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Sample records for aminoglycoside antibiotic activity

  1. Potentiation of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity using the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor

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    Felipe S. Ferreira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Boa constrictor is widely used in traditional communities in many different folk remedies and products derived from it are sold in public markets throughout northeastern Brazil and as its body fat has many different therapeutic indications as a folk remedy. The present work evaluates the antibacterial activity of the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor when employed either alone or in combination with antibiotics and discusses the ecological implications of the use of this traditional remedy. Oil (OBC was extracted from body fat located in the ventral region of B. constrictor using hexane as a solvent. The antibacterial activity of OBC was tested against standard as well as multi-resistant lines, either alone and in combination with antibiotics. OBC did not demonstrate any relevant antibacterial activity against standard or multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. OBC showed synergistic activity when combined with the aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results indicate that the body fat of Boa constrictor does not possess bactericidal activity, from the clinical point of view, but when combined with an antibiotic, the fat demonstrated a significant synergistic activity.

  2. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  3. Potentiation of antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides by natural products from Cordia verbenacea DC.

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    Matias, Edinardo F F; Alves, Erivania F; Silva, Maria K N; Carvalho, Victoria R A; Medeiros, Cassio R; Santos, Francisco A V; Bitu, Vanessa C N; Souza, Celestina E S; Figueredo, Fernando G; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Costa, José G M; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants are often the only therapeutic resource for many communities and ethnic groups. Cordia verbenacea DC., "Erva-baleeira," is one of the species of plants currently used to produce a phytotherapeutic product extracted from its leaves. The present study aimed to establish its chemical profile, antibacterial activity and resistance-modulating potential. The C. verbenacea extracts were prepared from fresh leaves using solvents as methanol and hexane. Ethyl Acetate was used for the preparation of the fraction. Phytochemical screening was carried out using HPLC-DAD for determination and quantification of the secondary metabolites present in the fractions. Antibacterial and resistance-modulation assays were performed to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using a microdilution assay. The data were subjected to statistical analysis with two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni posttests. Results of phytochemical prospecting and HPLC analysis of the fractions were in agreement with the literature. The natural products presented moderate antibacterial activity when considering the clinical relevance of a MIC of 256 μg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 512 μg/mL against P. aeruginosa. However, when the fractions were combined with antibiotics we observed a synergic effect, as natural products enhanced the antibacterial effect of aminoglycosides, significantly decreasing the MIC of antibiotics at 12.5%-98.4%. We believe that the data obtained from phytochemical analysis and from antibacterial and resistance modulation assays of C. verbenacea extracts new can open perspectives in the search for new alternatives for the treatment of bacterial infections and stimulate the renewed use of antibiotics with reduced effectiveness due to resistance. PMID:27033000

  4. Cationic Amphiphiles Increase Activity of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Tobramycin in the Presence of Airway Polyelectrolytes

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    Purdy Drew, Kirstin R.; Sanders, Lori K.; Culumber, Zachary W.; Zribi, Olena; Wong, Gerard C.L.; (UIUC)

    2009-06-17

    It is empirically known that anionic polyelectrolytes present in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways due to bacterial infection significantly decrease the activity of cationic antimicrobials via electrostatic binding. In this work, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to investigate the interaction between tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly administered to CF patients via inhalation, with DNA, which is found in high concentrations in the CF airway. We find that interactions between DNA and tobramycin are significantly modified by the presence of mixtures of amphiphilic molecules. We measure a hierarchy of self-assembled structures formed between tobramycin, DNA, and the amphiphile mixtures and show how interactions between these components can be controlled. Results indicate that mixtures of cationic and negative curvature amphiphiles optimized for DNA binding via charge matching and curvature matching can competitively displace bound tobramycin from DNA and thereby drastically suppress tobramycin-DNA binding and resultant antimicrobial inactivation. Growth inhibition assays confirm the increased activity of tobramycin in the presence of DNA with the addition of the amphiphiles. These results suggest that optimized cationic amphiphile solutions have the potential to enhance antimicrobial function in highly infected environments that contain increased concentrations of anionic inflammatory polymers.

  5. Cationic Amphiphiles Increase Activity of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Tobramycin in the Presence of Airway Polyelectrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drew, K.R.Purdy; Sanders, L.K.; Culumber, Z.W.; Zribi, O.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-05-21

    It is empirically known that anionic polyelectrolytes present in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways due to bacterial infection significantly decrease the activity of cationic antimicrobials via electrostatic binding. In this work, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to investigate the interaction between tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly administered to CF patients via inhalation, with DNA, which is found in high concentrations in the CF airway. We find that interactions between DNA and tobramycin are significantly modified by the presence of mixtures of amphiphilic molecules. We measure a hierarchy of self-assembled structures formed between tobramycin, DNA, and the amphiphile mixtures and show how interactions between these components can be controlled. Results indicate that mixtures of cationic and negative curvature amphiphiles optimized for DNA binding via charge matching and curvature matching can competitively displace bound tobramycin from DNA and thereby drastically suppress tobramycin-DNA binding and resultant antimicrobial inactivation. Growth inhibition assays confirm the increased activity of tobramycin in the presence of DNA with the addition of the amphiphiles. These results suggest that optimized cationic amphiphile solutions have the potential to enhance antimicrobial function in highly infected environments that contain increased concentrations of anionic inflammatory polymers.

  6. Cationic Amphiphiles Increase Activity of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Tobramycin in the Presence of Airway Polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is empirically known that anionic polyelectrolytes present in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways due to bacterial infection significantly decrease the activity of cationic antimicrobials via electrostatic binding. In this work, we use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to investigate the interaction between tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly administered to CF patients via inhalation, with DNA, which is found in high concentrations in the CF airway. We find that interactions between DNA and tobramycin are significantly modified by the presence of mixtures of amphiphilic molecules. We measure a hierarchy of self-assembled structures formed between tobramycin, DNA, and the amphiphile mixtures and show how interactions between these components can be controlled. Results indicate that mixtures of cationic and negative curvature amphiphiles optimized for DNA binding via charge matching and curvature matching can competitively displace bound tobramycin from DNA and thereby drastically suppress tobramycin-DNA binding and resultant antimicrobial inactivation. Growth inhibition assays confirm the increased activity of tobramycin in the presence of DNA with the addition of the amphiphiles. These results suggest that optimized cationic amphiphile solutions have the potential to enhance antimicrobial function in highly infected environments that contain increased concentrations of anionic inflammatory polymers

  7. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

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    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  8. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the...

  9. Selective condensation of DNA by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

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    Kopaczynska, M; Schulz, A; Fraczkowska, K; Kraszewski, S; Podbielska, H; Fuhrhop, J H

    2016-05-01

    The condensing effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the structure of double-stranded DNA was examined. The selective condensation of DNA by small molecules is an interesting approach in biotechnology. Here, we present the interaction between calf thymus DNA and three types of antibiotic molecules: tobramycin, kanamycin, and neomycin. Several techniques were applied to study this effect. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy images, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the interaction of tobramycin with double-stranded DNA caused the rod, toroid, and sphere formation and very strong condensation of DNA strands, which was not observed in the case of other aminoglycosides used in the experiment. Studies on the mechanisms by which small molecules interact with DNA are important in understanding their functioning in cells, in designing new and efficient drugs, or in minimizing their adverse side effects. Specific interactions between tobramycin and DNA double helix was modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation study shows the aminoglycoside specificity to bend DNA double helix, shedding light on the origins of toroid formation. This phenomenon may lighten the ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity issues, but also other adverse reactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the human body. PMID:26646261

  10. Aminoglycoside antibiotics and autism: a speculative hypothesis

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    Manev Hari

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, it has been suspected that there is a relationship between therapy with some antibiotics and the onset of autism; but even more curious, some children benefited transiently from a subsequent treatment with a different antibiotic. Here, we speculate how aminoglycoside antibiotics might be associated with autism. Presentation We hypothesize that aminoglycoside antibiotics could a trigger the autism syndrome in susceptible infants by causing the stop codon readthrough, i.e., a misreading of the genetic code of a hypothetical critical gene, and/or b improve autism symptoms by correcting the premature stop codon mutation in a hypothetical polymorphic gene linked to autism. Testing Investigate, retrospectively, whether a link exists between aminoglycoside use (which is not extensive in children and the onset of autism symptoms (hypothesis "a", or between amino glycoside use and improvement of these symptoms (hypothesis "b". Whereas a prospective study to test hypothesis "a" is not ethically justifiable, a study could be designed to test hypothesis "b". Implications It should be stressed that at this stage no direct evidence supports our speculative hypothesis and that its main purpose is to initiate development of new ideas that, eventually, would improve our understanding of the pathobiology of autism.

  11. Potentiation of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity using the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe S. Ferreira; Nalba L. G. Silva; Edinardo F.F Matias; Samuel V. Brito; Francisco G. Oliveira; José G. M. Costa; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.; Waltécio O. Almeida; Alves, Rômulo R. N.

    2011-01-01

    Boa constrictor is widely used in traditional communities in many different folk remedies and products derived from it are sold in public markets throughout northeastern Brazil and as its body fat has many different therapeutic indications as a folk remedy. The present work evaluates the antibacterial activity of the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor when employed either alone or in combination with antibiotics and discusses the ecological implications of the use of this traditional rem...

  12. Enhancement of the antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides by extracts from Anadenanthera colubrine (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

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    Barreto, Humberto M; Coelho, Kivia M R N; Ferreira, Josie H L; Dos Santos, Bernadete H C; de Abreu, Aislan P L; Coutinho, Henrique D M; da Silva, Romezio A C; de Sousa, Taciana O; Citó, Antonia M das G L; Lopes, José A D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol (EEAC) and hexane (HFAC) extracts from the stem bark of Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil alone or in combination with aminoglycosides against multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extracts were determined by using microdilution assay. For the evaluation of extracts as modulators of antibiotic resistance, MICs of neomycin and amikacin were determined in presence or absence of each compound at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Both EEAC and HFAC did not show antimicrobial activity against MDR strains tested. However, the addition of EEAC and HFAC enhanced the activity of neomycin and amikacin against Staphylococcus aureus SA10 strain. When the natural products were replaced by chlorpromazine, the same effect was observed. Anadenanthera colubrine var. cebil may be a source of phytochemicals able to potentiate the aminoglycoside activity against MDR S. aureus by the inhibition of efflux pump. PMID:26158209

  13. High throughput LSPR and SERS analysis of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

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    McKeating, Kristy S; Couture, Maxime; Dinel, Marie-Pier; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2016-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, and are often dispensed only in severe cases due to their adverse side effects. Patients undergoing treatment with these antibiotics are therefore commonly subjected to therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) to ensure a safe and effective personalised dosage. The ability to detect these antibiotics in a rapid and sensitive manner in human fluids is therefore of the utmost importance in order to provide effective monitoring of these drugs, which could potentially allow for a more widespread use of this class of antibiotics. Herein, we report on the detection of various aminoglycosides, by exploiting their ability to aggregate gold nanoparticles. The number and position of the amino groups of aminoglycoside antibiotics controlled the aggregation process. We investigated the complementary techniques of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) for dual detection of these aminoglycoside antibiotics and performed an in-depth study of the feasibility of carrying out TDM of tobramycin using a platform amenable to high throughput analysis. Herein, we also demonstrate dual detection of tobramycin using both LSPR and SERS in a single platform and within the clinically relevant concentration range needed for TDM of this particular aminoglycoside. Additionally we provide evidence that tobramycin can be detected in spiked human serum using only functionalised nanoparticles and SERS analysis. PMID:27412506

  14. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Nikolaus; Beate Strehlitz

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminog...

  15. Preparation and characterization of dehydration-rehydration vesicles loaded with aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics.

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    Mugabe, Clement; Azghani, Ali O; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-13

    Enhanced activity of liposomes-encapsulated antibiotics against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been documented with liposomes of low encapsulation efficiency. We sought to construct liposomes with high yield entrapment of aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics as well as favorable stability in storage and physiological conditions. Liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin) and a macrolide (erythromycin) were prepared by a modified dehydration-rehydration vesicles (DRVs) method, and their particle size and entrapment efficiency were determined. We studied in vitro stability of these vesicles over a 48 h period at 4 and 37 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and in plasma at 37 degrees C. The mean particle size of DRVs loaded with antibiotics varied from 163.37+/-38.44 to 259.83+/-11.80 nm with no significant difference in regard with the type of the antibiotics encapsulated. Encapsulation efficiency of DRVs loaded with amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and erythromycin were 29.27+/-1.17, 33+/-0.76, 22.33+/-1.48 and 32.06+/-0.82% of initial amount of the drug, respectively. These vesicles were stable regardless of the experimental temperature. Indeed, the liposomes retained more than 75% of the initially encapsulated drugs for the study period of 48 h. DRVs incubated in plasma however, released more antibiotics than those incubated in PBS. In conclusion, using this modified DRV method, we obtained small sized vesicles with high yield entrapment for aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics. The technique may be utilized to overcome the low encapsulation efficiency associated with aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics. PMID:16289986

  16. Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics using complex compounds of chromotropic acid bisazoderivatives with rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of complex formation of bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid with rare earth ions and aminoglycoside antibiotics have made it possible to choose carboxyarsenazo, orthanyl R and carboxynitrazo as highly sensitive reagents for determining aminoglycoside antibiotics. Conditions have been found for the formation of precipitates of different-ligand complexes containing rare earth ions, bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid and aminogylcoside antibiotics. A procedure has been worked out of determining the antibiotics in biological samples with carboxyarsenazo

  17. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

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    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-01

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  18. Toggled RNA Aptamers Against Aminoglycosides Allowing Facile Detection of Antibiotics Using Gold Nanoparticle Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Derbyshire, Nicola; White, Simon J.; Bunka, David H. J.; Song, Lei; Stead, Sara; Tarbin, Jonathan; Sharman, Matthew; Zhou, Dejian; Stockley, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    We have used systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) to isolate RNA aptamers against aminoglycoside antibiotics. The SELEX rounds were toggled against four pairs of aminoglycosides with the goal of isolating reagents that recognize conserved structural features. The resulting aptamers bind both of their selection targets with nanomolar affinities. They also bind the less structurally related targets, although they show clear specificity for this class of antibiotics....

  19. Phytochemical screening and synergistic interactions between aminoglycosides, selected antibiotics and extracts from the bryophyte Octoblepharum albidum Hedw (Calymperaceae

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    Vidal C.A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is the first to describe the modulation of antibiotic activity of the bryophyte Octoblepharum albidum Hedw extract. The antibacterial activity of ethanolic extract of O. albidum (EEOa, alone and in association with aminoglycosides, was determined against six bacterial strains by a microdilution test. The results showed a similar inhibitory activity of EEOa against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 33018 (MICs 512 μg/mL. The synergistic effect of the extracts and aminoglycosides was also verified. The most pronounced effects were obtained with EEOa + gentamicin against E. coli and EEOa + kanamycin against K. pneumoniae with MICs reduction (128 to 32 μg/mL. The data from this study are indicative of the antibacterial activity of the bryophyte O. albidum extracts and its potential in modifying the resistance of aminoglycosides analyzed.

  20. USMB-induced synergistic enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotics in biofilms.

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    Ronan, Evan; Edjiu, Narbeh; Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon; Karshafian, Raffi

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of combining antibiotics with ultrasound and microbubbles (USMB) toward the eradication of biofilms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms were treated with the antibiotics gentamicin sulfate or streptomycin sulfate, or a combination of USMB with the respective antibiotics. Biofilm structure was quantified using confocal laser scanning microscopy with COMSTAT analysis, while activity was measured as whole-biofilm CO2 production in a continuous-flow biofilm model. The combined antibiotic-USMB treatment significantly impacted biofilm biomass, thickness and surface roughness compared to antibiotics alone (p<0.05). USMB exposure caused the formation of craters (5-20μm in diameter) in the biofilms, and when combined with gentamicin, activity was significantly lower, compared to gentamicin, USMB or untreated controls, respectively. Interestingly, the CO2 production rate following combined streptomycin-USMB treatment was higher than after streptomycin alone, but significantly lower than USMB alone and untreated control. These results show strong evidence of a synergistic effect between antibiotics and USMB, although the varied response to different antibiotics emphasize the need to optimize the USMB exposure conditions to maximize this synergism and ultimately transfer this technology into clinical or industrial practice. PMID:27111871

  1. Sensitivity of ribosomes of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

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    Bocchetta, M; Huber, R.; Cammarano, P

    1996-01-01

    A poly(U)-programmed cell-free system from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex pyrophilus has been developed, and the susceptibility of Aquifex ribosomes to the miscoding-inducing and inhibitory actions of all known classes of aminoglycoside antibiotics has been assayed at temperatures (75 to 80 degrees C) close to the physiological optimum for cell growth. Unlike Thermotoga maritima ribosomes, which are systematically refractory to all known classes of aminoglycoside compounds (P. Londei...

  2. Introducing Aztreonam The First Monobactam Antibiotic, A Suitable Substitution for the Aminoglycosides

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    A. Jahanshahi M.Khajeh - Karamadeni S. Fazli Bazaz

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available Aztreonam (Azactam for injection, squibb is the first member of a new and unique class of beta - lactam antibiotics designated by researchers at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research as monobactams (monocyclic bacterially produced beta - lactam antibiotics."nIn this research, for the first time, antimicrobial spectrum of aztrenoam was determined by Disk - Agar Diffusion (250 spp. and Macrodilution Broth Methods (150 Spp."nWe also compared this antibiotic with two routine aminoglycoside antibiotics (Amikacin, Gentamicin in Iran. The most active antibiotic in our study was aztreonam which had MIC50 & MIC90 of 4 & 32 ^g/ml specifically against Pseudomonas aeruginosa."nThis rate for the other aerobic gram - negative bacteria (E. coli, Kleb. pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, enterobacter spp., Shigella Spp. and Salmonella Spp. was less than 0.5 & 4 g/ml respectively."nAztreonam's MIC90 for kleb pneumoniae was 8/jg/mI our results were Correlated to the other studies"nAll aerobic gram - negative bacteria has been obtained from the Qhaem's Medical Center in Mashhad - IRAN."nThe results of Disk - Agar Diffusion Method determines that all bacteria were 100% susceptible against aztreonam except Pseudomonas aeruginosa with 83% susceptibility.

  3. Aminoglycoside microarrays to explore interactions of antibiotics with RNAs and proteins.

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    Disney, Matthew D; Seeberger, Peter H

    2004-07-01

    RNA is an important target for drug discovery efforts. Several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics bind to bacterial rRNA and inhibit protein synthesis. Aminoglycosides, however, are losing efficacy due to their inherent toxicity and the increase in antibiotic resistance. Targeting of other RNAs is also becoming more attractive thanks to the discovery of new potential RNA drug targets through genome sequencing and biochemical efforts. Identification of new compounds that target RNA is therefore urgent, and we report here on the development of rapid screening methods to probe binding of low molecular weight ligands to proteins and RNAs. A series of aminoglycosides has been immobilized onto glass microscope slides, and binding to proteins and RNAs has been detected by fluorescence. Construction and analysis of the arrays is completed by standard DNA genechip technology. Binding of immobilized aminoglycosides to proteins that are models for study of aminoglycoside toxicity (DNA polymerase and phospholipase C), small RNA oligonucleotide mimics of aminoglycoside binding sites in the ribosome (rRNA A-site mimics), and a large (approximately 400 nucleotide) group I ribozyme RNA is detected. The ability to screen large RNAs alleviates many complications associated with binding experiments that use isolated truncated regions from larger RNAs. These studies lay the foundation for rapid identification of small organic ligands from combinatorial libraries that exhibit strong and selective RNA binding while displaying decreased affinity to toxicity-causing proteins. PMID:15224340

  4. Environmental and genetic factors affecting mutability to aminoglycoside antibiotics among Escherichia coli K12 strains

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    Monteiro A.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental and genetic factors affecting the in vitro spontaneous mutation frequencies to aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli K12 were investigated. Spontaneous mutation frequencies to kanamycin resistance were at least 100 fold higher on modified Luria agar (L2 plates, when compared to results obtained in experiments carried out with Nutrient agar (NA plates. In contrast to rifampincin, the increased mutability to kanamycin resistance could not be attributed to a mutator phenotype expressed by DNA repair defective strains. Kanamycin mutant selection windows and mutant preventive concentrations on L2 plates were at least fourfold higher than on NA plates, further demonstrating the role of growth medium composition on the mutability to aminoglycosides. Mutability to kanamycin resistance was increased following addition of sorbitol, suggesting that osmolarity is involved on the spontaneous mutability of E. coli K12 strains to aminoglycosides. The spontaneous mutation rates to kanamycin resistance on both L2 and NA plates were strictly associated with the selective antibiotic concentrations. Moreover, mutants selected at different antibiotic concentrations expressed heterogeneous resistance levels to kanamycin and most of them expressing multiple resistance to all tested aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin, neomycin, amykacin and tobramycin. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the complex nature of aminoglycoside resistance and the emergence of spontaneous resistant mutants among E. coli K12 strains.

  5. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 ± 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected‐area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: ► Method for NaBH4 reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. ► Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. ► Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. ► Antibiotic conjugated nanoparticles exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity

  6. Synergistic Effect of Oleanolic Acid on Aminoglycoside Antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Shin

    Full Text Available Difficulties involved in treating drug-resistant pathogens have created a need for new therapies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using oleanolic acid (OA, a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, as a natural adjuvant for antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii. High concentrations of OA can kill cells, partly because it generates reactive oxygen species. Measurement of the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC for OA and time-kill experiments demonstrated that it only synergizes with aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin, kanamycin. Other classes of antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin, rifampicin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline have no interactions with OA. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that genes involved in ATP synthesis and cell membrane permeability, the gene encoding glycosyltransferase, peptidoglycan-related genes, phage-related genes, and DNA repair genes were upregulated under OA. OA highly induces the expression of adk, which encodes an adenylate kinase, and des6, which encodes a linoleoyl-CoA desaturase, and deletion of these genes increased FICs; these observations indicate that adk and des6 are involved in the synergism of OA with aminoglycosides. Data obtained using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, fluorescence-conjugated gentamicin, and membrane fatty acid analysis indicates that adk and des6 are involved in changes in membrane permeability. Proton-motive force and ATP synthesis tests show that those genes are also involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our data show that OA boosts aminoglycoside uptake by changing membrane permeability and energy metabolism in A. baumannii.

  7. Natural antioxidant L-carnosine inhibits LPO intensification in structures of the auditory analyzer under conditions of chronic exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravskii, S G; Aleksandrova, L A; Sirot, V S; Ivanov, S A

    2004-10-01

    Intragastric administration of L-carnosine suspension to Wistar-Kyoto rats 3 days before and after 7-day course of intraperitoneal injections of ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin compensated expenditures of tissue antioxidant systems and significantly eliminated kanamycin-induced intensification of MDA production in tissues of the membrane part of the cochlea and in the auditory cortex of the temporal lobe. L-NAME (competitive NO synthase inhibitor) also inhibited LPO, increased total antioxidant activity, and decreased ototoxicity of kanamycin, which confirms the contribution of NO into LPO intensification under conditions of aminoglycoside treatment. Inhibition of pathological intensification of LPO processes and increase in total antioxidant activity under conditions of induced acute aminoglycoside ototoxicity characterizes L-carnosine as a highly effective otoprotector. PMID:15665945

  8. Investigation on the Mechanism of Exacerbation of Myasthenia Gravis by Aminoglycoside Antibiotics in Mouse Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Changqin; HU Fang

    2005-01-01

    Summary: To investigate the underlying mechanism of the exacerbation of myasthenia gravis by aminoglycoside antibiotics. C57/BL6 mice were immunized with acetylcholine receptor (AChR), extracted from electric organ of Narcine timilei according to Xu Haopeng's methods, in complete Fruend's adjuvant (CFA) to establish experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). EAMG mice were divided randomly into 5 groups: MG group, NS group and three antibiotics groups. The clinical symptom scores of mice were evaluated on d7 after the last immunization and d14 of antibiotics treatment. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) was performed and the levels of anti-AChR antibody (AChR-Ab) were tested at the same time. The mean clinical symptom grades of gentamycin group (1.312, 2.067), amikacin group (1.111, 1.889) and etimicin group (1.263, 1.632) were significantly higher than those of MG group (1.000, 1.200) (P<0.05). The positive rates of RNS of three antibiotics groups were 69.23 %, 58.82 % and 63.16 % respectively, which were significantly higher than those of MG group and NS group (40.00 %, 40.00 %, P<0.05). The AChR-Ab level in serum and the expression of AChR on neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of mice in three antibiotics groups were also higher than those of MG group. Our results indicated that aminoglycoside antibiotics could aggravate the symptom of myasthenia gravis. The exacerbation of myasthenia gravis by these antibiotics probably involves competitively restraining the release of acetylcholine from presynaptic membrane, impairing the depolarization of postsynaptic membrane, depressing the irritability of myocyte membrane around the end-plate membrane and consequently leading to the blockade of neuromuscular junction.

  9. Mechanism of enhanced activity of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O; Lafrenie, Robert M; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of > or =32 versus < or =8 microg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% +/- 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% +/- 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 +/- 2.3 versus 24.2 +/- 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P < or = 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  10. The comparative effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics and muscle relaxants on electrical field stimulation response in rat bladder smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Chang Ho; Min, Young Sil; Lee, Sang Joon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that several aminoglycoside antibiotics have a potential of prolonging the action of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants by drug interactions acting pre-synaptically to inhibit acetylcholine release, but antibiotics itself also have a strong effect on relaxing the smooth muscle. In this study, four antibiotics of aminoglycosides such as gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin were compared with skeletal muscle relaxants baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine, and a smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine. The muscle strips isolated from the rat bladder were stimulated with pulse trains of 40 V in amplitude and 10 s in duration, with pulse duration of 1 ms at the frequency of 1-8 Hz, at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz respectively. To test the effect of four antibiotics on bladder smooth muscle relaxation, each of them was treated cumulatively from 1 μM to 0.1 mM with an interval of 5 min. Among the four antibiotics, gentamicin and neomycin inhibited the EFS response. The skeletal muscle relaxants (baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine) and inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA and glycine) did not show any significant effect. However, papaverine, had a significant effect in the relaxation of the smooth muscle. It was suggested that the aminoglycoside antibiotics have inhibitory effect on the bladder smooth muscle. PMID:27260628

  11. Determination of stability constants of aminoglycoside antibiotics with their metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwow, Vanny M. A.

    2014-03-01

    One group of aminoglycoside antibiotics contains aminosugars. The aminosugar neomycin B with its derivate product neamine (2-Deoxy-4-0-(2,6-diamino-2,6-dideoxy-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-D-Streptamine) was identified as a free ligands and metal complexes. In particular, the stability constants of metal complexes by potentiometric titration techniques were investigated. Our previous study had determined the acid dissociation constants of these aminosugars with few metal complexes in fair depth. In this work, the complexation of two pyridine-containing amino alcohols and an amino sugar (neamine) have been measured potentiometrically. For instance, the stability constant of copper(II) complexation were determine and the model system generated an excellent fit. Stability constants with several metals have been determined and will be reported.

  12. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaohu [ORNL; Norris, Adrianne [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Serpersu, Engin H [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  13. Combinations of β-lactam or aminoglycoside antibiotics with plectasin are synergistic against methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Hu

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101 and MRSA (n = 115. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI, plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin in 87-89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA

  14. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of...

  15. Non-derivatization approach to high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection for aminoglycoside antibiotics based on a ligand displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Tomellini, S A

    2001-12-21

    An indirect fluorescence detection method has been developed for detecting the aminoglycoside antibiotics following chromatographic separation. This approach to detection is based on a displacement reaction between the aminoglycosides and a copper(II)-L-tryptophan (L-Trp) complex, Cu(L-Trp)2. The aminoglycosides, which contain multiple amino groups, have strong affinities for the Cu(II) ion and displace L-Trp from the Cu(L-Trp)2 complex. The resulting increase in L-Trp fluorescence, which is quenched when coordinated to Cu(II), is indicative of the presence of the aminoglycoside. Fluorescence titration data indicate that there is a stoichiometric ratio of 1:1 between the reaction of the aminoglycosides with Cu(L-Trp)2. This HPLC detection scheme is implemented postcolumn by mixing a buffered Cu(L-Trp)2 solution with the column eluent prior to detection. The aminoglycosides were separated with the use of a column packed with a polymeric strong cation-exchanger. Separation and detection variables were optimized and are discussed. The detection limits for the aminoglycosides tested ranged from 4.2 to 14.5 ng injected (S/N=3). A linear working curve was achieved for amikacin in the range of 29-586 ng for a six point linearity test. The developed separation and detection scheme was further tested by analyzing commercial pharmaceutical formulations of these antibiotics. PMID:11806546

  16. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis of sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eSegil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the drug of choice for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in nearly one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 hours of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternative pathway regulating gentamicin-induced hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contribute to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside

  17. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life. PMID:26991103

  18. Tolerance of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) embryogenic tissue to penicillin, carbapenem and aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, J.; Pavingerová, Daniela; Cvrčková, H.; Bříza, Jindřich; Dostál, J.; Šíma, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2009), s. 156-161. ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : somatic embryogenesis * Norway spruce * penicillin antibiotics * Agrobacterium tumefaciens * carbapenem antibiotics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Aminoglycoside antibiotics and the sensory hair cells of inner ear and lateral line system in the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua: effects on fish hearing threshold

    OpenAIRE

    Faucher, Karine; Aas-Hansen, Øyvind; Damsgard, Borge; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Fuhr, Torgrim; Laukli, Einar; Stenklev, Niels-Christian

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate: a) the potential involvement of the fish lateral line system in hearing at 250 Hz and b) the possible regeneration of the inner ear hair cells in the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). The inner ear and lateral line system of the Atlantic cod were inactivated using ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotics by injection (gentamicin) or bath (gentamicin and streptomycin), respectively. Hearing thresholds were measured in the fish using the Auditory Brainst...

  20. 30S Subunit-Dependent Activation of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 Aminoglycoside Resistance-Conferring 16S rRNA Methyltransferase Kmr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Miloje; Sunita, S.; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Desai, Pooja M.; Macmaster, Rachel; Vinal, Kellie

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of bacterial 16S rRNA within the ribosomal decoding center confers exceptionally high resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. This resistance mechanism is exploited by aminoglycoside producers for self-protection while functionally equivalent methyltransferases have been acquired by human and animal pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report structural and functional analyses of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 aminoglycoside resistance-conferring methyltransferase Kmr. Our results demonstrate that Kmr is a 16S rRNA methyltransferase acting at residue A1408 to confer a canonical aminoglycoside resistance spectrum in Escherichia coli. Kmr possesses a class I methyltransferase core fold but with dramatic differences in the regions which augment this structure to confer substrate specificity in functionally related enzymes. Most strikingly, the region linking core β-strands 6 and 7, which forms part of the S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) binding pocket and contributes to base flipping by the m1A1408 methyltransferase NpmA, is disordered in Kmr, correlating with an exceptionally weak affinity for SAM. Kmr is unexpectedly insensitive to substitutions of residues critical for activity of other 16S rRNA (A1408) methyltransferases and also to the effects of by-product inhibition by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). Collectively, our results indicate that adoption of a catalytically competent Kmr conformation and binding of the obligatory cosubstrate SAM must be induced by interaction with the 30S subunit substrate. PMID:25733511

  1. Crystallographic Studies of Two Bacterial AntibioticResistance Enzymes: Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (2')-Ic and GES-1\\beta-lactamase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynes, Laura; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-10-31

    Guiana Extended-Spectrum-1 (GES-1) and Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (2')-Ic (APH(2')-Ic) are two bacteria-produced enzymes that essentially perform the same task: they provide resistance to an array of antibiotics. Both enzymes are part of a growing resistance problem in the medical world. In order to overcome the ever-growing arsenal of antibiotic-resistance enzymes, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of their action. Accurate structures of these proteins have become an invaluable tool to do this. Using protein crystallography techniques and X-ray diffraction, the protein structure of GES-1 bound to imipenem (an inhibitor) has been solved. Also, APH(2')-Ic has been successfully crystallized, but its structure was unable to be solved using molecular replacement using APH(2')-Ib as a search model. The structure of GES-1, with bound imipenem was solved to a resolution of 1.89A, and though the inhibitor is bound with only moderate occupancy, the structure shows crucial interactions inside the active site that render the enzyme unable to complete the hydrolysis of the {beta}-lactam ring. The APH(2')-Ic dataset could not be matched to the model, APH(2')-Ib, with which it shares 25% sequence identity. The structural information gained from GES-1, and future studies using isomorphous replacement to solve the APH(2')-Ic structure can aid directly to the creation of novel drugs to combat both of these classes of resistance enzymes.

  2. Special characteristics of fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering for cadmium telluride nanocrystal aqueous solution and its interactions with aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI TaiShan; LIU ShaoPu; LIU ZhongFang; HU XiaoLi; ZHANG LiPing

    2009-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals (CdTe NCs) were achieved by reaction of CdCl2 with KHTe solution and were capped with sodium mercaptoacetate. The product was detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet-visible spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The CdTe NCs are of cubic structure and the average size is about 5 nm. The fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe NCs aqueous solution increased from 37% to 97% after 20 d under room light. The maximum λem of fluorescence changed from 543 nm to 510 nm and the blue shift was 33 nm. CdTe NCs aqueous solution can be steady for at least 10 months at 4℃ in a refrigerator. The resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) of CdTe NCs in the aqueous solution was investigated. The maximum scattering peak was located at about 554 nm. The interactions of CdTe NCs with amikacin sulfate (AS) and micronomicin sulfate (MS) were in-vestigated respectively. The effects of AS and MS on fluorescence and RRS of CdTe NCs were analyzed. It was found that AS and MS quenched the photoluminescence of CdTe NCs and enhanced RRS of CdTe NCs. Under optimum conditions, there are linear relationships between quenching intensity (F0-F), intensity of RRS (1-10) and concentration of AS and MS. The detection limits (3σ) of AS and MS are re-spectively 3.4 ng.mL-1 and 2.6 ng.mL-1 by the fluorescence quenching method, and 15.2 ng.mL-1 and 14.0 ng.mL-1 by the RRS method. The methods have high sensitivity, thus CdTe NCs may be used as fluorescence probes and RRS probes for the detection of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  3. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch controls the expression of aminoglycoside resistance acetyltransferase and adenyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens is an increasing threat to public health. The fundamental mechanisms that control the high levels of expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are one of the earliest classes of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. In the clinic aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug although resistance through enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or the overexpression of efflux pumps is also appearing. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch has been identified that controls expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes that encode the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (ANT) (adenyltransferase (AAD)) enzymes. AAC and ANT cause resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics through modification of the drugs. Expression of the AAC and ANT resistance genes is regulated by aminoglycoside binding to the 5' leader RNA of the aac/aad genes. The aminoglycoside sensing RNA is also associated with the integron cassette system that captures antibiotic resistance genes. Specific aminoglycoside binding to the leader RNA induces a structural transition in the leader RNA, and consequently induction of resistance protein expression. Reporter gene expression, direct measurements of drug RNA binding, chemical probing and UV cross-linking combined with mutational analysis demonstrated that the leader RNA functioned as an aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch in which drug binding to the leader RNA leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches. PMID:24631585

  4. Rapid analysis of aminoglycoside antibiotics in bovine tissues using disposable pipette extraction and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high-throughput qualitative screening and identification method for 9 aminoglycosides of regulatory interest has been developed, validated, and implemented for bovine kidney, liver, and muscle tissues. The method involves extraction at previously validated conditions, cleanup using disposable pip...

  5. Structural and Molecular Basis for Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics by the Adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Georgina; Peter J. Stogios; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure...

  6. Potentiation of antibiotic activity by Eugenia uniflora and Eugenia jambolanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Henrique D M; Costa, José G M; Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne S; Siqueira-Júnior, José P; Lima, Edeltrudes O

    2010-08-01

    This is the first report about the modifying antibiotic activity of Eugenia uniflora L. and Eugenia jambolanum L. In this study the ethanol extract of E. uniflora and E. jambolanum was tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli. The growth of the two strains of E. coli bacteria tested was not inhibited in a clinically relevant form by the extract. The minimal inhibitory concentration was >or=1,024 microg/mL for both strains of E. coli assayed. Synergism between this extract and gentamicin was demonstrated. In the same extract synergism was observed between chlorpromazine and kanamycin and between amikacin and tobramycin, indicating the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to these aminoglycosides. It is therefore suggested that extracts from E. uniflora L. and E. jambolanum L. could be used as a source of plant-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to gentamicin. PMID:20482280

  7. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Aminoglycosides and Modulating the Essential Oil of Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf

    OpenAIRE

    Tintino, Saulo R.; Lucena, Bruno F. F.; Fernando G. Figueredo; Cícera Datiane de M. OLIVEIRA; José J. DOS S. AGUIAR; Edmilson DO N. CARDOSO; Pedro E. A. DE AQUINO; Jacqueline C. ANDRADE; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.; Ednardo F. F. MATIAS

    2014-01-01

     Several works demonstrated the importance of the study of natural products as an alternative source for new antimicrobial drugs or for modulators for these ones. In this point, the aim of this was to investigate the antibacterial activity and the possible interactions between the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus alone and in association with aminoglycosides against standard and clinically isolated strains of multidrug-resistant bacteria such as S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa by mic...

  8. In vitro activities of quinolones against enterococci resistant to penicillin-aminoglycoside synergy.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahm, D F; Koburov, G T

    1989-01-01

    The MICs and MBCs of CI-934, ciprofloxacin, difloxacin (A-56619), A-56620, norfloxacin, enoxacin, amifloxacin, and coumermycin were determined for 43 clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis known to be resistant to penicillin-aminoglycoside synergy. Results were compared with those obtained for 37 synergy-susceptible E. faecalis and 22 Enterococcus faecium strains. Although no substantial differences in quinolone activities were observed between synergy-resistant and -susceptible E. faecal...

  9. Mechanistic studies of copper(II)-aminoglycoside mediated DNA damage and magnesium catalyzed nuclease activity of hammerhead ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Anjali A.

    The antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides stems from their high affinity binding to the 16S rRNA in bacteria resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. Used to treat acute bacterial infections these antibiotics have limited applications due to their high dosage requirements and the emergence of resistant strains. We have synthesized and characterized Cu(II) derivatives of the aminoglycosides, kanamycin A, tobramycin, neamine, kanamycin B, neomycin B, and paromomycin. The first three exhibit preferential and tight binding to Cu(II) as against neomycin B and kanamycin B and paromomycin. EPR of frozen solutions and UV-visible spectroscopy suggest a change in geometry around the Cu(II) but the stabilities of the complexes in water differ. These copper derivatives efficiently cleave plasmid DNA at micromolar concentrations (hydrolytic) and at nanomolar concentrations in the presence co-reactants like hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. Hydrolysis is multi turnover and exhibits Michelis-Menten kinetics with enzyme-like behavior whereas oxidative cleavage is highly specific with C-4' H abstraction resulting in characteristic base propenal and nucleotide base products. Hydroxyl radicals generated are copper based and are generated in close proximity of the substrate. Hammerhead ribozymes are selectively hydrolyzed in the presence of divalent ions with Mg2+ being the metal ion of choice in vivo . Our studies with complex ions like cobalt hexaammine and fac-triamminetriaquochromium(III) establish outer sphere interactions of Mg2+ with the hammerhead in the catalytic site. There are two sets of sites, one structural and one catalytic. Complex ions in the catalytic site and divalent ions in the structural site result in a slow but active hammerhead ribozyme suggesting that the complex ions are not inhibitory, contrary to what was suggested previously.

  10. Special characteristics of fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering for cadmium telluride nanocrystal aqueous solution and its interactions with aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals(CdTe NCs) were achieved by reaction of CdCl2 with KHTe solution and were capped with sodium mercaptoacetate.The product was detected by transmission electron microscopy(TEM),high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM),energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS),fluorescence spectra,ultraviolet-visible spectra and X-ray diffraction(XRD).The CdTe NCs are of cubic structure and the average size is about 5 nm.The fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe NCs aqueous solution increased from 37% to 97% after 20 d under room light.The maximum λem of fluorescence changed from 543 nm to 510 nm and the blue shift was 33 nm.CdTe NCs aqueous solution can be steady for at least 10 months at 4℃ in a refrigerator.The resonance Rayleigh scattering(RRS) of CdTe NCs in the aqueous solution was investigated.The maximum scattering peak was located at about 554 nm.The interactions of CdTe NCs with amikacin sulfate(AS) and micronomicin sulfate(MS) were investigated respectively.The effects of AS and MS on fluorescence and RRS of CdTe NCs were analyzed.It was found that AS and MS quenched the photoluminescence of CdTe NCs and enhanced RRS of CdTe NCs.Under optimum conditions,there are linear relationships between quenching intensity(F0-F),intensity of RRS(I-I0) and concentration of AS and MS.The detection limits(3б) of AS and MS are respectively 3.4 ng·mL-1 and 2.6 ng·mL-1 by the fluorescence quenching method,and 15.2 ng·mL-1 and 14.0 ng·mL-1 by the RRS method.The methods have high sensitivity,thus CdTe NCs may be used as fluorescence probes and RRS probes for the detection of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  11. Crystallization and X-ray analysis of 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosose synthase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 2-deoxystreptamine-containing aminoglycoside antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosose synthase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 2-deoxystreptamine-containing aminoglycoside antibiotics, is reported. A recombinant 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosose synthase from Bacillus circulans has been crystallized at 277 K using PEG 4000 as precipitant. The diffraction pattern of the crystal extends to 2.30 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystals are monoclinic and belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.5, b = 70.4, c = 83.0 Å, β = 117.8°. The presence of two molecules per asymmetric unit gives a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.89 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent constant of 57.4% by volume

  12. Partial characterization of an endemic strain of a methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) homogeneously resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, J; Meers, P D

    1992-06-01

    Selected strains of methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) were subjected to a preliminary examination. They were representative of a larger group collected in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory over a period of 2 years. MARSA was endemic in the associated hospital. The characteristics investigated were antimicrobial resistance, the production of beta-lactamase, free and bound coagulase, protein A, DNA-ase, urease, lipase and pigment. The MARSA strains were generally indistinguishable, other than in their antimicrobial resistances. The resistance to methicillin was completely homogeneous. Except with imipenem, growth extended to the edge of discs containing methicillin and the other beta-lactam antibiotics tested when the strains were cultured at 37 degrees C on media without added salt. Homogeneous resistance may confer an epidemiological advantage on strains of this phenotype. PMID:1353087

  13. Defining RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions via two-dimensional combinatorial screening and structure-activity relationships through sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-10-15

    RNA is an extremely important target for the development of chemical probes of function or small molecule therapeutics. Aminoglycosides are the most well studied class of small molecules to target RNA. However, the RNA motifs outside of the bacterial rRNA A-site that are likely to be bound by these compounds in biological systems is largely unknown. If such information were known, it could allow for aminoglycosides to be exploited to target other RNAs and, in addition, could provide invaluable insights into potential bystander targets of these clinically used drugs. We utilized two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS), a library-versus-library screening approach, to select the motifs displayed in a 3×3 nucleotide internal loop library and in a 6-nucleotide hairpin library that bind with high affinity and selectivity to six aminoglycoside derivatives. The selected RNA motifs were then analyzed using structure-activity relationships through sequencing (StARTS), a statistical approach that defines the privileged RNA motif space that binds a small molecule. StARTS allowed for the facile annotation of the selected RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions in terms of affinity and selectivity. The interactions selected by 2DCS generally have nanomolar affinities, which is higher affinity than the binding of aminoglycosides to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the bacterial rRNA A-site. PMID:23719281

  14. Aminoglycosides: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kevin M; Serio, Alisa W; Kane, Timothy R; Connolly, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are natural or semisynthetic antibiotics derived from actinomycetes. They were among the first antibiotics to be introduced for routine clinical use and several examples have been approved for use in humans. They found widespread use as first-line agents in the early days of antimicrobial chemotherapy, but were eventually replaced in the 1980s with cephalosporins, carbapenems, and fluoroquinolones. Aminoglycosides synergize with a variety of other antibacterial classes, which, in combination with the continued increase in the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of the class through optimized dosing regimens, has led to a renewed interest in these broad-spectrum and rapidly bactericidal antibacterials. PMID:27252397

  15. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D;

    1999-01-01

    Decoding of genetic information occurs upon interaction of an mRNA codon-tRNA anticodon complex with the small subunit of the ribosome. The ribosomal decoding region is associated with highly conserved sequences near the 3' end of 16 S rRNA. The decoding process is perturbed by the aminoglycoside...... of universally conserved nucleotides at 1406 to 1408 and 1494 to 1495 in the decoding region of plasmid-encoded bacterial 16 S rRNA. Phenotypic changes range from the benign effect of U1406-->A or A1408-->G substitutions, to the highly deleterious 1406G and 1495 mutations that assemble into 30 S subunits...... but are defective in forming functional ribosomes. Changes in the local conformation of the decoding region caused by these mutations were identified by chemical probing of isolated 30 S subunits. Ribosomes containing 16 S rRNA with mutations at positions 1408, 1407+1494, or 1495 had reduced affinity...

  16. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Aminoglycosides and Modulating the Essential Oil of Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo R. TINTINO

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available  Several works demonstrated the importance of the study of natural products as an alternative source for new antimicrobial drugs or for modulators for these ones. In this point, the aim of this was to investigate the antibacterial activity and the possible interactions between the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus alone and in association with aminoglycosides against standard and clinically isolated strains of multidrug-resistant bacteria such as S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa by microdilution method. The results indicated a synergism between the antibiotics and the essential oil with a subinhibitory concentration (MIC/8, reducing the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC sixteen times against the multidrug-resistant strains of S. aureus 358, E. coli 27 and P. aeruginosa 143, but none modulatory activity was observed against P. aeruginosa 78 and P. aeruginosa 91 strains. By our results, can be concluded that the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus can be an interesting source of natural products with antibacterial and/or modulatory antibiotic activitieAVALIAÇÃO DA ATIVIDADE ANTIBACTERIANA E MODULADORA DE AMINOGLICOSÍDEOS DO ÓLEO ESSENCIAL DE Cymbopogon citratus (DC. STAPFVários trabalhos vêm demonstrando a importância do estudo de produtos naturais como fonte alternativa para novos antimicrobianos ou que venham potencializar os já existentes. Neste contexto este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a atividade antibacteriana e as possíveis interações entre o óleo essencial de Cymbopogon citratus combinados a aminoglicosídeos frente a linhagens padrões e multirresistentes de S. aureus, E. coli e de P. aeruginosa provenientes de isolados clínicos. Um ensaio de microdiluição foi realizado para verificar a atividade antibacteriana e as possíveis interacções entre o produto natural e os antibióticos, utilizando uma concentração sub-inibitória. Através dos resultados foi constatado a interferência sinérgica dos

  17. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Cheng-Wei T Chang; Meissner, Nicole; Oblad, John; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Sorensen, Kevin N.; Michelle M. Grilley; Jon Y Takemoto

    2014-01-01

    K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20′s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were de...

  18. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Cheng-Wei Tom Chang; Nicole eMeissner; John eOblad; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Sorensen, Kevin N.; Michelle M. Grilley; Jon Y Takemoto

    2014-01-01

    K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20’s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were d...

  19. Mitochondrial COX2 G7598A Mutation May Have a Modifying Role in the Phenotypic Manifestation of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Induced Deafness Associated with 12S rRNA A1555G Mutation in a Han Chinese Pedigree

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tianbin; Liu, Qicai; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Can; Ou, Qishui

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain mitochondrial haplogroup markers and some specific variants in mitochondrial haplogroup may also influence the phenotypic expression of particular mitochondrial disorders. In this report, the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization were identified in a Chinese pedigree with the aminoglycoside antibiotic (AmAn)-induced deafness and nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL). The pathogenic gene responsible for this hereditary NSHL pedigree was determined by ...

  20. Directed Evolution of Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (3′) Type IIIa Variants That Inactivate Amikacin but Impose Significant Fitness Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Joseph R.; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The rules that govern adaptive protein evolution remain incompletely understood. Aminoglycoside aminotransferase (3′) type IIIa (hereafter abbreviated APH(3′)-IIIa) is a good model enzyme because it inactivates kanamycin efficiently; it recognizes other aminoglycoside antibiotics, including amikacin, but not nearly as well. Here we direct the evolution of APH(3′)-IIIa variants with increased activity against amikacin. After four rounds of random mutation and selection in Escherichia coli, the...

  1. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Jadali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss.

