All powder formulations exhibited mass median diameters of less than 1.3 and 3.2 microm, as determined by two different laser diffraction methods, the Malvern's Mastersizer and Spraytec, respectively. The fine particle fraction varied within a range of 50.5 and 68.3%. Lipid coating of tobramycin formulations resulted in a reduced agglomeration tendency and in high fine particle fraction values, thus improving drug deposition. The very low excipients content (about 5% m/m) of these formulations offers the benefit of delivering particularly huge concentrations of antibiotic directly to the site of infection, while minimizing systemic exposure, and may provide a valuable alternative treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  13. Pulmonary delivery of tobramycin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections associated with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Sastre, María; Pastor, Marta; Esquisabel, Amaia; Sans, Eulàlia; Viñas, Miguel; Fleischer, Aarne; Palomino, Esther; Bachiller, Daniel; Pedraz, José Luis

    2016-02-10

    Among the pathogens that affect cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent. As a way to fight against this infection, nanotechnology has emerged over the last decades as a promising alternative to overcome resistance to antibiotics in infectious diseases. The goal of this work was to elaborate and characterize lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery of tobramycin. Tobramycin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Tb-NLCs) were prepared by hot melt homogenization technique. In addition, nanoparticles labeled with infrared dye (IR-NLCs) were used to investigate their in vivo performance after pulmonary administration. Tb-NLCs displayed a mean diameter size around 250 nm, high drug encapsulation (93%) and sustained release profile. Tb-NLCs showed to be active against clinically isolated P. aeruginosa. Moreover, Tb-NLCs did not decrease cell viability and were able to overcome an artificial mucus barrier in the presence of mucolytics agents. During the in vivo assay, IR-NLCs were administered to several mice by the intratracheal route using a Penn Century device. Next, the biodistribution of the nanoparticles was analyzed at different time points showing a wide nanosystem distribution in the lungs. Altogether, tobramycin-loaded NLCs seem to us an encouraging alternative to the currently available CF therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Protective effect of rasagiline in aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polony, G; Humli, V; Andó, R; Aller, M; Horváth, T; Harnos, A; Tamás, L; Vizi, E S; Zelles, T

    2014-04-18

    Sensorineural hearing losses (SNHLs; e.g., ototoxicant- and noise-induced hearing loss or presbycusis) are among the most frequent sensory deficits, but they lack effective drug therapies. The majority of recent therapeutic approaches focused on the trials of antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers in SNHLs. The rationale for these studies was the prominent role of disturbed redox homeostasis and the consequent ROS elevation. Although the antioxidant therapies in several animal studies seemed to be promising, clinical trials have failed to fulfill expectations. We investigated the potential of rasagiline, an FDA-approved monomanine oxidase type B inhibitor (MAO-B) inhibitor type anti-parkinsonian drug, as an otoprotectant. We showed a dose-dependent alleviation of the kanamycin-induced threshold shifts measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) in an ototoxicant aminoglycoside antibiotic-based hearing loss model in mice. This effect proved to be statistically significant at a 6-mg/kg (s.c.) dose. The most prominent effect appeared at 16kHz, which is the hearing sensitivity optimum for mice. The neuroprotective, antiapoptotic and antioxidant effects of rasagiline in animal models, all targeting a specific mechanism of aminoglycoside injury, may explain this otoprotection. The dopaminergic neurotransmission enhancer effect of rasagiline might also contribute to the protection. Dopamine (DA), released from lateral olivocochlear (LOC) fibers, was shown to exert a protective action against excitotoxicity, a pathological factor in the aminoglycoside-induced SNHL. We have shown that rasagiline enhanced the electric stimulation-evoked release of DA from an acute mouse cochlea preparation in a dose-dependent manner. Using inhibitors of voltage-gated Na(+)-, Ca(2+) channels and DA transporters, we revealed that rasagiline potentiated the action potential-evoked release of DA by inhibiting the reuptake. The complex, multifactorial pathomechanism of SNHLs

  16. Protective effect of edaravone against tobramycin-induced ototoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asplund, Monika Stenkvist; Lidian, Adnan; Linder, Birgitta; Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion. It is suggested that simultaneous treatment with the radical scavenger edaravone has an effective protective effect against tobramycin ototoxicity in rat. Even if the edaravone treatment is postponed for 7 days, it can still prevent hearing loss, but a 14 day delay cannot protect from

  17. Targeted Release of Tobramycin from a pH-Responsive Grafted Bilayer Challenged with S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Dastgheyb, Sana S.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Eckmann, David M.; Composto, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    A stimuli-responsive, controlled release bilayer for the prevention of bacterial infection on biomaterials is presented. Drug release is locally controlled by the pH-responsiveness of the bilayer, comprised of an inner poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) monolayer grafted to a biomaterial and cross-linked with an outer chitosan (CH) brush. Tobramycin (TOB) is loaded in the inner PAA in part to minimize bacteria resistance. Because biofilm formation causes a decrease in local pH, TOB is released from PAA and permeates through the CH which is in contact with the biofilm. Antibiotic capacity is controlled by the PAA thickness which depends on PAA brush length and the extent of cross-linking between CH and PAA at the bilayer interface. This TOB-loaded, pH responsive bilayer exhibits significantly enhanced antibacterial activity relative to controls. PMID:25585173

  18. Clinical Features, Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles, and Outcomes of Infectious Keratitis Caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierer, Oriel; Monsalve, Pedro F; OʼBrien, Terrence P; Alfonso, Eduardo C; Gologorsky, Daniel; Miller, Darlene

    2016-05-01

    Reports on Achromobacter xylosoxidans ocular infections are increasing, drawing attention to its emerging role in infectious keratitis. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and visual outcomes of infectious keratitis secondary to Achromobacter xylosoxidans. A microbiology database and clinical chart review was performed in all patients diagnosed with A. xylosoxidans keratitis at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between the years 1987 and 2014. Initial presentation, antimicrobial susceptibilities, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), treatment course, and outcomes were recorded. Twenty-eight patients were identified. The main risk factors were corneal graft (n = 8, 28.6%) and contact lens wear (n = 8, 28.6%). On presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 or worse in 20 (71.2%) patients. Hypopyon was present in 7 (25.0%) patients. In most cases, topical fluoroquinolones or tobramycin were the initial treatment, often accompanied by vancomycin. High susceptibility rates were found for piperacillin [100%, minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of isolates (MIC90) = 8] and ticarcillin (100%, MIC90 = 16). Low susceptibility rates were documented for ciprofloxacin (46.7%, MIC90 = 8), tobramycin (26.7%, MIC90 = 16), and gentamicin (20%, MIC90 = 16). One (3.6%) patient suffered endophthalmitis. Six (21.4%) patients underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty, and 2 (7.1%) patients had conjunctival flap surgery. Visual acuity at final follow-up was 20/100 or worse in 16 (57.1%) patients. Infectious keratitis caused by A. xylosoxidans is associated with poor visual outcomes. Fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are not appropriate treatments for these ocular infections. Further studies are needed to define the clinical application of compound piperacillin and ticarcillin eye drops.

  19. Exploring the possibilities of capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection in combination with liquid chromatography for the analysis of polar compounds using aminoglycosides as test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovics, Péter; Chopra, Shruti; El-Attug, Mohamed N; Cabooter, Deirdre; Wolfs, Kris; Noszál, Béla; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2015-08-10

    The analysis of highly polar (often charged) compounds which lack a strong UV absorbing chromophore is really challenging. Despite the numerous analytical methods published, the demand for a simple, robust and cheap technique for their analysis still persists. Here, reversed phase (RP) liquid chromatography (LC) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) was explored for the first time as a possible method for separation and detection of various aminoglycoside (AMG) antibiotics which were taken as typical test compounds: tobramycin (TOB), spectinomycin, streptomycin, amikacin, kanamycin A and kanamycin B. C(4)D was performed using a commercially available as well as a laboratory made cell. As ion-pairing reagents (IPR) four perfluorinated carboxylic acids were used: pentafluoropropionic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid, nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) and pentadecafluorooctanoic acid (PDFOA). 0.125 mM NFPA-acetonitrile (ACN) (90:10) or 0.125 mM PDFOA-ACN (70:30) as mobile phases were suitable to detect TOB with reasonable retention times. However, NFPA was preferred for practical reasons. Its applicable concentration range in the mobile phase was strongly restricted by loss of chromatographic performance at lower levels and excessive background conductivity at higher levels. Overall repeatability and robustness of the method were rather poor which was explained by the relatively low IPR levels. Selectivity between the tested AMGs was mainly influenced by the number of protonated amino groups per molecule making it impossible to separate compounds of equal net charges. Problems encountered with gradient elution, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and separation at high pH without IPRs are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural bizbenzoquinoline derivatives protect zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells from aminoglycoside toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eKruger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20-30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment.

  1. Short-course aminoglycoside therapy in patients with spinal cord injury. Standard dose versus low dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapico, F L; Lindquist, L B; Montgomerie, J Z; Jimenez, E M; Morrow, J W

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-nine patients with spinal cord injury and asymptomatic urinary tract infection were treated with standard or reduced doses of tobramycin and amikacin. The patients received five days of intramuscular antibiotics. Most of the patients in the tobramycin groups had Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and most of those in the amikacin group had either Proteus rettgeri or Providencia stuartii infections. Only 1 patient had a positive urine antibody coating test. High antibiotic concentrations were demonstrated in the urine of all patients during therapy. Urine cultures were obtained two and seven days after completion of therapy. Forty-eight per cent of the patients were cured, while 31 per cent showed persistence or relapse, and 21 per cent had reinfection with other bacteria. No significant differences in results were observed between the standard-dose and low-dose regimens and between the amikacin and tobramycin groups. The low success rate of the regimens used may indicate the need to evaluate alternative therapeutic regimens to treat urinary tract infections in this special group of patients.

  2. Kinetic and Structural Analysis of Bisubstrate Inhibition of the Salmonella enterica Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase†,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Maria L. B.; Vetting, Matthew W.; Gao, Feng; Freiburger, Lee; Auclair, Karine; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are antibacterial compounds that act by binding to the A site of the small 30S bacterial ribosomal subunit and inhibiting protein translation. Clinical resistance to aminoglycosides is generally the result of the expression of enzymes that covalently modify the antibiotic, including phosphorylation, adenylylation, and acetylation. Bisubstrate analogs for the aminoglycoside N-acetyl-transferases are nanomolar inhibitors of Enterococcus faecium AAC(6′)-Ii. However, in the case of the Salmonella enterica aac(6′)-Iy-encoded aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase, we demonstrate that a series of bisubstrate analogs are only micromolar inhibitors. In contrast to studies with AAC(6′)-Ii, the inhibition constants toward AAC(6′)-Iy are essentially independent of both the identity of the aminoglycoside component of the bisubstrate and the number of carbon atoms that are used to link the CoA and aminoglycoside components. The patterns of inhibition suggest that the CoA portion of the bisubstrate analog can bind to the enzyme–aminoglycoside substrate complex and that the aminoglycoside portion can bind to the enzyme–CoA product complex. However, at the high concentrations of bisubstrate analog used in crystallization experiments, we could crystallize and solve the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme–bisubstrate complex. The structure reveals that both the CoA and aminoglycoside portions bind in essentially the same positions as those previously observed for the enzyme–CoA–ribostamycin complex, with only a modest adjustment to accommodate the “linker”. These results are compared to previous studies of the interaction of similar bisubstrate analogs with other aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferases. PMID:18095712

  3. Solid lipid nanoparticles as promising tool for intraocular tobramycin delivery: Pharmacokinetic studies on rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetoni, Patrizia; Burgalassi, Susi; Monti, Daniela; Tampucci, Silvia; Tullio, Vivian; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Spagnolo, Rita; Zara, Gian Paolo; Cavalli, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    Eye drops are widely accepted as formulations for targeting the anterior segment notwithstanding their limitations in terms of bioavailability. The unique structure of the eye requires specially-designed formulations able to favor the pharmacokinetic profile of administered drugs, mainly minimizing the influence of ocular barriers. Nanotechnology-based delivery systems lead to significant technological and therapeutical advantages in ophthalmic therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine whether tobramycin as ion-pair incorporated in mucoadhesive Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) reaches the inner parts of the eye favoring drug activity. After technological characterization of the tobramycin entrapped SLN formulation (Tobra-SLN), a pharmacokinetic study in rabbits after topical instillation and intravenous administration of the formulation has been carried out. In addition, the intracellular activity of Tobra-SLN formulation against phagocytosed Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. The SLN were spherical in shape, and showed a hydrodynamic diameter of about 80nm, a negative zeta potential (-25.7mV) with a polydispersity index of 0.15, representative of a colloidal dispersion with high quality, characterized by an unimodal relatively narrow size distribution. As demonstrated by FTIR and DSC, tobramycin ion-pair could be concentrated into lipid inner core of SLN, without interaction with the stearic acid, thus promoting a slow and constant drug release profile in the dissolution medium. Surprisingly, the drug concentration was significantly higher in all ocular tissues after ocular and intravenous administration of Tobra-SLN formulation with respect to reference formulations and only Tobra-SLN allowed the penetration of drug into retina. Furthermore, the use of Tobra-SLN resulted in both higher intraphagocytic antibiotic concentrations in polymorphonuclear granulocytes and greater bactericidal activity against intracellular Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  4. Megalin-targeted enhanced transfection efficiency in cultured human HK-2 renal tubular proximal cells using aminoglycoside-carboxyalkyl- polyethylenimine -containing nanoplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroojalian, Fatemeh; Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Shier, Wayne Thomas; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-05-15

    Non-viral vectors are of interest as therapeutic gene delivery agents in gene therapy, because they are simple to prepare, easy to modify and have definable safety profiles compared to viral vectors. The potential of gene therapy in the treatment of renal diseases is limited by a lack of effective kidney-targeted gene delivery systems. Aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin and neomycin were connected by amide linkages to carboxyl groups on carboxyalkylated-PEI 25 (25kDa PEI) or carboxyalkylated-PEI 10 (10kDa PEI). Aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI conjugates were characterized with respect to size, surface charge density, DNA condensation ability, and buffering capacity. Polyplexes prepared by electrostatic interaction between aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEIs and enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing (EGFP) plasmid DNA had appropriate nano-scale size (143-173nm). Their targeting potential was investigated in cultured HK-2 immortalized human cortex/proximal tubule kidney epithelial cells, which expresses megalin, a scavenger receptor that mediates endocytosis of a diverse group of ligands, including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEIs significantly increased EGFP gene transfection efficiency in HK-2 cells by ∼13-fold for aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI 25 and ∼7-fold increase for aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI 10 relative to the corresponding PEIs without aminoglycosides. The transfection efficiency of polyplexes was dependent on the weight ratio of aminoglycoside-containing ligand in the carrier. In the presence of a range of concentrations of human serum albumin, which competes for megalin binding, aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI-mediated transfection was reduced to background levels. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI polyplexes can target megalin-expressing kidney-derived cells in vitro resulting in improved transfection efficiency with low cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017

  5. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Hein-Kristensen, Line; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were...... to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition......I and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections....

  6. Detection of antibiotics residues in meat of reformed and marketed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that farmers use eight families of antibiotics: aminoglycosides, diaminopyridines, macrolides, polypeptides, quinolones second and third generation, sulfonamides and tetracyclines. Residues of tetracyclines and aminoglycosides were found only in Abomey-Calavi town with respective proportions of 25.71 ...

  7. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides in the Neonate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are common in the neonates and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Sixty percent of preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units received at least one antibiotic during the first week of life. Penicillins, aminoglycosides and cephalosporins comprised 53, 43 and 16%, respectively. Kinetic parameters such as the half-life (t1/2, clearance (Cl, and volume of distribution (Vd change with development, so the kinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides need to be studied in order to optimise therapy with these drugs. The aim of this study is to review the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate in a single article in order to provide a critical analysis of the literature and thus provide a useful tool in the hands of physicians. The bibliographic search was performed electronically using PubMed, as the search engine, until February 2nd, 2010. Medline search terms were as follows: pharmacokinetics AND (penicillins OR cephalosporins OR aminoglycosides AND infant, newborn, limiting to humans. Penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides are fairly water soluble and are mainly eliminated by the kidneys. The maturation of the kidneys governs the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate. The renal excretory function is reduced in preterms compared to term infants and Cl of these drugs is reduced in premature infants. Gestational and postnatal ages are important factors in the maturation of the neonate and, as these ages proceed, Cl of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides increases. Cl and t1/2 are influenced by development and this must be taken into consideration when planning a dosage regimen with these drugs. More pharmacokinetic studies are required to ensure that the dose recommended for the treatment of sepsis in the neonate is evidence based.

  8. Assessment of aminoglycoside-induced hearing impairment in hospitalized neonates by TEOAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Mohammad; Maamouri, Gholamali; Boskabadi, Hassan; Golparvar, Sadegh; Taleh, Mohamadreza; Esmaeeli, Habib; Khademi, Javad

    2009-12-01

    Aminoglycosides, as potent bactericidal antibiotics against aerobic gram-negative infections, is still widely used, especially in NICU patients, despite their known potential ototoxic effects. To evaluate the potential of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in early identification of decreased hearing sensitivity in hospitalized neonates receiving aminoglycosides for severe gram-negative infections. Fifty (50) neonates treated with intravenous gentamicin (5 mg/kg/day) or amikacin (15 mg/kg/day) were tested with TEOAE in the beginning and the end of aminoglycoside therapeutic course. There were 23 males and 27 females, ranging from 29 to 40 weeks (mean: 36 weeks). The treatment duration was 3-30 days (in 26 neonates up to 7 days - group A, and in 24 neonates higher than 7 days - group B). In group A, no statistically significant difference in the mean response level was found between the onset and the end of treatment course (p > 0.001). In group B, a statistically significant difference in the mean response level was found between the onset and the end of treatment course, especially at high frequency region (p < 0.001). TEOAE is sensitive enough to detect early aminoglycoside ototoxicity. As this test is simple to perform, non-invasive and reliable, so we suggest that TEOAE test should be performed in NICU as routine for monitoring cochlear function to prevent permanent hearing loss especially in those who are receiving aminoglycoside for more than 7 days.

  9. Immunoassay Analysis of Kanamycin in Serum Using the Tobramycin Kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J. A.; Voerman, A. J.; Greijdanus, B.; Touw, D. J.; Alffenaar, J. W. C.

    Kanamycin is one of the aminoglycosides used in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Blood concentrations of kanamycin are predictive for the treatment efficacy and the occurrence of side effects, and dose adjustments can be needed to optimize therapy. However, an immunoassay method

  10. Ocular flora and their antibiotic susceptibility in patients having cataract surgery in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Vincenzo; Blanco, Anna Rita; Santocono, Marcello

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the ocular flora in a consecutive group of patients having cataract surgery and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of isolates to several ophthalmic antibiotics. Hospital Di Stefano, Catania, Italy. Observational case series. Conjunctival and eyelid cultures from patients were obtained 14 days before surgery and, if positive, repeated the day of the surgery. Antimicrobial susceptibility for aminoglycosides (netilmicin and tobramycin), fluoroquinolones (ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin), chloramphenicol, and azithromycin was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Susceptibility was also tested for oxacillin, cefuroxime, and vancomycin. All positive patients received a 2-day preoperative course of 3 mg/mL netilmicin ophthalmic solution 4 times a day. The recovery rate of microorganisms after antibiotic treatment compared with baseline was calculated. One hundred twenty consecutive patients were included in the study. Cultures were positive in 72.5% of patients; 131 isolates, mainly gram-positive, were identified. Staphylococcus epidermidis (58.0%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.3%) were the most frequently isolated microorganisms. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci accounted for 3.8% of S epidermidis and 20.0% of S aureus. A high in vitro susceptibility (>90%) for all isolates, including multiresistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, was obtained for netilmicin, vancomycin, and cefuroxime. The recovery rate of isolates before surgery was reduced by 93.9% (P Industria Farmaceutica Italiana SpA. Dr. Santocono has no financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-01-01

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å

  12. Influence of Different Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids on the In Vitro Activity of Cefepime, Ciprofloxacin, Ertapenem, Meropenem and Tobramycin Against Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussmann, Manuel; Schuster, Linda; Wrenger, Sarah; Pichler, Petra; Reznicek, Gottfried; Burgmann, Heinz; Poeppl, Wolfgang; Zeitlinger, Markus; Wiesholzer, Martin

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Peritonitis is a major problem among patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). The influence of diverse PD fluids on the activity of frequently used antibiotics has been insufficiently investigated. Thus, the present study set out to investigate the impact of different PD fluids on the activity of cefepime, ciprofloxacin, ertapenem, meropenem, and tobramycin against Escherichia coli. ♦ METHODS: Time-kill curves in 4 different PD fluids (Dianeal PDG4, Extraneal, Nutrineal PD4 and Physioneal 40, all Baxter Healthcare Corp., Deerfield, IL, USA) were performed over 24 hours with 4 different concentrations (1 × minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], 4 × MIC, 8 × MIC, 30 × MIC) of each antibiotic evaluated and without antibiotics as control. Cation-adjusted Mueller Hinton broth (CA-MHB) was used as comparator solution. ♦ RESULTS: In all PD fluids investigated, bacterial growth and antimicrobial activity of all antibiotics tested was significantly reduced compared with the CA-MHB comparator solution. Except at high concentrations of 30 × MIC, cefepime, ertapenem and meropenem demonstrated a strongly reduced activity in all PD fluids investigated. Ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were highly active and bactericidal in all PD fluids and demonstrated dose-dependent activity. ♦ CONCLUSION: The antimicrobial activity of cefepime, ertapenem and meropenem is limited or even nullified in certain PD fluids in vitro, whereas ciprofloxacin and tobramycin show excellent activity. The choice of PD fluids can impact the activity of antimicrobial agents and might influence microbiological outcome. Further studies are required to verify the clinical relevance of our findings. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  13. Involvement of an active efflux system in the natural resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, J R; Köhler, T; Nikaido, H; Plésiat, P

    1999-11-01

    A mutant, named 11B, hypersusceptible to aminoglycosides, tetracycline, and erythromycin was isolated after Tn501 insertion mutagenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Cloning and sequencing experiments showed that 11B was deficient in an, at that time, unknown active efflux system that contains homologs of MexAB. This locus also contained a putative regulatory gene, mexZ, transcribed divergently from the efflux operon. Introduction of a recombinant plasmid that carries the genes of the efflux system restored the resistance of 11B to parental levels, whereas overexpression of these genes strongly increased the MICs of substrate antibiotics for the PAO1 host. Antibiotic accumulation studies confirmed that this new system is an energy-dependent active efflux system that pumps out aminoglycosides. Furthermore, this system appeared to function with an outer membrane protein, OprM. While the present paper was being written and reviewed, genes with a sequence identical to our pump genes, mexXY of P. aeruginosa, have been reported to increase resistance to erythromycin, fluoroquinolones, and organic cations in Escherichia coli hosts, although efflux of aminoglycosides was not examined (Mine et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 43:415-417, 1999). Our study thus shows that the MexXY system plays an important role in the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to aminoglycosides. Although overexpression of MexXY increased the level of resistance to fluoroquinolones, disruption of the mexXY operon in P. aeruginosa had no detectable effect on susceptibility to these agents.

  14. Successful treatment of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis using a colistin- and tobramycin-impregnated PMMA spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Jochen; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M; Tröger, Uwe; Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Mulrooney, Thomas; Mittelstädt, Hagen; Russlies, Martin; Kirchner, Rainer; Knobloch, Johannes K-M

    2014-10-01

    Discovered in 1949, the antibiotic colistin was initially used for therapeutic purposes. Parenteral use of colistin was gradually abandoned because of its side-effect profile, especially its nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Despite the risk of these potentially serious adverse effects, increasing resistance of Gram-negative bacteria has led to a renaissance of intravenous use of colistin in the last few years. Local administration of colistin is an alternative method to minimise the risk of systemic toxicity. We present a case of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis treated successfully with high-dose colistin- and tobramycin-impregnated bone cement as a drug delivery vehicle. For the first time, local colistin concentrations in drainage and synovial fluid were quantified in order to determine the optimal dose and to minimise serious side effects. Insertion of a bone cement spacer loaded with a high dose of tobramycin and colistin resulted in local colistin levels at the infection site that exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of colistin against the isolated P. aeruginosa five-fold on Day 4. Thus, the treatment may be expected to exert a prolonged effect. Whereas systemic administration of colistin alone was not sufficient to treat the infection, combined local and parenteral therapy led to eradication of P. aeruginosa in this patient. Plasma colistin levels remained in the therapeutic range, which confirms the systemic safety of the method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Biomechanical Forces on Antibiotics Release Kinetics from Hydroxyapatite Coated Surgical Fixation Pins

    OpenAIRE

    Lilja, Mirjam; Sörensen, Jan Henrik; Sörensen, Torben; Åstrand, Maria; Procter, Philip; Steckel, Hartwig; Strømme, Maria

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the impact of biomechanical wear and abrasion on the antibiotic release profiles of hydroxyapa-tite (HA) coated fixation pins during their insertion into synthetic bone. Stainless steel fixation pins are coated with crystalline TiO2 by cathodic arc evaporation forming the bioactive layer for biomimetic deposition of Tobramycin con-taining HA. Tobramycin is either introduced by co-precipitation during HA formation or by adsorption-loading after HA deposition. The samples...

  16. Budget impact model of tobramycin inhalation solution for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Tatia Chay; Brown, Ruth; Sacco, Patricia; Zhang, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is the most common airway pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The objective of this analysis was to determine the costs of managing PA infection in CF patients with a chronic regimen of tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS). A budget impact model of CF patients was developed to evaluate the costs of TIS from a US managed-care organization (MCO) perspective. The Microsoft Excel model compared TIS treatment plus standard care with standard care alone over a 4-year time horizon and included the cost of drugs, medical care, and annual probabilities of hospitalization and IV anti-pseudomonal (anti-PA) antibiotics administration. For an MCO with 5,000,000 members, 389 members 6 years of age or older were estimated to have CF, and 218 (56%) had PA infection. Assuming that use of TIS increased from 20% to 25%, the 1-year budget increased $231,251 or from $0.049 to $0.053 per member per month (PMPM). The net drug budget increase was $243,919, while medical costs associated with exacerbation management decreased $12,669 over the first year. Increasing utilization of TIS, from 20% to 40% over 4 years resulted in an incremental overall budget increase of $925,002, a 3% decrease in hospitalizations, and a 4% decrease in administrations of IV anti-PA antibiotics. These reductions translated to a medical care cost saving of $50,676 over 4 years. Limitations of this study include that the clinical data for the model are from clinical trials conducted in 1996 and the estimation of TIS use for CF patients with chronic PA infections can be impacted by TIS adherence. Model results suggest that increasing the use of TIS decreases medical care costs due to decreased hospital admissions and the use of IV anti-PA antibiotics at the expense of higher drug costs.

  17. Suggestions for the optimization of the initial tobramycin dose in adolescent and adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Vinks, A A; Heijerman, H G; Hermans, J; Bakker, W

    Clinical pharmacokinetic data of intravenously administered tobramycin in 34 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were correlated with patient parameters. Patients began tobramycin therapy with 10 mg/kg/day in three divided doses. Peak and trough serum concentrations were measured. Tobramycin dose was

  18. d-Tubocurarine and Berbamine: Alkaloids That Are Permeant Blockers of the Hair Cell's Mechano-Electrical Transducer Channel and Protect from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkwood, Nerissa K.; Derudas, Marco; Kenyon, Emma J; Huckvale, Rosemary; van Netten, Sietse; Ward, Simon; Richardson, Guy P; Kros, Corne J

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used for the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections, but cause permanent hearing loss in a substantial proportion of treated patients. The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are damaged following entry of these antibiotics via the mechano-electrical

  19. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-Ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important.

  20. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanxiang Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%. The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6'-Ie-aph(2'', aph(2'-Id, aph(3'-IIIa, and ant(6'-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2''-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species.

  1. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanxiang; Li, Jing; Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Lin, Xiaowei; Chen, Mengquan; Ye, Renji; Lv, Huoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B) disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates) was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%). The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6')-Ie-aph(2''), aph(2')-Id, aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6')-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2'')-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS) strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species. PMID:25768240

  2. Fitness cost and interference of Arm/Rmt aminoglycoside resistance with the RsmF housekeeping methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Belen; Escudero, Jose A; San Millan, Alvaro; Hidalgo, Laura; Carrilero, Laura; Ovejero, Cristina M; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Thomas-Lopez, Daniel; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Arm/Rmt methyltransferases have emerged recently in pathogenic bacteria as enzymes that confer high-level resistance to 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides through methylation of the G1405 residue in the 16S rRNA (like ArmA and RmtA to -E). In prokaryotes, nucleotide methylations are the most common type of rRNA modification, and they are introduced posttranscriptionally by a variety of site-specific housekeeping enzymes to optimize ribosomal function. Here we show that while the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase RmtC methylates G1405, it impedes methylation of the housekeeping methyltransferase RsmF at position C1407, a nucleotide that, like G1405, forms part of the aminoglycoside binding pocket of the 16S rRNA. To understand the origin and consequences of this phenomenon, we constructed a series of in-frame knockout and knock-in mutants of Escherichia coli, corresponding to the genotypes rsmF(+), ΔrsmF, rsmF(+) rmtC(+), and ΔrsmF rmtC(+). When analyzed for the antimicrobial resistance pattern, the ΔrsmF bacteria had a decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, showing that the housekeeping methylation at C1407 is involved in intrinsic aminoglycoside susceptibility in E. coli. Competition experiments between the isogenic E. coli strains showed that, contrary to expectation, acquisition of rmtC does not entail a fitness cost for the bacterium. Finally, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allowed us to determine that RmtC methylates the G1405 residue not only in presence but also in the absence of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Thus, the coupling between housekeeping and acquired methyltransferases subverts the methylation architecture of the 16S rRNA but elicits Arm/Rmt methyltransferases to be selected and retained, posing an important threat to the usefulness of aminoglycosides worldwide.

  3. The Impact of Aminoglycosides on the Dynamics of Translation Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tsai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Inferring antibiotic mechanisms on translation through static structures has been challenging, as biological systems are highly dynamic. Dynamic single-molecule methods are also limited to few simultaneously measurable parameters. We have circumvented these limitations with a multifaceted approach to investigate three structurally distinct aminoglycosides that bind to the aminoacyl-transfer RNA site (A site in the prokaryotic 30S ribosomal subunit: apramycin, paromomycin, and gentamicin. Using several single-molecule fluorescence measurements combined with structural and biochemical techniques, we observed distinct changes to translational dynamics for each aminoglycoside. While all three drugs effectively inhibit translation elongation, their actions are structurally and mechanistically distinct. Apramycin does not displace A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center, as demonstrated by a solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure, causing only limited miscoding; instead, it primarily blocks translocation. Paromomycin and gentamicin, which displace A1492 and A1493, cause significant miscoding, block intersubunit rotation, and inhibit translocation. Our results show the power of combined dynamics, structural, and biochemical approaches to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying translation and its inhibition.

  4. The impact of aminoglycosides on the dynamics of translation elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Albert; Uemura, Sotaro; Johansson, Magnus; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Marshall, R. Andrew; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Korlach, Jonas; Ehrenberg, Måns; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Inferring antibiotic mechanisms on translation through static structures has been challenging as biological systems are highly dynamic. Dynamic single-molecule methods are also limited to few simultaneously-measurable parameters. We have circumvented these limitations with a multifaceted approach to investigate three structurally-distinct aminoglycosides that bind to the aminoacyl-tRNA site (A site) in the prokaryotic 30S ribosomal subunit: apramycin, paromomycin, and gentamicin. Using several single-molecule fluorescence measurements combined with structural and biochemical techniques, we observed distinct changes to translational dynamics for each aminoglycoside. While all three drugs effectively inhibit translation elongation, their actions are structurally and mechanistically distinct. Apramycin does not displace A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center, as demonstrated by a solution NMR structure, causing only limited miscoding; instead it primarily blocks translocation. Paromomycin and gentamicin, which displace A1492 and A1493, cause significant miscoding, block intersubunit rotation, and inhibit translocation. Our results show the power of combined dynamics, structural, and biochemical approaches to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying translation and its inhibition. PMID:23416053

  5. Antibiotic Resistance Among Ocular Pathogens in the United States: Five-Year Results From the Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbell, Penny A; Sanfilippo, Christine M; Pillar, Christopher M; DeCory, Heleen H; Sahm, Daniel F; Morris, Timothy W

    2015-12-01

    The Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) study is the only ongoing nationwide antibiotic resistance surveillance program specific to ocular pathogens. To report resistance rates and trends among common ocular isolates collected during the first 5 years of the ARMOR study. This antibiotic resistance surveillance study was performed at an independent central laboratory. Clinical centers across the United States were invited to submit ocular isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Isolates were collected from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2013, and analyzed from January 16 to May 15, 2015. Minimum inhibitory concentrations for various antibiotic classes were determined by broth microdilution according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were interpreted as susceptible, intermediate, or resistant based on established break points. A total of 3237 ocular isolates (1169 S aureus, 992 CoNS, 330 S pneumoniae, 357 H influenzae, and 389 P aeruginosa) were collected from 72 centers. Methicillin resistance was found among 493 S aureus isolates (42.2%; 95% CI, 39.3%-45.1%) and 493 CoNS isolates (49.7%; 95% CI, 46.5%-52.9%), and methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates had a high probability of concurrent resistance to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, or macrolides (P < .001). Multidrug resistance to at least 3 additional antibiotic classes was found in 428 MR S aureus isolates (86.8%) and 381 MRCoNS isolates (77.3%). All staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. Resistance among S pneumoniae isolates was highest for azithromycin (113 isolates [34.2%]) whereas resistance among P aeruginosa and H influenzae was low against the antibiotics tested. Staphylococcal isolates from elderly patients were more likely to be MR, as were S aureus isolates

  6. Renal failure after placement of an articulating, antibiotic impregnated polymethylmethacrlyate hip spacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Runner, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old male presented with native joint septic arthritis of the hip and osteomyelitis. After treatment with an articulating antibiotic spacer, he developed acute renal failure requiring dialysis. He continued to have elevated serum tobramycin levels exclusively from the antibiotic spacer elution as no intravenous tobramycin was used. Subsequent explantation was required to correct his renal failure. Although renal failure after antibiotic impregnated cement placement is rare, the risk of this potential complication should be considered preoperatively and in the postoperative management of these patients.

  7. Rapid determination of bacterial aminoglycoside resistance in environmental samples using membrane electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liusheng; Ke, Ming; Yuan, Min; Pu, Ji; Li, Juan; Lu, Jinxing; Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, Mei; Xu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is becoming a global public health problem, such as aminoglycoside resistance encoded by the armA gene. Although many methods have been reported, rapid analysis of environmental samples is still challenging. A rapid analytical method was developed in this study to determine bacterial aminoglycoside resistance using membrane electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MESI-MS). Precursor/product-ion pairs of ArmA unique peptides were detected with minimal sample preparation. Standard peptides were synthesized and used for developing and validating the methodology, and then the method was verified by both ArmA positive and ArmA negative simulated environmental samples. A rapid method for determination of bacterial aminoglycoside resistance was developed using MESI-MS/MS. The bacterial cultural time was optimized to 2 hours, and the precision, accuracy and recovery of this method were investigated. The peptide IHSSTNER (IR-8) unique to ArmA in simulated environmental samples can be successfully identified within 3 hours. The novel assay offered a rapid method to determine bacterial aminoglycoside resistance with high sensitivity, accuracy and precision in simulated environmental samples. This method could also be applied to identify other drug-resistance proteins in clinical/environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release...

  9. [Antibiotic sensitivity of strains of Klebsiella isolated in Geneva and Algiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekfali, K; Rahal, K; Ducel, G

    1989-01-01

    573 strains of Klebsiella were isolated in Geneva (239 strains) and in Algiers (334 strains). The complete work with bacteriologic features (culture, biochemistry and antigenicity) will be published later. Two investigations took place in surgical cardio-vascular service in Geneva cantonal hospital and in Algiers hospitals: Pediatric (Beni-Messous) and intensive care service (Mustapha). High resistance percentages are found with Penicillins (greater than 60% by C.M.I.) in Geneva and Algiers. The strains are susceptible to aminoglycosides: in Algiers, 8.68% strains are resistant to Gentamicin and 5.99% to Tobramycin. In Geneva, all the strains are susceptible to Aminoglycosides. All the strains are susceptible to Trimethoprim and the Furans resistant strains are rare. The C.M.I. test is more precise than disc diffusion technique, especially for Penicillin and Furans. Cephalosporins and aminoglycosides are the best choice for treatment of Klebsiella infections.

  10. Analysis of Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzyme Genes Responsible for High-Level Aminoglycoside Resistance among Enterococcal Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Shete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic modification results in high-level resistance to aminoglycoside (HLAR, which eliminates the synergistic bactericidal effect of combined exposure to a cell wall-active agent and an aminoglycoside. So aim of the study was to determine prevalence of HLAR enterococcal isolate and to study distribution of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes in them. A total of 100 nonrepeat isolates of enterococci from various clinical samples were analyzed. As per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines enterococci were screened for HLAR by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration of all isolates for gentamicin and streptomycin was determined by E-test. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR was carried out for HLAR enterococcal isolates to identify aminoglycoside modifying enzymes genes responsible for resistance. 60% isolates were found to be high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR whereas 45% isolates were found to be high-level streptomycin resistant (HLSR. By multiplex PCR 80% HLGR isolates carried bifunctional aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia whereas 18 out of 45 high-level streptomycin resistant, that is, 40%, isolates carried aph(3′-IIIa. However, aph(2′′-Ib, aph(2′′-Ic, aph(2′′-Id, and ant(4′-Ia genes which encode other aminoglycosides modifying enzymes were not detected. Bifunctional aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia is the predominant gene responsible for HLAR.

  11. Synergistic interactions between plant extracts, some antibiotics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The methanol extraction ingredients recorded the maximum Inhibition Zone Diameter. (mm IZD); 18.8/R, 12.6/C and 12.8/G plants. Prominent synergism occurred between plants extract mixture and Gentamycin, Ceftasidine, Tobramycin, Cefoperazone and Spictinomycin (GD) antibiotics. Rehum plant extract was the most ...

  12. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  13. Osmotic Compounds Enhance Antibiotic Efficacy against Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falghoush, Azeza; Beyenal, Haluk; Besser, Thomas E; Omsland, Anders; Call, Douglas R

    2017-10-01

    Biofilm-associated infections are a clinical challenge, in part because a hydrated matrix protects the bacterial community from antibiotics. Herein, we evaluated how different osmotic compounds (maltodextrin, sucrose, and polyethylene glycol [PEG]) enhance antibiotic efficacy against Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm communities. Established (24-h) test tube biofilms (strain ATCC 17978) were treated with osmotic compounds in the presence or absence of 10× the MIC of different antibiotics (50 μg/ml tobramycin, 20 μg/ml ciprofloxacin, 300 μg/ml chloramphenicol, 30 μg/ml nalidixic acid, or 100 μg/ml erythromycin). Combining antibiotics with hypertonic concentrations of the osmotic compounds for 24 h reduced the number of biofilm bacteria by 5 to 7 log ( P baumannii strains were similarly treated with 400-Da PEG and tobramycin, resulting in a mean 2.7-log reduction in recoverable bacteria compared with tobramycin treatment alone. Multivariate regression models with data from different osmotic compounds and nine antibiotics demonstrated that the benefit from combining hypertonic treatments with antibiotics is a function of antibiotic mass and lipophilicity ( r 2 > 0.82; P baumannii and Escherichia coli K-12. Augmenting topical antibiotic therapies with a low-mass hypertonic treatment may enhance the efficacy of antibiotics against wound biofilms, particularly when using low-mass hydrophilic antibiotics. IMPORTANCE Biofilms form a barrier that protects bacteria from environmental insults, including exposure to antibiotics. We demonstrated that multiple osmotic compounds can enhance antibiotic efficacy against Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm communities, but viscosity is a limiting factor, and the most effective compounds have lower molecular mass. The synergism between osmotic compounds and antibiotics is also dependent on the hydrophobicity and mass of the antibiotics. The statistical models presented herein provide a basis for predicting the optimal combination of

  14. Diffusion Retardation by Binding of Tobramycin in an Alginate Biofilm Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bao; Christophersen, Lars; Kolpen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    to be uniformly distributed throughout the volume of the alginate bead. The power-law appears to be a consequence of binding to a multitude of different binding sites. In a diffusion model these results are shown to produce pronounced retardation of the penetration of tobramycin into the biofilm. This filtering...... as a model of the extracellular polysaccharide matrix in P. aeruginosa biofilm. We find that, rather than a normal first order saturation curve, the concentration of tobramycin in the alginate beads follows a power-law as a function of the external concentration. Further, the tobramycin is observed...... of the free tobramycin concentration inside biofilm beads is expected to aid in augmenting the survival probability of bacteria residing in the biofilm....

  15. Comparative activities of ciprofloxacin, ticarcillin, and tobramycin against experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Schiff, J B; Small, G J; Pennington, J E

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of ciprofloxacin, an investigational quinoline derivative, was compared with those of ticarcillin and tobramycin in guinea pigs with experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Guinea pigs challenged with tracheal instillations of 10(8) CFU of P. aeruginosa developed acute pneumonia, for which survival rates were: controls, 0%; ticarcillin treatment, 37%; ciprofloxacin treatment, 57%; and tobramycin treatment, 69%. Intrapulmonary killing of P. aeruginosa was greate...