  2. SYNTHESIS AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF NEW 5H-INDOLO[2,3-B]QUINOLINE O-AMINOGLYCOSIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowska-Rosłonek, Katarzyna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Switalska, Marta; Piskozub, Małgorzata; Peczyńska-Czoch, Wanda; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    Novel 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline O-aminoglycosides were synthesized in order to check the hypothesis that the construction of hybrids composed of the active 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline chromophore and daunosaminyl or acosaminyl moiety may result in the cytotoxic activity of the obtained derivatives that is much higher than the one of the parent DIMIQ (5,11-dimethyl-5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline) and 6H-indoloquinoline analogs. Actually, 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides showed the anti-proliferative activity in vitro against human lung adenocarcinoma A549, breast cancer MCF-7, melanoma Hs294T, promyelocytic leukemia HL-60, uterine sarcoma MES-SA and colon cancer LoVo cell lines, which was 10 times higher than that of the 6H-analogs and comparable to the one of the referential DIMIQ. Unexpectedly, it appeared that except for HL-60/MX2 (P-gp-independent and topoisomerase II-dependent resistance), other MDR tumor cell lines (LoVo/DX. P-gp-dependent, MRP-, LRP-dependent multidrug resistance) and MES-SA/DX5 (P-gp-dependent resistance to doxorubicin) are also resistant to the 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides tested. This is surprising because 6H-analogs, in general, 10 times less active against non-MDR tumor cell lines, as well as the DIMIQ itself, are able to overcome drug resistance in all MDR cell lines examined. The cytotoxicity of the tested compounds against tumor cell lines and against normal cells (mice fibroblasts BALB/3T3) was comparable. PMID:27476287

  3. Study of Pseudomonas Aeroginosa resistance to Penicillines, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleknezhad P

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug therapy and prophylaxy in infectious diseases, from hygienic and economical point of view, are very important. Infections caused by pseudomonas aeroginosa were particularly severe, with high mortality rates. In the recent years pseudomonas aeroginosa continued to cause the most severe, life-thereating infections in burned patients, in spite of the introduction of a wide variety of antibiotics advised specifically for their anti pseudomonal activity. The aim of this study, in which many cases of ps.aeroginosa infections are assessed is to identify the drug resistance of this bacteria to penicillines, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides by antibiotic sensitivity test (disk ager diffusion. Results as percent of resistance to each antibiotic were 89% to carbenicillin, 55% to piperacillin, 89% to mezlocillin, 89.5% to ticarcillin+clavulonic acid, 85% to ceftriaxone, 95% to tobramycin, 5% of all isolates were not sensitive to any antibiotics.

  4. CHEMICALLY FABRICATED SILVER NANOPARTICLES ENHANCES THE ACTIVITY OF ANTIBIOTICS AGAINST SELECTED HUMAN BACTERIAL PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thangapandiyan and P. Prema*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the outbreak of infectious diseases caused by different pathogenic bacteria and the development of antibiotic resistance, the pharmaceutical companies and the researchers are now searching for new unconventional antibacterial agents. Nanotechnology represents a modern and innovative approach to develop new formulations based on metallic nanoparticles with antimicrobial properties. The potential bioactivity of chemically fabricated silver nanoparticles has been extensively studied. However, the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles individually or in combination with different antibiotics has not been demonstrated. In the present investigations, the effect of silver nanoparticles on the antibacterial activity of different antibiotics was evaluated against selected human bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus epidermis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus by disc diffusion method. In the presence of sub - inhibitory concentration of silver nanoparticles (100µL/disc, the antibacterial activities of all antibiotics are increased from 1 mm to 10 mm. The maximum fold increase was noticed for vancomycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (66.67%, Escherichia coli (62.50%, and Staphylococcus aureus (46% followed by rifampicin against Bacillus cereus (66.67% and kanamycin against Streptococcus epidermis (25%. These results signify that the silver nanoparticles showed potential antibacterial action of ß-lactams, glycopeptides, aminoglycosides, sulphonamides suggesting a possible utilization of silver nanocompounds in combination therapy against selected pathogens used in the experiment.

  5. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Hein-Kristensen, Line; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to...... heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of...... the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more...

  6. [Antibiotic activity of some fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchuk, Ia I; Tsyganenko, K S; Zaĭchenko, O M

    2013-01-01

    Biological activity of pure extracts of cultural filtrates of Aspergillus niveus 2411, Myrothecium cinctum 910, Ulocladium consortiale 960, Penicillium sp. 10-51 concerning wide spectrum of test-organisms was investigated. It was shown that the extracts had high levels of antibacterial activity against Gram-positive microorganisms, especially against Bacillus genus. But their activity against Gram-negative bacteria was a bit lower. On the other hand, metabolites of M. cinctum 910 and Penicillium sp. 10-51 did show the activity concerning phytopathogenic bacteria. Extracts of fungi showed fungistatic activity against yeasts, but they were not so active concerning fungal test-cultures. Extracts of A. niveus 2411, Penicillium sp. 10-51 suppressed the growth of Phoma betae. The highest level of fungistatic activity was shown by metabolites of M. cinctum 910. They showed activity against Aspergillus genus strains and phytopathogenic isolates of Fusarium lactis, Rhizoctonia solani and Botrytis cinerea. PMID:24479314

  7. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  8. Multiple antibiotic resistance in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, A.; Martínez, J L

    1997-01-01

    A cryptic multidrug resistance (MDR) system in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, the expression of which is selectable by tetracycline, is described. Tetracycline resistance was the consequence of active efflux of the antibiotic, and it was associated with resistance to quinolones and chloramphenicol, but not to aminoglycosides or beta-lactam antibiotics. MDR is linked to the expression of an outer membrane protein (OMP54) both in a model system and in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates.

  9. Defining RNA motif–aminoglycoside interactions via two-dimensional combinatorial screening and structure–activity relationships through sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    RNA is an extremely important target for the development of chemical probes of function or small molecule therapeutics. Aminoglycosides are the most well studied class of small molecules to target RNA. However, the RNA motifs outside of the bacterial rRNA A-site that are likely to be bound by these compounds in biological systems is largely unknown. If such information were known, it could allow for aminoglycosides to be exploited to target other RNAs and, in addition, could provide invaluabl...

  10. Mechanistic Study of the Synergistic Antibacterial Activity of Combined Silver Nanoparticles and Common Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; McShan, Danielle; Zhang, Ying; Sinha, Sudarson S; Arslan, Zikri; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-08-16

    A combination of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and an antibiotic can synergistically inhibit bacterial growth, especially against the drug-resistant bacteria Salmonella typhimurium. However, the mechanism for the synergistic activity is not known. This study chooses four classes of antibiotics, β-lactam (ampicillin and penicillin), quinolone (enoxacin), aminoglycoside (kanamycin and neomycin), and polykeptide (tetracycline) to explore their synergistic mechanism when combined with AgNPs against the multidrug-resistant bacterium Salmonella typhimurium DT 104. Enoxacin, kanamycin, neomycin, and tetracycline show synergistic growth inhibition against the Salmonella bacteria when combined with AgNPs, while ampicillin and penicillin do not. UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy studies reveal that all these four synergistic antibiotics can form complexes with AgNPs, while ampicillin and penicillin do not. The presence of tetracycline enhances the binding of Ag to Salmonella by 21% and Ag(+) release by 26% in comparison to that without tetracycline, while the presence of penicillin does not enhance the binding of Ag or Ag(+) release. This means that AgNPs first form a complex with tetracycline. The tetracycline-AgNPs complex interacts more strongly with the Salmonella cells and causes more Ag(+) release, thus creating a temporal high concentration of Ag(+) near the bacteria cell wall that leads to growth inhibition of the bacteria. These findings agree with the recent findings that Ag(+) release from AgNPs is the agent causing toxicity. PMID:27390928

  11. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Aminoglycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lokangu Lombo(Congo); HE Hua

    2004-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics informations of aminoglycosides, their monograph and clinical Pharmacokinetics parameters are reported in this review. The Aminoglycosides are highly polarity and in reserve for serious infections caused by aerobic gram-negative bacteria and some gram-positive bacteria but their toxicity are major limitations in clinical use.

  13. Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  14. The aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin damages DNA bases in Escherichia coli: caffeine potentiates the DNA-damaging effects of kanamycin while suppressing cell killing by ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tina Manzhu; Yuan, Jessica; Nguyen, Angelyn; Becket, Elinne; Yang, Hanjing; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2012-06-01

    The distribution of mutants in the Keio collection of Escherichia coli gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and neomycin indicates that damaged bases resulting from antibiotic action can lead to cell death. Strains lacking one of a number of glycosylases (e.g., AlkA, YzaB, Ogt, KsgA) or other specific repair proteins (AlkB, PhrB, SmbC) are more sensitive to these antibiotics. Mutants lacking AlkB display the strongest sensitivity among the glycosylase- or direct lesion removal-deficient strains. This perhaps suggests the involvement of ethenoadenine adducts, resulting from reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, since AlkB removes this lesion. Other sensitivities displayed by mutants lacking UvrA, polymerase V (Pol V), or components of double-strand break repair indicate that kanamycin results in damaged base pairs that need to be removed or replicated past in order to avoid double-strand breaks that saturate the cellular repair capacity. Caffeine enhances the sensitivities of these repair-deficient strains to kanamycin and neomycin. The gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to caffeine (dnaQ, holC, holD, and priA knockout mutants) indicate that caffeine blocks DNA replication, ultimately leading to double-strand breaks that require recombinational repair by functions encoded by recA, recB, and recC, among others. Additionally, caffeine partially protects cells of both Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis from killing by the widely used fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. PMID:22391551

  15. Rifaximin: beyond the traditional antibiotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanni, Fiorella; Renzulli, Cecilia; Barbanti, Miriam; Viscomi, Giuseppe Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Rifaximin is a non-systemic oral antibiotic derived from rifampin and characterized by a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and -negative, aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Rifaximin was first approved in Italy in 1987 and afterwards in many other worldwide countries for the treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases. This review updates the pharmacology and pharmacodynamics of rifaximin highlighting the different actions, beyond its antibacterial activity, such as alteration of virulence, prevention of gut mucosal adherence and bacterial translocation. Moreover, rifaximin exerts some anti-inflammatory effects with only a minimal effect on the overall composition of the gut microbiota. All these properties make rifaximin a good candidate to treat various gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25095806

  16. A preliminary report on the susceptibility to aminoglycosides of Escherichia coli isolated from the community-acquired urinary tract infections in adults in south-east Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidecka-Skwarzynska Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available World-wide, urinary tract infections (UTIs are an important clinical problem. In such, the most frequently isolated uropathogen is Escherichia coli. In the treatment of uncomplicated UTIs, e.g. cystitis, the widely used antibiotics are nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, fosfomycin trometamol or ciprofloxacin, while the treatment of pyelonephritis requires the usage of antibiotics with a broader spectrum of activity, such as cephalosporins of the 3rd and 4th generation, aminoglycosides or even carbapenems. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility to aminoglycosides (such as amikacin, gentamicin, netilmicin and tobramycin of E. coli isolated from UTIs in adult community patients living in Lubelszczyzna. We found that all of the 86 strains of E. coli encountered were susceptible to amikacin. Moreover, the prevalence of susceptibility to tobramycin, gentamicin or netilmicin among the tested strains was found to be 89,5%, 90,7% or 94,2%, respectively. The data obtained in the present study shows the high susceptibility to aminoglycosides of E. coli isolated from the community-acquired UTIS in adults. These data, together with that derived from current literature, indicate that aminoglycosides, when employed in combination therapy with other antibiotics, may still be very useful group of antibacterial agents in the treatment of UTI’s in Poland.

  17. Strategies to overcome the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes for treating resistant bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Labby, Kristin J.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of the first antibiotics, bacterial resistance began to emerge. Many mechanisms give rise to resistance; the most prevalent mechanism of resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) family of antibiotics is the action of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Since the identification of these modifying enzymes, many efforts have been put forth to prevent their damaging alterations of AGs. These diverse strategies are discussed within this review, including: creating new...

  18. DETERMINATION OF AMINOGLYCOSIDES IN FOOD BY FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION IMMUNOASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARAFONOVA O.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodic for quantitative determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, amikacin, neomycin in food by polarization fluorescent immunoassay (FPIA is developed. The size and structure influence of a fluorescent molecule on a fluorescence polarization degree is analyzed. Affinity constants of antibodies to compounds and tracers were estimated, optimized working concentration of tracers and antibodies that provide the maximum value of analytical signal. Methods were tested in the antibiotics identification in milk, eggs and chicken.

  19. Kinetic and Structural Analysis of Bisubstrate Inhibition of the Salmonella enterica Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase†,‡

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Maria L. B.; Vetting, Matthew W.; Gao, Feng; Freiburger, Lee; Auclair, Karine; Blanchard, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are antibacterial compounds that act by binding to the A site of the small 30S bacterial ribosomal subunit and inhibiting protein translation. Clinical resistance to aminoglycosides is generally the result of the expression of enzymes that covalently modify the antibiotic, including phosphorylation, adenylylation, and acetylation. Bisubstrate analogs for the aminoglycoside N-acetyl-transferases are nanomolar inhibitors of Enterococcus faecium AAC(6′)-Ii. However, in the case o...

  20. Mitochondrial COX2 G7598A Mutation May Have a Modifying Role in the Phenotypic Manifestation of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Induced Deafness Associated with 12S rRNA A1555G Mutation in a Han Chinese Pedigree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianbin; Liu, Qicai; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Can

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain mitochondrial haplogroup markers and some specific variants in mitochondrial haplogroup may also influence the phenotypic expression of particular mitochondrial disorders. In this report, the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization were identified in a Chinese pedigree with the aminoglycoside antibiotic (AmAn)-induced deafness and nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL). The pathogenic gene responsible for this hereditary NSHL pedigree was determined by Microarray chip, which possessed the nine NSHL hot-spot mutations, including GJB2 (35delG, 176dell6bp, 235de1C, and 299delAT), GJB3 (538C>T), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2A>G and 2168A>G), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA (C1494T and A1555G). Only the homoplasmic A1555G mutation was detected, which was confirmed by direct sequencing. Also, real-time amplification refractory mutation system quantitative polymerase chain reaction methodology was performed to calculate the A1555G mutation load. The proband's complete mtDNA genome were amplified and direct sequencing was performed to determine the mitochondrial haplogroup and private mutations. The proband's mitochondrial haplogroup belonges to M7b1 and a private mutation MTCOX2 G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) is found. Phylogenetic analysis of COX2 polypeptide sequences demonstrates that the alanine residue is relatively conserved, but owing to the missense mutation (p.Ala 5 Thr), its side chain hydrophobicity will be changed, and what is more, as it is adjacent to a glutamine residue, which is highly conserved and hydrophilic, in an evolutionary stable domain; G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) may alter the protein secondary structure and physiological function of COX2 and, thus, aggravate the mitochondrial dysfunction conferred by the A1555G mutation. Furthermore, the G7598A mutation is absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls; therefore, G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) in the mitochondrial haplogoup M7b1 may have a modifying role, enhancing its penetrance and severity

  1. Influence of antibiotic adsorption on biocidal activities of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Chandni; Vala, Anjana K; Andhariya, Nidhi; Pandey, O P; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2016-04-01

    Excessive use of antibiotics has posed two major challenges in public healthcare. One of them is associated with the development of multi-drug resistance while the other one is linked to side effects. In the present investigation, the authors report an innovative approach to tackle the challenges of multi-drug resistance and acute toxicity of antibiotics by using antibiotics adsorbed metal nanoparticles. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles (SNPs) have been synthesised by two-step process. In the first step, SNPs were prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO3 with oleylamine and in the second step, oleylamine capped SNPs were phase-transferred into an aqueous medium by ligand exchange. Antibiotics - tetracycline and kanamycin were further adsorbed on the surface of SNPs. Antibacterial activities of SNPs and antibiotic adsorbed SNPs have been investigated on gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis), and gram-negative (Proteus vulgaris, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacterial strains. Synergistic effect of SNPs on antibacterial activities of tetracycline and kanamycin has been observed. Biocidal activity of tetracycline is improved by 0-346% when adsorbed on SNPs; while for kanamycin, the improvement is 110-289%. This synergistic effect of SNPs on biocidal activities of antibiotics may be helpful in reducing their effective dosages. PMID:27074856

  2. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib K. Shrestha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20’s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were determined. Effects on Cryptococcus neoformans H-99 infectivity were determined with a preventive murine lung infection model. The antifungal mechanism of action was studied using intact fungal cells, yeast lipid mutants, and small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 exhibited broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activities but not antibacterial activities. Pulmonary, single dose-administration of K20 reduced C. neoformans lung infection rates 4-fold compared to controls. Hemolysis and half-maximal cytotoxicities of mammalian cells occurred at concentrations that were 10 to 32-fold higher than fungicidal MICs. With fluorescein isothiocyanate, 20 to 25 mg/L K20 caused staining of >95% of C. neoformans and Fusarium graminearum cells and at 31.3 mg/L caused rapid leakage (30 to 80% in 15 min of calcein from preloaded small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 appears to be a broad-spectrum fungicide, capable of reducing the infectivity of C. neoformans, and exhibits low hemolytic activity and mammalian cell toxicity. It perturbs the plasma membrane by mechanisms that are lipid modulated. K20 is a novel amphiphilic aminoglycoside amenable to scalable production and a potential lead antifungal for therapeutic and crop protection applications.

  3. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão Rodrigues, Fabíola Fernandes; Costa, José Galberto Martins; Rodrigues, Fábio Fernandes Galvao; Campos, Adriana Rolim

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%-P. amboinicus) and eugenol (22.9%-P. ornatus e 25.1%-P. barbatus). In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant) using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23662150

  4. High-Throughput Screening for Streptomyces Antibiotic Biosynthesis Activators

    OpenAIRE

    Li CHEN; Wang, Yemin; Guo, Hang; Xu, Min; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2012-01-01

    A genomic cosmid library of Streptomyces clavuligerus was constructed and transferred efficiently by conjugation to Streptomyces lividans, and 12 distinct groups of overlapping cosmid clones that activated the silent actinorhodin biosynthesis gene cluster were identified. This generally applicable high-throughput screening procedure greatly facilitates the identification of antibiotic biosynthesis activators.

  5. In vitro read-through of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) nonsense mutations using aminoglycosides: a potential therapy for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gladys; Reichardt, Juergen; Christodoulou, John

    2013-11-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU, OMIM 261600) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of phenylalanine metabolism, predominantly caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Approximately 10% of patients carry a nonsense mutation, which results in an inactive or unstable truncated protein. In some genetic disorders, including cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, restoration of full-length protein has been achieved by aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin and G-418 (Geneticin). More recently, nonsense read-through has been induced at greater rates using a non-aminoglycoside drug, PTC124 (Ataluren), which has the advantage of being non-toxic in contrast to the antibiotics. The efficacy of read-through induced by three compounds, aminoglycosides G418 and gentamicin, and PTC124 were evaluated for four nonsense mutations of PAH in an in vitro expression system in two mammalian cell lines (COS-7 and HEK293). The production of full-length PAH was investigated using western blotting and the functionality confirmed by enzyme activity. Gentamicin and G-418 induced read-through of nonsense PAH mutations in HEK293 cells. The read-through product partially restored enzymatic activity, which was significantly less than that of wild-type, but comparable to a missense mutation of PAH associated with less severe forms of PKU. Treatment with PTC124 up to 100 μM did not result in full-length PAH polypeptide. Nonsense read-through drugs are a potential form of treatment for PKU, although the high dosage of aminoglycosides used is not appropriate in a clinical setting. In vitro studies with new non-toxic read-through agents as well as in vivo studies would also be essential to determine the extent of read-through required to restore normal phenylalanine levels. PMID:23532445

  6. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  7. Emerging resistance to aminoglycosides in lactic acid bacteria of food origin-an impending menace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimee, G; Halami, P M

    2016-02-01

    Aminoglycosides are the most preferred choice of therapy against serious infections in humans. Therefore, its use in animal husbandry has been strictly regulated in the EU, UK, and USA to avoid the hazards of aminoglycoside resistance in gut microflora. Nevertheless, aminoglycosides are recommended for prophylaxis and therapeutics in food animals and agriculture owing to its bactericidal nature. In the recent past, the global surge in aminoglycoside-resistant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from food sources has been noticed that might question its continued use in animal husbandry. Upon antibiotic administration, a selective pressure is created in the gut environment; in such instances, LAB could act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance which may facilitate their transfer to pathogenic organisms contradicting its probiotic and industrial significance. This may be a risk to human health as the presence of one aminoglycoside resistance gene renders the bacteria tolerant to almost all antibiotics of the same class, thereby challenging its therapeutic efficacy. Low doses of aminoglycosides are recommended in farm animals due to its toxic nature and insolubility in blood. However, recent investigations indicate that use of aminoglycosides in sub-lethal concentrations can trigger the selection and conjugal transfer of aminoglycoside resistance in probiotic LAB. Resistance to erythromycin, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones in LAB were reported earlier to which immediate regulatory measures were adopted by some countries. Paradoxically, lack of regulations on antibiotic use in farms in most developing countries makes them a potential source of antibiotic resistance and its uncontrolled spread around the globe. The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance was observed in enterococci from food origin earlier; however, its emergence in lactobacilli and pediococci suggests its spread in probiotic cultures which prompts immediate precautionary methods. This review highlights the

  8. Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. PMID:26501865

  9. Damaging Effects of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics on Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons%氨基糖苷类抗生素对耳蜗螺旋神经节的损害作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高可雷; 丁大连; 李鹏; 孙虹; Richard Salvi

    2015-01-01

    氨基糖苷类药物(AmAn)是一类经典的治疗革兰阴性菌感染的抗生素,但具有耳毒性和肾毒性。以往的研究认为AmAn的耳毒性仅仅针对内耳毛细胞并可引起继发的延迟性螺旋神经节细胞(SGNs)死亡。但是随着关于AmAn耳毒性和对耳蜗其他细胞的研究进展,人们逐渐意识到耳蜗内支持细胞的损害也是引起SGNs延迟死亡的重要原因之一。我们发现,不同的AmAn对内耳的损害方式不同,以硫酸链霉素为代表的少数AmAn可以不受血-迷路屏障阻碍直接进入内耳并首先损害内耳的周边神经元;而以往认为只能间接损害SGNs的其他那些难以跨越血-迷路屏障的AmAn,比如卡那霉素,对出生后三天大鼠处于发育阶段的SGNs也具有直接的损害作用。因此我们提出一个根据不同内耳损害方式来区分AmAn的分类建议,并希望本文介绍的新内容能够为更深入理解不同种类AmAn的不同耳毒性机制以及听觉系统各个重要组织成分之间的相互作用关系提供新的参考信息。%Aminoglycoside antibiotics (AmAn) are widely used for gram negative bacterial infections while they are al⁃so notorious for their ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Conventional view is that the ototoxic effects of AmAn can only damage sensory hair cells in the inner ear, and can cause delayed spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) degeneration as a result of the loss of sensory hair cells. But with deepening of research, people have come to realize that supporting cell damage is also one of the important reasons for the delayed SGNs death. Meanwhile, it has been found that different AmAns may exert their ototoxic ef⁃fects through different approaches to different target cells via different pathways. Streptomycin sulfate, which represents a mi⁃nor category of AmAn, passes easily through the blood-labyrinth barrier and can directly damage peripheral neurons in the in⁃ner ear. AmAns that

  10. Mycobacteriophage putative GTPase-activating protein can potentiate antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuangquan; Xu, Mengmeng; Duan, Xiangke; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Li, Qiming; Xie, Longxiang; Fan, Xiangyu; Xie, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The soaring incidences of infection by antimicrobial resistant (AR) pathogens and shortage of effective antibiotics with new mechanisms of action have renewed interest in phage therapy. This scenario is exemplified by resistant tuberculosis (TB), caused by resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacteriophage SWU1 A321_gp67 encodes a putative GTPase-activating protein. Mycobacterium smegmatis with gp67 overexpression showed changed colony formation and biofilm morphology and supports the efficacy of streptomycin and capreomycin against Mycobacterium. gp67 down-regulated the transcription of genes involved in cell wall and biofilm development. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that phage protein in addition to lysin or recombination components can synergize with existing antibiotics. Phage components might represent a promising new clue for better antibiotic potentiators. PMID:27345061

  11. Assessment on the adverse effects of Aminoglycosides and Flouroquinolone on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Khaki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic therapies used in treatment of many diseases have adverse effects on fertility. This review analyzes previous comparative studies that surveyed the effects of two common groups of antibiotics on male fertility. Objective: To evaluate histo-pathological effects of fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue. Materials and Methods: Articles about the effects of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones on male infertility, sperm parame...

  12. Once Daily Dosing of Aminoglycosides in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Wassil, Sarah K.; Fox, Kristie M.; White, James W.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis receive many courses of antibiotic therapy throughout their lifetime. Dosing aminoglycosides once daily has become common practice in many of these individuals. Due to ease of home administration, decreased nursing time, and improved quality of life, this regimen is being increasingly explored in the cystic fibrosis population. Because patients with cystic fibrosis have increased aminoglycoside clearance, once daily dosing may result in a prolonged time during th...

  13. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Novel Semisynthetic Nocathiacin I Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Indu; Sullivan, Margery; McCutchan, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the arsenal of antimalarial drugs is limited and needs to be replenished. We evaluated the potential antimalarial activity of two water-soluble derivatives of nocathiacin (BMS461996 and BMS411886) against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Nocathiacins are a thiazolyl peptide group of antibiotics, are structurally related to thiostrepton, have potent activity against a wide spectrum of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibit protein synthesis. The in...

  14. Activating and Attenuating the Amicoumacin Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Bong; Perez, Corey E; Perry, Elena Kim; Crawford, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    The amicoumacins belong to a class of dihydroisocoumarin natural products and display antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activities. Amicoumacins are the pro-drug activation products of a bacterial nonribosomal peptide-polyketide hybrid biosynthetic pathway and have been isolated from Gram-positive Bacillus and Nocardia species. Here, we report the stimulation of a "cryptic" amicoumacin pathway in the entomopathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Xenorhabdus bovienii, a strain not previously known to produce amicoumacins. X. bovienii participates in a multi-lateral symbiosis where it is pathogenic to insects and mutualistic to its Steinernema nematode host. Waxmoth larvae are common prey of the X. bovienii-Steinernema pair. Employing a medium designed to mimic the amino acid content of the waxmoth circulatory fluid led to the detection and characterization of amicoumacins in X. bovienii. The chemical structures of the amicoumacins were supported by 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-QTOF-MS, tandem MS, and polarimeter spectral data. A comparative gene cluster analysis of the identified X. bovienii amicoumacin pathway to that of the Bacillus subtilis amicoumacin pathway and the structurally-related Xenorhabdus nematophila xenocoumacin pathway is presented. The X. bovienii pathway encodes an acetyltransferase not found in the other reported pathways, which leads to a series of N-acetyl-amicoumacins that lack antibacterial activity. N-acetylation of amicoumacin was validated through in vitro protein biochemical studies, and the impact of N-acylation on amicoumacin's mode of action was examined through ribosomal structural analyses. PMID:27347911

  15. Potentiation of Aminoglycoside Activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Targeting the AmgRS Envelope Stress-Responsive Two-Component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Keith; Gilmour, Christie; Farha, Maya A; Mullen, Erin; Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Brown, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    A screen for agents that potentiated the activity of paromomycin (PAR), a 4,5-linked aminoglycoside (AG), against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa identified the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampin (RIF). RIF potentiated additional 4,5-linked AGs, such as neomycin and ribostamycin, but not the clinically important 4,6-linked AGs amikacin and gentamicin. Potentiation was absent in a mutant lacking the AmgRS envelope stress response two-component system (TCS), which protects the organism from AG-generated membrane-damaging aberrant polypeptides and, thus, promotes AG resistance, an indication that RIF was acting via this TCS in potentiating 4,5-linked AG activity. Potentiation was also absent in a RIF-resistant RNA polymerase mutant, consistent with its potentiation of AG activity being dependent on RNA polymerase perturbation. PAR-inducible expression of the AmgRS-dependent genes htpX and yccA was reduced by RIF, suggesting that AG activation of this TCS was compromised by this agent. Still, RIF did not compromise the membrane-protective activity of AmgRS, an indication that it impacted some other function of this TCS. RIF potentiated the activities of 4,5-linked AGs against several AG-resistant clinical isolates, in two cases also potentiating the activity of the 4,6-linked AGs. These cases were, in one instance, explained by an observed AmgRS-dependent expression of the MexXY multidrug efflux system, which accommodates a range of AGs, with RIF targeting of AmgRS undermining mexXY expression and its promotion of resistance to 4,5- and 4,6-linked AGs. Given this link between AmgRS, MexXY expression, and pan-AG resistance in P. aeruginosa, RIF might be a useful adjuvant in the AG treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27021319

  16. Nanoliposomes containing Eucalyptus citriodora as antibiotic with specific antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Cui, Haiying; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Xuejing; Bortolini, Christian; Chen, Menglin; Liu, Lei; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-02-14

    Bacterial infections are a serious issue for public health and represent one of the major challenges of modern medicine. In this work, a selective antimicrobial strategy based on triggering of pore-forming toxin, which is secreted by infective bacteria, was designed to fight Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial activity is realized by employing Eucalyptus citriodora oil as antibiotic which in this study is encapsulated in nanoliposomes. PMID:25573466

  17. Antibiofilm Activity of Manuka Honey in Combination with Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Campeau, Michelle E. M.; Robin Patel

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the in vitro activity of Manuka honey against biofilm bacteria in combination with antibiotics and visualized the effect of Manuka honey on bacterial biofilms using scanning electron microscopy. The fractional biofilm eradication concentration (∑FBEC ) index for vancomycin plus Manuka honey against S. aureus IDRL-4284 biofilms was 0.34, indicating a synergistic interaction. The ∑FBEC  index for gentamicin plus Manuka honey against P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms was 0.78–0.82, indicat...

  18. Synergistic effect of [10]-gingerol and aminoglycosides against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Chihiro; Shiota, Sumiko; Kuroda, Teruo; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Kariyama, Reiko; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2006-03-01

    An extract from ginger (root of Zingiber officinale) reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aminoglycosides in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The effective compound was isolated and identified as [10]-gingerol. In the presence of [10]-gingerol at 1/10 concentration of its own MIC, the MIC of arbekacin was lowered by 1/32 to 1/16. [10]-Gingerol also reduced the MICs of other aminoglycosides, and of bacitracin and polymixin B, but not of other antimicrobial agents tested. Because [10]-gingerol reduced the MICs of several aminoglycosides both in strains possessing or lacking aminoglycoside-modification enzymes, it seems that the effect of [10]-gingerol is not related to these enzymes, which mainly confer bacterial resistance against aminoglycosides. It seemed that a detergent-like effect of [10]-gingerol potentiated the antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycosides. In fact, some detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100 reduced the MICs of aminoglycosides, bacitracin and polymixin B in VRE. Since the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci is due to low level of entry of the drugs into the cells, increase in the membrane permeability caused by [10]-gingerol will enhance the influx of aminoglycosides into enterococcal cells. PMID:16508142

  19. Enhancement of antimicrobial activity of antibiotics and antifungals by the use of natural products from Pityrogramma calomelanos (L.) link

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Teógenes M.; Morais-Braga Maria F.B.; Costa José G.M.; Saraiva Antônio A.F.; Coutinho Henrique D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol extract and methanol fraction of Pityrogramma calomelanos (L.) link were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal and modulatory activities against strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, C. krusei and C. tropicalis. The antimicrobial activity of the natural products was evaluated by the microdilution method associated or not with aminoglycosides and antifungals. The ethanol extract and methanol fraction of P. calomelanos ...

  20. Chemoprophylactic efficacy against experimental endocarditis caused by beta-lactamase-producing, aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci is associated with prolonged serum inhibitory activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, A S; Tu, J

    1990-01-01

    We studied the prevention of experimental aortic endocarditis caused by a beta-lactamase-producing, aminoglycoside-resistant strain of Enterococcus faecalis (HH22) in 146 catheterized rabbits. Both vancomycin and ampicillin-sulbactam readily killed this resistant enterococcus strain in vitro. At a challenge inoculum of approximately 10(9) CFU, vancomycin (40 mg/kg intravenously [i.v.]), ampicillin (40 mg/kg i.v.), or a combination of ampicillin plus a beta-lactamase inhibitor, sulbactam (20 m...

  1. Natural bizbenzoquinoline derivatives protect zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells from aminoglycoside toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eKruger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20-30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment.

  2. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (SC); (Toronto); (UV)

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  3. Natural Bizbenzoquinoline Derivatives Protect Zebrafish Lateral Line Sensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Matthew; Boney, Robert; Ordoobadi, Alexander J; Sommers, Thomas F; Trapani, Josef G; Coffin, Allison B

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20-30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment. PMID:27065807

  4. LC-MS/MS-Methoden zur Rückstandsanalyse von Penicillinen, Cephalosporinen und Aminoglycosid-Antibiotika

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In today’s livestock farming and milk production, therapeutic, metaphylactic and prophylactic use of ß-lactams (penicillins, cephalosporins) and aminoglycosides is inevitable. However, improper use of these antibiotics may lead to residues in milk and edible tissues and can cause human health hazards as well as technological problems in dairy industry. In general, antibiotics are unwanted components in food, and it has to be ensured that the consumer is not exposed to antibioti...

  5. Urinary antibiotic activity in paediatric patients attending an outpatient department in north-western Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Emary, KR; Carter, MJ; Pol, S; Sona, S; V. Kumar; Day, NP; Parry, CM; Moore, CE

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antibiotic resistance is a prominent public and global health concern. We investigated antibiotic use in children by determining the proportion of unselected children with antibacterial activity in their urine attending a paediatric outpatient department in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Methods Caregiver reports of medication history and presence of possible infection symptoms were collected in addition to urine samples. Urine antibiotic activity was estimated by exposing bacteria to urine s...

  6. Mitomycin antibiotic reductive potential and related pharmacological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S S; Gonzalez, H

    1990-06-01

    Relationships of reductive potential, kinetics of enzymatic reduction, augmented oxygen consumption, and cytotoxicity were determined for seven clinically relevant mitomycin antibiotics. Potentials for one-electron reduction were obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis in dimethyl sulfoxide with 0.1 M tetraethyl-ammonium perchlorate. These potentials were -0.55 V for N7-acetylmitomycin C, -0.61 V for mitomycin A, -0.75 V for N7-(p-hydroxyphenyl)mitomycin C, -0.79 V for N7-(dimethylamino-methylene)mitomycin C, -0.81 V for N7-(2-(4-nitrophenyldithio)-ethyl)-mitomycin C, -0.81 V for mitomycin C, and -0.89 V for porfiromycin. All seven antibiotics were reduced by xanthine oxidase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, but the rate of reduction varied for each antibiotic and each enzyme. The less negative the reductive potential of an antibiotic, the more easily that antibiotic was reduced enzymatically. These seven mitomycin antibiotics also augmented oxygen consumption by rat liver microsomes. As with their reduction by xanthine oxidase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, the less negative the reductive potential of an antibiotic, the more it augmented oxygen consumption. Cytotoxicity of each antibiotic was assessed by defining the IC50 against HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells. A relationship between the reductive potential of these antibiotics and their cytotoxicity against HCT 116 cells was also observed. PMID:2113607

  7. The effect of pharmacy intervention on aminoglycoside costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, R T; Nakagawa, R S

    1987-04-01

    Antibiotics constitute a large percentage of every hospital's drug budget. In an effort to control the escalating costs of antimicrobial therapy, we focused on the usage of aminoglycosides at our institution. The aminoglycosides, gentamicin and tobramycin, are similar in terms of antimicrobial spectra and toxicities. Since gentamicin is much less expensive, it was felt that significant cost savings would be realized if gentamicin were to be used preferentially over tobramycin. Specific criteria for the use of tobramycin were developed and approved by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. All patients prescribed parenteral tobramycin during the five week data collection period were entered into the study. We chose to use direct verbal intervention as our method for altering physician's prescribing patterns. An educational program of intervention was set up such that when a physician prescribed tobramycin, the patient's chart was immediately reviewed. If tobramycin was prescribed for a purpose other than those in the approved criteria for tobramycin use, the physician was contacted personally to discuss the cost-effectiveness of gentamicin use. Utilization figures from the previous six months showed that our interventions would save approximately $32,000 over a one year period. Our interventions on aminoglycoside prescribing represents a highly successful, cost-effective and educational method for altering physician's prescribing patterns. PMID:10282090

  8. Sweet antibiotics – the role of glycosidic residues in antibiotic and antitumor activity and their randomization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křen, Vladimír; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 5 (2008), s. 858-889. ISSN 0168-6445 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA AV ČR IAA400200503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : glycosides * sweet antibiotic s * aglycone Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 7.963, year: 2008

  9. Search of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterise the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs. selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed at the Drug Institute in Poland. Over 160 pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. The surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S aureus, E. coil, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains:acyclovir (Awirol 5%, cream), alendronate (Alenato 5 mg, tabl.), alverine (Meteospasmyl 20 mg, caps.), butorphanole (Butamidor 10 mg/ml, amp.), clodronate (Sindronat 400 mg, caps), diclofenac (Olfen 75 mg, amp.), emadastine (Emadine 0.05%, eye dr.), etodolac (Febret 200 mg, caps.), fluvastatine (Lescol 40 mg, tabl.), ketamine (Ketamidor 10%, amp.), levocabastine (Histimet 0.5 mg/ml, eye dr.), losartan (Lorista 50 mg, tabl.), matipranolol (Betaman 0.3% eye dr.), mesalazine (Pentasa 1%, susp.), naproxen (Nalgesin 550 mg, tabl.), oxaprosine (Reumax 600 mg, tabl.), oxymethazoline (Nasivin 0.025%, nose dr.), proxymetacaine (Alcaine 0.5%, eye dr.), ribavirin (Rebetol 200 mg, caps.), rutoside with ascorbic acid (Cerutin 20+200 mg, tabl.), sulodexide (Vessel due F, 250 LSU, caps.), tegaserole (Zelmac 50 mg, tabl.), telmisartan (Pritor 20 mg, tabl.), temosolomide (Temodal 100 mg, caps.), ticlopidine (Ticlid 250 mg, tabl.), tolfenamic acid (Migea rapid 200 mg, tabl.), tramadole (Tramundin 100 mg, tabl.), tropicamide (Tropicamidum 1%, eye dr.). Staphylococcus aureus was susceptible to most of the drugs listed above. Ticlopidine showed activity against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans (MICs equal to: 0.45; 0.45 and 0.65 mg/ml, respectively

  10. In vitro antimalarial activity of novel semisynthetic nocathiacin I antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Indu; Sullivan, Margery; McCutchan, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the arsenal of antimalarial drugs is limited and needs to be replenished. We evaluated the potential antimalarial activity of two water-soluble derivatives of nocathiacin (BMS461996 and BMS411886) against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Nocathiacins are a thiazolyl peptide group of antibiotics, are structurally related to thiostrepton, have potent activity against a wide spectrum of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibit protein synthesis. The in vitro growth inhibition assay was done using three laboratory strains of P. falciparum displaying various levels of chloroquine (CQ) susceptibility. Our results indicate that BMS461996 has potent antimalarial activity and inhibits parasite growth with mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 51.55 nM for P. falciparum 3D7 (CQ susceptible), 85.67 nM for P. falciparum Dd2 (accelerated resistance to multiple drugs [ARMD]), and 99.44 nM for P. falciparum K1 (resistant to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine). Similar results at approximately 7-fold higher IC50s were obtained with BMS411886 than with BMS461996. We also tested the effect of BMS491996 on gametocytes; our results show that at a 20-fold excess of the mean IC50, gametocytes were deformed with a pyknotic nucleus and growth of stage I to IV gametocytes was arrested. This preliminary study shows a significant potential for nocathiacin analogues to be developed as antimalarial drug candidates and to warrant further investigation. PMID:25779576

  11. Enhancement of antimicrobial activity of antibiotics and antifungals by the use of natural products from Pityrogramma calomelanos (L. link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Teógenes M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol extract and methanol fraction of Pityrogramma calomelanos (L. link were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal and modulatory activities against strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, C. krusei and C. tropicalis. The antimicrobial activity of the natural products was evaluated by the microdilution method associated or not with aminoglycosides and antifungals. The ethanol extract and methanol fraction of P. calomelanos showed good activity against S. aureus when associated with aminoglycosides and with benzoilmetronidazol against species of the genus Candida. These results indicate that P. calomelanos should be studied as a possible source of natural products to combat bacteria and fungi either directly or by modulating the mechanisms of resistance of these microorganisms, enhancing the antimicrobial activity of these drugs and combating microbial resistance.

  12. Antibiotic Bactericidal Activity Is Countered by Maintaining pH Homeostasis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartek, I L; Reichlen, M J; Honaker, R W; Leistikow, R L; Clambey, E T; Scobey, M S; Hinds, A B; Born, S E; Covey, C R; Schurr, M J; Lenaerts, A J; Voskuil, M I

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics target specific biosynthetic processes essential for bacterial growth. It is intriguing that several commonalities connect the bactericidal activity of seemingly disparate antibiotics, such as the numerous conditions that confer broad-spectrum antibiotic tolerance. Whether antibiotics kill in a manner unique to their specific targets or by a universal mechanism is a critical and contested subject. Herein, we demonstrate that the bactericidal activity of diverse antibiotics against Mycobacterium smegmatis and four evolutionarily divergent bacterial pathogens was blocked by conditions that worked to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis. Single-cell pH analysis demonstrated that antibiotics increased the cytosolic pH of M. smegmatis, while conditions that promoted proton entry into the cytosol prevented intracellular alkalization and antibiotic killing. These findings led to a hypothesis that posits antibiotic lethality occurs when antibiotics obstruct ATP-consuming biosynthetic processes while metabolically driven proton efflux is sustained despite the loss of proton influx via ATP synthase. Consequently, without a concomitant reduction in respiratory proton efflux, cell death occurs due to intracellular alkalization. Our findings indicate the effects of antibiotics on pH homeostasis should be considered a potential mechanism contributing to antibiotic lethality. IMPORTANCE Since the discovery of antibiotics, mortality due to bacterial infection has decreased dramatically. However, infections from difficult to treat bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant pathogens have been on the rise. An understanding of the cascade of events that leads to cell death downstream of specific drug-target interactions is not well understood. We have discovered that killing by several classes of antibiotics was stopped by maintaining pH balance within the bacterial cell, consistent with a shared mechanism of antibiotic killing. Our findings

  13. [Is it possible to reduce the incidence of aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillastre, J P

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of nephrotoxicity due to aminoglycosides should be sharply reduced. The indications for prescribing these antibiotics should be limited to infectious disorders induced by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria and by some Gram-positive bacteria requiring treatment in specialized hospital units using an association of aminoglycosides and another antibiotic. Daily doses should not exceed those indicated by the manufacturer, and the length of treatment should be as short as possible, with a relay to other antibiotics that are not or are less nephrotoxic. The possibilities for reducing the incidence of nephrotoxicity are few. It is not possible to prevent the antibiotic from entering the renal tubular cell or from producing deleterious effects therein. However, by using short-term intravenous infusion as the administration route, prolonged contact between the antibiotic and its receptors on the brush borders of the proximal tubular cells can be avoided, particularly since the process of cellular absorption is saturable. Essentially, doses should be adapted according to the age and the glomerular filtration of the patient, since renal function usually decreases with age. Volemic and hydroelectrolytic disorders favour nephrotoxicity and should be corrected. Associations with other nephrotoxic drugs should either be avoided or used with increased caution. The same is true in special situations such as endotoxaemia, severe renal parenchymatous infections and cholestasis. In any case, given the well-known insidious onset of nephropathy, aminoglycoside treatment always requires laboratory follow-up consisting of repeated testing of creatinemia during the two weeks of treatment. PMID:10465001

  14. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Fernandes Galvão Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%—P. amboinicus and eugenol (22.9%—P. ornatus e 25.1%—P. barbatus. In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  15. Antibiofilm Activity of Manuka Honey in Combination with Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, Michelle E M; Patel, Robin

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the in vitro activity of Manuka honey against biofilm bacteria in combination with antibiotics and visualized the effect of Manuka honey on bacterial biofilms using scanning electron microscopy. The fractional biofilm eradication concentration (∑FBEC) index for vancomycin plus Manuka honey against S. aureus IDRL-4284 biofilms was 0.34, indicating a synergistic interaction. The ∑FBEC index for gentamicin plus Manuka honey against P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms was 0.78-0.82, indicating an additive interaction. Scanning electron microscopy of S. aureus IDRL-4284 and P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms exposed to Manuka honey and artificial honey containing the same sugar composition as Manuka honey showed that the former had more pronounced effects than the latter on both S. aureus and P. aeruginosa biofilms. Visualized effects included distorted cell morphologies for both bacteria and a decrease in P. aeruginosa extracellular matrix. In conclusion, Manuka honey has a synergistic interaction with vancomycin against S. aureus biofilms and an additive interaction with gentamicin against P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:26904740

  16. Once-daily aminoglycoside therapy: potential ototoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, C. M.; Duffull, S. B.; Begg, E J

    1996-01-01

    Current data indicate that once-daily aminoglycoside therapy is as efficacious as traditional multiple daily dosing and equally or less toxic. Our experience with once-daily gentamicin, 6 mg/kg of body weight led to a 10% (3 of 33 patients) occurrence of documented ototoxicity after prolonged aminoglycoside exposure.

  17. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides in the Neonate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are common in the neonates and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Sixty percent of preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units received at least one antibiotic during the first week of life. Penicillins, aminoglycosides and cephalosporins comprised 53, 43 and 16%, respectively. Kinetic parameters such as the half-life (t1/2, clearance (Cl, and volume of distribution (Vd change with development, so the kinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides need to be studied in order to optimise therapy with these drugs. The aim of this study is to review the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate in a single article in order to provide a critical analysis of the literature and thus provide a useful tool in the hands of physicians. The bibliographic search was performed electronically using PubMed, as the search engine, until February 2nd, 2010. Medline search terms were as follows: pharmacokinetics AND (penicillins OR cephalosporins OR aminoglycosides AND infant, newborn, limiting to humans. Penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides are fairly water soluble and are mainly eliminated by the kidneys. The maturation of the kidneys governs the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate. The renal excretory function is reduced in preterms compared to term infants and Cl of these drugs is reduced in premature infants. Gestational and postnatal ages are important factors in the maturation of the neonate and, as these ages proceed, Cl of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides increases. Cl and t1/2 are influenced by development and this must be taken into consideration when planning a dosage regimen with these drugs. More pharmacokinetic studies are required to ensure that the dose recommended for the treatment of sepsis in the neonate is evidence based.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å

  19. UK31214, a new aminoglycoside and derivative of kanamycin B.

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, R.; Andrews, J. M.; Bedford, K A

    1980-01-01

    The in vitro activity of UK31214, a kanamycin B derivative, was studied against 250 recent isolates and compared with other aminoglycosides. Against the Enterobacteriaceae (with the exception of Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii) UK31214 and amikacin had similar degrees of activity (mode minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], 1 microgram/ml). Proteus mirabilis and P. stuartii strains were four- to eight-fold more susceptible to amikacin than to UK31214. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain...

  20. Intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Enterococcus faecium is conferred by the 16S rRNA m5C1404-specific methyltransferase EfmM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galimand, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Panvert, Michel; Desmolaize, Benoît; Douthwaite, Stephen Roger; Mechulam, Yves; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are ribosome-targeting antibiotics and a major drug group of choice in the treatment of serious enterococcal infections. Here we show that aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecium strain CIP 54-32 is conferred by the chromosomal gene efmM, encoding the E. faecium methyltr......Aminoglycosides are ribosome-targeting antibiotics and a major drug group of choice in the treatment of serious enterococcal infections. Here we show that aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecium strain CIP 54-32 is conferred by the chromosomal gene efmM, encoding the E. faecium...... locations are required for catalysis. The tertiary structure of EfmM is highly similar to that of RsmF, consistent with m(5)C formation at adjacent sites on the 30S subunit, while distinctive structural features account for the enzymes' respective specificities for nucleotides C1404 and C1407....

  1. Directed evolution of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (3' type IIIa variants that inactivate amikacin but impose significant fitness costs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Kramer

    Full Text Available The rules that govern adaptive protein evolution remain incompletely understood. Aminoglycoside aminotransferase (3' type IIIa (hereafter abbreviated APH(3'-IIIa is a good model enzyme because it inactivates kanamycin efficiently; it recognizes other aminoglycoside antibiotics, including amikacin, but not nearly as well. Here we direct the evolution of APH(3'-IIIa variants with increased activity against amikacin. After four rounds of random mutation and selection in Escherichia coli, the minimum inhibitory concentration of amikacin rose from 18 micrograms/mL (wild-type enzyme to over 1200 micrograms/mL (clone 4.1. The artificially evolved 4.1 APH(3'-IIIa variant exhibited 19-fold greater catalytic efficiency (k cat/K M than did the wild-type enzyme in reactions with amikacin. E. coli expressing the evolved 4.1 APH(3'-IIIa also exhibited a four-fold decrease in fitness (as measured by counting colony forming units in liquid cultures with the same optical density compared with isogenic cells expressing the wild-type protein under non-selective conditions. We speculate that these fitness costs, in combination with the prevalence of other amikacin-modifying enzymes, hinder the evolution of APH(3'-IIIa in clinical settings.

  2. Structural Studies of Bacterial Enzymes and their Relation to Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β- lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes

  3. Silver nanoparticles strongly enhance and restore bactericidal activity of inactive antibiotics against multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panáček, Aleš; Smékalová, Monika; Večeřová, Renata; Bogdanová, Kateřina; Röderová, Magdaléna; Kolář, Milan; Kilianová, Martina; Hradilová, Šárka; Froning, Jens P; Havrdová, Markéta; Prucek, Robert; Zbořil, Radek; Kvítek, Libor

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is currently one of the most important healthcare issues, and has serious negative impacts on medical practice. This study presents a potential solution to this problem, using the strong synergistic effects of antibiotics combined with silver nanoparticles (NPs). Silver NPs inhibit bacterial growth via a multilevel mode of antibacterial action at concentrations ranging from a few ppm to tens of ppm. Silver NPs strongly enhanced antibacterial activity against multiresistant, β-lactamase and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae when combined with the following antibiotics: cefotaxime, ceftazidime, meropenem, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. All the antibiotics, when combined with silver NPs, showed enhanced antibacterial activity at concentrations far below the minimum inhibitory concentrations (tenths to hundredths of one ppm) of individual antibiotics and silver NPs. The enhanced activity of antibiotics combined with silver NPs, especially meropenem, was weaker against non-resistant bacteria than against resistant bacteria. The double disk synergy test showed that bacteria produced no β-lactamase when treated with antibiotics combined with silver NPs. Low silver concentrations were required for effective enhancement of antibacterial activity against multiresistant bacteria. These low silver concentrations showed no cytotoxic effect towards mammalian cells, an important feature for potential medical applications. PMID:26970828

  4. Aminoglycoside binding to the HIV-1 RNA dimerization initiation site: thermodynamics and effect on the kissing-loop to duplex conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Bernacchi, Serena; Freisz, Séverine; Maechling, Clarisse; Spiess, Bernard; Marquet, Roland; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Owing to a striking, and most likely fortuitous, structural and sequence similarity with the bacterial 16 S ribosomal A site, the RNA kissing-loop complex formed by the HIV-1 genomic RNA dimerization initiation site (DIS) specifically binds 4,5-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamine (2-DOS) aminoglycoside antibiotics. We used chemical probing, molecular modeling, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and UV melting to investigate aminoglycoside binding to the DIS loop–loop complex. We showed that ...

  5. Performance evaluation of powdered activated carbon for removing 28 types of antibiotics from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbo; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Wen, Haitao; Li, Nan; Wu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the occurrence and fate of antibiotics in the aquatic environment has become a very serious problem in that they can potentially and irreversibly damage the ecosystem and human health. For this reason, interest has increased in developing strategies to remove antibiotics from water. This study evaluated the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) in removing from water 6 representative groups of 28 antibiotics, namely Tetracyclines (TCs), Macrolides (MCs), Chloramphenicols (CPs), Penicillins (PNs), Sulfonamides (SAs) and Quinolones (QNs). Results indicate that PAC demonstrated superior adsorption capacity for all selected antibiotics. The removal efficiency was up to 99.9% in deionized water and 99.6% in surface water at the optimum conditions with PAC dosage of 20 mg/L and contact time of 120 min. According to the Freundlich model's adsorption isotherm, the values of n varied among these antibiotics and most were less than 1, suggesting that the adsorption of antibiotics onto PAC was nonlinear. Adsorption of antibiotics followed well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model (R(2) = 0.99). Analysis using the Weber-Morris model revealed that the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Overall, the findings in this study confirm that PAC is a feasible and viable option for removing antibiotics from water in terms of water quality improvement and urgent antibiotics pollution control. Further research is essential on the following subjects: (i) removing more types of antibiotics by PAC; (ii) the adsorption process; and (iii) the mechanism of the competitive adsorption existing between natural organic matters (NOMs) and antibiotics. PMID:26946168

  6. Enhancement of the Norfloxacin Antibiotic Activity by Gaseous Contact with the Essential Oil of Croton zehntneri

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho, HDM; Matias, EFF; Santos, KKA; Tintino, SR; Souza, CES; Guedes, GMM; Santos, FAD; Costa, JGM; Falcão-Silva, VS; Siqueira-Júnior, JP

    2010-01-01

    This is the first on the modulation of norfloxacin antibiotic activity by the volatile compounds of an essential oil. We report the chemical composition and antibiotic modifying activity of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of Croton zehntneri Pax et Hoffm (variety estragole), using the minimal inhibitory dose method and gaseous contact. The leaves of Croton zehntneri Pax et Hoffm (Euphorbiaceae) were subjected to hydrodistillation, and the essential oil extracted was examined with ...

  7. [L forms of Staphylococcus aureus. Behavior of coagulase, hemolytic and desoxyribonuclease activities and antibiotic sensitivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschiavo, F; Giarrizzo, S

    1977-01-01

    L Forms derived from strains of coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus, have, on the whole, preserved their DNAsic, haemolitic and coagulastic activities. L. forms showed high resistence to antibiotics acting on the bacterial cell-wall. The sensibility to other antibiotics was, roughly, analogous for the L forms as well as for the bacterial strains ones, with the exception of the clortetraciclin and the diidrostreptomicin, ehich proved to be comparatively more active on the L forms. PMID:614141

  8. Synergistic antimicrobial activity between pentacyclic triterpenoids and antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navaratnam Parasakthi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been considerable effort to discover plant-derived antibacterials against methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA which have developed resistance to most existing antibiotics, including the last line of defence, vancomycin. Pentacyclic triterpenoid, a biologically diverse plant-derived natural product, has been reported to show anti-staphylococcal activities. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between three pentacyclic triterpenoid and standard antibiotics (methicillin and vancomycin against reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Methods and Results The activity of the standard antibiotics and compounds on reference methicillin-sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus were determined using the macrodilution broth method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the compounds was compared with that of the standard antibiotics. The interaction between any two antimicrobial agents was estimated by calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index of the combination. The various combinations of antibiotics and compounds reduced the MIC to a range of 0.05 to 50%. Conclusion Pentacyclic triterpenoids have shown anti-staphylococcal activities and although individually weaker than common antibiotics produced from bacteria and fungi, synergistically these compounds may use different mechanism of action or pathways to exert their antimicrobial effects, as implicated in the lowered MICs. Therefore, the use of current antibiotics could be maintained in their combination with plant-derived antibacterial agents as a therapeutic option in the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  9. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  10. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1(+/-)) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1(+/-) mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1(+/-) mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  11. Structure, toxicity and antibiotic activity of gramicidin S and derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierstra, J; Kapoerchan, V; Knijnenburg, A; van Belkum, A; Overhand, M

    2016-05-01

    Development of new antibiotics is declining whereas antibiotic resistance is rising, heralding a post-antibiotic era. Antimicrobial peptides such as gramicidin S (GS), exclusively topically used due to its hemolytic side-effect, could still be interesting as therapeutic compounds. By modifying the amino-acid composition of GS, we synthesized GS analogues. We now show that derivative VK7 has a lower MIC (7.8-31.2 μg/ml, median 15.6 μg/ml) against strains of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa than GS has (3.9-62.5 μg/ml, median 31.3 μg/ml). Low MICs for both VK7 and GS were observed for Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium. VK7 showed reduced haemolysis and less lactate dehydrogenase release. All compounds were fully bactericidal at MIC values. Modification of GS enables production of novel derivatives potentially useful for systemic treatment of human infections. PMID:26886453

  12. Intrasaccular injection of aminoglycosides: a novel method for temporary damaging fish inner ear hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    Faucher, Karine; Aas-Hansen, Øyvind; Damsgard, Borge; Stenklev, Niels-Christian

    2008-01-01

    Fish models are increasingly being used for hearing research investigations. Aminoglycoside antibiotics that are used for damaging the inner ear hair cells can have systemic side effects leading to death of study animals. This study aimed to compare two methods: i) systemic (intravenous) and ii) local (intrasaccular) gentamicin administration for induction of inner ear hair cell damage in the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (L.). Hair cell damage was assessed using scanning electron microscopy; ha...

  13. Rescue of non-sense mutated p53 tumor suppressor gene by aminoglycosides

    OpenAIRE

    Floquet, Célia; Deforges, Jules; Rousset, Jean-Pierre; Bidou, Laure

    2010-01-01

    Mutation-based treatments are a new development in genetic medicine, in which the nature of the mutation dictates the therapeutic strategy. Interest has recently focused on diseases caused by premature termination codons (PTCs). Drugs inducing the readthrough of these PTCs restore the production of a full-length protein. In this study, we explored the possibility of using aminoglycoside antibiotics to induce the production of a full-length functional p53 protein from a gene carrying a PTC. We...

  14. Sodium-Glucose Transporter-2 (SGLT2; SLC5A2) Enhances Cellular Uptake of Aminoglycosides

    OpenAIRE

    Meiyan Jiang; Qi Wang; Takatoshi Karasawa; Ja-Won Koo; Hongzhe Li; Steyger, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, like gentamicin, continue to be clinically essential worldwide to treat life-threatening bacterial infections. Yet, the ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects of these drugs remain serious complications. A major site of gentamicin uptake and toxicity resides within kidney proximal tubules that also heavily express electrogenic sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2; SLC5A2) in vivo. We hypothesized that SGLT2 traffics gentamicin, and promotes cellular toxicity. We conf...

  15. The role of active efflux in antibiotic - resistance of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falsafi T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux pumps that excrete drugs can confer resistance to antibiotics however, in Helicobacter pylori this role is not well established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of active efflux in resistance of H. pylori isolates to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Twelve multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR isolates resistant to at least four antibiotics, including β-lactams, metronidazole, tetracycline, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin; three resistant to only β-lactams, and two hyper-susceptible isolates, were obtained from screening of 96 clinical isolates of H. pylori . Their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs for antibiotics and ethidium-bromide (EtBr were compared in the presence- and absence of a proton-conductor, carbonyl cyanide-m chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP using agar-dilution and disc diffusion. Drug accumulation studies for EtBr and antibiotics were assessed in the presence and absence of CCCP using spectrofluorometry. Results: MIC of EtBr for eight MAR-isolates was decreased two- to four-folds in the presence of CCCP, of which five showed reduced MICs for β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin with CCCP. Accumulation of EtBr by the MAR-isolates was rapid and not dependant on the pattern of multiple resistance. Antibiotic accumulation assay confirmed the presence of energy-dependant efflux of β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin, but no erythromycin in five MAR isolates. Energy-dependant efflux of EtBr or antibiotics was not observed for four MAR-isolates, and three isolates were resistant only to β-lactams. Conclusion: Energy-dependant efflux plays a role in the resistance of H. pylori clinical isolates to structurally unrelated antibiotics in a broadly specific multidrug efflux manner. Difference in the efflux potential of MAR isolates may be related to the presence or absence of functional efflux-pumps in diverse H. pylori

  16. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli strains isolated from Antarctic bird feces, water from inside a wastewater treatment plant, and seawater samples collected in the Antarctic Treaty area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbia, Virginia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; Jiménez, Sebastián; Quezada, Mario; Domínguez, Mariana; Vergara, Luis; Gómez-Fuentes, Claudio; Calisto-Ulloa, Nancy; González-Acuña, Daniel; López, Juana; González-Rocha, Gerardo

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a problem of global concern and is frequently associated with human activity. Studying antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from pristine environments, such as Antarctica, extends our understanding of these fragile ecosystems. Escherichia coli strains, important fecal indicator bacteria, were isolated on the Fildes Peninsula (which has the strongest human influence in Antarctica), from seawater, bird droppings, and water samples from inside a local wastewater treatment plant. The strains were subjected to molecular typing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine their genetic relationships, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility with disk diffusion tests for several antibiotic families: β-lactams, quinolones, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, and trimethoprim-sulfonamide. The highest E. coli count in seawater samples was 2400 cfu/100 mL. Only strains isolated from seawater and the wastewater treatment plant showed any genetic relatedness between groups. Strains of both these groups were resistant to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfonamide.In contrast, strains from bird feces were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested. We conclude that naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in E. coli strains isolated from Antarctic bird feces is rare and the bacterial antibiotic resistance found in seawater is probably associated with discharged treated wastewater originating from Fildes Peninsula treatment plants.

  17. Does human activity impact the natural antibiotic resistance background? Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in 21 Swiss lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekalski, Nadine; Sigdel, Radhika; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging environmental contaminants, known to be continuously discharged into the aquatic environment via human and animal waste. Freshwater aquatic environments represent potential reservoirs for ARG and potentially allow sewage-derived ARG to persist and spread in the environment. This may create increased opportunities for an eventual contact with, and gene transfer to, human and animal pathogens via the food chain or drinking water. However, assessment of this risk requires a better understanding of the level and variability of the natural resistance background and the extent of the human impact. We have analyzed water samples from 21 Swiss lakes, taken at sampling points that were not under the direct influence of local contamination sources and analyzed the relative abundance of ARG using quantitative real-time PCR. Copy numbers of genes mediating resistance to three different broad-spectrum antibiotic classes (sulfonamides: sul1, sul2, tetracyclines: tet(B), tet(M), tet(W) and fluoroquinolones: qnrA) were normalized to copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We used multiple linear regression to assess if ARG abundance is related to human activities in the catchment, microbial community composition and the eutrophication status of the lakes. Sul genes were detected in all sampled lakes, whereas only four lakes contained quantifiable numbers of tet genes, and qnrA remained below detection in all lakes. Our data indicate higher abundance of sul1 in lakes with increasing number and capacity of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the catchment. sul2 abundance was rather related to long water residence times and eutrophication status. Our study demonstrates the potential of freshwater lakes to preserve antibiotic resistance genes, and provides a reference for ARG abundance from lake systems with low human impact as a baseline for assessing ARG contamination in lake water. PMID:25913323

  18. Intracellular Activity of Antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus in a Mouse Peritonitis Model ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Anne; Hessler, Jonas H. R.; Skov, Robert L.; Blom, Jens; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is often problematic due to the slow response to therapy and the high frequency of infection recurrence. The intracellular persistence of staphylococci has been recognized and could offer a good explanation for these treatment difficulties. Knowledge of the interplay between intracellular antibiotic activity and the overall outcome of infection is therefore important. Several intracellular in vitro models have been developed, but few ex...

  19. Occurrence and distribution of antibiotics in coastal water of the Bohai Bay, China: Impacts of river discharge and aquaculture activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of 21 antibiotics in six different groups was investigated in coastal water of the Bohai Bay. Meantime, to illuminate the potential effects caused by the river discharge and aquaculture activities, wastewater from three breeding plants and surface water from six rivers flowing into the Bohai Bay were also analyzed for the selected antibiotics. The result revealed that measured antibiotics in the North Bobai Bay were generally higher than those in the South, highlighting the remarkable effects of high density of human activities on the exposure of antibiotics in environment. The antibiotics found in the six rivers were generally higher than those in the Bohai Bay reflecting the important antibiotics source of river discharge. This study reveals that the high consumption of some antibiotics in aquaculture activities may pose high ecological risk to the bay. - Highlights: → Some antibiotics were ubiquitous with high concentration in the Bohai bay, North China. → The antibiotics were mainly from the six rivers discharge around the Bay. → Antibiotics are commonly used in aquaculture activities around the Bay. → Aquaculture was suggested to be an important antibiotics source in the Bay. - River discharge and aquaculture were suggested to be important sources for antibiotics occurred in the coastal water of the Bohai Bay, North China.

  20. A Simple Assay to Screen Antimicrobial Compounds Potentiating the Activity of Current Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Junaid; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to pose a significant problem in the management of bacterial infections, despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Here, we suggest a simple, inexpensive, and easy-to-perform assay to screen antimicrobial compounds from natural products or synthetic chemical libraries for their potential to work in tandem with the available antibiotics against multiple drug-resistant bacteria. The aqueous extract of Juglans regia tree bark was tested against representative multiple drug-resistant bacteria in the aforementioned assay to determine whether it potentiates the activity of selected antibiotics. The aqueous extract of J. regia bark was added to Mueller-Hinton agar, followed by a lawn of multiple drug-resistant bacteria, Salmonella typhi or enteropathogenic E. coli. Next, filter paper discs impregnated with different classes of antibiotics were placed on the agar surface. Bacteria incubated with extract or antibiotics alone were used as controls. The results showed a significant increase (>30%) in the zone of inhibition around the aztreonam, cefuroxime, and ampicillin discs compared with bacteria incubated with the antibiotics/extract alone. In conclusion, our assay is able to detect either synergistic or additive action of J. regia extract against multiple drug-resistant bacteria when tested with a range of antibiotics. PMID:23865073

  1. A Simple Assay to Screen Antimicrobial Compounds Potentiating the Activity of Current Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance continues to pose a significant problem in the management of bacterial infections, despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Here, we suggest a simple, inexpensive, and easy-to-perform assay to screen antimicrobial compounds from natural products or synthetic chemical libraries for their potential to work in tandem with the available antibiotics against multiple drug-resistant bacteria. The aqueous extract of Juglans regia tree bark was tested against representative multiple drug-resistant bacteria in the aforementioned assay to determine whether it potentiates the activity of selected antibiotics. The aqueous extract of J. regia bark was added to Mueller-Hinton agar, followed by a lawn of multiple drug-resistant bacteria, Salmonella typhi or enteropathogenic E. coli. Next, filter paper discs impregnated with different classes of antibiotics were placed on the agar surface. Bacteria incubated with extract or antibiotics alone were used as controls. The results showed a significant increase (>30% in the zone of inhibition around the aztreonam, cefuroxime, and ampicillin discs compared with bacteria incubated with the antibiotics/extract alone. In conclusion, our assay is able to detect either synergistic or additive action of J. regia extract against multiple drug-resistant bacteria when tested with a range of antibiotics.

  2. 糖尿病足分离的铜绿假单胞菌对氨基糖苷类抗生素耐药机制探讨%Study on aminoglycoside antibiotics resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from diabetic foot infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乌洪芳; 孙茜; 李玉珠; 张敏; 孟玲玲; 李代清

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features, phenotypes and genotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) strains isolated from patients with diabetic foot infection (DFI) resisting to aminoglycosides antibiotics (AmAn). Methods The clinical profiles of 209 DFI patients hospitalized in the Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital were collected and ana⁃lyzed. Forty-one PA strains were identified, and their antibiotic resistance profiles were obtained. The DNAs of PA isolates were extracted and applied to amplifications for several aminoglycosides modifying enzyme genes, including aac(3′)-Ⅰ, aac (3′)-Ⅱ, aac(6′)-Ⅰb, aac(6′)-Ⅱ, ant(2′′)-Ⅰand ant(3′′)-Ⅰby PCR method. Combining with the clinical features and the antibiotic resistance profiles, the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes of the PA strains was analyzed. Results Gram positive bacteria (G+) were the majority of the pathogen with 51.67%detection rate. The total detection rate of PA was 19.62%, listed as the top one pathogenic bacterium among gram negative bacteria (47.67%). There was significant difference in the ratio of ulcer area≥4 cm2 between PA group and non-PA group and G+group. There were significantly higher inci⁃dence rate of ischemic ulcer and osteomyelitis in PA group than those of G+group. There were higher clinical characteristics and ulcer depth (SAD) score, and increased hypersensitive C-reactive protein in PA group than those of G+ group. There were 30 strains of PA being resistant to AmAn (73.17%). The predominant drug resistance gene to AmAn was ant(3′′)-Ⅰ(65.85%), and aac(3′)-Ⅰgene was not found from all PA isolates. Conclusion The detection rate of PA isolated from DFI patients was higher, and patients were with the characteristics of larger, deeper and severe ischemia of ulcer area. The phe⁃nomenon of PA resistant to AmAn was more serious, and ant(3′′)-Ⅰgene identified from PA isolates was the most common resistance gene identified to Am

  3. In vitro activities of temafloxacin (A-62254) and four other antibiotics against Chlamydia trachomatis.

    OpenAIRE

    Segreti, J; Kessler, H A; Kapell, K S; Trenholme, G M

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro activity of temafloxacin (A-62254), a new quinolone antibiotic, against 13 strains of Chlamydia trachomatis was determined and compared with those of doxycycline, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and difloxacin. Temafloxacin and difloxacin were the most active quinolones tested, with bactericidal activity comparable to that of doxycycline.

  4. [Study on composition, antibiotic activity and antioxidant activity of volatile oils from uyghur medicine Althaea rosea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munira, Abudukeremu; Muheta'er, Tu'erhong; Resalat, Yimin; Xia, Na

    2015-04-01

    Althaea rosea is a type of mallow plant. Its dry flowers are one of common herb in Uyghur medicines and recorded to have several efficacies such as external application for detumescence, moistening lung and arresting cough, sweating and relieving asthma, diminishing swelling and promoting eruption, soothing the nerves and strengthening heart. However, there are only fewer studies on effective components of A. rosea and no literature about its volatile oil and pharmacological activity. In this paper, the volatile oil of A. rosea was obtained by using the chemical distillation and extraction method. The individual chemical components were separated from the volatile oil and identified by the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer technique (GC-MS). The antioxidant activity against free radicals was detected by the'ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer method. The antibiotic activity was detected by the filter paper diffusion method. The experimental results showed nearly 70 compounds in the volatile oil, with complex chemical components. With a low content, most of the compounds were aromatic and aliphatic compounds and their derivatives. A. rosea had a better antibiotic activity for common microorganisms, with a wide antibacterial spectrum. According to the results, the volatile oil of A. rosea will have a good application value in medicine, food and cosmetic industries, which provided a scientific basis for the development of natural A. rosea resources. PMID:26281609

  5. Isolation and speciation of Enterococci from various clinical samples and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern with special reference to high level Aminoglycoside resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    :Saroj Golia, Nirmala AR, Asha S Kamath B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Enterococci are important nosocomial agents and strains resistant to penicillin and other antibiotics occur frequently. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins and offer low level resistance to aminoglycosides. In penicillin sensitive strains, synergism occurs with combination treatment with penicillin and aminoglycoside. Serious infections caused by them are treated with penicillin and aminoglycoside combination. But the synergistic effect is lost, when the strain develops high level aminoglycoside resistance. The choice of drug for infections due to such strains is vancomycin. The present study was carried out to isolate and speciate Enterococci from various clinical samples, to know the susceptibility pattern of the isolates, to determine the High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance (HLAR among Enterococcal isolates. Methods: A total of One hundred Enterococcal species isolated from various clinical samples were identified by various biochemical reactions. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and HLAR were determined by Kirby- Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: Out of 100 Enterococcal isolates, 59 were E. faecalis, 38 were E. faecium, 3 were other Enterococcal species. Among these 53 isolates showed High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance. Conclusion: Present study shows the presence of drug resistance to most of commonly used antibiotics and HLAR is also more in E.faecium compared to E.fecalis.

  6. Association of community antibiotic consumption with clinically active trachoma in rural Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Berhan; Belay, Tesfaye; Gebre, Teshome; Zerihun, Mulat; Amere, Abayneh; Assefa, Yared; Habte, Dereje; Loh, Allison R; Stoller, Nicole E; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2011-12-01

    Community antibiotic utilization and its relationship with trachoma has been poorly characterized in areas with endemic trachoma. A survey of all drug-dispensing facilities in an area of rural Ethiopia was conducted. Antibiotic use was calculated using both retrospective and prospective methodology, and expressed as defined daily doses (DDDs). Overall antibiotic consumption estimates ranged from 2.91 to 3.07 DDDs per 1000 person days. Macrolide antibiotics accounted for 0.01 to 0.02 DDDs per 1000 person days. Each additional DDD of antibiotic use per 1000 person days was associated with a 15.0% (95% CI -19.7 to -10.3) decrease in the prevalence of clinically active trachoma among children under 10 years of age after adjusting for age, gender, altitude and the distance to nearest town. Increased background community antibiotic use may therefore be an aspect of socioeconomic development that can partially explain why trachoma prevalence has decreased in some areas in the absence of a trachoma program. The low volume of macrolide consumption in this area suggests that selection for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal macrolide resistance after mass azithromycin treatments likely has little clinical significance. PMID:22247750

  7. Disinfectant and antibiotic activities: a comparative analysis in Brazilian hospital bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Márcia Aparecida

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. It has been shown that appropriate environmental hygienic and disinfection practices can be very helpful to hospital infection control. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of some disinfectants against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant hospital bacterial isolates. The susceptibility of 27 clinical isolates to disinfectants and antibiotics was determined by the Association of Official Analytical Chemist?s (AOAC Use-Dilution method and by the Kirby-Bauer method, respectively. All strains tested were susceptible to sodium hypochlorite, glutaraldehyde and to the association quaternary ammonium - formaldehyde - ethyl alcohol disinfectants. However, the susceptibility of strains to phenol and to one quaternary ammonium compound was variable. Among twenty-one antibiotic-multiresistant strains (methicillin-resistant staphylococci, Enterococcus spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens and Escherichia coli eleven (52% and eight (38% strains were resistant to the quaternary ammonium and phenol compounds, respectively. Among six isolates that demonstrated susceptibility to antibiotics (staphylococci, Enterococcus spp, P. mirabilis, E. cloacae and E. coli two strains (33% showed resistance to these disinfectants. The results demonstrated the lack of correlation between antibiotic-susceptibility and susceptibility to disinfectants in hospital strains.

  8. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  9. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y.; Manning, Sara A.; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role

  10. An alkylaminoquinazoline restores antibiotic activity in Gram-negative resistant isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Baitiche, Milad; Adam, Elissavet; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2011-02-01

    To date, various bacterial drug efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) have been described. They exhibit variability in their activity spectrum with respect to antibiotic structural class and bacterial species. Among the various 4-alkylaminoquinazoline derivatives synthesized and studied in this work, one molecule, 1167, increased the susceptibility of important human-pathogenic, resistant, Gram-negative bacteria towards different antibiotic classes. This 4-(3-morpholinopropylamino)-quinazoline induced an increase in the activity of chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and sparfloxacin, which are substrates of the AcrAB-TolC and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps that act in these multidrug-resistant isolates. In addition, 1167 increased the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol in efflux pump-overproducing strains. The rate of restoration depended on the structure of the antibiotic, suggesting that different sites in the efflux pumps may be involved. A molecule exhibiting a morpholine functional group and a propyl extension of the side chain was more active. PMID:21071494

  11. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpirito, Alan A.; Zahn, James A.; Graham, David W.; Kim, Hyung J.; Alterman, Michail; Larive, Cynthia

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  12. Evolution of an Antibiotic Resistance Enzyme Constrained by Stability and Activity Trade-offs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    Pressured by antibiotic use, resistance enzymes have been evolving new activities. Does such evolution have a cost? To investigate this question at the molecular level, clinically isolated mutants of the {beta}-lactamase TEM-1 were studied. When purified, mutant enzymes had increased activity against cephalosporin antibiotics but lost both thermodynamic stability and kinetic activity against their ancestral targets, penicillins. The X-ray crystallographic structures of three mutant enzymes were determined. These structures suggest that activity gain and stability loss is related to an enlarged active site cavity in the mutant enzymes. In several clinically isolated mutant enzymes, a secondary substitution is observed far from the active site (Met182 {yields} Thr). This substitution had little effect on enzyme activity but restored stability lost by substitutions near the active site. This regained stability conferred an advantage in vivo. This pattern of stability loss and restoration may be common in the evolution of new enzyme activity.

  13. Effects of six selected antibiotics on plant growth and soil microbial and enzymatic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential impact of six antibiotics (chlortetracycline, tetracycline and tylosin; sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine and trimethoprim) on plant growth and soil quality was studied by using seed germination test on filter paper and plant growth test in soil, soil respiration and phosphatase activity tests. The phytotoxic effects varied between the antibiotics and between plant species (sweet oat, rice and cucumber). Rice was most sensitive to sulfamethoxazole with the EC10 value of 0.1 mg/L. The antibiotics tested inhibited soil phosphatase activity during the 22 days' incubation. Significant effects on soil respiration were found for the two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethazine) and trimethoprim, whereas little effects were observed for the two tetracyclines and tylosin. The effective concentrations (EC10 values) for soil respiration in the first 2 days were 7 mg/kg for sulfamethoxazole, 13 mg/kg for sulfamethazine and 20 mg/kg for trimethoprim. Antibiotic residues in manure and soils may affect soil microbial and enzyme activities. - Terrestrial ecotoxicological effects of antibiotics are related to their sorption and degradation behavior in soil.

  14. Effects of six selected antibiotics on plant growth and soil microbial and enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Feng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guangguo.ying@gmail.co [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tao Ran; Zhao Jianliang; Yang Jifeng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhao Lanfeng [College of Resource and Environmental Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2009-05-15

    The potential impact of six antibiotics (chlortetracycline, tetracycline and tylosin; sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine and trimethoprim) on plant growth and soil quality was studied by using seed germination test on filter paper and plant growth test in soil, soil respiration and phosphatase activity tests. The phytotoxic effects varied between the antibiotics and between plant species (sweet oat, rice and cucumber). Rice was most sensitive to sulfamethoxazole with the EC10 value of 0.1 mg/L. The antibiotics tested inhibited soil phosphatase activity during the 22 days' incubation. Significant effects on soil respiration were found for the two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethazine) and trimethoprim, whereas little effects were observed for the two tetracyclines and tylosin. The effective concentrations (EC10 values) for soil respiration in the first 2 days were 7 mg/kg for sulfamethoxazole, 13 mg/kg for sulfamethazine and 20 mg/kg for trimethoprim. Antibiotic residues in manure and soils may affect soil microbial and enzyme activities. - Terrestrial ecotoxicological effects of antibiotics are related to their sorption and degradation behavior in soil.

  15. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-06-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes. PMID:24647910

  16. Membrane-Active Macromolecules Resensitize NDM-1 Gram-Negative Clinical Isolates to Tetracycline Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Manjunath, Goutham B.; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Kaviyil, Jyothi E.; Ravikumar, Raju; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R.; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens have become world’s major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the ‘old antibiotics’ and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMs) that restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold) of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracycline in the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover, bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs. PMID:25789871

  17. Aminoglycoside resistance in clinical Gram-negative isolates from Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Haldorsen, Bjørg Christina

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides represent an important class of antimicrobial agents. The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance among Gram-negative bacteria in Norway is low, but an increased prevalence among clinical isolates of Escherichia coli has been observed during the last years. The most prevalent resistance mechanism is aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. In addition, resistance may occur when bacteria produces 16S rRNA methylases, which causes high level and broad-spectrum aminoglycoside resistance...

  18. Cooperative Electrostatic Polymer-Antibiotic Nanoplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Vadala, Timothy Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria can enter phagocytic cells and replicate in them, and these intracellular bacteria are difficult to treat because the recommended antibiotics do not transport into the cells efficiently. Examples include food-borne bacteria such as Salmonella and Listeria as well as more toxic bacteria such as Brucella and the Mycobacteria that lead to tuberculosis. Current treatments utilize aminoglycoside antibiotics that are polar and positively charged and such drugs do not ente...

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    APH(2′′)-Ic is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. gallinarum isolates. Crystals of the wild-type enzyme and three mutants have been prepared and a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal. Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2′′)-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14–20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl2, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg2GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 Å, β = 108.8°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA

  20. ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PROFILE OF LACTOBACILLUS PARACASEI SSP. PARACASEI-1 ISOLATED FROM REGIONAL YOGURTS OF BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummay Honi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei-1 was identified from traditional yogurts of Khulna region, Bangladesh and its enzyme and antibiotic resistance profiles were determined. A commercially available API Zym kit was employed to determine the activities of 19 different enzymes. We found that L. paracasei ssp. paracasei-1 showed strong activities for several enzymes, viz. leucine arylamidase, valine arylamidase, napthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase, β-galactosidase, α –Glucosidase, N-Acetyl- β- glucosaminidase while activities for other enzymes were absent. Antibiotic resistance profile was assessed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC test for 61 major antibiotics and 4 antifungal agents obtained from commercial sources in MRS Agar media. The strain generally showed resistance to gram negative spectrum antibiotic while it showed susceptibility towards β-lactam antibiotic to gram positive spectrum antibiotic. The findings provide the therapeutic basis of using L. paracasei ssp. paracasei-1 in finished food products.

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of Aeromonas spp. isolates from food in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Mohammad Bashir; Maqbool, Ahmed; Bari, Abdul; Krovacek, Karel

    2009-01-01

    A total of 57 Aeromonas isolates from food samples such as fresh and frozen chicken, game birds, pasteurized milk, baby food, bakery products, fruit and vegetables, fish, and water from Abu Dahbi, UAE were investigated for antibiotic susceptibility profile. Most strains were resistant to penicillins (ticarcillin, mezlocillin, oxacillin, piperacillin), sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and macrolides (erythromycin, vancomycin, clindamycin) but sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin), cephalosporins (cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, cefazolin, cephalexin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime), quinolone (ciprofloxacin), colistin sulphate and SXT (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). On the other hand, many antibiotics showed excellent inhibitory activity (>75% strains were sensitive to them) against all the strains tested. These include cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, ciprofloxacin, colistin, amikacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime and tobramycin. In conclusion, the results show a detailed pattern of sensitivity of the various Aeromonas spp. isolates to a variety of antibiotics and provide useful information in the context of selective isolation and phenotypic identification of the aeromonads from food. PMID:19382665

  2. Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the Tokay gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C E; Hudspeth, A J

    2000-01-01

    The high sensitivity and sharp frequency discrimination of hearing depend on mechanical amplification in the cochlea. To explore the basis of this active process, we examined the pharmacological sensitivity of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in a lizard, the Tokay gecko. In a quiet environment, each ear produced a complex but stable pattern of emissions. These SOAEs were reversibly modulated by drugs that affect mammalian otoacoustic emissions, the salicylates and the aminoglycoside antibiotics. The effect of a single i.p. injection of sodium salicylate depended on the initial power of the emissions: ears with strong control SOAEs displayed suppression at all frequencies, whereas those with weak control emissions showed enhancement. Repeated oral administration of acetylsalicylic acid reduced all emissions. Single i.p. doses of gentamicin or kanamycin suppressed SOAEs below 2.6 kHz, while modulating those above 2.6 kHz in either of two ways. For ears whose emission power at 2.6-5.2 kHz encompassed more than half of the total, individual emissions displayed facilitation as great as 35-fold. For the remaining ears, emissions dropped to as little as one-sixth of their initial values. The similarity of the responses of reptilian and mammalian cochleas to pharmacological intervention provides further evidence for a common mechanism of cochlear amplification. PMID:10618439

  3. Martinomycin, a new polyether antibiotic produced by Streptomyces salvialis. I. Taxonomy, fermentation and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernan, V S; Montenegro, D A; Goodman, J J; Alluri, M R; Carter, G T; Abbanat, D R; Pearce, C J; Maiese, W M; Greenstein, M

    1994-12-01

    Actinomycete culture LL-D37187 has been found to produce the new polyether antibiotic martinomycin. Taxonomic studies, including morphological, physiological, and cell wall chemistry analyses, revealed that culture LL-D37187 is a novel streptomycete species, and the proposed name is Streptomyces salvialis. Martinomycin exhibits activity against the Southern Army Worm (Spodoptera eridania) and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7844037

  4. Transition Metal–α-Amino Acid Complexes with Antibiotic Activity against Mycobacterium spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Karpin, George W.; Merola, Joseph S.; Joseph O. Falkinham

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic iridium-, rhodium-, and ruthenium-amino acid complexes with hydrophobic l-amino acids have antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium spp., including Mycobacterium bovis BCG and the rapidly growing species Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae. Concentrations of transition metal-amino acid complexes demonstrating hemolysis or cytotoxicity were 10- to 25-fold higher than were the MICs.

  5. Biotransformation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ligninolytic fungi - Metabolites, enzymes and residual antibacterial activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čvančarová, Monika; Moeder, M.; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 136, OCT 2015 (2015), s. 311-320. ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218; GA ČR GA13-28283S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fluoroquinolone antibiotics * White rot fungi * Residual antibacterial activity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.340, year: 2014

  6. Syntheses and In Vitro Biological Activity of Some Derivatives of C-9154 Antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Asusheyi Bello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In our continued attempts at designing new antibiotics based on the structure of the C-9154 antibiotic, to simultaneously improve activity and lower toxicity, an analogue to the C-9154 antibiotic and six derivatives of this analogue were synthesized. The approach was to significantly reduce the polarity of the synthesized analogue in the derivatives to achieve increased permeability across cell membranes by conversion of the highly polar carboxylic group to an ester functional group. The compounds were synthesized using a two-step reaction which involved an additional reaction between benzyl amine and maleic anhydride and then conversion of the terminal carboxylic acid functional group to an ester functional group using a thionyl chloride mediated esterification reaction. The compounds were fully characterized using Infrared, GC-MS, and 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The in vitro biological activity of the compounds showed that the derivatives were more active than the analogues as was anticipated with minimum inhibitory concentration in the range 0.625–5 μg/mL. The analogue had minimum inhibitory concentration in the range 2.5–10 μg/mL. These values are significantly better than that obtained for the original C-9154 antibiotic which had activity in the range 10–>100 μg/mL.

  7. Berberine Enhances the Antibacterial Activity of Selected Antibiotics against Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus Strains in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Wojtyczka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic interactions between commonly used antibiotics and natural bioactive compounds may exhibit therapeutic benefits in a clinical setting. Berberine, an isoquinoline-type alkaloid isolated from many kinds of medicinal plants, has proven efficacy against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. The aim of the presented work was to assess the antibacterial activity of berberine chloride in light of the effect exerted by common antibiotics on fourteen reference strains of Staphylococccus spp., and to evaluate the magnitude of interactions of berberine with these antistaphylococcal antibiotics. In our study minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of berberine chloride against CoNS ranged from 16 to 512 µg/mL. The most noticeable effects were observed for S. haemolyticus ATCC 29970, S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, S. capitis subsp. capitis ATCC 35661, S. galinarium ATCC 700401, S. hominis subsp. hominis ATCC 27844, S. intermedius ATCC 29663 and S. lugdunensis ATCC 49576. The most significant synergistic effect was noticed for berberine in combination with linezolid, cefoxitin and erythromycin. The synergy between berberine and antibiotics demonstrates the potential application of compound combinations as an efficient, novel therapeutic tool for antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  8. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance of Enterobacteriaceae family representatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Kotsyuba

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the basic medical scheme of antibiotics use for treatment of lesions caused by enterobacteria and mechanisms of resistance of Enterobacteriaceae to different classes of antibiotics. It is known that the main mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics are enzymatic inactivation, modification of the target, efflux, violation of conduct through the membrane and formation of metabolic shunt. The most common cases of resistance to beta-lactams among Enterobacteriaceae relate to production of plasmid and chromosomal beta-lactamases, violation of the permeability of the outer membrane, and modification of target penicillin binding proteins. Active release of antibiotics from the cell, or efflux, in Enterobacteriaceae is used for maintaining resistance to tetracyclines, macrolides, carbapenems. Genes of efflux system are localized on plasmids and contribute to rapid spreading among Enterobacteriaceae. Mutations are the basis of resistance to novobiocinum and rifampicinum. Enzymatic inactivation by modifying is typical for resistance to aminoglycosides. Three groups of enzymes are engaged in the process, by adding the molecule of acetic acid, phosphate or adenine. Joining of these groups is irreversible and leads to complete loss of biological activity of the antibiotic. Resistance to aminoglycosides appears also due to inhibition of drug penetration, that is associated with genetically determined mechanisms of electron transport through the membrane. Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is associated with the modification of topoisomerase II and IV which are targets of these groups of antibiotics. Resistance is possible as a result of changes in the structure of the target, breaching of penetration into the cell, and active release from the cell. The highest level of resistance is develope in the case of two- or three-stage mutations in one or the other, or both, subunits in different genes. At the same time, for breaching of

  9. Using wildlife activity and antibiotic resistance analysis to model bacterial water quality in coastal ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Pullaro, Thomas C.; Pan, Wei; Chiovarou, Erica D.; Daugomah, James W.; Shea, Norman R.; Siewicki, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Models that help predict fecal coliform bacteria (FCB) levels in environmental waters can be important tools for resource managers. In this study, we used animal activity along with antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA), land cover, and other variables to build models that predict bacteria levels in coastal ponds that discharge into an estuary. Photographic wildlife monitoring was used to estimate terrestrial and aquatic wildlife activity prior to sampling. Increased duck activity was an impor...

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Aminoglycosides Resistance in Acinetobacter Spp. with Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Nazem Shirazi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acinetobacter spp. is characterized as an important nosocomial pathogen and increasing antimicrobial resistance. Our aim was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility and aminoglycosides resistance genes of Acinetobacter spp. isolated from hospitalized patients.Methods: Sixty isolates were identified as Acinetobacter species. The isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance by disc diffusion method for 12 antimicrobials. The presence of aphA6, aacC1 aadA1, and aadB genes were detected using PCR.Results: From the isolated Acinetobacter spp. the highest resistance rate showed against amikacin, tobramycin, and ceftazidim, respectively; while isolated bacteria were more sensitive to ampicillic/subactam. More than 66% of the isolates were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics, and 27.5% of MDR strains were resistant to all seven tested classes of antimicrobials. The higher MDR rate presented in bacteria isolated from the ICU and blood samples. More than 60% of the MDR bacteria were resistance to amikacin, ceftazidim, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, doxycycline, tobramycin and levofloxacin. Also, more than 60% of the isolates contained phosphotransferase aphA6, and acetyltransferase genes aacC1, but adenylyltransferase genes aadA1 (41.7%, and aadB (3.3% were less prominent. 21.7% of the strains contain three aminoglycoside resistance genes (aphA6, aacC1 and aadA1.Conclusion: The rising trend of resistance to aminoglycosides poses an alarming threat to treatment of such infections. The findings showed that clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. in our hospital carrying various kinds of aminoglycoside resistance genes.

  11. Physiological and Molecular Pathology of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Su-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The problem of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity, which was recognized within a year of the discovery of streptomycin to combat tuberculosis in 1944, is still of great concern due to the widespread use of these powerful antibacterial agents. These drugs can damage to varying degrees the cochlea and vestibular system. Their primary targets are the…

  12. Aminoglycoside resistance among isolates of nosocomial Enterobacteriaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-seven gentamicin-resistant isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, obtained from patients attending hospital, were examined for the production of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Of the 51 strains producing such enzymes, 34 were presumptively plasmid-mediated as indicated by conjugation experiments

  13. Antibiotic allergy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, J S; Nasser, S

    2005-06-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are more common in cystic fibrosis (CF) than in the general population. This in part is due to the improving survival in adults with CF and the increased use of high dose intravenous antibiotics. While some are immediate anaphylaxis type (IgE mediated) reactions, the majority are late onset and may have non-specific features such as rash and fever. Piperacillin has consistently been found to have the highest rate of reported reactions (30-50%). There is a low risk of cross reactions between penicillins and other non-beta-lactam classes of antibiotics in penicillin skin prick positive patients. Carbapenems should only be used with extreme caution in patients with positive skin prick tests to penicillin. However, aztreonam can be used safely in patients who are penicillin allergic with positive skin prick reactions. The aminoglycosides are a relatively uncommon cause of allergic reactions, but patients who react to one member of the family may cross react with other aminoglycosides. Desensitisation relies on the incremental introduction of small quantities of the allergen and has been used for penicillins, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin and must be repeated before each course. Personalized cards should be regularly updated for patients who develop allergic reactions. Written instructions on the emergency treatment of allergic reactions should be provided to patients self-administering intravenous antibiotics at home. Further research is required to identify risk factors and predictors for antibiotic allergy. PMID:15923254

  14. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane pe...

  15. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euna eOh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically-important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN. Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  16. Intracellular activity of antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse peritonitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Anne; Hessler, Jonas H R; Skov, Robert L; Blom, Jens; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2009-05-01

    Antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is often problematic due to the slow response to therapy and the high frequency of infection recurrence. The intracellular persistence of staphylococci has been recognized and could offer a good explanation for these treatment difficulties. Knowledge of the interplay between intracellular antibiotic activity and the overall outcome of infection is therefore important. Several intracellular in vitro models have been developed, but few experimental animal models have been published. The mouse peritonitis/sepsis model was used as the basic in vivo model exploring a quantitative ex vivo extra- and intracellular differentiation assay. The intracellular presence of S. aureus was documented by electron microscopy. Five antibiotics, dicloxacillin, cefuroxime, gentamicin, azithromycin, and rifampin (rifampicin), were tested in the new in vivo model; and the model was able to distinguish between their extra- and intracellular effects. The intracellular effects of the five antibiotics could be ranked as follows as the mean change in the log(10) number of CFU/ml (Delta log(10) CFU/ml) between treated and untreated mice after 4 h of treatment: dicloxacillin (3.70 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > cefuroxime (3.56 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > rifampin (1.86 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > gentamicin (0.61 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > azithromycin (0.21 Delta log(10) CFU/ml). We could also show that the important factors during testing of intracellular activity in vivo are the size, number, and frequency of doses; the time of exposure; and the timing between the start of infection and treatment. A poor correlation between the intracellular accumulation of the antibiotics and the actual intracellular effect was found. This stresses the importance of performing experimental studies, like those with the new in vivo model described here, to measure actual intracellular activity instead of making predictions based on cellular pharmacokinetic and MICs. PMID

  17. [Comparative urinary bactericidal activity of oral antibiotics against gram-positive pathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenić, Branka; Budimir, Ana; Gverić, Ana; Plecko, Vanda; Vranes, Jasmina; Bubonja-Sonje, Marina; Kalenić, Smilja

    2012-01-01

    In routine bacteriological laboratories the antibacterial activity of antibiotics is determined by in vitro testing, usually by disk-diffusion test. However, in vitro testing does not always reflect antibacterial efficiency of antibiotics in vivo. In this investigation, the urine samples obtained in a single oral dose pharmacokinetic study were examined for their bactericidal activity against a range of relevant Gram-positive urinary tract pathogens. Urinary bactericidal activity of linezolid had been previously compared with ciprofloxacin but not with other oral antibiotics such as beta-lactams. Linezolid showed satisfactory urinary bactericidal titres throughout the whole testing period against all Gram-positive cocci. Fluoroquinolones displayed high and persisting levels of urinary bactericidal activity against staphylococci, but their activity against enterococci was weaker. According to the results of ex-vivo testing amoxycillin could be recommended only for infections caused by E. faecalis. Amoxycillin combined with clavulanic acid can be considered as a therapeutic option for infections caused by S. saprophyticus and E. faecalis. Older cephalosporins had high titres only against S. saprophyticus. Their drawback is a short elimination half-time in urine resulting in rapid decrease of urinary bactericidal titers during dosing interval. Furthermore, they do not show activity against enterococci due to their intrinsic resistance to cephalosporins. PMID:22930932

  18. Deficient autolytic enzyme activity in antibiotic-tolerant lactobacilli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K. S.; Morrison, J O; Bayer, A S

    1982-01-01

    To define the mechanism(s) of penicillin tolerance in lactobacilli, one nontolerant and two tolerant strains were examined for autolytic enzyme activity. When incubated with 14C-labeled cell wall preparations, autolysin extracts of tolerant lactobacilli released significantly less radioactivity than did extracts of nontolerant lactobacilli (p less than 0.02). These differences in the release of radioactivity by nontolerant and tolerant strains were maximal during the logarithmic growth phase....

  19. Enzymatic activation of oxygen in the biosynthesis of polyketide antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Koskiniemi, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    The electron structure of molecular oxygen (O2) is such that it cannot spontaneously react with organic molecules, a feature that protects organisms from oxidative stress. However, oxygenases can insert O2 in organic substrates. The enzymes do this after activating O2 for the reaction, most often with the aid of an organic or inorganic cofactor. A number of different cofactors have been discovered in nature thus far. In this thesis, five oxygenases with three different cata...

  20. Genetic Transferability of Anomalous Irradiation Alterations of Antibiotic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bass, George E.

    2007-01-01

    It previously has been discovered that visible light irradiation of crystalline substrates can lead to enhancement of subsequent enzymatic reaction rates as sharply peaked oscillatory functions of irradiation time. The particular activating irradiation times can vary with source of a given enzyme and thus, presumably, its molecular structure. The experiments reported here demonstrate that the potential for this anomalous enzyme reaction rate enhancement can be transferred from one bacterial s...