  16. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of ≥32 versus ≤8 μg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% ± 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% ± 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 ± 2.3 versus 24.2 ± 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P ≤ 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  17. Rapid Aminoglycoside NP Test for Rapid Detection of Multiple Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Patrice; Jayol, Aurélie; Dobias, Jan; Poirel, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    The rapid aminoglycoside NP (Nordmann/Poirel) test was developed to rapidly identify multiple aminoglycoside (AG) resistance in Enterobacteriaceae It is based on the detection of the glucose metabolism related to enterobacterial growth in the presence of a defined concentration of amikacin plus gentamicin. Formation of acid metabolites was evidenced by a color change (orange to yellow) of the red phenol pH indicator. The rapid aminoglycoside NP test was evaluated by using bacterial colonies of 18 AG-resistant isolates producing 16S rRNA methylases, 20 AG-resistant isolates expressing AG-modifying enzymes (acetyl-, adenyl-, and phosphotransferases), and 10 isolates susceptible to AG. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 97%, respectively, compared to the broth dilution method, which was taken as the gold standard for determining aminoglycoside resistance. The test is inexpensive, rapid (<2 h), and implementable worldwide. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Rise and dissemination of aminoglycoside resistance: the aac(6′)-Ib paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, María S.; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic modification is a prevalent mechanism by which bacteria defeat the action of antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are often inactivated by aminoglycoside modifying enzymes encoded by genes present in the chromosome, plasmids, and other genetic elements. The AAC(6′)-Ib (aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib) is an enzyme of clinical importance found in a wide variety of gram-negative pathogens. The AAC(6′)-Ib enzyme is of interest not only because of his ubiquity but also because of other characteristics, it presents significant microheterogeneity at the N-termini and the aac(6′)-Ib gene is often present in integrons, transposons, plasmids, genomic islands, and other genetic structures. Excluding the highly heterogeneous N-termini, there are 45 non-identical AAC(6′)-Ib related entries in the NCBI database, 32 of which have identical name in spite of not having identical amino acid sequence. While some variants conserved similar properties, others show dramatic differences in specificity, including the case of AAC(6′)-Ib-cr that mediates acetylation of ciprofloxacin representing a rare case where a resistance enzyme acquires the ability to utilize an antibiotic of a different class as substrate. Efforts to utilize antisense technologies to turn off expression of the gene or to identify enzymatic inhibitors to induce phenotypic conversion to susceptibility are under way. PMID:23730301

  19. Rise and dissemination of aminoglycoside resistance: the aac(6')-Ib paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, María S; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic modification is a prevalent mechanism by which bacteria defeat the action of antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are often inactivated by aminoglycoside modifying enzymes encoded by genes present in the chromosome, plasmids, and other genetic elements. The AAC(6')-Ib (aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib) is an enzyme of clinical importance found in a wide variety of gram-negative pathogens. The AAC(6')-Ib enzyme is of interest not only because of his ubiquity but also because of other characteristics, it presents significant microheterogeneity at the N-termini and the aac(6')-Ib gene is often present in integrons, transposons, plasmids, genomic islands, and other genetic structures. Excluding the highly heterogeneous N-termini, there are 45 non-identical AAC(6')-Ib related entries in the NCBI database, 32 of which have identical name in spite of not having identical amino acid sequence. While some variants conserved similar properties, others show dramatic differences in specificity, including the case of AAC(6')-Ib-cr that mediates acetylation of ciprofloxacin representing a rare case where a resistance enzyme acquires the ability to utilize an antibiotic of a different class as substrate. Efforts to utilize antisense technologies to turn off expression of the gene or to identify enzymatic inhibitors to induce phenotypic conversion to susceptibility are under way.

  20. Structural characterization of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII from Streptomyces rimosus with enzymatic activity modulated by phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, Konstantin M., E-mail: kmb@inbi.ras.ru [Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Federal Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt. 33, Bld. 2, 119071, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Gorbacheva, Marina A.; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, Maria G.; Mavletova, Dilara A.; Zakharevich, Natalia V.; Elizarov, Sergey M.; Rudakova, Natalia N.; Danilenko, Valery N. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina str. 3, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation); Popov, Vladimir O. [Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Federal Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt. 33, Bld. 2, 119071, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-02

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases represent a broad class of enzymes that promote bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics via the phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups in the latter. Here we report the spatial structure of the 3′-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of novel VIII class (AphVIII) solved by X-ray diffraction method with a resolution of 2.15 Å. Deep analysis of APHVIII structure and its comparison with known structures of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases of various types reveals that AphVIII has a typical two-domain fold and, however, possesses some unique characteristics that distinguish the enzyme from its known homologues. The most important difference is the presence of the activation loop with unique Ser146 residue. We demonstrate that in the apo-state of the enzyme the activation loop does not interact with other parts of the enzyme and seems to adopt catalytically competent state only after substrate binding. - Highlights: • 3D structure of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII was obtained. • AphVIII activation loop is clearly identified in the electron density. • AphVIII has some unique structural features in its substrate C-ring binding pocket.

  1. Aminoglycoside resistance profile and structural architecture of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Im.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Toth, Marta; Stewart, Nichole K; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2017-11-09

    Aminoglycoside 6'-acetyltransferase-Im (AAC(6')-Im) is the closest monofunctional homolog of the AAC(6')-Ie acetyltransferase of the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2")-Ia. The AAC(6')-Im acetyltransferase confers 4- to 64-fold higher MICs to 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides and the 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycoside neomycin than AAC(6')-Ie, yet unlike AAC(6')-Ie, the AAC(6')-Im enzyme does not confer resistance to the atypical aminoglycoside fortimicin. The structure of the kanamycin A complex of AAC(6')-Im shows that the substrate binds in a shallow positively-charged pocket, with the N6' amino group positioned appropriately for an efficient nucleophilic attack on an acetyl-CoA cofactor. The AAC(6')-Ie enzyme binds kanamycin A in a sufficiently different manner to position the N6' group less efficiently, thereby reducing the activity of this enzyme towards the 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. Conversely, docking studies with fortimicin in both acetyltransferases suggest that the atypical aminoglycoside might bind less productively in AAC(6')-Im, thus explaining the lack of resistance to this molecule.

  2. Heterologous Expression of Chaperones from Hyperthermophilic Archaea Inhibits Aminoglycoside-Induced Protein Misfolding in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S; Chu, Z; Lu, J; Li, D; Wang, Y; Yang, S; Zhang, Y

    2017-10-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics affect protein translation fidelity and lead to protein aggregation and an increase in intracellular oxidative stress level as well. The overexpression of the chaperonin GroEL/GroES system promotes short-term tolerance to aminoglycosides in Escherichia coli. Here, we demonstrated that the coexpression of prefoldin or Hsp60 originating from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus in E. coli cells can rescue cell growth and inhibit protein aggregation induced by streptomycin exposure. The results of our study show that hyperthermophilic chaperones endow E. coli with a higher tolerance to streptomycin than the GroEL/GroES system, and that they exert better effects on the reduction of intracellular protein misfolding, indicating that these chaperones have unique features and functions.

  3. Chromosomal mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, S; Oh, H; Jalal, S

    2009-01-01

    In total, 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were included in this study. Twenty of these were collected in 1994 and 1997, from six CF patients, and the rest were collected from different CF patients in 2000 and 2001. The relative expression of mRNA for the efflux....... aeruginosa, were analysed. MexY mRNA overproduction was found in 17/20 isolates collected in 1994 and 1997, and was correlated with decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Alteration of the MexXY-OprM efflux system has been the main mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in CF P...... not in the CF environment, as rplY and galU were unaltered in all isolates, and nuoG was not expressed in only one isolate. No 16S rRNA A-site mutations were found in any of the four copies of the gene in 13 investigated isolates....

  4. Intracellular polyamine pools, oligopeptide-binding protein A expression, and resistance to aminoglycosides in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria BR Acosta

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of intracellular free polyamine (putrescine and spermidine pools in multiple resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics was investigated among in vitro selected kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli J53 mutants expressing diminished oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA levels and/or defective ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity. The results suggest that diminished OppA content, but not defective ODC activity expression, increased the relative concentration of free spermidine as compared to the wild type strain. Moreover, by adding exogenous polyamines or polyamine synthesis inhibitors to cultures with different mutant strains, a direct relationship between the intracellular OppA levels and resistance to kanamycin was revealed. Collectively these results further suggest a complex relation among OppA expression, aminoglycoside resistance and polyamine metabolism.

  5. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib K. Shrestha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20’s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were determined. Effects on Cryptococcus neoformans H-99 infectivity were determined with a preventive murine lung infection model. The antifungal mechanism of action was studied using intact fungal cells, yeast lipid mutants, and small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 exhibited broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activities but not antibacterial activities. Pulmonary, single dose-administration of K20 reduced C. neoformans lung infection rates 4-fold compared to controls. Hemolysis and half-maximal cytotoxicities of mammalian cells occurred at concentrations that were 10 to 32-fold higher than fungicidal MICs. With fluorescein isothiocyanate, 20 to 25 mg/L K20 caused staining of >95% of C. neoformans and Fusarium graminearum cells and at 31.3 mg/L caused rapid leakage (30 to 80% in 15 min of calcein from preloaded small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 appears to be a broad-spectrum fungicide, capable of reducing the infectivity of C. neoformans, and exhibits low hemolytic activity and mammalian cell toxicity. It perturbs the plasma membrane by mechanisms that are lipid modulated. K20 is a novel amphiphilic aminoglycoside amenable to scalable production and a potential lead antifungal for therapeutic and crop protection applications.

  6. rRNA chemical groups required for aminoglycoside binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, S C; Fourmy, D; Eason, R G; Puglisi, J D

    1998-05-26

    Through an affinity chromatography based modification-interference assay, we have identified chemical groups within Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA sequence that are required for binding the aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin. Paromomycin was covalently linked to solid support via a nine atom spacer from the 6"'-amine of ring IV, and chemical modifications to an A-site oligonucleotide that disrupted binding were identified. Positions in the RNA oligonucleotide that correspond to G1405(N7), G1491(N7), G1494(N7), A1408(N7), A1493(N7), A1408(N1), A1492(N1), and A1493(N1), as well as the pro-R phosphate oxygens of A1492 and A1493 in 16S rRNA are chemical groups that are essential for a high-affinity RNA-paromomycin interaction. These data are consistent with genetic, biochemical, and structural studies related to neomycin-class antibiotics and provide additional information for establishing an exact model for their interaction with the ribosome.

  7. Preparation and characterization of spray-dried tobramycin powders containing nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcer, Gabrielle; Vanderbist, Francis; Amighi, Karim

    2009-01-05

    Using high-pressure homogenization and spray-drying techniques, novel formulations were developed for manufacturing dry powder for inhalation, composed of a mixture of micro- and nanoparticles in order to enhance lung deposition. Particle size analysis was performed by laser diffraction. Spray-drying was applied in order to retrieve nanoparticles in dried-powder state from tobramycin nanosuspensions. The aerolization properties of the different formulations were evaluated by a multi-stage liquid impinger. Suspensions of nanoparticles of tobramycin containing Na glycocholate at 2% (w/w) relative to tobramycin content and presenting a mean particle size about 200 nm were produced. The results from the spray-dried powders showed that the presence of nanoparticles in the formulations improved particle dispersion properties during inhalation. The fine particle fraction (percentage of particles below 5 microm) increased from 36% for the raw micronized tobramycin material to about 61% for the most effective formulation. These new nanoparticle-containing tobramycin DPI formulations, based on the use of very low level of excipient and presenting high lung deposition properties, offer very important perspectives for improving the delivery of drugs to the pulmonary tract.

  8. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  9. The relationship between the use of flucloxacillin, vancomycin, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin and the susceptibility patterns of coagulase-negative staphylococci recovered from blood cultures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, JG; Kosterink, JGW; Degener, JE

    1997-01-01

    Antibiotic use is a cause of selection of multiresistant bacterial strains. Over three years (1990-1992) we studied the relation between the use of flucloxacillin, vancomycin, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin and the susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) recovered from blood

  10. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria: A Global Challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vealed several aminoglycoside resistances in nonculturable bac- teria. Notwithstanding the availability of so many antimicrobial agents, infectious diseases still remain the second leading cause of death worldwide. Eventually, the widespread occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has added a new dimension to the.

  11. Chronic otorrhoea: Spectrum of microorganisms and antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otorrhoea had a different microbial spectrum compared with international reports, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in a single patient. The organisms isolated were susceptible mainly to fluoroquinolones (96%) and aminoglycosides (81%). Conclusion. Amoxicillin is a poor choice of antibiotic due to ...

  12. Assay method for polymer-controlled antibiotic release from allograft bone to target orthopaedic infections - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevy, Justin O; Slawson, Matthew H; Grainger, David W; Brooks, Amanda E

    2010-01-01

    To mitigate and circumvent orthopaedic-associated infection, systematic oral and parenteral antibiotic therapy is often used; however, efficacy is limited due to dosing, systemic side-effects, patient compliance, effective delivery, treatment length, and resistant bacteria. A more effective method may be sustained local drug delivery of antibiotics at the wound site, using delivery vehicles that control release rates. In the case of bone for example, this could be clinically familiar bone graft. Unfortunately, without a rate-control strategy, local antibiotic delivery from allograft displays a prominent burst release: a large amount of drug payload is released as a bolus within 72 hours and depleted. Although his offers effective immediate killing, persitor bacteria remain an infection risk. Notably, drug resistance is a problem at reduced antibiotic levels. To allow better local dosing modulation, a degradable polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer allograft coating is used to modulate local delivery of the antibiotic, tobramycin. This polymer/antibiotic hybrid coats the porous structure of the cancellous bone graft, providing a substantial drug reservoir and allowing controlled release of antibiotic over extended time. PCL/tobramycin-coated bone fragments of different PCL molecular weights and variable drug loads are assayed in vitro for drug release. Tobramycin concentration is determined based on derivatization of its 5 primary amine groups with a fluorescent reagent, phthaldialdehyde (OPA). Tobramycin concentrations in release media can be calculated based on a standard curve with a reasonable accuracy and dynamic range.

  13. Synergistic antibiotic combinations for colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádár, Béla; Kocsis, Béla; Tóth, Ákos; Damjanova, Ivelina; Szász, Máté; Kristóf, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Szabó, Dóra

    2013-06-01

    In this study antibiotic combinations for multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains were investigated. The study included a colistin-susceptible and a colistin-resistant KPC-2 producing K. pneumoniae ST258 strains isolated in 2008 and 2009 during an outbreak in Hungary. Antibiotic combinations were analyzed by checkerboard technique and fractional inhibitory concentration indices were calculated. The following antibiotics were tested: ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ampicillin, imipenem, ertapenem, amikacin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifampicin, polymyxin B and colistin. Combinations including 0.25 μg/ml colistin plus 1 μg/ml rifampicin, 0.25 μg/ml polymyxin B plus 1 μg/ml rifampicin, 1 μg/ml imipenem plus 2 μg/ml tobramycin, were found synergistic.These in vitro synergistic combinations suggest potential therapeutical options against infections caused by KPC-2 producing, multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae ST258.

  14. Berberine is a novel type efflux inhibitor which attenuates the MexXY-mediated aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Morita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime, macrolides (erythromycin, and lincosamides (lincomycin demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the 4 other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN, a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important.

  15. Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Resources for You Information for Consumers (Drugs) Buying & Using Medicine Safely Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics ... Antibiotic Resistance and Protect Public Health The White House Blog FDA’s Take on the Executive Order and ...

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of the incorporation of tobramycin and strontium-ions into hydroxyapatite by means of co-precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Baochang [Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), S 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Lilja, Mirjam, E-mail: mirjam.lilja@sandvik.com [Division for Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Sandvik Coromant Sverige AB, 12680 Stockholm (Sweden); Ma, Taoran [Applied Materials Physics, Department of Materials and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), S 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Sörensen, Jan; Steckel, Hartwig [Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, Christian Albrecht University Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Ahuja, Rajeev [Condensed Matter Theory, Uppala University (Sweden); Strømme, Maria, E-mail: maria.stromme@angstrom.uu.se [Division for Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We investigate incorporation of tobramycin into hydroxyapatite using co-precipitation by theory and experiment. • The drug molecule shows larger adsorption energy on a submicron HA surface compared to a TiO{sub 2} surface. • Strontium substitution allows for production of thinner coatings with enhanced drug incorporation capacity. - Abstract: Antibiotic incorporation into hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings by co-precipitation and the impact of bone relevant doping elements on the adsorption kinetics are investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. Tobramycin interactions with bioactive TiO{sub 2} and HA surfaces are analyzed using density functional theory. According to the calculations, the drug molecule has larger adsorption energy than the Ca{sup +} ion on both surfaces under study in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS). The results support the experimental observations that HA nucleation and growth are strongly limited on TiO{sub 2} surfaces in the presence of clinically relevant antibiotic concentrations in PBS. The drug molecule is more likely to adopt parallel arrangement onto the HA surface, as the adsorption energy of such arrangement is higher compared to a perpendicular one. Strontium substitution of the HA surface is found to results in a weaker drug–surface interaction, and leads also to a decrease in coating thickness. However, the presence of strontium gives rise to a coating morphology with enhanced drug incorporation capacity and slower antibiotic release compared to non-substituted, co-precipitated counterparts. Our theoretical calculation results were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data and provide a powerful tool to understand the interaction mechanism between drug and different surface chemistries necessary for development of future versatile orthopedic and dental implant surfaces.

  17. Bioanalysis of tobramycin for therapeutic drug monitoring by solid-phase extraction and capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonge, Humphrey; Kaale, Eliangiringa; Govaerts, Cindy; Desmet, Koenraad; Van Schepdael, Ann; Hoogmartens, Jos

    2004-10-25

    A method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) for the analysis of tobramycin in human serum is presented. An off-line SPE employing a carboxypropyl bonded phase (CBA) cartridge was used for the extraction of tobramycin from human serum. Adsorbed tobramycin was eluted from the CBA cartridge using a mixture of NH(3) (25%, w/v)-methanol (30:70, v/v). After evaporation, the analyte was reconstituted and derivatized with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA)/3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The resulting tobramycin-OPA/MPA derivative was purified, and then identified by mass spectrometry. The tobramycin-OPA/MPA derivative was then analysed by CZE with a background electrolyte (BGE) comprising of 30 mM sodium tetraborate pH 10.0-acetonitrile (ACN) (80:20, v/v) with ultraviolet detection at 230 nm. A linear response was observed in the range of 0.3-30 microg/ml with r(2) = 0.992. The sensitivity of the method was determined by its limit of quantitation (LOQ) and limit of detection (LOD) of 0.3 microg/ml and 0.1 microg/ml, respectively. SPE recovery ranged from 68 to 79% at the trough levels to 98% at the peak levels found in serum. Furosemide has been added as internal standard (IS) to improve precision. For the therapeutic range of tobramycin in serum (2-10 microg/ml) the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was less than 11% for the entire SPE/CE process. The method demonstrated excellent selectivity as shown by the lack of interference from a total of 20 drugs investigated. The method was then used in therapeutic drug monitoring of patients receiving the drug.

  18. Antibiotic rezistance genes in soil actinobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Patrmanová, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacteria are important members of the soil ecosystems, where they are involved in organic matter decomposition. It is worth mentioning that their secondary metabolism allows them to produce a variety of different compounds. These compounds include antibiotics, among them aminoglycosides have a place in clinical practice. These antibiotics are significant due to a broad spectrum of activities against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, their use currently carries a ri...

  19. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  20. Inhalation of tobramycin in cystic fibrosis. Part 1: the choice of a nebulizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brun, P P; de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Heijerman, H G; Frijlink, H W

    1999-11-05

    Forteen commercially available jet and ultrasonic nebulizers were investigated with the aim to select the most suitable type of apparatus for the inhalation of a 10% tobramycin solution. Two different techniques for measurement of particle size distribution were evaluated: laser diffraction and cascade impactor analysis. The final selection of the nebulizers is based on particle size distribution, output and stable performance during nebulization. All 14 nebulizers (eight jet and six ultrasonic) were filled with a solution of 10% m/v tobramycin (as sulphate) in water. The volume in the tested devices ranged from 4.5 to 10 ml (=450-1000 mg tobramycin) in accordance with the prescribed usage by the suppliers. The nebulizers were connected with a special designed adapter to a laser diffraction analyser in order to measure particle size distribution of the aerosol. Inhalation was simulated with a static flow of 40 l/min. The particle size distribution (expressed as X(10), X(50), and X(90)) was determined after 10 s, 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6, 9 and 12 min of nebulization. Furthermore, the tobramycin solutions were assayed for tobramycin content before and after nebulization. For all nebulizers, the mean particle size distribution, depicted as X(50), was within the range of 1-5 mm. There were no relevant differences between the nebulizers in concentration or particle size distribution during nebulization. The output of the nebulizers is a result of both nebulization and evaporation. The output, expressed as volume of tobramycin solution, ranged from 0.06 to 0.50 ml/min. The output of tobramycin ranged from 1.2 to 39.5 mg/min. For clinical practice 300-600 mg have to be nebulized within 20-30 min. It was concluded that only three jet nebulizers [Porta-Neb Sidestream (PNS), Porta-Neb Ventstream (PNV) and Pariboy Pari LC+ (PLC)] have a reasonable output and an acceptable particle size distribution for the administration of a 10% tobramycin solution in the therapeutic dosage range.

  1. The major aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme AAC(3)-II found in Escherichia coli determines a significant disparity in its resistance to gentamicin and amikacin in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yonghong; Hu, Yunjian

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in Escherichia coli in different areas of China and to explore the relationship between pandemic enzyme type and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents in China. Gentamicin- or etimicin-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli were collected from different areas of China, and the in vitro antibacterial activity of 11 aminoglycoside agents was determined using standard (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) agar dilution methods. Twelve aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were detected by PCR and confirmed by DNA sequencing. A total of 205 E. coli strains were collected from nine hospitals in seven cities. All strains were highly resistant to gentamicin or etimicin, whereas resistance to tobramycin, netilmicin, and kanamycin was slightly lower. However, less than 15% of isolates were resistant to amikacin and isepamicin. Of the gentamicin-resistant strains, 88.2% and 86.7% were sensitive to isepamicin and amikacin, respectively. Five aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were detected in 191 strains, whereas the remaining 14 strains were negative. The most common gene type was aac(3)-II (162 strains), followed by aac(6')-I (50 strains), ant(3″)-I (28 strains), aph(3')-II (20 strains), and ant(2″)-I (20 strains). Ninety-five strains yielded aac(3)-II only, whereas the others contained two or three genes. The three main gene combinations were aac(6')-I/aac(3)-II (28 strains), aac(3)-II/ant(3″)-I (11 strains), and aac(3)-II/aac(6')-I (10 strains). Regional bacterial resistance and enzyme distribution were roughly similar, although minor differences were found in Guangzhou, Jinan, and Dalian, which were the sources of most of the amikacin- or isepamicin-resistant strains. Chinese clinical isolates of E. coli remain highly resistant to gentamicin and etimicin, but are susceptible to amikacin and isepamicin. The dominant type of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme

  2. Molecular identification of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid isolated in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Miró, Elisenda; Ortega, Adriana; Bou, Germán; González-López, Juan José; Oliver, Antonio; Pascual, Alvaro; Cercenado, Emilia; Oteo, Jesús; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, Ferran

    2015-08-01

    The activity of eight aminoglycosides (amikacin, apramycin, arbekacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin and tobramycin) against a collection of 257 amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates was determined by microdilution. Aminoglycoside resistance rates, the prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes, the relationship between AME gene detection and resistance phenotype to aminoglycosides, and the association of AME genes with mechanisms of AMC resistance in E. coli isolates in Spain were investigated. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of genes encoding common AMEs [aac(3)-Ia, aac(3)-IIa, aac(3)-IVa, aac(6')-Ib, ant(2″)-Ia, ant(4')-IIa and aph(3')-Ia] or 16S rRNA methylases (armA, rmtB, rmtC and npmA). In total, 105 isolates (40.9%) were resistant to at least one of the aminoglycosides tested. Amikacin, apramycin and arbekacin showed better activity, with MIC90 values of 2mg/L (arbekacin) and 8mg/L (amikacin and apramycin). Kanamycin presented the highest MIC90 (128mg/L). The most common AME gene was aac(6')-Ib (36 strains; 34.3%), followed by aph(3')-Ia (31 strains; 29.5%), ant(2″)-Ia (29 strains; 27.6%) and aac(3)-IIa (23 strains; 21.9%). aac(3)-Ia, aac(3)-IVa, ant(4')-IIa and the four methylases were not detected. The ant(2″)-Ia gene was usually associated with OXA-1 [21/30; 70%], whilst 23/25 (92%) strains producing CTX-M-15 had the aac(6')-Ib gene. The most prevalent AME gene was aac(6')-Ib (18/41; 44%) in nosocomial isolates, whilst ant(2″)-Ia and aph(3')-Ia genes (20/64; 31%) were more frequent in strains of community origin. In 64.6% isolates the phenotypic profile correlated with the presence of commonly encountered AMEs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR on β-lactam and non-β-lactam transient cross-resistance upon pre-exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Hansi; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Zincke, Diansy

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded opportunistic pathogens accounting for 10 % of hospital-acquired infections, with a 50 % mortality rate in chronically ill patients. The increased prevalence of drug-resistant isolates is a major cause of concern. Resistance in P. aeruginosa is mediated by various mechanisms, some of which are shared among different classes of antibiotics and which raise the possibility of cross-resistance. The goal of this study was to explore the effect of subinhibitory concentrations (SICs) of clinically relevant antibiotics and the role of a global antibiotic resistance and virulence regulator, AmpR, in developing cross-resistance. We investigated the induction of transient cross-resistance in P. aeruginosa PAO1 upon exposure to SICs of antibiotics. Pre-exposure to carbapenems, specifically imipenem, even at 3 ng ml−1, adversely affected the efficacy of clinically used penicillins and cephalosporins. The high β-lactam resistance was due to elevated expression of both ampC and ampR, encoding a chromosomal β-lactamase and its regulator, respectively. Differences in the susceptibility of ampR and ampC mutants suggested non-AmpC-mediated regulation of β-lactam resistance by AmpR. The increased susceptibility of P. aeruginosa in the absence of ampR to various antibiotics upon SIC exposure suggests that AmpR plays a major role in the cross-resistance. AmpR was shown previously to be involved in resistance to quinolones by regulating MexEF–OprN efflux pump. The data here further indicate the role of AmpR in cross-resistance between quinolones and aminoglycosides. This was confirmed using quantitative PCR, where expression of the mexEF efflux pump was further induced by ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, its substrate and a non-substrate, respectively, in the absence of ampR. The data presented here highlight the intricate cross-regulation of antibiotic resistance pathways at SICs of antibiotics and the need for careful assessment

  4. In vitro antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycoside arbekacin tested against oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated in Brazilian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. R. Cordeiro

    Full Text Available Arbekacin is an aminoglycoside used in Japan for treating infections caused by gentamicin and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin against 454 clinical isolates of ORSA. The isolates were consecutively collected between January and July, 2000, from patients hospitalized in 8 Brazilian medical centers. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method according to NCCLS recommendations. The vast majority of the isolates, 453 strains (99.8%, were considered susceptible to arbekacin based on the criteria proposed by the Requirements for Antibiotic Products of Japan. Only 1 isolate (0.2% was classified as resistant. On the other hand, high rates of resistance were demonstrated for other aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin (97.6% resistance and amikacin (97.0% resistance. Resistance rate was also high for ciprofloxacin (98.0%. All isolates were considered susceptible to vancomycin. The excellent in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin demonstrated in this study indicates that this antimicrobial agent may play an important role in the treatment of severe ORSA infections, especially those that show poor clinical response with vancomycin monotherapy. Since the aminoglycosides should not be used as monotherapy to treat Gram positive infections, further studies evaluating in vitro and in vivo synergistic activity of arbekacin combinations are necessary to clarify the clinical role of this aminoglycoside.

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycoside arbekacin tested against oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated in Brazilian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Julio C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Arbekacin is an aminoglycoside used in Japan for treating infections caused by gentamicin and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin against 454 clinical isolates of ORSA. The isolates were consecutively collected between January and July, 2000, from patients hospitalized in 8 Brazilian medical centers. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method according to NCCLS recommendations. The vast majority of the isolates, 453 strains (99.8%, were considered susceptible to arbekacin based on the criteria proposed by the Requirements for Antibiotic Products of Japan. Only 1 isolate (0.2% was classified as resistant. On the other hand, high rates of resistance were demonstrated for other aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin (97.6% resistance and amikacin (97.0% resistance. Resistance rate was also high for ciprofloxacin (98.0%. All isolates were considered susceptible to vancomycin. The excellent in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin demonstrated in this study indicates that this antimicrobial agent may play an important role in the treatment of severe ORSA infections, especially those that show poor clinical response with vancomycin monotherapy. Since the aminoglycosides should not be used as monotherapy to treat Gram positive infections, further studies evaluating in vitro and in vivo synergistic activity of arbekacin combinations are necessary to clarify the clinical role of this aminoglycoside.

  6. Functional hair cell mechanotransducer channels are required for aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Alharazneh

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides (AG are commonly prescribed antibiotics with potent bactericidal activities. One main side effect is permanent sensorineural hearing loss, induced by selective inner ear sensory hair cell death. Much work has focused on AG's initiating cell death processes, however, fewer studies exist defining mechanisms of AG uptake by hair cells. The current study investigated two proposed mechanisms of AG transport in mammalian hair cells: mechanotransducer (MET channels and endocytosis. To study these two mechanisms, rat cochlear explants were cultured as whole organs in gentamicin-containing media. Two-photon imaging of Texas Red conjugated gentamicin (GTTR uptake into live hair cells was rapid and selective. Hypocalcemia, which increases the open probability of MET channels, increased AG entry into hair cells. Three blockers of MET channels (curare, quinine, and amiloride significantly reduced GTTR uptake, whereas the endocytosis inhibitor concanavalin A did not. Dynosore quenched the fluorescence of GTTR and could not be tested. Pharmacologic blockade of MET channels with curare or quinine, but not concanavalin A or dynosore, prevented hair cell loss when challenged with gentamicin for up to 96 hours. Taken together, data indicate that the patency of MET channels mediated AG entry into hair cells and its toxicity. Results suggest that limiting permeation of AGs through MET channel or preventing their entry into endolymph are potential therapeutic targets for preventing hair cell death and hearing loss.

  7. Occurrence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes genes (aac(6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides is the primary mechanism of resistance by Pseudomonas aerug- inosa. Obejectives: We investigated the occurrence and mechanism of aminoglycosides resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates from hospitals in SouthWest Nigeria. Methods: A total of 54 ...

  8. Low Molecular Weight Chitosan-Coated PLGA Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Delivery of Tobramycin for Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nemrawi, Nusaiba K; Alshraiedeh, Nid''A H; Zayed, Aref L; Altaani, Bashar M

    2018-03-08

    (1) Background: Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with Tobramycin were prepared using a solvent-evaporation method. (2) Methods: The NPs were coated with low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) to enhance the mucoadhesiveness of PLGA-NPs. The following w / w ratios of tobramycin to LMWC were prepared: control (0:0.50), F₀ (1:0.25), F₀.₅ (1:0.5), and F₁ (1:1). (3) Results: The results showed that the size of the particles increased from 220.7 nm to 575.77 nm as the concentration of LMWC used in the formulation increased. The surface charge was also affected by the amount of LMWC, where uncoated-PLGA nanoparticles had negative charges (-2.8 mV), while coated-PLGA NPs had positive charges (+33.47 to +50.13 mV). SEM confirmed the size and the spherical homogeneous morphology of the NPs. Coating the NPs with LMWC enhanced the mucoadhesive properties of the NPs and sustained the tobramycin release over two days. Finally, all NPs had antimicrobial activity that increased as the amount of LMWC increased. (4) Conclusion: In conclusion, the formulation of mucoadhesive, controlled-release, tobramycin-LMWC-PLGA nanoparticles for the treatment of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is possible, and their properties could be controlled by controlling the concentration of LMWC.

  9. Spatiotemporal pharmacodynamics of meropenem- and tobramycin-treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Verotta, Davide; Huang, Liusheng

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown in an in vitro flow-chamber model. Pharmacokinetic profiles of meropenem and tobramycin used in human therapy were administered to GFP-labelled P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in flow chambers for 24 or 72 h. Images were acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy...

  10. Inhalation of tobramycin in cystic fibrosis. Part 1 : The choice of a nebulizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Brun, P.P.H.; de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Heijerman, H.G.M.; Frijlink, H W

    1999-01-01

    Forteen commercially available jet and ultrasonic nebulizers were investigated with the aim to select the most suitable type of apparatus for the inhalation of a 10% tobramycin solution. Two different techniques for measurement of particle size distribution were evaluated: laser diffraction and

  11. Low Molecular Weight Chitosan-Coated PLGA Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Delivery of Tobramycin for Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusaiba K. Al-Nemrawi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs loaded with Tobramycin were prepared using a solvent-evaporation method. (2 Methods: The NPs were coated with low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC to enhance the mucoadhesiveness of PLGA-NPs. The following w/w ratios of tobramycin to LMWC were prepared: control (0:0.50, F0 (1:0.25, F0.5 (1:0.5, and F1 (1:1. (3 Results: The results showed that the size of the particles increased from 220.7 nm to 575.77 nm as the concentration of LMWC used in the formulation increased. The surface charge was also affected by the amount of LMWC, where uncoated-PLGA nanoparticles had negative charges (−2.8 mV, while coated-PLGA NPs had positive charges (+33.47 to +50.13 mV. SEM confirmed the size and the spherical homogeneous morphology of the NPs. Coating the NPs with LMWC enhanced the mucoadhesive properties of the NPs and sustained the tobramycin release over two days. Finally, all NPs had antimicrobial activity that increased as the amount of LMWC increased. (4 Conclusion: In conclusion, the formulation of mucoadhesive, controlled-release, tobramycin-LMWC-PLGA nanoparticles for the treatment of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is possible, and their properties could be controlled by controlling the concentration of LMWC.

  12. Commutability of proficiency testing material containing tobramycin: a study within the framework of the Dutch Calibration 2.000 project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robijns, Karen; Boone, Niels W; Jansen, Rob T P; Kuypers, Aldy W H M; Neef, Cees; Touw, Daan J

    2017-02-01

    Results from external quality assessment schemes (EQASs) can provide information about accuracy and comparability of different measurement methods, provided that the material used in these schemes behave identical to patient samples among the different methods, a characteristic also known as commutability. The aim of this study was to assess the commutability of different matrices for the material used in an EQAS for tobramycin. Proficiency testing material (PTM) and patient samples containing tobramycin were prepared, collected, pooled, and distributed to participating laboratories for analysis. Low, medium, and high tobramycin concentrations in liquid human, liquid bovine and lyophilized bovine serum were tested in this study. The patient serum results of every laboratory were plotted against each of the other laboratories, and the distances of the PTM results to the patient serum regression line were calculated. For comparison, these distances were divided by the average within-laboratory standard deviation (SDwl) of the results reported in the official EQAS for tobramycin, resulting in a relative residual. The commutability decision limit was set at 3 SDwl. With 10 laboratories participating in this study, 45 laboratory couples were formed. For human serum, only one relative residual for high concentrations of tobramycin was found outside the commutability decision limit. For liquid and lyophilized bovine sera, the number of relative residuals outside the decision limit was between 15 and 18 for low, medium, and high tobramycin concentrations. The PTM used for tobramycin is preferably prepared with human serum.

  13. MexY-promoted aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: involvement of a putative proximal binding pocket in aminoglycoside recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Hughes, Daniel; Poole, Keith

    2014-04-22

    The resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family multidrug efflux system MexXY-OprM is a major determinant of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although the details of aminoglycoside recognition and export by MexY, the substrate-binding RND component of this efflux system, have not been elucidated. To identify regions/residues of MexY important for aminoglycoside resistance, plasmid-borne mexY was mutagenized and mutations that impaired MexY-promoted aminoglycoside (streptomycin) resistance were identified in a ΔmexY strain of P. aeruginosa. Sixty-one streptomycin-sensitive mexY mutants were recovered; among these, 7 unique mutations that yielded wild-type levels of MexY expression were identified. These mutations compromised resistance to additional aminoglycosides and to other antimicrobials and occurred in both the transmembrane and periplasmic regions of the protein. Mapping of the mutated residues onto a 3-dimensional structure of MexY modeled on Escherichia coli AcrB revealed that these tended to occur in regions implicated in general pump operation (transmembrane domain) and MexY trimer assembly (docking domain) and, thus, did not provide insights into aminoglycoside recognition. A region corresponding to a proximal binding pocket connected to a periplasm-linked cleft, part of a drug export pathway of AcrB, was identified in MexY and proposed to play a role in aminoglycoside recognition. To test this, selected residues (K79, D133, and Y613) within this pocket were mutagenized and the impact on aminoglycoside resistance was assessed. Mutations of D133 and Y613 compromised aminoglycoside resistance, while, surprisingly, the K79 mutation enhanced aminoglycoside resistance, confirming a role for this putative proximal binding pocket in aminoglycoside recognition and export. IMPORTANCE Bacterial RND pumps do not typically accommodate highly hydrophilic agents such as aminoglycosides, and it is unclear how those, such as MexY, which accommodate

  14. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão Rodrigues, Fabíola Fernandes; Costa, José Galberto Martins; Rodrigues, Fábio Fernandes Galvao; Campos, Adriana Rolim

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%-P. amboinicus) and eugenol (22.9%-P. ornatus e 25.1%-P. barbatus). In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant) using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  15. Elution Profiles of Two Methods of Antibiotic Tibial Nail Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karek, Matthew R; Jackson, Nancy M; Flynn, Jeffrey C; Vaidya, Rahul; Markel, David C

    2017-05-01

    Interlocking nails coated with antibiotic-supplemented cement provide effective treatment of infected long bone nonunion, but the thicker coating on guidewires may provide greater antibacterial activity. This study compared the properties of cement cured on each construct by evaluating 2-cm segments of 8-mm interlocking nails and 3.5-mm guidewires coated with antibiotic-supplemented cement. Each construct (n=7 for each group) was coated with polymethylmethacrylate cement (Simplex; Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, New Jersey) containing either 1 g tobramycin or 1 g vancomycin powder plus 2.2 g tobramycin powder. A No. 40 French polyvinyl chloride chest tube was used as a mold for all constructs. Segments were soaked in sterile phosphate-buffered saline, and entire aliquots were exchanged at various intervals over a 6-week period. Antibiotic concentration, antibacterial activity, cement curing temperature, and porosity were measured. At least half of the total elution of antibiotics occurred within the first 24 hours for all constructs. For the tobramycin-only cement, no differences between constructs were observed. For constructs containing both antibiotics, interlocking nails showed more antibiotic release than guidewires at most time points (PAntibiotics were released for 6 weeks and continued to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth. Cement curing temperatures for interlocking nails were lower than those for guidewires (Pantibiotic released did not directly relate to porosity for any construct type. Interlocking nails coated with antibiotic-supplemented cement may provide greater antibiotic delivery to infected long bone nonunion compared with guidewires. A thin mantle of cement may allow greater elution, possibly as a result of cooler exothermic reactions. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e436-e442.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN) genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families

  17. Ligand promiscuity through the eyes of the aminoglycoside N3 acetyltransferase IIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Adrianne L; Serpersu, Engin H

    2013-07-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AGMEs) are expressed in many pathogenic bacteria and cause resistance to aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics. Remarkably, the substrate promiscuity of AGMEs is quite variable. The molecular basis for such ligand promiscuity is largely unknown as there is not an obvious link between amino acid sequence or structure and the antibiotic profiles of AGMEs. To address this issue, this article presents the first kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of one of the least promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3 acetyltransferase-IIa (AAC-IIa) and its comparison to two highly promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3-acetyltransferase-IIIb (AAC-IIIb) and the AG phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa (APH). Despite having similar antibiotic selectivities, AAC-IIIb and APH catalyze different reactions and share no homology to one another. AAC-IIa and AAC-IIIb catalyze the same reaction and are very similar in both amino acid sequence and structure. However, they demonstrate strong differences in their substrate profiles and kinetic and thermodynamic properties. AAC-IIa and APH are also polar opposites in terms of ligand promiscuity but share no sequence or apparent structural homology. However, they both are highly dynamic and may even contain disordered segments and both adopt well-defined conformations when AGs are bound. Contrary to this AAC-IIIb maintains a well-defined structure even in apo form. Data presented herein suggest that the antibiotic promiscuity of AGMEs may be determined neither by the flexibility of the protein nor the size of the active site cavity alone but strongly modulated or controlled by the effects of the cosubstrate on the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the enzyme. Copyright Copyright © 2013 The Protein Society.

  18. Aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from non-cystic fibrosis patients in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonsuk, Kanchana; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine aminoglycosides (AMGs) resistance mechanisms, including the AMG-modifying enzyme genes, mexXY, rplY, nuoG, and galU, in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa non-cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates in Thailand. One hundred P. aeruginosa isolates from non-CF patients were examined for susceptibility to AMGs and for the presence of 10 AMG-modifying enzyme genes. Thirty randomly selected isolates were tested for transcription of mexXY and nuoG and mutations in rplY and galU. All the P. aeruginosa isolates exhibited simultaneous resistance to at least 4 AMGs. High resistance rates to amikacin (92%), gentamicin (95%), streptomycin (99%), and tobramycin (96%) were observed, and all isolates were resistant to kanamycin, neomycin, and spectinomycin. Nine AMG-modifying enzyme genes were detected, including aadA1 (84%), aadB (84%), aadA2 (67%), ant(2″)-Ia (72%), strA-strB (70%), aph(3')-IIb (57%), aac(3')-Ia (40%), and aac(6')-IIa (27%). None of the isolates harbored aac(6')-IIb. Of 30 isolates tested, all but 1 isolate expressed MexXY. Two isolates did not express nuoG. Six isolates carried an amino acid change in RplY, but none of the isolates harbored mutation in galU. The results indicated that the AMG-modifying enzyme genes were widespread among the P. aeruginosa non-CF isolates. The MexXY efflux pump and inactivation for rplY played a role in AMG resistance but disruption of nuoG or galU did not.

  19. Theoretical and experimental study of the incorporation of tobramycin and strontium-ions into hydroxyapatite by means of co-precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baochang; Lilja, Mirjam; Ma, Taoran; Sörensen, Jan; Steckel, Hartwig; Ahuja, Rajeev; Strømme, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Antibiotic incorporation into hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings by co-precipitation and the impact of bone relevant doping elements on the adsorption kinetics are investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. Tobramycin interactions with bioactive TiO2 and HA surfaces are analyzed using density functional theory. According to the calculations, the drug molecule has larger adsorption energy than the Ca+ ion on both surfaces under study in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS). The results support the experimental observations that HA nucleation and growth are strongly limited on TiO2 surfaces in the presence of clinically relevant antibiotic concentrations in PBS. The drug molecule is more likely to adopt parallel arrangement onto the HA surface, as the adsorption energy of such arrangement is higher compared to a perpendicular one. Strontium substitution of the HA surface is found to results in a weaker drug-surface interaction, and leads also to a decrease in coating thickness. However, the presence of strontium gives rise to a coating morphology with enhanced drug incorporation capacity and slower antibiotic release compared to non-substituted, co-precipitated counterparts. Our theoretical calculation results were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data and provide a powerful tool to understand the interaction mechanism between drug and different surface chemistries necessary for development of future versatile orthopedic and dental implant surfaces.