  1. Aminoglycoside binding to the HIV-1 RNA dimerization initiation site: thermodynamics and effect on the kissing-loop to duplex conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, Serena; Freisz, Séverine; Maechling, Clarisse; Spiess, Bernard; Marquet, Roland; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Owing to a striking, and most likely fortuitous, structural and sequence similarity with the bacterial 16 S ribosomal A site, the RNA kissing-loop complex formed by the HIV-1 genomic RNA dimerization initiation site (DIS) specifically binds 4,5-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamine (2-DOS) aminoglycoside antibiotics. We used chemical probing, molecular modeling, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and UV melting to investigate aminoglycoside binding to the DIS loop-loop complex. We showed that apramycin, an aminoglycoside containing a bicyclic moiety, also binds the DIS, but in a different way than 4,5-disubstituted 2-DOS aminoglycosides. The determination of thermodynamic parameters for various aminoglycosides revealed the role of the different rings in the drug-RNA interaction. Surprisingly, we found that the affinity of lividomycin and neomycin for the DIS (K(d) approximately 30 nM) is significantly higher than that obtained in the same experimental conditions for their natural target, the bacterial A site (K(d) approximately 1.6 microM). In good agreement with their respective affinity, aminoglycoside increase the melting temperature of the loop-loop interaction and also block the conversion from kissing-loop complex to extended duplex. Taken together, our data might be useful for selecting new molecules with improved specificity and affinity toward the HIV-1 DIS RNA. PMID:17942426

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Various Plants Extracts Against Antibiotic-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Laham, Shaza Anwar; Al Fadel, Frdoos Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aeromonas hydrophila cause one of the most important diseases in fishes and lead to economic losses, and may be contaminated human beings. Objectives: The current research aimed to investigate the anti-bacterial activity shown by the extracts prepared from different parts of Olea europea, Myrtus communis, Thymus vulgaris, Rosmarinuis officinalis, and Achillea falcata that grow in Syria against A. hydrophila that causes the most dangerous bacterial diseases in fish. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in four stages: First of all, the presence of A. hydrophila was investigated in 450 Samples of Cyprinus Carpio fish using blood agar, Trypticase soya agar, and Analytical Profile Index (API20E). Secondly, the plants extract was obtained using water, absolute alcohol, then ether using Soxhlet extraction apparatus and rotary vacuum evaporator. Thirdly, the antibacterial activity of some antibiotics on these bacteria was evaluated by disk diffusion method. Finally, the antibacterial effect of the extracts was determined by disk diffusion method. Results: The studied antibiotics showed no antibacterial activity against these bacteria, except amikacin which had an acceptable effectiveness. However, the ethanol extracts of the studied plants revealed different antibacterial effects against A. hydrophila which showed antibiotic resistant. T. vulgaris extract had the strongest effect, whereas O. europea extract had the weakest activity. The water and ether petroleum extracts had no antibacterial activities. Conclusions: Ethanol extracts of the studied plants had different antibacterial effects against antibiotic-resistant A. hydrophila. T. vulgaris had the highest activity, R. officinalis had the second, and M. communis and A. falcate were in the third place, while the O. europea had the weakest antibacterial activity. PMID:25368797

  3. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases activate nucleoside antibiotics in severely pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Shannon, O.; Clausen, A.R.;

    2007-01-01

    kinase-deficient Escherichia coli strains become highly susceptible to nucleoside analogs when they express recombinant kinases from Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. We further demonstrate that recombinant S. aureus deoxyadenosine kinase efficiently phosphorylates the anticancer drug...... gemcitabine in vitro and is therefore the key enzyme in the activation pathway. When adult mice were infected intraperitoneally with a fatal dose of S. pyogenes strain AP1 and afterwards received gemcitabine, they failed to develop a systemic infection. Nucleoside analogs may therefore represent a promising...

  4. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26918268

  5. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A;

    2012-01-01

    disease specialists in Europe, the United States, Canada, and Australia. An international expert panel selected systemic antibacterial drugs for their potential to treat infections caused by resistant bacteria or their unique value for specific criteria. Twenty-two of the 33 selected antibiotics were...... available in fewer than 20 of 38 countries. Economic motives were the major cause for discontinuation of marketing of these antibiotics. Fourteen of 33 antibiotics are potentially active against either resistant Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. Urgent measures are then needed to ensure better...

  6. Epilobi Hirsuti Herba Extracts Influence the In Vitro Activity of Common Antibiotics on Standard Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirvu Lucia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilobium genus has been confirmed as an effective source of natural antimicrobials. However, the influence of Epilobi hirsuti herba derived products on usual antibiotics activity has not been studied. In this study, several standardized Epilobi hirsuti herba extracts (EHE were evaluated in order to asses their potential effects on usual antibiotics tested on standard Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains in vitro. The results emphasized that the bacterial strains ranged from sensitive (MIC values between 50–200 μg GAE mL-1 (S. epidermidis ATCC 12228 to very resistant (E. coli strains, E. faecalis ATCC 29212 being practically immune to EHE. In terms of synergistic interaction, Tetracycline and Ampicillin combinations lead to the most important stimulatory effects, the diameters of the inhibition zone being even 60% bigger compared to the antibiotic alone. Synergistic effects between myricetin(galloyl derivates and Tetracycline were also revealed on P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains. Together, it clearly demonstrated not only EHE’s own antimicrobial properties, but also their capacity to influence the antimicrobial potency of some common antibiotics. These results could be useful for the area of herbal medicines and as potential candidates in managing microbial resistance, but also for physicians and pharmacists using combined antibacterial therapy.

  7. Combinatorial Activity of Flavonoids with Antibiotics Against Drug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana Cristina; Serra, Sofia C; Borges, Anabela; Saavedra, Maria José; Mcbain, Andrew J; Salgado, António J; Simões, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The use of resistance-modifying agents is a potential strategy that is used to prolong the effective life of antibiotics in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance. Since certain flavonoids are potent bacterial efflux pump inhibitors, we assessed morin, rutin, quercetin, hesperidin, and (+)-catechin for their combined activity with the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin, oxacillin, and ampicillin against drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Four established methods were used to determine the combined efficacy of each combination: microdilution checkerboard assays, time-kill determinations, the Etest, and dual disc-diffusion methods. The cytotoxicity of the flavonoids was additionally evaluated in a mouse fibroblast cell line. Quercetin and its isomer morin decreased by 3- to 16-fold the minimal inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin against some S. aureus strains. Rutin, hesperidin, and (+)-catechin did not promote any potentiation of antibiotics. Despite the potential cytotoxicity of these phytochemicals at a high concentration (fibroblast IC50 of 41.8 and 67.5 mg/L, respectively), quercetin is commonly used as a supplement for several therapeutic purposes. All the methods, with exception of the time-kill assay, presented a high degree of congruence without any apparent strain specificity. PMID:25734256

  8. Appearance of amikacin and tobramycin resistance due to 4'-aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase [ANT(4')-II] in gram-negative pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, G A; Blaser, M J; Santanam, P; Hächler, H; Kayser, F H; Hare, R S; Miller, G. H.

    1990-01-01

    Following the use of amikacin as the principal aminoglycoside at a Denver hospital, amikacin resistance appeared first in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and then in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and other enteric organisms from debilitated and compromised patients who had spent time in intensive care units and who had been treated with multiple antibiotics, usually including amikacin. In a P. aeruginosa isolate, resistance to amikacin and tobramycin was transferable by the IncP-2 plasmid p...

  9. Screen of FDA-approved drug library reveals compounds that protect hair cells from aminoglycosides and cisplatin

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasits, Anna L.; Simon, Julian A.; Raible, David W.; Rubel, Edwin W; Owens, Kelly N.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of mechanosensory hair cells in the inner ear accounts for many hearing loss and balance disorders. Several beneficial pharmaceutical drugs cause hair cell death as a side effect. These include aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as neomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin, and several cancer chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin. Discovering new compounds that protect mammalian hair cells from toxic insults is experimentally difficult because of the inaccessibility of the inner ear. We used the ...

  10. Antibacterial Activity and Antibiotic-Enhancing Effects of Honeybee Venom against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Mi; Kim, Joung Min; Hong, In Pyo; Woo, Soon Ok; Kim, Se Gun; Jang, He Rye; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), along with other antibiotic resistant bacteria, has become a significant social and clinical problem. There is thus an urgent need to develop naturally bioactive compounds as alternatives to the few antibiotics that remain effective. Here we assessed the in vitro activities of bee venom (BV), alone or in combination with ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin or vancomycin, on growth of MRSA strains. The antimicrobial activity of BV against MRSA strains was investigated using minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) and a time-kill assay. Expression of atl which encodes murein hydrolase, a peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme involved in cell separation, was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The MICs of BV were 0.085 µg/mL and 0.11 µg/mL against MRSA CCARM 3366 and MRSA CCARM 3708, respectively. The MBC of BV against MRSA 3366 was 0.106 µg/mL and that against MRSA 3708 was 0.14 µg/mL. The bactericidal activity of BV corresponded to a decrease of at least 3 log CFU/g cells. The combination of BV with ampicillin or penicillin yielded an inhibitory concentration index ranging from 0.631 to 1.002, indicating a partial and indifferent synergistic effect. Compared to ampicillin or penicillin, both MRSA strains were more susceptible to the combination of BV with gentamicin or vancomycin. The expression of atl gene was increased in MRSA 3366 treated with BV. These results suggest that BV exhibited antibacterial activity and antibiotic-enhancing effects against MRSA strains. The atl gene was increased in MRSA exposed to BV, suggesting that cell division was interrupted. BV warrants further investigation as a natural antimicrobial agent and synergist of antibiotic activity. PMID:26771592

  11. Antibacterial Activity and Antibiotic-Enhancing Effects of Honeybee Venom against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Mi Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, along with other antibiotic resistant bacteria, has become a significant social and clinical problem. There is thus an urgent need to develop naturally bioactive compounds as alternatives to the few antibiotics that remain effective. Here we assessed the in vitro activities of bee venom (BV, alone or in combination with ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin or vancomycin, on growth of MRSA strains. The antimicrobial activity of BV against MRSA strains was investigated using minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC, minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC and a time-kill assay. Expression of atl which encodes murein hydrolase, a peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme involved in cell separation, was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The MICs of BV were 0.085 µg/mL and 0.11 µg/mL against MRSA CCARM 3366 and MRSA CCARM 3708, respectively. The MBC of BV against MRSA 3366 was 0.106 µg/mL and that against MRSA 3708 was 0.14 µg/mL. The bactericidal activity of BV corresponded to a decrease of at least 3 log CFU/g cells. The combination of BV with ampicillin or penicillin yielded an inhibitory concentration index ranging from 0.631 to 1.002, indicating a partial and indifferent synergistic effect. Compared to ampicillin or penicillin, both MRSA strains were more susceptible to the combination of BV with gentamicin or vancomycin. The expression of atl gene was increased in MRSA 3366 treated with BV. These results suggest that BV exhibited antibacterial activity and antibiotic-enhancing effects against MRSA strains. The atl gene was increased in MRSA exposed to BV, suggesting that cell division was interrupted. BV warrants further investigation as a natural antimicrobial agent and synergist of antibiotic activity.

  12. Exogenous pulmonary surfactant as a drug delivering agent: influence of antibiotics on surfactant activity.

    OpenAIRE

    van 't Veen, A; Gommers, D.; Mouton, J. W.; Kluytmans, J.A.; Krijt, E. J.; Lachmann, B.

    1996-01-01

    1. It has been proposed to use exogenous pulmonary surfactant as a drug delivery system for antibiotics to the alveolar compartment of the lung. Little, however, is known about interactions between pulmonary surfactant and antimicrobial agents. This study investigated the activity of a bovine pulmonary surfactant after mixture with amphotericin B, amoxicillin, ceftazidime, pentamidine or tobramycin. 2. Surfactant (1 mg ml-1 in vitro and 40 mg ml-1 in vivo) was mixed with 0.375 mg ml-1 amphote...

  13. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant

    OpenAIRE

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-01-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine...

  14. Penicillin-Bound Polyacrylate Nanoparticles: Restoring the Activity of β-Lactam Antibiotics Against MRSA

    OpenAIRE

    Turos, Edward; Reddy, G. Suresh Kumar; Greenhalgh, Kerriann; Ramaraju, Praveen; Abeylath, Sampath C.; Jang, Seyoung; Dickey, Sonja; Lim, Daniel V

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the preparation of antibacterially-active emulsified polyacrylate nanoparticles in which a penicillin antibiotic is covalently conjugated onto the polymeric framework. These nanoparticles were prepared in water by emulsion polymerization of an acrylated penicillin analogue pre-dissolved in a 7:3 (w:w) mixture of butyl acrylate and styrene in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (surfactant) and potassium persulfate (radical initiator). Dynamic light scattering analysis...

  15. Dissecting the cosubstrate structure requirements of the Staphylococcus aureus aminoglycoside resistance enzyme ANT(4').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Vanessa R; Green, Keith D; Zolova, Olga E; Houghton, Jacob L; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2010-12-01

    Aminoglycosides are important antibiotics used against a wide range of pathogens. As a mechanism of defense, bacteria have evolved enzymes able to inactivate these drugs by regio-selectively adding a variety of functionalities (acetyl, phospho, and nucelotidyl groups) to their scaffolds. The aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(4') is one of the most prevalent and unique modifying-enzymes. Here, by TLC, HRMS, and colorimetric assays, we demonstrate that the resistance enzyme ANT(4') from Staphylococcus aureus is highly substrate and cosubstrate promiscuous. We show that deoxy-ribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) are better cosubstrates than NTPs. We demonstrate that the position of the triphosphate group (5' and not 3') on the ribose/deoxyribose ring is important for recognition by ANT(4'), and that NTPs with larger substituents at the 3'-position of the ribose ring are not cosubstrates for ANT(4'). We confirm that for all aminoglycosides tested, the respective nucleotidylated products are completely inactive. These results provide valuable insights into the development of strategies to combat the ever-growing bacterial resistance problem. PMID:21040710

  16. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45% isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55% as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients.

  17. Activity and interactions of antibiotic and phytochemical combinations against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premkumar Jayaraman, Meena K Sakharkar, Chu Sing Lim, Thean Hock Tang, Kishore R. Sakharkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the in vitro activities of seven antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, polymyxin B and piperacillin and six phytochemicals (protocatechuic acid, gallic acid, ellagic acid, rutin, berberine and myricetin against five P. aeruginosa isolates, alone and in combination are evaluated. All the phytochemicals under investigation demonstrate potential inhibitory activity against P. aeruginosa. The combinations of sulfamethoxazole plus protocatechuic acid, sulfamethoxazole plus ellagic acid, sulfamethoxazole plus gallic acid and tetracycline plus gallic acid show synergistic mode of interaction. However, the combinations of sulfamethoxazole plus myricetin shows synergism for three strains (PA01, DB5218 and DR3062. The synergistic combinations are further evaluated for their bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa ATCC strain using time-kill method. Sub-inhibitory dose responses of antibiotics and phytochemicals individually and in combination are presented along with their interaction network to suggest on the mechanism of action and potential targets for the phytochemicals under investigation. The identified synergistic combinations can be of potent therapeutic value against P. aeruginosa infections. These findings have potential implications in delaying the development of resistance as the antibacterial effect is achieved with lower concentrations of both drugs (antibiotics and phytochemicals.

  18. Antagonistic activity of antibiotic producing Streptomyces sp. against fish and human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Hossain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to isolate Streptomyces sp. from soil samples of two different regions of Bangladesh and evaluate their antagonistic activity against fish and human pathogenic bacteria. A total of 10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces sp. based on several morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. Cross streak method was used to observe the antagonistic activity of the Streptomyces sp. isolates against different fish pathogens belonging to the genus Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Edwardsiella and human clinical isolates belonging to the genus Klebsiella, Salmonella and Streptococcus. Seven Streptomyces sp. isolates showed antagonism against both fish and human pathogenic bacteria. Four isolates viz., N24, N26, N28 and N47 showed broad spectrum of antagonistic activity (80-100% against all genera of fish and human pathogenic bacteria. The isolate N49 exhibited highest spectrum of antagonism against all fish pathogens (90-100% but comparatively lower degree of antagonism against human pathogens (50-60%. Rest of the two isolates (N21 and N23 showed variability in their antagonism. Results showed that broad spectrum antibiotic(s could be developed from the isolates N24, N26, N28 and N47against several human and fish pathogens. The isolate N49 could be a potential source of antibiotic, especially for fish pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during two decades of antipseudomonal treatment at the Danish CF Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Pedersen, S S;

    1994-01-01

    At the Danish CF Center patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection were treated 3-4 times a year (from 1976) with a 2-week intravenous antipseudomonal course which included preferentially an aminoglycoside and a beta-lactam antibiotic. We investigated the development of antibiotic...... 1991 (100 strains). All the strains were screened and assayed semiquantitatively for beta-lactamase activity by use of nitrocefin. We found a significant (p < 0.005) increase in the MIC values of the P. aeruginosa strains against piperacillin and ceftazidime. However, no significant correlation was...... found between the MIC and the number of antipseudomonal courses of antibiotics. The proportion of resistant in vivo selected P. aeruginosa strains, presumed to be stably derepressed producers of chromosomal beta-lactamase, also increased significantly during the period studied. Our results confirm that...

  20. Chronopharmacokinetics of once daily dosed aminoglycosides in hospitalized infectious patients

    OpenAIRE

    van Maarseveen, Erik; Man, Wai Hong; Proost, Johannes; Neef, Cees; Touw, Daniël

    2015-01-01

    Background hospitalized patients with serious infections treated with aminoglycosides are at risk of developing nephrotoxicity. Previous clinical studies have shown that the pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in humans follow a circadian rhythm. Therefore, the time of administration could have important clinical implications with respect to the risk of developing aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in patients treated with once daily dosing regimens. Objective To examine the effect of t...

  1. Induction kinetics of the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall stress stimulon in response to different cell wall active antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus activates a protective cell wall stress stimulon (CWSS in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis or cell envelope damage caused by several structurally and functionally different antibiotics. CWSS induction is coordinated by the VraSR two-component system, which senses an unknown signal triggered by diverse cell wall active agents. Results We have constructed a highly sensitive luciferase reporter gene system, using the promoter of sas016 (S. aureus N315, which detects very subtle differences in expression as well as measuring > 4 log-fold changes in CWSS activity, to compare the concentration dependence of CWSS induction kinetics of antibiotics with different cell envelope targets. We compared the effects of subinhibitory up to suprainhibitory concentrations of fosfomycin, D-cycloserine, tunicamycin, bacitracin, flavomycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, lysostaphin and daptomycin. Induction kinetics were both strongly antibiotic- and concentration-dependent. Most antibiotics triggered an immediate response with induction beginning within 10 min, except for tunicamycin, D-cycloserine and fosfomycin which showed lags of up to one generation before induction commenced. Induction characteristics, such as the rate of CWSS induction once initiated and maximal induction reached, were strongly antibiotic dependent. We observed a clear correlation between the inhibitory effects of specific antibiotic concentrations on growth and corresponding increases in CWSS induction kinetics. Inactivation of VraR increased susceptibility to the antibiotics tested from 2- to 16-fold, with the exceptions of oxacillin and D-cycloserine, where no differences were detected in the methicillin susceptible S. aureus strain background analysed. There was no apparent correlation between the induction capacity of the various antibiotics and the relative importance of the CWSS for the corresponding resistance phenotypes

  2. β-lactam antibiotic-induced release of lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus leads to activation of neutrophil granulocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartung Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN are phagocytes of the first line of antimicrobial defense. Previously we demonstrated that lipoteichoic acid (LTA from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus directly activates neutrophil granulocytes. Others have reported that exposure of S. aureus to β-lactam antibiotics leads to LTA release. In the present study we addressed the question whether exposure of S. aureus to β-lactam antibiotics or antibiotics of other groups results in the generation of PMN-stimulating activity and whether this activity can be attributed to LTA. Methods S. aureus were exposed to flucloxacillin, a β-lactam antibiotic or to the protein synthesis-inhibitors erythromycin and gentamicin, or to ciprofloxacin, a gyrase inhibitor. Supernatants of the antibiotic-treated bacteria were assayed for their LTA content and for their effect on PMN functions. Results We observed that exposure of S. aureus to flucloxacillin and, to a lesser degree to ciprofloxacin, but not to erythromycin or gentamicin led to LTA release. Co-incubation of neutrophil granulocytes with LTA-containing supernatants led to PMN activation as assed by morphological changes, release of IL-8, delay of spontaneous apoptosis and enhanced phagocytic activity. Depletion of LTA from the supernatants markedly reduced their PMN-activating capacity. Conclusion The findings suggest that, via the activation of PMN, antibiotic-induced LTA release from S. aureus leads to enhanced antimicrobial activity of the innate immune defense mechanisms.

  3. Antibiotic resistance in lactic acid bacteria and Micrococcaceae/Staphylococcaceae isolates from artisanal raw milk cheeses, and potential implications on cheese making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Alonso, P; Fernández-Otero, C; Centeno, J A; Garabal, J I

    2009-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility against 19 antimicrobial agents was evaluated in isolates of the genera Lactococcus (46 isolates), Leuconostoc (22), Lactobacillus (19), Staphylococcus (8), Enterococcus (7), and Microccoccus/Kocuria (5) obtained from the predominant microflora of nonrecent and recent types of artisanal raw cow's milk cheeses. Beta-lactams showed broad activity against all genera, although leuconostocs and lactobacilli were highly resistant to oxacillin (80% to 95.5%). Resistance to aminoglycosides was frequent for lactococci and enterococci (particularly for streptomycin), whereas lower rates of resistance were detected for lactobacilli and leuconostocs. Technologically interesting traits for the food industry were distributed among isolates that showed different degrees of resistance to common antibiotics. However, isolates showing resistance to less than 2 antibiotics were mainly those with properties of greatest technological interest (acidifying activity, proteolytic/lipolytic activities, or diacetyl production). PMID:19723213

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the aminoglycoside-6′-acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Im

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AAC(6′)-Im is an N-acetyltransferase enzyme responsible for aminoglycoside resistance in E. faecium and E. coli isolates. Crystals of the kanamycin complex of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of enzymatic deactivation of the drugs. The aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferases (AACs) are a large family of bacterial enzymes that are responsible for coenzyme-A-facilitated acetylation of aminoglycosides. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, AAC(6′)-Im, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 178 amino-acid residues) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized as the kanamycin complex. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.0 Å resolution were collected from a crystal of this complex on beamline BL12-2 at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P65, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 107.75, c = 37.33 Å, and contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Structure determination is under way using molecular replacement

  5. On the use of antibiotics to reduce rhizoplane microbial populations in root physiology and ecology investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, D. R.; Ferro, A.; Ritchie, K.; Bugbee, B. G.

    1995-01-01

    No straightforward method exists for separating the proportion of ion exchange and respiration due to rhizoplane microbial organisms from that of root ion exchange and respiration. We examined several antibiotics that might be used for the temporary elimination of rhizoplane bacteria from hydroponically grown wheat roots (Triticum aestivum cv. Veery 10). Each antibiotic was tested for herbicidal activity and plate counts were used to enumerate bacteria and evaluate antibiotic kinetics. Only lactam antibiotics (penicillins and cephalosporins) did not reduce wheat growth rates. Aminoglycosides, the pyrimidine trimethoprim, colistin and rifampicin reduced growth rates substantially. Antibiotics acted slowly, with maximum reductions in rhizoplane bacteria occurring after more than 48 h of exposure. Combinations of nonphytotoxic antibiotics reduced platable rhizoplane bacteria by as much as 98%; however, this was generally a reduction from about 10(9) to 10(6) colony forming units per gram of dry root mass, so that many viable bacteria remained on root surfaces. We present evidence which suggests that insufficient bacterial biomass exists on root surfaces of nonstressed plants grown under well-aerated conditions to quantitatively interfere with root nitrogen absorption measurements.

  6. Sustainable Activated Carbons from Agricultural Residues Dedicated to Antibiotic Removal by Adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonatan Torres-Perez; Claire Gerente; Yves Andres

    2012-01-01

    The. objectives.of this study are to convert at laboratory s.cale agric.ultural residues into activated carbons (AC) with specific properties, to characterize them and to test them in adsorption reactor for tetracycline removal, a common antibiotic. Two new ACs were produced by direct activation with steam from beet pulp (BP-H2O) and peanut hu_lls (PH-H2O) in environmental friendly conditions BP-H2O and PH-H2Opresentcarbon content rangedcarbons with different intrinsic properties.

  7. Antagonistic Activities of Purple Non-sulfur Bacterial Extracts Against Antibiotic Resistant Vibrio sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran, R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extracts of native purple non-sulfur bacterial (PNSB isolates from the effluents of brackish shrimp culture ponds, near Nagapattinam coast (South India were evaluated for antibacterial activity by the disc diffusion method. Best results were shown by the chloroform extracts against oxytetracycline resistant Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischerii. Among the purple non-sulfur bacterial isolates, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, showed maximum antagonistic activity. The findings suggest that the antagonistic extracts from Rba. sphaeroides could be used as an effective antibiotic in controlling Vibrio spp., in aquaculture systems.

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity of autochthonous starter cultures as safety parameters for fresh cheese production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Bučan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity, as food safety parameters important for application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB, that previously satisfied technological criteria for functional starter cultures in fresh cheese production were examined. Soluble whole cell protein patterns of autochthonous LAB strains from fresh cheese, obtained by SDS-PAGE, revealed the presence of two predominant strains, which were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum A8 and Enterococcus faecium A7. These strains were not resistant and shown susceptibility to antibiotics: ampicillin, bacitracin, penicillin G, azithromycin, chloramphenicol, clarithromycin, clindamycin, spiramycin, tetracycline, streptomycin, neomycin, gentamicin, erythromycin, rifampicin and novobiocin. Lb. fermentum A8 strain displayed phenotypic resistance to vancomycin, but this resistance is intrinsic, not transferable and it is acceptable from the safety aspect. The capacity of Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 to inhibit growth of test-microorganisms Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 11911, Escherichia coli 3014, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium FP1 and Staphylococcus aureus 3048, was also analysed. According to obtained results, Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 are safe from the aspect of spreading antibiotic resistance and could be useful as bioprotective cultures that inhibit common bacterial food contaminants, including L. monocytogenes.

  9. Isolation, Phylogenetic Analysis and Antibiotic Activity Screening of Red Sea Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Chen

    2013-06-01

    Infectious disease has always been and will continue to be a heavy burden on human society worldwide. Terrestrial actinobacteria, notable as a source of antibiotics, have been well investigated in the past. In constrast, marine actinobacteria, especially sponge-associated species, have received much less attention and isolates are sparse. With the aim of studying and discovering novel marine actinobacteria, 11 different species of sponges were collected from the Central Red Sea in Saudi Arabia and cultured with three different types of media. 16S rRNA gene-sequencing revealed that among all 75 isolated bacterial strains 13 belonged to the order actinomycetales. These 13 actinomycetes fall into four different families and can be assigned to six different genera. Antibiotic activity tests using disc diffusion assay were performed against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus sp.), Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli), fungi (Fusarium sp.) and West Nile virus NS3 protease. Nine strains presented different level of bioactivity against these pathogens. These findings provide evidence that actinomycetes are presented in marine sponges and that they have the potential to be good candidates in the search for new effective antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral compounds.

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to elucidate the clearance mechanisms of Tc-99m labeled quinolone antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to establish molecular modeling methods for predicting the liver and kidney uptakes of Tc-99m labeled quinolone antibiotics. Some three-dimensional quantitative-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis and grid-independent descriptors procedures. As a first report on 3D-QSAR modeling, the predicted liver and kidney uptakes for quinolone antibiotics were in good agreement with the experimental values. The obtained results confirm the importance of hydrophobic interactions, size and steric hindrance of antibiotic molecules in their liver uptakes, while the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding ability have impressive effects on their kidney uptakes. (author)

  11. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF TRADITIONAL HERBS AND STANDARD ANTIBIOTICS AGAINST POULTRY ASSOCIATED PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affia Rafique

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Present study aims to access the antibacterial activity of medicinal plants and antibiotics against poultry associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa is the most widespread avian pathogen and it produces a range of toxins and enzymes that may contribute to pathogenicity. P. aeruginosa was isolated from the chicken liver and identified through biochemical methods. The antibacterial activity of extracts of medicinal herbs and various antibiotics were analyzed against P. aeruginosa through agar disc diffusion method. P. aeruginosa was susceptible against Norfloxacin, Chloramphenicol, Streptomycin, Gentamicin, Tobramycin, and Ciprofloxacin. Whereas, moderately susceptible in case of Oxytetracycline, Neomycin, Lincomycin, and Sulfomethoxyzol. It was also analyzed that Ampicillin, Tetracycline, Penicillin G and Trimethoprim had no effect. Among the plants tested C. zylanicum, C. cyminum, T. ammi, S. aromaticum and green part of M. charantia were most active. The maximum antibacterial activity was calculated by the extracts of isoamylalcohol of C. zylanicum, C. cyminum, T. ammi, S. aromaticum, and ethanolic and methanol extract of green part of M. charantia against P. aeruginosa. This study indicated that these medicinal plants could be the potential source for antimicrobial agents. Hence, these medicinal plants can be further subjected to isolation of the therapeutic antimicrobials and further pharmacological evaluation.

  12. Screening a Mediterranean Sponge Axinella verrucosa For Antibacterial Activity in Comparison to Some Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Shabbar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial effect of crude extract of marine sponge Axinella verrucosa at room temperature against seven nosocomial bacteria and one fungal isolates including, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter septicus and Proteus vulgaris, Acinetobacter meningitis, Klebsiella pneumonia, E. coli and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans were studied by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay and, the findings of antibacterial activity of crude methanolic extract sponge A. verrucosa were compared to the efficiency of some marketed antibiotics that were tested against the same bacteria at given concentrations. In result, it was found that MeOH crude extract of Axinella verrucosa is effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter septicus and Proteus vulgaris and except for its ineffectiveness against Acinetobacter meningitis, Klebsiella pneumonia, E. coli and the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. It was more active than Azithromycin and Gentamicin Against Proteus vulgaris and more efficient than ciprofloxacin against Acinetobacter septicus. Hexane and Ethyl acetate crude extracts derived from A. verrucosa revealed no activity against all bacterial and fungal pathogen. Sponge Axinella verrucosa remains an interesting source of new antibacterial metabolites with better activity than some antibiotics.

  13. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  14. Isolation, purification and identification of three peptaibols from Trichoderma koningii with antibiotic activity against Ralstonia solancearum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Qing-tao; CHEN Xiu-lan; SUN Cai-yun; ZHANG Yu-zhong

    2004-01-01

    @@ The use of microorganisms for biological purposes has become an effective alternative to control plant pathogens. Trichoderma koningii Smf2 was chosen from eight Trichoderma strains for its thermostatic metabolites with antibiotic activity against Ralstonia solancearum Smith. Exclusion chromatography (LH20) was used twice to partially purify targeted metabolites combined with biological test. LC/ESI-MS, a powerful tool for rapid identification and sequence determination of peptides, identified these metabolites as three peptaibols named Trichokonin Ⅵ, Ⅶ and Ⅷ, and their sequences were confirmed with NMR.

  15. Production of polypeptide antibiotic from Streptomyces parvulus and its antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakasham Reddy Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly potent secondary metabolite producing actinomycetes strain is isolated from marine soil sediments of Visakhapatnam sea coast, Bay of Bengal. Over all ten strains are isolated from the collected soil sediments. Among the ten actinomycetes strains the broad spectrum strain RSPSN2 was selected for molecular characterization, antibiotic production and its purification. The nucleotide sequence of the 1 rRNA gene (1261 base pairs of the most potent strain evidenced a 96% similarity with Streptomyces parvulus 1044 strain, Streptomyces parvulus NBRC 13193 and Streptomyces parvulus BY-F. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate RSPSN2 matches with Streptomyces parvulus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:3, v/v at pH 7.0. The separation of active ingredient and its purification was performed by using both thin layer chromatography (TLC and column chromatography (CC techniques. Spectrometric studies such as UV-visible, FTIR, and NMR and mass were performed. The antibacterial activity of pure compound was performed by cup plate method against some pathogenic bacteria including of streptomycin resistant bacteria like (Pseudomonas mirabilis. Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus cereus. In conclusion, the collected data emphasized the fact that a polypeptide antibiotic (Actinomycin D was produced by Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2.

  16. Azurocidin, a natural antibiotic from human neutrophils: expression, antimicrobial activity, and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R P; Vanet, A; Witko-Sarsat, V; Melchior, M; McCabe, D; Gabay, J E

    1996-06-01

    The azurophil granules of human PMN contain four antibiotic proteins, the serprocidins, which have extensive homology to one another and to serine proteases. Azurocidin, a member of this family, is a 29-kDa glycoprotein with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and chemotactic activity toward monocytes. Insect cells transfected with a baculovirus vector carrying azurocidin cDNA produced a recombinant azurocidin protein. We purified the recombinant azurocidin protein from the culture medium of the infected cells and showed that it retained the antimicrobial activity of the native neutrophil-derived molecule. In addition, we present evidence that a 49-amino-acid region of the recombinant azurocidin protein is required for its secretion from insect cells. PMID:8776752

  17. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and synergistic effect between antibiotic and the essential oils of some medicinal plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fadila Moussaoui; Tajelmolk Alaoui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the in vitro antibacterial properties of five essential oils against ten bacterial strains and study the synergistic effect of the combination of essential oils with standard antibiotics. Methods: Origanum compactum, Chrysanthemum coronarium, Thymus willdenowii Boiss, Melissa officinalis and Origanum majorana L. were used alone and combined used with standard antibiotics to evaluate their antimicrobial activities. The disk diffusion method was employed. Results: The results showed that the combined application of the essential oils of the plants with antibiotics led to a synergistic effect in some cases, but antagonistic effect was also observed in some bacteria. Conclusions: This study shows that the combination of essential oils of the five plants with antibiotics may be useful in the fight against emerging microbial drug resistance.

  18. Surveillance and Control of Antibiotic Resistance in the Mediterranean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Walter; Giubbini, Gabriele; Laurenti, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most relevant problems in the healthcare: the growth of resistant microorganisms in healthcare settings is a worrisome threat, raising length to stay (LOS), morbidity and mortality in those patients. The importance of the antibiotic resistance and its spread around the world, gave rise to the activation of several surveillance systems, based especially on the collection of laboratory data to local or national level. The objective of this work is to carry out a review of the scientific literature existing on the topic and scientific activities related to surveillance of antibiotic resistance in the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Recent Data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (November 2015) show, for different combinations bacterium-drug, an increase of resistance from North to South and from West to East of Europe. It is of particular concern the phenomenon of resistance carried out by some gram-negative, specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to third-generation cephalosporin, often combined in opposition to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Is particularly high the incidence of resistance to carbapenems by strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella included). The resistance exerted by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) continues to be relevant, albeit showing some decline in recent years. The incidence of resistance carried on by Streptococcus pneumoniae is stable and is mainly relevant to macrolides. Finally, a significant increase in recording relatively exercised by Enterococcus faecium to Vancomycin. Detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic resistance requires strategic, coordinated, and sustained efforts. It also depends on the engagement of governments, academia, industry, healthcare providers, the general public, and the agricultural community, as well as international partners. Committing to combating antibiotic-resistant microbes does support

  19. In vitro Antibacterial Activity of Combretum edwardsii, Combretum krausii, and Maytenus nemorosa and Their Synergistic Effects in Combination with Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwujekwu, Jude C; van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the antibacterial activity of crude extracts of C. edwardsii, Combretum krausii, and Maytenus nemorosa as well as their interactions with selected antibiotics against drug resistant bacterial strains. Using the rapid p-iodonitrotetrazolium chloride colorimetric assay, minimum inhibitory concentration values of plant extracts and antibiotics were determined. The interactions of plant extracts and antibiotics were studied using a checkerboard method. The MICs of the plant extracts and antibiotics were in the range of 0.037-6.25 and 0.001-2.5 mg/ml, respectively. The plant fractions tested in the present study displayed varying levels of antibacterial activity depending on the bacterial strains. Generally, Staphylococcus aureus was the most susceptible of the three strains of bacteria while the other two beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria were the most resistant. The hexane leaf extract of M. nemorosa was the most active (MIC = 37 μg/ml) against S. aureus. Ethyl acetate leaf extract of C. krausii was the most active against Klebsiella pneumoniae and ethyl acetate leaf extract of C. edwardsii was the most active against Escherichia coli. Synergistic interactions were detected in 13% of the combinations against E. coli, 27% of the combinations against K. pneumoniae and 80% of the combinations against S. aureus. The few synergistic interactions observed in the present study suggest that the crude extracts of the leaves of M. nemorosa, C. edwardsii, and C. krausii could be potential sources of broad spectrum antibiotic resistance modifying compounds. PMID:27471466

  20. Study on in vitro antimicrobial activity of Colistin and other antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii%粘菌素等抗菌药物对临床分离鲍曼不动杆菌的抗菌活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李然; 史录文; 王睿; 梁蓓蓓; 宋秀杰; 蔡芸

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antimicrobial activity of Colistin and other antibiotics against Acine-tobacter baumannii. METHODS: The agar dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of Colistin and other antibiotics against 70 Acinetobacter baumannii collected from PLA General Hospital, Peking Hospital and Beijing Union Hospital. The sensitive rate was judged by CLSI stan- dard. RESULTS: The resistant rates of 70 Acineto-bacter baumannii to penicillins and cephalosporins, carbopenems ( meropenem and imipenem/eilastatin ), aminoglycosides(netilmicin and amikacin) , fluoroquin-olones(ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) were 71.4% -82.9%, 75.7% - 77.1%, 71.4% - 75.7%, 32.8% - 82.9% . Fifty-five multidrug-resistant Acin-etobacter baumannii were isolated. All Acinetobacter baumannii in the study were sensitive to Colistin, the MIC_(50) and MIG_(90) were both 1 μg/mL. CONCLU- SION : Acinetobacter baumannii in the study were resistant to many antibiotics including penicillins and cephalosporins, carbopenems, aminoglycosides. Colistin has good antimicrobial activity against Aeinetobacter baumannii.%目的:评价粘菌素对临床分离多药耐药鲍曼不动杆菌的抗菌活性.方法:收集解放军总医院、北京医院、北京协和医院3家医院分离的非重复分离鲍曼不动杆菌70株,采用琼脂稀释法测定粘菌素与其他12种抗菌药物的最低抑菌浓度(MIC),以CLSI标准判断其敏感率.结果:70株鲍曼不动杆菌,对青霉素类和头孢菌素类的耐药率为71.4%~82.9%,对碳青霉烯类(美罗培南、亚胺培南/西司他丁)的耐药率为75.7%~77.1%,对氨基糖苷类(奈替米星、阿米卡星)的耐药率为71.4%~75.7%,对氟喹酮类的耐药率(环丙沙星、左氧氟沙星)为32.9%~82.9%.共筛选出多药耐药鲍曼不动杆菌55株,对粘菌素全部敏感,MIC_(50)和MIC_(90)均为1/μg/mL.结论:鲍曼不动杆菌对本研究的大多数抗菌药物耐药率较高,粘菌素

  1. Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Staphylococcus aureus sub-populations of slow-growing cells forming small colony variants (SCVs) are associated with persistent and recurrent infections that are difficult to eradicate with antibiotic therapies. In SCVs that are resistant towards aminoglycosides, mutations have been...... different mechanism of action influence the formation of SCVs that are resistant to otherwise lethal concentrations of the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. We found that exposure of S. aureus to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C increased the frequency of gentamicin resistant SCVs, while other antibiotic classes...... that environmental stimuli, including antimicrobials that reduce replication fidelity, increase the formation of SCVs through activation of the SOS response and thereby potentially promote persistent infections that are difficult to treat....

  2. Cymbopogon citratus protects against the renal injury induced by toxic doses of aminoglycosides in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, N.; Khan, M. A.; Khan, T.; W Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Renal injury is the most common side-effect of aminoglycosides. These antimicrobial drugs are particularly effective against Gram-negative microorganisms. The present study was conducted to investigate the renal protective activity of Cymbopogon citratus in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male rabbits were divided into four groups (n=6) including group 1 (0.9% saline treated), group 2 (80 mg/kg/day gentamicin-treated), group 3 (200 mg/kg/day Cymbopogon citratus treated) and group 4 (80 mg/...

  3. Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the Tokay gecko

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Charles E; Hudspeth, A. James

    2000-01-01

    The high sensitivity and sharp frequency discrimination of hearing depend on mechanical amplification in the cochlea. To explore the basis of this active process, we examined the pharmacological sensitivity of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in a lizard, the Tokay gecko. In a quiet environment, each ear produced a complex but stable pattern of emissions. These SOAEs were reversibly modulated by drugs that affect mammalian otoacoustic emissions, the salicylates and the aminoglycoside...

  4. Antibiotics in otorhinolaryngology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan-Mikić Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study investigated utilization of antibacterial agents at the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman and at the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center Novi Sad, in the period February - March 2001. Material and methods All antibacterial agents were classified as group J, regarding Anatomic-Therapeutic-Chemical Classification. Data on drug utilization were presented in Defined Daily Doses (DDD. Patients who were under observation were all treated with antibiotics. Results In regard to prescribed treatment in the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman, most outpatients were treated with macrolide antibiotics - in 26.21%; combination of penicillin and beta-lactamase inhibitors in 20.83% and pyranosides in 16.12%. At the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center Novi Sad, macrolides and lincosamines were most frequently used - in 20.46%; cephalosporins in 19.87% and penicillins susceptible to beta-lactamase in 18.85%. It is extremely positive and in agreement with current pharmacotherapeutic principles that in both institutions peroral ampicillins have not been prescribed. Aminoglycosides have been prescribed in less than 1% of patients of the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman, whereas they were much more frequently prescribed at the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center Novi Sad - in 11.25%. Although there is a positive postantibiotic effect in regard to these antibiotics and it is recommended to use them once a day, in both examined institutions aminoglycosides were given twice a day. In regard to bacterial identification it was done in 80.76% of patients of the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Outpatient Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman, while in the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of the Clinical Center

  5. Chitosan Microparticles Exert Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity against Antibiotic-Resistant Micro-organisms without Increasing Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhengxin; Kim, Donghyeon; Adesogan, Adegbola T; Ko, Sanghoon; Galvao, Klibs; Jeong, Kwangcheol Casey

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is growing exponentially, increasing public health concerns for humans and animals. In the current study, we investigated the antimicrobial features of chitosan microparticles (CM), engineered from chitosan by ion gelation, seeking potential application for treating infectious disease caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms. CM showed excellent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms, including clinically important antibiotic-resistant pathogens without raising resistant mutants in serial passage assays over a period of 15 days, which is a significantly long passage compared to tested antibiotics used in human and veterinary medicine. In addition, CM treatment did not cause cross-resistance, which is frequently observed with other antibiotics and triggers multidrug resistance. Furthermore, CM activity was examined in simulated gastrointestinal fluids that CM encounter when orally administered. Antimicrobial activity of CM was exceptionally strong to eliminate pathogens completely. CM at a concentration of 0.1 μg/mL killed E. coli O157:H7 (5 × 10(8) CFU/mL) completely in synthetic gastric fluid within 20 min. Risk assessment of CM, in an in vitro animal model, revealed that CM did not disrupt the digestibility, pH or total volatile fatty acid production, indicating that CM likely do not affect the functionality of the rumen. Given all the advantages, CM can serve as a great candidate to treat infectious disease, especially those caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens without adverse side effects. PMID:27057922

  6. Antibiotic usage in 2013 on a dairy CAFO in NY State, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Sarenbo, Sirkku; Doane, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening humans and animals worldwide. Biosecurity and 1-year usage of antibiotics on a dairy concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) in NY State, USA, were mapped: how much antibiotics were used, for what purpose, and whether any decrease could be warranted. Approximately 493 kg antibiotics was used, of which 376 kg was ionophores (monensin and lasalocides), 79 kg penicillin, 16.5 kg lincosamides, 8.0 kg aminoglycosides, 7.7 kg sulfamides, 3.4 kg cephalosp...

  7. Molecular basis of rare aminoglycoside susceptibility and pathogenesis of Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates from Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily A Trunck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei is intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides and macrolides, mostly due to AmrAB-OprA efflux pump expression. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of aminoglycoside susceptibility exhibited by Thai strains 708a, 2188a, and 3799a. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: qRT-PCR revealed absence of amrB transcripts in 708a and greatly reduced levels in 2188a and 3799a. Serial passage on increasing gentamicin concentrations yielded 2188a and 3799a mutants that became simultaneously resistant to other aminoglycosides and macrolides, whereas such mutants could not be obtained with 708a. Transcript analysis showed that the resistance of the 2188a and 3799a mutants was due to upregulation of amrAB-oprA expression by unknown mechanism(s. Use of a PCR walking strategy revealed that the amrAB-oprA operon was missing in 708a and that this loss was associated with deletion of more than 70 kb of genetic material. Rescue of the amrAB-oprB region from a 708a fosmid library and sequencing showed the presence of a large chromosome 1 deletion (131 kb and 141 kb compared to strains K96243 and 1710b, respectively. This deletion not only removed the amrAB-oprA operon, but also the entire gene clusters for malleobactin and cobalamin synthesis. Other genes deleted included the anaerobic arginine deiminase pathway, putative type 1 fimbriae and secreted chitinase. Whole genome sequencing and PCR analysis confirmed absence of these genes from 708a. Despite missing several putative virulence genes, 708a was fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain 708a may be a natural candidate for genetic manipulation experiments that use Select Agent compliant antibiotics for selection and validates the use of laboratory-constructed Delta(amrAB-oprA mutants in such experiments.

  8. Multiple Roles of Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxins: Pathogenicity, Superantigenic Activity, and Correlation to Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gálvez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat-stable enterotoxins are the most notable virulence factors associated with Staphylococcus aureus, a common pathogen associated with serious community and hospital acquired diseases. Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs cause toxic shock-like syndromes and have been implicated in food poisoning. But SEs also act as superantigens that stimulate T-cell proliferation, and a high correlation between these activities has been detected. Most of the nosocomial S. aureus infections are caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA strains, and those resistant to quinolones or multiresistant to other antibiotics are emerging, leaving a limited choice for their control. This review focuses on these diverse roles of SE, their possible correlations and the influence in disease progression and therapy.

  9. [Susceptibility to antibiotics and biochemical activity of strains of Acinetobacter sp. isolated from various sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, E

    1993-01-01

    The study was performed on 576 Acinetobacter strains isolated from clinical material, objects from hospital, environment, soil, water and from animals. Applying API 20NE system identification was following: A. baumanii (61.1%), A. junii (19.4%), A. haemolyticus (4.3%), A. lwoffii (3.3%), A. johnsonii (0.52%) and not belonging to above genus strains (11.3%). Over 47% strains of Acinetobacter were isolated from clinical material as the only bacteria (mainly from samples received from intensive care units and surgical and urological wards). Out of 23 antibiotics and antimicrobials used for investigation of 535 strains of Acinetobacter, most active were imipenem (99%) of susceptible strains, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (95%) and netilmicin (88%). Multiple resistant strains were isolated more frequently from hospital environment than from other sources--these were mostly A. baumanii and A. junii. PMID:8189806

  10. Differential trypanocidal activity of novel macrolide antibiotics; correlation to genetic lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Aquilino

    Full Text Available Here we report the systematic study of the anti-trypanocidal activity of some new products derived from S. diastatus on 14 different T. cruzi strains spanning the six genetic lineages of T. cruzi. As the traditional growth inhibition curves giving similar IC(50 showed great differences on antibiotic and lineage tested, we decided to preserve the wealth of information derived from each inhibition curve and used an algorithm related to potency of the drugs, combined in a matrix data set used to generate a cluster tree. The cluster thus generated based just on drug susceptibility data closely resembles the phylogenies of the lineages derived from genetic data and provides a novel approach to correlate genetic data with phenotypes related to pathogenesis of Chagas disease. Furthermore we provide clues on the drugs mechanism of action.

  11. Escape from Lethal Bacterial Competition through Coupled Activation of Antibiotic Resistance and a Mobilized Subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbendieck, Reed M; Straight, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria have diverse mechanisms for competition that include biosynthesis of extracellular enzymes and antibiotic metabolites, as well as changes in community physiology, such as biofilm formation or motility. Considered collectively, networks of competitive functions for any organism determine success or failure in competition. How bacteria integrate different mechanisms to optimize competitive fitness is not well studied. Here we study a model competitive interaction between two soil bacteria: Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces sp. Mg1 (S. Mg1). On an agar surface, colonies of B. subtilis suffer cellular lysis and progressive degradation caused by S. Mg1 cultured at a distance. We identify the lytic and degradative activity (LDA) as linearmycins, which are produced by S. Mg1 and are sufficient to cause lysis of B. subtilis. We obtained B. subtilis mutants spontaneously resistant to LDA (LDAR) that have visibly distinctive morphology and spread across the agar surface. Every LDAR mutant identified had a missense mutation in yfiJK, which encodes a previously uncharacterized two-component signaling system. We confirmed that gain-of-function alleles in yfiJK cause a combination of LDAR, changes in colony morphology, and motility. Downstream of yfiJK are the yfiLMN genes, which encode an ATP-binding cassette transporter. We show that yfiLMN genes are necessary for LDA resistance. The developmental phenotypes of LDAR mutants are genetically separable from LDA resistance, suggesting that the two competitive functions are distinct, but regulated by a single two-component system. Our findings suggest that a subpopulation of B. subtilis activate an array of defensive responses to counter lytic stress imposed by competition. Coordinated regulation of development and antibiotic resistance is a streamlined mechanism to promote competitive fitness of bacteria. PMID:26647299

  12. Assessment of the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus species for identifying new potential antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, Grégory; Elsawi, Ziena; Raoult, Didier

    2015-11-01

    The bacteriocin-mediated antimicrobial properties of Lactobacillus spp. have been widely studied, leading to the use of these micro-organisms in the food industry as preservative agents against foodborne pathogens. In an era in which antibiotic resistance is becoming a public health issue, the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus spp. could be used for the discovery of new potential antibiotics. Thus, it is essential to have an accurate method of screening the production of antimicrobial agents by prokaryotes. Many in vitro assays have been published to date, largely concerning but not limited to Lactobacillus spp. However, these methods mainly use the spot-on-the-lawn method, which is prone to contamination during the overlay stage, with protocols using methanol vapours or the reverse side agar technique being applied to avoid such contamination. In this study, a method combining the spot-on-the-lawn and well diffusion methods was tested, permitting clear identification of inhibition zones from eight Lactobacillus spp. towards clinical isolates of 12 species (11 bacteria and 1 yeast) commonly found in human pathology. Lactobacillus plantarum CIP 106786 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CSUR P567 exhibited the widest antimicrobial activity, whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus strain DSM 20079 was relatively inactive. In addition, the putative MIC(50) of L. rhamnosus against Proteus mirabilis was estimated at 1.1×10(9)CFU/mL using culture broth dilution. In conclusion, considering the increasing cultivable bacterial human repertoire, these findings open the way of an effective method to screen in vitro for the production of potential antimicrobial compounds. PMID:26163158

  13. Antibiotic and disinfectant susceptibility profiles of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) isolated from community wastewater in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ross C; Duke, Sara E; Ziprin, Richard L; Harvey, Roger B; Hume, Michael E; Poole, Toni L; Scott, H Morgan; Highfield, Linda D; Alali, Walid Q; Andrews, Kathleen; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2008-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) from human wastewater effluents in a nonclinical semiclosed agri-food system in Texas were characterized for susceptibility to antibiotics and disinfectants. The 50 VRE were resistant to eight fluoroquinolones and 10 of 17 antimicrobials typically active against Gram-positive organisms. The VRE were susceptible to quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid. Lack of the insertion element IS1251 correlated with VRE susceptibility to streptomycin and gentamicin at p or =2 ppm. Triclosan MICs for many of the VRE were well over expected product application levels. No association was observed between antibiotic resistance and disinfectant susceptibility in these VRE. Enterococci multiply-resistant to vancomycin and aminoglycosides were found in a non-hospital environment where one would not expect to find them. PMID:18193143

  14. ASSESSMENT OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF PUNICA GRANATUM AGAINST ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TYPE (D)

    OpenAIRE

    FRDOOS AL FADEL , SHAZA AL LAHAM, HASSANA CHOUR

    2015-01-01

    The search for new antibiotics and alternative products to solve the increasing number of bacterial resistance to customary antibiotics has become an urgent need. To investigate the effectiveness of the extracts prepared from different parts of Syrian Punica granatum Linn (family Punicaceae), against Clostridium perfringens type (D), which is resistant against many antibiotics, 684 samples were isolated from intestines and livers of death goats by using blood agar, and a selective agar for gr...

  15. Microplate phosphocellulose binding assay for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooksey, R C; Metchock, B G; Thornsberry, C

    1986-01-01

    We modified the phosphocellulose binding assay for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) by use of microdilution plates and a multichannel micropipette. Batteries of aminoglycoside substrates for screening organisms for the presence of AMEs as well as for subclassifying enzymes were prepared and stored in microdilution plates. When tested in parallel with the conventional tube reaction assay, the microplate assay yielded comparable radioactive counts and therefore equally correct identifica...

  16. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  17. Antibacterial Activities of Selected Cameroonian Plants and Their Synergistic Effects with Antibiotics against Bacteria Expressing MDR Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Lacmata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the antibacterial properties of the methanol extracts of some Cameroonian medicinal plants and the effect of their associations with currently used antibiotics on multidrug resistant (MDR Gram-negative bacteria overexpressing active efflux pumps. The antibacterial activities of twelve methanol extracts of medicinal plants were evaluated using broth microdilution. The results of this test showed that three extracts Garcinia lucida with the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC varying from 128 to 512 μg/mL, Garcinia kola (MIC of 256 to 1024 μg/mL, and Picralima nitida (MIC of 128 to 1024 μg/mL were active on all the twenty-nine studied bacteria including MDR phenotypes. The association of phenylalanine arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN or efflux pumps inhibitor to different extracts did not modify their activities. At the concentration of MIC/2 and MIC/5, the extracts of P. nitida and G. kola improved the antibacterial activities of some commonly used antibiotics suggesting their synergistic effects with the tested antibiotics. The results of this study suggest that the tested plant extracts and mostly those from P. nitida, G. lucida and G. kola could be used alone or in association with common antibiotics in the fight of bacterial infections involving MDR strains.

  18. Alkaloids: an overview of their antibacterial, antibiotic-enhancing and antivirulence activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Cushnie, Benjamart; Lamb, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    With reports of pandrug-resistant bacteria causing untreatable infections, the need for new antibacterial therapies is more pressing than ever. Alkaloids are a large and structurally diverse group of compounds that have served as scaffolds for important antibacterial drugs such as metronidazole and the quinolones. In this review, we highlight other alkaloids with development potential. Natural, semisynthetic and synthetic alkaloids of all classes are considered, looking first at those with direct antibacterial activity and those with antibiotic-enhancing activity. Potent examples include CJ-13,136, a novel actinomycete-derived quinolone alkaloid with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.1 ng/mL against Helicobacter pylori, and squalamine, a polyamine alkaloid from the dogfish shark that renders Gram-negative pathogens 16- to >32-fold more susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Where available, information on toxicity, structure-activity relationships, mechanisms of action and in vivo activity is presented. The effects of alkaloids on virulence gene regulatory systems such as quorum sensing and virulence factors such as sortases, adhesins and secretion systems are also described. The synthetic isoquinoline alkaloid virstatin, for example, inhibits the transcriptional regulator ToxT in Vibrio cholerae, preventing expression of cholera toxin and fimbriae and conferring in vivo protection against intestinal colonisation. The review concludes with implications and limitations of the described research and directions for future research. PMID:25130096

  19. Antibacterial activity of some medicinal mangroves against antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeysinghe P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of the leaves and bark of mangrove plants, Avicennia marina, A. officinalis, Bruguiera sexangula, Exoecaria agallocha, Lumnitzera racemosa, and Rhizophora apiculata was evaluated against antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus sp. Soxhlet extracts of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, ethanol and water were prepared and evaluated the antibacterial activity using agar diffusion method. Most of the plant extracts showed promising antibacterial activity against both bacterial species. However, higher antibacterial activity was observed for Staphylococcus aureus than Proteus sp. The highest antibacterial activity was shown by ethyl acetate of mature leaf extracts of E. agallocha for Staphylococcus aureus. All ethyl acetate extracts showed higher inhibition against S. aureus while some extracts of chloroform, ethyl acetate and ethanol gave inhibition against Proteus sp. None of the petroleum ether and aqueous extracts showed inhibition against Proteus sp. All fresh plant materials did also show more antibacterial activity against both bacterial strains than did dried plant extracts. Antibacterial activity of fresh and dried plant materials reduced for both bacterial strains with time after extraction. Since L. racemosa and A. marina gave the best inhibition for bacterial species, they were used for further investigations. Charcoal treated plant extracts of L. racemosa and A. marina were able to inhibit both bacterial strains more than those of untreated plant extracts. Phytochemical screening of mature leaf, bark of L. racemosa and leaf extracts of A. marina has been carried out and revealed that leaf and bark contained alkaloids, steroids, triterpenoids and flavonoids. None of the above extracts indicate the presence of saponins and cardiac glycosides. Separated bands of extracts by TLC analysis showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  20. Plasmid-Mediated High-Level Resistance to Aminoglycosides in Enterobacteriaceae Due to 16S rRNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Galimand, Marc; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    A self-transferable plasmid of ca. 80 kb, pIP1204, conferred multiple-antibiotic resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae BM4536, which was isolated from a urinary tract infection. Resistance to β-lactams was due to the blaTEM1 and blaCTX-M genes, resistance to trimethroprim was due to the dhfrXII gene, resistance to sulfonamides was due to the sul1 gene, resistance to streptomycin-spectinomycin was due to the ant3"9 gene, and resistance to nearly all remaining aminoglycosides was due to the aac3-...

  1. Antibiotics Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  2. Influence of a macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin, on mast cell growth and activation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Shimane

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-term administration of macrolide antibiotics is recognized to be able to favorably modify the clinical condition of inflammatory diseases, such as diffuse panbronchiolitis and cystic fibrosis. However, the precise mechanisms by which macrolide antibiotics could improve clinical conditions of the patients are not well understood.

  3. Antibiotic pigment from desert soil actinomycetes; biological activity, purification and chemical screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvameenal L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An actinomycete strain, Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. ossamyceticus (strain D10 was isolated from Thar Desert soil, Rajasthan during the year 2006 and found to produce a yellow color pigment with antibiotic activity. Crude pigment was produced from strain D10 by solid state fermentation using wheat bran medium followed by extraction with ethyl acetate. The antimicrobial activity of the crude pigment was evaluated against drug resistant pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended spectrum b-lactamase producing cultures of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella sp. About 420 mg of crude pigment was produced per 10 g of wheat bran medium. In the disc diffusion method the crude ethyl acetate extract showed a minimum of 10 mm inhibition against Klebsiella sp. and maximum of 19 mm of inhibition against Escherichia coli. The crude pigment was partially purified using thin layer chromatography with the solvent system chloroform:methanol (30:70 and the Rf value was calculated as 0.768. Antimicrobial activity of the partially purified compound from thin layer chromatography was determined using the bioautography method. The purified pigment showed minimum of 15 mm inhibition against Klebsiella sp. and a maximum of 23 mm of inhibition against vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the disc diffusion method. Based on the results of chemical screening, the pigment was tentatively identified as group of sugar containing molecules.

  4. On the Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotics Mixed with Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burygin, G. L.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Shantrokha, A. N.; Dykman, L. A.; Bogatyrev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, N. G.

    2009-08-01

    The bacterial action of gentamicin and that of a mixture of gentamicin and 15-nm colloidal-gold particles on Escherichia coli K12 was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units, and turbidimetry. Addition of gentamicin to colloidal gold changed the gold color and extinction spectrum. Within the experimental errors, there were no significant differences in antibacterial activity between pure gentamicin and its mixture with gold nanoparticles (NPs). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that upon application of the gentamicin-particle mixture, there were no gold NPs in the zone of bacterial-growth suppression in agar. Yet, free NPs diffused into the agar. These facts are in conflict with the earlier findings indicating an enhancement of the bacterial activity of similar gentamicin-gold nanoparticle mixtures. The possible causes for these discrepancies are discussed, and the suggestion is made that a necessary condition for enhancement of antibacterial activity is the preparation of stable conjugates of NPs coated with the antibiotic molecules.

  5. On the Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotics Mixed with Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantrokha AN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bacterial action of gentamicin and that of a mixture of gentamicin and 15-nm colloidal-gold particles onEscherichia coliK12 was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units, and turbidimetry. Addition of gentamicin to colloidal gold changed the gold color and extinction spectrum. Within the experimental errors, there were no significant differences in antibacterial activity between pure gentamicin and its mixture with gold nanoparticles (NPs. Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that upon application of the gentamicin-particle mixture, there were no gold NPs in the zone of bacterial-growth suppression in agar. Yet, free NPs diffused into the agar. These facts are in conflict with the earlier findings indicating an enhancement of the bacterial activity of similar gentamicin–gold nanoparticle mixtures. The possible causes for these discrepancies are discussed, and the suggestion is made that a necessary condition for enhancement of antibacterial activity is the preparation of stable conjugates of NPs coated with the antibiotic molecules.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of the Modulation of Antibiotic-Activity against Strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

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    Henrique D. M. Coutinho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Combining multiple drugs is an strategy used to combat the dissemination of pathogenic and drug resistant bacteria. However, the misuse of these drugs against bacteria have caused the selection of more resistant specimens called multidrug-resistant bacteria. Objective: In this work we evaluated the antibiotic activity of claritromicin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and imipenen, alone or associating one by one, against strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Material and methods: The minimal inhibitory concentration (mic was performed us­ing the microdilution assay. Based in the mic values, the antibiotic effect of the drugs alone and in association were determined. Results: The association between the drugs demonstrated the synergism against the bacterial strains. Conclusion: The use of the combined antibiotic-therapy can be positively performed, but additional studies have to be conducted first for proving that its use is safe.

  7. Study of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases against aminoglycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI FENG SHI; SU JIAN WANG; JIAN PING QIN

    2007-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ( K. pneumoniae) is one of the main gram-negative bacilli in clinical practice. Nosocomial infections caused by K. pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are very difficult to treat. This paper investigated the resistant characteristics of K. pneumoniae producing ESBLs and their aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions including Nacetyltransferases and O-adenyhransferases. Bacteria identification and ESBLs confirmatory tests were performed by Phoenix TM-100 system. And minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of gentamicin,amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin and neomycin in 53 K. pneumoniae isolates were detected by agar dilution. In addition, six aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by DNA sequencer. It was found that imipenem and meropenem against 120 K. pneumoniae isolates produced powerful antimicrobial activities. The resistant rates of gentamicin and amikacin were 55.0% and 46.7%, respectively. Except neomycin,MIC50 and MIC90 of gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin and netilmicin in 53 K. pneumoniae were all > 128 μg/ml, and the resistant rates were 83.0%, 52.3%, 75.5%, 81. 1% and 69.8%, respectively. However, neomycin was only 39.6%. In addition, five modifying enzyme genes, including aac(3)- Ⅰ , aac(3)-Ⅱ, aac(6′) - Ⅰ b, ant(3″) - Ⅰ, ant(2″) - Ⅰ genes, were found in 53 isoahes except aac (6′)-Ⅱ, and their positive rates were 11.3%, 67.9%, 47.2%,1.9 % and 39.6 %, respectively. It was also confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis that the above resistant genes shared nearly 100% identities with GenBank published genes. The results obtained in the present study indicated that K. pneumoniae producing ESBLs strains are rapidly spreading in our hospital, and their resistance to aminoglycosides may be associated with aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. casseliflavus isolates. Three different crystals of wild-type substrate-free APH(2′′)-IVa have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken on all three crystal forms. The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding

  9. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Toxic Metabolic Perturbations that Lead to Cellular Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how antibiotics impact bacterial metabolism may provide insight into their mechanisms of action and could lead to enhanced therapeutic methodologies. Here, we profiled the metabolome of Escherichia coli after treatment with three different classes of bactericidal antibiotics (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones. These treatments induced a similar set of metabolic changes after 30 min that then diverged into more distinct profiles at later time points. The most striking changes corresponded to elevated concentrations of central carbon metabolites, active breakdown of the nucleotide pool, reduced lipid levels, and evidence of an elevated redox state. We examined potential end-target consequences of these metabolic perturbations and found that antibiotic-treated cells exhibited cytotoxic changes indicative of oxidative stress, including higher levels of protein carbonylation, malondialdehyde adducts, nucleotide oxidation, and double-strand DNA breaks. This work shows that bactericidal antibiotics induce a complex set of metabolic changes that are correlated with the buildup of toxic metabolic by-products.

  10. Magnetic isotope effect of magnesium (25)Mg on E. coli resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letuta, U G; Vekker, A S; Kornilova, T A; Gryaznov, A A; Cheplakov, I A

    2016-07-01

    Effects of synergism and antagonism of antibacterial drugs and magnetic isotope of magnesium (25)Mg on antibiotic resistance of bacteria E. coli were discovered. Fourteen antibiotics from seven different groups were tested. The increase in antibiotic resistance in the presence of the ion (25)Mg(2+) was discovered in E. coli cells incubated with quinolones/fluoroquinolones, indicating the inhibiting effect of the magnetic moments of nuclei (25)Mg on DNA synthesis. The change in antibiotic resistance was also detected in bacteria affected by magnesium (25)Mg and certain antibiotics from aminoglycoside and lincosamide groups. PMID:27599512

  11. In vitro activity of fluoroquinolones (gatifloxacin, levofloxacin and trovafloxacin and seven other antibiotics against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicodemo A.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the level of resistance of S. pneumoniae to beta-lactam and/or macrolides has increased around the world including some countries in South America. Because of this resistance, it is necessary to test the therapeutic alternatives for treating this pathogen, including the newer quinolones. This study was carried out in order to compare the in vitro activity of fluoroquinolones gatifloxacin, levofloxacin and trovafloxacin, to penicillin G, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cufuroxime sodium, ceftriaxone, azithromycin and clarithromycin, against 300 strains of S. pneumoniae. Of the 300 samples tested, 18.6% were not susceptible to penicillin (56 strains and 7% (21 strains were resistant to the second generation cephalosporin. Among the macrolides, resistance ranged from 6.7% for clarithromycin to 29.6% for azithromycin. Susceptibility to the newer quinolones was 100% including the 56 strains not susceptible to penicillin. Among the 10 antibiotics evaluated, the fluoroquinolones gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and trovafloxacin displayed high levels of in vitro activity against S. pneumoniae.

  12. Screening of Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Freshwater and Marine Algae as a Prominent Natural Antibiotic Available in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mehadi Hassan Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, algae have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. So, present work provides the eligibility of algae commonly found in Bangladesh as a prominent natural antibiotic against various pathogens. In vitro screening of organic solvent extracts (methanol, ethanol and chloroform of ten fresh water and marine algae showed antimicrobial activity carried out by disc diffusion method against two gram positive, four gram negative bacteria and one fungus. Marine algal species performed better than fresh water algal species. Green algae are more potent than red and brown algae. Ethanolic extracts are more effective than methanolic and chloroform extracts. Ulva lactuca and Chlorella sp. revealed the best activity among other algal species in all solvent forms. Spirogyra crassa showed very poor antibacterial activity where its antifungal activity was moderate. Escherichia coli was more resistant bacteria in a comparison to others because it showed totally resistant against some algae. Highest zone of inhibition (26 mm was recorded for chloroform extract of Ulva lactuca against E. coli where chloroform extract of Dictyopteris membranacea didn’t show any microbial activity. At the end, it was clear that almost all extracts of all algal species revealed antimicrobial activity against all pathogens. These results give an indication of the presence of promising antimicrobial compounds in the algal species under studied. Further phytochemical studies are needed to elucidate these compounds structures and activity for use algae as an alternative natural antibiotic against synthetic conventional antibiotics.

  13. Factors impacting the aminoglycoside-induced UGA stop codon readthrough in selenoprotein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martitz, Janine; Hofmann, Peter Josef; Johannes, Jörg; Köhrle, Josef; Schomburg, Lutz; Renko, Kostja

    2016-09-01

    Aminoglycosides (AG) are oligosaccharide antibiotics that interfere with the small ribosomal subunit in aerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, causing pathogen-destructing error rates in their protein biosynthesis. Aminoglycosides also induce mRNA misinterpretation in eukaryotic cells, especially of the UGA (Opal)-stop codon, albeit to a lower extent. UGA recoding is essentially required for the incorporation of selenocysteine (Sec) into growing selenoproteins during translation. Selenocysteine incorporation requires the presence of a selenoprotein-specific stem-loop structure within the 3'-untranslated region of the mRNA, the so-called Sec-insertion sequence (SECIS) element. Interestingly, selenoprotein genes differ in their SECIS-element sequence and in their UGA base context. We hypothesized that the SECIS-element and the specific codon context synergize in controlling the effects of AG on stop codon readthrough. To this end, the SECIS-elements of glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione peroxidase 4 and selenoprotein P transcripts were cloned into a reporter system and analyzed in combination with different UGA codon contexts. Our results indicate that a cytosine in position 4 (directly downstream of UGA) confers strongest effects on both the Se- and AG-dependent readthrough. Overall selenoprotein biosynthesis rate depends on the Se-status, AG concentration and the specific SECIS-element present in the transcript. These findings help to get a better understanding for the susceptibility of different transcripts towards AG-mediated interference with the biosynthesis of functional Se-containing selenoproteins, and highlight the importance of the Se-status for successful selenoprotein biosynthesis under antibiotic therapy. PMID:27157664

  14. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. ...

  15. In vitro activities of nisin and nisin derivatives alone and in combination with antibiotics against Staphylococcus biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Des eField

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development and spread of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to the existing catalogue of antibiotics is a major public health threat. Biofilms are complex, sessile communities of bacteria embedded in an organic polymer matrix which serve to further enhance antimicrobial resistance. Consequently, novel compounds and innovative methods are urgently required to arrest the proliferation of drug-resistant infections in both nosocomial and community environments. Accordingly, it has been suggested that antimicrobial peptides could be used as novel natural inhibitors that can be used in formulations with synergistically-acting antibiotics. Nisin is a member of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides that exhibit potent antibacterial activity against many Gram-positive bacteria. Recently we have used bioengineering strategies to enhance the activity of nisin against several high profile targets, including multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE, staphylococci and streptococci associated with bovine mastitis. We have also identified nisin derivatives with an enhanced ability to impair biofilm formation and to reduce the density of established biofilms of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of nisin and nisin derivatives to increase the efficacy of conventional antibiotics and to assess the possibility of killing and/or eradicating biofilm-associated cells of a variety of staphylococcal targets. Growth curve-based comparisons established that combinations of derivatives nisin V + penicillin or nisin I4V + chloramphenicol had an enhanced inhibitory effect against S. aureus SA113 and S. pseudintermedius DSM21284 respectively compared to the equivalent nisin A + antibiotic combinations or when each antimicrobial was administered alone. Furthermore, the metabolic

  16. In Vitro Activities of Nisin and Nisin Derivatives Alone and In Combination with Antibiotics against Staphylococcus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Des; O' Connor, Rory; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The development and spread of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to the existing catalog of antibiotics is a major public health threat. Biofilms are complex, sessile communities of bacteria embedded in an organic polymer matrix which serve to further enhance antimicrobial resistance. Consequently, novel compounds and innovative methods are urgently required to arrest the proliferation of drug-resistant infections in both nosocomial and community environments. Accordingly, it has been suggested that antimicrobial peptides could be used as novel natural inhibitors that can be used in formulations with synergistically acting antibiotics. Nisin is a member of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides that exhibit potent antibacterial activity against many Gram-positive bacteria. Recently we have used bioengineering strategies to enhance the activity of nisin against several high profile targets, including multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, staphylococci, and streptococci associated with bovine mastitis. We have also identified nisin derivatives with an enhanced ability to impair biofilm formation and to reduce the density of established biofilms of methicillin resistant S. pseudintermedius. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of nisin and nisin derivatives to increase the efficacy of conventional antibiotics and to assess the possibility of killing and/or eradicating biofilm-associated cells of a variety of staphylococcal targets. Growth curve-based comparisons established that combinations of derivatives nisin V + penicillin or nisin I4V + chloramphenicol had an enhanced inhibitory effect against S. aureus SA113 and S. pseudintermedius DSM21284, respectively, compared to the equivalent nisin A + antibiotic combinations or when each antimicrobial was administered alone. Furthermore, the metabolic activity of established biofilms treated with nisin

  17. New antibiotics for bad bugs: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Matteo; Merelli, Maria; Temperoni, Chiara; Astilean, Augusta

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is growing up day by day in both community and hospital setting, with a significant impact on the mortality and morbidity rates and the financial burden that is associated. In the last two decades multi drug resistant microorganisms (both hospital- and community-acquired) challenged the scientific groups into developing new antimicrobial compounds that can provide safety in use according to the new regulation, good efficacy patterns, and low resistance profile. In this review we made an evaluation of present data regarding the new classes and the new molecules from already existing classes of antibiotics and the ongoing trends in antimicrobial development. Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) supported a proGram, called "the '10 × ´20' initiative", to develop ten new systemic antibacterial drugs within 2020. The microorganisms mainly involved in the resistance process, so called the ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and enterobacteriaceae) were the main targets. In the era of antimicrobial resistance the new antimicrobial agents like fifth generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams, β-lactamases inhibitors, aminoglycosides, quinolones, oxazolidones, glycopeptides, and tetracyclines active against Gram-positive pathogens, like vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and MRSA, penicillin-resistant streptococci, and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) but also against highly resistant Gram-negative organisms are more than welcome. Of these compounds some are already approved by official agencies, some are still in study, but the need of new antibiotics still does not cover the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Therefore the management of antimicrobial resistance should also include fostering coordinated actions by all stakeholders, creating policy guidance, support for

  18. THE EFFECT OF GROWTH PARAMETERS ON THE ANTIBIOTIC ACTIVITY AND SPORULATION IN BACILLUS SPP. ISOLATED FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Usta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-two Bacillus strains, which were isolated from different soil samples, were screened for antibiotic properties. The Bacillus strains were checked for antibacterial properties by the cross-streak method against 5 test pathogens, and 25 Bacillus strains had an effect on the test microorganisms. One strain of Bacillus, which exhibited the largest inhibition zone (25 mm against Shigella sonnei, was named Bacillus sp. EA62. The antibacterial activity from Bacillus sp. EA62 was tested in six different culture media against Shigella sonnei using the agar well diffusion method. The best activity medium was selected and used for further studies. The influence of the incubation period, pH, and different glucose and nitrogen concentrations on the antibacterial activity was studied. The optimal conditions for the strongest antibiotic activity were found to be 72 hours (18 mm, pH 7.5 (23 mm, 3% glucose (25 mm, and 0.3% nitrogen concentration (23 mm. Additionally, the relationship between the antibiotic activity and sporulation was investigated. Accordingly, it was determined that the increase of the activity paralleled sporulation.

  19. Characterization of paired mucoid/non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Danish cystic fibrosis patients: antibiotic resistance, beta-lactamase activity and RiboPrinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Fussing, V; Bagge, N;

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize 42 paired mucoid and non-mucoid Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected in 1997, by RiboPrinting, antibiotic susceptibility and beta-lactamase activity. Eight P. aeruginosa isolates collected before 1991 were included for...... before 1991 had an antibiotic susceptibility pattern similar to the 1997 isolates. Despite prolonged and intensive antibiotic treatment, susceptible mucoid isolates were isolated from the CF sputum, possibly because these bacteria are protected from the selective pressure of antibiotics by the resistant...

  20. A Simple Assay to Screen Antimicrobial Compounds Potentiating the Activity of Current Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Junaid Iqbal; Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui; Shahana Urooj Kazmi; Naveed Ahmed Khan

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to pose a significant problem in the management of bacterial infections, despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Here, we suggest a simple, inexpensive, and easy-to-perform assay to screen antimicrobial compounds from natural products or synthetic chemical libraries for their potential to work in tandem with the available antibiotics against multiple drug-resistant bacteria. The aqueous extract of Juglans regia tree bark was tested a...

  1. Screening for Antibiotic Activity by Miniaturized Cultivation in Micro-Segmented Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Emerson; Tovar, Miguel; Martin, Karin; Roth, Martin

    Despite arduous dedication of the scientific community during the last decades, most screening efforts failed to reveal new antibiotic substances. Droplet-based microfluidics provide a powerful platform to effectively exploit natural metabolic diversity and revitalize the search for new antimicrobials. In this chapter, we explore main requirements to develop and apply droplet-based microfluidic screening strategies for the discovery of novel antibiotics from natural products.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF PUNICA GRANATUM AGAINST ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TYPE (D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRDOOS AL FADEL , SHAZA AL LAHAM, HASSANA CHOUR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The search for new antibiotics and alternative products to solve the increasing number of bacterial resistance to customary antibiotics has become an urgent need. To investigate the effectiveness of the extracts prepared from different parts of Syrian Punica granatum Linn (family Punicaceae, against Clostridium perfringens type (D, which is resistant against many antibiotics, 684 samples were isolated from intestines and livers of death goats by using blood agar, and a selective agar for growing of Clostridium perfringens(SPS agar. The isolated bacteria were typed by using ELISA apparatus. Many parts of Punica granatum was extracted with water, absolute alcohol, then ether by using soxhlet apparatus and rotary evaporator. The Antibiotic susceptibility testing of many antibiotics was conducted by using disc diffusion method in anaerobic atmosphere and break points method. The alcoholic extracts prepared from many parts of punica granatum (pericarp, leaves, flowers, seeds showed different antibacterial effect against Clostridium perfringens type(D,whereas the studied antibiotics had not shown any antibacterial effect, except Clindamycin which showed partial effectiveness. 

  3. In Search of Alternative Antibiotic Drugs: Quorum-Quenching Activity in Sponges and their Bacterial Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Kumar; Bar-Shalom, Rinat; Haber, Markus; Burgsdorf, Ilia; Oliviero, Giorgia; Costantino, Valeria; Morgenstern, David; Steindler, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the extensive development of drug resistance in pathogens against the available antibiotic arsenal, antimicrobial resistance is now an emerging major threat to public healthcare. Anti-virulence drugs are a new type of therapeutic agent aiming at virulence factors rather than killing the pathogen, thus providing less selective pressure for evolution of resistance. One promising example of this therapeutic concept targets bacterial quorum sensing (QS), because QS controls many virulence factors responsible for bacterial infections. Marine sponges and their associated bacteria are considered a still untapped source for unique chemical leads with a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we screened extracts of 14 sponge species collected from the Red and Mediterranean Sea for their quorum-quenching (QQ) potential. Half of the species showed QQ activity in at least 2 out of 3 replicates. Six out of the 14 species were selected for bacteria isolation, to test for QQ activity also in isolates, which, once cultured, represent an unlimited source of compounds. We show that ≈20% of the isolates showed QQ activity based on a Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 screen, and that the presence or absence of QQ activity in a sponge extract did not correlate with the abundance of isolates with the same activity from the same sponge species. This can be explained by the unknown source of QQ compounds in sponge-holobionts (host or symbionts), and further by the possible non-symbiotic nature of bacteria isolated from sponges. The potential symbiotic nature of the isolates showing QQ activity was tested according to the distribution and abundance of taxonomically close bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in a dataset including 97 sponge species and 178 environmental samples (i.e., seawater, freshwater, and marine sediments). Most isolates were found not to be enriched in sponges and may simply have been trapped in the filtration channels of the

  4. In search of alternative antibiotic drugs: Quorum-quenching activity in sponges and their bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar eSaurav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the extensive development of drug resistance in pathogens against the available antibiotic arsenal, antimicrobial resistance is now an emerging major threat to public healthcare. Anti-virulence drugs are a new type of therapeutic agent aiming at virulence factors rather than killing the pathogen, thus providing less selective pressure for evolution of resistance. One promising example of this therapeutic concept targets bacterial quorum sensing (QS, because QS controls many virulence factors responsible for bacterial infections. Marine sponges and their associated bacteria are considered a still untapped source for unique chemical leads with a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we screened extracts of fourteen sponge species collected from the Red and Mediterranean Sea for their quorum-quenching (QQ potential. Half of the species showed QQ activity in at least 2 out of 3 replicates. Six out of the 14 species were selected for bacteria isolation, to test for QQ activity also in isolates, which, once cultured, represent an unlimited source of compounds. We show that approximately 20% of the isolates showed QQ activity based on a Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 screen, and that the presence or absence of QQ activity in a sponge extract did not co-relate with the abundance of isolates with the same activity from the same sponge species. This can be explained by the unknown source of QQ compounds in sponge-holobionts (host or symbionts, and further by the possible non-symbiotic nature of bacteria isolated from sponges. The potential symbiotic nature of the isolates showing QQ activity was tested according to the distribution and abundance of taxonomically close bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs in a dataset including 97 sponge species and 178 environmental samples (i.e., seawater, freshwater and marine sediments. Most isolates were found not to be enriched in sponges, and may simply have been trapped in the

  5. Relationship between antimicrobial resistance and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-feng; JIANG Jian-ping; MI Zu-huang

    2005-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the main gram-negative bacilli in clinical practice. Nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii is very difficult to treat. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance characteristics and four resistant gene expressions of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes including N-acetyltransferases and O-phosphotransferases in Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods Bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed by PhoenixTM system in 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of seven aminoglycosides including gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin, neomycin and streptomycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were detected by agar dilution. Four aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by DNA sequencer.Results The resistance rates of 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii against cefotaxime, levofloxacin, piperacillin, aztreonam, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol were more than 50%. Imipenem and meropenem showed high antibacterial activities with resistance rates of 3.2% and 4.1%. MIC50 and MIC90 of gentamicin, amikacin, streptomycin and kanamycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii were all more than 1024 mg/L, and the resistance rates were 100%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. But their resistance rates to tobramycin, netilmicin and neomycin were 86.7%, 93.3% and 46.7%, respectively. Three modifying enzyme genes, including aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes, were found in 15 strains, but aphA6 had not been detected. Their positive rates were 93.3%, 20.0% and 20.0%, respectively. These three genes existed simultaneously in No.19 strain. Nucleotide sequences of aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes shared 100%, 97.9% and 99.7% identities with GenBank genes (AY307113, S68058 and AY

  6. Antibiotic activity and structural analysis of the scorpion-derived antimicrobial peptide IsCT and its analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungik; Shin, Song Yub; Kim, Kyoungho; Lim, Shin Saeng; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Yangmee

    2004-10-15

    IsCT is a non-cell-selective antimicrobial peptide isolated from the scorpion Opisthacanthus madagascariensis that has potent cytolytic activity against both mammalian and bacterial cells. To investigate the structure-activity relationships of IsCT and to design novel peptide antibiotics with bacterial cell selectivity, we synthesized several analogs of IsCT and determined their three-dimensional structures in solution by 2D-NMR spectroscopy. IsCT has a linear alpha-helical structure from Gly3 to Phe13, and [K7]-IsCT has a linear alpha-helical structure from Leu2 to Phe13. [K7, P8, K11]-IsCT, which has a bend in its middle region, exhibited the highest antibacterial activity without hemolytic activity, suggesting that its proline-induced bend is an important determinant of this selectivity. Tryptophan fluorescence showed that the high selectivity of [K7, P8, K11]-IsCT toward bacterial cells is closely correlated with its highly selective interaction with negatively charged phospholipids. Its potent activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria suggests that [K7, P8, K11]-IsCT may serve as a promising lead candidate in the development of new peptide antibiotics. PMID:15369808

  7. Induction of a stress response in Lactococcus lactis is associated with a resistance to ribosomally active antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrian, James M; Briggs, Deborah A; Ridley, Michael L; Layfield, Robert; Kerr, Ian D

    2011-11-01

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance in bacteria underlies the failure of antimicrobial therapy, and the emergence of pathogens that are resistant to almost the entire armoury of antibiotics. Among the proteins that can mediate or contribute to the drug-resistance profile in Gram-positive bacteria is a subset of ATP-binding cassette proteins that are comprised of a tandem-repeated nucleotide-binding domain. In this study, we expressed one of these NBD(2) proteins, LmrC, in an antibiotic-sensitive Gram-positive host strain (Lactococcus lactis) and demonstrated the acquisition of resistance to ribosomally active antibiotics. Mutation of key catalytic residues suggested that the resistance profile was the result of a cellular response, rather than being a function of the NBD(2) protein itself. This observation was confirmed by 2D SDS/PAGE, which demonstrated that the expression of the NBD(2) protein induced a stress response in L. lactis. A model combining this stress response induction and the acquisition of antibiotic resistance is proposed. PMID:21848804

  8. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'- acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) were defined to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical standard curves at six different concentrations resulted in a correlation coefficient (r value) of greater than 0.99 for each aminoglycoside. The radioenzymatic assay correlates well with the bioassay (tobramycin and netilmicin) and radioimmunoassay (amikacin and kanamycin); the correlation coefficient is greater than 0.90 for all. The authors conclude that the radioenzymatic assay utilizing kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase is feasible for all commercially available parenterally administered aminoglycosides

  9. High frequency ultrasound as a selective advanced oxidation process to remove penicillinic antibiotics and eliminate its antimicrobial activity from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Galvis, Efraim A; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Giraldo-Aguirre, Ana L; Flórez-Acosta, Oscar A; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2016-07-01

    This work studies the sonochemical degradation of a penicillinic antibiotic (oxacillin) in simulated pharmaceutical wastewater. High frequency ultrasound was applied to water containing the antibiotic combined with mannitol or calcium carbonate. In the presence of additives, oxacillin was efficiently removed through sonochemical action. For comparative purposes, the photo-Fenton, TiO2 photocatalysis and electrochemical oxidation processes were also tested. Therefore, the evolution of the antibiotic and its associated antimicrobial activity (AA) were monitored. A high inhibition was found for the other three oxidation processes in the elimination of the antimicrobial activity caused by the additives; while for the ultrasonic treatment, a negligible effect was observed. The sonochemical process was able to completely degrade the antibiotic, generating solutions without AA. In fact, the elimination of antimicrobial activity showed an excellent performance adjusted to exponential kinetic-type decay. The main sonogenerated organic by-products were determined by means of HPLC-MS. Four intermediaries were identified and they have modified the penicillinic structure, which is the moiety responsible for the antimicrobial activity. Additionally, the possible oxacillin sonodegradation mechanism was proposed based on the evolution of the by-products and their chemical structure. Furthermore, the high-frequency ultrasound action over 120 min readily removed oxacillin and eliminated its antimicrobial activity. However, the pollutant was not mineralized even after a long period of ultrasonic irradiation (360 min). Interestingly, the previously sonicated water containing oxacillin and both additives was completely mineralized using non-adapted microorganisms from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. These results show that the sonochemical treatment transformed the initial pollutant into substances that are biotreatable with a typical aerobic biological system. PMID:26964950

  10. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME WILD MEDICAL PLANTS EXTRACT TO ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANT ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Hleba

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are probably the most successful family of drugs so far developed for improving human health. Because of increasing resistance to antibiotics of many bacteria, plant extracts and plant compounds are of new interest as antiseptics and antimicrobial agents in medicine. In this study, we researched antimicrobial effects of extracts of some medical plants (Tussilagofarfara, Equisetum arvense, Sambucusnigra, Aesculushippocastanumand Taraxacumofficinale from Slovakia to antibiotic resistant and antibiotic sensitive bacteria isolated from milk of cows and mare, which were breeded in different conditions. Microorganisms which were used in this experiment we isolated from milk from conventional breeding of cows (tenE. coli strains and from ecological breeding of Lipicanmare (tenE. coli strains by sterile cotton swabs. For antibiotic susceptibility testing was used disc diffusion method according by EUCAST. After dried at room temperature we weighed 50 g of crushed medical plants (parts and it were to extract in 400 ml methanol for two weeks at room temperature. For antimicrobial susceptibility testing of medical plants extract blank discs with 6 mm diameter disc diffusion method was used. We determined that all Escherichia coli strains isolated from milk of conventional breeding of cows were resistant to ampicillin and chloramphenicol. We determined that all tested ampicillin and chloramphenicol resistant E. coli strains isolated from conventional breeding of cow showed susceptibility to all used medical plants extracts. In difference, we determined that antibiotic susceptible E. coli strains isolated from ecological breeding of Lipicanmare were susceptible to Tussilagofarfara extract only. From these results we could be conclude some observations, which could be important step in treatment of bacterial infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria and it could be important knowledge for treatment of livestock in conventional breeding

  11. Identification of clinically antibiotic resistant genes Aac(3)-IIa and Aac(6’)-Ib in wastewater samples by multiplex PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Naser Samadi; Rahim Aali; Esrafil Asgari; Hamed Mirhosaeini; Ali Shahriari; Farhad Mahmoodi; Fardin Nouri; Asad Hamdi; Farzad Fanaie; Shahla Yosefi; Saied Dadashi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used in medical centers, particularly to treat infections. The resistance developed against these agents is a huge concern in health care. A number of researchers have reported that hospital and municipal wastewaters are among the most important dissemination sources of these agent into the environment. Some, however, do not agree with this opinion. In the present study, the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes was investigated in raw...

  12. Synergistic activity of biocides and antibiotics on resistant bacteria from organically produced foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Abriouel, Hikmate; Gadea, Rebeca; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio; Ortega, Elena

    2014-10-01

    Synergism between biocides and antibiotics was investigated in 20 biocide and antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains that were previously isolated from organically produced foods, according to their antimicrobial resistance profiles. Most of the antibiotic/biocide combinations yielded synergistic interactions, reducing the inhibitory concentrations of biocides and antibiotics by 4- to 16-fold. Among enterococci, synergism with biocides was detected for amoxicillin (AM), cefuroxime (CX), erythromycin (EM), ciprofloxacin (CP), and trimethoprim/sulphametoxazol (T/S). Among staphylococci, interactions were synergistic (AM) and either synergistic or indifferent (CX and EM, depending on biocide). Among the three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical strains included in the study, the combinations of methicillin and triclosan or hexachlorophene acted synergistically in all strains, but interactions were either synergistic or indifferent for the other biocides, depending on the strain. All combinations tested were synergistic for Lactobacillus (AM, CX, EM, and CP) and Micrococcus (AM, EM). In Salmonella, interactions were indifferent (AM, CX, EM, and CP) or synergistic (T/S). Synergism with biocides was also detected in Klebsiella isolates (AM, CX, and T/S), Enterobacter sp. (AM, CX, EM, and T/S), Pantoea (AM, CX, EM, CP, and T/S), and Chryseobacterium sp. (EM). These results suggest that combinations of biocides and antibiotics may open new possibilities to combat antimicrobial resistance. PMID:24660956

  13. Frontline antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGowan, Alasdair; Albur, Maha

    2013-06-01

    The need to use front-line antibiotics wisely has never been greater. Antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistant infection, driven by antibiotic use, remain major public health and professional concerns. To overcome these infection problems, use of older antibiotics active against multi drug-resistant pathogens is increasing - for example, colistin, fosfomycin, pivmecillinam, pristinamycin, temocillin and oral tetracyclines. The number of new antibacterials reaching clinical practice has reduced significantly in the last 20 years, most being focused on therapy of Gram-positive infection - eg linezolid, daptomycin, telavancin and ceftaroline. Recent guidance on antibiotic stewardship in NHS trusts in England is likely to provide a backdrop to antibiotic use in hospitals in the next 5 years. PMID:23760700

  14. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Kailong Huang; Junying Tang; Xu-Xiang Zhang; Ke Xu; Hongqiang Ren

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera cons...

  15. The antibiotic activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants Atividade antibiótica de algumas plantas medicinais brasileiras

    OpenAIRE

    Maria R. Ferreira de Lima; Eulália C.P. Azevedo Ximenes; Josiane S. Luna; Antônio E. Goulart Sant'Ana

    2006-01-01

    The antibiotic activities of the ethanol extracts from 16 species of plants used in Brazilian folk medicine have been determined against Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Salmonella enteretidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Serratia marcescens, Mycobacterium phlei, M. smegmatis and M. fortuitum, and the yeasts Candida albicans and C. krusei. Among 32 extracts assayed, only those from Lafoensia pacari and Pterodon polygalae...

  16. Screening of Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Freshwater and Marine Algae as a Prominent Natural Antibiotic Available in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Mehadi Hassan Chowdhury; Khadizatul Kubra; Mohammad Belal Hossain; M. Golam Mustafa; Tahsina Jainab; M. Reazul Karim; M. Elias Mehedy

    2015-01-01

    In Bangladesh, algae have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. So, present work provides the eligibility of algae commonly found in Bangladesh as a prominent natural antibiotic against various pathogens. In vitro screening of organic solvent extracts (methanol, ethanol and chloroform) of ten fresh water and marine algae showed antimicrobial activity carried out by disc diffusion method against two gram positive, four gram negative bacteria and ...

  17. In vitro anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant effects of antibiotics towards Platelet Activating Factor and thrombin

    OpenAIRE

    Demopoulos Constantinos A; Tsekes George; Lioni Athina; Tsogas Nickolaos; Chini Maria; Tsoupras Alexandros B; Lazanas Marios C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Sepsis is characterized as a systemic inflammatory response that results from the inability of the immune system to limit bacterial spread during an ongoing infection. In this condition the significant mediator of inflammation Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) and the coagulant factor thrombin are implicated. In animal models, treatment with PAF-antagonists or co-administration of antibiotics with recombinant-PAF-Acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) have exhibited promising results. I...

  18. Methodological variation in antibiotic synergy tests against enterococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, R W; Kwasnik, I; Tilton, R C

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-two human isolates of enterococci were tested for antibiotic synergy by using penicillin and one of six aminoglycosides. Three methods were used: synergy screen, microdilution checkerboard, and time-kill curves. The synergy screen accurately predicted synergy for gentamicin-penicillin combinations, and this synergy was later confirmed by time-kill curves. The microdilution checkerboard method suffered from inherent variation, and agreement with time-kill curves ranged from 92% (twofold...

  19. In vitro Synergistic Antimicrobial Activity of Romanian Propolis and Antibiotics against Escherichia coli Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela NICULAE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to characterize the chemical composition and the antimicrobial activity of Romanian propolis ethanolic extracts (EEP against antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains isolated from bovine mastitis. The preliminary antimicrobial screening was performed by a disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC based on broth microdilution assay; further, the synergistic action of propolis with antimicrobial drugs was assessed by a disk diffusion method on agar containing subinhibitory concentrations of propolis. For the chemical characterisation of EEP, the flavonoids (flavones/flavonols, flavanones/dihydroflavonols and total phenolics were evaluated by spectrophotometric methods. The phenolic compounds of these extracts were also determined using HPLC. The results indicated for Romanian propolis ethanolic extracts the typical poplar composition profile with flavonoids and phenolic acids as main biological active compounds, with chromatographic analysis data confirmed also spectrophotometrically. In addition, positively correlated with the chemical composition, a strong antimicrobial efficacy was exhibited towards E. coli strains, along with interesting synergistic interaction with antibiotics that can be further investigated to obtain propolis-based formulation with antibacterial properties. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating the safety and efficacy are intended to consider propolis in veterinary therapeutic protocols.

  20. Detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria endowed with antimicrobial activity from a freshwater lake and their phylogenetic affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zothanpuia; Passari, Ajit K.; Gupta, Vijai K.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance poses a serious challenge to global public health. In this study, fifty bacterial strains were isolated from the sediments of a freshwater lake and were screened for antibiotic resistance. Out of fifty isolates, thirty-three isolates showed resistance against at least two of the selected antibiotics. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the isolates belonged to ten different genera, namely Staphylococcus(n = 8), Bacillus(n = 7), Lysinibacillus(n = 4), Achromobacter(n=3), bacterium(n = 3), Methylobacterium(n = 2), Bosea(n = 2), Aneurinibacillus(n = 2), Azospirillum(n = 1), Novosphingobium(n = 1). Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and BOX-PCR markers were used to study the genetic relatedness among the antibiotic resistant isolates. Further, the isolates were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacterial pathogens viz., Staphylococcus aureus(MTCC-96), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(MTCC-2453) and Escherichia coli(MTCC-739), and pathogenic fungi viz., Fusarium proliferatum (MTCC-286), Fusarium oxysporum (CABI-293942) and Fusarium oxy. ciceri (MTCC-2791). In addition, biosynthetic genes (polyketide synthase II (PKS-II) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)) were detected in six and seven isolates, respectively. This is the first report for the multifunctional analysis of the bacterial isolates from a wetland with biosynthetic potential, which could serve as potential source of useful biologically active metabolites. PMID:27330861

  1. Design of Novel Aminoglycoside Derivatives with Enhanced Suppression of Diseases-Causing Nonsense Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbavarapu, Narayana Murthy; Shavit, Michal; Degani, Yarden; Smolkin, Boris; Belakhov, Valery; Baasov, Timor

    2016-04-14

    New pseudotrisaccharide derivatives of aminoglycosides that exploit additional interaction on the shallow groove face of the decoding-site rRNA of eukaryotic ribosome were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated. Novel lead structures (6 and 7 with an additional 7'-OH), exhibiting enhanced specificity to eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosome, and superior nonsense mutation suppression activity than those of gentamicin, were discovered. The comparative benefit of new leads was demonstrated in four different nonsense DNA-constructs underling the genetic diseases cystic fibrosis, Usher syndrome, and Hurler syndrome. PMID:27096052

  2. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6’)-aph(2”) Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. Objectives: This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3”)-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. Results: The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6’)-aph(2”). The prevalence of aph(3”)-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6’)-aph(2”) among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary.