  20. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-06-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6')-Ie-phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2'')-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2'')-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2'')-IIa and APH(2'')-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2'')-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2'')-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2'')-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a `gatekeeper' residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2'')-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme.

  1. Once-daily versus multiple-daily dosing with intravenous aminoglycosides for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Alan R; Bhatt, Jayesh; Nevitt, Sarah J

    2017-03-27

    People with cystic fibrosis, who are chronically colonised with the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa, often require multiple courses of intravenous aminoglycoside antibiotics for the management of pulmonary exacerbations. The properties of aminoglycosides suggest that they could be given in higher doses less often. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness and safety of once-daily versus multiple-daily dosing of intravenous aminoglycoside antibiotics for the management of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cystic Fibrosis Specialist Register held at the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's editorial base, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and handsearching abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 24 June 2016. All randomised controlled trials, whether published or unpublished, in which once-daily dosing of aminoglycosides has been compared with multiple-daily dosing in terms of efficacy or toxicity or both, in people with cystic fibrosis. The two authors independently selected the studies to be included in the review and assessed the risk of bias of each study; authors also assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE criteria. Data were independently extracted by each author. Authors of the included studies were contacted for further information. As yet unpublished data were obtained for one of the included studies. Fifteen studies were identified for possible inclusion in the review. Four studies reporting results from a total of 328 participants (aged 5 to 50 years) were included in this review. All studies compared once-daily dosing with thrice-daily dosing. One study had a low risk of bias for all criteria assessed; the remaining three included studies had a high risk of bias from blinding, but for other criteria were judged to have either an unclear or a low risk

  2. Activation of the cryptic aac(6')-Iy aminoglycoside resistance gene of Salmonella by a chromosomal deletion generating a transcriptional fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, S; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    1999-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis BM4361 and BM4362 were isolated from the same patient. BM4361 was susceptible to aminoglycosides, whereas BM4362 was resistant to tobramycin owing to synthesis of a 6'-N-acetyltransferase type I [AAC(6')-I]. Comparative analysis of nucleotide sequences, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and Southern hybridizations indicated that the chromosomal aac(6')-Iy genes for the enzyme in both strains were identical and that BM4362 derived from BM4361 following a ca. 60-kb deletion that occurred 1.5 kb upstream from the resistance gene. Northern hybridizations showed that aac(6')-Iy was silent in BM4361 and highly expressed in BM4362 due to a transcriptional fusion. Primer extension mapping identified the transcriptional start site for aac(6')-Iy in BM4362: 5 bp downstream from the promoter of the nmpC gene. Study of the distribution of aac(6')-Iy by PCR and Southern hybridization with a specific probe indicated that the gene, although not found in S. enterica subsp. arizonae, was specific for Salmonella. In this bacterial genus, aac(6')-Iy was located downstream from a cluster of seven open reading frames analogous to an Escherichia coli locus that encodes enzymes putatively involved in carbohydrate transport or metabolism. This genomic environment suggests a role in the catabolism of a specific sugar for AAC(6')-Iy in Salmonella.

  3. Incorporation of different antibiotics into carbonated hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium implants, release and antibiotic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, M; Bezemer, J; de Groot, K; Layrolle, P

    2004-09-14

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) coatings were applied onto titanium implants by using a biomimetic precipitation method. Different antibiotics were incorporated into the CHA coatings and their release and efficacy against bacteria growth were studied in vitro. The following antibiotics were used within this study: cephalothin, carbenicillin, amoxicillin, cefamandol, tobramycin, gentamicin and vancomycin. Increased concentrations of antibiotics in the coating solution led to a higher quantity of antibiotic incorporated into the CHA coating. Some antibiotics were better incorporated than others depending on their chemical structure. Antibiotics, containing carboxylic groups such as cephalothin, carbenicillin and cefamandol, were better incorporated than antibiotics lacking these groups. A bacterial inhibition test on Staphylococcus aureus bacteria showed inhibition of growth for all antibiotics that were released from the CHA coating. A release test was conducted in phosphate buffer saline PBS at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C and showed that antibiotics containing carboxylic groups like cephalothin were slower released from the CHA coating than others. These results suggest that certain antibiotics are able to bind/chelate with calcium, resulting in a better incorporation into the CHA coating and a slower release. Antibiotics incorporated in CHA coatings on titanium implants might be used to prevent post-surgical infections and to promote bone-bonding of orthopedic devices.

  4. Clinical impact of laboratory error on therapeutic drug monitoring of once-daily tobramycin in cystic fibrosis: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Prescott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Once-daily dosing intravenous tobramycin is commonly used to treat cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations. Clinicians often utilize historical therapeutic drug monitoring data to individualize the dose among patients who have been treated with tobramycin previously. This case series involves three patients with cystic fibrosis who had supra-therapeutic tobramycin levels despite use of a once-daily dosing that produced therapeutic drug levels during a previous hospital admission, raising questions about the validity of these levels. Investigation into several potential sources of error led to the discovery of an analyzer error in the laboratory. Once the laboratory’s tobramycin analyzer was recalibrated, the reported levels were comparable to historical levels. This case series emphasizes the clinical importance of critically analyzing reported levels, and specifically, the importance of utilizing past therapeutic drug monitoring data, if available, for all patients treated with intravenous tobramycin. If a patient was therapeutic on a similar dose of tobramycin during a previous admission, a dose adjustment may not be necessary, and clinicians should consider repeating levels while pursuing alternative explanations for the discrepant serum levels.

  5. Preventing Ototoxic Synergy of Prior Noise Trauma During Aminoglycoside Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Johns Hopkins University. 212 p (2007). 9. Liao S, et al. Noise Exposure in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit : A Prospective Study. American Academy...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0006 TITLE: Preventing Ototoxic Synergy Of Prior Noise Trauma During Aminoglycoside Therapy ...Dec 2014 - 30 Nov 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Ototoxic Synergy Of Prior Noise Trauma During Aminoglycoside Therapy

  6. In vitro susceptibility pattern of acinetobacter species to commonly used cephalosporins, quinolones, and aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Acinetobacter spp. is an emerging important nosocomial pathogen. Clinical isolates of this genus are often resistant to many antibiotics. The in vitro susceptibility of Acinetobacter isolates obtained from patients were tested for currently used antibiotics. In addition, the study aimed at biotyping of Acinetobacter baumannii. METHODS: A total of 66 isolates were phenotypically characterised through a large panel of 25 carbon assimilation tests and susceptibility through disc diffusion method with 10 antimicrobial agents were tested. MICs were determined only for second line broad-spectrum drugs such as cefotaxime, ceftazidime, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin using NCCLS guidelines. RESULTS: Multiple drug resistance (MDR was only witnessed in A. baumannii and not in other Acinetobacter species. Aminoglycosides such as amikacin, netilmicin were most active against the MDR isolates tested (60% susceptibility. Ceftazidime was more active than cefotaxime. MDR A. baumannii strains were susceptible only to amikacin, netilmicin and ceftadizime. Ciprofloxacin had poor activity irrespective of isolates belonging to different DNA groups tested (58% resistance overall, 79% among A. baumannii. Strains of Biotypes 6 and 19 of A. baumannii showed broader resistance than those of biotype 10 and others. CONCLUSIONS: Strains of A. baumannii from patients in our hospital, were generally more resistant to quinolones, -lactam antibiotics, first and second generation cephalosporins and partially resistant to third generation cephalosporins and aminoglycosides. The strains belonging to other DNA groups of Acinetobacter were comparatively less resistant than A.baumannii, except ciprofloxacin. This study suggests that, a combination therapy, using a third generation cephalosporin and amikacin, would be best choice for treating Acinetobacter infections.

  7. A comparison of different antibiotic regimens for the treatment of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Dayer, Mark; Conterno, Lucieni O; Gonzalez Garay, Alejandro G; Martí-Amarista, Cristina Elena; Simancas-Racines, Daniel

    2016-04-19

    Infective endocarditis is a microbial infection of the endocardial surface of the heart. Antibiotics are the cornerstone of treatment, but their use is not standardised, due to the differences in presentation, populations affected and the wide variety of micro-organisms that can be responsible. To assess the existing evidence about the clinical benefits and harms of different antibiotics regimens used to treat people with infective endocarditis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE Classic and EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index on 30 April 2015. We also searched three trials registers and handsearched the reference lists of included papers. We applied no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of antibiotic regimens for treating possible infective endocarditis diagnosed according to modified Duke's criteria. We considered all-cause mortality, cure rates and adverse events as the primary outcomes. We excluded people with possible infective endocarditis and pregnant women. Three review authors independently performed study selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment and data extraction in duplicate. We constructed 'Summary of findings' tables and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of studies. We described the included studies narratively. Four small randomised controlled trials involving 728 allocated/224 analysed participants met our inclusion criteria. These trials had a high risk of bias. Drug companies sponsored two of the trials. We were unable to pool the data due to the heterogeneity in outcome definitions and the different antibiotics used.The included trials compared the following antibiotic schedules. The first trial compared quinolone (levofloxacin) plus standard treatment (anti-staphylococcal penicillin (cloxacillin or dicloxacillin), aminoglycoside (tobramycin or netilmicin) and rifampicin) versus standard treatment

  8. Antibiotics as intermicrobial signaling agents instead of weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, J F; Gustafsson, I; Baquero, F; Martinez, J L

    2006-12-19

    It has been widely assumed that the ecological function of antibiotics in nature is fighting against competitors. This made them a good example of the Darwinian struggle-for-life in the microbial world. Based on this idea, it also has been believed that antibiotics, even at subinhibitory concentrations, reduce virulence of bacterial pathogens. Herein, using a combination of genomic and functional assays, we demonstrate that specific antibiotics (namely tobramycin, tetracycline, and norfloxacin) at subinhibitory concentrations trigger expression of determinants influencing the virulence of the major opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All three antibiotics induce biofilm formation; tobramycin increases bacterial motility, and tetracycline triggers expression of P. aeruginosa type III secretion system and consequently bacterial cytotoxicity. Besides their relevance in the infection process, those determinants are relevant for the ecological behavior of this bacterial species in natural, nonclinical environments, either by favoring colonization of surfaces (biofilm, motility) or for fighting against eukaryotic predators (cytotoxicity). Our results support the notion that antibiotics are not only bacterial weapons for fighting competitors but also signaling molecules that may regulate the homeostasis of microbial communities. At low concentrations, they can even be beneficial for the behavior of susceptible bacteria in natural environments. This is a complete change on our vision on the ecological function of antibiotics with clear implications both for the treatment of infectious diseases and for the understanding of the microbial relationships in the biosphere.

  9. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotic-Functionalized Graphite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Rotella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface functionalization of nanomaterials is an area of current investigation that supports the development of new biomaterials for applications in biology and medicine. Herein we describe the synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial properties of the first examples of antibiotic-labeled graphitic carbon nanofibers (GCNFs covalently functionalized with aminoglycoside and quinolone antibiotics. Ruthenium tetroxide oxidation of herringbone GCNFs gave higher amounts of surface carboxyl groups than previous methods. These carboxyl groups served as sites of attachment for antibiotics by acyl substitution. Bioassay of these novel, functionalized GCNFs using serial dilution and optical density methods demonstrated that antibiotic-labeled GCNFs possess significant antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The activity we observe for aminoglycoside-functionalized GCNFs suggests a membranolytic mechanism of action.

  10. [Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated from keratitis and intraocular infections at Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander (FOSCAL), Floridablanca, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Guerra, Alfredo; Acuña, María Fernanda; Villarreal, Donaldo

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial resistance is critical for the selection of antibiotics in the treatment of infections, so it is vital to know its current status in our geographical area. To determine in vitro antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates obtained from keratitis and intraocular infections. A retrospective study of microbiological tests in Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander (FOSCAL) was carried out between June, 2011, and January, 2012. A total of 92 samples were examined and 110 bacteria, 27 fungi and 12 free-living amoebae were identified. Polymicrobial infections constituted 50% of the total; 1.1%, 0%, 1.1%, 16.9%, 29.3% and 85% of Gram-positive bacteria were resistant to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, respectively, while 0%, 8.3%, 0%, 0%, 18.2% and 27.3% of Gram-negative bacteria were resistant to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, respectively. For methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci, resistance percentages to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were 0%, 0%, 0%, 7%, 17% and 100%, respectively. For methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci, resistance percentages to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were 3%, 0%, 0%, 24%, 44% and 100%, respectively. Overall bacterial resistance to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative, was 1%, 1%, 1%, 15.1%, 28% and 64.5%, respectively. The levels of bacterial resistance to imipenem, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were lower than for levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin. The levels of resistance to tobramycin were very high, which calls into question its usefulness in this region of our country.

  11. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates.

  12. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  13. The fate of inhaled antibiotics after deposition in cystic fibrosis: How to get drug to the bug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Aukje C; Passé, Kimberly M; Mouton, Johan W; Janssens, Hettie M; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic airway infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are most often treated with inhaled antibiotics of which deposition patterns have been extensively studied. However, the journey of aerosol particles does not end after deposition within the bronchial tree. To review how local conditions affect the clinical efficacy of antibiotic aerosol particles after deposition in the airways of patients with CF. Electronic databases were searched from inception to September 2015. Original studies describing the effect of CF sputum or bacterial factors on antibiotic efficacy and formulations to increase efficacy were included. 35 articles were included which mostly described in vitro studies and mainly investigated aminoglycosides. After deposition, diffusion through the mucus layer was reduced for aminoglycosides, β-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones. Within CF mucus, low oxygen tension adversely affected aminoglycosides, β-lactam antibiotics, and chloramphenicol; and molecules inactivated aminoglycosides but not β-lactam antibiotics. Finally, the alginate layer surrounding Pseudomonas aeruginosa was an important factor in the resistance against all antibiotics. After deposition in the airways, the local efficacy of inhaled antibiotics can be reduced by molecules within CF mucus and the alginate layer surrounding P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synergistic antibacterial efficacy of early combination treatment with tobramycin and quorum-sensing inhibitors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intraperitoneal foreign-body infection mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise; van Gennip, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim H

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS)-deficient Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms formed in vitro are more susceptible to tobramycin than QS-proficient P. aeruginosa biofilms, and combination treatment with a QS inhibitor (QSI) and tobramycin shows synergistic effects on the killing of in vitro biofilms. We extended...

  15. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially improved safety profile compared to other aminoglycosides. This study assessed plazomicin MICs and MBCs in four Brucella spp. reference strains. Like other aminoglycosides and aminocyclitols, plazomicin MBC values equaled MIC values ...

  16. The effect of tobramycin incorporated with bismuth-ethanedithiol loaded on niosomes on the quorum sensing and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdiun, Faeze; Mansouri, Shahla; Khazaeli, Payam; Mirzaei, Rasoul

    2017-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, enable of causing infections especially in immunocompromised patients. Recently many isolates developed multiple drug resistance, resulting in treatment failure in serious infections. In this study, the effect of tobramycin incorporated with bismuth-ethanedithiol loaded on niosomes on the quorum sensing and biofilm production by P. aeruginosa was evaluated. Thin layer hydration method with cholesterol (30%), Span 40 and Tween 40 were used to make niosomes. The physical properties and particle size of the niosomes were investigated. Micro dilution method was used to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for tobramycin, niosomal tobramycin, bismuth ethanedithiol, niosomal bismuth ethanedithiol, tobramycin incorporated with bismuth-ethanedithiol and niosomal tobramycin incorporated with bismuth-ethanedithiol. Biofilm formation was evaluated using microtiter plate. The effect of different combination on N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) production was evaluated in presence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain (GV3101). The best combination inhibiting the growth of various strains of P. aeruginosa were niosomal tobramycin and niosomal tobramycin incorporated with bismuth-ethanedithiol which reduced the MIC of tobramycin significantly. Sub-MIC concentration of these compounds reduced the rate of biofilm formation 80% lower than the untreated bacteria, and effectively inhibited the production of AHL molecule. The prepared formulations containing non-ionic surfactants, can kept the drug and gradually release it. Encapsulation of tobramycin in combination with bismuth-ethanedithiol in niosome had the ability to reduce the MIC of tobramycin and effectively inhibiting the biofilm formation. These combinations can be used as an excellent combination for further evaluation for treatment of infections caused by MDR isolates of P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes. PMID:28152054

  18. Antibiotic penetration and bacterial killing in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bao; Christophersen, Lars; Thomsen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    model. METHODS: Seaweed alginate beads containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured in LB medium, sampled at day 1, 3, 5 or 7 and examined for the effect of treatment with tobramycin for 30 min. Treated beads were homogenized and the number of cfu was determined. The antibiotic concentration...... in the solution of homogenized beads was measured. Finally, beads were examined for live cells by Syto9 staining and for dead cells by propidium iodide staining using a confocal laser scanning microscope. RESULTS: The antibiotic level in each bead was relatively stable (range 30-42 mg/L; MIC = 1.5 mg...... of tobramycin in an in vitro biofilm model. In addition, this model system enables parallel investigation of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, providing a model for testing new treatment strategies....

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of hetero- and homodimers of ribosome-targeting antibiotics: antimicrobial activity, in vitro inhibition of translation, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov-Zrihen, Yifat; Green, Keith D; Labby, Kristin J; Feldman, Mark; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Fridman, Micha

    2013-07-11

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of a full set of homo- and heterodimers of three intact structures of different ribosome-targeting antibiotics: tobramycin, clindamycin, and chloramphenicol. Several aspects of the biological activity of the dimeric structures were evaluated including antimicrobial activity, inhibition of in vitro bacterial protein translation, and the effect of dimerization on the action of several bacterial resistance mechanisms that deactivate tobramycin and chloramphenicol. This study demonstrates that covalently linking two identical or different ribosome-targeting antibiotics may lead to (i) a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, (ii) improved inhibition of bacterial translation properties compared to that of the parent antibiotics, and (iii) reduction in the efficacy of some drug-modifying enzymes that confer high levels of resistance to the parent antibiotics from which the dimers were derived.

  20. Tobramycin Ophthalmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be both safe and effective prior to marketing. Please see the FDA website for more information on unapproved drugs (http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/Transparency/Basics/ucm213030.htm) and the approval process (http://www. ...

  1. The risks of concurrent treatment with tenofovir and aminoglycosides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risks of concurrent treatment with tenofovir and aminoglycosides in patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis. C Kenyon, N Wearne, R Burton, G Meintjes. Abstract. The South African public sector antiretroviral treatment (ART) guidelines have recently been changed to include tenofovir in the first-line regimen.1 ...

  2. Looking for new preparations for antibacterial therapy. IV. New antimicrobial agents from the aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline groups in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series on the search for new antibacterial therapies, and covers new compounds belonging to the aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline groups of antibiotics. The article describes eight new substances at the clinical trial stage of development. One of them is an aminoglycoside (plazomicin), four are macrolides, collectively known as ketolides (cethromycin, solithromycin, EDP-420 and EDP-788), and the remaining three are members of the tetracycline group (omadacycline, eravacycline, sarecycline). Despite the long-term and very expensive process of collecting documentation proving the efficacy of antimicrobial drugs, there is a possibility, that particular compounds find use as active ingredients of medicinal products allowing for the triumph over the clinically relevant, dangerous bacteria.

  3. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie-phosphotransfer­ase(2′′)-Ia [AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2′′)-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2′′)-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2′′)-IIa and APH(2′′)-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2′′)-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2′′)-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a ‘gatekeeper’ residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2′′)-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme. PMID:24914967

  4. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6')-aph(2") Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-03-01

    Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6')-aph(2") and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6')-aph(2") and aph(3")-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6')-aph(2"). The prevalence of aph(3")-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6')-aph(2") among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary.

  5. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Fernandes Galvão Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%—P. amboinicus and eugenol (22.9%—P. ornatus e 25.1%—P. barbatus. In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  6. The spatial profiles and metabolic capabilities of microbial populations impact the growth of antibiotic-resistant mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Karishma S.; Ratnayeke, Nalin; Katira, Parag; Gordon, Vernita D.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance adversely affects clinical and public health on a global scale. Using the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we show that increasing the number density of bacteria, on agar containing aminoglycoside antibiotics, can non-monotonically impact the survival of antibiotic-resistant mutants. Notably, at high cell densities, mutant survival is inhibited. A wide range of bacterial species can inhibit antibiotic-resistant mutants. Inhibition results from the metabolic breakdown of amino acids, which results in alkaline by-products. The consequent increase in pH acts in conjunction with aminoglycosides to mediate inhibition. Our work raises the possibility that the manipulation of microbial population structure and nutrient environment in conjunction with existing antibiotics could provide therapeutic approaches to combat antibiotic resistance. PMID:25972434

  7. Activation of the Cryptic aac(6′)-Iy Aminoglycoside Resistance Gene of Salmonella by a Chromosomal Deletion Generating a Transcriptional Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis BM4361 and BM4362 were isolated from the same patient. BM4361 was susceptible to aminoglycosides, whereas BM4362 was resistant to tobramycin owing to synthesis of a 6′-N-acetyltransferase type I [AAC(6′)-I]. Comparative analysis of nucleotide sequences, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and Southern hybridizations indicated that the chromosomal aac(6′)-Iy genes for the enzyme in both strains were identical and that BM4362 derived from BM4361 following a ca. 60-kb deletion that occurred 1.5 kb upstream from the resistance gene. Northern hybridizations showed that aac(6′)-Iy was silent in BM4361 and highly expressed in BM4362 due to a transcriptional fusion. Primer extension mapping identified the transcriptional start site for aac(6′)-Iy in BM4362: 5 bp downstream from the promoter of the nmpC gene. Study of the distribution of aac(6′)-Iy by PCR and Southern hybridization with a specific probe indicated that the gene, although not found in S. enterica subsp. arizonae, was specific for Salmonella. In this bacterial genus, aac(6′)-Iy was located downstream from a cluster of seven open reading frames analogous to an Escherichia coli locus that encodes enzymes putatively involved in carbohydrate transport or metabolism. This genomic environment suggests a role in the catabolism of a specific sugar for AAC(6′)-Iy in Salmonella. PMID:10542165

  8. Discovery of Antibiotics-derived Polymers for Gene Delivery using Combinatorial Synthesis and Cheminformatics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potta, Thrimoorthy; Zhen, Zhuo; Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Christensen, Matthew D.; Ramos, James; Breneman, Curt M.; Rege, Kaushal

    2014-01-01

    We describe the combinatorial synthesis and cheminformatics modeling of aminoglycoside antibiotics-derived polymers for transgene delivery and expression. Fifty-six polymers were synthesized by polymerizing aminoglycosides with diglycidyl ether cross-linkers. Parallel screening resulted in identification of several lead polymers that resulted in high transgene expression levels in cells. The role of polymer physicochemical properties in determining efficacy of transgene expression was investigated using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) cheminformatics models based on Support Vector Regression (SVR) and ‘building block’ polymer structures. The QSAR model exhibited high predictive ability, and investigation of descriptors in the model, using molecular visualization and correlation plots, indicated that physicochemical attributes related to both, aminoglycosides and diglycidyl ethers facilitated transgene expression. This work synergistically combines combinatorial synthesis and parallel screening with cheminformatics-based QSAR models for discovery and physicochemical elucidation of effective antibiotics-derived polymers for transgene delivery in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:24331709

  9. Discovery of antibiotics-derived polymers for gene delivery using combinatorial synthesis and cheminformatics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potta, Thrimoorthy; Zhen, Zhuo; Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Christensen, Matthew D; Ramos, James; Breneman, Curt M; Rege, Kaushal

    2014-02-01

    We describe the combinatorial synthesis and cheminformatics modeling of aminoglycoside antibiotics-derived polymers for transgene delivery and expression. Fifty-six polymers were synthesized by polymerizing aminoglycosides with diglycidyl ether cross-linkers. Parallel screening resulted in identification of several lead polymers that resulted in high transgene expression levels in cells. The role of polymer physicochemical properties in determining efficacy of transgene expression was investigated using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) cheminformatics models based on Support Vector Regression (SVR) and 'building block' polymer structures. The QSAR model exhibited high predictive ability, and investigation of descriptors in the model, using molecular visualization and correlation plots, indicated that physicochemical attributes related to both, aminoglycosides and diglycidyl ethers facilitated transgene expression. This work synergistically combines combinatorial synthesis and parallel screening with cheminformatics-based QSAR models for discovery and physicochemical elucidation of effective antibiotics-derived polymers for transgene delivery in medicine and biotechnology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antibiotic policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gyssens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    There is a clear association between antibiotic use and resistance both on individual and population levels. In the European Union, countries with large antibiotic consumption have higher resistance rates. Antibiotic resistance leads to failed treatments, prolonged hospitalisations, increased costs and deaths. With few new antibiotics in the Research & Development pipeline, prudent antibiotic use is the only option to delay the development of resistance. Antibiotic policy consists of prescrib...

  11. Influence of pulmonary surfactant on in vitro bactericidal activities of amoxicillin, ceftazidime, and tobramycin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van 't Veen (Annemarie); J.W. Mouton (Johan); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); P. Dekkers; B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe influence of a natural pulmonary surfactant on antibiotic activity was investigated to assess the possible use of exogenous surfactant as a vehicle for antibiotic delivery to the lung. The influence of surfactant on the bactericidal activity of

  12. Occurrence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among isolates of Escherichia coli exhibiting high levels of aminoglycoside resistance isolated from Korean cattle farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaynehe, Kuastros Mekonnen; Shin, Seung Won; Hong-Tae, Park; Yoo, Han Sang

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated 247 Escherichia coli isolates collected from four cattle farms to characterize aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes, their plasmid replicons and transferability. Out of 247 isolates a high number of isolates (total 202; 81.78%) were found to be resistant to various antibiotics by disc diffusion. Of the 247 strains, 139 (56.3%) were resistant to streptomycin, and other antibiotic resistances followed as tetracycline (12.15%), ampicillin (7%), chloramphenicol (5.7%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (0.8%). Among 247 isolates B1 was the predominant phylogenetic group identified comprising 151 isolates (61.1%), followed by groups A (27.9%), D (7%) and B2 (4%). Out of 139 isolates investigated for AME, 130 (93.5%) isolates carried at least one AME gene. aph3″-1a and aph3″-1b (46%) were the principal genes detected, followed by aac3-IVa (34.5%). ant2″-1a was the least detected gene (2.2%). Nine (6.5%) strains carried no AME genes. Twelve (63.2%) among 19 isolates transferred an AME gene to a recipient and aph3΄-1a was the dominant transferred gene. Transferability mainly occurred via the IncFIB replicon type (52.6%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing demonstrated a higher degree of diversity with 14 distinct cluster types. This result suggests that commensal microflora from food-producing animals has a tremendous ability to harbor and transfer AME genes, and poses a potential risk by dissemination of resistance to humans through the food chain. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Enabling techniques in the search for new antibiotics: Combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Je Won; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2017-06-15

    Nature has a talent for inventing a vast number of natural products, including hybrids generated by blending different scaffolds, resulting in a myriad of bioactive chemical entities. Herein, we review the highlights and recent trends (2010-2016) in the combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics where nature's structural diversification capabilities are exploited to enable the creation of new anti-infective and anti-proliferative drugs. In this review, we describe the modern combinatorial biosynthetic approaches for polyketide synthase-derived complex and aromatic polyketides, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-directed lipo-/glycopeptides, aminoglycosides, nucleoside antibiotics, and alkaloids, along with their therapeutic potential. Finally, we present the feasible nexus between combinatorial biosynthesis, systems biology, and synthetic biology as a toolbox to provide new antibiotics that will be indispensable in the post-antibiotic era. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. tmRNA decreases the bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides and the susceptibility to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luidalepp, Hannes; Hallier, Marc; Felden, Brice; Tenson, Tanel

    2005-04-01

    Trans-translation is a process that recycles ribosomes stalled on problematic mRNAs. tmRNA, coded by the DeltassrA gene, is a major component of trans-translation. Bacteria lacking tmRNA are more sensitive to several inhibitors of protein synthesis when compared to a wild type strain. We measured bacterial growth of the DeltassrA and wild type strains in Escherichia coli in the presence of 14 antibiotics including some that do not target protein synthesis. Both the optical density of the bacterial cultures and the number of viable cells were monitored. For the ribosome-targeted antibiotics, sensitization was observed on erythromycin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, puromycin and streptomycin. Minor or no effects were observed with clindamycin, tetracycline and spectinomycin. Surprisingly, the DeltassrA strain is more sensitive than wild type to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis: fosfomycin and ampicillin. No growth difference was observed on drugs with other target sites: ofloxacin, norfloxacin, rifampicin and trimethoprim. Sensitization to antibiotics having target sites other than the ribosome suggests that trans-translation could influence antibiotic-induced stress responses. In trans-translation-deficient bacteria, cell death is significantly enhanced by the two aminoglycosides that induce translational misreading, streptomycin and kanamycin.

  15. The Sensitivity to Aminoglycosides and Heavy Metals of Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty-two clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were tested for their sensitivity to aminoglycosides by an agar diffusion method and to heavy metals by a dilution technique on tri –buffered mineral salt agar containing 10 – 100mg/L CdCl2.H20, CoCl2.6H20, ZnCl2, AgNO3 and HgCl2. All the strains tested ...

  16. Multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Hu, Mei; Wang, Dali; Wang, Guojian; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue; Sun, Jian

    2012-06-20

    Multifunctional gene vectors with high transfection, low cytotoxicity, and good antitumor and antibacterial activities were prepared from natural aminoglycosides. Through the Michael-addition polymerization of gentamycin and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, cationic hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers were synthesized, and their physical and chemical properties were analyzed by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, GPC, ζ-potential, and acid-base titration techniques. The cytotoxicity of these hyperbranched glycoconjugated polycations was low because of the hydrolysis of degradable glycosidic and amide linkages in acid conditions. Owing to the presence of various primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the polymers, hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers showed high buffering capacity and strong DNA condensation ability, resulting in the high transfection efficiency. In the meantime, due to the introduction of natural aminoglycosides into the polymeric backbone, the resultant hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers inhibited the growth of cancer cells and bacteria efficiently. Combining the gene transfection, antitumor, and antibacterial abilities together, the multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides may play an important role in protecting cancer patients from bacterial infections.

  17. Aminoglucósidos: mirada actual desde su historia Aminoglycosides: a present look based on their history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Aliño Santiago

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se refiere la historia, mecanismos de acción y eficacia de los aminoglucósidos en los pacientes pediátricos, así como las limitaciones de su utilidad por el surgimiento de resistencias bacterianas originadas por empleo abusivo. Se presenta la estrategia de administración de monodosis, como alternativa frente al método tradicional de dosis fraccionadas, y también las complicaciones más frecuentes y graves de los aminoglucósidos y su sinergismo con otras familias de antimicrobianos. Y se citan investigaciones realizadas en el país en materia de terapia antibiótica.We referred to history, mechanisms of action and efficacy of aminoglycosides in pediatric patients as well as limitations in their use because of the emergence of bacterial resistance caused by overuse. The one-dose administration strategy as an alternative to the traditional methods of fractioned doses, the most frequent and serious complictions of aminoglycosides and their sinergism with other antimicrobial families were presented. We quoted research studies on antibiotic therapy made in the country.

  18. Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of Aminoglycoside-2 ''-Phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2 '')-Ic] From Enterococcus Gallinarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrnes, L.J.; /SLAC, SSRL; Badarau, A.; Vakulenko, S.B.; /Notre Dame U.; Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2{double_prime}-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2{double_prime})-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2{double_prime})-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14-20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 108.8{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 {angstrom} resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  19. Antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile, and short-chain fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, H; Tvede, M; Mortensen, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that Clostridium difficile and decreased colonic production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) cause the development of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. We therefore wanted to investigate the effects of an intensive and uniform antibiotic therapy on faecal SCFAs...... concentrations. C. difficile, and extent of diarrhoea. METHODS: Fifteen liver-transplanted patients who received oral bowel flora suppression therapy (6.3 g cefuroxime, 0.6 g tobramycin, and 0.5 g nystatin three times daily) were studied for 12 days before and 12 days after discontinuation of therapy. RESULTS...

  20. In vitro synergistic combinations of pentamidine, polymyxin B, tigecycline and tobramycin with antifungal agents against Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzebon Venturini, Tarcieli; Rossato, Luana; Chassot, Francieli; Tairine Keller, Jéssica; Baldissera Piasentin, Fernanda; Morais Santurio, Janio; Hartz Alves, Sydney

    2016-08-01

    The genus Fusarium is characterized by hyaline filamentous fungi that cause infections predominantly in immunocompromised patients. The remarkable primary resistance to antifungal agents of this genus requires a search for new therapeutic possibilities. This study assessed the in vitro susceptibility of 25 clinical isolates of Fusarium against antifungal agents (amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole and voriconazole) and antimicrobials (pentamidine, polymyxin B, tigecycline and tobramycin) according to the broth microdilution method (M38-A2). The interactions between antifungal and antimicrobial agents were evaluated by the microdilution checkerboard method. Pentamidine and polymyxin B showed MIC values ≥4 µg ml-1 against Fusarium spp. The highest rates of synergism were observed when amphotericin B or voriconazole was combined with tobramycin (80 % and 76 %, respectively), polymyxin B (76 % and 64 %) and pentamidine (72 % and 68 %). The most significant combinations deserve in vivo evaluations in order to verify their potential in the treatment of fusariosis.

  1. Antibiotic penetration and bacterial killing in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bao; Christophersen, Lars; Thomsen, Kim; Sønderholm, Majken; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2015-07-01

    Treating biofilm infections successfully is a challenge. We hypothesized that biofilms may be considered as independent compartments with particular pharmacokinetics. We therefore studied the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of tobramycin in a seaweed alginate-embedded biofilm model. Seaweed alginate beads containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured in LB medium, sampled at day 1, 3, 5 or 7 and examined for the effect of treatment with tobramycin for 30 min. Treated beads were homogenized and the number of cfu was determined. The antibiotic concentration in the solution of homogenized beads was measured. Finally, beads were examined for live cells by Syto9 staining and for dead cells by propidium iodide staining using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The antibiotic level in each bead was relatively stable (range 30-42 mg/L; MIC = 1.5 mg/L). There were fewer cfu in the tobramycin-treated beads than the non-treated beads (P testing new treatment strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bacterial adhesion to urethral catheters: role of coating materials and immersion in antibiotic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormio, L; La Forgia, P; La Forgia, D; Siitonen, A; Ruutu, M

    2001-09-01

    To determine whether new coating materials (silver and hydrogel) or immersion in antibiotic solution may reduce or prevent bacterial adhesion to urethral catheters. Precut segment of Teflon-, silver- and hydrogel-coated urethral catheters were incubated with two uropathogenic bacterial strains with and without previous immersion in antibiotic solution. Tobramycin, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin solutions were used as these antibiotics are commonly administered for the prophylaxis and treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI), especially in hospitals. Microbiological analysis showed that the new coating materials (silver and hydrogel) did not reduce bacterial adhesion to urethral catheters, whereas immersion in antibiotic solution yielded a statistically significant (ptobramycin. Immersion in a suitable antibiotic solution may significantly reduce bacterial adhesion to urethral catheters and consequently reduce the risk of UTI in connection with these devices. Although experimental, these findings may be of clinical relevance and provide grounds for further studies in vivo.

  3. Inhaled anti-pseudomonal antibiotics for long-term therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sherie; Rowbotham, Nicola J; Regan, Kate H

    2018-03-30

    Inhaled antibiotics are commonly used to treat persistent airway infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa that contributes to lung damage in people with cystic fibrosis. Current guidelines recommend inhaled tobramycin for individuals with cystic fibrosis and persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection who are aged six years or older. The aim is to reduce bacterial load in the lungs so as to reduce inflammation and deterioration of lung function. This is an update of a previously published review. To evaluate the effects long-term inhaled antibiotic therapy in people with cystic fibrosis on clinical outcomes (lung function, frequency of exacerbations and nutrition), quality of life and adverse events (including drug sensitivity reactions and survival). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched ongoing trials registries.Date of last search: 13 February 2018. We selected trials if inhaled anti-pseudomonal antibiotic treatment was used for at least three months in people with cystic fibrosis, treatment allocation was randomised or quasi-randomised, and there was a control group (either placebo, no placebo or another inhaled antibiotic). Two authors independently selected trials, judged the risk of bias, extracted data from these trials and judged the quality of the evidence using the GRADE system. The searches identified 333 citations to 98 trials; 18 trials (3042 participants aged between five and 56 years) met the inclusion criteria. Limited data were available for meta-analyses due to the variability of trial design and reporting of results. A total of 11 trials (1130 participants) compared an inhaled antibiotic to placebo or usual treatment for a duration between three and 33 months. Five trials (1255 participants) compared different antibiotics, two trials (585 participants) compared different regimens of tobramycin and one trial

  4. Occurrence of antibiotics in pharmaceutical industrial wastewater, wastewater treatment plant and sea waters in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahrani, Leyla; Van Loco, Joris; Ben Mansour, Hedi; Reyns, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are among the most commonly used group of pharmaceuticals in human medicine. They can therefore reach surface and groundwater bodies through different routes, such as wastewater treatment plant effluents, surface runoff, or infiltration of water used for agricultural purposes. It is well known that antibiotics pose a significant risk to environmental and human health, even at low concentrations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of aminoglycosides and phenicol antibiotics in municipal wastewaters, sea water and pharmaceutical effluents in Tunisia. All analysed water samples contained detectable levels of aminoglycoside and phenicol antibiotics. The highest concentrations in wastewater influents were observed for neomycin and kanamycin B (16.4 ng mL(-1) and 7.5 ng mL(-1), respectively). Chloramphenicol was found in wastewater influents up to 3 ng mL(-1). It was observed that the waste water treatment plants were not efficient in completely removing these antibiotics. Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were found in sea water samples near aquaculture sites at levels up to, respectively, 15.6 ng mL(-1) and 18.4 ng mL(-1). Also aminoglycoside antibiotics were found near aquaculture sites with the highest concentration of 3.4 ng mL(-1) for streptomycin. In pharmaceutical effluents, only gentamycin was found at concentrations up to 19 ng mL(-1) over a sampling period of four months.

  5. Sulfonamide-Based Inhibitors of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Eis Abolish Resistance to Kanamycin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzan, Atefeh; Willby, Melisa J.; Green, Keith D.; Gajadeera, Chathurada S.; Hou, Caixia; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Posey, James E.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-12-08

    A two-drug combination therapy where one drug targets an offending cell and the other targets a resistance mechanism to the first drug is a time-tested, yet underexploited approach to combat or prevent drug resistance. By high-throughput screening, we identified a sulfonamide scaffold that served as a pharmacophore to generate inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis acetyltransferase Eis, whose upregulation causes resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotic kanamycin A (KAN) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Rational systematic derivatization of this scaffold to maximize Eis inhibition and abolish the Eis-mediated KAN resistance of M. tuberculosis yielded several highly potent agents. A crystal structure of Eis in complex with one of the most potent inhibitors revealed that the inhibitor bound Eis in the AG-binding pocket held by a conformationally malleable region of Eis (residues 28–37) bearing key hydrophobic residues. These Eis inhibitors are promising leads for preclinical development of innovative AG combination therapies against resistant TB.

  6. Antibiotic resistance pattern in uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic strains from inpatient and outpatient departments were studied from April 1997 to March 1999 for their susceptibility profiles. The various isolates were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecalis. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these isolates revealed that for outpatients, first generation cephalosporins, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin/ciprofloxacin were effective for treatment of urinary tract infection but for inpatients, parenteral therapy with newer aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporins need to be advocated as the organisms for nosocomial UTI exhibit a high degree of drug resistance. Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole combination was not found to be effective for the treatment of urinary tract infections as all the uropathogens from inpatients and outpatients showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole. Culture and sensitivity of the isolates from urine samples should be done as a routine before advocating the therapy.

  7. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In-feed antibiotic effects on the swine intestinal microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looft, Torey; Johnson, Timothy A.; Allen, Heather K.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Alt, David P.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Sul, Woo Jun; Stedtfeld, Tiffany M.; Chai, Benli; Cole, James R.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Tiedje, James M.; Stanton, Thad B.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics have been administered to agricultural animals for disease treatment, disease prevention, and growth promotion for over 50 y. The impact of such antibiotic use on the treatment of human diseases is hotly debated. We raised pigs in a highly controlled environment, with one portion of the littermates receiving a diet containing performance-enhancing antibiotics [chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, and penicillin (known as ASP250)] and the other portion receiving the same diet but without the antibiotics. We used phylogenetic, metagenomic, and quantitative PCR-based approaches to address the impact of antibiotics on the swine gut microbiota. Bacterial phylotypes shifted after 14 d of antibiotic treatment, with the medicated pigs showing an increase in Proteobacteria (1–11%) compared with nonmedicated pigs at the same time point. This shift was driven by an increase in Escherichia coli populations. Analysis of the metagenomes showed that microbial functional genes relating to energy production and conversion were increased in the antibiotic-fed pigs. The results also indicate that antibiotic resistance genes increased in abundance and diversity in the medicated swine microbiome despite a high background of resistance genes in nonmedicated swine. Some enriched genes, such as aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases, confer resistance to antibiotics that were not administered in this study, demonstrating the potential for indirect selection of resistance to classes of antibiotics not fed. The collateral effects of feeding subtherapeutic doses of antibiotics to agricultural animals are apparent and must be considered in cost-benefit analyses. PMID:22307632

  9. Development of molecular imprinted nanosensor for determination of tobramycin in pharmaceuticals and foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Uzun, Lokman; Özaltın, Nuran; Denizli, Adil

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we developed quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) nanosensor for the real-time detection of tobramycin (TOB). Firstly, the modification of gold surface of QCM chip was performed by self-assembling monolayer formation of allyl mercaptane to introduce polymerizable double bonds on the chip surface. Then, TOB imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methacryloylamidoglutamic acid) [p(HEMA-MAGA)] film was generated on the gold surface. The nonmodified and TOB-imprinted p(HEMA-MAGA) surfaces were characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ellipsometry and contact angle measurements. The proposed method was validated according to the ICH guideline. The linearity range and the detection limit (S/N=3) were obtained as 1.7×10(-11)-1.5×10(-10) M and 5.7×10(-12) M, respectively. The developed method was applied to pharmaceuticals, and food samples such as chicken egg white and milk extract for the determination of TOB. In addition, association kinetics analysis and isotherm models were applied to the data to explain the adsorption process that took place. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of antibiotic beads to salvage infected breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Rami D; Ingargiola, Michael; Sanati-Mehrizy, Paymon; Torina, Philip J; Harmaty, Marco A

    2017-10-01

    When an implant becomes infected, implant salvage is often performed where the implant is removed, capsulectomy is performed, and a new implant is inserted. The patient is discharged with a PICC line and 6-8 weeks of intravenous (IV) antibiotics. This method has variable success and subjects the patient to long-term systemic antibiotics. In the 1960s, the use of antibiotic-impregnated beads for the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis was described. These beads deliver antibiotic directly to the site of the infection, thereby eliminating the complications of systemic IV antibiotics. This study aimed to present a case series illustrating the use of STIMULAN calcium sulfate beads loaded with vancomycin and tobramycin to increase the rate of salvage of the infected implant and forgo IV antibiotics. A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who were treated at Mount Sinai Hospital for implant infection with salvage and antibiotic beads. Twelve patients were identified, 10 of whom had breast cancer. Comorbidities included hypertension, smoking, and immunocompromised status. Infections were noted anywhere from 5 days to 8 years postoperatively. Salvage was successful in 9 out of the 12 infected implants using antibiotic bead therapy without home IV antibiotics. The use of antibiotic beads is promising for salvaging infected breast implants without IV antibiotics. Seventy-five percent of the implants were successfully salvaged. Of the three patients who had unsalvageable implants, one was infected with antibiotic-resistant Rhodococcus that was refractory to bead therapy and one was noncompliant with postoperative instructions. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the Tokay gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C E; Hudspeth, A J

    2000-01-04

    The high sensitivity and sharp frequency discrimination of hearing depend on mechanical amplification in the cochlea. To explore the basis of this active process, we examined the pharmacological sensitivity of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in a lizard, the Tokay gecko. In a quiet environment, each ear produced a complex but stable pattern of emissions. These SOAEs were reversibly modulated by drugs that affect mammalian otoacoustic emissions, the salicylates and the aminoglycoside antibiotics. The effect of a single i.p. injection of sodium salicylate depended on the initial power of the emissions: ears with strong control SOAEs displayed suppression at all frequencies, whereas those with weak control emissions showed enhancement. Repeated oral administration of acetylsalicylic acid reduced all emissions. Single i.p. doses of gentamicin or kanamycin suppressed SOAEs below 2.6 kHz, while modulating those above 2.6 kHz in either of two ways. For ears whose emission power at 2.6-5.2 kHz encompassed more than half of the total, individual emissions displayed facilitation as great as 35-fold. For the remaining ears, emissions dropped to as little as one-sixth of their initial values. The similarity of the responses of reptilian and mammalian cochleas to pharmacological intervention provides further evidence for a common mechanism of cochlear amplification.

  12. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Adult bullfrogs were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 (mu) M gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence of absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest sterocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier times than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the same sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  13. Pure tone audiograms and possible aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in belugas (Delphinapterus leucas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneran, James J.; Carder, Donald A.; Dear, Randall; Belting, Traci; McBain, Jim; Dalton, Les; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2005-06-01

    A behavioral response paradigm was used to measure pure-tone hearing sensitivities in two belugas (Delphinapterus leucas). Tests were conducted over a 20-month period at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, in Tacoma, WA. Subjects were two males, aged 8-10 and 9-11 during the course of the study. Subjects were born in an oceanarium and had been housed together for all of their lives. Hearing thresholds were measured using a modified up/down staircase procedure and acoustic response paradigm where subjects were trained to produce audible responses to test tones and to remain quiet otherwise. Test frequencies ranged from approximately 2 to 130 kHz. Best sensitivities ranged from approximately 40 to 50 dB re 1 μPa at 50-80 kHz and 30-35 kHz for the two subjects. Although both subjects possessed traditional ``U-shaped'' mammalian audiograms, one subject exhibited significant high-frequency hearing loss above 37 kHz compared to previously published data for belugas. Hearing loss in this subject was estimated to approach 90 dB for frequencies above 50 kHz. Similar ages, ancestry, and environmental conditions between subjects, but a history of ototoxic drug administration in only one subject, suggest that the observed hearing loss was a result of the aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin. .

  14. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  15. Aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for molecular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, Bhavani; Godeshala, Sudhakar; Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Christensen, Matthew D; Tian, Yanqing; Rege, Kaushal

    2016-10-01

    The development of effective drug carriers can lead to improved outcomes in a variety of disease conditions. Aminoglycosides have been used as antibacterial therapeutics, and are attractive as monomers for the development of polymeric materials in various applications. Here, we describe the development of novel aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for drug delivery, with an eye towards ablation of cancer cells. The aminoglycoside paromomycin was first cross-linked with resorcinol diglycidyl ether leading to the formation of a poly (amino ether), PAE. PAE molecules were further derivatized with methoxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) or mPEG resulting in the formation of mPEG-PAE polymer, which self-assembled to form nanoparticles. Formation of the mPEG-PAE amphiphile was characterized using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and FTIR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the polymer into nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyses, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the pyrene fluorescence assay. mPEG-PAE nanoparticles were able to carry significant amounts of doxorubicin (DOX), presumably by means of hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the core. Cell-based studies indicated that mPEG-PAE nanoparticles, loaded with doxorubicin, were able to induce significant loss in viabilities of PC3 human prostate cancer, MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer, and MB49 murine bladder cancer cells; empty nanoparticles resulted in negligible losses of cell viability under the conditions investigated. Taken together, our results indicate that the mPEG-PAE nanoparticle platform is attractive for drug delivery in different applications, including cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hearing loss and nephrotoxicity treatment in patients with in long-term aminoglycoside tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, R

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ototoxic and nephrotoxic effects of long-term use of aminoglycosides. DESIGN: Patients treated for tuberculosis with aminoglycosides were evaluated for hearing loss and nephrotoxicity for a minimum of 14 days. RESULTS: Hearing loss of 15 decibels (dB) at two or more

  17. A low-barrier hydrogen bond mediates antibiotic resistance in a noncanonical catalytic triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    One group of enzymes that confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics through covalent modification belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. We show how a unique GNAT subfamily member uses a previously unidentified noncanonical catalytic triad, consisting of a glutamic acid, a histidine, and the antibiotic substrate itself, which acts as a nucleophile and attacks the acetyl donor molecule. Neutron diffraction studies allow for unambiguous identification of a low-barrier hydrogen bond, predicted in canonical catalytic triads to increase basicity of the histidine. This work highlights the role of this unique catalytic triad in mediating antibiotic resistance while providing new insights into the design of the next generation of aminoglycosides. PMID:29632894

  18. [Determination of antibiotics using luminescent Escherichia coli and serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, I I; Asrieli, T V; Gavrilova, E M; Danilov, V S

    2007-01-01

    The methodical bases for detecting antibiotics using a bioluminescent assay and blood serum are briefed. Antibiotics inhibit the luminescence of a genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain. The degree of inhibition depended on the type of antibiotic, its concentration, and the time of cell incubation with antibiotic. The highest cell sensitivity was recorded towards the aminoglycoside antibiotics, which amounted to 85 +/- 10 ng/ml for gentamicin and streptomycin. The sensitivity of this system to a number of antibiotics essentially increased when the cells were previously activated with blood serum. The sensitivity of this method for gentamicin and streptomycin in the presence of blood serum amounted to 2.5 +/- 0.5 ng/ml; for tetracycline, 45 +/- 8 ng/ml. Use of the sera containing specific antibodies to the antibiotic detected provided a high sensitivity of the biosensor tested. Comparison of the luminescences of E. coli cells activated with normal and specific antisera upon incubation with an antibiotic allows the type of antibiotic and its quantitative content in the sample to be determined. Characteristic of the analysis of antibiotics with the help of recombinant E. coli are a high accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, simplicity, and a short time needed for measurement.

  19. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugahara

    Full Text Available It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group. In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM. Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  20. [Investigation of molecular mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Salmonella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubritskiĭ, A V; Il'ina, E N; Strel'chenko, S A; Malakhova, M V; Lenev, S V; Skliarov, O D; Panin, A N; Govorun, V M

    2011-01-01

    The spread of aminoglycoside resistance phenotype and respective genetic resistance determinants was evaluated in 243 Salmonella strains isolated within 1948-2010 and stored in the Culture Collection of the Russian State Research Institute for Control, Standardization and Certification of Veterinary Preparations (Moscow). The Salmonella strains showed resistance to streptomycin and gentamicin in 3.7% (n = 9) and 0.8% (n = 2) of the isolates respectively. Intermediate resistance to streptomycin was recorded in 9.9% (n = 24) of the isolates. To detect the genes responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance, primers for aadA1, aadA2, aadB, aphA1, aphA3, sat, strA, strB, aphA, aacC, rmtB, armA and rpsL genes amplification and sequencing were designed. The strains with lower susceptibility to streptomycin harbored aadA1, aadA2, strA, strB resistance genes encoding enzymes for aminoglicoside modification and rpsL mutant allele (K42N, G91D). Genetic mechanisms able to explain the gentamicin resistance development were not detected. Some strains carried genetic markers of streptomycine resistance but had no clinically sufficient resistance to it. In this regard, genetic testing is essential for prevention of drug resistance spreading due to horizontal transfer of genes in microbial population.

  1. Economic impact of tobramycin in patients with cystic fibrosis in a managed care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Debra A; Chang, Chun-Lan; Stephenson, Judith J; Zhang, Jie; Kuhn, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines recommend chronic use of tobramycin solution for inhalation (TSI) for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with moderate-to-severe lung disease and persistent airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study evaluated the economic impact of TSI in managed care CF patients. Patients (0-64 years) with ≥2 CF medical claims between 01/01/04-03/31/09 were identified. For TSI users, the index date was the first TSI claim in the period; for non-users, a pseudo-index date was determined and randomly assigned by simulating the distribution of index dates of TSI users. Maximum sample size was obtained for patients with ≥3 months pre- and ≥12 months post-index eligibility. Users were categorized by number of TSI prescriptions filled during 12-month post-index period as low (1 fill), medium (2-3 fills) and high adherence (≥4 fills). Differences in per member per month (PMPM) costs pre-index to post-index were analyzed using paired t-tests. A total of 388 TSI users (mean age 19 years, 48% female) and 444 non-users (mean age 30 years, 54% female) met study criteria. In users, total and CF-related PMPM costs decreased $959 (17%) and $113 (3%), respectively, after starting TSI. Among TSI users, CF-related inpatient PMPM costs decreased by $1171 (49%; p=0.01), while CF-related prescription PMPM costs increased by $992 (pTSI users and non-users. All-cause and CF-related PMPM medical costs significantly decreased after TSI initiation. Among TSI users, total healthcare costs decreased, although not significantly, due to PMPM increases in prescription costs. A trend towards greater decrease in inpatient PMPM costs was observed with increasing TSI adherence.

  2. Phenotype overlap in Xylella fastidiosa is controlled by the cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase Eal in response to antibiotic exposure and diffusible signal factor-mediated cell-cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Alessandra A; Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-06-01

    Eal is an EAL domain protein in Xylella fastidiosa homologous to one involved in resistance to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EAL and HD-GYP domain proteins are implicated in the hydrolysis of the secondary messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (cyclic di-GMP). Cell density-dependent communication mediated by a Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) also modulates cyclic di-GMP levels in X. fastidiosa, thereby controlling the expression of virulence genes and genes involved in insect transmission. The possible linkage of Eal to both extrinsic factors such as antibiotics and intrinsic factors such as quorum sensing, and whether both affect virulence, was thus addressed. Expression of eal was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, and an eal deletion mutant was more susceptible to this antibiotic than the wild-type strain and exhibited phenotypes similar to those of an rpfF deletion mutant blocked in DSF production, such as hypermotility, reduced biofilm formation, and hypervirulence to grape. Consistent with that, the rpfF mutant was more susceptible than the wild-type strain to tobramycin. Therefore, we propose that cell-cell communication and antibiotic stress can apparently lead to similar modulations of cyclic di-GMP in X. fastidiosa, resulting in similar phenotypes. However, the effect of cell density is dominant compared to that of antibiotic stress, since eal is suppressed by RpfF, which may prevent inappropriate behavioral changes in response to antibiotic stress when DSF accumulates.

  3. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S

    1994-01-01

    resistance in P. aeruginosa strains isolated from Danish CF patients over a period of 18 years by testing the in vitro efficacy of carbenicillin, piperacillin, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa strains collected in 1973 (51 strains), 1980 (80 strains), 1985 (58 strains...... was found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm...... that the beta-lactamase production is an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa....

  4. Gatifloxacin 0.3% Versus Fortified Tobramycin-Cefazolin in Treating Nonperforated Bacterial Corneal Ulcers: Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Namrata; Arora, Tarun; Jain, Vikas; Agarwal, Tushar; Jain, Rajat; Jain, Vaibhav; Yadav, Chander Prakash; Titiyal, Jeewan; Satpathy, Gita

    2016-01-01

    To compare the equivalence of gatifloxacin 0.3% with a combination of fortified cefazolin sodium 5% and tobramycin sulfate 1.3% eye drops in the treatment of nonperforated bacterial corneal ulcers. In randomized, controlled, equivalence clinical trials, microbiologically proven cases of nonperforated bacterial corneal ulcers were enrolled and were allocated randomly to one of the 2 treatment groups. Group A was given combination therapy (fortified cefazolin sodium 5% and tobramycin sulfate 1.3%) and group B was given monotherapy (gatifloxacin 0.3%). The primary outcome measure was the percentage of corneal ulcers that healed at 3 months of follow-up. Out of 204 patients enrolled, 103 patients were randomized to group A, whereas 101 patients were randomized to group B. The mean ± SD of ulcer size in groups A and B were 4.35 ± 1.36 and 4.18 ± 1.31 mm, respectively (P = 0.376). The most common bacterial isolate was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (51.5% in group A and 45.5% in group B). Worsening of the ulcer was seen in 27.2% (28/103) of the cases in group A and in 21.8% (22/101) of the cases in group B. The percentage healing difference was calculated to be 5.4% (90% confidence interval, -4.5 to 15.3). No serious events attributable to therapy were reported in any group. Using the prespecified definition of equivalence of ±20%, this trial found evidence that gatifloxacin monotherapy was equivalent to combination therapy with cefazolin and tobramycin for the treatment of nonperforated bacterial corneal ulcers.

  5. Spectrophotometric Determination of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Based on their Oxidation by Potassium Permanganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Didamony, A. M.; Ghoneim, A. K.; Telebany, A. M.; Amin, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive validated spectrophotometric methods have been described for the assay of neomycin and streptomycin either in pure form or in pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods were based on the oxidation of the studied drugs by a known excess of potassium permanganate in acidic medium and estimating the unreacted permanganate with amaranth dye (method A), acid orange II (method B), indigocarmine (method C), and methylene blue (method D), in the same acid medium at a suitable λ max =521, 485, 610 and 664 nm, respectively. Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration range of 5-10 and 2-7 mg mL -1 for neomycin and streptomycin, respectively. The apparent molar absorptivity and sandell sensitivity values are in the range 5.47-6.20x10 4 , 2.35-2.91x10 5 L mol -1 cm -1 and 7.57-8.59, 5.01-6.2 ng cm -2 for neomycin and streptomycin, respectively. Different variables affecting the reaction were studied and optimized. The proposed methods were applied successfully to the determination of the examined drugs either in a pure or pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. No interferences were observed from excipients and the results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained using the official methods

  6. In vitro synergy of antibiotic combinations against planktonic and biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani, Hossein

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The combination of different antimicrobial agents and subsequent synergetic effects may be beneficial in treatment of infections. The aim of the present study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates of and the effect of different antibiotic combinations against the multidrug-resistant (MDR, biofilm-producing bacterium . Methods: Thirty-six clinical isolates were evaluated. The disk diffusion method was performed to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. The minimum inhibitory concentration of antimicrobial agents for the test organisms was determined by the broth microdilution method. To determine synergetic effects of the combinations of agents, the checkerboard assay and the fractional inhibitory concentration were used. The biofilm inhibitory concentration was determined to detect any inhibitory effect of antibiotics against the biofilm. Results: High levels of resistance were detected against most antibiotics, except colistin and polymyxin. According to the disk diffusion method, 58.3% of isolates were MDR. A synergetic effect between amikacin/ceftazidime, tobramycin/colistin and ceftazidime/colistin was found in 55.6%, 58.3% and 52.8% of isolates, respectively. A significant synergetic effect against biofilm-producing isolates was observed for the combination of tobramycin (0.5–1 µg/ml and clarithromycin (256–512 µg/ml.Conclusion: Combinations of antibiotics have a different activity on the biofilm and planktonic forms of . Consequently, separate detection of antibacterial and antibiofilm effects of the antibiotic combinations may be useful in guiding the antibiotic therapy.

  7. Utilisation of antibiotic therapy in community practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, B

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to identify outpatient antibiotic consumption between Jan 2000 and Dec 2005 through analysis of the HSE-Primary Care Reimbursement Services (PCRS) database as part of the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) project. Total antibiotic consumption on the PCRS scheme between January 2000 and December 2005 expressed in Defined Daily Dose per 1000 PCRS inhabitants per day increased by 26%. The penicillin group represents the highest consumption accounting for approximately 50% of the total outpatient antibiotic use. Total DIDs for this group increased by 25% between 2000 and 2005. Co-amoxiclav and amoxicillin account for 80% of the total consumption of this group of anti-infectives. With the exception of aminoglycosides and sulfonamides which demonstrated a decrease in DID consumption of 47% and 8% respectively, all other groups of anti-infectives had an increase in DID consumption of greater than 25% during the study period. Antibiotic prescribing data is a valuable tool for assessing public health strategies aiming to optimise antibiotic prescribing.

  8. UK-18,892: resistance to modification by aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R J; Brammer, K W; Cheeseman, H E; Jevons, S

    1978-12-01

    UK-18,892, a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside, was active against bacteria possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes, with the exception of some known to possess AAC(6') or AAD(4') enzymes. This activity has been rationalized by using cell-free extracts of bacteria containing known inactivating enzymes, where it was shown that UK-18,892 was not a substrate for the APH(3'), AAD(2''), AAC(3), and AAC(2') enzymes. It was also demonstrated that UK-18,892 protected mice against lethal infections caused by organisms possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

  9. Deciphering the details of RNA aminoglycoside interactions: from atomistic models to biotechnological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgu, Muslum [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study was done of the neomycin-B RNA aptamer for determining its selectivity and binding ability to both neomycin– and kanamycin-class aminoglycosides. A novel method to increase drug concentrations in cells for more efficiently killing is described. To test the method, a bacterial model system was adopted and several small RNA molecules interacting with aminoglycosides were cloned downstream of T7 RNA polymerase promoter in an expression vector. Then, the growth analysis of E. coli expressing aptamers was observed for 12-hour period. Our analysis indicated that aptamers helped to increase the intracellular concentration of aminoglycosides thereby increasing their efficacy.

  10. Involvement of aph(3‘-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eWoegerbauer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination.We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3’-IIa (nptII gene. APH(3’-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria.The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in 3 datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program, RDP4, and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection, GARD.From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99% - 100% sequence identity with aph(3’-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3’-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3’-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants.

  11. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...

  12. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    In view of the alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance in the absence of new antibiotics, this study aimed at assessing the availability of potentially useful older antibiotics. A survey was performed in 38 countries among experts including hospital pharmacists, microbiologists, and infectious...

  13. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  14. novel 6'-n-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Iaj from a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kirikae, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCGM1588 has a novel chromosomal class 1 integron, In151, which includes the aac(6')-Iaj gene. The encoded protein, AAC(6')-Iaj, was found to consist of 184 amino acids, with 70% identity to AAC(6')-Ia. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing the aac(6')-Iaj gene acquired resistance to all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. Of note, aac(6')-Iaj contributed to the resistance to arbekacin. Thin-layer chromatography revealed that AAC(6')-Iaj acetylated all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. These findings indicated that AAC(6')-Iaj is a functional acetyltransferase that modifies the amino groups at the 6' positions of aminoglycosides and contributes to aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa NCGM1588, including arbekacin.

  15. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  16. Aminoglycosides in septic shock: an overview, with specific consideration given to their nephrotoxic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Alexandre; Gruson, Didier; Bouchet, Stéphane; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Hoang-Nam, Bui; Vargas, Frédéric; Gilles, Hilbert; Molimard, Mathieu; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Moore, Nicholas

    2013-04-01

    Aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity has been reported in patients with sepsis, and several risk factors have been described. Once-daily dosing and shorter treatment have reduced nephrotoxicity risk, and simplified aminoglycoside monitoring. This review focuses on nephrotoxicity associated with aminoglycosides in the subset of patients with septic shock or severe sepsis. These patients are radically different from those with less severe sepsis. They may have, for instance, renal impairment due to the shock per se, sepsis-related acute kidney injury, frequent association with pre-existing risk factors for renal failure such as diabetes, dehydration and other nephrotoxic treatments. In this category of patients, these risk factors might modify substantially the benefit-risk ratio of aminoglycosides. In addition, aminoglycoside administration in critically ill patients with sepsis is complicated by an extreme inter- and intra-individual variability in drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics: the volume of distribution (Vd) is frequently increased while the elimination constant can be either increased or decreased. Consequently, and although its effect on nephrotoxicity has not been explored, a different administration schedule, i.e. a high-dose once daily (HDOD), and several therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) options have been proposed in these patients. This review describes the historical perspective of these different options, including those applying to subsets of patients in which aminoglycoside administration is even more complex (obese intensive care unit [ICU] patients, patients needing continuous or discontinuous renal replacement therapy [CRRT/DRRT]). A simple linear dose adjustment according to aminoglycoside serum concentration can be classified as low-intensity TDM. Nomograms have also been proposed, based on the maximum (peak) plasma concentration (Cmax) objectives, weight and creatinine clearance. The Sawchuk and Zaske method (based on the

  17. Association between the introduction of a new cystic fibrosis inhaled antibiotic class and change in prevalence of patients receiving multiple inhaled antibiotic classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrook, Elliott C; Konstan, Michael W; VanDevanter, Donald R

    2015-05-01

    In 2010, aztreonam for inhalation solution joined aminoglycosides and colistimethate as a new cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic inhaled antimicrobial therapy. We studied how the introduction of this new inhaled antibiotic class changed the management of US CF patients. The use of inhaled aminoglycosides, colistimethate, and aztreonam among patients followed in the CF Foundation Patient Registry was analyzed by age group, lung disease stage, and microbiologic status both annually, and at individual visits between 2009 and 2012. The overall prevalence of inhaled antibiotic use did not change during the period, but the prevalence of annual and any visit treatment with >1 inhaled antibiotic class more than doubled. Adults, those with advanced lung disease, and those with >1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory culture were more likely to receive >1 antibiotic class. Inhaled antibiotic management of US CF patients has dramatically changed in association with the introduction of a third inhaled antibiotic class. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of aac(2')-I type b aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes in resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T; Tang, C G; Li, Q H; Ji, J; Ge, H Y; Zhang, X Y; Sun, H P

    2015-03-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii toward aminoglycosides. A total of 32 A. baumannii strains were identified by molecular identification and subsequently isolated. The isolates were then amplified by polymerase chain reaction to analyze the 9 aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and 7 16S rRNA methylase genes. Five types of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and 1 type of 16S rRNA methylase gene were detected in the 32 drug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Positive genes included 7 detection modes, of which the all-6-gene-positive mode aac(2')-Ib+aac(3)-I+aac(6')-Ib+ant(3'')-I+aph(3')-I+armA exhibited the largest number of strains (12, 37.5%). The resistance of A. baumannii against aminoglycosides resulted from the presence of 5 types of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA. This study is the first to isolate the aac(2')-Ib aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene from A. baumannii in a domestic clinical setting.

  19. Accuracy of genetic code translation and its orthogonal corruption by aminoglycosides and Mg2+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingji; Pavlov, Michael Y; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2018-02-16

    We studied the effects of aminoglycosides and changing Mg2+ ion concentration on the accuracy of initial codon selection by aminoacyl-tRNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP (T3) on mRNA programmed ribosomes. Aminoglycosides decrease the accuracy by changing the equilibrium constants of 'monitoring bases' A1492, A1493 and G530 in 16S rRNA in favor of their 'activated' state by large, aminoglycoside-specific factors, which are the same for cognate and near-cognate codons. Increasing Mg2+ concentration decreases the accuracy by slowing dissociation of T3 from its initial codon- and aminoglycoside-independent binding state on the ribosome. The distinct accuracy-corrupting mechanisms for aminoglycosides and Mg2+ ions prompted us to re-interpret previous biochemical experiments and functional implications of existing high resolution ribosome structures. We estimate the upper thermodynamic limit to the accuracy, the 'intrinsic selectivity' of the ribosome. We conclude that aminoglycosides do not alter the intrinsic selectivity but reduce the fraction of it that is expressed as the accuracy of initial selection. We suggest that induced fit increases the accuracy and speed of codon reading at unaltered intrinsic selectivity of the ribosome.

  20. Functional characterization of MexXY and OpmG in aminoglycoside efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Wannaprasat, Wechsiri; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2008-01-01

    MexXY is an active efflux system that contributes to intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MexXY can function in combination with OprM in aminoglycoside efflux but may also functionally associate with another as yet unidentified outer membrane channel. The possible role of OpmG as a third component of MexXY in aminoglycoside efflux was investigated by construction of unmarked opmG mutants. Loss of OpmG did not have any impact on minimum inhibitory concentrations for aminoglycosides regardless of the presence of oprM, indicating that MexXY does not interact with OpmG in aminoglycoside efflux. In a clinical isolate PAJ010, (mexXY) enhanced streptomycin susceptibility but neither oprM nor opmG could, suggesting that MexXY functionally associates with an unidentified outer membrane protein for aminoglycoside efflux. Expression of an opmG-lacZ transcriptional fusion revealed that OpmG expression was neither constitutive nor inducible by gentamicin. Growth rates of wildtype P. aeruginosa and opmG mutant derivatives were not different, indicating that expression of opmG is not essential for P. aeruginosa growth.

  1. Aerosolization of tobramycin (TOBI) with the PARI LC PLUS reusable nebulizer : which compressor to use? Comparison of the CR60 to the PortaNeb compressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, Elsbeth M; Boer, Anne H De; Touw, Daan J; Brun, Paul P H Le; Roldaan, Albert C; Frijlink, Henderik W; Heijerman, Harry G M

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol output, aerosol output rate, and aerosol size distribution are influenced by the compressed air flow rate through the nebulizer cup. Testing a nebulizer-compressor with a drug for inhalation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is mandatory prior to starting therapy. Tobramycin solution for

  2. Predictive Value of Prior Colonization and Antibiotic Use for Third-Generation Cephalosporin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Bacteremia in Patients With Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottier, Wouter C.; Bamberg, Yara R. P.; Dorigo-Zetsma, J. Wendelien; van der Linden, Paul D.; Ammerlaan, Heidi S. M.; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To prevent inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment in patients with bacteremia caused by third-generation cephalosporin (3GC)-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (3GC-R EB), Dutch guidelines recommend beta-lactam and aminoglycoside combination therapy or carbapenem monotherapy in patients

  3. Antibiotic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibiotics www.healthsci.tufts.edu Georgia-Pacific Health Smart Institute www.gphealthsmart.com Special thanks to Rhonda ... effectiveness of other medications such as birth control pills? 7. Are there any possible adverse reactions if ...

  4. [Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Katarzyna; Kot, Barbara; Piechota, Małgorzata; Frankowska, Aneta

    2013-12-16

    The main problem in the treatment of nosocomial infections is the increasing drug resistance of microorganisms that cause them, limiting the number of effective antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacilli are the cause of many serious hospital-acquired infections occurring primarily in patients within high-risk groups. The most vulnerable are those with weakened immune systems, as well as those with extensive surgical wounds and burn wounds. Infections are usually of the nature of secondary infections, caused by multidrug strains. Due to the high antimicrobial activity, beta-lactams, aminoglycosides and quinolones are drugs commonly used in hospitals, both in prevention and treatment of infections with P. aeruginosa. However, their irrational use is associated with selection and spread of strains resistant to these antibiotics. Resistance of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics is the result of a number of independent co-occurring mechanisms. These are: reducing the membrane permeability, the efflux system, and production of enzymes inactivating and degrading antibiotics. The paper devotes special attention to the determination of resistance mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon.

  5. Studying the Phenotypic and Genotypic Expression of Antibiotic Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimochkina, N R; Stetsenko, V V; Bykova, I V; Markova, Yu M; Polyanina, A S; Aleshkina, A I; Sheveleva, S A

    2018-03-01

    Specific features for the development of resistance in Campylobacter jejuni strains were studied after treatment with antibiotics of 6 pharmacological groups. Populations of 18 native strains of C. jejuni (isolated from raw poultry products) and their subcultures (obtained after 2-3-fold stress exposures to antimicrobial agents in subinhibitory doses) were examined to evaluate the expression of phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Genotypic properties of strains were studied by the PCR with primers that detect the presence of genes for resistance to aminoglycosides (aphA-1, aphA-3, and aphA-7), tetracyclines (tetO), and quinolones (GZgyrA). The majority of test strains of C. jejuni exhibited a high resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline, which reached the maximum value after numerous passages. The expression of antibiotic resistance was greatest in the presence of nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Ciprofloxacin resistance of 33% strains, which were initially resistant to this antibiotic, was increased after 2-3-fold treatment. We revealed a high degree of correspondence between phenotypic and genotypic profiles of antibiotic resistance in food isolates of Campylobacter. One, two, or more genes of aphA were identified in 85% strains phenotypically resistant to aminoglycosides. The tetO gene was found nearly in all strains resistant to tetracycline. Studying the biofilm matrix in C. jejuni after culturing with antibiotics in subinhibitory doses showed that quinolones (particularly nalidixic acid) and tetracyclines potentiate the formation of biofilms and increase the tolerance of Campylobacter to stress exposures. The intensity of biofilm growth was shown to depend little on the effect of macrolides and aminoglycosides. Therefore, the presence of these agents in residual concentrations is associated with a lower risk for the development of antibiotic resistance in C. jejuni populations.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus faecium aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ib [APH(2′′)-Ib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walanj, Rupa; Young, Paul; Baker, Heather M.; Baker, Edward N.; Metcalf, Peter [Laboratory of Structural Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Chow, Joseph W.; Lerner, Stephen [Division of Infectious Diseases, Wayne State University School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Vakulenko, Sergei [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Smith, Clyde A., E-mail: csmith@slac.stanford.edu [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Laboratory of Structural Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2005-04-01

    APH(2′′)-Ib is an enzyme responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. faecium isolates. Native crystals of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, APH(2′′)-Ib, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 299 amino-acid residues) expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 16%(w/v) PEG 3350 and gentamicin. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 79.7, b = 58.8, c = 81.4 Å, β = 98.4°, and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis is consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.65 Å resolution were collected from a native APH(2′′)-Ib crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL (Stanford, CA, USA). Selenium-substituted crystals have also been produced and structure determination is proceeding.

  7. Randomized clinical study for comparative evaluation of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones with the combination of fortified antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vinit Mahendra; Tandon, Radhika; Satpathy, Gita; Nayak, Niranjan; Chawla, Bhavna; Agarwal, Tushar; Sharma, Namrata; Titiyal, Jeewan S; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2010-07-01

    Comparative evaluation of efficacy of monotherapy with moxifloxacin (0.5%) or gatifloxacin (0.3%) with combination therapy of cefazolin (5%) and tobramycin (1.3%) in treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Patients diagnosed with bacterial keratitis (ulcer diameter 2-8 mm) were randomized to 1 of the 3 treatment groups (tobramycin 1.3% and cefazolin 5%, gatifloxacin 0.3%, or moxifloxacin 0.5%). After obtaining corneal scrapings, assigned study medication was instilled hourly for 48 hours and tapered as per clinical response. Healing of ulcer, duration to cure, adverse reactions, antibiogram profile, treatment failures, final visual acuity, and corneal opacity size were evaluated. A total of 61 patients were enrolled [cefazolin and tobramycin (n = 20), gatifloxacin (n = 21), and moxifloxacin (n = 20)]. Overall, 57 patients (93%) healed on treatment. On comparison of the mean time taken to heal, no statistically significant difference was found among all the 3 treatment groups (P = 0.98). Positive bacterial culture was obtained in only 38 patients (62%). There was no significant difference in the bacterial isolates in each treatment group. There were 4 (7%) treatment failures (perforation or nonhealing ulcer): 1 (5%) each in moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin group and 2 (10%) in fortified antibiotics group. All regimens were well tolerated. The study failed to find a difference in the efficacy of monotherapy with fourth-generation fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers of 2-8 mm size when compared with combination therapy of fortified antibiotics.

  8. Local mechanisms for loud sound-enhanced aminoglycoside entry into outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhe; Kachelmeier, Allan; Furness, David N; Steyger, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Loud sound exposure exacerbates aminoglycoside ototoxicity, increasing the risk of permanent hearing loss and degrading the quality of life in affected individuals. We previously reported that loud sound exposure induces temporary threshold shifts (TTS) and enhances uptake of aminoglycosides, like gentamicin, by cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). Here, we explore mechanisms by which loud sound exposure and TTS could increase aminoglycoside uptake by OHCs that may underlie this form of ototoxic synergy. Mice were exposed to loud sound levels to induce TTS, and received fluorescently-tagged gentamicin (GTTR) for 30 min prior to fixation. The degree of TTS was assessed by comparing auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) before and after loud sound exposure. The number of tip links, which gate the GTTR-permeant mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels, was determined in OHC bundles, with or without exposure to loud sound, using scanning electron microscopy. We found wide-band noise (WBN) levels that induce TTS also enhance OHC uptake of GTTR compared to OHCs in control cochleae. In cochlear regions with TTS, the increase in OHC uptake of GTTR was significantly greater than in adjacent pillar cells. In control mice, we identified stereociliary tip links at ~50% of potential positions in OHC bundles. However, the number of OHC tip links was significantly reduced in mice that received WBN at levels capable of inducing TTS. These data suggest that GTTR uptake by OHCs during TTS occurs by increased permeation of surviving, mechanically-gated MET channels, and/or non-MET aminoglycoside-permeant channels activated following loud sound exposure. Loss of tip links would hyperpolarize hair cells and potentially increase drug uptake via aminoglycoside-permeant channels expressed by hair cells. The effect of TTS on aminoglycoside-permeant channel kinetics will shed new light on the mechanisms of loud sound-enhanced aminoglycoside uptake, and consequently on ototoxic synergy.

  9. Local Mechanisms for Loud Sound-Enhanced Aminoglycoside Entry into Outer Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe eLi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Loud sound exposure exacerbates aminoglycoside ototoxicity, increasing the risk of permanent hearing loss and degrading the quality of life in affected individuals. We previously reported that loud sound exposure induces temporary threshold shifts (TTS and enhances uptake of aminoglycosides, like gentamicin, by cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs. Here, we explore mechanisms by which loud sound exposure and TTS could increase aminoglycoside uptake by OHCs that may underlie this form of ototoxic synergy.Mice were exposed to loud sound levels to induce TTS, and received fluorescently-tagged gentamicin (GTTR for 30 minutes prior to fixation. The degree of TTS was assessed by comparing auditory brainstem responses before and after loud sound exposure. The number of tip links, which gate the GTTR-permeant mechanoelectrical transducer (MET channels, was determined in OHC bundles, with or without exposure to loud sound, using scanning electron microscopy.We found wide-band noise (WBN levels that induce TTS also enhance OHC uptake of GTTR compared to OHCs in control cochleae. In cochlear regions with TTS, the increase in OHC uptake of GTTR was significantly greater than in adjacent pillar cells. In control mice, we identified stereociliary tip links at ~50% of potential positions in OHC bundles. However, the number of OHC tip links was significantly reduced in mice that received WBN at levels capable of inducing TTS.These data suggest that GTTR uptake by OHCs during TTS occurs by increased permeation of surviving, mechanically-gated MET channels, and/or non-MET aminoglycoside-permeant channels activated following loud sound exposure. Loss of tip links would hyperpolarize hair cells and potentially increase drug uptake via aminoglycoside-permeant channels expressed by hair cells. The effect of TTS on aminoglycoside-permeant channel kinetics will shed new light on the mechanisms of loud sound-enhanced aminoglycoside uptake, and consequently on ototoxic

  10. Environmental cycle of antibiotic resistance encoded genes: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. ghanbari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes enter the environment in different ways. The release of these factors into the environment has increased concerns related to public health. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in the environmental resources. In this systematic review, the data were extracted from valid sources of information including ScienceDirect, PubMed, Google Scholar and SID. Evaluation and selection of articles were conducted on the basis of the PRISMA checklist. A total of 39 articles were included in the study, which were chosen from a total of 1249 papers. The inclusion criterion was the identification of genes encoding antibiotic resistance against the eight important groups of antibiotics determined by using the PCR technique in the environmental sources including municipal and hospital wastewater treatment plants, animal and agricultural wastes, effluents from treatment plants, natural waters, sediments, and drinking waters. In this study, 113 genes encoding antibiotic resistance to eight groups of antibiotics (beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, macrolides, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, glycopeptides and quinolones were identified in various environments. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in all the investigated environments. The investigation of microorganisms carrying these genes shows that most of the bacteria especially gram-negative bacteria are effective in the acquisition and the dissemination of these pollutants in the environment. Discharging the raw wastewaters and effluents from wastewater treatments acts as major routes in the dissemination of ARGs into environment sources and can pose hazards to public health.

  11. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G Perron

    Full Text Available Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes.

  12. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Gabriel G; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes.

  13. Functional Characterization of Bacteria Isolated from Ancient Arctic Soil Exposes Diverse Resistance Mechanisms to Modern Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P.; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes. PMID:25807523

  14. Practices and Factors Influencing the Use of Antibiotics in Selected Poultry Farms in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boamah, VE; Odoi, H; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    and to assess factors influencing farmers’ choice of antibiotics for use on their farms. A cross-sectional survey using questionnaires and semistructured interviews was conducted among 400 poultry farms in the Ashanti, Brong-Ahafo and Greater Accra regions of Ghana. Data was analysed using IBM SPSS...... and Microsoft Excel. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate correlations between farm variables and the dependency of antibiotic use on internal and external farm characteristics. Farmers reported the use of 35 different antimicrobial agents for management of conditions such as Newcastle, fowl pox......, coccidiosis, and coryza. From these agents, 20 essential antibiotics belonging to 10 antibiotic classes were extracted. Frequently employed antibiotics were tetracyclines (24.17%), aminoglycosides (17.87%), penicillins (16.51%) and fluoroquinolones (10.55%). Only 63% of the farms completed recommended...

  15. Antibiotic Resistance: New Challenge in the Management of Bacterial Eye Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, A K; Sultana, Z; Jahan, I; Khanam, M; Rahman, M; Rahman, M F; Rahman, M B

    2017-01-01

    Ophthalmologists are still facing difficulties in managing bacterial eye infections. The study was designed for the isolation and identification of bacteria from infected eyes and observation of the sensitivity and resistant pattern. This cross sectional study was performed among 160 patients of suspected bacterial eye infection at Dr. K. Zaman BNSB Eye Hospital, Mymensingh and Department of Microbiology and Hygiene, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh from March, 2010 to June, 2014. After collection of the samples from suspected infected eyes, it was nourished into nutrient broth in shaking incubator for three hours and then cultured into nutrient agar media followed by Mannitol salt agar, MacConkey's agar and blood agar. Bacteria were categorized by colony characteristics and Gram staining. Antibiogram was performed by disc diffusion method on Mueller Hinton agar media. McFarland Equivalence Turbidity Standard was maintained. The efficacy of the drug was evaluated by measuring the diameter of the zone of inhibition surrounding the disc. Ten percent Staphylococcus species isolates was resistant to Gatifloxacin, Gentamicin, Tobramycin and Cloxacillin, 26.0% to Ciprofloxacin, 40.0% to Azythromycin and Moxifloxacin, 58.0% to Cefixime and 64.0% to Cephalexin. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 62.8%. About 24.0% Streptococcus species isolates was resistant to Gatifloxacin, 33.3% to Azythromycin, Ciprofloxacin, Gentamycin, Moxifloxacin and Tobramycin, 52.4% to Cefixime and 71.4% to Cephalexin. About 9.0% of Pseudomonas species was resistant to Gatifloxacin and Tobramycin, 14.7% to Ciprofloxacin, 26.5% to Cefixime, 29.4% to Gentamicin and Moxifloxacin, 44.1% to Azythromycin and 82.3% to Cephalexin and Cloxacillin. Rational use of antibiotics and proper attentions of concerned authorities are necessary to overcome the emergent ocular situation leaded by antibiotic resistant.

  16. Antibiotic allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimmi, S; Caimmi, D; Lombardi, E; Crisafulli, G; Franceschini, F; Ricci, G; Marseglia, G L

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are commonly injected during the perioperative period and are responsible of 15 percent of the anaphylactic reactions. Anaphylaxis triggered by antibiotics primarily involves penicillin and cephalosporin. The management of patients with histories of allergic reactions to antibiotics is a common situation in clinical practice. The confirmation or invalidation of the allergic nature of the reported reaction is not based on in vitro tests, but on a rigorous allergological work-up based on detailed analysis of clinical history, skin tests and drug provocation test. Considering a possible cross-reactivity between penicillins, once an immediate penicillin allergy has been diagnosed, skin testing with the alternative molecule (cephalosporin, carbapenem, aztreonam) is mandatory and, if negative, the relevant drug should be given in an appropriate setting at increasing doses.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P.O.; Burmolle, M.

    2005-01-01

    to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics and are protected from bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). P. aeruginosa controls the expression of many of its virulence factors by means of a cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing (QS). In the present report it is demonstrated......The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant...