  3. Antibiotic resistance pattern in uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic strains from inpatient and outpatient departments were studied from April 1997 to March 1999 for their susceptibility profiles. The various isolates were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumanii and Enterococcus faecalis. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these isolates revealed that for outpatients, first generation cephalosporins, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin/ciprofloxacin were effective for treatment of urinary tract infection but for inpatients, parenteral therapy with newer aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporins need to be advocated as the organisms for nosocomial UTI exhibit a high degree of drug resistance. Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole combination was not found to be effective for the treatment of urinary tract infections as all the uropathogens from inpatients and outpatients showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole. Culture and sensitivity of the isolates from urine samples should be done as a routine before advocating the therapy.

  4. Critical influence of resistance to streptogramin B-type antibiotics on activity of RP 59500 (quinupristin-dalfopristin) in experimental endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fantin, B.; Leclercq, R.; Merlé, Y; Saint-Julien, L; Veyrat, C; Duval, J; Carbon, C

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the microbiological and pharmacokinetic parameters that best predicted the in vivo antistaphylococcal activity of the streptogramin RP 59500 (quinupristin-dalfopristin), we evaluated the activity in rabbit aortic endocarditis of three regimens of quinupristin-dalfopristin against five strains of Staphylococcus aureus with various streptogramin B-type antibiotic resistance phenotypes and susceptible to streptogramin A-type antibiotics. Quinupristin-dalfopristin was as act...

  5. Ribozyme-based aminoglycoside switches of gene expression engineered by genetic selection in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauser, Benedikt; Atanasov, Janina; Siewert, Lena K; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-05-15

    Systems for conditional gene expression are powerful tools in basic research as well as in biotechnology. For future applications, it is of great importance to engineer orthogonal genetic switches that function reliably in diverse contexts. RNA-based switches have the advantage that effector molecules interact immediately with regulatory modules inserted into the target RNAs, getting rid of the need of transcription factors usually mediating genetic control. Artificial riboswitches are characterized by their simplicity and small size accompanied by a high degree of modularity. We have recently reported a series of hammerhead ribozyme-based artificial riboswitches that allow for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression via switching mRNA, tRNA, or rRNA functions. A more widespread application was so far hampered by moderate switching performances and a limited set of effector molecules available. Here, we report the re-engineering of hammerhead ribozymes in order to respond efficiently to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We first established an in vivo selection protocol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that enabled us to search large sequence spaces for optimized switches. We then envisioned and characterized a novel strategy of attaching the aptamer to the ribozyme catalytic core, increasing the design options for rendering the ribozyme ligand-dependent. These innovations enabled the development of neomycin-dependent RNA modules that switch gene expression up to 25-fold. The presented aminoglycoside-responsive riboswitches belong to the best-performing RNA-based genetic regulators reported so far. The developed in vivo selection protocol should allow for sampling of large sequence spaces for engineering of further optimized riboswitches. PMID:24871672

  6. [Effect of preservation conditions on the viability and activity of Streptomyces griseus--producer of the antibiotic grizin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenina, G A; Lavrova, L N; Iustratova, L S; Kuklin, V V

    1983-03-01

    Strain AURIGenetics- 1552 of Str. griseus producing grisin used as a feed additive was obtained in the course of stepped selection. It is deposited at the Central Collection of Industrial Microorganisms of the USSR and designated as strain S-248. The strain was stored under varying conditions and their effect on its viability, morphological variation and antibiotic potency was studied. Investigation of the strain variation with respect to the cultural and morphological properties and the antibiotic production revealed definite correlation between the morphological properties of the culture and its capacity for the synthesis of the antibiotic. The medium G-1 containing KNO3 as the only source of nitrogen was found to be advantageous for maintaining the strain potency on storage with the method of subcultures or under a layer of mineral oil. It was shown that the strain can be successfully stored by lyophilization. This method in combination with selection of active variants from populations of lyophilized cells provided not only maintenance of the culture potency at the required level but also its increase. PMID:6407387

  7. Conjugative DNA Transfer Induces the Bacterial SOS Response and Promotes Antibiotic Resistance Development through Integron Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Bikard, David; Mazel, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Conjugation is one mechanism for intra- and inter-species horizontal gene transfer among bacteria. Conjugative elements have been instrumental in many bacterial species to face the threat of antibiotics, by allowing them to evolve and adapt to these hostile conditions. Conjugative plasmids are transferred to plasmidless recipient cells as single-stranded DNA. We used lacZ and gfp fusions to address whether conjugation induces the SOS response and the integron integrase. The SOS response contr...

  8. Diverse modulation of spa transcription by cell wall active antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Roggenbuck, Michael; Haaber, Jakob Krause;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various classes of clinically relevant antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations on virulence gene expression and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. FINDINGS: LacZ promoter fusions of genes related to staphylococ...... wall penicillin binding proteins we speculate that subtle differences in this interaction fine-tunes spa expression independently of agr....

  9. Mycobacterium abscessus: a new antibiotic nightmare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessar, Rachid; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Reyrat, Jean Marc; Murray, Alan; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2012-04-01

    The intrinsic and acquired resistance of Mycobacterium abscessus to commonly used antibiotics limits the chemotherapeutic options for infections caused by these mycobacteria. Intrinsic resistance is attributed to a combination of the permeability barrier of the complex multilayer cell envelope, drug export systems, antibiotic targets with low affinity and enzymes that neutralize antibiotics in the cytoplasm. To date, acquired resistance has only been observed for aminoglycosides and macrolides, which is conferred by mutations affecting the genes encoding the antibiotic targets (rrs and rrl, respectively). Here we summarize previous and recent findings on the resistance of M. abscessus to antibiotics in light of what has been discovered for other mycobacteria. Since we can now distinguish three groups of strains belonging to M. abscessus (M. abscessus sensu stricto, Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium bolletii), studies on antibiotic susceptibility and resistance should be considered according to this new classification. This review raises the profile of this important pathogen and highlights the work needed to decipher the molecular events responsible for its extensive chemotherapeutic resistance. PMID:22290346

  10. Genetic basis of aminoglycoside resistance following changes in aminoglycoside prescription patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidis, Chris; Giannopoulou, Maria; Flountzi, Anastasia; Markogiannakis, Antonis; Goukos, Dimitris; Petrikkos, George; Daikos, George L; Tzanetou, Konstantina

    2013-08-01

    Aminoglycosides (AG) offer an important therapeutic option for the treatment of infections caused by multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae. We observed a change in AG usage patterns in our institution between 1997 and 2006, namely a reduction in use of all AG except amikacin. We studied the changes in AG susceptibility rates in these time periods and correlated with prevalence of different molecular resistance mechanisms. Enterobacteriaceae isolated from blood cultures from 1997 and 2006 were studied. Susceptibilities to AG were determined with the disk diffusion method. PCR was used to detect genes encoding AG-modifying enzymes and methylases. Gentamicin resistance rates dropped from 14·5 to 8·8%, whereas resistance rates to other AG remained unchanged. The AAC(6')-I+AAC(3)-I combination was more common in 1997, whereas AAC(6')-I was the most common mechanism in 2006. Reduction in gentamicin use may preserve the usefulness of this agent against severe infections by multiresistant bacteria such as carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:23906075

  11. Structure and Antibacterial Activity of Ambobactin, a New Telomycin-Like Cyclic Depsipeptide Antibiotic Produced by Streptomyces ambofaciens F3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Wei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A new telomycin-like cyclic depsipeptide, ambobactin (1, was isolated from the metabolites of Streptomyces ambofaciens F3, an endophyte of Platycladus orientalis. Its structure was elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and advanced Marfey’s method. Ambobactin is structurally related with telomycin, except that the configuration of the 3-methyltryptophanes in their structures is different. It exhibited strong antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, this investigation revealed that S. ambofaciens F3 is a new producer of telomycin-like antibiotics.

  12. [Bacteriocidal activity of Streptomyces cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, L V; Bambura, O I; Luk'ianchuk, V V

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriocidal activity of metabolites synthesized by 17 plasmid-containing cultures of Streptomyces has been studied. These cultures were isolated from soils of Ukraine with different anthropogenic contamination. The cultures, in their majority (85.3%), synthesized bioactive metabolites, which suppressed growth of microorganisms of different taxonomical groups, pathogenic for people, animals or plants. None of 17 Streptomyces cultures was able to suppress growth of yeasts or Escherichia coli. All 17 investigated cultures of Streptomyces were polyresistant to antibiotics, which were used in medicine and veterinary: makrolide, aminoglycoside, beta-lactam and other groups. Resistance of 8 cultures to the antibiotic thiostrepton, which was widely used in some branches of science, was found. PMID:23088099

  13. Effect of Special Rectification Activities of Antibiotics on The Antibiotic Use among The Inpatients%抗菌药物专项整治活动对住院患者抗菌药物应用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娟; 陈耀升; 冯玉凤; 王军慈

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of the special antibiotic rectification activities on antibiotic use in the inpatients and evaluate the clinical antibiotic use after policy implementation so as to provide reference for carrying out special rectification.METHODS:Retrospectively, the antibiotic use in the inpatients in our hospital from 2010 to 2014 was analyzed with consumption amount, antibiotic use density ( AUD) , rate of antibiotic use, defined daily cost ( DDC) , medication frequency ( DDDs ) , rate of preventive antibiotic use in patients undergoing type Ⅰ incision operation and rate of pathogen test as the key monitoring indicators, with inpatient antibiotic use before and after the special rectification activities evaluated.RESULTS:Over the 5 years, the rate of antibiotic use, the AUD, the DDC and other indicators showed downward trend, with the number of antibacterial drugs available down from 50 varieties (78 specifications) to 34 varieties (53 specifications), the proportion of antibiotic consumption sum in total drug consumption sum down from 27.7%to 11.3%, the rate of antibiotic use down from 89.5% to 52.1%, AUD down from 69.5 DDD/(100 person per day) to 36.2 DDD/(100 person per day) , rate of pathogen test up year by year and rate of prophylactic antibiotic use in patients undergoing typeⅠincision operation down from 85.6%to 29.7%.The rate of rational antibiotic use in terms of drug varieties in prophylactic use, delivery time and course of treatment etc was up from 11.6% to 82.5%.The choice of prophylactic antibiotic in variety and the drug delivery time were significantly improved with the special rectification activities; however, the course of treatment needs to be standardized.CONCLUSIONS:Special rectification activities on antibiotic use significantly improved the rationality in clinical antibiotic use, however, the limitations of drug varieties of antibiotics, screening of drug resistance and the importance of pathogen test of different

  14. COMBINATIONAL ADMINISTRATION OF AMINOGLYCOSIDES AND LOOP DIURETICS AS AN EFFICIENT STRATEGY TO ESTABLISH DEAFNESS MODELS IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Tao; LIU Riyuan; YUAN Shuolong; XU Liangwei; YANG Shiming

    2014-01-01

    It is known that aminoglycoside antibiotics can damage the vestibular and auditory sensory epithelia, and the loop diuretics can enhance the ototoxic effect of aminoglycosides. Previous studies on the synergistic effect of these two types of drugs have used mice, guinea pigs and cats, but not rats. The aim of this study was to determine this synergistic effects in rat cochleae. Rats received intravenous injections of different doses of furosemide and/or intramuscular injections of kanamycin sulfate. Au-ditory brainstem response (ABR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunocytochemistry were used to determine the effects of drug administration. In the group receiving combined administration of furosemide and kanamycin, the ABR thresh-old showed significant elevation 3 days after drug administration, greater than single drug administration. The hair cells showed various degrees of injury from the apical turn to the basal turn of the cochlea and from the outer hair cells to the inner hair cells. Neuron fibers of the hair cells showed significant loss 7 days after the drug administration, but the number of spiral ganglia did not decrease and supporting cells showed no signs of injury. Our study suggest that combined administration of fu-rosemide and kanamycin has an synergistic ototoxic effect, and can result in hair cell loss and hearing loss in rats.

  15. A Comprehensive in vitro and in silico Analysis of Antibiotics that Activate PXR and Induce CYP3A4 in Liver and Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, Kazuto; Ranade, Aarati; Venkataramanan, Raman; Strom, Stephen; Chupka, Jonathan; Ekins, Sean; Schuetz, Erin; Bachmann, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated several in silico and in vitro methods in order to improve our ability to predict potential drug interactions of antibiotics. Our focus was to identify those antibiotics that activate PXR and induce CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and intestinal cells. Human PXR activation was screened using reporter assays in HepG2 cells, kinetic measurements of PXR activation were made in DPX-2 cells, and induction of CYP3A4 expression and activity was verified by quantitative PCR, immunobl...

  16. Indole Based Weapons to Fight Antibiotic Resistance: A Structure-Activity Relationship Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Susan; Buonerba, Federica; Goracci, Laura; Velilla, Irene; Ruzziconi, Renzo; Schindler, Bryan D; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2016-02-11

    Antibiotic resistance represents a worldwide concern, especially regarding the outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a common cause for serious skin and soft tissues infections. A major contributor to Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic resistance is the NorA efflux pump, which is able to extrude selected antibacterial drugs and biocides from the membrane, lowering their effective concentrations. Thus, the inhibition of NorA represents a promising and challenging strategy that would allow recycling of substrate antimicrobial agents. Among NorA inhibitors, the indole scaffold proved particularly effective and suitable for further optimization. In this study, some unexplored modifications on the indole scaffold are proposed. In particular, for the first time, substitutions at the C5 and N1 positions have been designed to give 48 compounds, which were synthesized and tested against norA-overexpressing S. aureus. Among them, 4 compounds have NorA IC50 values lower than 5.0 μM proving to be good efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) candidates. In addition, preliminary data on their ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profile is reported. PMID:26757340

  17. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, A; Smith, A L; Opheim, K E

    1985-01-01

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, we defined the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical...

  18. Determination of aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by DNA hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickgiesser, N; Kreiswirth, B N

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for identification of the genes conferring aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by dot-blot and Southern blot techniques. As radioactive probes, fragments of plasmids pAT48, pUBH2, and pH13, carrying the genes for an aminocyclitol-3'-phosphotransferase, an aminocyclitol-4'-adenylyltransferase, and an aminocyclitol-2''-phosphotransferase-aminocyclitol-6'-acetyltransferase, respectively, were used.

  19. Retrospective analysis of antibiotic susceptibility patterns of respiratory isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Turkish University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkurt Ibrahim

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa have a high mortality rate. Antibacterial activity of various antibiotics against P. aeruginosa isolated from each hospital depends on the variety or amount of antibiotics used in each hospital. Method A total of 249 respiratory isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Sivas (Turkey were included between January-1999 and January-2002. Isolates were tested against 14 different antibiotics by a disc diffusion method or standardized microdilution technique. Results Organisms were cultured from the following specimens: sputum (31.3%, transtracheal/endotracheal aspirates (37.8%, and bronchial lavage (30.9%. Isolates in bronchial lavage were highly susceptible to cefoperazone and aminoglycosides. Resistance to ampicillin/sulbactam was 98.8%, ticarcillin 40.1%, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid 11.2%, piperacillin 21.8%, aztreonam 66.6%, cefotaxim 75.4%, ceftriaxone 84.2%, cefoperazone 39.0%, ceftazidime 50.8%, gentamicin 57.5%, tobramycin 58.4%, amikacin 25.4%, ciprofloxacin 16.1%, and imipenem/cilastatin 21.6%. The term multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa covered resistance to imipenem, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, gentamicin, and piperacillin. 1.2% of isolates were multidrug-resistant. Conclusions These findings suggest that amikacin resistance increases progressively in Turkey. Piperacillin and ticarcillin/clavulanate were the most active agents against both imipenem- and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates in our region.

  20. Cymbopogon citratus protects against the renal injury induced by toxic doses of aminoglycosides in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ullah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal injury is the most common side-effect of aminoglycosides. These antimicrobial drugs are particularly effective against Gram-negative microorganisms. The present study was conducted to investigate the renal protective activity of Cymbopogon citratus in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male rabbits were divided into four groups (n=6 including group 1 (0.9% saline treated, group 2 (80 mg/kg/day gentamicin-treated, group 3 (200 mg/kg/day Cymbopogon citratus treated and group 4 (80 mg/kg/day gentamicin and 200 mg/kg/day Cymbopogon citratus treated. Biochemical kidney functioning parameters, urinary enzymes and histopathological examination were performed. The results of the present study showed that simultaneous administration of Cymbopogon citrates and gentamicin significantly protected alteration in body weight, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, serum uric acid, serum electrolytes, urinary volume, urinary protein, urinary lactate dehydrogenase and urinary alkaline phosphatase induced by gentamicin. Histological examination of the kidney also suggested the same. It is concluded from the current study that co-administration of Cymbopogon citratus with gentamicin for 3 weeks successfully prevented renal damage associated with aminoglycosides.

  1. Cymbopogon citratus Protects against the Renal Injury Induced by Toxic Doses of Aminoglycosides in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, N; Khan, M A; Khan, T; Ahmad, W

    2013-03-01

    Renal injury is the most common side-effect of aminoglycosides. These antimicrobial drugs are particularly effective against Gram-negative microorganisms. The present study was conducted to investigate the renal protective activity of Cymbopogon citratus in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male rabbits were divided into four groups (n=6) including group 1 (0.9% saline treated), group 2 (80 mg/kg/day gentamicin-treated), group 3 (200 mg/kg/day Cymbopogon citratus treated) and group 4 (80 mg/kg/day gentamicin and 200 mg/kg/day Cymbopogon citratus treated). Biochemical kidney functioning parameters, urinary enzymes and histopathological examination were performed. The results of the present study showed that simultaneous administration of Cymbopogon citrates and gentamicin significantly protected alteration in body weight, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, serum uric acid, serum electrolytes, urinary volume, urinary protein, urinary lactate dehydrogenase and urinary alkaline phosphatase induced by gentamicin. Histological examination of the kidney also suggested the same. It is concluded from the current study that co-administration of Cymbopogon citratus with gentamicin for 3 weeks successfully prevented renal damage associated with aminoglycosides. PMID:24019578

  2. 16S ribosomal RNA methylation: emerging resistance mechanism against aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yohei; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2007-07-01

    Methylation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance against aminoglycosides among gram-negative pathogens belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae and glucose-nonfermentative microbes, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species. This event is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases, which share modest similarity to those produced by aminoglycoside-producing actinomycetes. Their presence confers a high level of resistance to all parenterally administered aminoglycosides that are currently in clinical use. The responsible genes are mostly located on transposons within transferable plasmids, which provides them with the potential to spread horizontally and may in part explain the already worldwide distribution of this novel resistance mechanism. Some of these organisms have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases or metallo-beta-lactamases, contributing to their multidrug-resistant phenotypes. A 2-tiered approach, consisting of disk diffusion tests followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction, is recommended for detection of 16S rRNA methylase-mediated resistance. PMID:17554708

  3. The sigma factor sigma s affects antibiotic production and biological control activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarniguet, A; Kraus, J; Henkels, M D; Muehlchen, A M; Loper, J E

    1995-12-19

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5, a rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium that suppresses several soilborne pathogens of plants, produces the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. A gene necessary for pyrrolnitrin production by Pf-5 was identified as rpoS, which encodes the stationary-phase sigma factor sigma s. Several pleiotropic effects of an rpoS mutation in Escherichia coli also were observed in an RpoS- mutant of Pf-5. These included sensitivities of stationary-phase cells to stresses imposed by hydrogen peroxide or high salt concentration. A plasmid containing the cloned wild-type rpoS gene restored pyrrolnitrin production and stress tolerance to the RpoS- mutant of Pf-5. The RpoS- mutant overproduced pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetyl-phloroglucinol, two antibiotics that inhibit growth of the phytopathogenic fungus Pythium ultimum, and was superior to the wild type in suppression of seedling damping-off of cucumber caused by Pythium ultimum. When inoculated onto cucumber seed at high cell densities, the RpoS- mutant did not survive as well as the wild-type strain on surfaces of developing seedlings. Other stationary-phase-specific phenotypes of Pf-5, such as the production of cyanide and extracellular protease(s) were expressed by the RpoS- mutant, suggesting that sigma s is only one of the sigma factors required for the transcription of genes in stationary-phase cells of P. fluorescens. These results indicate that a sigma factor encoded by rpoS influences antibiotic production, biological control activity, and survival of P. fluorescens on plant surfaces. PMID:8618880

  4. Evaluation of Aminoglycoside and Non-Aminoglycoside Compounds for Stop-Codon Readthrough Therapy in Four Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gómez-Grau

    Full Text Available Nonsense mutations are quite prevalent in inherited diseases. Readthrough drugs could provide a therapeutic option for any disease caused by this type of mutation. Geneticin (G418 and gentamicin were among the first to be described. Novel compounds have been generated, but only a few have shown improved results. PTC124 is the only compound to have reached clinical trials. Here we first investigated the readthrough effects of gentamicin on fibroblasts from one patient with Sanfilippo B, one with Sanfilippo C, and one with Maroteaux-Lamy. We found that ARSB activity (Maroteaux-Lamy case resulted in an increase of 2-3 folds and that the amount of this enzyme within the lysosomes was also increased, after treatment. Since the other two cases (Sanfilippo B and Sanfilippo C did not respond to gentamicin, the treatments were extended with the use of geneticin and five non-aminoglycoside (PTC124, RTC13, RTC14, BZ6 and BZ16 readthrough compounds (RTCs. No recovery was observed at the enzyme activity level. However, mRNA recovery was observed in both cases, nearly a two-fold increase for Sanfilippo B fibroblasts with G418 and around 1.5 fold increase for Sanfilippo C cells with RTC14 and PTC124. Afterwards, some of the products were assessed through in vitro analyses for seven mutations in genes responsible for those diseases and, also, for Niemann-Pick A/B. Using the coupled transcription/translation system (TNT, the best results were obtained for SMPD1 mutations with G418, reaching a 35% recovery at 0.25 μg/ml, for the p.W168X mutation. The use of COS cells transfected with mutant cDNAs gave positive results for most of the mutations with some of the drugs, although to a different extent. The higher enzyme activity recovery, of around two-fold increase, was found for gentamicin on the ARSB p.W146X mutation. Our results are promising and consistent with those of other groups. Further studies of novel compounds are necessary to find those with more

  5. Utilisation of antibiotic therapy in community practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, B

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to identify outpatient antibiotic consumption between Jan 2000 and Dec 2005 through analysis of the HSE-Primary Care Reimbursement Services (PCRS) database as part of the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) project. Total antibiotic consumption on the PCRS scheme between January 2000 and December 2005 expressed in Defined Daily Dose per 1000 PCRS inhabitants per day increased by 26%. The penicillin group represents the highest consumption accounting for approximately 50% of the total outpatient antibiotic use. Total DIDs for this group increased by 25% between 2000 and 2005. Co-amoxiclav and amoxicillin account for 80% of the total consumption of this group of anti-infectives. With the exception of aminoglycosides and sulfonamides which demonstrated a decrease in DID consumption of 47% and 8% respectively, all other groups of anti-infectives had an increase in DID consumption of greater than 25% during the study period. Antibiotic prescribing data is a valuable tool for assessing public health strategies aiming to optimise antibiotic prescribing.

  6. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (td,E) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (t·OH,E) in sunlit surface waters. The td,E values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas t·OH,E ranges from 3.24 h to 33.6 h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. - Highlights: • It is first reported on hydroxyl-radical oxidation of 6 fluoroquinolone antibiotics. • Methods were developed to assess photolysis and oxidation fate in surface waters. • The neutral form reacted faster with hydroxyl radical than protonated forms. • The main oxidation intermediates and transformation pathways were clarified. • The antibacterial activity changes depend on dominant photolysis pathways

  7. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Siyu [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Kai [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Peng, E-mail: pzhang@nmemc.org.cn [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (t{sub d,E}) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (t{sub ·OH,E}) in sunlit surface waters. The t{sub d,E} values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas t{sub ·OH,E} ranges from 3.24 h to 33.6 h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. - Highlights: • It is first reported on hydroxyl-radical oxidation of 6 fluoroquinolone antibiotics. • Methods were developed to assess photolysis and oxidation fate in surface waters. • The neutral form reacted faster with hydroxyl radical than protonated forms. • The main oxidation intermediates and transformation pathways were clarified. • The antibacterial activity changes depend on dominant photolysis pathways.

  8. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP sludge.

  9. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  10. 3 Certain Shell Hospital Inpatient Antibiotic Uses are Analysed%某三甲医院住院病人抗生素利用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟卿

    2002-01-01

    Objective We appraise the application condition of 3 certain shell hospital antibiotics. Methods According to medicine, we use research method. As the 280 certain courtyard regular inpatients of May 2001 use the condition of antibiotic,investigate. With the survey that DDD studies as medicine use, we worth. Is judgement doctor with DUI reasonable use the standard of medicine? Results 185 examples are used antibiotic, take 66.07%. With penicillins, Quinolones and Aminoglycosides use count frequently highest. Before locating in, 5 antibiotics are in proper order. Penicillin G, Clindamycin,Amikacin, Sodium Cefotaxime, and Ciprofloxacin. Conclusions The most antibiotic DUI ≤ 1, whole, the application ofantibiotic is reasonable.

  11. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellat, Mathieu F; Raguž, Luka; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human-pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last-resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled "Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow" triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  12. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  13. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Adult bullfrogs were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 (mu) M gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence of absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest sterocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier times than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the same sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  14. The effect of systemic antibiotics administered during the active phase of non-surgical periodontal therapy or after the healing phase: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretuza FRITOLI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this systematic review was to compare the clinical effectiveness of systemic antibiotics administered in the active stage of periodontal treatment or after the healing phase. Material and Methods An electronic search was performed in the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA statement. A manual search of the reference list of selected studies and of review articles was also performed up to November 2013. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT that evaluated the systemic administration of antibiotics as adjuvants to scaling and root planning (SRP at different phases of periodontal treatment were included. Systematic reviews and studies that evaluated subjects with systemic diseases and those that used subantimicrobial doses of antibiotics were excluded. Results The initial search identified 1,039 articles, of which seven were selected, and only one met the inclusion criteria. This study showed that subjects taking metronidazole and amoxicillin at the initial phase of treatment exhibited statistically significantly greater reduction in pocket depth and gain in clinical attachment level in initially deep sites (PD≥7 mm than subjects taking antibiotics after healing (p<0.05. This comparison was conducted 2 months after antibiotic intake, at the healing phase. Conclusion To date, only one short-term RCT has directly compared different moments of systemic antibiotics administration, as adjuncts to SRP, in the treatment of periodontitis. Although the results of this study suggested some benefits for antibiotics intake during the active phase of therapy, these findings need to be confirmed by larger placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials with longer follow-up periods.

  15. Conjugative DNA transfer induces the bacterial SOS response and promotes antibiotic resistance development through integron activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Baharoglu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Conjugation is one mechanism for intra- and inter-species horizontal gene transfer among bacteria. Conjugative elements have been instrumental in many bacterial species to face the threat of antibiotics, by allowing them to evolve and adapt to these hostile conditions. Conjugative plasmids are transferred to plasmidless recipient cells as single-stranded DNA. We used lacZ and gfp fusions to address whether conjugation induces the SOS response and the integron integrase. The SOS response controls a series of genes responsible for DNA damage repair, which can lead to recombination and mutagenesis. In this manuscript, we show that conjugative transfer of ssDNA induces the bacterial SOS stress response, unless an anti-SOS factor is present to alleviate this response. We also show that integron integrases are up-regulated during this process, resulting in increased cassette rearrangements. Moreover, the data we obtained using broad and narrow host range plasmids strongly suggests that plasmid transfer, even abortive, can trigger chromosomal gene rearrangements and transcriptional switches in the recipient cell. Our results highlight the importance of environments concentrating disparate bacterial communities as reactors for extensive genetic adaptation of bacteria.

  16. Montmorillonite enhanced ciprofloxacin transport in saturated porous media with sorbed ciprofloxacin showing antibiotic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Gao, Bin; Yang, Liu-Yan; Ma, Lena Q.

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotic ciprofloxacin (CIP) is immobile in the subsurface but it has been frequently detected in the aquatic system. Therefore it is important to investigate the factors impacting CIP's mobilization in aquifer. Laboratory columns packed with sand were used to test colloid-facilitated CIP transport by 1) using kaolinite or montmorillonite to mobilize presorbed-CIP in a column or 2) co-transporting with CIP by pre-mixing them before transport. The Langmuir model showed that CIP sorption by montmorillonite (23 g kg- 1) was 100 times more effective than sand or kaolinite. Even with strong CIP complexation ability to Fe/Al coating on sand surface, montmorillonite promoted CIP transport, but not kaolinite. All presorbed-CIP by sand was mobilized by montmorillonite after 3 pore volumes through co-transporting of CIP with montmorillonite. The majority of CIP was fixed onto the montmorillonite interlayer but still showed inhibition of bacteria growth. Our results suggested that montmorillonite with high CIP sorption ability can act as a carrier to enhance CIP's mobility in aquifer.

  17. De novo macrolide–glycolipid macrolactone hybrids: Synthesis, structure and antibiotic activity of carbohydrate-fused macrocycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Desmond

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural product-like macrocycles were designed as potential antibacterial compounds. The macrocycles featured a D-glucose unit fused into a 12- or 13-member macrolactone. The rings are connected via the C6’ and anomeric (C1’ positions of the monosaccharide. The new macrocycles/macrolides were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Their structures showed that, in addition to the ester and alkene units, the dihedral angle about the glycosidic linkage (exo-anomeric effect influenced the overall shape of the molecules. Glycosylation of an available hydroxy group on the macrocycle gave a hybrid macrolide with features common to erythromycin and sophorlipid macrolactone. Weak antibiotic activity (MICs <100 μg/mL was observed for several of the compounds.

  18. Investigation on antibacterial and antioxidant activities, phenolic and flavonoid contents of some thai edible plants as an alternative for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Cho, S; Paik, H D; Choi, C W; Nam, K T; Hwang, S G; Kim, S K

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to examine the antibacterial and antioxidative properties of seven edible plants from Thailand to develop alternative antibiotics as feed additives. The plants include Citrus aurantifolia Swingle (Lime) fruits and its leaves, Sesbania grandiflora L. (Agati sesbania) leaves, Piper sarmentosum Roxb (Wild betal) leaves, Curcuma domestica Valeton (Turmeric) roots, Morinda citrifolia L. (Beach mulberry) leaves, Cassia siamea britt (Siamea cassia) leaves, and Cocos nucifera L. (Coconut) peels. The plants were extracted by methanol, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol and water. Antibacterial activities with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determined by agar diffusion assay against Escherichia coli, Burkholderia sp., Haemopilus somnus, Haemopilus parasuis, and Clostridium perfringens that were considered pathogenic strains in livestock infection. Methanol extracts of C. aurantifolia Swingle fruits and leaves showed the broadest spectrum of antibacterial activities except for C. perfringens. Butanol extract of S. grandiflora L. leaves showed the strongest activity against Burkholderia sp. with MIC, 135 μg/mL. P. sarmentosum Roxb leaves showed antibacterial activities against E. coli, Burkholderia sp. and H. parasuis. Ethyl acetate and water extracts from C. domesitca Valeton roots showed MIC of 306 μg/mL and 183 μg/mL, respectively against only C. perfringens. Antioxidative activity was determined by 2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl photometric assay. The methanol extracts of C. aurantifolia Swingle fruits and P. sarmentosum Roxb leaves showed the highest antioxidant activity among all the extracts with 3.46 mg/mL and 2.70 mg/mL effective concentration 50% (EC50) values, respectively. Total contents of phenolics and flavonoids were measured from the plant extracts. Methanol extracts of S. grandiflora L. and chloroform extracts of C. domestica Valeton were found to have the highest amount of total phenolics, 41.7 and 47.8

  19. Technological characterisation, antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity of wild-type Leuconostoc strains isolated from North Italian traditional cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Stefano; Cremonesi, Paola; Silvetti, Tiziana; Brasca, Milena

    2013-11-01

    Genotypic and technological properties, antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity of 35 Leuconostoc strains, isolated from different Italian raw milk cheeses, were investigated. RAPD-PCR was used to study genetic variability and to distinguish closely related strains. The results showed a high degree of heterogeneity among isolates. All the strains had weak acidifying activity and showed low proteolytic and lipolytic activities. Reduction activity, was generally low. All the Leuconostoc were susceptible to ampicillin, mupirocin, erythromycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin and tetracycline. Many strains were classified as resistant to oxacillin, ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantonin, while all isolates were found resistant to vancomycin. PCR-based detection did not identify any of the common genetic determinants for vancomycin (vanA, vanB, vanC1, vanC2, vanC3, vanD, vanE, vanG) or erythromycin (ermB and ermC). Tetracycline resistance genes were detected in 25 tetracycline susceptible strains, the most frequent one being tetM. One strain, belonging to Ln. pseudomesenteroides species, was positive for the presence of the int gene of the Tn916/Tn1545 trasposon family. This is the first time the conjugative transposon Tn916 has been detected inside the Leuconostoc species. All strains showed antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis and Ent. faecium. The presence of genes encoding amino-acid decarboxylases (hdc and tdc) was not detected. Some strains are interesting in view of their use in cheese production as starter and non starter cultures. PMID:24067095

  20. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  1. Chaperonins fight aminoglycoside-induced protein misfolding and promote short-term tolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Good, Liam; Bentin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    survival, whereas inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria. Overexpression of the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE chaperone system similarly facilitated survival but did not promote growth of aminoglycoside-treated bacteria. Inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria to aminoglycosides as...

  2. EF-Tu from the enacyloxin producing Frateuria W-315 strain: Structure/activity relationship and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Malosse, Christian; Hountondji, Codjo

    2016-08-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated that the poly(U)-dependent poly(Phe) synthesis activity of elongator factor Tu (EF-Tu) from the enacyloxin producing strain Frateuria sp. W-315 is inhibited by the antibiotic similarly to that of Escherichia coli EF-Tu. The inhibitory effect of enacyloxin observed in a purified system was the same as that obtained with an S30 extract from E. coli or Frateuria sp. W-315, respectively, suggesting that antibiotic resistance of enacyloxin producing Frateuria sp. W-315 is not due neither to EF-Tu nor to other components of the translation machinery but to a still unknown mechanism. The EF-Tu gene, as PCR amplified from Frateuria W-315 genomic DNA and sequenced represented an ORF of 1191 nucleotides corresponding to 396 amino acids. This protein is larger than the product of tufA from E. coli by only two amino acid residues. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of EF-Tu from E. coli with those of Frateuria and Ralstonia solanacearum indicates on average 80% identical amino acid residues and 9.7% conservative replacements between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli, on one hand, and 97% identity and 1.7% conservative replacement between EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu Ralstonia solanacearum, on the other hand. These strong primary structure similarities between EF-Tu from different origins are consistent with the fact that this factor is essential for the translation process in all kingdoms of life. Comparison of the effects of antibiotics on EF-Tu Frateuria and EF-Tu E. coli revealed that enacyloxin, kirromycin and pulvomycin exert a stronger stimulation of the GDP dissociation rate on EF-Tu Frateuria, while the effects of the antibiotics on the GDP association rate were comparable for the two EF-Tu species. Different mutants of EF-Tu E. coli were constructed with the help of site directed mutagenesis by changing one or several residues of EF-Tu E. coli by the corresponding residues of EF-Tu Frateuria. The single A45K substitution did

  3. [Analysis of antibiotic usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balpataki, R; Balogh, J; Zelkó, R; Vincze, Z

    2001-01-01

    Economic analysis is founded on the assumption that resources are limited and that should be used in a way that maximizes the benefits gained. Pharmacoeconomics extends these assumptions to drug treatment. Therefore, a full pharmacoeconomic analysis must consider two or more alternative treatments and should be founded on measurement of incremental cost, incremental efficacy, and the value of successful outcome. Antibiotic policy based only on administrative restrictions is failed, instead of it disease formularies and infectologist consultation system are needed. Equally important are various programmes that encourage the cost-conscious use of the antibiotics chosen. Some of the methods evaluated in the literature include: streamlining from combination therapy to a single agent, early switching from parenteral to oral therapy, initiating treatment with oral agents, administering parenteral antibiotic at home from outset of therapy, and antibiotic streamlining programmes that are partnered with infectious disease physicians. The solution is the rational and adequate use of antibiotics, based on the modern theory and practice of antibiotic policy and infection control, that cannot be carried out without the activities of experts in this field. PMID:11769090

  4. Phenotypic Resistance to Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of antibiotic resistance is usually associated with genetic changes, either to the acquisition of resistance genes, or to mutations in elements relevant for the activity of the antibiotic. However, in some situations resistance can be achieved without any genetic alteration; this is called phenotypic resistance. Non-inherited resistance is associated to specific processes such as growth in biofilms, a stationary growth phase or persistence. These situations might occur during infection but they are not usually considered in classical susceptibility tests at the clinical microbiology laboratories. Recent work has also shown that the susceptibility to antibiotics is highly dependent on the bacterial metabolism and that global metabolic regulators can modulate this phenotype. This modulation includes situations in which bacteria can be more resistant or more susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding these processes will thus help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches based on the actual susceptibility shown by bacteria during infection, which might differ from that determined in the laboratory. In this review, we discuss different examples of phenotypic resistance and the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk between bacterial metabolism and the susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, information on strategies currently under development for diminishing the phenotypic resistance to antibiotics of bacterial pathogens is presented.

  5. Aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for molecular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, Bhavani; Godeshala, Sudhakar; Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Christensen, Matthew D; Tian, Yanqing; Rege, Kaushal

    2016-10-01

    The development of effective drug carriers can lead to improved outcomes in a variety of disease conditions. Aminoglycosides have been used as antibacterial therapeutics, and are attractive as monomers for the development of polymeric materials in various applications. Here, we describe the development of novel aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for drug delivery, with an eye towards ablation of cancer cells. The aminoglycoside paromomycin was first cross-linked with resorcinol diglycidyl ether leading to the formation of a poly (amino ether), PAE. PAE molecules were further derivatized with methoxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) or mPEG resulting in the formation of mPEG-PAE polymer, which self-assembled to form nanoparticles. Formation of the mPEG-PAE amphiphile was characterized using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and FTIR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the polymer into nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyses, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the pyrene fluorescence assay. mPEG-PAE nanoparticles were able to carry significant amounts of doxorubicin (DOX), presumably by means of hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the core. Cell-based studies indicated that mPEG-PAE nanoparticles, loaded with doxorubicin, were able to induce significant loss in viabilities of PC3 human prostate cancer, MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer, and MB49 murine bladder cancer cells; empty nanoparticles resulted in negligible losses of cell viability under the conditions investigated. Taken together, our results indicate that the mPEG-PAE nanoparticle platform is attractive for drug delivery in different applications, including cancer. PMID:27472455

  6. New insights into membrane-active action in plasma membrane of fungal hyphae by the lipopeptide antibiotic bacillomycin L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao; Dong, Chunjuan; Shang, Qingmao; Han, Yuzhu; Li, Pinglan

    2013-09-01

    Bacillomycin L, a natural iturinic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, is characterized by strong antifungal activities against a variety of agronomically important filamentous fungi including Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. Prior to this study, the role of membrane permeabilization in the antimicrobial activity of bacillomycin L against plant pathogenic fungi had not been investigated. To shed light on the mechanism of this antifungal activity, the permeabilization of R. solani hyphae by bacillomycin L was investigated and compared with that by amphotericin B, a polyene antibiotic which is thought to act primarily through membrane disruption. Our results derived from electron microscopy, various fluorescent techniques and gel retardation experiments revealed that the antifungal activity of bacillomycin L may be not solely a consequence of fungal membrane permeabilization, but related to the interaction of it with intracellular targets. Our findings provide more insights into the mode of action of bacillomycin L and other iturins, which could in turn help to develop new or improved antifungal formulations or result in novel strategies to prevent fungal spoilage. PMID:23756779

  7. Spectrophotometric Determination of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Based on their Oxidation by Potassium Permanganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid, simple and sensitive validated spectrophotometric methods have been described for the assay of neomycin and streptomycin either in pure form or in pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods were based on the oxidation of the studied drugs by a known excess of potassium permanganate in acidic medium and estimating the unreacted permanganate with amaranth dye (method A), acid orange II (method B), indigocarmine (method C), and methylene blue (method D), in the same acid medium at a suitable λmax=521, 485, 610 and 664 nm, respectively. Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration range of 5-10 and 2-7 mg mL-1 for neomycin and streptomycin, respectively. The apparent molar absorptivity and sandell sensitivity values are in the range 5.47-6.20x104, 2.35-2.91x105 L mol-1 cm-1 and 7.57-8.59, 5.01-6.2 ng cm-2 for neomycin and streptomycin, respectively. Different variables affecting the reaction were studied and optimized. The proposed methods were applied successfully to the determination of the examined drugs either in a pure or pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. No interferences were observed from excipients and the results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained using the official methods

  8. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources of...... antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I...... to rationally design drug combinations that limit the evolution of antibiotic resistance due to counteracting evolutionary trajectories. My results highlight that an in-depth knowledge about the genetic responses to the individual antimicrobial compounds enables the prediction of responses to drug...

  9. Postantibiotic effect assessments for antibiotics exhibiting a wide range of bactericidal activities by using a modified total-cell-counting method.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, R. C.; S.W. Lee

    1997-01-01

    We recently described a total-cell-counting method for postantibiotic effect (PAE) assessments that performs well with weakly bactericidal antibiotics. This note presents a modified method for the study of PAE with extended capability to cover a broad range of bactericidal activities.

  10. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Aqueous Extracts of Onion and some Antibiotics on a Number of Important Bacteria in Terms of Food Hygiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzabi Younes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of edible onion plant and a number of common antibiotics in the case of some important bacteria regarding food hygiene. Materials and Methods: The sensitivity or resistance of standard strains of 9 important species of transmissible pathogenic bacteria, through food in laboratory Mueller Hinton agar medium and using blank paper discs containing onion extract, 9 standard synthetic chemicals, and antibiotics by agar disk diffusion method (disk diffusion agar, were investigated. Results: The findings of this study showed that, of the 9 species of bacteria tested, the aqueous extract of onion only has relatively small antibacterial activity on the 2 species of Staphylococcus aureus and clostridium perfringens. Statistical analysis of the results also indicated that there was no significant relationship among the different antibiotics used and the edible onion aqueous extract, and the resistance or susceptibility of isolates. Moreover, there was a difference between different antibiotics tested in this study and aqueous extract of onion, regarding the number of resistant bacteria, and intermediate and moderate susceptibility, and susceptibility to the antibacterial compounds. Conclusion: It seems that the aqueous extract of onions cannot be used as an alternative to commonly used antibiotics to fight important bacteria in terms food hygiene.

  11. Structure-activity relationships in aminosterol antibiotics: the effect of stereochemistry at the 7-OH group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Tsemre-Dingel; Gassler, Frank; Shu, Youheng; Jones, Stephen; Selinsky, Barry S

    2013-06-01

    Squalamine and three aminosterol analogs have been shown to inhibit bacterial cell growth and induce lysis of large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles. The analogs differ in the identity of the polyamine attached at C3 of the sterol, and the stereochemistry of a hydroxyl substituent at C7. Analogs with a tetraammonium spermine polyamine are somewhat more active than analogs with a shorter trisammonium spermidine polyamine, and analogs with an axial (α) hydroxyl substituent at C7 are more active than analogs with the corresponding equatorial (β) hydroxyl group. There is some variability noted; the 7β-OH spermine analog is the most active compound against Escherichia coli, but the least effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lytic activity correlates well with antimicrobial activity of the compounds, but the lytic activity varies with the phospholipid composition of the vesicles. PMID:23618624

  12. Ozonation of Cephalexin Antibiotic Using Granular Activated Carbon in a Circulating Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circulating reactor was used to decompose cephalexin during catalytic ozonation. The effect of ozone supply and granular activated carbon (GAC) catalyst was investigated for removal of CEX and COD. The regeneration of exhausted activated carbon was investigated during in-situ ozonation. According to results, ozone supply appeared as the most influencing variable followed by dosage of granular activated carbon. The BET surface area, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) curves indicated that solid phase regeneration of activated carbon using ozone gas followed by mild thermal decomposition was very effective. The adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbon was slightly lower than virgin activated carbon. The overall study revealed that catalytic ozonation was effective in removing cephalexin from solution and the method can be applied for in-situ ozonation processes. (author)

  13. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui; Zhang, Siyu; Li, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (td,E) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (tOH,E) in sunlit surface waters. The td,E values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas tOH,E ranges from 3.24h to 33.6h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. PMID:25956144

  14. Investigations into the in vitro antimicrobial activity and mode of action of the phenazine antibiotic D-alanylgriseoluteic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddens, Stephen R; Bean, David C

    2007-01-01

    D-Alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA) is a potent antimicrobial phenazine compound produced by Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola) Eh1087. Susceptibility tests against a range of microbes indicated that AGA had a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and was particularly active against Gram-positive pathogens. Comparison of the in vitro efficacy of AGA with eight other antibiotics against 119 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae demonstrated that all were inhibited by low concentrations of AGA (minimal inhibitory concentration range activity suggest that AGA may warrant further investigation. PMID:17189100

  15. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of some heterocyclic chalcone analogues alone and in combination with antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh-Dao; Nguyen, Thi-Thao-Nhu; Do, Tuong-Ha; Huynh, Thi-Ngoc-Phuong; Tran, Cat-Dong; Thai, Khac-Minh

    2012-01-01

    A series of simple heterocyclic chalcone analogues have been synthesized by Claisen Schmidt condensation reactions between substituted benzaldehydes and heteroaryl methyl ketones and evaluated for their antibacterial activity. The structures of the synthesized chalcones were established by IR and ¹H-NMR analysis. The biological data shows that compounds p₅, f₆ and t₅ had strong activities against both susceptible and resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, but not activity against a vancomycin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a human sample. The structure and activity relationships confirmed that compounds f₅, f₆ and t₅ are potential candidates for future drug discovery and development. PMID:22728362

  16. Antibacterial activity of liposomal gentamicin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a time-kill study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukholm, Gavin; Mugabe, Clement; Azghani, Ali O; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common and lethal genetic disorder with a carrier frequency of 1 in 29 Caucasians. Chronic respiratory infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals with CF. Aminoglycoside antibiotics, including gentamicin, are highly effective against P. aeruginosa, but severe toxicity limits their use. One potential strategy for avoiding this problem is to encapsulate aminoglycosides in liposomes. In this study, we compared the bactericidal capacity of liposome-encapsulated gentamicin with that of free antibiotic against clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Liposome size, encapsulation efficiency and minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the free and liposomal gentamicin against gentamicin-sensitive and -resistant strains of P. aeruginosa were determined. In vitro time-kill studies were performed using free and liposomal gentamicin at 1, 2 or 4 times the MICs. The average liposomal size was 426.25 +/- 13.56 nm, with a gentamicin encapsulation efficiency of 4.51 +/- 0.54%. The MICs for liposomal gentamicin were significantly lower than those of corresponding free gentamicin. In addition, the time-kill values for liposomal gentamicin were either equivalent to or better than those of the free antibiotic. In conclusion, our liposomal gentamicin formulation is a more potent antipseudomonal drug with an improved killing time and prolonged antimicrobial activity. PMID:16472992

  17. THE STUDY OF ANTIBIOTIC- AND FAGOSENSITIVITY OF NOSOCOMIAL STRAINS BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM TRANSPLANTED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Gabrielan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic and fagosensitivity most etiologically important nosocomial strains of bacteria – Pseudomonas aeru- ginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp. were studied. Multiple drug-resistant bacteria as gram-positive and gram-negative, isolated from 8 substrates, had been demonstrated. With regard to the sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa >40% was observed in 40–50% of the strains to aminoglycosides – aztreonam, amikacin, netilmicin, and only 23–25% of the strains – to gentamicin and levofloxacin (an average of antibiotic susceptibility was 27%. All strains of ESBL Klebsiella drew up and were sensitive only to imipenem, meropenem and aminoglycosides. Specific phages lysed 43–48% of the strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Pro- teus spp., multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp. It is proposed to introduce the use of phages in clinical practice. 

  18. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of a diverse set of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and the presence of 38 plasmids among all the isolates were determined. Among the novel plasmids found, there were eight that encoded resistance genes to antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosp...