  18. Indirect resistance to several classes of antibiotics in cocultures with resistant bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-01-01

    Indirect resistance (IR), the ability of an antibiotic-resistant population of bacteria to protect a susceptible population, has been previously observed for β-lactamase-producing bacteria and associated with antimicrobial treatment failures. Here, we determined whether other resistance determinants could cause IR in the presence of five other classes of antibiotics. A test was designed to detect IR and 14 antibiotic resistance genes were tested in the presence of 13 antibiotics from six classes. A bioassay was used to measure the ability of resistance-causing enzymes to decrease the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium. We confirmed IR in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics (ampicillin and mecillinam) when TEM-1A was expressed. We found that bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes Ere(A), Tet(X2) or CatA1 caused IR in the presence of macrolides (erythromycin and clarithromycin), tetracyclines (tetracycline and tigecycline) and chloramphenicol, respectively. IR was not observed with resistance determinants that did not modify or destroy antibiotics or with enzymes modifying aminoglycosides or degrading fosfomycin. IR was dependent on the resistance enzymes decreasing the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium, hence allowing nearby susceptible bacteria to resume growth once the antibiotic concentration fell below their MIC. IR was not limited to β-lactamase-producing bacteria, but was also caused by resistant bacteria carrying cytoplasmic antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes that catalyse energy-consuming reactions requiring complex cellular cofactors. Our results suggest that IR is common and further emphasizes that coinfecting agents and the human microflora can have a negative impact during antimicrobial therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Structural Studies of Bacterial Enzymes and their Relation to Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β- lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes

  20. Rapid identification of aminoglycoside-induced deafness gene mutations using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shasha; Xiang, Guangxin; Kang, Dongyang; Wang, Chen; Kong, Yanling; Zhang, Xun; Liang, Shujian; Mitchelson, Keith; Xing, Wanli; Dai, Pu

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics can induce ototoxicity in genetically susceptible individuals carrying certain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (C1494T and A1555G), resulting in hearing loss. So, a rapid diagnostic approach is needed to accurately identify subjects carrying such gene mutations. In the present study, we describe a rapid and reliable four-color, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for simultaneously detecting two mtDNA 12S rRNA gene variants, A1555G and C1494T, which are prevalent in the Han Chinese population. This multiplex assay incorporates three allele-specific TaqMan probes labeled with different fluorophores in a single reaction, providing high genotyping accuracy for clinical blood samples. Tests with C1494T, A1555G and wild-type DNA exhibited high sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility and accuracy of discriminating mutations from wild-type. This study shows that this simple and inexpensive method can be used for routine molecular diagnostics and potentially for large-scale genetic screening. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Herbal therapy associated with antibiotic therapy: potentiation of the antibiotic activity against methicillin – resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Turnera ulmifolia L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Edeltrudes O

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus genus is widely spread in nature being part of the indigenous microbiota of skin and mucosa of animal and birds. Some Staphylococcus species are frequently recognized as etiological agents of many animal and human opportunistic infections This is the first report testing the antibiotic resistance-modifying activity of Turnera ulmifolia against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus – MRSA strain. Methods In this study an ethanol extract of Turnera ulmifolia L. and chlorpromazine were tested for their antimicrobial activity alone or in combination with aminoglycosides against an MRSA strain. Results The synergism of the ethanol extract and aminoglycosides were verified using microdillution method. A synergistic effect of this extract on gentamicin and kanamycin was demonstrated. Similarly, a potentiating effect of chlorpromazine on kanamycin, gentamicin and neomycin, indicating the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to these aminoglycosides. Conclusion It is therefore suggested that extracts from Turnera ulmifolia could be used as a source of plant-derived natural products with resistance-modifying activity, constituting a new weapon against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics demonstrated in MRSA strains.

  2. Stability and Compatibility of Antibiotics in Peritoneal Dialysis Solutions Applied to Automated Peritoneal Dialysis in The Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Guillaume; Grégoire, Matthieu; Bouquié, Régis; Le Marec, Aude; Allard, Sophie; Dailly, Eric; Pineau, Alain; Allain-Launay, Emma; Jolliet, Pascale; Roussey, Gwenaëlle; Navas, Dominique

    ♦ OBJECTIVES: Assess the stability of several antibiotics in peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions under common conditions of use in pediatrics, particularly in automated PD. ♦ METHODS: Amoxicillin, cefazolin, cefepime, ceftazidime, imipenem, cotrimoxazole, tobramycin, vancomycin, and the association of ceftazidime + vancomycin and ceftazidime + tobramycin, were tested in 3 different PD solutions: bicarbonate/lactate solution with 2 glucose concentrations (Physioneal 1.36 and 3.86%; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA) and an icodextrin-containing solution (Extraneal; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA). Concentrations were those recommended in guidelines for the treatment of peritonitis in pediatrics. Physioneal bags were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours, whereas Extraneal bags were stored 12 hours at room temperature (22 ± 2°C) and then 12 hours at 37°C. Drug concentrations were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Each measure was taken in triplicate. Stability of antibiotics was defined as less than 10% degradation of the drug over time. ♦ RESULTS: Cefazolin, cotrimoxazole, tobramycin, and vancomycin were stable under studied conditions. Ceftazidime was stable 24 hours in icodextrin, 12 hours in Physioneal 1.36% and 6 hours in Physioneal 3.86%. The association of tobramycin or vancomycin did not influence the stability of ceftazidime. Cefepime and amoxicillin were stable 6 h, 4 h, and 8 h in Physioneal 1.36%, 3.86% and Extraneal, respectively. The stability of imipenem was very low: 2 h in Physioneal and 6 h in Extraneal. Moreover, an increasingly yellow coloration was observed with the use of imipenem, whereas no color change or precipitation occurred in other bags. ♦ CONCLUSION: Cefazolin, tobramycin, cotrimoxazole, and vancomycin are stable in PD solutions up to 24 hours and can be administered in the PD bag for the treatment of peritonitis, even in automated PD under studied conditions. However

  3. Hydrid Antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhal, Vladislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2003), s. 17-25 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/1004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : hydrid * antibiotics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2003

  4. d-Tubocurarine and Berbamine: Alkaloids That Are Permeant Blockers of the Hair Cell's Mechano-Electrical Transducer Channel and Protect from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa K. Kirkwood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used for the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections, but cause permanent hearing loss in a substantial proportion of treated patients. The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are damaged following entry of these antibiotics via the mechano-electrical transducer (MET channels located at the tips of the hair cell's stereocilia. d-Tubocurarine (dTC is a MET channel blocker that reduces the loading of gentamicin-Texas Red (GTTR into rat cochlear hair cells and protects them from gentamicin treatment. Berbamine is a structurally related alkaloid that reduces GTTR labeling of zebrafish lateral-line hair cells and protects them from aminoglycoside-induced cell death. Both compounds are thought to reduce aminoglycoside entry into hair cells through the MET channels. Here we show that dTC (≥6.25 μM or berbamine (≥1.55 μM protect zebrafish hair cells in vivo from neomycin (6.25 μM, 1 h. Protection of zebrafish hair cells against gentamicin (10 μM, 6 h was provided by ≥25 μM dTC or ≥12.5 μM berbamine. Hair cells in mouse cochlear cultures are protected from longer-term exposure to gentamicin (5 μM, 48 h by 20 μM berbamine or 25 μM dTC. Berbamine is, however, highly toxic to mouse cochlear hair cells at higher concentrations (≥30 μM whilst dTC is not. The absence of toxicity in the zebrafish assays prompts caution in extrapolating results from zebrafish neuromasts to mammalian cochlear hair cells. MET current recordings from mouse outer hair cells (OHCs show that both compounds are permeant open-channel blockers, rapidly and reversibly blocking the MET channel with half-blocking concentrations of 2.2 μM (dTC and 2.8 μM (berbamine in the presence of 1.3 mM Ca2+ at −104 mV. Berbamine, but not dTC, also blocks the hair cell's basolateral K+ current, IK,neo, and modeling studies indicate that berbamine permeates the MET channel more readily than dTC. These studies reveal key properties of

  5. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Farm Animals FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance For More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial Resistance Information for Consumers and Health Professionals CDC: Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work More in Consumer Updates ...

  6. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Heleen; Gielis, Jan; Acke, Marloes; Cools, Freya; Cos, Paul; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation) to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem) were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures) but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment.

  7. Oxidative stress induction of the MexXY multidrug efflux genes and promotion of aminoglycoside resistance development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraud, Sebastien; Poole, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g., peroxide) was shown to induce expression of the PA5471 gene, which was previously shown to be required for antimicrobial induction of the MexXY components of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system and aminoglycoside resistance determinant in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. mexXY was also induced by peroxide exposure, and this too was PA5471 dependent. The prospect of ROS promoting mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance recalls P. aeruginosa infection of the chronically inflamed lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where the organism is exposed to ROS and where MexXY-OprM predominates as the mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. While ROS did not enhance aminoglycoside resistance in vitro, long-term (8-day) exposure of P. aeruginosa to peroxide (mimicking chronic in vivo ROS exposure) increased aminoglycoside resistance frequency, dependent upon PA5471 and mexXY. This enhanced resistance frequency was also seen in a mutant strain overexpressing PA5471, in the absence of peroxide, suggesting that induction of PA5471 by peroxide was key to peroxide enhancement of aminoglycoside resistance frequency. Resistant mutants selected following peroxide exposure were typically pan-aminoglycoside-resistant, with mexXY generally required for this resistance. Moreover, PA5471 was required for mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance in these as well as several CF isolates examined.

  8. DOWN-STREAM SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TRAITS ALONG METAL CONTAMINATED STREAM REACHES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuckfield, C; J V Mcarthur (NOEMAIL), J

    2007-04-16

    Sediment bacteria samples were collected from three streams in South Carolina, two contaminated with multiple metals (Four Mile Creek and Castor Creek), one uncontaminated (Meyers Branch), and another metal contaminated stream (Lampert Creek) in northern Washington State. Growth plates inoculated with Four Mile Creek sample extracts show bacteria colony growth after incubation on plates containing either one of two aminoglycosides (kanamycin or streptomycin), tetracycline or chloramphenocol. This study analyzes the spatial pattern of antibiotic resistance in culturable sediment bacteria in all four streams that may be due to metal contamination. We summarize the two aminoglycoside resistance measures and the 10 metals concentrations by Principal Components Analysis. Respectively, 63% and 58% of the variability was explained in the 1st principal component of each variable set. We used the respective multivariate summary metrics (i.e. 1st principal component scores) as input measures for exploring the spatial correlation between antibiotic resistance and metal concentration for each stream reach sampled. Results show a significant and negative correlation between metals scores versus aminoglycoside resistance scores and suggest that selection for metal tolerance among sediment bacteria may influence selection for antibiotic resistance differently than previously supposed.. In addition, we borrow a method from geostatistics (variography) wherein a spatial cross-correlation analysis shows that decreasing metal concentrations scores are associated with increasing aminoglycoside resistance scores as the separation distance between sediment samples decreases, but for contaminated streams only. Since these results were counter to our initial expectation and to other experimental evidence for water column bacteria, we suspect our field results are influenced by metal bioavailability in the sediments and by a contaminant promoted interaction or ''cocktail effect

  9. Antibiotics for acute pyelonephritis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, Yvonne; Hodson, Elisabeth M; Willis, Narelle S; Webster, Angela C; Craig, Jonathan C

    2014-07-28

    comparisons. No significant differences were found in duration of fever (2 studies, 808 children: MD 2.05 hours, 95% CI -0.84 to 4.94), persistent UTI at 72 hours after commencing therapy (2 studies, 542 children: RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.07 to 17.41) or persistent kidney damage at six to 12 months (4 studies, 943 children: RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.12) between oral antibiotic therapy (10 to 14 days) and intravenous (IV) therapy (3 days) followed by oral therapy (10 days). Similarly, no significant differences in persistent bacteriuria at the end of treatment (4 studies, 305 children: RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.24 to 2.55) or persistent kidney damage (4 studies, 726 children: RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.29) were found between IV therapy (three to four days) followed by oral therapy and IV therapy (seven to 14 days). No significant differences in efficacy were found between daily and thrice daily administration of aminoglycosides (1 study, 179 children, persistent clinical symptoms at three days: RR 1.98, 95% CI 0.37 to 10.53). Adverse events were mild and uncommon and rarely resulted in discontinuation of treatment. This updated review increases the body of evidence that oral antibiotics alone are as effective as a short course (three to four days) of IV antibiotics followed by oral therapy for a total treatment duration of 10 to 14 days for the treatment of acute pyelonephritis in children. When IV antibiotics are given, a short course (two to four days) of IV therapy followed by oral therapy is as effective as a longer course (seven to 10 days) of IV therapy. If IV therapy with aminoglycosides is chosen, single daily dosing is safe and effective. Insufficient data are available to extrapolate these findings to children aged less than one month of age or to children with dilating vesicoureteric reflux (grades III-V). Further studies are required to determine the optimal total duration of antibiotic therapy required for acute pyelonephritis.

  10. Role of the MexXY multidrug efflux pump in moderate aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Pseudomonas mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Wannaprasat, Wechsiri; Ajariyakhajorn, Kittisak; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2008-08-01

    The contribution of the MexXY multidrug efflux system to aminoglycoside resistance was investigated in 18 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from dairy cows with Pseudomonas mastitis. All of the isolates expressed MexXY as determined by reverse transcription-PCR. The loss of mexXY resulted in increased susceptibility (two- to 16-fold decline in MIC) to aminoglycosides, confirming the contribution of this system in aminoglycoside resistance in these strains. As the impact of DeltamexXY varied, overexpression of MexXY alone is not sufficient for aminoglycoside resistance. Expression of mexXY also varied and did not strictly correlate with aminoglycoside insusceptibility. Transcription levels of mexY were independent on mutations in mexZ, suggesting the existence of additional regulatory mechanisms other than mexZ.

  11. Clonal origin of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii isolates in a Danish county

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norskov-Lauritsen, N.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Hedegaard, J.

    2001-01-01

    During 1997, attention was drawn to an increased frequency of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii in a Danish county, when a total of 24 resistant C. freundii isolates was detected. In this study, 15 such isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, riboprinting and partial...... sequencing of the gene encoding translation initiation factor 2. Fourteen of the 15 isolates were identical, as evaluated by their antibiograms and by all these typing methods, This epidemic strain harboured the aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(3)-II and ant(3")-I, with the latter located in tandem...

  12. A minimum structure of aminoglycosides that causes an initiation shift of trans-translation

    OpenAIRE

    Konno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Toshiharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2004-01-01

    Trans-translation is an unusual translation in which transfer-messenger RNA plays a dual function—as a tRNA and an mRNA—to relieve the stalled translation on the ribosome. It has been shown that paromomycin, a typical member of a 4,5-disubstituted class of aminoglycosides, causes a shift of the translation-resuming point on the tmRNA by −1 during trans-translation. To address the molecular basis of this novel effect, we examined the effects of various aminoglycosides that can bind around the ...

  13. Functional metagenomic characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural soils from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian Qiang; Wei, Bei; Xu, Chun Yan; Qiao, Min; Zhu, Yong Guan

    2014-04-01

    Soil has been regarded as a rich source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) due to the complex microbial community and diverse antibiotic-producing microbes in soil, however, little is known about the ARGs in unculturable bacteria. To investigate the diversity and distribution of ARGs in soil and assess the impact of agricultural practice on the ARGs, we screened soil metagenomic library constructed using DNA from four different agricultural soil for ARGs. We identified 45 clones conferring resistance to minocycline, tetracycline, streptomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, amikacin, chloramphenicol and rifampicin. The similarity of identified ARGs with the closest protein in GenBank ranged from 26% to 92%, with more than 60% of identified ARGs had low similarity less than 60% at amino acid level. The identified ARGs include aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, aminoglycoside 6-adenyltransferase, ADP-ribosyl transferase, ribosome protection protein, transporters and other antibiotic resistant determinants. The identified ARGs from the soil with manure application account for approximately 70% of the total ARGs in this study, implying that manure amendment may increase the diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria. These results suggest that antibiotic resistance in soil remains unexplored and functional metagenomic approach is powerful in discovering novel ARGs and resistant mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A two-component regulatory system interconnects resistance to polymyxins, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and β-lactams in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Cédric; Plésiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy

    2011-03-01

    Constitutive overexpression of the active efflux system MexXY/OprM is a major cause of resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and cefepime in clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Upregulation of this pump often results from mutations occurring in mexZ, the local repressor gene of the mexXY operon. In this study, analysis of MexXY-overproducing mutants selected in vitro from reference strain PAO1Bes on amikacin (at a concentration 1.5-fold higher than the MIC) led to identification of a new class of mutants harboring an intact mexZ gene and exhibiting increased resistance to colistin and imipenem in addition to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and cefepime. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) experiments on a selected clone named PAOW2 demonstrated that mexXY overexpression was independent of mexZ and the PA5471 gene, which is required for drug-dependent induction of mexXY. Furthermore, the transcript levels of the oprD gene, which encodes the carbapenem-selective porin OprD, were found to be reduced drastically in PAOW2. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a single mutation resulting in an M59I substitution in the ParR protein, the response regulator of the ParRS two-component regulatory system (with ParS being the sensor kinase), which is required for adaptive resistance of P. aeruginosa to polycationic peptides such as colistin. The multidrug resistance phenotype was suppressed in PAOW2 by deletion of the parS and parRS genes and conferred to PAO1Bes by chromosomal insertion of the mutated parRS locus from PAOW2. As shown by transcriptomic analysis, only a very small number of genes were expressed differentially between PAOW2 and PAO1Bes, including the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification operon arnBCADTEF-ugd, responsible for resistance to polycationic agents. Exposure of wild-type PAO1Bes to different polycationic peptides, including colistin, was shown to result in increased mexY and repressed oprD expression via Par

  15. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I......Bacteria can avoid extinction during antimicrobial exposure by becoming resistant. They achieve this either via adaptive mutations or horizontally acquired resistance genes. If resistance emerges in clinical relevant species, it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately result in increasing...... morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...

  16. Why are ototopical aminoglycosides still first-line therapy for chronic suppurative otitis media? A systematic review and discussion of aminoglycosides versus quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A S; Elhassan, H A; Flook, E P

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish that quinolones are as effective as aminoglycosides when used to treat chronic suppurative otitis media. The review included good quality, randomised, controlled trials on human subjects, published in English, that compared topical aminoglycosides with topical quinolones for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media. Nine trials met the criteria. Two studies showed a higher clinical cure rate in the quinolone group (93 per cent vs 71 per cent, p = 0.04, and 76 per cent vs 52 per cent, p = 0.009). Four studies showed no statistically significant difference in clinical outcome. A significant difference in microbiological clearance in favour of quinolones was shown in two studies (88 per cent vs 30 per cent, p otitis media and when used as prophylaxis post-myringotomy. Topical quinolones should be considered a first-line treatment for these patients.

  17. Improvement in Ocular Bioavailability and Prolonged Delivery of Tobramycin Sulfate Following Topical Ophthalmic Administration of Drug-Loaded Mucoadhesive Microparticles Incorporated in Thermosensitive In Situ Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shagufta; Warade, Sonali; Singhavi, Dilesh J

    2017-12-06

    Conventional topical delivery in hyperacute bacterial conjunctivitis and endophthalmitis is associated with low drug bioavailability due to rapid precorneal clearance. Hence, in the present investigation, an attempt has been made to enhance ocular bioavailability of tobramycin sulfate by formulating drug-loaded microparticles dispersed in thermosensitive in situ gel. Microparticles prepared by emulsion-ionic gelation technique were characterized for drug loading, entrapment efficiency, particle size, surface morphology, and in vitro drug release. Consequently microparticles (F2 prepared with 1.5%w/v chitosan, 0.2%w/v tripolyphosphate, and drug, 30%w/w of polymer) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were dispersed in thermosensitive in situ gel containing poloxamer 407 and varying percentage of chitosan. In situ gel containing drug-loaded microparticles were evaluated for gelation temperature, rheological behavior, mucoadhesive strength, in vitro drug release, in vitro permeation, ocular irritation, and bioavailability in aqueous humor of rabbits. Formulation containing 17%w/v poloxamer 407 and 0.5%w/v chitosan (P2) gelled at 32°C ± 1.5°C gave pseudoplastic behavior. In vitro permeability of tobramycin from the formulation P2 was found 2-folds greater than eye drops. It also gave significantly higher aqueous humor concentration of tobramycin compared with eye drops with no signs of ocular irritation. Thus, the formulation possesses high potential for treating ocular infections.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii in Iran: A Systemic Review of the Published Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Jale; Hashemi, Farhad B; Bahador, Abbas

    2015-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterium responsible for health care-associated infections, and it frequently develops multiple drug resistance (MDR). The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii in Iran has increased, and this may cause significant clinical problems. Therefore, in order to elucidate the development of antibiotic resistance, we performed a systematic review of the literature published on antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii reported in Iran. Thirty-six publications that met the criteria for inclusion were reviewed from an initial 87 papers. Selected papers published between 2008 and September 2014, were categorized on the basis of the sample collecting year been between 2001 and 2013. Analysis of data revealed that, in general, there was an increase in antimicrobial resistance. During the initial time point of these studies (2001-2007) there was a high rate of resistance to all antibiotics, with the exception of carbapenems, lipopeptides, and aminoglycosides that had a low resistance rate in comparison with the others. Also, the resistance rate was increased in one group of these three antimicrobial groups from 2010 to 2013. In particular, there was an increase in resistance to carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem) from 2010-2011 and 2012-2013, whereas no significant change in the resistance rate of the other two antimicrobial groups (lipopeptides and aminoglycosides) during the study time was observed, although we did observe certain trends in amikacin (aminoglycoside group antibiotic) between 2011-2012 and 2012-2013. These findings indicate that antimicrobial resistance of A. baumannii in Iran has increased, which may very well affect the antimicrobial resistance of this organism worldwide. Based on these results, novel prevention and treatment strategies against A. baumannii infections are warranted. Furthermore, these data may assist in revising treatment guidelines and regional policies in care units to slow the emergence of antimicrobial

  19. Epoch-making milestones in antibiotic exploratory researches in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kunimoto

    2017-01-01

    Professor Satoshi Ōmura was awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He is the third to win the award for research on antibiotic, following Fleming' (UK, 1945, discovery of penicillin) and Waksman (USA, 1952, discovery of streptomycin), and the second person after Waksman to receive the award for research on actinomycetes. By focusing his research on macrolides stemming from leucomycin research rather than β-lactams like penicillin or aminoglycosides like streptomycin, Prof. Ōmura realized many scientific achievements. These efforts finally led to the discovery of avermectin and its semi-synthetic derivative, ivermectin, considered a monumental contribution to the human race. In this manuscript, I will outline the chronicles of the epoch-making antibiotic exploratory researches preceding Prof. Ōmura.

  20. Optimizing Guideline-Recommended Antibiotic Doses for Pediatric Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kristen R; Israel, Emily N; Thomas, Christopher A; Knoderer, Chad A

    2016-05-01

    The American Heart Association recently published an updated scientific statement on the management of infective endocarditis in childhood. The recommendations included for vancomycin, aminoglycoside, and β-lactam dosing and monitoring are based primarily on expert opinion and do not consider available evidence for dose optimization based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles in pediatric patients. This is concerning because even when clinically necessary, some practitioners may be hesitant to deviate from guideline-recommended doses. In this perspective, we highlight potential areas for improvement in the statement-recommended doses and summarize evidence supporting antibiotic dosing optimization. The addition of a pediatric clinical pharmacist with expertise in antibiotic dosing to the panel would be beneficial for future updates. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Assessing the antibiotic susceptibility of freshwater cyanobacteria spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa eDias

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater is a vehicle for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in freshwater, where they are exposed to antibiotics and resistant organisms, but their role on water resistome was never evaluated. Data concerning the effects of antibiotics on cyanobacteria, obtained by distinct methodologies, is often contradictory. This emphasizes the importance of developing procedures to understand the trends of antibiotic susceptibility in cyanobacteria. In this study we aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of four cyanobacterial isolates from different genera (Microcystis aeruginosa, Aphanizomenon gracile, Chrisosporum bergii, Planktothix agradhii, and among them nine isolates from the same specie (M. aeruginosa to distinct antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, kanamycine, gentamicine, tetracycline, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin. We used a method adapted from the bacteria standard broth microdilution. Cyanobacteria were exposed to serial dilution of each antibiotic (0.0015-1.6 mg/L in Z8 medium (20 ± 1 ºC; 14/10 h L/D cycle; light intensity 16 ± 4 µEm-2 s-1. Cell growth was followed overtime (OD450nm/microscopic examination and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were calculated for each antibiotic/isolate. We found that -lactams exhibited the lower MICs, aminoglycosides, tetracycline and norfloxacine presented intermediate MICs; none of the isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim and nalidixic acid. The reduced susceptibility of all tested cyanobacteria to some antibiotics suggests that they might be naturally non-susceptible to these compounds, or that that they might became non-susceptible due to antibiotic contamination pressure, or to the transfer of genes from resistant bacteria present in the environment.

  2. Covalently linked kanamycin - Ciprofloxacin hybrid antibiotics as a tool to fight bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Michal; Pokrovskaya, Varvara; Belakhov, Valery; Baasov, Timor

    2017-06-01

    To address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, a set of 12 hybrid compounds that covalently link fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycoside (kanamycin A) antibiotics were synthesized, and their activity was determined against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including resistant strains. The hybrids were antagonistic relative to the ciprofloxacin, but were substantially more potent than the parent kanamycin against Gram-negative bacteria, and overcame most dominant resistance mechanisms to aminoglycosides. Selected hybrids were 42-640 fold poorer inhibitors of bacterial protein synthesis than the parent kanamycin, while they displayed similar inhibitory activity to that of ciprofloxacin against DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. The hybrids showed significant delay of resistance development in both E. coli and B. subtilis in comparison to that of component drugs alone or their 1:1 mixture. More generally, the data suggest that an antagonistic combination of aminoglycoside-fluoroquinolone hybrids can lead to new compounds that slowdown/prevent the emergence of resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibiotic usage in 2013 on a dairy CAFO in NY State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Doane

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is threatening humans and animals worldwide. Biosecurity and 1-year usage of antibiotics on a dairy concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO in NY State, USA, were mapped: how much antibiotics were used, for what purpose, and whether any decrease could be warranted. Approximately 493 kg antibiotics was used, of which 376 kg was ionophores (monensin and lasalocides, 79 kg penicillin, 16.5 kg lincosamides, 8.0 kg aminoglycosides, 7.7 kg sulfamides, 3.4 kg cephalosporin, 2 kg macrolides, 0.7 kg amphenicols, and 0.1 kg fluoroquinolones. Usage reduction by 84% was realistic without compromising the animal welfare. Further reduction could be possible by improving the biosecurity and by utilizing antibiotic sensitivity testing.

  4. Involvement of a novel efflux system in biofilm-specific resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2008-07-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms are more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. How this transition occurs is unclear, but it is likely there are multiple mechanisms of resistance that act together in order to provide an increased overall level of resistance to the biofilm. We have identified a novel efflux pump in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is important for biofilm-specific resistance to a subset of antibiotics. Complete deletion of the genes encoding this pump, PA1874 to PA1877 (PA1874-1877) genes, in an P. aeruginosa PA14 background results in an increase in sensitivity to tobramycin, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin, specifically when this mutant strain is growing in a biofilm. This efflux pump is more highly expressed in biofilm cells than in planktonic cells, providing an explanation for why these genes are important for biofilm but not planktonic resistance to antibiotics. Furthermore, expression of these genes in planktonic cells increases their resistance to antibiotics. We have previously shown that ndvB is important for biofilm-specific resistance (T. F. Mah, B. Pitts, B. Pellock, G. C. Walker, P. S. Stewart, and G. A. O'Toole, Nature 426:306-310, 2003). Our discovery that combining the ndvB mutation with the PA1874-1877 gene deletion results in a mutant strain that is more sensitive to antibiotics than either single mutant strain suggests that ndvB and PA1874-1877 contribute to two different mechanisms of biofilm-specific resistance to antibiotics.

  5. Normal flora of conjunctiva and lid margin, as well as its antibiotic sensitivity, in patients undergoing cataract surgery at Phramongkutklao Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnumnoi, Ravee; Keorochana, Narumon; Sontisombat, Chavalit

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the normal flora of conjunctiva and lid margin, as well as its antibiotic sensitivity. This was a prospective cross-sectional study. A prospective study was conducted on 120 patients who underwent cataract surgery at the Phramongkutklao Hospital from September 2014 to October 2014. Conjunctival and lid margin swabs were obtained from patients before they underwent cataract surgery. These swabs were used to inoculate blood agar and chocolate agar plates for culturing. After growth of the normal flora, the antibiotic sensitivity method using tobramycin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and cefazolin was applied. Normal flora of conjunctiva and lid margin, along with its antibiotic sensitivity, from patients who underwent cataract surgery was assessed. A total of 120 eyes were included in this study, and bacterial isolation rates were identified. Five bacteria from the lid margin were cultured, namely, coagulase-negative staphylococcus (58.33%), Streptococcus spp. (2.5%), Corynebacterium (1.67%), Micrococcus spp. (1.67%), and Staphylococcus aureus (0.83%). Two bacteria from the conjunctiva were cultured, namely, coagulase-negative staphylococcus (30%) and Streptococcus spp. (0.83%). Results of antibiotic sensitivity test showed that all isolated bacteria are sensitive to cefazolin 100%, tobramycin 98.67%, levofloxacin 100%, and moxifloxacin 100%. Coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most common bacteria isolated from conjunctiva and lid margin.

  6. Aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in HIV-positive and HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of 115 patients who were genetically screened, none had MT-RNR1 mutations. Conclusion. Ototoxic hearing loss is common in MDR-TB patients treated with aminoglycosides. HIV-positive patients are at increased risk of ototoxicity. Auditory monitoring and auditory rehabilitation should be an integral part of the package of ...

  7. 21 CFR 173.170 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans-ferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... development of genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho-trans-ferase II. 173.170 Section 173.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  8. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. Clonal origin of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii isolates in a Danish county

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norskov-Lauritsen, N.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Hedegaard, J.

    2001-01-01

    sequencing of the gene encoding translation initiation factor 2. Fourteen of the 15 isolates were identical, as evaluated by their antibiograms and by all these typing methods, This epidemic strain harboured the aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(3)-II and ant(3")-I, with the latter located in tandem...

  10. Synergism between tobramycin and ceftazidime against a resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, tested in an in vitro pharmacokinetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. den Hollander (Jan); A.M. Horrevorts; M.L. van Goor; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); J.W. Mouton (Johan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSynergism between two antibiotics is usually tested by a checkerboard titration technique, or by time-kill methods. Both methods have the disadvantage that synergism is determined at constant concentrations of the antibiotics, which do not reflect reality in

  11. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, James C.; Liesa, Marc; Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Slomovic, Shimyn; Molina, Anthony; Shirihai, Orian S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged antibiotic treatment can lead to detrimental side effects in patients, including ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and tendinopathy, yet the mechanisms underlying the effects of antibiotics in mammalian systems remain unclear. It has been suggested that bactericidal antibiotics induce the formation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacteria. We show that clinically relevant doses of bactericidal antibiotics—quinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams—cause mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS overproduction in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that these bactericidal antibiotic–induced effects lead to oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, and membrane lipids. Mice treated with bactericidal antibiotics exhibited elevated oxidative stress markers in the blood, oxidative tissue damage, and up-regulated expression of key genes involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms, which points to the potential physiological relevance of these antibiotic effects. The deleterious effects of bactericidal antibiotics were alleviated in cell culture and in mice by the administration of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or prevented by preferential use of bacteriostatic antibiotics. This work highlights the role of antibiotics in the production of oxidative tissue damage in mammalian cells and presents strategies to mitigate or prevent the resulting damage, with the goal of improving the safety of antibiotic treatment in people. PMID:23825301

  12. Resistant gram-negative bacilli and antibiotic consumption in zarqa, jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataineh, H.A.; Alrashed, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among gram-negative bacteria in relation to antibiotic use in Prince Hashem Hospital (PHH), Jordan. One hundred consecutive gram-negative bacterial isolates from different sites were collected from patients admitted to the ICU at PHH. The susceptibilities of the strains to 12 antibiotics were performed and interpreted. The quantities and the numbers of the patients discharged on antibiotics and the quantities consumed were obtained from the hospital pharmacy records. The most common isolate was P. aeruginosa (n=21) The most common site of isolation was the respiratory tract (65%), The highest susceptibility was to piperacillin/ tazobactam(78%), and the lowest was to cefuroxime(34%). The aminoglycosides gentamicin and amikacin were active against 71% and 73% of the isolates respectively, Ciprofloxacin was active against 75% of the isolates. The most frequently used antibiotics were the third-generation cephalosporins ceftriaxone and ceftazidime, followed by imipenem and amikacin. Antibiotic resistance surveillance programs associated with registration of antibiotic consumption are necessary to promote optimal use of antibiotics. Rational prescribing of antibiotics should be encouraged through educational programs, surveillance and audit. Proper infection control measures should be practiced to prevent horizontal transfer of drug-resistant organisms. (author)

  13. Antibiotic resistance potential of the healthy preterm infant gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Rose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Few studies have investigated the gut microbiome of infants, fewer still preterm infants. In this study we sought to quantify and interrogate the resistome within a cohort of premature infants using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. We describe the gut microbiomes from preterm but healthy infants, characterising the taxonomic diversity identified and frequency of antibiotic resistance genes detected. Results Dominant clinically important species identified within the microbiomes included C. perfringens, K. pneumoniae and members of the Staphylococci and Enterobacter genera. Screening at the gene level we identified an average of 13 antimicrobial resistance genes per preterm infant, ranging across eight different antibiotic classes, including aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. Some antibiotic resistance genes were associated with clinically relevant bacteria, including the identification of mecA and high levels of Staphylococci within some infants. We were able to demonstrate that in a third of the infants the S. aureus identified was unrelated using MLST or metagenome assembly, but low abundance prevented such analysis within the remaining samples. Conclusions We found that the healthy preterm infant gut microbiomes in this study harboured a significant diversity of antibiotic resistance genes. This broad picture of resistances and the wider taxonomic diversity identified raises further caution to the use of antibiotics without consideration of the resident microbial communities.

  14. Mobile health application to assist doctors in antibiotic prescription - an approach for antibiotic stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuon, Felipe Francisco; Gasparetto, Juliano; Wollmann, Luciana Cristina; Moraes, Thyago Proença de

    Technologies applied to mobile devices can be an important strategy in antibiotic stewardship programs. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a decision-making application on antibiotic prescription. This was an observational, analytical and longitudinal study on the implementation of an antimicrobial guide for mobile application. This study analyzed the period of 12 months before and 12 months after the app implementation at a university hospital based on local epidemiology, avoiding high cost drugs and reducing the potential for drug resistance including carbapenem. Antimicrobials consumption was evaluated in Daily Defined Dose/1000 patients-day and direct expenses converted into USD. The monthly average consumption of aminoglycosides and cefepime had a statistically significant increase (pantibiotic as a substitute of piperacillin/tazobactam for treating intra-hospital infections. There was a net saving of USD 296,485.90 (pantibiotic protocol in the app can help antibiotic stewardship reducing cost, changing the microbiological profile and antimicrobial consumption. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of Apple Orchard Soil Reveals Antibiotic Resistance Genes Encoding Predicted Bifunctional Proteins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Justin J.; Moe, Luke A.; Converse, Brandon J.; Smart, Keith D.; Berklein, Flora C.; McManus, Patricia S.; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the diversity and origins of antibiotic resistance genes, we identified resistance genes in the soil in an apple orchard using functional metagenomics, which involves inserting large fragments of foreign DNA into Escherichia coli and assaying the resulting clones for expressed functions. Among 13 antibiotic-resistant clones, we found two genes that encode bifunctional proteins. One predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to ceftazidime and contains a natural fusion between a predicted transcriptional regulator and a β-lactamase. Sequence analysis of the entire metagenomic clone encoding the predicted bifunctional β-lactamase revealed a gene potentially involved in chloramphenicol resistance as well as a predicted transposase. A second clone that encodes a predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to kanamycin and contains an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase domain fused to a second acetyltransferase domain that, based on nucleotide sequence, was predicted not to be involved in antibiotic resistance. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator fused to a β-lactamase and of an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase fused to an acetyltransferase not involved in antibiotic resistance. PMID:20453147

  16. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-10-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and enterococcal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6')-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2'')-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2'')-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2'')-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2'')-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia enzyme.

  17. Single versus combination intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy for people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, Heather E; Scott, Alison

    2016-12-01

    Choice of antibiotic, and the use of single or combined therapy are controversial areas in the treatment of respiratory infection due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF). Advantages of combination therapy include wider range of modes of action, possible synergy and reduction of resistant organisms; advantages of monotherapy include lower cost, ease of administration and reduction of drug-related toxicity. Current evidence does not provide a clear answer and the use of intravenous antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis requires further evaluation. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of single compared to combination intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy for treating people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 14 October 2016. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a single intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibiotic with a combination of that antibiotic plus a second anti-pseudomonal antibiotic in people with CF. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We identified 45 trials, of which eight trials (356 participants) comparing a single anti-pseudomonal agent to a combination of the same antibiotic and one other, were included.There was a wide variation in the individual antibiotics used in each trial. In total, the trials included seven comparisons of a beta-lactam antibiotic (penicillin-related or third generation cephalosporin) with a beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combination and three comparisons of an aminoglycoside with a beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combination. These two groups of trials were analysed as separate subgroups.There was considerable heterogeneity amongst these trials

  18. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Rescuing Antibiotics from Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2016-11-01

    Rooted in the mechanism of action of antibiotics and subject to bacterial evolution, antibiotic resistance is difficult and perhaps impossible to overcome. Nevertheless, strategies can be used to minimize the emergence and impact of resistance. Antibiotic adjuvants offer one such approach. These are compounds that have little or no antibiotic activity themselves but act to block resistance or otherwise enhance antibiotic action. Antibiotic adjuvants are therefore delivered in combination with antibiotics and can be divided into two groups: Class I agents that act on the pathogen, and Class II agents that act on the host. Adjuvants offer a means to both suppress the emergence of resistance and rescue the activity of existing drugs, offering an orthogonal strategy complimentary to new antibiotic discovery VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High Prevalence and Predominance of the aph(2″)-If Gene Conferring Aminoglycoside Resistance in Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Liu, Dejun; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qijing; Shen, Zhangqi

    2017-05-01

    Campylobacter is a major foodborne pathogen, and previous studies revealed that Campylobacter isolates from food-producing animals are increasingly resistant to gentamicin in China. The molecular epidemiology and genetic mechanisms responsible for gentamicin resistance in China have not been well understood. In this study, 607 Campylobacter isolates of chicken and swine origins collected in 2014 were analyzed, revealing that 15.6% (25/160) of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates and 79.9% (357/447) of the Campylobacter coli isolates were resistant to gentamicin. PCR detection of the gentamicin resistance genes indicated that aph(2″)-If was more prevalent than the previously identified aacA/aphD gene and has become the dominant gentamicin resistance determinant in Campylobacter Transformation and whole-genome sequencing as well as long-range PCR discovered that aph(2″)-If was located on a chromosomal segment inserted between two conserved genes, Cj0299 and panB Cloning of aph(2″)-If into gentamicin-susceptible C. jejuni NCTC 11168 confirmed its function in conferring high-level resistance to gentamicin and kanamycin. Molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested that both regional expansion of a particular clone and horizontal transmission were involved in the dissemination of the aph(2″)-If gene in Campylobacter To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the high prevalence of a chromosomally encoded aph(2″)-If gene in Campylobacter The high prevalence and predominance of this gene might be driven by the use of aminoglycoside antibiotics in food animal production in China and potentially compromise the usefulness of gentamicin as a therapeutic agent for Campylobacter -associated systemic infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Evaluation of automated systems for aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones susceptibility testing for Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichang Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated systems (MicroScan WalkAway 96 Plus, Phoenix 100, and Vitek 2 Compact are widely used in clinical laboratories nowadays. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of these three systems for susceptibility testing of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones against Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE. Methods A total of 75 CRE isolates were used in this study. Quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs (qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, aac(6′-Ib-cr, oqxAB and qepA and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs (aac(6′-Ib, armA, npmA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD and rmtE of these CRE were screened by PCR. The MICs of aminoglycosides (gentamicin and amikacin and fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin to CRE obtained with the automated systems were compared with the reference method (agar dilution method. Results Totally, 97.3% (73/75 of CRE harbored QRDs. The qnr gene was the most common QRD determinant identified in 68 (96.7%, followed by aac (6′-Ib-cr in 56 (74.7%, oqxAB in 23 (30.7%, and qepA in 2 (2.7%, respectively. 22.7% (17/75 of CRE harbored ARD determinants. rmtA, rmtB and npmA were identified among these isolates in 6 (8.0%, 6 (8.0% and 5 (6.7%, respectively. A total of 900 results were obtained in this study. Overall, the total error rate was 9.89%. Twenty-eight very major errors (3.11%, 22 major errors (2.44% and 39 minor errors (4.33% were identified against agar dilution method. The very major errors were almost evenly distributed between results for fluoroquinolones (2.89% and aminoglycosides (3.33%, while the major errors and minor errors were more commonly found in the results of fluoroquinolones (3.11% and 6.44%, respectively than aminoglycosides (1.78% and 2.22%, respectively. Conclusions Our study shows that testing difficulties in susceptibility testing do exist in automated systems. We suggest clinical laboratories using automated systems should consider using a second

  1. Novel 6′-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Iaj from a Clinical Isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCGM1588 has a novel chromosomal class 1 integron, In151, which includes the aac(6′)-Iaj gene. The encoded protein, AAC(6′)-Iaj, was found to consist of 184 amino acids, with 70% identity to AAC(6′)-Ia. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing the aac(6′)-Iaj gene acquired resistance to all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. Of note, aac(6′)-Iaj contributed to the resistance to arbekacin. Thin-layer chromatography revealed that AAC(6′)-Iaj acetylated all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. These findings indicated that AAC(6′)-Iaj is a functional acetyltransferase that modifies the amino groups at the 6′ positions of aminoglycosides and contributes to aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa NCGM1588, including arbekacin. PMID:23070167

  2. A Novel 6'-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Ial, from a Clinical Isolate of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2016-03-01

    Serratia marcescens IOMTU115 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Ial. The encoded protein AAC(6')-Ial has 146 amino acids, with 91.8% identity to the amino acid sequence of AAC(6')-Ic in S. marcescens SM16 and 97.3% identity to the amino acid sequence of AAC(6')-Iap in S. marcescens WW4. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of aminoglycosides for Escherichia coli expressing AAC(6')-Ial were similar to those for E. coli expressing AAC(6')-Ic or AAC(6')-Iap. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Ial, AAC(6')-Ic, or AAC(6')-Iap acetylated all the aminoglycosides tested, except for apramycin, gentamicin, and lividomycin. Kinetics assays revealed that AAC(6')-Ial is a functional acetyltransferase against aminoglycosides. The aac(6')-Ial gene was located on chromosomal DNA.

  3. Evaluation of antibiotic-impregnated microspheres for the prevention of implant-associated orthopaedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Catherine G; Clyburn, Terry A; Mika, Joerg; Gogola, Gloria R; Kaplan, Heidi B; Wanger, Audrey; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-01-15

    Prevention of infection associated with uncemented orthopaedic implants could lead to improved implant stability and better patient outcomes. We hypothesized that coating porous metal implants with antibiotic-containing microspheres would prevent infections in grossly contaminated wounds. Bioresorbable polymer microspheres containing tobramycin were manufactured and pressed into porous metal cylinders that were then implanted into radial defects in rabbits. Control implants that did not contain antibiotic microspheres were also implanted into the contralateral limbs. Each implant was then contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus prior to closure of the wound. The animal was euthanized after clinical signs of infection appeared, or at two weeks after surgery. Periprosthetic tissue was cultured for the presence of S. aureus, and integration of the implant with the surrounding bone was measured. The antibiotic microspheres successfully prevented infection in 100% of the eleven limbs with treated implants, which represented a significant improvement (p = 0.004) compared with the infection rate of 64% (seven of eleven) for the limbs with control implants. Implant integration averaged 38.87% ± 12.69% in the fifteen uninfected limbs, which was significantly better (p = 0.012) than the average of 19.46% ± 14.49% in the seven infected limbs. The antibiotic delivery system successfully prevented infection in 100% of the cases studied, resulting in an increase in implant integration. Antibiotic delivery utilizing the system described here may be effective in preventing implant-associated infections after orthopaedic surgery and increasing the longevity of orthopaedic implants.

  4. Abundance and distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in a full-scale anaerobic-aerobic system alternately treating ribostamycin, spiramycin and paromomycin production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mei; Dou, Xiaomin; Wang, Chunyan; Tian, Zhe; Yang, Min; Zhang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) has been intensively investigated for wastewater treatment systems treating single class of antibiotic in recent years. However, the impacts of alternately occurring antibiotics in antibiotic production wastewater on the behavior of ARGs in biological treatment systems were not well understood yet. Herein, techniques including high-capacity quantitative PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to investigate the behavior of ARGs in an anaerobic-aerobic full-scale system. The system alternately treated three kinds of antibiotic production wastewater including ribostamycin, spiramycin and paromomycin, which referred to stages 1, 2 and 3. The aminoglycoside ARGs (52.1-79.3%) determined using high-capacity quantitative PCR were the most abundant species in all sludge samples of the three stages. The total relative abundances of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes and aminoglycoside resistance genes measured using qPCR were significantly higher (P  0.05) in both aerobic and anaerobic sludge samples. In aerobic sludge, one acetyltransferase gene (aacA4) and the other three nucleotidyltransferase genes (aadB, aadA and aadE) exhibited positive correlations with intI1 (r 2  = 0.83-0.94; P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation. These results and facts will be helpful to understand the abundance and distribution of ARGs from antibiotic production wastewater treatment systems.

  5. Evolving risk factors and antibiotic sensitivity patterns for microbial keratitis at a large county hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haoxing; Parker, Walter T; Law, Nathan W; Clarke, Cameron L; Gisseman, Jordan D; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Wang, Li; Al-Mohtaseb, Zaina N

    2017-11-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors, causative organisms, antimicrobial susceptibility and outcomes of microbial keratitis in a large county hospital in Houston, Texas. Design: Case series. Setting: A large county hospital in Houston, Texas. Patients with known diagnosis of microbial keratitis from January 2011 to May 2015. Retrospective chart review. Epidemiology, risk factors, outcomes and antibiotic susceptibility of microbial keratitis. The most commonly identified risk factors were contact lens use (34.4%), ocular trauma (26.3%), diabetes mellitus (16.7%), ocular surgery (13.5%), ocular surface diseases (11.5%), previous keratitis (10.4%), glaucoma (6.3%), cocaine use (5.2%) and HIV-positive status (4.2%). Eyes with positive cultures (61.5%) were associated with worse visual outcomes (p=0.019) and a higher number of follow-up visits (p=0.007) than eyes with negative cultures (38.5%). Corneal perforation was the most common complication (11.5%). Gram-negative organisms (21.9%) were all susceptible to ceftazidime, tobramycin and fluoroquinolones. Gram-positive organisms (33.3%) had worse outcomes than Gram-negative organisms (21.9%) and exhibited a wide spectrum of antibiotic resistance, but all were susceptible to vancomycin. Twenty-seven per cent of the coagulase-negative Staphylococci were resistant to fluoroquinolones. This study identified a recent shift in risk factors and antibiotic resistance patterns in microbial keratitis at a County Hospital in Houston, Texas. In our patient population, fluoroquinolone monotherapy is not recommended for severe corneal ulcers. On the basis of these results, vancomycin and tobramycin should be used for empirical therapy until microbial identity and sensitivity results are available. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity from the ocular conjunctiva of horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel de Araújo Ferreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to identify the conjunctival bacterial flora of healthy horses in Brasilia (Distrito Federal, Brazil, and to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolated strains. We examined 200 eyes of 100 healthy adult horses without any eye problems, belonging to the 1st Regiment of the Cavalry Guard (RCG of the Brazilian Army in Brasilia. Samples were collected from the inferior conjunctival fornix of both eyes. Drug sensitivity test was performed with the antibiotics gentamicin (10µg, tobramycin (10µg, chloramphenicol (30µg and ciprofloxacin (5µg. Of the 200 samples collected, 131 (65.5% were considered positive for bacterial growth. A total of 208 bacterial strains belonging to 19 genera were isolated, where there was prevalence of gram-positive bacteria (65%, with Staphylococcus sp. being the species of greatest incidence. It was observed that 94, 85, 81 and 68% of the isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol and tobramycin, respectively. These results can guide the empirical selection antimicrobial therapy for infections of the ocular surface of horses, pending the identification of the etiologic agent.

  7. Strength of Selection Pressure Is an Important Parameter Contributing to the Complexity of Antibiotic Resistance Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Tugce; Guvenek, Aysegul; Yildiz, Sadik; Karaboga, Enes; Tamer, Yusuf Talha; Mumcuyan, Nirva; Ozan, Vedat Burak; Senturk, Gizem Hazal; Cokol, Murat; Yeh, Pamela; Toprak, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Revealing the genetic changes responsible for antibiotic resistance can be critical for developing novel antibiotic therapies. However, systematic studies correlating genotype to phenotype in the context of antibiotic resistance have been missing. In order to fill in this gap, we evolved 88 isogenic Escherichia coli populations against 22 antibiotics for 3 weeks. For every drug, two populations were evolved under strong selection and two populations were evolved under mild selection. By quantifying evolved populations’ resistances against all 22 drugs, we constructed two separate cross-resistance networks for strongly and mildly selected populations. Subsequently, we sequenced representative colonies isolated from evolved populations for revealing the genetic basis for novel phenotypes. Bacterial populations that evolved resistance against antibiotics under strong selection acquired high levels of cross-resistance against several antibiotics, whereas other bacterial populations evolved under milder selection acquired relatively weaker cross-resistance. In addition, we found that strongly selected strains against aminoglycosides became more susceptible to five other drug classes compared with their wild-type ancestor as a result of a point mutation on TrkH, an ion transporter protein. Our findings suggest that selection strength is an important parameter contributing to the complexity of antibiotic resistance problem and use of high doses of antibiotics to clear infections has the potential to promote increase of cross-resistance in clinics. PMID:24962091

  8. Factors associated with suitability of empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitalized patients with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Chagai; Keller, Nathan; Bornstein, Gil; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Koren-Morag, Nira; Rahav, Galia

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Initiation of inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy is associated with a worse outcome. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence and the factors associated with inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalized with bacteremia. A cross-sectional study was conducted during January 2010-December 2011 at the medical wards of the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Israel. The records of all patients with bacteremia were reviewed. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, bacteremic pathogens and antimicrobial agents were retrieved from the medical records. Factors associated with appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapy were assessed. A total of 681 eligible adults were included in the study. Antibiotic therapy was found to be inappropriate in 138 (20.2%) patients (95% C.I. 17.2-23.2). The rate of appropriateness was not related to the type of antibiotic regimen and the type of bacteria. Patients with healthcare-associated infections were more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Patients with primary bloodstream infections were also more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Empiric combination therapy was more likely to be appropriate than monotherapy, except for an aminoglycosides-based combination. Combination empiric antibiotic therapy should be considered in patients with healthcare-associated infections and in those with primary bloodstream infections.

  9. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Näsvall, Joakim [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 582, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Wu, Shiying [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, Dan I. [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 582, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Selmer, Maria, E-mail: maria.selmer@icm.uu.se [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-10-31

    The crystal structure of the aminoglycoside-adenylating enzyme AadA is reported together with functional experiments providing insights into its oligomeric state, ligand binding and catalysis. Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding.

  10. Analysis of Triclosan-Selected Salmonella enterica Mutants of Eight Serovars Revealed Increased Aminoglycoside Susceptibility and Reduced Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensch, Ulrike; Klein, Guenter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2013-01-01

    The biocide triclosan (TRC) is used in a wide range of household, personal care, veterinary, industrial and medical products to control microbial growth. This extended use raises concerns about a possible association between the application of triclosan and the development of antibiotic resistance. In the present study we determined triclosan mutant prevention concentrations (MPC) for Salmonella enterica isolates of eight serovars and investigated selected mutants for their mechanisms mediating decreased susceptibility to triclosan. MPCTRC values were 8 - 64-fold higher than MIC values and ranged between 1 - 16 µg/ml. The frequencies at which mutants were selected varied between 1.3 x 10-10 - 9.9 x 10-11. Even if MIC values of mutants decreased by 3-7 dilution steps in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide, only minor changes were observed in the expression of genes encoding efflux components or regulators, indicating that neither the major multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC nor AcrEF are up-regulated in triclosan-selected mutants. Nucleotide sequence comparisons confirmed the absence of alterations in the regulatory regions acrRA, soxRS, marORAB, acrSE and ramRA of selected mutants. Single bp and deduced Gly93→Val amino acid exchanges were present in fabI, the target gene of triclosan, starting from a concentration of 1 µg/ml TRC used for MPC determinations. The fabI genes were up to 12.4-fold up-regulated. Complementation experiments confirmed the contribution of Gly93→Val exchanges and fabI overexpression to decreased triclosan susceptibility. MIC values of mutants compared to parent strains were even equal or resulted in a more susceptible phenotype (1-2 dilution steps) for the aminoglycoside antibiotics kanamycin and gentamicin as well as for the biocide chlorhexidine. Growth rates of selected mutants were significantly lower and hence, might partly explain the rare occurrence of Salmonella field isolates exhibiting decreased

  11. Novel 3-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Gene, aac(3)-Ic, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Integron

    OpenAIRE

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Dell'Amico, Emanuela; Luzzaro, Francesco; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2003-01-01

    A novel gene, aac(3)-Ic, encoding an AAC(3)-I aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase, was identified on a gene cassette inserted into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa integron that also carries a blaVIM-2 and a cmlA7 gene cassette. The aac(3)-Ic gene product is 59 and 57% identical to AAC(3)-Ia and AAC(3)-Ib, respectively, and confers resistance to gentamicin and sisomicin.

  12. Misread protein creates membrane channels: an essential step in the bactericidal action of aminoglycosides.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, B D; Chen, L L; Tai, P C

    1986-01-01

    Among the pleiotropic effects of aminoglycosides, their irreversible uptake and their blockade of initiating ribosomes have appeared to explain their bactericidal action, while the contributions of translational misreading and membrane damage and the mechanism of that damage have remained uncertain. We now present evidence that incorporation of misread proteins into the membrane can account for the membrane damage. The bactericidal action thus appears to result from the following sequence, in...

  13. Two unusual cases of severe recalcitrant hypocalcemia due to aminoglycoside-induced hypomagnesemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Tarun; Saini, Ashish; Panchani, Roopal; Gupta, Nitin R.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AMG)-induced renal toxicity is well-known and may manifest with non-oliguric renal failure or renal tubular dysfunction like Fanconi-like syndrome, Barter syndrome-like syndrome or distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). These phenomena have been described with Gentamycin and Amikacin though rarely with Kanamycin. We present two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis that were treated with Kanamycin and during the course of treatment, developed severe recalcitrant hypocalcemia along with hypomagnesemia. PMID:24251160

  14. Molecular detection of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Mohsen; Salimi Chirani, Alireza; Khoshnood, Saeed; Eslami, Gita; Atyabi, Seyyed Mohammad; Nazem, Habibollah; Fazilati, Mohammad; Hashemi, Ali; Soleimani, Saleh

    2017-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major opportunistic pathogen in healthcare settings worldwide. In Iran, there are only few reports on the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes among A. baumannii isolates. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes from A. baumannii strains collected at a university teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred A. baumannii strains were collected between 2014 and 2015 from hospitalized patients at Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. The DNA was extracted using a kit obtained from Bioneer Co. (Korea) and was used as a template for polymerase chain reaction. The most active antimicrobial agent against these strains was colistin. The rate of extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance was 97%. The aadA1, aadB, aac(6')-Ib, and aac(3)-IIa genes were found in 85%, 77%, 72%, and 68% of A. baumannii isolates, respectively. This study showed a high prevalence rate of AME genes in A. baumannii. This prevalence rate has explained that further aminoglycoside resistance genes may have role in the resistance of clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Therefore, control and treatment of serious infections caused by this opportunistic pathogen should be given more consideration.

  15. Method of Selection of Bacteria Antibiotic Resistance Genes Based on Clustering of Similar Nucleotide Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, I S; Naumov, V A; Borovikov, P I; Gordeev, A B; Dubodelov, D V; Lyubasovskaya, L A; Rodchenko, Yu V; Bystritskii, A A; Aleksandrova, N V; Trofimov, D Yu; Priputnevich, T V

    2017-10-01

    A new method for selection of bacterium antibiotic resistance genes is proposed and tested for solving the problems related to selection of primers for PCR assay. The method implies clustering of similar nucleotide sequences and selection of group primers for all genes of each cluster. Clustering of resistance genes for six groups of antibiotics (aminoglycosides, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides, macrolides and lincosamides, and fusidic acid) was performed. The method was tested for 81 strains of bacteria of different genera isolated from patients (K. pneumoniae, Staphylococcus spp., S. agalactiae, E. faecalis, E. coli, and G. vaginalis). The results obtained by us are comparable to those in the selection of individual genes; this allows reducing the number of primers necessary for maximum coverage of the known antibiotic resistance genes during PCR analysis.

  16. Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: Pathogenesis, Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms, and Prospective Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Moonhee; Park, Kwang Seung; Bae, Il Kwon; Kim, Young Bae; Cha, Chang-Jun; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is undoubtedly one of the most successful pathogens responsible for hospital-acquired nosocomial infections in the modern healthcare system. Due to the prevalence of infections and outbreaks caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii, few antibiotics are effective for treating infections caused by this pathogen. To overcome this problem, knowledge of the pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii is important. In this review, we summarize current studies on the virulence factors that contribute to A. baumannii pathogenesis, including porins, capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, phospholipases, outer membrane vesicles, metal acquisition systems, and protein secretion systems. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance of this organism, including acquirement of β-lactamases, up-regulation of multidrug efflux pumps, modification of aminoglycosides, permeability defects, and alteration of target sites, are also discussed. Lastly, novel prospective treatment options for infections caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii are summarized. PMID:28348979

  17. Multiresidue analysis of antibiotics in food of animal origin using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastovska, Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are the most important drugs administered in veterinary medicine. Their use in food-producing animals may result in antibiotic residues in edible tissues, which are monitored to protect human and animal health, support the enforcement of regulations, provide toxicological assessment data, and resolve international trade issues. This chapter provides basic characterization of the most important classes of antibiotics used in food-producing animals (aminoglycosides, amphenicols, β-lactams, macrolides and lincosamides, nitrofurans, quinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines), along with examples of practical liquid chromatographic-(tandem) mass spectrometric methods for analysis of their residues in food matrices of animal origin. The focus is on multiresidue methods that are favored by regulatory and other food testing laboratories for their ability to analyze residues of multiple compounds in a time- and cost-effective way.

  18. Phenotypic Resistance to Disinfectants and Antibiotics in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espigares, E; Moreno Roldan, E; Espigares, M; Abreu, R; Castro, B; Dib, A L; Arias, Á

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this research was to study the phenotypic resistances to disinfectants and antibiotics in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) obtained from Canary black pigs. Analyses were performed on 54 strains of MRSA, isolated in Canary black pigs from the province of Tenerife (Spain); all of them carried the mecA gene. The strains were isolated by means of nasal swab samples of healthy pigs, collected under veterinarian supervision. Bactericidal activity of antiseptics and disinfectants was tested by means of the dilution-neutralization method. Susceptibility to the disinfectants glutaraldehyde, peracetic acid and silver nitrate was assessed, as well as to the antiseptics chlorhexidine, benzalkonium chloride and povidone iodine. Susceptibility to a wide array of antibiotics representing the main groups was determined by means of the disc diffusion method. All the strains demonstrated susceptibility to the disinfectants tested at the recommended concentration, and even to dilutions equal to or lesser than 1/16. The most effective antiseptic and disinfectant were, respectively, chlorhexidine and silver nitrate. With regard to the antibiotics, the strains proved to be multiresistant. All presented phenotypic resistance to the β-lactam antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin and cefoxitin, as well as to numerous aminoglycosides, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. It was also observed that 61.1% of the strains were carriers of plasmids. Our results underline that in the strains such as MRSA, which show multiple resistances to antibiotics, the antiseptics and disinfectants show great efficacy. Moreover, as other authors also suggest, for the treatment and prevention of infections caused by MRSA, the use of β-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics may be less effective. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. A resorbable antibiotic-eluting polymer composite bone void filler for perioperative infection prevention in a rabbit radial defect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Brooks

    Full Text Available Nearly 1.3 million total joint replacement procedures are performed in the United States annually, with numbers projected to rise exponentially in the coming decades. Although finite infection rates for these procedures remain consistently low, device-related infections represent a significant cause of implant failure, requiring secondary or revision procedures. Revision procedures manifest several-fold higher infection recurrence rates. Importantly, many revision surgeries, infected or not, require bone void fillers to support the host bone and provide a sufficient tissue bed for new hardware placement. Antibiotic-eluting bone void fillers (ABVF, providing both osteoconductive and antimicrobial properties, represent one approach for reducing rates of orthopedic device-related infections. Using a solvent-free, molten-cast process, a polymer-controlled antibiotic-eluting calcium carbonate hydroxyapatite (HAP ceramic composite BVF (ABVF was fabricated, characterized, and evaluated in vivo using a bacterial challenge in a rabbit radial defect window model. ABVF loaded with tobramycin eliminated the infectious burden in rabbits challenged with a clinically relevant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (inoculum as high as 10⁷ CFU. Histological, microbiological, and radiographic methods were used to detail the effects of ABVF on microbial challenge to host bone after 8 weeks in vivo. In contrast to the HAP/BVF controls, which provided no antibiotic protection and required euthanasia 3 weeks post-operatively, tobramycin-releasing ABVF animals showed no signs of infection (clinical, microbiological, or radiographic when euthanized at the 8-week study endpoint. ABVF sites did exhibit fibrous encapsulation around the implant at 8 weeks. Local antibiotic release from ABVF to orthopedic sites requiring bone void fillers eliminated the periprosthetic bacterial challenge in this 8-week in vivo study, confirming previous in vitro results.

  20. Antibacterial, modulatory activity of antibiotics and toxicity from Rhinella jimi (Stevaux, 2002) (Anura: Bufonidae) glandular secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Débora Lima; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana Bezerra; Santos, Antonia Thassya Lucas Dos; Machado, Antonio Judson Targino; Araujo Filho, João Antonio de; Dias, Diógenes de Queiroz; Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra da; Saraiva, Rogério de Aquino; Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar de; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Costa, José Galberto Martins; Ferreira, Felipe Silva; Alves, Rômulo Romeu da Nóbrega; Almeida, Waltécio de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    The increase in microorganisms with resistance to medications has caused a strong preoccupation within the medical and scientific community. Animal toxins studies, such as parotoid glandular secretions from amphibians, possesses a great potential in the development of drugs, such as antimicrobials, as these possess bioactive compounds. It was evaluated Rhinella jimi (Stevaux, 2002) glandular secretions against standard and multi-resistant bacterial strains; the effect of secretions combined with drugs; and determined the toxicity using two biologic in vivo models, and a in vitro model with mice livers. Standard strains were used for the determination of the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), while for the modulatory activity of antibiotics, the clinical isolates Escherichia coli 06, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 03 and Staphylococcus aureus 10 were used. Modulatory activity was evaluated by the broth microdilution method with aminoglycosides and β-lactams as target antibiotics. The secretions in association with the antibiotics have a significant reduction in MIC, both the aminoglycosides and β-lactams. The toxicity and cytotoxicity results were lower than the values used in the modulation. R. jimi glandular secretions demonstrated clinically relevant results regarding the modulation of the tested antimicrobials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Two Cases of Multi-antibiotic Resistant Cronobacter spp. Infections of Infants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing Hua; Yu, Bo; Xiang, Yun; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Ting; Zeng, Ying Chun; Cui, Zhi Gang; Huo, Xi Xiang

    2017-08-01

    Infections by Cronobacter spp. are hazardous to infants since they can lead to neonatal meningitis, bacteremia, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Cronobacter spp. are frequently resistant to β-lactam derivatives, macrolides, and aminoglycosides. In addition, multi-resistant strains have also been detected. In China, the isolation rate of Cronobacter spp. from commercial powdered infant formula (PIF) or follow-up formula (FUF) is relatively high. Nevertheless, clinical cases of Cronobacter infection have been ignored to date. Here we describe two cases of Cronobacter infection detected at the Wuhan Women and Children Medical Care Center Hospital (Wuhan City, China). We provide the genomic analysis of the isolates and the antibiotic-resistance profiles of the two strains. The Cronobacter strains identified in this study were not susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycoside, and/or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Whole genome sequencing revealed various genes known to encode antibiotic resistance. Future studies are needed to determine whether the genes predicted in this study are functional. As with Enterobacter spp., the antibiotic resistance of Cronobacter is a serious issue that requires more attention. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of laser-induced fluorescence or ultraviolet detectors for sensitive and selective analysis of tobramycin or erythropoietin in complex samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hytham M.; Ebeid, Wael B.

    2015-05-01

    Complex samples analysis is a challenge in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical analysis. In this work, tobramycin (TOB) analysis in human urine samples and recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) analysis in the presence of similar protein were selected as representative examples of such samples analysis. Assays of TOB in urine samples are difficult because of poor detectability. Therefore laser induced fluorescence detector (LIF) was combined with a separation technique, micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), to determine TOB through derivatization with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). Borate was used as background electrolyte (BGE) with negative-charged mixed micelles as additive. The method was successively applied to urine samples. The LOD and LOQ for Tobramycin in urine were 90 and 200 ng/ml respectively and recovery was >98% (n = 5). All urine samples were analyzed by direct injection without sample pre-treatment. Another use of hyphenated analytical technique, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) connected to ultraviolet (UV) detector was also used for sensitive analysis of rhEPO at low levels (2000 IU) in the presence of large amount of human serum albumin (HSA). Analysis of rhEPO was achieved by the use of the electrokinetic injection (EI) with discontinuous buffers. Phosphate buffer was used as BGE with metal ions as additive. The proposed method can be used for the estimation of large number of quality control rhEPO samples in a short period.

  3. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardien, Soraya; Human, Hannique; Harris, Tashneem; Hefke, Gwynneth; Veikondis, Rene; Schaaf, H Simon; van der Merwe, Lize; Greinwald, John H; Fagan, Johan; de Jong, Greetje

    2009-01-01

    Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n) and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n) variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n) variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will continue to be used

  4. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greinwald John H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will

  5. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D

    1999-01-01

    of universally conserved nucleotides at 1406 to 1408 and 1494 to 1495 in the decoding region of plasmid-encoded bacterial 16 S rRNA. Phenotypic changes range from the benign effect of U1406-->A or A1408-->G substitutions, to the highly deleterious 1406G and 1495 mutations that assemble into 30 S subunits...

  6. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingsheng Lou

    Full Text Available To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury.A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014.A total of 153 (30.6% of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9% and intravitreal injection (42.0%. Cephalosporins (53.8% and vancomycin (42.0% were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%, and aminoglycosides (13.4%. Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7% replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4% (p = 0.001, Fisher's exact test.Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis.

  7. Antibiotic Resistance Determinants in a Pseudomonas putida Strain Isolated from a Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Roca, Amalia; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Segura, Ana; Plesiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267) kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts. PMID:24465371

  8. Assessing time to pulmonary function benefit following antibiotic treatment of acute cystic fibrosis exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Riordan Mary A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a life-shortening genetic disease in which ~80% of deaths result from loss of lung function linked to inflammation due to chronic bacterial infection (principally Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pulmonary exacerbations (intermittent episodes during which symptoms of lung infection increase and lung function decreases can cause substantial resource utilization, morbidity, and irreversible loss of lung function. Intravenous antibiotic treatment to reduce exacerbation symptoms is standard management practice. However, no prospective studies have identified an optimal antibiotic treatment duration and this lack of objective data has been identified as an area of concern and interest. Methods We have retrospectively analyzed pulmonary function response data (as forced expiratory volume in one second; FEV1 from a previous blinded controlled CF exacerbation management study of intravenous ceftazidime/tobramycin and meropenem/tobramycin in which spirometry was conducted daily to assess the time course of pulmonary function response. Results Ninety-five patients in the study received antibiotics for at least 4 days and were included in our analyses. Patients received antibiotics for an average of 12.6 days (median = 13, SD = 3.2 days, with a range of 4 to 27 days. No significant differences were observed in mean or median treatment durations as functions of either treatment group or baseline lung disease stage. Average time from initiation of antibiotic treatment to highest observed FEV1 was 8.7 days (median = 10, SD = 4.0 days, with a range of zero to 19 days. Patients were treated an average of 3.9 days beyond the day of peak FEV1 (median = 3, SD = 3.8 days, with 89 patients (93.7% experiencing their peak FEV1 improvement within 13 days. There were no differences in mean or median times to peak FEV1 as a function of treatment group, although the magnitude of FEV1 improvement differed between groups. Conclusions Our

  9. Antibiotic strategies for eradicating Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton Hewer, Simon C; Smyth, Alan R

    2017-04-25

    numbers of participants and most had relatively short follow-up periods; however, there was generally a low risk of bias from missing data. In most trials it was difficult to blind participants and clinicians to treatment given the interventions and comparators used. Two trials were supported by the manufacturers of the antibiotic used.Evidence from two trials (38 participants) at the two-month time-point showed treatment of early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection with inhaled tobramycin results in microbiological eradication of the organism from respiratory secretions more often than placebo, odds ratio 0.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.65) and data from one of these trials, with longer follow up, suggested that this effect may persist for up to 12 months.One randomised controlled trial (26 participants) compared oral ciprofloxacin and nebulised colistin versus usual treatment. Results after two years suggested treatment of early infection results in microbiological eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa more often than no anti-pseudomonal treatment, odds ratio 0.12 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.79).One trial comparing 28 days to 56 days treatment with nebulised tobramycin solution for inhalation in 88 participants showed that both treatments were effective and well-tolerated, with no notable additional improvement with longer over shorter duration of therapy. However, this trial was not powered to detect non-inferiority or equivalence .A trial of oral ciprofloxacin with inhaled colistin versus nebulised tobramycin solution for inhalation alone (223 participants) failed to show a difference between the two strategies, although it was underpowered to show this. A further trial of inhaled colistin with oral ciprofloxacin versus nebulised tobramycin solution for inhalation with oral ciprofloxacin also showed no superiority of the former, with increased isolation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in both groups.A recent, large trial in 306 children aged between one and 12 years

  10. Plasmid Mediated Antibiotic and Heavy Metal Resistance in Bacillus Strains Isolated From Soils in Rize, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif SEVİM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen Bacillus strains which were isolated from soil samples were examined for resistance to 17 different antibiotics (ampicillin, methicillin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, cephalotine, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, vancomycin, oxacilin, neomycin, kanamycin and, novabiocin and to 10 different heavy metals (copper, lead, cobalt, chrome, iron, mercury, zinc, nickel, manganese and, cadmium and for the presence of plasmid DNA. A total of eleven strains (67% were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The most common resistance was observed against methicillin and oxacillin. The most resistance strains were found as Bacillus sp. B3 and Bacillus sp. B11. High heavy metal resistance against copper, chromium, zinc, iron and nickel was detected, but mercury and cobalt resistance was not detected, except for 3 strains (B3, B11, and B12 which showed mercury resistance. It has been determined that seven Bacillus strains have plasmids. The isolated plasmids were transformed into the Bacillus subtilis W168 and it was shown that heavy metal and antibiotic resistance determinants were carried on these plasmids. These results showed that there was a correlation between plasmid content and resistance for both antibiotic and heavy metal resistance

  11. Photo-activated porphyrin in combination with antibiotics: therapies against Staphylococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastgheyb, Sana S.; Eckmann, David M.; Composto, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcal infections have become difficult to treat due to antibiotic insensitivity and resistance. Antimicrobial combination therapies may minimize acquisition of resistance and photodynamic therapy is an attractive candidate for these combinations. In this manuscript, we explore combined use of antibiotics and meso-tetra (4-aminophenyl) porphine (TAPP), a cationic porphyrin, for treatment of Staphylococcus aureus contamination. We characterize the antimicrobial activity of photoactivated TAPP and show that activity is largely lost in the presence of a radical scavenger. Importantly, TAPP can be reactivated with continued, albeit attenuated, antibacterial activity. We then show that the antimicrobial activity of illuminated TAPP is additive with chloramphenicol and tobramycin for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and synergistic for MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chloramphenicol + methylene blue, another photosensitizer, also show additivity against Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, ceftriaxone and vancomycin do not strongly augment the low level effects of TAPP against S. aureus. Eukaryotic cells exhibit a dose-dependent toxicity with illuminated TAPP. Our results suggest that even sub-minimum inhibitory concentration levels of photo-activated TAPP could be used to boost the activity of waning antibiotics. This may play an important role in treatments reliant on antibiotic controlled release systems where augmentation with photo-active agents could extend their efficacy. PMID:24148969

  12. Profile of antibiotic consumption, sensitivity and resistance in an urban area of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripi, Sunita Bhargavi; Thadepalli, Venu Gopala Rao; Khagga, Mukkanti; Tripuraribhatla, Prasanna Krishna; Bharadwaj, Dinesh Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are an important category of drugs in which indiscriminate use can affect the susceptibility patterns among infectious organisms, resulting in antibiotic resistance. Data on antibiotic usage and susceptibility patterns were collected from public and private health centres in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India, through the use of questionnaires. The data collected were then coded, tabulated, computed and evaluated using statistical analysis. The consumption profile of the different categories of drugs used in public and private hospitals was as follows: nutrition and metabolism products 19.0%; gastrointestinal disorder-related drugs 18.5%; antibiotics 16.8%; anti-pyretics and anti-analgesics 20.6%. These drugs were found to be in high demand. Among the antibiotics, aminoglycosides (amikacin), quinolones (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin), tetracyclines (doxycycline), penicillin (ampicillin) and sulphonamides (co-trimoxazole) were the most commonly prescribed drugs for antibiotic therapy. 46% of the culture laboratory reports were positive with the following organism profile: Escherichia coli (36%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (16%), Staphylococcus aureus (29%), Enterococcus faecalis (9%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10%). In terms of the sensitivity profile of antibacterials, amikacin (66.9%) was the only antibiotic showing sensitivity patterns, while the majority of antibiotics, such as cotrimoxazole, nalidixic acid, amoxicillin, gentamycin and norfloxacin, had acquired a resistance rate of 55.1%-80.6%. The results of this study suggest that indiscriminate prescription and consumption of new broad-spectrum antibiotics against sensitive organisms results in the development of antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to curb the excessive use of antibiotics in local hospitals in order to control the trend of increasing antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics.

  13. A novel method to depurate β-lactam antibiotic residues by administration of a broad-spectrum β-lactamase enzyme in fish tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sik Choe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a novel strategy to remove β-lactam antibiotic residues from fish tissues, utilization of β-lactamase, enzyme that normally degrades β-lactam structure-containing drugs, was explored. The enzyme (TEM-52 selectively degraded β-lactam antibiotics but was completely inactive against tetracycline-, quinolone-, macrolide-, or aminoglycoside-structured antibacterials. After simultaneous administration of the enzyme with cefazolin (a β-lactam antibiotic to the carp, significantly lowered tissue cefazolin levels were observed. It was confirmed that the enzyme successfully reached the general circulation after intraperitoneal administration, as the carp serum obtained after enzyme injection could also degrade cefazolin ex vivo. These results suggest that antibiotics-degrading enzymes can be good candidates for antibiotic residue depuration.

  14. Comparison of isolates and antibiotic sensitivity pattern in pediatric and adult cancer patients; is it different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhash, K; Bajpai, J; Gokarn, A; Arora, B; Kurkure, P A; Medhekar, A; Kelkar, R; Biswas, S; Gupta, S; Naronha, V; Shetty, N; Goyel, G; Banavali, S D

    2014-01-01

    Infection is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. Organisms are becoming resistant to antibiotics; age appears to be one of the factors responsible. We analyzed common organisms and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in the correlation with age. This is a single institutional, retrospective analysis of all culture positive adult and pediatric cancer patients from January 2007 to December 2007. For statistical analysis, Chi-square test for trend was used and P values were obtained. Of 1251 isolates, 262 were from children 12 years of age). Gram-negative organisms were predominant (64.95) while Gram-positive constituted 35.09% of isolates. The most common source in all age groups was peripheral-blood, accounting to 47.8% of all samples. The most common organisms in adults were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.3%) while in children it was coagulase negative Staphylococcus aureus (19.8%). Antibiotic sensitivity was different in both groups. In pediatric group higher sensitivity was seen for Cefoparazone-sulbactum, Cefipime, Amikacin, and Tobramycin. No resistance was found for Linezolid. The isolates in both children and adults were predominantly Gram-negative though children had proportionately higher Gram-positive organisms. High-dose cytarabine use, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and frequent use of central lines in children especially in hematological malignancies could explain this observation. Children harbor less antibiotic resistance than adults; Uncontrolled, cumulative exposure to antibiotics in our community with increasing age, age-related immune factors and variable bacterial flora in different wards might explain the higher antibiotic resistance in adults. Thus age is an important factor to be considered while deciding empirical antibiotic therapy.

  15. Previous Antibiotic Exposure and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana M. Djordjevic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The alarming spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing healthcare-associated infections has been extensively reported in recent medical literature. Aims: To compare trends in antimicrobial consumption and development of resistance among isolates of Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that cause hospital infections. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A study was conducted in a tertiary healthcare institution in central Serbia, during the 7-year period between January 2009 and December 2015. The incidence rate of infections caused by Acinetobacter or Pseudomonas, as well as their resistance density to commonly used antibiotics, were calculated. Utilization of antibiotics was expressed as the number of defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. Results: A statistically significant increase in resistance density in 2015 compared to the first year of observation was noted for Acinetobacter, but not for Pseudomonas, to third-generation cephalosporins (p=0.008, aminoglycosides (p=0.005, carbapenems (p=0.003, piperacillin/tazobactam (p=0.025, ampicillin/sulbactam (p=0.009 and tigecycline (p=0.048. Conclusion: Our study showed that there is an association between the resistance density of Acinetobacter spp. and utilization of carbapenems, tigecycline and aminoglycosides. A multifaceted intervention is needed to decrease the incidence rate of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas hospital infections, as well as their resistance density to available antibiotics

  16. New highly effective dry powder tobramycin formulations for inhalation in the treatment of cystic fibrosis/Nouvelles formulations à poudre sèche pour inhalation à base de tobramycine pour le traitement de la mucoviscidose

    OpenAIRE

    Pilcer, Gabrielle

    2008-01-01

    Local delivery of medication to the lung is highly desirable as the principal advantages include reduced systemic side effects and higher dose levels of the applicable medication at the site of drug action. This administration could be particularly useful for patients with specifically chronic pulmonary infections or pulmonary diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, asthma or lung cancer.In order to deliver a high dose range of medication for highly-dosed drugs such as antibiotics, “carrier-free” ...

  17. Monitoring antibiotic resistance in ocular microorganisms: results from the Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular micRorganisms (ARMOR) 2009 surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Wolfgang; Pillar, Chris M; Torres, Mohana; Morris, Timothy W; Sahm, Daniel F

    2011-10-01

    To determine the antibacterial susceptibility profile of bacterial pathogens from ocular infections against relevant aminoglycoside, β-lactam, cephalosporin, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolone, glycopeptide, lincosamide, and macrolide antibacterial agents. Laboratory investigation. Isolates from patients with bacterial eye infections were collected prospectively by 34 institutions across the United States and were submitted to a central laboratory for inclusion in the Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular micRorganisms (ARMOR) study. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by microbroth dilution for 200 Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), 144 coagulase-negative staphylococci, 75 Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), 73 Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae), and 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates. A large proportion of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates were resistant to oxacillin/methicillin, azithromycin, or fluoroquinolones; 46.5% of S. aureus, 58.3% of coagulase-negative staphylococci, 9.0% of P. aeruginosa, and 9.3% of pneumococcal isolates were nonsusceptible to 2 or more antibacterial drug classes. Only 2.7% of H. influenzae isolates were nonsusceptible to 1 of the agents tested. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci were statistically more likely (all P < .0038) also to be resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. Resistance to 1 or more antibiotics is prevalent among ocular bacterial pathogens. Current resistance trends should be considered before initiating empiric treatment of common eye infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Domain Dissection and Characterization of the Aminoglycoside Resistance Enzyme ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId from Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Keith D.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are broad-spectrum antibiotics whose constant use and presence in growth environment has led bacteria to develop resistance mechanisms to aid in their survival. A common mechanism of resistance to AGs is their chemical modification (nucleotidylation, phosphorylation, or acetylation) by AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Through evolution, fusion of two AME-encoding genes has resulted in bifunctional enzymes with broader spectrum of activity. Serratia marcescens, a human enteropathogen, contains such a bifunctional enzyme, ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId. To gain insight into the role, effect, and importance of the union of ANT(3″)-Ii and AAC(6′)-IId in this bifunctional enzyme, we separated the two domains and compared their activity to that of the full-length enzyme. We performed a thorough comparison of the substrate and cosubstrate profiles as well as kinetic characterization of the bifunctional ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId and its individually expressed components. PMID:23485681

  19. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Threat Gonorrhea has progressively developed resistance to the antibiotic drugs prescribed to treat it. Following the spread ...

  20. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network ...

  1. Normal flora of conjunctiva and lid margin, as well as its antibiotic sensitivity, in patients undergoing cataract surgery at Phramongkutklao Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnumnoi R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ravee Ratnumnoi, Narumon Keorochana, Chavalit Sontisombat Department of Ophthalmology, Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the normal flora of conjunctiva and lid margin, as well as its antibiotic sensitivity. Design: This was a prospective cross-sectional study. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted on 120 patients who underwent cataract surgery at the Phramongkutklao Hospital from September 2014 to October 2014. Conjunctival and lid margin swabs were obtained from patients before they underwent cataract surgery. These swabs were used to inoculate blood agar and chocolate agar plates for culturing. After growth of the normal flora, the antibiotic sensitivity method using tobramycin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and cefazolin was applied. Main outcome measures: Normal flora of conjunctiva and lid margin, along with its antibiotic sensitivity, from patients who underwent cataract surgery was assessed. Results: A total of 120 eyes were included in this study, and bacterial isolation rates were identified. Five bacteria from the lid margin were cultured, namely, coagulase-negative staphylococcus (58.33%, Streptococcus spp. (2.5%, Corynebacterium (1.67%, Micrococcus spp. (1.67%, and Staphylococcus aureus (0.83%. Two bacteria from the conjunctiva were cultured, namely, coagulase-negative staphylococcus (30% and Streptococcus spp. (0.83%. Results of antibiotic sensitivity test showed that all isolated bacteria are sensitive to cefazolin 100%, tobramycin 98.67%, levofloxacin 100%, and moxifloxacin 100%. Conclusion: Coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most common bacteria isolated from conjunctiva and lid margin. Keywords: conjunctival flora, lid margin flora, cataract surgery, sensitivity, antibiotics

  2. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  3. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotic-associated colitis, which can occur after the antibiotic therapy upsets the balance of good and bad bacteria in your intestinal tract. Besides loose stools, C. difficile infection can ... and symptoms of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. These signs and symptoms are common ...

  4. Mutational activation of the AmgRS two-component system in aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N; Poole, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  5. Physical Characterization of Tobramycin Inhalation Powder: I. Rational Design of a Stable Engineered-Particle Formulation for Delivery to the Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danforth P; Tan, Trixie; Tarara, Thomas E; Nakamura, John; Malcolmson, Richard J; Weers, Jeffry G

    2015-08-03

    A spray-dried engineered particle formulation, Tobramycin Inhalation Powder (TIP), was designed through rational selection of formulation composition and process parameters. This PulmoSphere powder comprises small, porous particles with a high drug load. As a drug/device combination, TOBI Podhaler enables delivery of high doses of drug per inhalation, a feature critical for dry powder delivery of anti-infectives for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The objective of this work was to characterize TIP on both the particle and molecular levels using multiple orthogonal physical characterization techniques. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and Raman measurements show that a TIP particle consists of two phases: amorphous, glassy tobramycin sulfate with a glass transition temperature of about 100 °C and a gel-phase phospholipid (DSPC) with a gel-to-liquid-crystal transition temperature of about 80 °C. This was by design and constituted a rational formulation approach to provide Tg and Tm values that are well above the temperatures used for long-term storage of TIP. Raman and ESCA data provide support for a core/shell particle architecture of TIP. Particle surfaces are enriched with a porous, hydrophobic coating that reduces cohesive forces, improving powder fluidization and dispersibility. The excellent aerosol dispersibility of TIP enables highly efficient delivery of fine particles to the respiratory tract. Collectively, particle engineering has enabled development of TOBI Podhaler, an approved inhaled drug product that meaningfully reduces the treatment burden to cystic fibrosis patients worldwide.