  19. Enhanced simultaneous PEC eradication of bacteria and antibiotics by facilely fabricated high-activity {001} facets TiO2 mounted onto TiO2 nanotubular photoanode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiying; Nie, Xin; Chen, Jiangyao; Wong, Po Keung; An, Taicheng; Yamashita, Hiromi; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-09-15

    Biohazards and coexisted antibiotics are two groups of emerging contaminants presented in various aquatic environments. They can pose serious threat to the ecosystem and human health. As a result, inactivation of biohazards, degradation of antibiotics, and simultaneous removal of them are highly desired. In this work, a novel photoanode with a hierarchical structured {001} facets exposed nano-size single crystals (NSC) TiO2 top layer and a perpendicularly aligned TiO2 nanotube array (NTA) bottom layer (NSC/NTA) was successfully fabricated. The morphology and facets of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles covered on the top of NTA layer could be controlled by adjusting precalcination temperature and heating rate as the pure NTA was clamped with glasses. Appropriate recalcination can timely remove surface F from {001} facets, and the photocatalytic activity of the resultant photoanode was subsequently activated. NSC/NTA photoanode fabricated under 500 °C precalcination with 20 °C min(-1) followed by 550 °C recalcination possessed highest photoelectrocatalytic efficiency to simultaneously remove bacteria and antibiotics. Results suggest that two-step calcination is necessary for fabrication of high photocatalytic activity NSC/NTA photoanode. The capability of simultaneous eradication of bacteria and antibiotics shows great potential for development of a versatile approach to effectively purify various wastewaters contaminated with complex pollutants. PMID:27314556

  20. Antifilarial and Antibiotic Activities of Methanolic Extracts of Melaleuca cajuputi Flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abd, Nazeh M; Nor, Zurainee Mohamed; Mansor, Marzida; Hasan, M S; Kassim, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the activity of methanolic extracts of Melaleuca cajuputi flowers against the filarial worm Brugia pahangi and its bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia. Anti-Wolbachia activity was measured in worms and in Aedes albopictus Aa23 cells by PCR, electron microscopy, and other biological assays. In particular, microfilarial release, worm motility, and viability were determined. M. cajuputi flower extracts were found to significantly reduce Wolbachia endosymbionts in Aa23 cells, Wolbachia surface protein, and microfilarial release, as well as the viability and motility of adult worms. Anti-Wolbachia activity was further confirmed by observation of degraded and phagocytized Wolbachia in worms treated with the flower extracts. The data provided in vitro and in vivo evidence that M. cajuputi flower extracts inhibit Wolbachia, an activity that may be exploited as an alternative strategy to treat human lymphatic filariasis. PMID:27417081

  1. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Some Heterocyclic Chalcone Analogues Alone and in Combination with Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuong-Ha Do

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of simple heterocyclic chalcone analogues have been synthesized by Claisen Schmidt condensation reactions between substituted benzaldehydes and heteroaryl methyl ketones and evaluated for their antibacterial activity. The structures of the synthesized chalcones were established by IR and 1H-NMR analysis. The biological data shows that compounds p5, f6 and t5 had strong activities against both susceptible and resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, but not activity against a vancomycin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a human sample. The structure and activity relationships confirmed that compounds f5, f6 and t5 are potential candidates for future drug discovery and development.

  2. Antagonistic Activities of Purple Non-sulfur Bacterial Extracts Against Antibiotic Resistant Vibrio sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Ashok Kumar, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    Solvent extracts of native purple non-sulfur bacterial (PNSB) isolates from the effluents of brackish shrimp culture ponds, near Nagapattinam coast (South India) were evaluated for antibacterial activity by the disc diffusion method. Best results were shown by the chloroform extracts against oxytetracycline resistant Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischerii. Among the purple non-sulfur bacterial isolates, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, showed maximum antagonistic activity. The findings suggest that the...

  3. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  4. [Quorum sensing systems of regulation, synthesis of phenazine antibiotics, and antifungal (corrected) activity in rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, M a; Klein, Sh; Bass, I A; Lipasova, V A; Metlitskaia, A Z; Ovadis, M I; Chernin, L S; Khmel', I A

    2008-12-01

    Strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, an antagonist of a broad spectrum of phytopathogenic microorganisms isolated from the maize rhizosphere, was shown to produce three phenazine antibiotics: phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), 2-hydroxylphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA), and 2-hydroxylphenazine (2-OH-PHZ). Two Quorum Sensing (QS) systems of regulation were identified: PhzIR and CsaI/R. Genes phzI and csaI were cloned and sequenced. Cells of strain 449 synthesize at least three types of AHL: N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-AHL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-AHL), and N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (30C6-AHL). Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of strain 449 deficient in synthesis of phenazines, which carried inactivated phzA and phzB genes of the phenazine operon and gene phzO. Mutations phzA- and phzB-caused a drastic reduction in the antagonistic activity of bacteria toward phytopathogenic fungi. Both mutants lost the ability to protect cucumber and leguminous plants against phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These results suggest a significant role of phenazines in the antagonistic activity of P. chlororaphis 449. PMID:19178080

  5. Specific antibiotics and nematode trophic groups agree in assessing fungal:bacterial activity in agricultural soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S; Dam, M; Vestergaard, M;

    2012-01-01

    -induced respiration (SIR) inhibition approach. Here we compare fungal contribution to the microbial active biomass assessed by the SIR inhibition method with the contribution of fungal-feeding nematodes to the microbial-feeding nematode community. Four cultivation systems on the same soil that differ in carbon inputs...... with a factor two ranked exactly the same with the two methods. A conventionally farmed rotation with low organic input had the lowest fungal fraction, while three organically farmed soils ranked higher.......There are no methods at hand with a long and proven record for assessing the relative contribution of fungi and bacteria to decomposer activity in soil. Whereas a multitude of methods to determine fungal and bacterial biomass are available, activity assays traditionally relied on the substrate...

  6. Influence of First-Line Antibiotics on the Antibacterial Activities of Acetone Stem Bark Extract of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. against Drug-Resistant Bacterial Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmiso O. Olajuyigbe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of the acetone extract of A. mearnsii and its interactions with antibiotics against some resistant bacterial strains. Methods. The antibacterial susceptibility testing was determined by agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while the checkerboard method was used for the determination of synergy between the antibiotics and the extract. Results. The results showed that the susceptibility of the different bacterial isolates was concentration dependent for the extract and the different antibiotics. With the exception of S. marcescens, the inhibition zones of the extract produced by 20 mg/mL ranged between 18 and 32 mm. While metronidazole did not inhibit any of the bacterial isolates, all the antibiotics and their combinations, except for ciprofloxacin and its combination, did not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The antibacterial combinations were more of being antagonistic than of being synergistic in the agar diffusion assay. From the macrobroth dilution, the extract and the antibiotics exerted a varied degree of inhibitory effect on the test organisms. The MIC values of the acetone extract which are in mg/mL are lower than those of the different antibiotics which are in μg/mL. From the checkerboard assay, the antibacterial combinations showed varied degrees of interactions including synergism, additive, indifference, and antagonism interactions. While antagonistic and additive interactions were 14.44%, indifference interaction was 22.22% and synergistic interaction was 37.78% of the antibacterial combinations against the test isolates. While the additivity/indifference interactions indicated no interactions, the antagonistic interaction may be considered as a negative interaction that could result in toxicity and suboptimal bioactivity. Conclusion. The synergistic effects of the herbal-drug combinations may be harnessed for the discovery and development of more

  7. Ecological antibiotic policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høiby, N

    2000-09-01

    Development of resistance to antibiotics is a major problem worldwide. The normal oropharyngeal flora, the intestinal flora and the skin flora play important roles in this development. Within a few days after the onset of antibiotic therapy, resistant Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus epidermidis can be detected in the normal flora of volunteers or patients. Horizontal spread of the resistance genes to other species, e.g. Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs by conjugation or transformation. An ecologically sound antibiotic policy favours the use of antibiotics with little or no impact on the normal flora. Prodrug antibiotics which are not active against the bacteria in the mouth and the intestine (before absorption) and which are not excreted to a significant degree via the intestine, saliva or skin are therefore preferred. Prodrugs such as pivampicillin, bacampicillin, pivmecillinam and cefuroxime axetil are favourable from an ecological point of view. Experience from Scandinavia supports this, since resistance to mecillinam after 20 years of use is low (about 5%) and stable. PMID:11051626

  8. Involvement of aph(3‘-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eWoegerbauer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination.We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3’-IIa (nptII gene. APH(3’-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria.The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in 3 datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program, RDP4, and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection, GARD.From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99% - 100% sequence identity with aph(3’-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3’-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3’-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants.

  9. Involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3′)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3′)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3′)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3′)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  10. PCR-based site-specific mutagenesis of peptide antibiotics FALL-39 and its biologic activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-xia YANG; Yun FENG; Bo-yao WANG; Qi WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct PGEX-1λT-FALL-39 expression vector and its mutant vector, and study the relationship of function and structure. METHODS: A cDNA encoding mature FALL-39 was cloned from SPCA- 1 cell mRNA and the prokaryotic expression vector PGEX- 1λT-FALL-39 was constructed. Two kinds of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the site-direction mutagenesis were used to construct FALL-39 mutant expression vector, FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys-24. Minimal effective concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and minimal bactericidal concentration were used to assay the antibacterial activities of these peptides. Effects of different solution on the antibacterial activity of FALL-39 and FALL-39-Lys-32 were observed by CFU determination. The hemolytic effects of these peptides were also examined on human red blood cells. RESULTS: Two site-specific mutants FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were obtained by PCR-induced mutagenesis. In comparison with two-step PCR which required two pairs of primers, one step PCR which required one pair of primers is a simple and efficient method for the PCR based site-specific mutagenesis. Using the prokaryotic expression system, the E coli-based products of recombinant FALL39 and its mutant peptides were also obtained. The antibacterial assay showed that FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were more potential in the antibacterial activity against E coli ML35p and Pseltdomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 than that of FALL-39, and no increase in hemolysis was observed at the antibacterial concentrations. The antibacterial activity of FALL-39-Lys-32 against E coli was more potent than that of FALL-39 in NaCl-containing LB medium, while its activity was almost the same as FALL-39 in SO2-4 containing Medium E. CONCLUSION: PCR-based mutagensis is a useful model system for studying the structure and function relationship of antimicrobial peptides. Keeping α-helical conformation of FALL-39 and increasing net positive charge can increase the

  11. Antimicrobial activity of biopolymer–antibiotic thin films fabricated by advanced pulsed laser methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on thin film deposition by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of two polymer–drug composite thin film systems. A pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used to deposit composite thin films of poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) containing several gentamicin concentrations. FTIR spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical structures similar to those of drop cast materials. Scanning electron microscopy data indicated that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films of good morphological quality. The activity of PDLLA–gentamicin composite thin films against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was demonstrated using drop testing. The influence of drug concentration on microbial viability was also assessed. Our studies indicate that polymer–drug composite thin films prepared by MAPLE may be used to impart antimicrobial activity to implants, medical devices, and other contact surfaces.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of biopolymer–antibiotic thin films fabricated by advanced pulsed laser methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G.; Miroiu, F.M.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Gittard, S.D.; Miller, P.R.; Narayan, R.J. [Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7575 (United States); Enculescu, M. [National Institute for Materials Physics, PO Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [Tulane University, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We report on thin film deposition by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of two polymer–drug composite thin film systems. A pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used to deposit composite thin films of poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) containing several gentamicin concentrations. FTIR spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical structures similar to those of drop cast materials. Scanning electron microscopy data indicated that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films of good morphological quality. The activity of PDLLA–gentamicin composite thin films against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was demonstrated using drop testing. The influence of drug concentration on microbial viability was also assessed. Our studies indicate that polymer–drug composite thin films prepared by MAPLE may be used to impart antimicrobial activity to implants, medical devices, and other contact surfaces.

  13. Multiple Roles of Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxins: Pathogenicity, Superantigenic Activity, and Correlation to Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Gálvez; Hikmate Abriouel; Rosario Lucas; Elena Ortega

    2010-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxins are the most notable virulence factors associated with Staphylococcus aureus, a common pathogen associated with serious community and hospital acquired diseases. Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) cause toxic shock-like syndromes and have been implicated in food poisoning. But SEs also act as superantigens that stimulate T-cell proliferation, and a high correlation between these activities has been detected. Most of the nosocomial S. aureus infections are caused by met...

  14. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Some Heterocyclic Chalcone Analogues Alone and in Combination with Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Tuong-Ha Do; Thi-Ngoc-Phuong Huynh; Khac-Minh Thai; Cat-Dong Tran; Thanh-Dao Tran; Thi-Thao-Nhu Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    A series of simple heterocyclic chalcone analogues have been synthesized by Claisen Schmidt condensation reactions between substituted benzaldehydes and heteroaryl methyl ketones and evaluated for their antibacterial activity. The structures of the synthesized chalcones were established by IR and 1H-NMR analysis. The biological data shows that compounds p5, f6 and <...

  15. On the Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotics Mixed with Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Shantrokha AN; Burygin GL; Khlebtsov BN; Dykman LA; Bogatyrev VA; Khlebtsov NG

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The bacterial action of gentamicin and that of a mixture of gentamicin and 15-nm colloidal-gold particles onEscherichia coliK12 was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units, and turbidimetry. Addition of gentamicin to colloidal gold changed the gold color and extinction spectrum. Within the experimental errors, there were no significant differences in antibacterial activity between pure gentamicin and its mixture with gold nanoparticles (NPs). A...

  16. Deciphering the details of RNA aminoglycoside interactions: from atomistic models to biotechnological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgu, Muslum [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study was done of the neomycin-B RNA aptamer for determining its selectivity and binding ability to both neomycin– and kanamycin-class aminoglycosides. A novel method to increase drug concentrations in cells for more efficiently killing is described. To test the method, a bacterial model system was adopted and several small RNA molecules interacting with aminoglycosides were cloned downstream of T7 RNA polymerase promoter in an expression vector. Then, the growth analysis of E. coli expressing aptamers was observed for 12-hour period. Our analysis indicated that aptamers helped to increase the intracellular concentration of aminoglycosides thereby increasing their efficacy.

  17. Cp*Rh-based indicator-displacement assays for the identification of amino sugars and aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaubitzer, Friederike; Buryak, Andrey; Severin, Kay

    2006-05-01

    Indicator-displacement assays based on the organometallic complex [{Cp*RhCl2}2] (Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) and the dye gallocyanine were used to sense amino sugars and aminoglycosides in buffered aqueous solution by conducting UV-visible spectroscopy. The data of three assays at pH 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 were sufficient to distinguish between the amino sugars galactosamine, glucosamine, mannosamine and the aminoglycosides kanamycin A, kanamycin B, amikacin, apramycin, paromomycin, and streptomycin. Furthermore, the assays were used to characterize mixtures of aminoglycosides and obtain quantitative information about the respective analytes. PMID:16521137

  18. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of tigecycline, a glycylcycline antibiotic, in combination with chloroquine

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Rajnish; Walker, Larry A.; Tekwani, Babu L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several antibiotics have shown promising anti-malarial effects and have been useful for malarial chemotherapy, particularly in combination with standard anti-malarial drugs. Tigecycline, a semi-synthetic derivative of minocycline with a unique and novel mechanism of action, is the first clinically available drug in a new class of glycylcycline antibiotics. Methods Tigecycline was tested in vitro against chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive (D6) and resistant strains (W2) of Plasmodium falcip...

  19. Antibiotics for prophylaxis of Plasmodium falciparum infections : in vitro activity of doxycycline against Senegalese isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Pradines, B; Spiegel, A.; Rogier, C; Tall, A; Mosnier, J.; Fusai, T.; Trape, Jean-François; Parzy, D

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro acivities of doxycycline, chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, artemether, pyrimethamine, and cycloguanil were evaluated against #Plasmodium falciparum$ isolates from Senegal (Dielmo and Ndiop), using an isotopic, micro, drug susceptibility test. The 71 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for doxycycline ranged from 0.7 to 108.0 microMol and the geometric mean IC50 for the 71 isolates was 11.3 microMol (95% confidence interval = 9.5-13.4 microM). The activity of doxycycline ...

  20. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts and phytochemicals on antibiotic-resistant bacteria Atividade de extratos vegetais e fitofármacos sobre bactérias resistentes a antibióticos

    OpenAIRE

    Gislene G. F. Nascimento; Juliana Locatelli; Paulo C. Freitas; Giuliana L. Silva

    2000-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of plant extracts and phytochemicals was evaluated with antibiotic susceptible and resistant microorganisms. In addition, the possible synergistic effects when associated with antibiotics were studied. Extracts from the following plants were utilized: Achillea millifolium (yarrow), Caryophyllus aromaticus (clove), Melissa offficinalis (lemon-balm), Ocimun basilucum (basil), Psidium guajava (guava), Punica granatum (pomegranate), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), Sa...

  1. Characterization of a C3 Deoxygenation Pathway Reveals a Key Branch Point in Aminoglycoside Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Meinan; Ji, Xinjian; Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Chen; Su, Li; Ding, Wei; Deng, Zixin; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-25

    Apramycin is a clinically interesting aminoglycoside antibiotic (AGA) containing a highly unique bicyclic octose moiety, and this octose is deoxygenated at the C3 position. Although the biosynthetic pathways for most 2-deoxystreptamine-containing AGAs have been well characterized, the pathway for apramycin biosynthesis, including the C3 deoxygenation process, has long remained unknown. Here we report detailed investigation of apramycin biosynthesis by a series of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatical studies. We show that AprD4 is a novel radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme, which uses a noncanonical CX3CX3C motif for binding of a [4Fe-4S] cluster and catalyzes the dehydration of paromamine, a pseudodisaccharide intermediate in apramycin biosynthesis. We also show that AprD3 is an NADPH-dependent reductase that catalyzes the reduction of the dehydrated product from AprD4-catalyzed reaction to generate lividamine, a C3' deoxygenated product of paromamine. AprD4 and AprD3 do not form a tight catalytic complex, as shown by protein complex immunoprecipitation and other assays. The AprD4/AprD3 enzyme system acts on different pseudodisaccharide substrates but does not catalyze the deoxygenation of oxyapramycin, an apramycin analogue containing a C3 hydroxyl group on the octose moiety, suggesting that oxyapramycin and apramycin are partitioned into two parallel pathways at an early biosynthetic stage. Functional dissection of the C6 dehydrogenase AprQ shows the crosstalk between different AGA biosynthetic gene clusters from the apramycin producer Streptomyces tenebrarius, and reveals the remarkable catalytic versatility of AprQ. Our study highlights the intriguing chemistry in apramycin biosynthesis and nature's ingenuity in combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products. PMID:27120352

  2. Squalamine: an aminosterol antibiotic from the shark.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, K.S.; Wehrli, S; Roder, H; Rogers, M.; Forrest, J N; McCrimmon, D; Zasloff, M.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, a variety of low molecular weight antibiotics have been isolated from diverse animal species. These agents, which include peptides, lipids, and alkaloids, exhibit antibiotic activity against environmental microbes and are thought to play a role in innate immunity. We report here the discovery of a broad-spectrum steroidal antibiotic isolated from tissues of the dogfish shark Squalus acanthias. This water-soluble antibiotic, which we have named squalamine, exhibits potent bact...

  3. Occurrence of Antibiotics and Emerging Contaminants in Dairy Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, N.; Harter, T.; Bergamaschi, B.

    2007-12-01

    Intense animal husbandry is of growing concern as a potential contamination source of a variety of emerging contaminants including pathogens, naturally occurring and synthetic steroid hormones, and various pharmaceuticals, particularly antibiotics. For example, more than twenty million pounds of antibiotics are sold for use in animal husbandry with 95% going towards therapeutic use. Here, we focus on the application and potential environmental occurrence of pharmaceuticals and disinfectants on dairies. Recommended drug applications are available from national databases. Statistical data on actual usage, however, are not available. We complement national data with interviews and dairy visits for further evaluation of drug and chemical usage (not including pesticides used on crops and fertilizer) and an overall assessment of the potential antibiotics output in dairy waste. We find that aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, and coccidiostats make up much of the total mass of antibiotics used. On dairies using the ionophoric antibiotic monensin as feed additive, monensin makes up a large fraction of the total antibiotics use (by mass). Other chemicals of potential concern include disinfectants used to prevent mastitis, detergents used in the milking parlor, footbath reagents to prevent and treat lameness, and insecticides used to control flies and mites.

  4. Enhancement of the antibiotic activity of erythromycin by volatile compounds of Lippia alba (Mill. N.E. Brown against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenicy N.H. Veras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lippia alba (Mill. N.E. Brown, popularly known as "erva-cidreira," is commonly found in northeastern Brazil. The leaves tea is used to treat digestive disturbances, nausea, cough, and bronchitis. Objective: This work reports the chemical composition and erythromycin-modifying activity by gaseous contact against Staphylococcus aureus. Materials and Methods: The leaves of L. alba were subjected to hydrodistillation, and the essential oil extracted was examined with respect to the chemical composition, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and the essential oil extracted was evaluated for antibacterial and antibiotic-modifying activity by gaseous contact. Results: The overall yield of essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation was 0.52%. The GC-MS analysis has led to the identification of the main components: geranial (31.4% and neral (29.5%. It was verified that the essential oil interfered with erythromycin antibiotic activity against S. aureus ATCC 25923 was enhanced (221.4% in the presence of 12% essential oil. The 3% essential oil increased the effect against S. aureus ATCC 25923 (41.6% and S. aureus ATCC 6538 (58.3%. Conclusion: The essential oil of L. alba influences the activity of erythromycin and may be used as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy against respiratory tract bacterial pathogens.

  5. Structure of the Antibiotic Resistance Factor Spectinomycin Phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, D.; Lemke, C; Huang, J; Xiong, B; Berghuis, A

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) constitute a diverse group of enzymes that are often the underlying cause of aminoglycoside resistance in the clinical setting. Several APHs have been extensively characterized, including the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of two APH(3{prime}) isozymes and an APH(2{double_prime}) enzyme. Although many APHs are plasmid-encoded and are capable of inactivating numerous 2-deoxystreptmaine aminoglycosides with multiple regiospecificity, APH(9)-Ia, isolated from Legionella pneumophila, is an unusual enzyme among the APH family for its chromosomal origin and its specificity for a single non-2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside substrate, spectinomycin. We describe here the crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia in its apo form, its binary complex with the nucleotide, AMP, and its ternary complex bound with ADP and spectinomycin. The structures reveal that APH(9)-Ia adopts the bilobal protein kinase-fold, analogous to the APH(3{prime}) and APH(2{double_prime}) enzymes. However, APH(9)-Ia differs significantly from the other two types of APH enzymes in its substrate binding area and that it undergoes a conformation change upon ligand binding. Moreover, kinetic assay experiments indicate that APH(9)-Ia has stringent substrate specificity as it is unable to phosphorylate substrates of choline kinase or methylthioribose kinase despite high structural resemblance. The crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia demonstrate and expand our understanding of the diversity of the APH family, which in turn will facilitate the development of new antibiotics and inhibitors.

  6. The Prehistory of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global problem that is reaching crisis levels. The global collection of resistance genes in clinical and environmental samples is the antibiotic "resistome," and is subject to the selective pressure of human activity. The origin of many modern resistance genes in pathogens is likely environmental bacteria, including antibiotic producing organisms that have existed for millennia. Recent work has uncovered resistance in ancient permafrost, isolated caves, and in human specimens preserved for hundreds of years. Together with bioinformatic analyses on modern-day sequences, these studies predict an ancient origin of resistance that long precedes the use of antibiotics in the clinic. Understanding the history of antibiotic resistance is important in predicting its future evolution. PMID:27252395

  7. The aac(6'Ib gene in Proteus mirabilis strains resistant to aminoglycosides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Ratajczak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of aac(6'-Ib gene conferring resistance to aminoglycosides in Proteus mirabilis strains. Five isolates had aac(6'-Ib gene. In one case the gene was no-expressed. Three isolates were resistant to all aminoglycosides and minimum inhibitory concentrations were > or = 256 microg/ml. Additionally, all positive strains were resistant to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin.

  8. DOWN-STREAM SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TRAITS ALONG METAL CONTAMINATED STREAM REACHES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuckfield, C; J V Mcarthur (NOEMAIL), J

    2007-04-16

    Sediment bacteria samples were collected from three streams in South Carolina, two contaminated with multiple metals (Four Mile Creek and Castor Creek), one uncontaminated (Meyers Branch), and another metal contaminated stream (Lampert Creek) in northern Washington State. Growth plates inoculated with Four Mile Creek sample extracts show bacteria colony growth after incubation on plates containing either one of two aminoglycosides (kanamycin or streptomycin), tetracycline or chloramphenocol. This study analyzes the spatial pattern of antibiotic resistance in culturable sediment bacteria in all four streams that may be due to metal contamination. We summarize the two aminoglycoside resistance measures and the 10 metals concentrations by Principal Components Analysis. Respectively, 63% and 58% of the variability was explained in the 1st principal component of each variable set. We used the respective multivariate summary metrics (i.e. 1st principal component scores) as input measures for exploring the spatial correlation between antibiotic resistance and metal concentration for each stream reach sampled. Results show a significant and negative correlation between metals scores versus aminoglycoside resistance scores and suggest that selection for metal tolerance among sediment bacteria may influence selection for antibiotic resistance differently than previously supposed.. In addition, we borrow a method from geostatistics (variography) wherein a spatial cross-correlation analysis shows that decreasing metal concentrations scores are associated with increasing aminoglycoside resistance scores as the separation distance between sediment samples decreases, but for contaminated streams only. Since these results were counter to our initial expectation and to other experimental evidence for water column bacteria, we suspect our field results are influenced by metal bioavailability in the sediments and by a contaminant promoted interaction or ''cocktail effect

  9. Beyond Antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMMI Canada meeting in March 2006 hosted a symposium exploring the potential alternatives to antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of infection. Four papers summarizing talks from that session are published in this issue of the Journal (1-4. These reviews address the scientific underpinnings for a number of proposed concepts, and summarize the current status of clinical use. The approaches - probiotics, bacteriophage therapy, and manipulation of innate immunity - are all intriguing but are still removed from immediate practical applications.

  10. Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of the Gram-Negative Bacteria Based on Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Ruf, Claude; Crussard, Steve; Franceschi, Christine; Orenga, Sylvain; Ouattara, Jasmine; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Surre, Jérémy; Matic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly treating infections with adequate antibiotics is of major importance. This requires a fast and accurate determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial pathogens. The most frequently used methods are slow because they are based on the measurement of growth inhibition. Faster methods, such as PCR-based detection of determinants of antibiotic resistance, do not always provide relevant information on susceptibility, particularly that which is not genetically based. Consequently, new methods, such as the detection of changes in bacterial physiology caused by antibiotics using flow cytometry and fluorescent viability markers, are being explored. In this study, we assessed whether Alexa Fluor® 633 Hydrazide (AFH), which targets carbonyl groups, can be used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Carbonylation of cellular macromolecules, which increases in antibiotic-treated cells, is a particularly appropriate to assess for this purpose because it is irreversible. We tested the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to antibiotics from the three classes: β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. In addition to AFH, we used TO-PRO®-3, which enters cells with damaged membranes and binds to DNA, and DiBAC4 (3), which enters cells with depolarized membranes. We also monitored antibiotic-induced morphological alterations of bacterial cells by analyzing light scattering signals. Although all tested dyes and light scattering signals allowed for the detection of antibiotic-sensitive cells, AFH proved to be the most suitable for the fast and reliable detection of antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:27507962

  11. Synthesis and anti Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus activity of substituted chalcones alone and in combination with non-beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh-Dao; Do, Tuong-Ha; Tran, Ngoc-Chau; Ngo, Trieu-Du; Huynh, Thi-Ngoc-Phuong; Tran, Cat-Dong; Thai, Khac-Minh

    2012-07-15

    A total of 30 chalcone analogues was synthesized via a base catalyzed Claisen Schmidt condensation and screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) alone or in combination with non beta-lactam antibiotics namely ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, vancomycin, doxycycline and gentamicin. In the checkerboard technique, fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) show that the following combinations like ciprofloxacin with 25 (4'-bromo-2-hydroxychalcone); doxycycline with 21 (4-hydroxychalcone); doxycycline with 25; and doxycycline with 4 (2',2-dihydroxychalcone) were synergistic against MRSA. In term SAR study, the relationship between chalcone structure and their antibacterial activity against S. aureus and synergy with tested antibiotics were discussed. Possible mechanisms for antibacterial activity of chalcones alone as well as the synergistic effect in combinations were proposed by molecular modeling studies, respectively. Combinations of chalcones with conventional antibiotics could be an effective alternative in the treatment of infection caused by MRSA. PMID:22727643

  12. Analysis of 76 veterinary pharmaceuticals from 13 classes including aminoglycosides in bovine muscle by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenaki, Marilena E; Michali, Christina S; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2016-06-24

    A multiresidue/multiclass method for the simultaneous determination of 76 veterinary drugs and pharmaceuticals in bovine muscle tissue has been developed and validated according to the requirements of European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The analytes belong in 13 different classes, including aminoglycoside antibiotics, whose different physicochemical properties (extremely polar character) render their simultaneous determination with other veterinary drugs quite problematic. The method combines a two-step extraction procedure (extraction with acetonitrile followed by an acidic aqueous buffer extraction) with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) determination, allowing confirmation and quantification in a single chromatographic run. Further cleanup with solid phase extraction was performed using polymeric SPE cartridges. A thorough ionization study of aminoglycosides was performed in order to increase their sensitivity and significant differences in the abundance of the precursor ions of the analytes were revealed, depending on the composition of the mobile phase tested. Further gradient elution optimization and injection solvent optimization were performed for all target analytes.The method was validated according to the European Commission Decision 2002/657. Quantitative analysis was performed by means of standard addition calibration. Recoveries varied from 37.4% (bromhexine) to 106% (kanamycin) in the lowest validation level and 82% of the compounds showed recovery >70%. Detection capability (CCβ) varied from 2.4 (salinomycin) to 1302 (apramycin) μgkg(-1). PMID:27215463

  13. Antibiotics in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The range and number of interventional procedures is rapidly increasing each year. A major complication associated with many procedures is infection, which can result in serious adverse outcomes for the patient. Consequently, antibiotics are amongst the most common pharmaceuticals used by the interventionist, particularly for non-vascular procedures, yet almost no randomized controlled trial data exist to inform our decision when formulating appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis regimens. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the utilization of antibiotics for common interventional radiology procedures, focusing on timing and duration of antibiotic prophylaxis. - Highlights: • Prophylaxis when necessary should be given immediately prior to the procedure for optimum effect. • Where possible single agents with a narrow spectrum of activity should be used. • Account should be taken of the clinical circumstances of the patient, including surgical history. • Continuous review of agents is necessary, ideally with input from the local microbiology department. • The importance of maximum sterile precautions cannot be overstated

  14. Optimizing Guideline-Recommended Antibiotic Doses for Pediatric Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kristen R; Israel, Emily N; Thomas, Christopher A; Knoderer, Chad A

    2016-05-01

    The American Heart Association recently published an updated scientific statement on the management of infective endocarditis in childhood. The recommendations included for vancomycin, aminoglycoside, and β-lactam dosing and monitoring are based primarily on expert opinion and do not consider available evidence for dose optimization based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles in pediatric patients. This is concerning because even when clinically necessary, some practitioners may be hesitant to deviate from guideline-recommended doses. In this perspective, we highlight potential areas for improvement in the statement-recommended doses and summarize evidence supporting antibiotic dosing optimization. The addition of a pediatric clinical pharmacist with expertise in antibiotic dosing to the panel would be beneficial for future updates. PMID:26917819

  15. In70 of plasmid pAX22, a bla(VIM-1)-containing integron carrying a new aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene cassette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M L; Pallecchi, L; Fontana, R; Rossolini, G M

    2001-04-01

    An Achromobacter xylosoxydans strain showing broad-spectrum resistance to beta-lactams (including carbapenems) and aminoglycosides was isolated at the University Hospital of Verona (Verona, Italy). This strain was found to produce metallo-beta-lactamase activity and to harbor a 30-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pAX22, carrying a bla(VIM-1) determinant inserted into a class 1 integron. Characterization of this integron, named In70, revealed an original array of four gene cassettes containing, respectively, the bla(VIM-1) gene and three different aminoglycoside resistance determinants, including an aacA4 allele, a new aph-like gene named aphA15, and an aadA1 allele. The aphA15 gene is the first example of an aph-like gene carried on a mobile gene cassette, and its product exhibits close similarity to the APH(3')-IIa aminoglycoside phosphotransferase encoded by Tn5 (36% amino acid identity) and to an APH(3')-IIb enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38% amino acid identity). Expression of the cloned aphA15 gene in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to kanamycin and neomycin as well as (slightly) to amikacin, netilmicin, and streptomycin. Characterization of the 5' and 3' conserved segments of In70 and of their flanking regions showed that In70 belongs to the group of class 1 integrons associated with defective transposon derivatives originating from Tn402-like elements. The structure of the 3' conserved segment indicates the closest ancestry with members of the In0-In2 lineage. In70, with its array of cassette-borne resistance genes, can mediate broad-spectrum resistance to most beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. PMID:11257042

  16. Andrographolide: A potent antituberculosis compound that targets Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Amudha; Hassan, Sameer; Prabuseenivasan; Shainaba, A S; Hanna, L E; Kumar, Vanaja

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a major challenging infectious disease. The increased rate of emergence of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism has further complicated the situation, resulting in an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Antimycobacterial activity of Andrographis paniculata was evaluated using a rapid LRP assay and the probable targets were identified by docking analysis. The methanolic extract of A. paniculata showed maximum antimycobacterial activity at 250μg/ml against all the tested strains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv, MDR, and drug sensitive). Based on bioassay guided fractionation, andrographolide was identified as the potent molecule. With the docking analysis, both ICDH (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase) and AAC (Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase) were predicted as targets of andrographolide in M. tuberculosis. Molecular simulation revealed that, ICDH showed low binding affinity to andrographolide. However, for AAC, the andrographolide was observed to be well within the active site after 10ns of molecular simulation. This suggests that ACC (PDB ID 1M4I) could be the probable target for andrographolide. PMID:26245695

  17. Gene Sequence Based Clustering Assists in Dereplication of Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea Strains with Identical Inhibitory Activity and Antibiotic Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vynne, Nikolaj Grønnegaard; Månsson, Maria; Gram, Lone

    2012-01-01

    Some microbial species are chemically homogenous, and the same secondary metabolites are found in all strains. In contrast, we previously found that five strains of P. luteoviolacea were closely related by 16S rRNA gene sequence but produced two different antibiotic profiles. The purpose of the p...

  18. Impact of galacto-oligosaccharides on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity upon antibiotic treatment during in vitro fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladirat, S.E.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Schoterman, M.H.C.; Nauta, A.; Gruppen, H.; Schols, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotics are considered to have potential to reduce disturbances in the gut microbiota induced by antibiotics. Results in literature are, however, not consistent. The current in vitro study conducted in a fermentation screening platform allowed to unambiguously compare the impact of galacto-oligos

  19. Use of antibiotics in plant agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, V O; Duffy, B

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are essential for control of bacterial diseases of plants, especially fire blight of pear and apple and bacterial spot of peach. Streptomycin is used in several countries; the use of oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid and gentamicin is limited to only a few countries. Springtime antibiotic sprays suppress pathogen growth on flowers and leaf surfaces before infection; after infection, antibiotics are ineffective. Antibiotics are applied when disease risk is high, and consequently the majority of orchards are not treated annually. In 2009 in the United States, 16,465 kg (active ingredient) was applied to orchards, which is 0.12% of the total antibiotics used in animal agriculture. Antibiotics are active on plants for less than a week, and significant residues have not been found on harvested fruit. Antibiotics have been indispensable for crop protection in the United States for more than 50 years without reports of adverse effects on human health or persistent impacts on the environment. PMID:22849276

  20. Antimicrobial Peptide from the Wild Bee Hylaeus signatus Venom and Its Analogues: Structure-Activity Study and Synergistic Effect with Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nešuta, Ondřej; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Buděšínský, Miloš; Slaninová, Jiřina; Bednárová, Lucie; Hadravová, Romana; Straka, Jakub; Veverka, Václav; Čeřovský, Václav

    2016-04-22

    Venoms of hymenopteran insects have attracted considerable interest as a source of cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In the venom of the solitary bee Hylaeus signatus (Hymenoptera: Colletidae), we identified a new hexadecapeptide of sequence Gly-Ile-Met-Ser-Ser-Leu-Met-Lys-Lys-Leu-Ala-Ala-His-Ile-Ala-Lys-NH2. Named HYL, it belongs to the category of α-helical amphipathic AMPs. HYL exhibited weak antimicrobial activity against several strains of pathogenic bacteria and moderate activity against Candida albicans, but its hemolytic activity against human red blood cells was low. We prepared a set of HYL analogues to evaluate the effects of structural modifications on its biological activity and to increase its potency against pathogenic bacteria. This produced several analogues exhibiting significantly greater activity compared to HYL against strains of both Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa even as their hemolytic activity remained low. Studying synergism of HYL peptides and conventional antibiotics showed the peptides act synergistically and preferentially in combination with rifampicin. Fluorescent dye propidium iodide uptake showed the tested peptides were able to facilitate entrance of antibiotics into the cytoplasm by permeabilization of the outer and inner bacterial cell membrane of P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that treatment of P. aeruginosa with one of the HYL analogues caused total disintegration of bacterial cells. NMR spectroscopy was used to elucidate the structure-activity relationship for the effect of amino acid residue substitution in HYL. PMID:26998557

  1. Antibiotic usage in 2013 on a dairy CAFO in NY State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Doane

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is threatening humans and animals worldwide. Biosecurity and 1-year usage of antibiotics on a dairy concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO in NY State, USA, were mapped: how much antibiotics were used, for what purpose, and whether any decrease could be warranted. Approximately 493 kg antibiotics was used, of which 376 kg was ionophores (monensin and lasalocides, 79 kg penicillin, 16.5 kg lincosamides, 8.0 kg aminoglycosides, 7.7 kg sulfamides, 3.4 kg cephalosporin, 2 kg macrolides, 0.7 kg amphenicols, and 0.1 kg fluoroquinolones. Usage reduction by 84% was realistic without compromising the animal welfare. Further reduction could be possible by improving the biosecurity and by utilizing antibiotic sensitivity testing.

  2. Serum Aminoglycoside Assay by Enzyme-Mediated Immunoassay (EMIT): Correlation with Radioimmunoassay, Fluoroimmunoassay, and Acetyltransferase and Microbiological Assays

    OpenAIRE

    White, L O; Scammell, L. M.; Reeves, D S

    1981-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated immunoassay (EMIT) serum aminoglycoside assay results were accurate and precise and correlated well with radioimmunoassay, fluoroimmunoassay, and acetyltransferase and microbiological assay determinations.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA A1555G mutation screening using a testing kit method and its significance in preventing aminoglycoside-related hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin; YANG Weiyan; HAN Dongyi; JIN Zhengce; GUAN Minxin; DAI Pu; HUANG Deliang; YUAN Huijun; LI Weiming; YU Fei; ZHANG Xin; KANG Dongyang; CAO Juyang

    2006-01-01

    To report a new screening method for mitochondrial DNA 1555A→G mutation and the results of genotype analysis in 19 maternal inherited deafness pedigrees. Method Five hundred and forty-six non-syndromic neuro-sensory hearing loss patients were tested for 1555A→G mutation using a new compact testing kit, which allows clear distinction between wild type and 1555 A→G mutated mtDNAs. Results Nineteen subjects among the 546 patients (3.48%) were found to carry mtDNA A1555G mutation. The results were confirmed by sequencing in an ABI 3100 Avant sequencer. Conclusions Maternal inherited deafness families are a frequently seen in outpatient group. The detection ofmtDNA 1555 A→G mutation with a low cost, ready to use detection kit is needed and suitable in China for large scale screening and preventive testing before usage of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  4. The antibiotic activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants Atividade antibiótica de algumas plantas medicinais brasileiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R. Ferreira de Lima

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic activities of the ethanol extracts from 16 species of plants used in Brazilian folk medicine have been determined against Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Salmonella enteretidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Serratia marcescens, Mycobacterium phlei, M. smegmatis and M. fortuitum, and the yeasts Candida albicans and C. krusei. Among 32 extracts assayed, only those from Lafoensia pacari and Pterodon polygalaeflorus showed activity against the bacterial strains, and none were active against the yeasts. The ethanolic extract from the leaves of L. pacari showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 312.5 to 2500, 250, 625 and 1250 mg/mL, respectively, against eight different Gram-positive strains of Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram-negative Proteus mirabilis and the acid-fast bacilli Mycobacterium phlei, M. fortuitum and M. smegmatis. The ethanolic extract from the stem of L. pacari showed an MIC value of 625 mg/mL against S. aureus. Chemical analysis revealed that the crude extracts contained tannins, steroids, phenols, flavonoids, triterpenes and saponins: the activities were sufficiently high to present the possibility of future identification of the active components by bioassay-guided fractionation and purification.As atividades antibióticas de extratos etanólicos de 16 espécies de plantas usadas em medicina popular no Brasil foram determinadas contra Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Salmonella enteretidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Serratia marcescens, Mycobacterium phlei, M. smegmatis e M. fortuitum, contra as leveduras Candida albicans e C. krusei. Entre os trinta e dois extratos testados, somente aqueles derivados de Lafoensia pacari e Pterodon polygalaeflorus mostraram atividade contra as cepas bacterianas e nenhum deles apresentou atividade contra as leveduras. O

  5. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  6. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Pediatric Treatment Recommendations Inpatient Healthcare Professionals Community Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work Systematic Reviews ...

  7. A surprising dipolar cycloaddition provides ready access to aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Russell S; Finney, Nathaniel S

    2004-07-14

    This contribution describes the results of a new research effort in our laboratory aimed at the synthesis of novel aminoglycosides and amino-C-glycosides. Despite the importance of such compounds, and the previous development of some methodological solutions, this remains an important area of research. Notable features of our approach, which is distinct from and complementary to previous efforts, are the following: (1) Reliance on a surprising and unprecedented formation of glycal triazolines via an inverse electron demand dipolar cycloaddition of glucal. We believe this desirable transformation has not previously been discovered because of the unusual selection of substrates and solvent required. (2) Very mild reaction conditions. An initial thermal cycloaddition is carried out in an inert solvent, the triazoline generated is photochemically converted to a reactive aziridine, and the crude aziridine undergoes ring opening at room temperature in the presence of a nucleophile and a mild Lewis acid catalyst. (3) Formation of products lacking an N-acyl group, allowing ready synthesis of novel glucosamine derivatives. PMID:15237974

  8. Evaluation of the antibiotic activity and genetic mutation of microorganisms in the effluent treated with the electron-beam from waste-water treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Nam, Ji Hyun; Shin, Ji Hye; Yun, Seo Yeon; Cho, Young Cheol; Oh, Kyoung hee [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    In this study, the residual concentrations and activities of antibiotics after UV or gamma-ray treatments were estimated, and the effect of irradiation of UV, gamma-ray, or electron beam was estimated on the survivability and less mutagenic effect on bacteria. The changes of bacterial communities and radiation resistant population in the effluent treated with UV and electron-beam were analyzed. The gamma-ray irradiation was more effective than UV in degradation of antibiotics. The extent of mutagenicity of electron-beam irradiation was less than those of UV or gamma-ray irradiations. The application of election-beam to the wastewater treatment system showed the high efficiency of destroying and removal effects on bacterial cells. The selective increase in population of radiation resistant bacteria was not observed. These results indicate that the application of ionizing radiation to the processes of wastewater treatment system will be suitable than UV irradiation because of its degradability of variable antibiotics, high removal rate of harmful bacteria, less mutagenicity of bacteria, and low selective effect on radiation resistant bacteria

  9. Evaluation of the antibiotic activity and genetic mutation of microorganisms in the effluent treated with the electron-beam from waste-water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the residual concentrations and activities of antibiotics after UV or gamma-ray treatments were estimated, and the effect of irradiation of UV, gamma-ray, or electron beam was estimated on the survivability and less mutagenic effect on bacteria. The changes of bacterial communities and radiation resistant population in the effluent treated with UV and electron-beam were analyzed. The gamma-ray irradiation was more effective than UV in degradation of antibiotics. The extent of mutagenicity of electron-beam irradiation was less than those of UV or gamma-ray irradiations. The application of election-beam to the wastewater treatment system showed the high efficiency of destroying and removal effects on bacterial cells. The selective increase in population of radiation resistant bacteria was not observed. These results indicate that the application of ionizing radiation to the processes of wastewater treatment system will be suitable than UV irradiation because of its degradability of variable antibiotics, high removal rate of harmful bacteria, less mutagenicity of bacteria, and low selective effect on radiation resistant bacteria

  10. Antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of melittin and colistin, alone and in combination with antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosler, Sibel; Karaaslan, Elif; Alev Gerceker, A

    2016-04-01

    In vitro antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs) - melittin and colistin - both alone and in combination with antibiotics were evaluated against clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index were determined by the microbroth dilution and chequerboard techniques, respectively. The time-kill curve (TKC) method was used for determining the bactericidal activities of AMPs alone and in combination. Measurements of anti-biofilm activities were performed spectrophotometrically for both inhibition of attachment and 24-hour biofilm formation at MIC or subMIC. According to MIC90 values, the most active agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were colistin, imipenem and ciprofloxacin, respectively. In combination studies, synergistic effects were mostly seen with colistin-imipenem against E. coli and K. pneumoniae (50 and 54%, respectively), colistin-ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa (77%). In TKC studies, synergism was observed with almost all expected combinations, even more frequently than chequerboard method. All of the antimicrobial agents were able to inhibit attachment and 24-hour biofilm formation between 0-57% at 1/10 × MIC and 7-73% at 1 × or 1/10 × MIC, respectively. AMPs seem to be a good candidate for antimicrobial chemotherapy with their antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities as a single agent or in combination with antibiotics. PMID:25801062

  11. Diurnal variations in the occurrence and the fate of hormones and antibiotics in activated sludge wastewater treatment in Oslo, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an assessment of the dynamics in the influent concentration of hormones (estrone, estriol) and antibiotics (trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin) in the liquid phase including the efficiency of biological municipal wastewater treatment. The concentration of estradiol, 17-α-ethinylestradiol, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, demeclocycline, chlortetracycline, cefuroxime, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide were below the limit of detection in all of the sewage samples collected within this study. Two different types of diurnal variation pattern were identified in the influent mass loads of selected antibiotics and hormones that effectively correlate with daily drug administration patterns and with the expected maximum human hormone release, respectively. The occurrence of natural hormones and antimicrobials, administered every 12 hours, shows a daily trend of decreasing contaminant mass load, having the maximum values in the morning hours. The occurrence of antibiotics, typically administered every 8 hours, indicates a daily peak value in samples collected under the highest hydraulic loading. The efficiency of biological removal of both hormones and antibiotics is shown to be limited. Compared to the values obtained in the influent samples, increased concentrations are observed in the biologically treated effluent for trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin, mainly as a result of deconjugation processes. Ciprofloxacin is shown as the predominant antimicrobial compound in the effluent, and it is present at quantities approximately 10 fold greater than the total mass of the other of the compounds due to poor removal efficiency and alternating solid-liquid partitioning behaviour. Our results suggest that, to increase the micro-pollutant removal and the chemical dosing efficiency in enhanced tertiary treatment, significant benefits can be derived from the optimisation of reactor design and the development of control schemes that

  12. The sigma factor sigma s affects antibiotic production and biological control activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    OpenAIRE

    Sarniguet, A.; Kraus, J.; Henkels, M D; Muehlchen, A M; Loper, J E

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5, a rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium that suppresses several soilborne pathogens of plants, produces the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. A gene necessary for pyrrolnitrin production by Pf-5 was identified as rpoS, which encodes the stationary-phase sigma factor sigma s. Several pleiotropic effects of an rpoS mutation in Escherichia coli also were observed in an RpoS- mutant of Pf-5. These included sensitivities of stationary-p...

  13. Antibacterial activity of three newly-synthesized chalcones & synergism with antibiotics against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana D Bozic

    2014-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: o0 ur study demonstrated that three newly-synthesized chalcones exhibited significant anti-MRSA effect and synergism with non-β-lactam antibiotics. The most effective compound was 1,3-Bis-(2-hydroxy-phenyl-propenone. Our results provide useful information for future research of possible application of chalcones in combination with conventional anti-MRSA therapy as promising new antimicrobial agents.