  6. Effect of antibiotic stewardship on the incidence of infection and colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, David; Gladstone, Beryl Primrose; Burkert, Francesco; Carrara, Elena; Foschi, Federico; Döbele, Stefanie; Tacconelli, Evelina

    2017-09-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programmes have been shown to reduce antibiotic use and hospital costs. We aimed to evaluate evidence of the effect of antibiotic stewardship on the incidence of infections and colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science for studies published from Jan 1, 1960, to May 31, 2016, that analysed the effect of antibiotic stewardship programmes on the incidence of infection and colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and Clostridium difficile infections in hospital inpatients. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility of trials and extracted data. Studies involving long-term care facilities were excluded. The main outcomes were incidence ratios (IRs) of target infections and colonisation per 1000 patient-days before and after implementation of antibiotic stewardship. Meta-analyses were done with random-effect models and heterogeneity was calculated with the I 2 method. We included 32 studies in the meta-analysis, comprising 9 056 241 patient-days and 159 estimates of IRs. Antibiotic stewardship programmes reduced the incidence of infections and colonisation with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (51% reduction; IR 0·49, 95% CI 0·35-0·68; pbacteria (48%; 0·52, 0·27-0·98; p=0·0428), and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (37%; 0·63, 0·45-0·88; p=0·0065), as well as the incidence of C difficile infections (32%; 0·68, 0·53-0·88; p=0·0029). Antibiotic stewardship programmes were more effective when implemented with infection control measures (IR 0·69, 0·54-0·88; p=0·0030), especially hand-hygiene interventions (0·34, 0·21-0·54; pAntibiotic stewardship did not affect the IRs of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and quinolone-resistant and aminoglycoside-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Significant heterogeneity

  7. Use of a radiorespirometric assay for testing the antibiotic sensitivity of catheter-associated bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd, T.I.; Schmiel, D.; Nickel, J.C.; Costerton, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A 14 C-radiorespirometric assay was used to show the sensitivity of fixed-film (sessile), catheter-associated and free-living (planktonic) cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to varying concentrations (100 micrograms/mL to 1000 micrograms/mL) tobramycin sulfate. This strain of P. aeruginosa has an MIC of 0.6 microgram/ml and an MBC of 50 micrograms/mL when tested by conventional methods. When 14 C-glutamic acid was used as a substrate in this radiorespirometric assay, it could be completed in less than one hour and planktonic samples showed a significant reduction in mineralization activity (evolution of 14 CO 2 ) within eight hours of the antibiotic challenge. These changes in respiratory activity appeared to be dose and time dependent. Within 18 hr. at 1000 micrograms/mL, there was no significant residual respiratory activity in planktonic samples. Some residual respiratory activity was detected, however, in samples exposed to 100 micrograms/mL for 36 hours. The mineralization activity of sessile catheter-associated bacteria was unaffected by four hr. and eight hr. exposures to 1000 micrograms/mL of the antibiotic. A significant reduction in respiratory activity was recorded in catheter samples exposed for 18 hr. or more at each concentration examined. Unlike the planktonic samples, however, the antibiotic challenge failed to eradicate the metabolic activity of the attached bacteria. Antibiotic stressed, catheter-associated bacteria transferred to a post-exposure enrichment broth showed a limited ability to re-establish respiratory activity. This apparent recovery was limited to antibiotic exposures less than 24 hr. and was not observed in planktonic samples. The radioisotopic assay is a non-culture method which can be used to assess the antibiotic sensitivity of both planktonic bacteria and in situ biofilm populations

  8. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of aminoglycoside-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauskenieks, Matiss; Pole, Ilva; Skenders, Girts; Jansone, Inta; Broka, Lonija; Nodieva, Anda; Ozere, Iveta; Kalvisa, Adrija; Ranka, Renate; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2015-03-01

    Mutations causing resistance to aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin (KAN), amikacin (AMK), and streptomycin, are not completely understood. In this study, polymorphisms of aminoglycoside resistance influencing genes such as rrs, eis, rpsL, and gidB in 41 drug-resistant and 17 pan-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Latvia were analyzed. Mutation A1400G in rrs gene was detected in 92% isolates with high resistance level to KAN and diverse MIC level to AMK. Mutations in promoter region of eis were detected in 80% isolates with low-level MIC of KAN. The association of K43R mutation in rpsL gene, a mutation in the rrs gene at position 513, and various polymorphisms in gidB gene with distinct genetic lineages of M. tuberculosis was observed. The results of this study suggest that association of different controversial mutations of M. tuberculosis genes to the drug resistance phenotype should be done in respect to genetic lineages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Origin in Acinetobacter gyllenbergii and dissemination of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme AAC(6′)-Ih

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Goussard, Sylvie; Nemec, Alexandr; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aac(6′)-Ih gene encoding aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type I subtype h [AAC(6′)-Ih] is plasmid-borne in Acinetobacter baumannii where it confers high-level amikacin resistance, but its origin remains unknown. We searched for the gene in the genomes of a collection of 133 Acinetobacter spp. and studied its species specificity, expression and dissemination. Methods Gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR, expression by quantitative RT–PCR, MIC by microdilution and transfer by plasmid mobilization. Results The aac(6′)-Ih gene was present in the chromosome of the two Acinetobacter gyllenbergii of the collection and was detected in all seven A. gyllenbergii clinical isolates. They had indistinguishable flanking regions indicating that the gene was intrinsic to this species. A. baumannii PISAba23 promoters were provided by insertion of ISAba23, which disrupted the Pnative promoter in A. gyllenbergii. Both types of promoters were similarly potent in Escherichia coli and A. baumannii. Aminoglycoside MICs for A. baumannii harbouring pIP1858 were higher than for A. gyllenbergii due to gene dosage. The non-self-transferable plasmid could be mobilized to other A. baumannii cells by the broad host range plasmid RP4. Conclusions We have found the origin of aac(6′)-Ih in A. gyllenbergii, a species isolated, although rarely, in humans, and documented that dissemination of this gene is restricted to the Acinetobacter genus. PMID:26645270

  10. Protein aggregation caused by aminoglycoside action is prevented by a hydrogen peroxide scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiqiang; Cho, Chris; Guo, Li-Tao; Aerni, Hans R; Rinehart, Jesse; Söll, Dieter

    2012-12-14

    Protein mistranslation causes growth arrest in bacteria, mitochondrial dysfunction in yeast, and neurodegeneration in mammals. It remains poorly understood how mistranslated proteins cause such cellular defects. Here we demonstrate that streptomycin, a bactericidal aminoglycoside that increases ribosomal mistranslation, induces transient protein aggregation in wild-type Escherichia coli. We further determined the aggregated proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry. To identify genes that reduce cellular mistranslation toxicity, we selected from an overexpression library protein products that increased resistance against streptomycin and kanamycin. The selected proteins were significantly enriched in members of the oxidation-reduction pathway. Overexpressing one of these proteins, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit F (a protein defending bacteria against hydrogen peroxide), but not its inactive mutant suppressed aggregated protein formation upon streptomycin treatment and increased aminoglycoside resistance. This work provides in-depth analyses of an aggregated proteome caused by streptomycin and suggests that cellular defense against hydrogen peroxide lowers the toxicity of mistranslation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An Update on Aerosolized Antibiotics for Treating Hospital-Acquired and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G Christopher; Swanson, Joseph M

    2017-12-01

    A significant percentage of patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) have poor outcomes with intravenous antibiotics. It is not clear if adding aerosolized antibiotics improves treatment. This review is an update on using aerosolized antibiotics for treating HAP/VAP in adults. PubMed search using the terms "aerosolized antibiotics pneumonia," "nebulized antibiotics pneumonia," and "inhaled antibiotics pneumonia." Reference lists from identified articles were also searched. Clinical studies of aerosolized antibiotics for treating HAP/VAP in adults from July 2010 to March 2017. This article updates a previous review on this topic written in mid-2010. The size and quality of studies have improved dramatically in the recent time period compared to previous studies. However, there still are not large randomized controlled trials available. Colistin and aminoglycosides were the most commonly studied agents, and the most common pathogens were Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. The clinical efficacy of adding aerosolized antibiotics was mixed. Approximately half of the studies showed better outcomes, and none showed worse outcomes. Aerosolized antibiotics appear to be relatively safe, though pulmonary adverse events can occur. Attention to proper administration technique in mechanically ventilated patients is required, including the use of vibrating plate nebulizers. Adding aerosolized antibiotics to intravenous antibiotics may improve the outcomes of adult patients with HAP/VAP in some settings. It seems reasonable to add aerosolized antibiotics in patients with multidrug-resistant organisms or who appear to be failing therapy. Clinicians should pay attention to potential adverse events and proper administration technique.

  12. Moellerella wisconsensis: identification, natural antibiotic susceptibility and its dependency on the medium applied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo; Falsen, Enevold; Wiedemann, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    The present study establishes a data compilation on biochemical features and natural antibiotic susceptibilities of Moellerella wisconsensis strains. 17 moellerellae isolated from humans (n = 11), food (n = 5) and water (n = 1) were tested. Identification was carried out using two commercially available systems and conventional tests. MIC determinations of 74 antibiotics were performed applying a microdilution procedure in Cation-adjusted Mueller Hinton broth and IsoSensitest broth. M. wisconsensis was naturally sensitive to doxycycline, minocycline, all tested aminoglycosides, numerous beta-lactams, all fluoroquinolones, folate-pathway inhibitors, chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin. Natural resistance was found with oxacillin, penicillin G, all tested macrolides, lincomycin, streptogramins, ketolides, glycopeptides, fusidic acid, linezolid and rifampicin. Medium-dependent differences in susceptibility affecting clinical assessment criteria were seen with tetracycline, clindamycin and fosfomycin. From the data of the present study it is possible that some moellerellae are misidentified as Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae.

  13. Combination antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infective endocarditis due to enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Sebastiano; Noviello, Silvana; Esposito, Silvano

    2016-06-01

    Enterococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) in both health care and community-based setting. Enterococcal IE requires bactericidal therapy for an optimal outcome. For decades, cell-wall-active antimicrobial agents (penicillins or vancomycin) in combination with aminoglycosides were the cornerstone of the treatment; however, the emergence of antibiotic resistance has significantly reduced the efficacy of these regimens. Data for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE and references from relevant articles on antibiotic combination regimens for the treatment of enterococcal IE. Abstracts presented in scientific conferences were not searched for. New effective and safe combination treatments, including double-β-lactam and daptomycin/β-lactam combination, are proving useful for the management of IE due to enterococci.

  14. Improving known classes of antibiotics: an optimistic approach for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Karen

    2012-10-01

    New antibiotic agents are desperately needed to treat the multidrug-resistant pathogens that continue to emerge at alarming rates. Many of the agents that have entered full clinical development since 1995 have been members of previously accepted classes of antibiotics. Among these are a new aminoglycoside (plazomicin), anti-MRSA cephalosporins (ceftobiprole and ceftaroline), a monocyclic β-lactam (BAL30072), the β-lactamase inhibitor combination of tazobactam with the anti-pseudomonal cephalosporin ceftolozane, β-lactam combinations with new non-β-lactam inhibitors (MK-7655 with imipenem, and avibactam with ceftazidime and ceftaroline), new macrolides (cethromycin and solithromycin), oxazolidinones (tedizolid phosphate and radezolid), and quinolones (delafloxacin, nemonoxacin and JNJ-Q2). Resistance and safety issues have been circumvented by some of these new agents that have well-established mechanisms of action and defined pathways leading toward regulatory approval. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient age as a factor of antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alexander; Delorme, Thierry; Nasr, Payman

    2017-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. A thorough understanding of the epidemiology and distribution of MRSA allows the development of better preventive measures and helps to control or reduce the rate of infection among the general population. A retrospective survey was performed on 511 cases of MRSA infections from inpatient, outpatient and nursing home populations over a 12-month period. To study the relationships between two continuous quantitative variables (patient age vs resistance percentage), a simple linear regression was calculated for each antibiotic to predict the antibiotic resistance percentage with respect to patient age.Results/Key findings. The pattern of antibiotic resistance with respect to the age of patients depended on the antibiotic mode of action. Antibiotics that target DNA synthesis (i.e. fluoroquinolones) display a direct correlation with the age of patients, with higher rates of resistance among the older population, while antibiotics that target ribosomal functions (i.e. aminoglycosides) or cell wall synthesis (i.e. cephalosporin) do not display an age-dependent pattern and have a consistent degree of resistance across all age classes. Antibiotics that target DNA synthesis result in a progressively higher number of resistant isolates among the older population. The results emphasize the importance of patient age on antibiotic selection as a preventive measure to reduce the rate of resistant infections in each susceptible population. This pattern suggests that physicians should take into consideration patient age as another factor in determining the best antibiotic regiment with the aim of curtailing the emergence of newer resistant phenotypes in the future.

  16. Determinants of antibiotic prescription in paediatric patients: The case of two hospitals in Maputo, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L G S Monteiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The need for healthcare in paediatric patients is often due to respiratory diseases, acute diarrhoea and viral fever, which suggests a limited need for the use of antibiotics. Objectives. To identify the determinants of antibiotic prescription in hospitalised paediatric patients in Mozambique. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between January and June 2015. A total of 454 medical prescriptions and clinical records of children aged 0 - 14 years from Hospital Central de Maputo (HCM and Hospital Geral de Mavalane (HGM were analysed. Results. Antibiotics were used in 97.6% of the patients, with no significant differences (p>0.05 in the prescription rates of the hospitals. The most commonly used antibiotics were beta-lactams (57.3%, aminoglycosides (28.3% and co-trimoxazole (9.4%. Antibiotics were prescribed in all cases of bronchopneumonia, fever, sepsis and acute gastroenteritis. For malaria and undefined diagnoses, antibiotics were prescribed 97.8% and 99.3% of cases, respectively. It was clear that most severe clinical conditions (odds ratio (OR 9.06; 1.13 - 12.14 and age <5 years (OR 5.47;1.54 - 7.60 were treated with antibiotics. Conclusion. The prescription of antibiotics for paediatric patients at both HCM and HGM was largely influenced by patients’ clinical condition and age. It showed that physicians used an empirical approach, in the absence of laboratory tests, often leading to unnecessary antibiotic treatments with negative causative effects. Physicians should be encouraged to use an evidence-based approach for managing the cases correctly.

  17. Single daily dosing of antibiotics: importance of in vitro killing rate, serum half-life, and protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potel, G; Chau, N P; Pangon, B; Fantin, B; Vallois, J M; Faurisson, F; Carbon, C

    1991-10-01

    The relative importance of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for the feasibility of a single daily dose (SDD) of antibiotics remains to be established. Therefore, we studied the relationship between in vitro bacteriological parameters (MIC, MBC, and killing rate [KR], defined as the reduction in the inoculum within 3 h), pharmacokinetic parameters (t1/2 and protein binding [PB], and in vivo antibacterial effect of a single antibiotic dose in an experimental rabbit model of Escherichia coli endocarditis. Nine antibiotics were investigated: two aminoglycosides, two quinolones, and five beta-lactams. For each drug, the minimal effective dose (MED) (in milligrams per kilogram) was defined as the lowest dose able to achieve a significant difference (P less than 0.05) of CFU in the vegetations in comparison with controls 24 h after a single intravenous injection. Aminoglycosides and quinolones had the lowest MEDs, followed by beta-lactams. Univariate regression analysis showed that KR was the major determinant of MED. A stepwise regression analysis showed that t1/2 significantly improved the predictive value of KR, while PB, MIC, and MBC did not. The final equation was MED = 1,586-238 KR-297 t1/2 (r = 0.90, P = 0.01). We concluded that the pharmacodynamic parameters (especially the high KR) of aminoglycosides and quinolones explained their low MEDs and might allow SDD. In contrast, the low KR of beta-lactams emphasized the critical importance of a long t1/2, as for ceftriaxone, allowing the use of this beta-lactam alone in SDD.

  18. Urgent Need to Antibiotic Pharmacokinetic Services for Iranian Health Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Hayatshahi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the emergence of both Gram negative and Gram positive resistant bacterial strains in the recent years, makes it more prominent to utilize the existed antibiotics in an appropriate and justified way in the treatment of drug resistant infections. Many of the agents currently used to treat bacterial, viral and fungal infections do not need to be pharmacokinetically monitored; it means we do not require their serum levels in order to adjust the dose in a routine manner. Examples of these antibiotics are penicillins, cephalosporins, macrolides, tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, etc. Of course these agents need dose adjustment based on renal and hepatic functions. On the other hand there are antibiotics which need to be monitored through their serum levels because of three main following reasons: 1-      To avoid overdosing patient and reduce the incidence of toxicities. 2-      To avoid underdosing patient, this may lead to the emergence of resistant strains and treatment failure. 3-      To optimize the dose of antibiotic to achieve the bactericidal or bacteriostatic effects needed to suppress the infective agent. At this point, we are using vancomycin as a broad spectrum Gram positive agent and aminoglycosides both for the synergism for Gram positive coverage and also for treatment of Gram negative infection in combination with other agents. According to the guidelines published by the accredited organizations like Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA and American Society of Healthcare Pharmacists (ASHP, it is crucially important to perform therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM for both vancomycin and aminoglycosides based on their serum levels for all patients on these agents. In the other word, it is a wrong antibiotic therapy without monitoring the levels. Almost in all medical centers nationwide including teaching hospitals the clinicians prescribe vancomycin very often and aminoglycosides like gentamicin and

  19. PdtaS Deficiency Affects Resistance of Mycobacteria to Ribosome Targeting Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Dadura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-component regulatory systems (TCSSs are key regulatory elements responsible for the adaptation of bacteria to environmental stresses. A classical TCSS is typically comprised of a sensory histidine kinase and a corresponding response regulator. Here, we used homologous recombination to construct a Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant defective in the synthesis of cytosolic histidine kinase PdtaS (Msmeg_1918. The resulting ΔpdtaS mutant strain was tested in the Phenotype Microarray screening system, which allowed us to identify aminoglycoside antibiotic sensitivity, tetracyclines antibiotic resistance as well as membrane transport and respiration, as the main processes affected by removal of pdtaS. The antibiotic sensitivity profiles were confirmed by survival assessment and complementation studies. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed phenotype, we compared ribosomal RNA and protein profiles of the mutant and wild-type strains. We carried out Northern blotting and qRT-PCR to compare rRNA levels and analyzed ribosome sedimentation patterns of the wild-type and mutant strains on sucrose gradients. Isolated ribosomes were further used to estimate relative abundance of individual proteins in the ribosomal subunits using label free mass spectrometry analysis. Additionally, the ΔpdtaS mutant revealed lower activity of the respiratory chain as measured by the rate of TTC (triphenyltetrazolium chloride reduction, while at the same time showing only insignificant changes in the uptake of aminoglycosides. We postulate that deficiency of PdtaS affects the oxidative respiration rates and ribosomal composition causing relevant changes to intrinsic resistance or susceptibility to antibiotics targeting ribosomes, which are commonly used to treat mycobacterial infections.

  20. Audiologic monitoring of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients on aminoglycoside treatment with long term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Malay

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis has emerged as a significant problem with the resurfacing of tuberculosis and thus the need to use the second line drugs with the resultant increased incidence of adverse effects. We discuss the effect of second line aminoglycoside anti-tubercular drugs on the hearing status of MDR-TB patients. Methods Sixty four patients were put on second line aminoglycoside anti-TB drugs. These were divided into three groups: group I, 34 patients using amikacin, group II, 26 patients using kanamycin and group III, 4 patients using capreomycin. Results Of these, 18.75% of the patients developed sensorineural hearing loss involving higher frequencies while 6.25% had involvement of speech frequencies also. All patients were seen again approximately one year after aminoglycoside discontinuation and all hearing losses were permanent with no threshold improvement. Conclusion Aminoglycosides used in MDR-TB patients may result in irreversible hearing loss involving higher frequencies and can become a hearing handicap as speech frequencies are also involved in some of the patients thus underlining the need for regular audiologic evaluation in patients of MDR-TB during the treatment.

  1. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. [Antibiotic Susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae non O1/non O139 Serogroups Isolated from Environment in the Rostov Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selyanskaya, N A; Trishina, A V; Verkina, L M; Arkhangelskaya, I V; Kruglikov, V D; Zlenko, Yu M

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the antibioticograms of 22 strains of Vibrio cholerae non O1/non O139 serogroups (ctxA- tepA-) isolated from the environment in the Rostov Region in 2011 showed that all the cultures were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, aminoglycosides, ceftriaxone, trimetoprime/sulfamethoxazole and resistant to levomycetin and furazolidone. 32%, 18% and 9% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline, rifampicin and nalidixic acid respectively. No strains of V. cholerae susceptible to all the tested antimicrobials were detected. 37% of the V. cholerae isolates was resistant to two antibacterials and the others showed multiple resistance and contained 3-6 r-determinants of antibiotic resistance. Since the antibiotic resistance genes in Vibrio cholerae non O1/non O139 serogroups are often located on mobile genetic elements (plasmids, interferons, SXT elements), many strains of such organisms, the same as the natural environment, could serve as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance. The presence of antibiotic resistance r-determinants in the investigated strains in various combinations, the antibiotic resistance variability in the isolates collected on the same territory within a relatively short period of time require monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility in them and the use of the antibiotic for the etiotropic therapy only in strict accordance with the antibioticogram of the culture isolated from the concrete patient.

  3. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  4. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matutano, L.

    1966-01-01

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author) [fr

  5. [Antibiotic treatments in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussade, H; Sunder, S; Bernard, L; Coloby, P; Guy, L; Karsenty, G; Bastide, C; Bruyère, F

    2013-11-01

    To define prescription modalities for the use of antibiotics in urology. A bibliographic research was performed using the MEDLINE database concerning all the antibiotics usable in urology. Treatments were classified by families; modes of action, indications in urology and adverse events have been detailed. Administrative files for commercial use have been consulted and associated with literature analysis. About 8 classes of antibiotics are usable in urology in a routine use. How they work, indications in urology and adverse events are discussed. Knowing that bacterial resistance to quinilones is increasing dramatically, it seems imperative to control the use of 8 classes of antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  7. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci clinical isolates to netilmicin and other antibiotics commonly used in ophthalmic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Anna Rita; Sudano Roccaro, Andrea; Spoto, Carmela Giovanna; Papa, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the activity of selected antimicrobial agents commonly used in the treatment of ocular infections against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) isolates. A total of 43 staphylococci from respiratory tract and ocular infections were characterized for methicillin resistance using the Epsilometer test (E-test), the polymerase chain reaction for mecA gene detection and the PBP2' latex agglutination test. A perfect agreement among them was observed in 20 isolates (8 MRSA and 12 MRSE) which were then employed in the susceptibility test by using the agar disk diffusion test (NCCLS). The antibiotics tested were: netilmicin (NET), tobramycin (TOB), azithromycin (AZM), levofloxacin (LEV), moxifloxacin (MXF), chloramphenicol (C) and vancomycin (VA). All MRSE and most (87.5%) of MRSA isolates tested were NET and VA sensitive. The majority of MRSA were found to be resistant to all the other antibiotics, with the exception of C. In particular, 75%, 87% and 100% of the isolates were resistant to fluoroquinolones (LEV and MXF), AZM and TOB, respectively. As for the MRSE group, 25% of the strains tested were resistant to C and MXF while 33%, 42% and 58% of the strains were resistant to LEV, AZM and TOB, respectively. Together with VA, NET was the most effective antibiotic tested against both MRSA and MRSE clinical isolates. The exclusive topical use of NET for the treatment of ocular infections may curtail the emergence, spreading and persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  8. PCR Screening of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Faecal Samples from Australian and Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravensdale, Joshua T; Xian, Darren Ten Wei; Wei, Chooi Ming; Lv, Quanjun; Wen, Xiajian; Guo, Jing; Coorey, Ranil; LeSouëf, Peter; Lu, Fengmin; Zhang, Brad; Dykes, Gary A

    2018-03-31

    Recent public awareness campaigns on the risk of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes has placed pressure on governments to enforce stricter antimicrobial stewardship policies on the hospital and agricultural industry. This study aimed to screen faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes to identify demographics at risk of carriage of these genes and examine antimicrobial stewardship policies from the two countries which may influence carriage. Faecal samples from 46 Australian and 53 Chinese children were screened for the presence of six clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes using PCR. Clinical and demographic data was also collected from each patient. Over 90% of faecal samples from Chinese children tested positive for β-lactam, macrolide, tetracycline, and aminoglycoside resistance genes, which was substantially higher than Australian samples. Besides country of origin, no clear trend could be seen to predict carriage of resistance genes. The exception to this was Chinese born children who immigrated to Australia having higher rates of carriage for bla TEM and tetM genes than children born and still living in Australia. These data indicated that Chinese children were more likely to carry certain antibiotic resistance genes than Australian children. The Chinese government has recently implemented strict policies to control the overuse of antibiotics in hospitals. However, many of these policies do not extend to the agricultural industry which could explain the differences seen in this study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  10. Evaluating antibiotic release profiles as a function of polymer coating formulation - biomed 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Sherry N; Sevy, Justin O; Brooks, Benjamin D; Grainger, David W; Brooks, Amanda E

    2011-01-01

    To address persistent 1-3% infection rates associated with orthopedic implant surgeries, the next generation of bone graft filler materials will no longer pharmacologically silent being endowed as a local drug delivery vehicle to maintain locally high levels of antibiotic. Bone allograft material, used as a structural support to fill the avascular spaces in bone defects, revision surgeries, and traumatic injury, can be used as a drug depot to provide effective antibiotic delivery over the orthopedically relevant six-to-eight week time period. Passive antibiotic coatings, applied in the surgical theater, are quickly depleted from the site, inadvertently promoting the development of drug-resistance. Alternatively, many promising controlled-delivery strategies provide an initial burst release of antibiotic within 24 to 72 hours; however, this remains inadequate to combat the onslaught of ubiquitous pathogens that can persist only to reemerge once drug concentrations fall below the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). To improve the longevity of this strategy, a variety of coating techniques were evaluated in which clinically-accepted, FDA-recognized, degradable polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer acts as a rate-controlling membrane to retard the release of the antibiotic tobramycin from allograft bone. Using a combination of dipping and rapid drying, the drug-releasing polymer coating was applied concurrently maintaining the high surface area of the allograft bone; however, SEM imaging reveled an imperfect coating that negatively affected the release kinetics. Altering the drug-containing polymer formulation to incorporate water provided a smoother, more uniform coat and ultimately improved the drug-release profile and longevity out to 5 weeks using both bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal assays. Additionally, drug bioactivity was assessed and confirmed between 2 and 4 weeks in the absence of the water-containing polymer.

  11. Dynamics of Mutations during Development of Resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Five Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanfang; Jonker, Martijs J; Moustakas, Ioannis; Brul, Stanley; Ter Kuile, Benno H

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes considerable morbidity and mortality, specifically during intensive care. Antibiotic-resistant variants of this organism are more difficult to treat and cause substantial extra costs compared to susceptible strains. In the laboratory, P. aeruginosa rapidly developed resistance to five medically relevant antibiotics upon exposure to stepwise increasing concentrations. At several time points during the acquisition of resistance, samples were taken for whole-genome sequencing. The increase in the MIC of ciprofloxacin was linked to specific mutations in gyrA, parC, and gyrB, appearing sequentially. In the case of tobramycin, mutations in fusA, HP02880, rplB, and capD were induced. The MICs of the beta-lactam compounds meropenem and ceftazidime and the combination of piperacillin and tazobactam correlated linearly with beta-lactamase activity but not always with individual mutations. The genes that were mutated during the development of beta-lactam resistance differed for each antibiotic. A quantitative relationship between the frequency of mutations and the increase in resistance could not be established for any of the antibiotics. When the adapted strains are grown in the absence of the antibiotic, some mutations remained and others were reversed, but this reversal did not necessarily lower the MIC. The increased MIC came at the cost of moderately reduced cellular functions or a somewhat lower growth rate. In all cases except ciprofloxacin, the increase in resistance seems to be the result of complex interactions among several cellular systems rather than individual mutations. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. The economics of using prophylactic antibiotic-loaded bone cement in total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, C J; Zmistowski, B M; Clyde, C T; Parvizi, J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of peri-prosthetic infection following total joint replacement continues to rise, and attempts to curb this trend have included the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cement at the time of primary surgery. We have investigated the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the use of antibiotic-loaded cement for primary total knee replacement (TKR) by comparing the rate of infection in 3048 TKRs performed without loaded cement over a three-year period versus the incidence of infection after 4830 TKRs performed with tobramycin-loaded cement over a later period of time of a similar duration. In order to adjust for confounding factors, the rate of infection in 3347 and 4702 uncemented total hip replacements (THR) performed during the same time periods, respectively, was also examined. There were no significant differences in the characteristics of the patients in the different cohorts. The absolute rate of infection increased when antibiotic-loaded cement was used in TKR. However, this rate of increase was less than the rate of increase in infection following uncemented THR during the same period. If the rise in the rate of infection observed in THR were extrapolated to the TKR cohort, 18 additional cases of infection would have been expected to occur in the cohort receiving antibiotic-loaded cement, compared with the number observed. Depending on the type of antibiotic-loaded cement that is used, its cost in all primary TKRs ranges between USD $2112.72 and USD $112 606.67 per case of infection that is prevented.

  13. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  14. In Vitro Activity of Fusidic Acid (CEM-102, Sodium Fusidate) against Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients and Its Effect on the Activities of Tobramycin and Amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Pamela; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Beachel, Linda; Pankuch, Glenn A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia

    2011-01-01

    We tested the MICs of fusidic acid (CEM-102) plus other agents against 40 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and the activities of fusidic acid with or without tobramycin or amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MRSA, and Burkholderia cepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients in a 24-h time-kill study. Fusidic acid was potent (MICs, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml; a single 500-mg dose of fusidic acid at 8 h averaged 8 to 12. 5 μg/ml with 91 to 97% protein binding) against all MRSA strains. No antagonism was observed; synergy occurred for one MRSA strain treated with fusidic acid plus tobramycin. PMID:21343445

  15. In vitro activity of fusidic acid (CEM-102, sodium fusidate) against Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and its effect on the activities of tobramycin and amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Pamela; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Beachel, Linda; Pankuch, Glenn A; Appelbaum, Peter C; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia

    2011-05-01

    We tested the MICs of fusidic acid (CEM-102) plus other agents against 40 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and the activities of fusidic acid with or without tobramycin or amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MRSA, and Burkholderia cepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients in a 24-h time-kill study. Fusidic acid was potent (MICs, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml; a single 500-mg dose of fusidic acid at 8 h averaged 8 to 12. 5 μg/ml with 91 to 97% protein binding) against all MRSA strains. No antagonism was observed; synergy occurred for one MRSA strain treated with fusidic acid plus tobramycin.

  16. Identification of clinically antibiotic resistant genes Aac(3-IIa and Aac(6’-Ib in wastewater samples by multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Samadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used in medical centers, particularly to treat infections. The resistance developed against these agents is a huge concern in health care. A number of researchers have reported that hospital and municipal wastewaters are among the most important dissemination sources of these agent into the environment. Some, however, do not agree with this opinion. In the present study, the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes was investigated in raw and effluent wastewater from hospital and municipal wastewater treatment plants. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 30 samples were taken according to sampling principles and cold cycle and transferred to the molecular laboratory. DNA was extracted by the freeze-thaw method using a kit (Promega. The genes aac(3-IIa and aac(6’-Ib which code aminoglycoside resistance were examined in this study. Results: The results indicated that the studied genes are present in 35% of urban and hospital wastewaters, and their frequency percentage is higher in hospital wastewater (52% than urban wastewater (48%. The studied genes were identified in 61% of raw hospital wastewater samples; however, they were not detected in the output wastewater from the studied treatment plants. Conclusion: Although, the studied genes were not detected in the final effluent, there is a high potential for their release into the environment. The current study demonstrated that the coding genes of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance are present in raw urban and hospital wastewaters. In the case of improper exploitation of wastewater treatment plants, the output water can contaminate other environmental sections, such as soil and water resources, and result in the emission of these contaminants.

  17. Effects of loading concentration, blood and synovial fluid on antibiotic release and anti-biofilm activity of bone cement beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusane, Devendra H; Diamond, Scott M; Knecht, Cory S; Farrar, Nicholas R; Peters, Casey W; Howlin, Robert P; Swearingen, Matthew C; Calhoun, Jason H; Plaut, Roger D; Nocera, Tanya M; Granger, Jeffrey F; Stoodley, Paul

    2017-02-28

    Antibiotic loaded cement beads are commonly used for the treatment of biofilm related orthopaedic periprosthetic infections; however the effects of antibiotic loading and exposure of beads to body fluids on release kinetics are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of (i) antibiotic loading density (ii) loading amount (iii) material type and (iv) exposure to body fluids (blood or synovial fluid) on release kinetics and efficacy of antibiotics against planktonic and lawn biofilm bacteria. Short-term release into an agar gel was evaluated using a fluorescent tracer (fluorescein) incorporated in the carrier materials calcium sulfate (CaSO 4 ) and poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA). Different fluorescein concentrations in CaSO 4 beads were evaluated. Mechanical properties of fluorescein-incorporated beads were analyzed. Efficacy of the antibiotics vancomycin (VAN) or tobramycin (TOB) alone and in combination was evaluated against lawn biofilms of bioluminescent strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Zones of inhibition of cultures (ZOI) were measured visually and using an in-vivo imaging system (IVIS). The influence of body fluids on release was assessed using CaSO 4 beads that contained fluorescein or antibiotics and were pre-coated with human blood or synovial fluid. The spread from the beads followed a square root of time relationship in all cases. The loading concentration had no influence on short-term fluorescein release and pre-coating of beads with body fluids did not affect short-term release or antibacterial activity. Compared to PMMA, CaSO 4 had a more rapid short term rate of elution and activity against planktonic and lawn biofilms. This study highlights the importance of considering antibiotic loading and packing density when investigating the clinical application of bone cements for infection management. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Sensitization of Legionella pneumophila to Some Antibiotics by Reserpine and Anti-Legionella Effects of Different Benzofuranone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khaleghi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legionella pneumophila is  a  dangerous pathogenic bacterium can cause serious infectious diseases especially in hospitalized immuno-compromised patients. This bacterium is shown to be resistant against different antibiotics. Resistance against a wide range of antibiotics is usually mediated by efflux pump in bacteria. Efflux pumps are proteinaceous transporters localized in the cytoplasmic membrane of all kinds of cells which excreted antibiotics outside the cells. However, synthesis of new anti-Legionella compounds or selection of resistant modulating agents are useful strategy to combat with L. pneumophilain the future.Methods: In this study the antibacterial activity of some benzofuranone derivatives have been investigated by disk diffusion method against L. pneumophila. Also the sensitivity of this test strain was evaluated against 19 antibiotics and the combination effect of reserpine at a sub-inhibitory concentration was further studied with these antibiotics using disk diffusion method with some modifications.Conclusion: Among the different synthetic compounds which were tested against L. pneumophila, the most antibacterial activity was observed for compounds 1j and 1m which contain hydroxyl and methoxy groups on the C-6 and C-7 positionsagainst L. pneumophila. To evaluate whether efflux pumps are active in L. pneumophila or not an efflux inhibitor (reserpine was tested in combination of different antibiotics against this test strain. Reserpine significantly enhanced the antibacterial activities of kanamycin, nitrofurantoin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin, ofloxacillin, gentamycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, minocycline, tobramycin, and amikacin against L. pneumophila which shows the resistances to these antibiotics are mediated by efflux system in this bacterium.

  19. Antibiotic-mediated changes in the fecal microbiome of broiler chickens define the incidence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Wang, Yulin; Sun, Yongxue; Ma, Liping; Zeng, Qinglin; Jiang, Xiaotao; Li, Andong; Zeng, Zhenling; Zhang, Tong

    2018-02-13

    Antimicrobial agents have been widely used in animal farms to prevent and treat animal diseases and to promote growth. Antimicrobial agents may change the bacterial community and enhance the resistome in animal feces. We used metagenome-wide analysis to investigate the changes in bacterial community, variations in antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), and their bacterial hosts in the feces of broiler chickens over a full-treatment course of chlortetracycline at low and therapeutic dose levels. The effects of chlortetracycline on resistome were dependent on the specific ARG subtypes and not simply the overall community-level ARGs. Therapeutic dose of chlortetracycline promoted the abundance of tetracycline resistance genes (tetA and tetW) and inhibited multidrug resistance genes (mdtA, mdtC, mdtK, ompR, and TolC). The therapeutic dose of chlortetracycline led to loss of Proteobacteria mainly due to the decrease of Escherichia/Shigella (from 72 to 58%). Inhibition of Escherichia by chlortetracycline was the primary reason for the decrease of genes resistant to multiple drugs in the therapeutic dose group. The ARG host Bifidobacterium were enriched due to tetW harbored by Bifidobacterium under chlortetracycline treatment. Escherichia was always the major host for multidrug resistance genes, whereas the primary host was changed from Escherichia to Klebsiella for aminoglycoside resistance genes with the treatment of therapeutic dose of chlortetracycline. We provided the first metagenomic insights into antibiotic-mediated alteration of ARG-harboring bacterial hosts at community-wide level in chicken feces. These results indicated that the changes in the structure of antibiotic-induced feces microbial communities accompany changes in the abundance of bacterial hosts carrying specific ARGs in the feces microbiota. These findings will help to optimize therapeutic schemes for the effective treatment of antibiotic resistant pathogens in poultry farms. Resistome variations in

  20. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M.; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and entero­coccal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6′)-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2′′)-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2′′)-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2′′)-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme. PMID:25286858

  1. Risk factors for colonization with ampicillin and high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci during hospitalization in the ICU and the impact of prior antimicrobial exposure definition: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srovin, Tina Plankar; Seme, Katja; Blagus, Rok; Tomazin, Rok; Cižman, Milan

    2014-02-01

    The aim of our prospective cohort study was to determine the incidence, genetic relatedness and risk factors for colonization with ampicillin and high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci (ARHLARE) among patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit. During 15-month period, we included 105 patients. The only independent risk factor for ARHLARE colonization was days of cefotaxime/ceftriaxone therapy [odds ratio (OR): 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.27; P  =  0.045]. Patients with higher total use of antibiotics, patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, and patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), were also found to be at increased risk to become colonized with ARHLARE. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested multifocal origin of the majority of the colonizing strains. Our results show that an increase in total antibiotic consumption for 10 defined daily doses (DDD)/patient increased the odds of colonization with ARHLARE for 36%. Further efforts to optimize antimicrobial use in high risk patients are proposed.

  2. Origin in Acinetobacter gyllenbergii and dissemination of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme AAC(6')-Ih.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Goussard, Sylvie; Nemec, Alexandr; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    The aac(6')-Ih gene encoding aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type I subtype h [AAC(6')-Ih] is plasmid-borne in Acinetobacter baumannii where it confers high-level amikacin resistance, but its origin remains unknown. We searched for the gene in the genomes of a collection of 133 Acinetobacter spp. and studied its species specificity, expression and dissemination. Gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR, expression by quantitative RT-PCR, MIC by microdilution and transfer by plasmid mobilization. The aac(6')-Ih gene was present in the chromosome of the two Acinetobacter gyllenbergii of the collection and was detected in all seven A. gyllenbergii clinical isolates. They had indistinguishable flanking regions indicating that the gene was intrinsic to this species. A. baumannii PIS Aba23 promoters were provided by insertion of ISAba23, which disrupted the Pnative promoter in A. gyllenbergii. Both types of promoters were similarly potent in Escherichia coli and A. baumannii. Aminoglycoside MICs for A. baumannii harbouring pIP1858 were higher than for A. gyllenbergii due to gene dosage. The non-self-transferable plasmid could be mobilized to other A. baumannii cells by the broad host range plasmid RP4. We have found the origin of aac(6')-Ih in A. gyllenbergii, a species isolated, although rarely, in humans, and documented that dissemination of this gene is restricted to the Acinetobacter genus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Azobenzene-aminoglycoside: Self-assembled smart amphiphilic nanostructures for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Yadav, Santosh; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Here, we have designed and synthesized a novel cationic amphiphilic stimuli-responsive azobenzene-aminoglycoside (a small molecule) conjugate, Azo-AG 5, and characterized it by UV and FTIR. Light responsive nature of Azo-AG 5 was assessed under UV-vis light. Self- assembly of Azo-AG 5 in aqueous solutions into nanostructures and their ability to act as drug carrier were also investigated. The nanostructures of Azo-AG 5 showed average hydrodynamic diameter of ∼ 255 nm with aminoglycoside moiety (neomycin) and 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene forming hydrophilic shell and hydrophobic core, respectively. In the hydrophobic core, eosin and aspirin were successfully encapsulated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements demonstrated that the nanoassemblies showed expansion and contraction on successive UV and visible light irradiations exhibiting reversible on-off switch for controlling the drug release behavior. Similar behavior was observed when these nanostructures were subjected to pH-change. In vitro drug release studies showed a difference in UV and visible light-mediated release pattern. It was observed that the release rate under UV irradiation was comparatively higher than that observed under visible light. Further, azoreductase-mediated cleavage of the azo moiety in Azo-AG 5 nanoassemblies resulted in the dismantling of the structures into aggregated microstructures. Azo-AG 5 nanostructures having positive surface charge (+9.74 mV) successfully interacted with pDNA and retarded its mobility on agarose gel. Stimuli responsiveness of nanostructures and their on-off switch like behavior ensure the great potential as controlled drug delivery systems and in other biomedical applications such as colon-specific delivery and gene delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Simple Model for Inducing Optimal Increase of SDF-1 with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

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    Hyun Mi Ju

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. As a homing factor of stem cell, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 is important for the regenerative research in ototoxicity. Mice models with aminoglycoside ototoxicity have been widely used to study the regeneration capacity of MSCs in repair of cochlear injury. We developed a mouse model with maximal increase in SDF-1 levels in the inner ear, according to the “one-shot” doses of kanamycin and furosemide. Methods. C57BL/6 mice had kanamycin (420, 550, and 600 mg/kg dissolved in PBS, followed by an intraperitoneal injection of furosemide (130 mg/kg. The injuries of inner ear were measured with hearing thresholds, histology, and outer hair cell counts at 0, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 days before the sacrifice. The levels of SDF-1 in the inner ear were tested by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results. There were a significant reduction in hearing thresholds and a maximal increase of SDF-1 levels in the furosemide 130 mg/kg + kanamycin 550 mg/kg group, but severe hearing deterioration over time was observed in the furosemide 130 mg/kg + kanamycin 600 mg/kg group and four mice were dead. SDF-1 was detected mostly in the stria vascularis and organ of Corti showing the highest increase in expression. Conclusion. We observed optimal induction of the stem cell homing factor in the newly generated aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity mouse model using a “one-shot” protocol. This study regarding high SDF-1 levels in our mouse model of ototoxicity would play a major role in the development of therapeutic agents using MSC homing.

  5. The future of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  6. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  7. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea: An Overview Antibiotic resistance is the ...

  8. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  9. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Abundance of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial community composition in wastewater effluents from different Romanian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres, Edina; Baricz, Andreea; Chiriac, Cecilia Maria; Farkas, Anca; Opris, Ocsana; Soran, Maria-Loredana; Andrei, Adrian-Stefan; Rudi, Knut; Balcázar, Jose Luis; Dragos, Nicolae; Coman, Cristian

    2017-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a growing and significant public health threat, which requires a global response to develop effective strategies and mitigate the emergence and spread of this phenomenon in clinical and environmental settings. We investigated, therefore, the occurrence and abundance of several antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), as well as bacterial community composition in wastewater effluents from different hospitals located in the Cluj County, Romania. Antibiotic concentrations ranged between 3.67 and 53.05 μg L -1 , and the most abundant antibiotic classes were β-lactams, glycopeptides, and trimethoprim. Among the ARGs detected, 14 genes confer resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines. Genes encoding quaternary ammonium resistance and a transposon-related element were also detected. The sulI and qacEΔ1 genes, which confer resistance to sulfonamides and quaternary ammonium, had the highest relative abundance with values ranging from 5.33 × 10 -2 to 1.94 × 10 -1 and 1.94 × 10 -2 to 4.89 × 10 -2 copies/16 rRNA gene copies, respectively. The dominant phyla detected in the hospital wastewater samples were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Among selected hospitals, one of them applied an activated sludge and chlorine disinfection process before releasing the effluent to the municipal collector. This conventional wastewater treatment showed moderate removal efficiency of the studied pollutants, with a 55-81% decrease in antibiotic concentrations, 1-3 order of magnitude lower relative abundance of ARGs, but with a slight increase of some potentially pathogenic bacteria. Given this, hospital wastewaters (raw or treated) may contribute to the spread of these emerging pollutants in the receiving environments. To the best of our knowledge, this study quantified for the first time the

  11. Risk of drug-related problems for various antibiotics in hospital: assessment by use of a novel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blix, Hege Salvesen; Viktil, Kirsten K; Moger, Tron Anders; Reikvam, Aasmund

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the use of antibiotics in hospitals, to explore drug-related problems (DRPs) linked to antibiotics and to introduce a novel way of expressing the risks accompanying use of various antibiotics. Patients from internal medicine departments in four Norwegian hospitals were prospectively included in 2002. Demographics, drugs used, medical history, laboratory data and clinical/pharmacological risk factors were recorded. DRPs were identified by clinical pharmacists and assessed in multidisciplinary hospital teams. A new term, the drug risk ratio, was established and defined as the number of times the antibiotic was associated with DRPs in relation to the number of times it was used. Out of the 668 patients included, 283 patients (42%) used antibiotics (AB users). AB users were older (76.2 vs. 73.9), used more drugs on admission (5.1 vs. 4.4) and had more DRPs (3.0 vs. 2.2) than non-users. The DRP categories no further need for drug, non-optimal drug and non-optimal dose were most frequently observed. The drug risk ratio, calculated for 12 antibiotic groups, was highest for aminoglycosides (0.77), beta-lactamase-resistant penicillins (0.56), macrolides (0.54) and quinolones (0.48) and lowest for first- and third-generation cephalosporins, 0.17 and 0.13, respectively. Nearly half of the hospitalised patients were prescribed antibiotics and antibiotic associated DRPs occurred frequently. The drug risk ratio for the different antibiotic groups varied with a factor of six from the lowest to the highest. A high drug risk ratio would alert of antibiotics which require heightened awareness when going to be used in clinical practice.

  12. Diversity and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Acinetobacter Strains From Milk Powder Produced in Germany

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    Gyu-Sung Cho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Forty-seven Acinetobacter spp. isolates from milk powder obtained from a powdered milk producer in Germany were investigated for their antibiotic resistance susceptibilities, in order to assess whether strains from food harbor multiple antibiotic resistances and whether the food route is important for dissemination of resistance genes. The strains were identified by 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing, as well as by whole genome sequencing of selected isolates and their in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH. Furthermore, they were genotyped by rep-PCR together with reference strains of pan-European groups I, II, and III strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Of the 47 strains, 42 were identified as A. baumannii, 4 as Acinetobacter Pittii, and 1 as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In silico DDH with the genome sequence data of selected strains and rpoB gene sequencing data suggested that the five non-A. baumannii strains all belonged to A. pittii, suggesting that the rpoB gene is more reliable than the 16S rRNA gene for species level identification in this genus. Rep-PCR genotyping of the A. baumannii strains showed that these could be grouped into four groups, and that some strains clustered together with reference strains of pan-European clinical group II and III strains. All strains in this study were intrinsically resistant toward chloramphenicol and oxacillin, but susceptible toward tetracycline, tobramycin, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. For cefotaxime, 43 strains (91.5% were intermediate and 3 strains (6.4% resistant, while 3 (6.4% and 21 (44.7% strains exhibited resistance to cefepime and streptomycin, respectively. Forty-six (97.9% strains were susceptible to amikacin and ampicillin-sulbactam. Therefore, the strains in this study were generally not resistant to the clinically relevant antibiotics, especially tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, and meropenem, suggesting that the food route probably poses only a

  13. Evaluation of sorption capacity of antibiotics and antibacterial properties of a cyclodextrin-polymer functionalized hydroxyapatite-coated titanium hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mariam; Chai, Feng; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Neut, Christel; Goube, Michel; Maton, Mickael; Martel, Bernard; Hildebrand, Hartmut F

    2014-12-30

    Infection still present as one of common complications after total hip replacement (∼2.5%), which may cause serious outcomes. For preventing such risk, loading antibiotics onto implants for increasing local drug concentration at targeted sites could be a solution. This study aims at modifying the surface of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium hip implant material (Ti-HA) with polymer of cyclodextrin (polyCD) for loading antibiotics, to achieve a sustained local drug delivery. Two widely applied antibiotics (tobramycin and rifampicin) in orthopedic surgery were loaded alone or in combination. The drug adsorption isotherm, drug release kinetics and drug's efficacy were thoroughly investigated. The results proved that polyCD coating significantly improved the affinity of both drugs to Ti-HA surface, while the mechanism of drug-polyCD interaction varies from the nature of drug, courtesy of the structural complex of polyCD. The advantage of dual-drug loading was highlighted by its strong efficacy against both Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae, which overcomes the limitation of mono-drug loading for an effective treatment against both bacterial strains. The prolonged antibacterial activity of antibiotic loaded Ti-HA-polyCD samples confirmed that polyCD could be a promising drug-delivery system, for sustained antibiotics release or other potential applications e.g., antimitotic agent release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Occurrence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes genes (aac(6')-I and ant(2″)-I) in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odumosu, Bamidele Tolulope; Adeniyi, Bolanle A; Chandra, Ram

    2015-12-01

    Enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides is the primary mechanism of resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We investigated the occurrence and mechanism of aminoglycosides resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates from hospitals in SouthWest Nigeria. A total of 54 consecutive, non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were studied for the presence of aminoglycosides -modifying enzymes (AMEs) by PCR amplification and sequencing of genes encoding AMEs. Two types of AME genes [aac (6') - I and ant (2″) - I] were found in 12 isolates out of 54. Seven strains harboured one or more types of enzymes of which aac (6') - I was the most frequently found gene (10/54 isolates, 18.5%). None of the isolates investigated in this study were positive for aph, aac (3) and aac (6″) - II genes. Prevalence of P. aeruginosa producing AME genes in this study may suggest aminoglycosides use in Nigeria. This study highlights need for functional antimicrobial surveillance system in Nigeria.

  15. Alanine Enhances Aminoglycosides-Induced ROS Production as Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-zhou Ye

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolite-enabled killing of antibiotic-resistant pathogens by antibiotics is an attractive strategy to manage antibiotic resistance. Our previous study demonstrated that alanine or/and glucose increased the killing efficacy of kanamycin on antibiotic-resistant bacteria, whose action is through up-regulating TCA cycle, increasing proton motive force and enhancing antibiotic uptake. Despite the fact that alanine altered several metabolic pathways, other mechanisms could be potentially involved in alanine-mediated kanamycin killing of bacteria which remains to be explored. In the present study, we adopted proteomic approach to analyze the proteome changes induced by exogenous alanine. Our results revealed that the expression of three outer membrane proteins was altered and the deletion of nagE and fadL decreased the intracellular kanamycin concentration, implying their possible roles in mediating kanamycin transport. More importantly, the integrated analysis of proteomic and metabolomic data pointed out that alanine metabolism could connect to riboflavin metabolism that provides the source for reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Functional studies confirmed that alanine treatment together with kanamycin could promote ROS production that in turn potentiates the killing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Further investigation showed that alanine repressed the transcription of antioxidant-encoding genes, and alanine metabolism to riboflavin metabolism connected with riboflavin metabolism through TCA cycle, glucogenesis pathway and pentose phosphate pathway. Our results suggest a novel mechanism by which alanine facilitates kanamycin killing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria via promoting ROS production.

  16. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose.

  17. Real-time examination of aminoglycoside activity towards bacterial mimetic membranes using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Voo, Zhi Xiang; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone; Martin, Lisandra L

    2015-02-01

    The rapid increase in multi-drug resistant bacteria has resulted in previously discontinued treatments being revisited. Aminoglycosides are effective "old" antibacterial agents that fall within this category. Despite extensive usage and understanding of their intracellular targets, there is limited mechanistic knowledge regarding how aminoglycosides penetrate bacterial membranes. Thus, the activity of two well-known aminoglycosides, kanamycin A and neomycin B, towards a bacterial mimetic membrane (DMPC:DMPG (4:1)) was examined using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The macroscopic effect of increasing the aminoglycoside concentration showed that kanamycin A exerts a threshold response, switching from binding to the membrane to disruption of the surface. Neomycin B, however, disrupted the membrane at all concentrations examined. At concentrations above the threshold value observed for kanamycin A, both aminoglycosides revealed similar mechanistic details. That is, they both inserted into the bacterial mimetic lipid bilayer, prior to disruption via loss of materials, presumably aminoglycoside-membrane composites. Depth profile analysis of this membrane interaction was achieved using the overtones of the quartz crystal sensor. The measured data is consistent with a two-stage process in which insertion of the aminoglycoside precedes the 'detergent-like' removal of membranes from the sensor. The results of this study contribute to the insight required for aminoglycosides to be reconsidered as active antimicrobial agents/co-agents by providing details of activity at the bacterial membrane. Kanamycin and neomycin still offer potential as antimicrobial therapeutics for the future and the QCM-D method illustrates great promise for screening new antibacterial or antiviral drug candidates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Relatively high antibiotic resistance among heterotrophic bacteria from arctic fjord sediments than water - Evidence towards better selection pressure in the fjord sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatha, A. A. Mohamed; Neethu, C. S.; Nikhil, S. M.; Rahiman, K. M. Mujeeb; Krishnan, K. P.; Saramma, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and coliform bacteria from water and sediment of Kongsfjord. The study was based on the assumption that arctic fjord environments are relatively pristine and offer very little selection pressure for drug resistant mutants. In order to test the hypothesis, 200 isolates belonging to aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and 114 isolates belonging to coliforms were tested against 15 antibiotics belonging to 5 different classes such as beta lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, sulpha drugs and tetracyclines. Resistance to beta lactam and extended spectrum beta lactam (ESBL) antibiotics was considerably high and they found to vary significantly (p coliform bacteria. Though the coliforms showed significantly high level of antibiotic resistance against ESBL's extent and diversity of antibiotic resistance (as revealed by multiple antibiotic resistance index and resistance patterns), was high in the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Most striking observation was that isolates from fjord sediments (both heterotrophic bacteria and coliforms) in general showed relatively high prevalence of antibiotic resistance against most of the antibiotics tested, indicating to better selection pressure for drug resistance mutants in the fjord sediments.

  19. Cultivation-dependent and high-throughput sequencing approaches studying the co-occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal sewage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Dong; Ma, Liping; Jiang, Xiao-Tao; Zhang, Tong

    2017-11-01

    During the past years, antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) leading for the spreading of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) became a global problem, especially multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are considered the prime culprit of antibiotic resistance. However, the correlation between the antibiotic-resistant phenotype and the ARG profiles remains poorly understood. In the present study, metagenomic functional screening and metagenomic analysis of coliforms were combined to explore the phenotype and genotype of the ARBs from municipal sewage. Our results showed that the ARG co-occurrence was widespread in the municipal sewage. The present study also highlighted the high abundance of ARGs from antibiotic resistance coliforms especially the MDR coliforms with ARG level of 33.8 ± 4.2 copies per cell. The ARG profiles and the antibiotic resistance phenotypes of the isolated antibiotic resistant coliforms were also correlated and indicated that the resistance to the related antibiotic (ampicillin, kanamycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline) was mostly contributed by the ARGs belonging to the subtypes of β-lactamase, aminoglycoside 3-phosphotransferase, phosphotransferase type 2, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, tetA, etc.

  20. Antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from aquaculture and abattoir environments in urban communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isoken Henrietta Igbinosa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize multiple antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from aquaculture and abattoir environments. Methods: Wastewater samples were obtained from the abattoir and aquaculture environments between May 2016 and July 2016 and analysed using standard phenotypic, biochemical and PCR-based methods. Results: The mean pseudomonads count ranged from (4 × 102 ± 1.01 to (2 × 104 ± 0.10 colony-forming unit/mL in the aquaculture environment and (3 × 103 ± 0.00 to (1 × 105 ± 1.00 colony-forming unit/mL in the abattoir environment. A total of 96 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa confirmed by PCR were thereafter selected from both aquaculture and abattoir environments and further characterized for their antimicrobial susceptibility profile by adopting the disc diffusion method. High level of resistance was observed against the aminoglycosides [gentamycin 64/96 (66.67% and kanamycin 52/96 (54.17%], monobactams [aztreonam 76/96 (79.17%], carbapenems [meropenem 52/96 (54.17%], tetracyclines [tetracycline 72/96 (75.00%] and cephems [ceftazidime 72/96 (75.00% and cefuroxime 48/96 (50.00%]. Multiple antibiotic resistant index of the respective isolates ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 while multidrug resistant profile of the isolates revealed that 28 of the respective isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, cefuroxime, gentamycin, kanamycin, aztreonam which belongs to cephems, aminoglycosides and monobactam class of antimicrobials. Conclusions: Findings from the present study therefore underscores the need for effective monitoring of the abattoir and aquaculture environments as they could be the significant source for spreading antibiotic resistant bacteria within the environment.

  1. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  2. Report: Prevalence and antibiotic trials against Salmonella enterica isolated from diarrheic lambs and kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Ijaz, Muhammad; Aslam, Hassaan Bin; Farooqi, Shahid Hussain; Ahmad, Syed Saleem; Akhtar, Raheela

    2017-11-01

    Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) is the major zoonotic threat for small ruminants and humans responsible for huge economic losses and high mortality in Pakistan. Lambs and kids of Lahore district were examined to determine the prevalence, hematology and chemotherapy of S. enterica. A total of 200 diarrheic samples (n=100 lambs; n=100 kids) were collected and examined; 59 (29.50%) were found positive for S. enterica. Lambs had lightly greater prevalence (31%) than kids (29%). The frequency analysis (OR=1.16 [reciprocal =0.87]) showed non-significant difference in both the lambs and kids. The significant decrease (Pℜ0.001) in hemoglobin, pack cell volume and total erythrocyte count was observed in infected lambs and kids. Results of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility test revealed that S. enteric isolated from both lambs and kids were susceptible to levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, gentamicin, azithromycin, tobramycin, amoxicillin, ampicillin and nalidixic acid. Where as the results of in vivo antibiotic trials showed that isolates from both lambs and the kids with diarrhea were susceptible to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin.

  3. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  4. Nutrient availability as a mechanism for selection of antibiotic tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa within the CF airway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R Hoffman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are subjected to selective pressures during chronic infections of host tissues. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with inactivating mutations in the transcriptional regulator LasR are frequently selected within the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF, and infection with these isolates has been associated with poorer lung function outcomes. The mechanisms underlying selection for lasR mutation are unknown but have been postulated to involve the abundance of specific nutrients within CF airway secretions. We characterized lasR mutant P. aeruginosa strains and isolates to identify conditions found in CF airways that select for growth of lasR mutants. Relative to wild-type P. aeruginosa, lasR mutants exhibited a dramatic metabolic shift, including decreased oxygen consumption and increased nitrate utilization, that is predicted to confer increased fitness within the nutrient conditions known to occur in CF airways. This metabolic shift exhibited by lasR mutants conferred resistance to two antibiotics used frequently in CF care, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, even under oxygen-dependent growth conditions, yet selection for these mutants in vitro did not require preceding antibiotic exposure. The selection for loss of LasR function in vivo, and the associated adverse clinical impact, could be due to increased bacterial growth in the oxygen-poor and nitrate-rich CF airway, and from the resulting resistance to therapeutic antibiotics. The metabolic similarities among diverse chronic infection-adapted bacteria suggest a common mode of adaptation and antibiotic resistance during chronic infection that is primarily driven by bacterial metabolic shifts in response to nutrient availability within host tissues.

  5. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  6. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    as their exposure to antibiotics. Data on outpatient prescribing of antimicrobials (ATC J01) in 2010 were obtained from a prescription database covering Aragón (northeastern Spain). The antimicrobial consumption at the individual level was analysed both according to the volume of DDD and the number of packages...... purchased per year. Heavy antibiotic users were identified according to Lorenz curves and characterized by age, gender, and their antimicrobial prescription profile. Lorenz curves demonstrated substantial differences in the individual use of antimicrobials. Heavy antibiotic users (5% of individuals...... with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received a high...

  7. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really ...

  8. Multi-residue methods for confirmatory determination of antibiotics in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanidou, Victoria; Nisyriou, Styliani

    2008-06-01

    The prevalent use of antibiotics, e. g. sulphonamides, tetracyclines, beta-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, etc., in dairy farming to prevent and treat microbial infections e. g. mastitis, can be a potential source of veterinary drug residues in milk. Antibiotic residues constitute a risk to human health, since they can cause allergic reactions in hypersensitive individuals or they may lead to the appearance of drug-resistant bacteria. Analysis of these residues plays a key role in ensuring food safety. Regulatory agencies in the European Union and in other countries have established maximum residue limits and requirements concerning the performance of analytical methods and the interpretation of the results. This review describes the state of the art in the analytical strategies concerning the multi-class as well as the multi-residue analysis of antibiotics in milk. Since milk is a complex matrix due to its high protein and fat content, which often interfere in analytical procedures, special focus has been placed on sample preparation: extraction and clean-up. Confirmation of antibiotic residues according to European Decision 657/2002/EC has been also discussed.

  9. Determination of 14 aminoglycosides by LC-MS/MS using molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction for clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, Marie-Claude; Woo, Pei Mun; Ulrich, Pauline; Tarres, Adrienne; Mottier, Pascal; Desmarchelier, Aurélien

    2018-04-01

    An LC-MS/MS method for screening 14 aminoglycosides in foodstuffs of animal origin is presented. Its scope includes raw materials and processed ingredients but also finished products composed of milk, meat, fish, egg or fat. Aminoglycosides are extracted in an acidic aqueous solution, which is first recovered after centrifugation, then diluted with a basic buffer and finally purified by molecularly imprinted polymer-solid phase extraction (MIP-SPE). Analytes are detected within 8 min by ion-pair reversed phase LC-MS/MS. Due to the large range of foodstuffs involved, the variability of matrix effects led to significant MS signal variations. This was circumvented by systematically extracting each sample twice, i.e. 'unspiked' and 'spiked' at the screening target concentration of 50 µg kg -1 . The method was validated according to the European Community Reference Laboratories Residues Guidelines giving false-negative and false-positive rates ≤3% for all compounds. Ruggedness of the method was further demonstrated in quality control operations by a second laboratory. The 14 aminoglycosides in water-based standard solutions were stable for up to 6 months when stored at either -80°C, -20°C or at 4°C storage temperatures.

  10. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  11. Treatment of long bone osteomyelitis with a mechanically stable intramedullar antibiotic dispenser: nineteen consecutive cases with a minimum of 12 months follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancineto, Carlos Federico; Barla, Jorge Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Antibiotic cement beads are the most common system of local antibiotic delivery. Unfortunately, bead strings do not give mechanical support to the fracture site, stability being fundamental in osteomyelitis treatment. Local treatment associated with bone stability should improve the results in posttraumatic osteomyelitis. The objective of this article is to present our experience in the treatment of long bone osteomyelitis using an intramedullary, mechanically stable antibiotic dispenser. We present a retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients with a long bone osteomyelitis treated using an intramedullary, mechanically stable antibiotic dispenser. The dispenser used with a T-95 chest tube filled with poly(methyl methacrylate) + antibiotic (vancomycin, gentamycin, or both, tobramycin or imipenem; depending on culture results) and with a metal center (Ender nail). Fifteen patients were men and three were women, with an average age of 37 years (range, 18-52 years). In four cases, treatment involved the femur and in 15 the tibia. Positive cultures were obtained from each patient. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 17 cases. The intramedullary dispenser was removed between 6 and 76 weeks after surgery. Success was defined as negative cultures after dispenser removal. Follow-up period was between 10 and 54 months. Negative cultures were obtained from intramedullary reaming after dispenser removal in all but one patient who could not finish treatment because of local intolerance to antibiotic treatment. None of the 17 patients presented an infection recurrence. The combination of local antibiotic treatment with bone segment stability showed acceptable results in our short series of patients. Further investigation on locked intramedullary antibiotic dispensers providing improved stability will help us learn about this difficult clinical scenario.

  12. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  13. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates from Zahedan, Southeast Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Shahraki-Zahedani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Resistance to various classes of antibiotics is common among extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs-producing bacteria. Objectives To determine the antibiotic resistance pattern of ESBLs-producing K. pneumoniae clinical isolates from Zahedan. Methods In this sectional-descriptive study, susceptibility of 51 ESBLs-producing K. pneumoniae isolates to 18 antimicrobial agents was determined. Results All isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, cefpodoxime and amoxicillin as well as susceptible to colistin sulfate. Also, most isolates were resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and aztreonam. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that the rate of resistance to beta-lactams, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in ESBLs-producing K. pneumoniae isolates is high in Zahedan.

  14. Successful antibiotic treatment of Pseudomonas stutzeri-induced peritonitis without peritoneal dialysis catheter removal in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Wook Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas stutzeri is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, single polar-flagellated, soil bacterium that was first isolated from human spinal fluid and is widely distributed in the environment. It was isolated as an uncommon opportunistic pathogen from humans, and a few cases of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis have been reported in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD. Catheter removal with antibiotic treatment is generally recommended because peritonitis by Pseudomonas species is commonly associated with catheter-related infection. Here, we describe the first case of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis in an 82-year-old woman in Korea. She had received two antipseudomonal antibiotics, an aminoglycoside (isepamicin, Yuhan corporation, Seoul, Korea and a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, and was successfully treated without removal of the CAPD catheter.

  15. Increased prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Norway is associated with the acquisition of AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldorsen, Bjørg C; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Samuelsen, Orjan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that the increasing prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance observed in Norway among clinical Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates is mainly due to the presence of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib. A frequent co-association of aminoglycoside resistance with Cefotaximase-München group 1 extended-spectrum β-lactamases was also observed. © 2013.

  16. Antibiotic Prescriptions and Prophylaxis in Italian Children. Is It Time to Change? Data from the ARPEC Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Maia; Donà, Daniele; Montagnani, Carlotta; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Romanengo, Marta; Tagliabue, Claudia; Centenari, Chiara; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Lundin, Rebecca; Giaquinto, Carlo; Galli, Luisa; Guarino, Alfredo; Esposito, Susanna; Sharland, Mike; Versporten, Ann; Goossens, Herman; Nicolini, Giangiacomo

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are the most commonly prescribed drugs. Many studies have evaluated antibiotic prescriptions in the paediatric outpatient but few studies describing the real antibiotic consumption in Italian children's hospitals have been published. Point-prevalence survey (PPS) has been shown to be a simple, feasible and reliable standardized method for antimicrobials surveillance in children and neonates admitted to the hospital. In this paper, we presented data from a PPS on antimicrobial prescriptions carried out in 7 large Italian paediatric institutions. A 1-day PPS on antibiotic use in hospitalized neonates and children was performed in Italy between October and December 2012 as part of the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children project (ARPEC). Seven institutions in seven Italian cities were involved. The survey included all admitted patients less than 18 years of age present in the ward at 8:00 am on the day of the survey, who had at least one on-going antibiotic prescription. For all patients data about age, weight, underlying disease, antimicrobial agent, dose and indication for treatment were collected. The PPS was performed in 61 wards within 7 Italian institutions. A total of 899 patients were eligible and 349 (38.9%) had an on-going prescription for one or more antibiotics, with variable rates among the hospitals (25.7% - 53.8%). We describe antibiotic prescriptions separately in neonates ( = 30 days to antibiotics for prophylaxis and only 37.2% on those on antibiotics were treated for infection. Penicillins and aminoglycosides were the most prescribed antibiotic classes. In the paediatric cohort, 64.4% of patients were receiving antibiotics for treatment of infections and 35.5% for prophylaxis. Third generation cephalosporins and penicillin plus inhibitors were the top two antibiotic classes. The main reason for prescribing antibiotic therapy in children was lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), followed by febrile

  17. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    biocides and heavy metals. In this report, we show that very low concentrations of single antibiotics and heavy metals or combinations of compounds can select for a large plasmid that carries resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, tetracycline, macrolides, trimethoprim, sulfonamide, silver, copper, and arsenic. Our findings suggest that the low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals present in polluted external environments and in treated animals and humans could allow for selection and enrichment of bacteria with multiresistance plasmids and thereby contribute to the emergence, maintenance, and transmission of antibiotic-resistant disease-causing bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Gullberg et al.

  18. Antibiotic resistance genes and human bacterial pathogens: Co-occurrence, removal, and enrichment in municipal sewage sludge digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Li, Bing; Ma, Liping; Wang, Yubo; Huang, Danping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-15

    Understanding which/how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) contribute to increased acquisition of resistance by pathogens in aquatic environments are challenges of profound significance. We explored the co-occurrence and removal versus enrichment of ARGs and human bacterial pathogens (HBPs) in municipal sewage sludge digesters. We combined metagenomic detection of a wide spectrum of 323 ARGs and 83 HBPs with a correlation-based statistical approach and charted a network of their co-occurrence relationships. The results indicate that most ARGs and a minor proportion of HBPs (mainly Collinsella aerofaciens, Streptococcus salivarius and Gordonia bronchialis) could not be removed by anaerobic digestion, revealing a biological risk of post-digestion sludge in disseminating antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. Moreover, preferential co-occurrence patterns were evident within one ARG type (e.g., multidrug, beta-lactam, and aminoglycoside) and between two different ARG types (i.e., aminoglycoside and beta-lactam), possibly implicating co-effects of antibiotic selection pressure and co-resistance on shaping antibiotic resistome in sewage sludge. Unlike beta-lactam resistance genes, ARGs of multidrug and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin tended to co-occur more with HBPs. Strikingly, we presented evidence that the most straightforward biological origin of an ARG-species co-occurring event is a hosting relationship. Furthermore, a significant and robust HBP-species co-occurrence correlation provides a proper scenario for nominating HBP indicators (e.g., Bifidobacterium spp. are perfect indicators of C. aerofaciens; r = 0.92-0.99 and P-values < 0.01). Combined, this study demonstrates a creative and effective network-based metagenomic approach for exploring ARG hosts and HBP indicators and assessing ARGs acquisition by HBPs in human-impacted environments where ARGs and HBPs may co-thrive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Andrographolide: A potent antituberculosis compound that targets Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Amudha; Hassan, Sameer; Prabuseenivasan; Shainaba, A S; Hanna, L E; Kumar, Vanaja

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a major challenging infectious disease. The increased rate of emergence of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism has further complicated the situation, resulting in an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Antimycobacterial activity of Andrographis paniculata was evaluated using a rapid LRP assay and the probable targets were identified by docking analysis. The methanolic extract of A. paniculata showed maximum antimycobacterial activity at 250μg/ml against all the tested strains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv, MDR, and drug sensitive). Based on bioassay guided fractionation, andrographolide was identified as the potent molecule. With the docking analysis, both ICDH (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase) and AAC (Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase) were predicted as targets of andrographolide in M. tuberculosis. Molecular simulation revealed that, ICDH showed low binding affinity to andrographolide. However, for AAC, the andrographolide was observed to be well within the active site after 10ns of molecular simulation. This suggests that ACC (PDB ID 1M4I) could be the probable target for andrographolide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An Antipersister Strategy for Treatment of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeva, Martina; Gutu, Alina D; Hebert, Wesley; Wager, Jeffrey D; Yonker, Lael M; O'Toole, George A; Ausubel, Frederick M; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial persisters are a quasidormant subpopulation of cells that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment. The combination of the aminoglycoside tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator utilizes an antipersister strategy that is aimed at reducing recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections by enhancing the killing of P. aeruginosa persisters. Stationary-phase cultures of P. aeruginosa were used to generate persister cells. A range of tobramycin concentrations was tested with a range of metabolite concentrations to determine the potentiation effect of the metabolite under a variety of conditions, including a range of pH values and in the presence of azithromycin or cystic fibrosis (CF) patient sputum. In addition, 96-well dish biofilm and colony biofilm assays were performed, and the cytotoxicity of the tobramycin-fumarate combination was determined utilizing a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Enhanced killing of up to 6 orders of magnitude of P. aeruginosa persisters over a range of CF isolates, including mucoid and nonmucoid strains, was observed for the tobramycin-fumarate combination compared to killing with tobramycin alone. Furthermore, significant fumarate-mediated potentiation was seen in the presence of azithromycin or CF patient sputum. Fumarate also reduced the cytotoxicity of tobramycin-treated P. aeruginosa to human epithelial airway cells. Finally, in mucoid and nonmucoid CF isolates, complete eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilm was observed in the colony biofilm assay due to fumarate potentiation. These data suggest that a combination of tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator may be an attractive therapeutic for eliminating recurrent P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients through the eradication of bacterial persisters. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. High-performance thin-layer chromatography screening of multi class antibiotics in animal food by bioluminescent bioautography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yisheng; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2014-08-22

    The world-wide usage and partly abuse of veterinary antibiotics resulted in a pressing need to control residues in animal-derived foods. Large-scale screening for residues of antibiotics is typically performed by microbial agar diffusion tests. This work employing high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) combined with bioautography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry introduces a rapid and efficient method for a multi-class screening of antibiotic residues. The viability of the bioluminescent bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri to the studied antibiotics (16 species of 5 groups) was optimized on amino plates, enabling detection sensitivity down to the strictest maximum residue limits. The HPTLC method was developed not to separate the individual antibiotics, but for cleanup of sample extracts. The studied antibiotics either remained at the start zones (tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides) or migrated into the front (amphenicols), while interfering co-extracted matrix compounds were dispersed at hRf 20-80. Only after a few hours, the multi-sample plate image clearly revealed the presence or absence of antibiotic residues. Moreover, molecular information as to the suspected findings was rapidly achieved by HPTLC-mass spectrometry. Showing remarkable sensitivity and matrix-tolerance, the established method was successfully applied to milk and kidney samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Freshwater Biofilms May Reflect Influences from High-Intensity Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkworth-Lawrence, Cynthia; Lange, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health concern with growing evidence of environmental gene reservoirs, especially in freshwater. However, the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater, in addition to the wide spectrum of land use contaminants like nitrogen and phosphate, that waterways are subjected to is inconclusive. Using molecular analyses, freshwater benthic rock biofilms were screened for genes conferring resistance to antibiotics used in both humans and farmed animals (aacA-aphD to aminoglycosides; mecA to ß-lactams; ermA and ermB to macrolides; tetA, tetB, tetK, and tetM to tetracyclines; vanA and vanB to glycopeptides). We detected widespread low levels of antibiotic resistance genes from 20 waterways across southern New Zealand throughout the year (1.3 % overall detection rate; 480 samples from three rocks per site, 20 sites, eight occasions; July 2010-May 2011). Three of the ten genes, ermB, tetK, and tetM, were detected in 62 of the 4800 individual screens; representatives confirmed using Sanger sequencing. No distinction could be made between human and agricultural land use contamination sources based on gene presence distribution alone. However, land use pressures are suggested by moderate correlations between antibiotic resistance genes and high-intensity farming in winter. The detection of antibiotic resistance genes at several sites not subject to known agricultural pressures suggests human sources of resistance, like waterway contamination resulting from unsatisfactory toilet facilities at recreational sites.

  3. Prescribing Pattern and Antibiotic Use for Hospitalized Children in a Northern Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Lawal Waisu; Isah, Abdulmuminu; Musa, Shuaibu; Umar, Bilkisu

    2018-01-01

    Background: Assessment of patterns of drug to detect performance problems and compliance with standards facilitates objective comparisons and impact evaluation. Children are at higher risk of consequences of irrational prescribing and antibiotic misuse. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the prescribing pattern and utilization of antibiotics for children using standard prescribing indicators and indices of rational drug prescribing. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of prescriptions for pediatric inpatients at a teaching hospital in Northern Nigeria. Information was obtained from eligible prescriptions received over 24-month period using a modified WHO prescribing indicator form. The WHO prescribing indicators and the Index of Rational Drug Prescribing (IRDP) were used to evaluate prescriptions. Data were analyzed and presented as proportions, means, tables, and charts, comparing with WHO standards and with findings of similar studies. Results: There were 3908 eligible prescription orders, with a mean patient age of 3.1 (±2.7) years. With an average of 2.1 drugs per prescription, 66.8% were written with generic names, whereas a single antibiotic was included among 63% of prescriptions with antibiotics. Antibiotics and injections were contained in 49.5% and 67.7% of prescriptions, respectively. Medications were available in the Essential Medicines List in 95.5% of cases. The IRDP obtained is 2.99, against a standard of 5. Aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, and penicillins were the most common choices, whereas ampicillin/cloxacillin was the most common combination. Conclusion: Drug prescribing and antibiotic use were generally inappropriate compared with ideal standards. Continuous training/retraining on rational drug use, periodic monitoring, and use of treatment protocols in tertiary hospitals are recommended. PMID:29363633

  4. A Qualitative Review on the Pharmacokinetics of Antibiotics in Saliva: Implications on Clinical Pharmacokinetic Monitoring in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Tony K L; Ensom, Mary H H

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a systematic search to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the utility of saliva for clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring (CPM) of antibiotics. Although the majority of identified studies lacked sufficient pharmacokinetic data needed to assign an appropriate suitability classification, most aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, penicillins/cephalosporins, and tetracyclines are likely not suitable for CPM in saliva. No clear pattern of correlation was observed between physiochemical properties that favor drug distribution into saliva and the likelihood of the antibiotic being classified as suitable for CPM in saliva (and vice versa). Insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiological conditions affected salivary distribution of antibiotics. Additional confirmatory data are required for drugs (especially in patients) that are deemed likely suitable for CPM in saliva because only a few studies were available and many focused only on healthy subjects. All studies identified had relatively small sample sizes and exhibited large variability. Very few studies reported salivary collection parameters (e.g., salivary flow, pH) that could potentially have some impact on drug distribution into saliva. The available data are heavily weighted on healthy subjects, and insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiology had effects on saliva drug distribution. Some studies also lacked assay sensitivity for detecting antibiotics in saliva. Overall, this review can be useful to clinicians who desire an overview on the suitability of saliva for conducting CPM of specific antibiotics, or for researchers who wish to fill the identified knowledge gaps to move the science of salivary CPM further.

  5. Insight into the mechanism of chemical modification of antibacterial agents by antibiotic resistance enzyme O-phosphotransferase-IIIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Blake Hollett; Smith, Nathan; Downer, Brandon; Alisaraie, Laleh

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics was investigated. We examined the conformational changes of the O-phosphotransferase-IIIa enzyme, complexed with the antibiotics using MD simulations. The inhibitory effects of a group of antibacterial peptides against the enzyme were also examined, among which CP10A showed the highest affinity and the results correlated with the measured IC50 values. The regioselectivity of the phosphorylation reaction was shown to be in favor of the OH at the 5″ position versus the 3' of the antibiotic. The binding mode of CP10A was evaluated by means of MD simulation that resulted in recognizing its Trp8 and Arg13 residues binding near to where residues at the 3' and 5″ positions of the antibiotic would bind; thus, they are essential for the peptide inhibitory effect. The major open, semi-open, and closed conformations of the binding sites were identified throughout the MD trajectory, which enable the enzyme to regulate the influx of molecules into these sites. Based on the enzyme crystal structure, it was assumed that the 'antibiotic loop' of the enzyme is stable in its liganded mode; however, MD results revealed that the loop is highly flexible in both liganded and ligand-free modes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Outcome measurement of extensive implementation of antimicrobial stewardship in patients receiving intravenous antibiotics in a Japanese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, T; Shinoda, Y; Suzuki, A; Ohmori, T; Yasuda, M; Ohta, H; Fukao, A; Kitaichi, K; Matsuura, K; Sugiyama, T; Murakami, N; Itoh, Y

    2012-10-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship has not always prevailed in a wide variety of medical institutions in Japan. The infection control team was involved in the review of individual use of antibiotics in all inpatients (6348 and 6507 patients/year during the first and second annual interventions, respectively) receiving intravenous antibiotics, according to the published guidelines, consultation with physicians before prescription of antimicrobial agents and organisation of education programme on infection control for all medical staff. The outcomes of extensive implementation of antimicrobial stewardship were evaluated from the standpoint of antimicrobial use density, treatment duration, duration of hospital stay, occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and medical expenses. Prolonged use of antibiotics over 2 weeks was significantly reduced after active implementation of antimicrobial stewardship (2.9% vs. 5.2%, p generation cephalosporins (p = 0.03), carbapenems (p = 0.003), aminoglycosides (p antibiotics by 11.7%. The appearance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the proportion of Serratia marcescens to Gram-negative bacteria decreased significantly from 47.6% to 39.5% (p = 0.026) and from 3.7% to 2.0% (p = 0.026), respectively. Moreover, the mean hospital stay was shortened by 2.9 days after active implementation of antimicrobial stewardship. Extensive implementation of antimicrobial stewardship led to a decrease in the inappropriate use of antibiotics, saving in medical expenses, reduction in the development of antimicrobial resistance and shortening of hospital stay. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Co-occurrence of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance in Kızılırmak River isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icgen, Bulent; Yilmaz, Fadime

    2014-12-01

    Contamination of surface waters with antimicrobials has become an increasing public health concern because of the emergence of multi-resistant pathogens. For this reason, water samples collected from the Kızılırmak River-Kırıkkale, Turkey were analysed to learn more about the co-occurrence of heavy metal and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Resistant profiles were determined by using 26 antibiotics and 17 heavy metals. Out of 290, 24 isolates with both heavy metal and antibiotic resistance were determined. Resistance to heavy metals including lead, tin, nickel, barium, aliminum, strontium, silver and lithium varied between 50 and 92 %. More than 50 % of the isolates showed resistance to cephalosporin, quinolone, sulfonamide and aminoglycoside type of antibiotics. The discharge of antimicrobials to water bodies may cause a combined effect of selection and co-selection towards resistant bacteria. Therefore, surface waters may be potential hot spots of the evolution of heavy metal- and antibiotic-resistant bacteria and require special scientific consideration.

  8. Evaluation of levels of antibiotic resistance in groundwater-derived E. coli isolates in the Midwest of Ireland and elucidation of potential predictors of resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Jean; Hynds, Paul; Pot, Matthieu; Adley, Catherine C.; Ryan, Michael P.

    2017-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant (pathogenic and non-pathogenic) organisms and genes are now acknowledged as significant emerging aquatic contaminants with potentially adverse human and ecological health impacts, and thus require monitoring. This study is the first to investigate levels of resistance among Irish groundwater (private wells) samples; Escherichia coli isolates were examined against a panel of commonly prescribed human and veterinary therapeutic antibiotics, followed by determination of the causative factors of resistance. Overall, 42 confirmed E. coli isolates were recovered from a groundwater-sampling cohort. Resistance to the human panel of antibiotics was moderate; nine (21.4%) E. coli isolates demonstrated resistance to one or more human antibiotics. Conversely, extremely high levels of resistance to veterinary antibiotics were found, with all isolates presenting resistance to one or more veterinary antibiotics. Particularly high levels of resistance (93%) were found with respect to the aminoglycoside class of antibiotics. Results of statistical analysis indicate a significant association between the presence of human (multiple) antibiotic resistance ( p = 0.002-0.011) and both septic tank density and the presence of vulnerable sub-populations (<5 years). For the veterinary antibiotics, results point to a significant relationship ( p = <0.001) between livestock (cattle) density and the prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistant E. coli. Groundwater continues to be an important resource in Ireland, particularly in rural areas; thus, results of this preliminary study offer a valuable insight into the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in the hydrogeological environment and establish a need for further research with a larger geological diversity.

  9. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  10. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt

    2011-01-01

    . The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super......The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents...... (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2x the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 µg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity...

  11. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns of Enterococcus faecalis and faecium bacteria isolated from the human and the livestock