  14. Diurnal variations in the occurrence and the fate of hormones and antibiotics in activated sludge wastewater treatment in Oslo, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plosz, Benedek Gy., E-mail: benedek.plosz@niva.no [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, NIVA, Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349, Oslo (Norway); Leknes, Henriette [Norwegian Institute for Air Research NILU, 2027 Kjeller (Norway); Liltved, Helge; Thomas, Kevin V. [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, NIVA, Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-03-15

    We present an assessment of the dynamics in the influent concentration of hormones (estrone, estriol) and antibiotics (trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin) in the liquid phase including the efficiency of biological municipal wastewater treatment. The concentration of estradiol, 17-{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, demeclocycline, chlortetracycline, cefuroxime, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide were below the limit of detection in all of the sewage samples collected within this study. Two different types of diurnal variation pattern were identified in the influent mass loads of selected antibiotics and hormones that effectively correlate with daily drug administration patterns and with the expected maximum human hormone release, respectively. The occurrence of natural hormones and antimicrobials, administered every 12 hours, shows a daily trend of decreasing contaminant mass load, having the maximum values in the morning hours. The occurrence of antibiotics, typically administered every 8 hours, indicates a daily peak value in samples collected under the highest hydraulic loading. The efficiency of biological removal of both hormones and antibiotics is shown to be limited. Compared to the values obtained in the influent samples, increased concentrations are observed in the biologically treated effluent for trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin, mainly as a result of deconjugation processes. Ciprofloxacin is shown as the predominant antimicrobial compound in the effluent, and it is present at quantities approximately 10 fold greater than the total mass of the other of the compounds due to poor removal efficiency and alternating solid-liquid partitioning behaviour. Our results suggest that, to increase the micro-pollutant removal and the chemical dosing efficiency in enhanced tertiary treatment, significant benefits can be derived from the optimisation of reactor design and the development of control schemes that

  15. Effect of temperature on removal of antibiotic resistance genes by anaerobic digestion of activated sludge revealed by metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy

    2015-09-01

    As antibiotic resistance continues to spread globally, there is growing interest in the potential to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from wastewater sources. In particular, operational conditions during sludge digestion may serve to discourage selection of resistant bacteria, reduce horizontal transfer of ARGs, and aid in hydrolysis of DNA. This study applied metagenomic analysis to examine the removal efficiency of ARGs through thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion using bench-scale reactors. Although the relative abundance of various ARGs shifted from influent to effluent sludge, there was no measureable change in the abundance of total ARGs or their diversity in either the thermophilic or mesophilic treatment. Among the 35 major ARG subtypes detected in feed sludge, substantial reductions (removal efficiency >90%) of 8 and 13 ARGs were achieved by thermophilic and mesophilic digestion, respectively. However, resistance genes of aadA, macB, and sul1 were enriched during the thermophilic anaerobic digestion, while resistance genes of erythromycin esterase type I, sul1, and tetM were enriched during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Efflux pump remained to be the major antibiotic resistance mechanism in sludge samples, but the portion of ARGs encoding resistance via target modification increased in the anaerobically digested sludge relative to the feed. Metagenomic analysis provided insight into the potential for anaerobic digestion to mitigate a broad array of ARGs. PMID:25994259

  16. Molecular typing and differences in biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibilities among Prototheca strains isolated in Italy and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, S; Cremonesi, P; Capra, E; Silvetti, T; Decimo, M; Bianchini, V; Alves, A C; Vargas, A C; Costa, G M; Ribeiro, M G; Brasca, M

    2016-08-01

    Bovine mastitis caused by Prototheca is a serious and complex problem that accounts for high economic losses in the dairy industry. The main objective of this study was to identify and characterize at genetic level different Prototheca strains and provide the most complete data about protothecal antibiotic resistance. The study involves 46 isolates from Italian (13 strains) and Brazilian (33 strains) mastitic milk. These strains were identified by multiplex PCR and single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. Moreover, biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibility were evaluated. Forty-two strains resulted as Prototheca zopfii genotype 2, whereas 4 isolates could belong to a potential new Prototheca species. The RAPD-PCR, performed with 3 primers (M13, OPA-4, and OPA-18), showed a notable heterogeneity among isolates and grouped the strains according to the species and geographical origin. Biofilm production was species-dependent and P. zopfii genotype 2 strains were classified as strong biofilm producers. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that Prototheca strains were susceptible to antibacterial drugs belonging to aminoglycosides group; the highest activity against Prototheca strains was observed in the case of colistin sulfate, gentamicin, and netilmicin (100% of susceptible strains). It is interesting to note that all the Italian P. zopfii genotype 2 strains showed lower minimum inhibitory concentration values than the Brazilian ones. Nisin showed more efficacy than lysozyme and potassium sorbate, inhibiting 31% of the strains. Results obtained in this study confirmed that RAPD-PCR is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly discriminating tool for Prototheca strains characterization and could give a good scientific contribution for better understanding the protothecal mastitis in dairy herd. PMID:27236754

  17. Determination of aminoglycoside residues in milk and muscle based on a simple and fast extraction procedure followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Jank, Louíse; Martins, Magda Targa; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Sirtori, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in veterinary medicine mainly for treatment and prevention of diseases. The aminoglycosides are one of the antibiotics classes that have been extensively employed in animal husbandry for the treatment of bacterial infections, but also as growth promotion. The European Union has issued strict Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for aminoglycosides in several animal origin products including bovine milk, bovine, swine and poultry muscle. This paper describes a fast and simple analytical method for the determination of ten aminoglycosides (spectinomycin, tobramycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, hygromycin, apramycin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, amikacin and neomycin) in bovine milk and bovine, swine and poultry muscle. For sample preparation, an extraction method was developed using trichloroacetic acid and clean up with low temperature precipitation and C18 bulk. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to carry out quantitative analysis and liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) was used to screening purposes. Both methods were validated according to the European Union Commission Directive 2002/657/EC. Good performance characteristics were obtained for recovery, precision, calibration curve, specificity, decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) in all matrices evaluated. The detection limit (LOD) and quantification limit (LOQ) were ranging from 5 to 100ngg(-1) and 12.5 to 250ngg(-1), respectively. Good linearity (r)-above 0.99-was achieved in concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 2.0×MRL. Recoveries ranged from 36.8% to 98.0% and the coefficient of variation from 0.9 to 20.2%, noting that all curves have been made into their own matrices in order to minimize the matrix effects. The CCβ values obtained in qualitative method were between 25 and 250ngg(-1). The proposed method showed to be simple, easy, and adequate for high-throughput analysis of a large

  18. Impacts of human activities on distribution of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes and antibiotic resistance genes in marine coastal sediments of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Deng, Yu; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Li, Xiangdong; Leung, Kenneth My; Zhang, Tong

    2016-09-01

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sediments could be biomarkers for evaluating the environmental impacts of human activities, although factors governing their distribution are not clear yet. By using metagenomic approach, this study investigated the distributions of SRPs and ARGs in marine sediments collected from 12 different coastal locations of Hong Kong, which exhibited different pollution levels and were classified into two groups based on sediment parameters. Our results showed that relative abundances of major SRP genera to total prokaryotes were consistently lower in the more seriously polluted sediments (P-value niche differentiation of SRPs and behavior of ARGs in marine coastal sediment. PMID:27297722

  19. Antibiotic activity of the extract of Punica granatum Linn. over bovine strains of Staphylococcus aureus Atividade antimicrobiana do extrato de Punica granatum Linn. em linhagens de Staphylococcus aureus de origem bovina

    OpenAIRE

    Maria A. R. Silva; Jane S. Higino; Jozinete V. Pereira; José P. Siqueira-Júnior; Maria S.V. Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Human and veterinary medicines have not been so well succeeded in order to achieving their goals concerning the treatment of infections for long term caused by Staphylococcus aureus linked to resistance development against antibiotic agents. The antibiotic activity of the Punica granatum Linn. fresh fruit pericarp extract was evaluated by the agar diffusion method on 38 S. aureus strains, isolated from apparently healthy lactating cows in farms situated in counties of the semi-arid region of ...

  20. Antimicrobial activity of antibiotics in combination with natural flavonoids against clinical extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rong-Dih; Chin, Yi-Ping; Lee, Mei-Hsien

    2005-07-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are plasmid-mediated class A enzymes commonly found in the family Enterobacteriaceae, mainly in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Flavonoids have also been reported to possess antimicrobial activity. In this study, the in vitro activities of 18 antibiotics and 12 flavonoids against 20 ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were evaluated. All of these isolates were susceptible to imipenem and cefmetazole, but were resistant to ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, aztreonam, cefazolin, cefoperazone, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, piperacillin and ticarcillin. Susceptibilities to amikacin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin were variable. Myricetin, a flavonol, inhibited ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates at a high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (MIC(90) value 256 mg/mL), but exhibited significant synergic activity against ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae in separate combination with amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam and cefoxitin. Because of the low-toxic nature of flavonoids, the combination of antibiotics and flavonoids is a potential new strategy for developing therapies for infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria in the future. PMID:16161024

  1. Presence of Clostridium difficile and antibiotic and beta-lactamase activities in feces of volunteers treated with oral cefixime, oral cefpodoxime proxetil, or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachaty, E; Depitre, C; Mario, N; Bourneix, C; Saulnier, P; Corthier, G; Andremont, A

    1992-09-01

    Three groups of six healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to a treatment with 400 mg of oral cefpodoxime proxetil, oral cefixime, or placebo per day for 10 days. Informed consent was obtained from all volunteers. Clostridium difficile was not detected in the feces of any subject before treatment or at any time in the subjects in the placebo group. C. difficile was, however, detected in all subjects treated with cefpodoxime proxetil and in five of six treated with cefixime. Genomic DNA restriction patterns showed that the strains of C. difficile differed from one volunteer to another. Two subjects both shed different strains at different times during the 25-day surveillance period. All isolates were resistant to cefixime and cefpodoxime (MIC for 90% of strains, 256 and 512 mg/liter, respectively). Antibiotic activity was found in the feces of one volunteer treated with cefpodoxime proxetil and of four volunteers treated with cefixime. It was inversely correlated with the presence of fecal beta-lactamase activity. Intestinal side effects were limited to modifications of stool consistency, which occurred in only 3 of the 12 treated volunteers and did not lead to cessation of treatment. These modifications were significantly associated with the presence of fecal antibiotic activity (P less than 0.05) but not with the shedding of toxigenic or nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile or with the presence of toxin A in feces, which was detected only in one perfectly healthy treated volunteer. PMID:1416894

  2. Pediatric fecal microbiota harbor diverse and novel antibiotic resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée M Moore

    Full Text Available Emerging antibiotic resistance threatens human health. Gut microbes are an epidemiologically important reservoir of resistance genes (resistome, yet prior studies indicate that the true diversity of gut-associated resistomes has been underestimated. To deeply characterize the pediatric gut-associated resistome, we created metagenomic recombinant libraries in an Escherichia coli host using fecal DNA from 22 healthy infants and children (most without recent antibiotic exposure, and performed functional selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from eight drug classes. Resistance-conferring DNA fragments were sequenced (Illumina HiSeq 2000, and reads assembled and annotated with the PARFuMS computational pipeline. Resistance to 14 of the 18 antibiotics was found in stools of infants and children. Recovered genes included chloramphenicol acetyltransferases, drug-resistant dihydrofolate reductases, rRNA methyltransferases, transcriptional regulators, multidrug efflux pumps, and every major class of beta-lactamase, aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, and tetracycline resistance protein. Many resistance-conferring sequences were mobilizable; some had low identity to any known organism, emphasizing cryptic organisms as potentially important resistance reservoirs. We functionally confirmed three novel resistance genes, including a 16S rRNA methylase conferring aminoglycoside resistance, and two tetracycline-resistance proteins nearly identical to a bifidobacterial MFS transporter (B. longum s. longum JDM301. We provide the first report to our knowledge of resistance to folate-synthesis inhibitors conferred by a predicted Nudix hydrolase (part of the folate synthesis pathway. This functional metagenomic survey of gut-associated resistomes, the largest of its kind to date, demonstrates that fecal resistomes of healthy children are far more diverse than previously suspected, that clinically relevant resistance genes are present even without recent selective

  3. ACCUMULATION OF THE ANTIBIOTIC PHENAZINE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF DRYLAND WHEAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural antibiotics are thought to function in microbial defense, fitness, competitiveness, biocontrol, communication and gene regulation activity, and antibiotic-producing species are commonly found in microbial communities throughout nature. However, the frequency and amount of antibiotic producti...

  4. Antimicrobial Activity and Antibiotic Sensitivity of Three Isolates of Lactic Acid Bacteria From Fermented Fish Product, Budu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liasi, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Three isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB from the fermented food product, Budu, were identified as genus lactobacillus (Lactobacillus casei LA17, Lactobacillus plantarum LA22 and L. paracasei LA02, and the highest population was Lb. paracasei LA02. The antibacterial agent produced by the isolates inhibited the growth of a range of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Antimicrobial sensitivity test to 18 different types of antibiotic were evaluated using the disc diffusion method. Inhibition zone diameter was measured and calculated from the means of five determinations and expressed in terms of resistance or susceptibility. All the LAB isolates were resistant to colestin sulphate, streptomycin, amikacin, norfloxacin, nalidixic acid, mecillinam, sulphanethoxazole/ trimethoprim, kanamycin, neomycin, bacitracin and gentamycin but susceptible to erythromycin, penicillin G, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ampicillin and nitrofurantion.

  5. A nanoplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of vancomycin and bifunctional aminoglycoside resistance genes in Enterococcus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Manickam

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci have emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections in many parts of the world over the last decade. The most common enterococci strains present in clinical isolates are E. faecalis and E. faecium which have acquired resistant to either gentamicin or vancomycin. The conventional culture test takes 2–5 days to yield complete information of the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Hence our present study was focused on developing a nanoplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of vancomycin and bifunctional aminoglycoside resistant enterococci (V-BiA-RE. This assay simultaneously detects 8 genes namely 16S rRNA of Enterococcus genus, ddl of E. faecalis and E. faecium, aacA-aphD that encodes high level gentamicin resistance (HLGR, multilevel vancomycin resistant genotypes such as vanA, vanB, vanC and vanD and one internal control gene. Results Unique and specific primer pairs were designed to amplify the 8 genes. The specificity of the primers was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the nanoplex PCR products and BLAST analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of V-BiA-RE nanoplex PCR assay was evaluated against the conventional culture method. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was found to be 1 ng at the DNA level while the analytical specificity was evaluated with 43 reference enterococci and non-enterococcal strains and was found to be 100%. The diagnostic accuracy was determined using 159 clinical specimens, which showed that 97% of the clinical isolates belonged to E. faecalis, of which 26% showed the HLGR genotype, but none were vancomycin resistant. The presence of an internal control in the V-BiA-RE nanoplex PCR assay helped us to rule out false negative cases. Conclusion The nanoplex PCR assay is robust and can give results within 4 hours about the 8 genes that are essential for the identification of the most common Enterococcus spp. and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern. The PCR assay

  6. In-vitro activity of fosfomycin trometamol and some other antibiotics against Escherichia coli strains isolated from urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicem Tekin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In recent years, in our country and the world, susceptibility of uropathogenic E.coli strains to commonly used antibiotics in the treatment of urinary tract infections has decreased. That decreased susceptibility has been caused to treatment failure, need to change the empirical treatment, increase in prescription costs, prolongation of hospital stay, increased social costs, increased morbidity and mortality. In this study, determination of susceptibility to different variety of antibiotics and fosfomycin in urinary tract infection isolate E.coli were aimed.Materials and methods: The study included E.coli positive urine samples which had been sent to State Hospital Central Laboratory in Kızıltepe between August 2010 and December 2010. These isolates were obtained from patients who have microscopically 10/mm3 leukocyte in urine. In this study, we tested susceptibility of isolated E.coli to FOT (Fosfomycin, CIP(ciprofloxacin, IP (İmipenem, TZP (Piperasilin-Tazobactam, CAZ (Ceftazidim. According to CLSI criteria, susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method.Results: E.coli strains isolated from urine samples examined between August 2010 and December 2010, all were susceptible to fosfomisine. The resistance rates of E.coli strains to Ceftazidim, Ciprofloxacin, İmipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam were found respectively 33.3%, 49.1%, 36.8%, 45.6% (Table 1.Conclusions: Because of the high susceptibility rates of fosfomycin at community-acquired urinary tract infection, it can be preferred to the non-complicated urinary tract infections as an antimicrobial agent.

  7. Antibacterial and antibiotic-potentiation activities of the methanol extract of some cameroonian spices against Gram-negative multi-drug resistant phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voukeng Igor K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present work was designed to evaluate the antibacterial properties of the methanol extracts of eleven selected Cameroonian spices on multi-drug resistant bacteria (MDR, and their ability to potentiate the effect of some common antibiotics used in therapy. Results The extract of Cinnamomum zeylanicum against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and AG100 strains showed the best activities, with the lowest minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of 64 μg/ml. The extract of Dorstenia psilurus was the most active when tested in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor, phenylalanine Arginine-β- Naphtylamide (PAβN, a synergistic effect being observed in 56.25 % of the tested bacteria when it was combined with Erythromycin (ERY. Conclusion The present work evidently provides information on the role of some Cameroonian spices in the fight against multi-resistant bacteria.

  8. Antibiotic research and development: business as usual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbarth, S; Theuretzbacher, U; Hackett, J

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance is tremendous and, without new anti-infective strategies, will continue to increase in the coming decades. Despite the growing need for new antibiotics, few pharmaceutical companies today retain active antibacterial drug discovery programmes. One reason is that it is scientifically challenging to discover new antibiotics that are active against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria of current clinical concern. However, the main hurdle is diminishing economic incentives. Increased global calls to minimize the overuse of antibiotics, the cost of meeting regulatory requirements and the low prices of currently marketed antibiotics are strong deterrents to antibacterial drug development programmes. New economic models that create incentives for the discovery of new antibiotics and yet reconcile these incentives with responsible antibiotic use are long overdue. DRIVE-AB is a €9.4 million public-private consortium, funded by the EU Innovative Medicines Initiative, that aims to define a standard for the responsible use of antibiotics and to develop, test and recommend new economic models to incentivize investment in producing new anti-infective agents. PMID:25673635

  9. Emergence of aminoglycoside resistance genes aadA and aadE in the genus Campylobacter.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto-Alphandary, H; Mabilat, C; Courvalin, P

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to streptomycin or spectinomycin or both in five Campylobacter coli strains, two Campylobacter jejuni strains, and a Campylobacter-like strain was studied by enzymatic assays and dot blot hybridization. Resistance was due to 6- or 3",9-aminoglycoside adenylyltransferases and to new types of phospho- and adenylyltransferases.

  10. Single biosensor immunoassay for the detection of five aminoglycosides in reconstituted skimmed milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, W.; Cazemier, G.; Koets, M.; Amerongen, van A.

    2003-01-01

    The application of an optical biosensor (Biacore 3000), with four flow channels (Fcs), in combination with a mixture of four specific antibodies resulted in a competitive inhibition biosensor immunoassay (BIA) for the simultaneous detection of the five relevant aminoglycosides in reconstituted skimm

  11. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed...

  12. 21 CFR 173.170 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans-ferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.170 Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans... development of genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the...

  13. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingsheng Lou

    Full Text Available To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury.A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014.A total of 153 (30.6% of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9% and intravitreal injection (42.0%. Cephalosporins (53.8% and vancomycin (42.0% were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%, and aminoglycosides (13.4%. Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7% replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4% (p = 0.001, Fisher's exact test.Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis.

  14. Antibiotic resistance determinants in a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Molina

    Full Text Available Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267 kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts.

  15. Antibiotic resistance determinants in a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Roca, Amalia; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Segura, Ana; Plesiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267) kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts. PMID:24465371

  16. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Junlian; Yang, Yao; Yuan, Zhaohui; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR) code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014. Results A total of 153 (30.6%) of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9%) and intravitreal injection (42.0%). Cephalosporins (53.8%) and vancomycin (42.0%) were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%), and aminoglycosides (13.4%). Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7%) replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4%) (p = 0.001, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusions Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis. PMID:27275777

  17. Penetration barrier contributes to bacterial biofilm-associated resistance against only select antibiotics, and exhibits genus-, strain- and antibiotic-specific differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rachna; Sahore, Simmi; Kaur, Preetinder; Rani, Alka; Ray, Pallab

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are implicated in a wide range of implant-based and chronic infections. These infections are often associated with adverse therapeutic outcomes, owing to the decreased antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms compared with their planktonic counterparts. This altered biofilm susceptibility has been attributed to multiple factors, including a reduced antibiotic penetration. Although several studies have addressed the role of penetration barrier in biofilm-associated drug resistance, it remains inconclusive. This study was done to elucidate antibiotic penetration through biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, using an agar disk diffusion assay. Penetration capacity of six antimicrobial drugs from different classes (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, fluoroquinolones and glycopeptides) through biofilms formed by standard strains and clinical isolates from catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) was elucidated by measuring their growth-inhibition zones in lawn cultures on Mueller-Hinton agar, following diffusion of an antibiotic from an overlying disk through their biofilm to the agar medium. Penetration of only select antimicrobials (vancomycin and chloramphenicol) was hindered through biofilms. There was considerable variation in biofilm-permeating capacity depending upon the genus, strain/CRBSI isolate and antibiotic tested. Furthermore, antibiotics failed to kill the biofilm cells independent of penetration, indicating that other factors contributed substantially to biofilm resistance. PMID:27402781

  18. Mutation of Salmonella paratyphi A conferring cross-resistance to several groups of antibiotics by decreased permeability and loss of invasiveness.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutmann, L; Billot-Klein, D; Williamson, R.; Goldstein, F W; Mounier, J; Acar, J F; Collatz, E

    1988-01-01

    A spontaneous one-step mutant of Salmonella paratyphi A selected on ampicillin showed cross-resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics except imipenem and to aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, trimethoprim, and quinolones. It also grew as small colonies. Examination of the cell envelope of the mutant showed a quantitative decrease in three major outer membrane proteins of 40.6, 39.6 (presumably porins), and 24 kilodaltons and quantitative as well as qualitative modifications in th...

  19. Antibiotic research and development: business as usual?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harbarth, S.; Theuretzbacher, U.; Hackett, J.; Hulscher, M.

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance is tremendous and, without new anti-infective strategies, will continue to increase in the coming decades. Despite the growing need for new antibiotics, few pharmaceutical companies today retain active antibacterial drug discovery programmes. One reason is

  20. Modulatory antibacterial activity of body fat from Gallus gallus domesticus (Linnaeus 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Coutinho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the popular belief ,which uses fat from G. g. domesticus. (domestic chicken, to combat infectious and inflammatory processes, this work aims to evaluate the antibacterial action of lipids in adipose tissue of these animals besides verifying association with antibiotics observing the modulating effect of natural products against standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and multiresistant of Staphylococcus aureus from clinical isolates. We evaluated the antibacterial activity of the samples, determining the minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC by microdilution method. And after testing was conducted to verify the possible synergistic action between the samples and the antimicrobials using fat tissues in a sub inhibitory concentration.The interactions of aminoglycosides with the samples at concentrations of 128g /ml(MIC1/8were effective against S.aureos 358,and amikacin activity associated with the TAGCc with most representative reduction from 64 to 8μg/mL. The results of this study indicate that the TAGc and TAGi are an alternative source of natural products with antibacterial action, as possible to potentiate the activity of aminoglycosides against the strains of S.aureus 358. Both deserving continuing to elucidate the antimicrobial and toxicological action.

  1. Strengthening Control of Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EthelLu

    2005-01-01

    IT is a well-known fact that buy-ng guns is much easier than purchasing antibiotics in the United States. In China, however, the situation is different. According to a recent WHO survey,about 80 percent of Chinese inpatients take antibiotic medicines, and 58 percent of them are prescribed multifunctional antibiotics,

  2. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  3. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  4. Ex vivo treatment with a novel synthetic aminoglycoside NB54 in primary fibroblasts from Rett syndrome patients suppresses MECP2 nonsense mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vecsler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonsense mutations in the X-linked methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2 comprise a significant proportion of causative MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome (RTT. Naturally occurring aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin, have been shown to enable partial suppression of nonsense mutations related to several human genetic disorders, however, their clinical applicability has been compromised by parallel findings of severe toxic effects. Recently developed synthetic NB aminoglycosides have demonstrated significantly improved effects compared to gentamicin evident in substantially higher suppression and reduced acute toxicity in vitro. RESULTS: We performed comparative study of suppression effects of the novel NB54 and gentamicin on three MECP2 nonsense mutations (R294X, R270X and R168X common in RTT, using ex vivo treatment of primary fibroblasts from RTT patients harboring these mutations and testing for the C-terminal containing full-length MeCP2. We observed that NB54 induces dose-dependent suppression of MECP2 nonsense mutations more efficiently than gentamicin, which was evident at concentrations as low as 50 µg/ml. NB54 read-through activity was mutation specific, with maximal full-length MeCP2 recovery in R168X (38%, R270X (27% and R294X (18%. In addition, the recovered MeCP2 was translocated to the cell nucleus and moreover led to parallel increase in one of the most important MeCP2 downstream effectors, the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that NB54 may induce restoration of the potentially functional MeCP2 in primary RTT fibroblasts and encourage further studies of NB54 and other rationally designed aminoglycoside derivatives as potential therapeutic agents for nonsense MECP2 mutations in RTT.

  5. Structure-Activity Relationships of a Diverse Class of Halogenated Phenazines That Targets Persistent, Antibiotic-Tolerant Bacterial Biofilms and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Aaron T; Abouelhassan, Yasmeen; Norwood, Verrill M; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Bai, Fang; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rolfe, Melanie; Burch, Gena M; Jin, Shouguang; Luesch, Hendrik; Huigens, Robert W

    2016-04-28

    Persistent bacteria, including persister cells within surface-attached biofilms and slow-growing pathogens lead to chronic infections that are tolerant to antibiotics. Here, we describe the structure-activity relationships of a series of halogenated phenazines (HP) inspired by 2-bromo-1-hydroxyphenazine 1. Using multiple synthetic pathways, we probed diverse substitutions of the HP scaffold in the 2-, 4-, 7-, and 8-positions, providing critical information regarding their antibacterial and bacterial eradication profiles. Halogenated phenazine 14 proved to be the most potent biofilm-eradicating agent (≥99.9% persister cell killing) against MRSA (MBEC antimicrobial peptide mimics that eradicate biofilms through the general lysing of membranes, HPs do not lyse red blood cells. HPs are promising agents that effectively target persistent bacteria while demonstrating negligible toxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27018907

  6. Role of humic substances in the degradation pathways and residual antibacterial activity during the photodecomposition of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Jazmín; Bedoya, Cristina; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Santamaría, Alexander; Fernández, Jhon J; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the photo-transformation, in presence of humic substances (HSs), of ciprofloxacin (CIP), a commonly-used fluoroquinolone antibiotic whose presence in aquatic ecosystems is a health hazard for humans and other living organisms. HSs from the International Humic Substances Society (Elliott humic acid and fulvic acid, Pahokee peat humic acid and Nordic lake) and a humic acid extracted from modified coal (HACM) were tested for their ability to photodegrade CIP. Based on kinetic and analytical studies, it was possible to establish an accelerating effect on the rate of CIP decomposition caused by the humic substances. This effect was associated with the photosensitized capacity of the HSs to facilitate energy transfer from an excited humic state to the ground state of ciprofloxacin. Except for Nordic lake, which experienced a lower positive effect, no significant differences in the CIP transformation were found among the different humic acids examined. The photochemistry of CIP can be modified by parameters such as pH, CIP or oxygen concentration. The irradiation of this antibiotic in the presence of HACM showed that antimicrobial activity was negligible after 14 h for E. coli and 24 h for S. aureus. In contrast, the antimicrobial activity was only slightly decreased after 24 h of irradiation by direct photolysis. Although mineralization of CIP irradiation in the presence of a HACM solution was not achieved, biodegradability was achieved after 12 h of irradiation, indicating that microorganisms within the environment can easily degrade CIP photochemical by-products. PMID:26921708

  7. Kinetics of kill of bacterial conjunctivitis isolates with moxifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, compared with the aminoglycosides tobramycin and gentamicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph S Wagner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rudolph S Wagner1, David B Granet2, Steven J Lichtenstein3, Tiffany Jamison4, Joseph J Dajcs4, Robert D Gross5, Paul Cockrum41New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA; 2Ratner Children’s Eye Center, University of California – San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; 3University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, Illinois, USA; 4Alcon Research, Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USA; 5Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAPurpose: To compare the kinetics and speed of kill of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae on exposure to three topical ophthalmic antibiotic solutions.Materials and methods: Bacterial conjunctivitis isolates of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were exposed to 1:1000 dilutions of moxifloxacin 0.5%, tobramycin 0.3%, gentamicin 0.3%, and water (control. At 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after exposure, aliquots were collected, cells were cultured, and viable cell counts were determined using standard microbiological methods.Results: Moxifloxacin achieved 99.9% kill (3-log reduction at approximately 2 hours for S. pneumoniae and at 15 minutes for H. influenzae. Tobramycin and gentamicin did not achieve 3-log reduction of S. pneumoniae during the 180-minute study period. An increase in bacterial growth was noted for these isolates. Gentamicin took more than 120 minutes to achieve the 3-log reduction of H. influenzae and tobramycin did not reach the 3-log reduction of this pathogen during the 180-minute study period.Conclusion: Moxifloxacin killed S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in vitro faster than tobramycin and gentamicin, suggesting its potential clinical benefit as a first-line treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis to minimize patient symptoms and to limit the contagiousness of the disease.Keywords: kinetics of kill, bacterial conjunctivitis, in vitro, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides

  8. Aquaculture changes the profile of antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic element associated genes in Baltic Sea sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muziasari, Windi I; Pärnänen, Katariina; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Karkman, Antti; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in aquaculture and they can change the environmental resistome by increasing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Sediment samples were collected from two fish farms located in the Northern Baltic Sea, Finland, and from a site outside the farms (control). The sediment resistome was assessed by using a highly parallel qPCR array containing 295 primer sets to detect ARGs, mobile genetic elements and the 16S rRNA gene. The fish farm resistomes were enriched in transposon and integron associated genes and in ARGs encoding resistance to antibiotics which had been used to treat fish at the farms. Aminoglycoside resistance genes were also enriched in the farm sediments despite the farms not having used aminoglycosides. In contrast, the total relative abundance values of ARGs were higher in the control sediment resistome and they were mainly genes encoding efflux pumps followed by beta-lactam resistance genes, which are found intrinsically in many bacteria. This suggests that there is a natural Baltic sediment resistome. The resistome associated with fish farms can be from native ARGs enriched by antibiotic use at the farms and/or from ARGs and mobile elements that have been introduced by fish farming. PMID:26976842

  9. Suppressive Activity of a Macrolide Antibiotic, Roxithromycin, on Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Suzaki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the influence of a macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin (RXM, on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. In the first experiments, we examined the effect of RXM on in vitro cytokine production from lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood monocytes. The monocytes were cultured in the presence of various doses of the agent. After 24 h, the culture supernatants were obtained and assayed for IL-1β and TNF-α contents by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RXM suppressed the in vitro production of IL-1β and TNF-α in response to LPS stimulation. This was dose dependent and first noted at a concentration of as little as 0.05 μg/ml, which is much lower than therapeutic blood levels. In the second part of the experiments, we examined the influence of RXM on the appearance of IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse lung extract induced by LPS inhalation. RXM was administered orally into BALB/c mice at a single dose of 2.5 mg/kg once a day for 5-12 weeks. These mice were then instilled with LPS into the trachea and examined for the presence of cytokines in aqueous lung extracts. Pretreatment of mice with RXM for 5 weeks did not influence of the appearance of both IL-1β and TNF-α in aqueous lung extracts. However, pretreatment for more than 7 weeks dramatically suppressed the cytokine appearance in the extracts.

  10. Antibiotic lock therapy: review of technique and logistical challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justo JA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Julie Ann Justo, P Brandon Bookstaver Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections is a simple strategy in theory, yet its real-world application may be delayed or avoided due to technical questions and/or logistical challenges. This review focuses on these latter aspects of ALT, including preparation information for a variety of antibiotic lock solutions (ie, aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, folate antagonists, glycopeptides, glycylcyclines, lipopeptides, oxazolidinones, polymyxins, and tetracyclines and common clinical issues surrounding ALT administration. Detailed data regarding concentrations, additives, stability/compatibility, and dwell times are summarized. Logistical challenges such as lock preparation procedures, use of additives (eg, heparin, citrate, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, timing of initiation and therapy duration, optimal dwell time and catheter accessibility, and risks of ALT are also described. Development of local protocols is recommended in order to avoid these potential barriers and encourage utilization of ALT where appropriate. Keywords: antibiotic lock, biofilm, bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection

  11. [Modification of antibiotic resistance in microbial symbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznabaeva, L M; Usviatsov, B Ia; Bukharin, O V

    2010-01-01

    In antibiotic therapy it is necessary to use drugs active against the pathogen in its association with the host normal microflora. The aim of the study was to investigate modification of antibiotic resistance under conditions of the pathogen association with the representatives of the host normal microflora and to develop the microbiological criteria for determining effectiveness of antibacterials. Modification of microbial antibiotic resistance was investigated in 408 associations. Various changes in the antibiotic resistance of the strains were revealed: synergism, antagonism and indifference. On the basis of the results it was concluded that in the choice of the antibiotic active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes the preference should be given to oxacillin, gentamicin and levomycetin, since the resistance of the pathogens to these antibiotics under the association conditions did not increase, which could contribute to their destruction, whereas the resistance of the normoflora increased or did not change, which was important for its retention in the biocenosis. The data on changeability of the antibiotic resistance of the microbial strains under the association conditions made it possible to develop microbiological criteria for determining effectiveness of antibiotics in the treatment of inflammatory diseases of microbial etiology (RF Patent No. 2231554). PMID:21033469

  12. Estimation of the use of antibiotics in the small ruminant industry in The Netherlands in 2011 and 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Santman-Berends

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the quantity of antibiotics and classes of antibiotics used in the small ruminant industry in the Netherlands in 2011 and 2012. Twelve large veterinary practices, located throughout the Netherlands were selected for this study. All small ruminant farms associated with these practices that had complete records on the quantity of antibiotics prescribed were included. The veterinary practices provided data on all antibiotics prescribed, and the estimated animal used daily dose of antibiotics per year (AUDD/Y was calculated for each farm. The median AUDD/Y in small ruminant farms was zero in both years (mean 0.60 in 2011, and 0.62 in 2012. The largest quantity of antibiotic use was observed in the professional goat industry (herds of ≥32 goats with a median AUDD/Y of 1.22 in 2011 and 0.73 in 2012. In the professional sheep industry (flocks of ≥32 sheep, the median AUDD/Y was 0 in 2011 and 0.10 in 2012. In the small scale industry (flocks or herds of <32 sheep or goats, the median AUDD/Y never exceeded 0. The most frequently prescribed antibiotics in the small scale industry and professional sheep farms belonged to the penicillin class. In professional goat farms, antibiotics of the aminoglycoside class were most frequently prescribed. This study provides the first assessment on the quantity of antibiotic use in the small ruminant industry. Given a comparable attitude towards antibiotic use, these results might be valid for small ruminant populations in other north-western European countries as well. The antibiotic use in the small ruminant industry appeared to be low, and is expected to play a minor role in the development of antibiotic resistance. Nevertheless, several major zoonotic bacterial pathogens are associated with the small ruminant industry, and it remains important that antibiotics are used in a prudent way.

  13. Potent activity of the lichen antibiotic (+)-usnic acid against clinical isolates of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Hannu; Matikainen, Jorma; Pelttari, Eila

    2007-06-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and methicillin-resistant staphylococci, most notably methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are serious clinical problems. The antibiotic arsenal available against them is limited, and new mutants worsen the situation. We studied the activity of (+)-usnic acid, an old lichen-derived drug, and its sodium salt against clinical isolates of VRE and MRSA using the agar diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. The acid and, especially, the sodium salt had potent antimicrobial activity against all clinical isolates of VRE and MRSA studied. The MIC values of the sodium salt against VRE strains ranged between 4 and 16 μg/ml (1-day test) and between 4 and 31 μg/ml (2-day test), being below 8 μg/ml for most strains. The salt had potent activity even against those strains that were not inhibited by ampicillin (125 μg/ml), and it never lost its activity after 24 h, in contrast to ampicillin. Thus, in spite of the fact that usnic acid can in some cases cause serious toxicity, it and its salts may be worth considering in clinical practice in cases where other therapies have failed or the microbe is resistant toward other agents.

  14. [In vitro activity of meropenem and seven other beta-lactam antibiotics against K.pneumoniae and enterobacteriaceae producing beta-lactamases with extended spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, J D; Fabre, R; Crenn, Y; Meyran, M

    1994-05-01

    Meropenem is a broad antibacterial spectrum carbapenem with a good activity on betalactam resistant Gram-negative bacilli. 120 non repetitive strains isolated from clinical samples from 1989 to 1992 were selected: 60 K. pneumoniae, 7 E. coli, 2 E. aerogenes and 1 S. marcescens with extended spectrum betalactamases (23 CTX-1, 18 SHV-2, 5 SHV-3, 16 SHV-4, 4 SHV-5, 3 CTX-1 + SHV-4, 1 CAZ-1), 10 K. pneumoniae with broad spectrum TEM-1 enzyme, and 40 K. pneumoniae with only SHV-1 chromosomal betalactamase. Determination of Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) was done by agar dilution method for meropenem and 7 other betalactams (amoxicillin + clavulanic acid 2 mg/l, piperacillin + tazobactam 4 mg/l, cefoxitin, cefotetan, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, imipenem). All antibiotics except amoxicillin + clavulanic acid are active against strains with constitutive penicillinase. For strains with TEM-1 penicillinase, cephamycins, third generation cephalosporins and carbapenems are active. For strains with different extended spectrum betalactamases only cephamycins and carbapenems are efficious. There is no difference according to the period of isolation: 1989-90 or 1991-92. Meropenem has the best in vitro activity (MIC50 = 0.03 mg/l) for all strains independently of the nature of betalactamase. PMID:7824297

  15. Environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and correlation to anthropogenic contamination with antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berglund

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem which threatens modern healthcare globally. Resistance has traditionally been viewed as a clinical problem, but recently non-clinical environments have been highlighted as an important factor in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT events are likely to be common in aquatic environments; integrons in particular are well suited for mediating environmental dissemination of ARGs. A growing body of evidence suggests that ARGs are ubiquitous in natural environments. Particularly, elevated levels of ARGs and integrons in aquatic environments are correlated to proximity to anthropogenic activities. The source of this increase is likely to be routine discharge of antibiotics and resistance genes, for example, via wastewater or run-off from livestock facilities and agriculture. While very high levels of antibiotic contamination are likely to select for resistant bacteria directly, the role of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in environmental antibiotic resistance dissemination remains unclear. In vitro studies have shown that low levels of antibiotics can select for resistant mutants and also facilitate HGT, indicating the need for caution. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that the environment plays an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance; further studies are needed to elucidate key aspects of this process. Importantly, the levels of environmental antibiotic contamination at which resistant bacteria are selected for and HGT is facilitated at should be determined. This would enable better risk analyses and facilitate measures for preventing dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Gram-Negative Psychrotrophic Bacteria from Bulk Tank Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimo, Marilù; Silvetti, Tiziana; Brasca, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major global health problem and resistance of Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae is a serious concern. We investigated the prevalence of drug-resistance in a total of 80 psychrotrophic strains from bulk milk belonging to Pseudomonas genus (n. 63) and Enterobacteriaceae group (n. 17). All the strains were tested against 16 antibiotics. Pseudomonas were further investigated for their sensitivity against 12 additional antibiotics. Pseudomonas showed a high susceptibility toward fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and piperacillin and, to a lesser extent, to imipenem, ceftazidime, cefepime. Thirty-five out of 63 Pseudomonas strains were susceptible to meropenem, while among antibiotics for which recommended breakpoints are not yet available, 55% of Pseudomonas strains had no inhibition halo in presence of nitrofurantoin, highlighting a resistance toward this drug. The results obtained in this study indicate a high efficiency of fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol (94%), and kanamycin (76%) for Enterobacteriaceae while a high prevalence of resistant strains was found to ampicillin (13/17). Serratia marcescens is highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin. Moreover, mupirocin seems to be the new antibiotic with the less efficacy for Enterobacteriaceae, with 41% of strains without halo, pointing out an important resistance. Further knowledge on resistance to known and new antibiotics among Pseudomonas species and Enterobacteriaceae of milk origin was acquired. PMID:26910385

  17. Analysis of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from the surface microlayer and underlying water of an estuarine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Juliana S N; Araújo, Susana; Oliveira, Cláudia S; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    We compared the prevalence of cultivable antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes in the surface microlayer (SML) and underlying waters (UW) of an estuary. Prevalence of resistant bacteria was determined in antibiotic-supplemented agar. Bacterial isolates from the UW (n=91) and SML (n=80), selected in media without antibiotic, were characterized concerning susceptibility against nine antibiotics. The presence of genes bla(TEM), bla(OXA-B), bla(SHV), bla(IMP), tet(A), tet(B), tet(E), tet(M), cat, sul1, sul2, sul3, aadA, IntI1, IntI2, and IntI3 was assessed by PCR. The variable regions of integrons were sequenced. Ampicillin- and streptomycin-resistant bacteria were significantly more prevalent in SML. Resistance levels among the bacterial collections were generally low, preventing detection of significant differences between SML and UW. The tet(E) gene was detected in two Aeromonas isolates and tet(M) was detected in a Pseudomonas isolate. Gene sul1 was amplified from three Aeromonas isolates. Prevalence of intI genes was 2.11%. Cassette arrays contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides and chloramphenicol. A higher prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the SML, although only detectable when bacteria were selected in antibiotic-supplemented agar, suggests that SML conditions select for antibiotic resistance. Results also showed that antibiotic resistance was uncommon among estuarine bacteria and the resistance mechanisms are probably predominantly intrinsic. PMID:23067198

  18. X-ray crystallographic, FT-IR and NMR studies as well as anticancer and antibacterial activity of the salt formed between ionophore antibiotic Lasalocid acid and amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huczyński, Adam; Rutkowski, Jacek; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Stefańska, Joanna; Maj, Ewa; Ratajczak-Sitarz, Małgorzata; Katrusiak, Andrzej; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Bartl, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Two new complexes of the ionophore antibiotic Lasalocid acid (LAS) with phenylamine (PhA) and butylamine (BuA) were synthesized and their molecular structures were studied using single crystal X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods. In the solid state both amines are protonated and all NH3+ protons are hydrogen bonded to etheric, hydroxyl and carboxylic oxygen atoms of the LAS anion. In chloroform solutions the structure observed in the crystal of LAS-BuA complex is preserved and an equilibrium between the LAS-PhA complex and dissociated Lasalocid acid and phenylamine is observed. In vitro antimicrobial tests of the complexes showed a significant activity towards some strains of Gram-positive bacteria. For the first time Lasalocid acid and its complexes with amines were tested in vitro for cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines: A-549 (lung), MCF-7 (breast), HT-29 (colon) and mouse cancer cell line P-388 (leukemia). We found that LAS and its complexes are strong cytotoxic agents towards all tested cell lines. The cytostatic activity of the compounds studied is greater than that of cisplatin, indicating that Lasalocid and its complexes are promising candidates for new anticancer drugs.

  19. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina;

    2014-01-01

    a high proportion of antibiotics not recommended as first choice in primary health care. In conclusion, heavy antibiotic users consisted mainly of children and old adults. Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics (high quantity, high frequency, and inappropriate antibiotic choice) leads to a substantial...... individuals with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received...... risk of the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria, and interventions to reduce overuse of antibiotics should therefore primarily be targeted children and elderly people....

  20. Emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria with special reference to India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Raghunath

    2008-11-01

    The antibiotic era started in the 1940s and changed the profile of infectious diseases and human demography. The burgeoning classes and numbers promised much and elimination of this major cause of human (and animal) morbidity appeared possible. Bacterial antibiotic resistance which was observed soon after antibiotic introduction has been studied extensively. Diverse mechanisms have been demonstrated and the genetic basis elucidated. The resilience of the prokaryote ecosystems to antibiotic stress has been realized. The paper presents these subjects briefly to afford an overview. The epidemiology of antibiotic resistance is dealt with and community practices in different countries are described. The role of high antibiotic usage environments is indicated. The implication of the wide use of antibiotics in animals has been pointed out. Steadily increasing antibiotic resistance and decreasing numbers of newer antibiotics appear to point to a post-antibiotic period during which treatment of infections would become increasingly difficult. This article attempts to review the global antimicrobial resistance scene and juxtaposes it to the Indian experience. The prevalence in India of antibiotic resistance among major groups of pathogens is described. The factors that determine the prevalent high antibiotic resistance rates have been highlighted. The future research activity to ensure continued utility of antibiotics in the control of infections has been indicated.

  1. Understanding Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Goulart-Touma, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance among bacteria threatens our continued ability to treat infectious diseases. The need for sustainable strategies to cure bacterial infections has never been greater. So far, all attempts to restore susceptibility after resistance arises have been unsuccessful, including restrictions on prescribing antibiotics (Andersson DI et al.2011) and antibiotic cycling (Andersson DI et al. 2005, Bergstrom CT et al. 2004). Part of the problem may be that those effor...

  2. Aminoglycoside Efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement of Novel Outer Membrane Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, James T. H.; Brinkman, Fiona S.L.; Hancock, Robert E W

    2003-01-01

    The expression of tripartite multidrug efflux pumps such as MexA-MexB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to intrinsic resistance to a wide variety of antimicrobials, including β-lactams, chloramphenicol, macrolides, quinolones, and tetracycline. The MexX-MexY linker-pump combination has been shown to be involved in intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides, but the identity of the cognate outer membrane channel component remains under debate. Fourteen uncharacterized OprM homologs ident...

  3. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual fl...

  4. Macrophage adaptation leads to parallel evolution of genetically diverse Escherichia coli small-colony variants with increased fitness in vivo and antibiotic collateral sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiro, Ricardo S; Costa, Henrique; Gordo, Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Small-colony variants (SCVs) are commonly observed in evolution experiments and clinical isolates, being associated with antibiotic resistance and persistent infections. We recently observed the repeated emergence of Escherichia coli SCVs during adaptation to the interaction with macrophages. To identify the genetic targets underlying the emergence of this clinically relevant morphotype, we performed whole-genome sequencing of independently evolved SCV clones. We uncovered novel mutational targets, not previously associated with SCVs (e.g. cydA, pepP) and observed widespread functional parallelism. All SCV clones had mutations in genes related to the electron-transport chain. As SCVs emerged during adaptation to macrophages, and often show increased antibiotic resistance, we measured SCV fitness inside macrophages and measured their antibiotic resistance profiles. SCVs had a fitness advantage inside macrophages and showed increased aminoglycoside resistance in vitro, but had collateral sensitivity to other antibiotics (e.g. tetracycline). Importantly, we observed similar results in vivo. SCVs had a fitness advantage upon colonization of the mouse gut, which could be tuned by antibiotic treatment: kanamycin (aminoglycoside) increased SCV fitness, but tetracycline strongly reduced it. Our results highlight the power of using experimental evolution as the basis for identifying the causes and consequences of adaptation during host-microbe interactions. PMID:27606007

  5. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  6. Structure of polysaccharide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the structure of antibiotics having two or several sugars in their molecule. One may distinguish: the polysaccharide antibiotics themselves, made up of two or several sugars either with or without nitrogen, such as streptomycin, neomycins, paromomycine, kanamycin, chalcomycin; the hetero-polysaccharide antibiotics made up of one saccharide part linked to an aglycone of various type through a glucoside: macrolide, pigment, pyrimidine purine. Amongst these latter are: erythromycin, magnamycin, spiramycin, oleandomycin, cinerubin and amicetin. The sugars can either play a direct role in biochemical reactions or act as a dissolving agent, as far as the anti-microbe power of these antibiotics is concerned. (author)

  7. LOWER DOSE OF AMINOGLYCOSIDE OTOTOXIC EXPOSURE CAUSES PRESYNAPTIC ALTERATIONS ASSOICATED WITH HEARING LOSS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ke; WANG Xiaoyu; LI Sijun; TANG Siquan; XU Yice; WANG Xuefeng; SUN Jianhe; YANG Weiyan; YANG Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study presynaptic alternations of cochlear ribbons arising from aminoglycoside ototoxic stimuli in C57BL/6J mice. Methods Animals were injected with low dose gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day) for 14 days, From the 14th to 28th days, the mice were maintained free of gentamicin treatment. Immunohisto-chemistry labeling was employed to trace RIBEYE, a major presynaptic componment of ribbon synapses. RIBEYE/CtBP2 expression levels were assessed and compared with hearing threshold shifts. Auditory func-tion was assessed by auditory brainstem responses. The stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs) and IHCs was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Hearing thresholds were elevated with peak hearing loss observed on the 7th day after gentamicin exposure, followed by improvement after the 7th day. RIBEYE/CtBP2 expression directly correlated with observed hearing threshold shifts. Strikingly, we did not see any obvious changes in stereocilia in both OHCs and IHCs until the 28th day. Mild changes in stereocil-ia were only observed in OHCs on the 28th day. Conclusions These findings indicate that presynapse co-chlear ribbons, rather than stereocilia, may be sensitive to aminoglycoside ototoxic exposure in mice cochle-ae. A pattern of RIBEYE/CtBP2 expression changes seems to parallel hearing threshold shifts and suggests presynaptic response properties to lower dosage of aminoglycoside ototoxic stimuli.

  8. Heparin interferes with the radioenzymatic and homogeneous enzyme immunoassays for aminoglycosides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heparin interferes with measurement of aminoglycosides in serum by biological, radioenzymatic, and homogeneous enzyme immunoassay techniques, but not with radioimmunoassay. At concentrations greater than or equal to 105 and greater than or equal to 3 X 106 USP units/L, respectively, it interferes with the radioenzymatic assay by inhibiting the gentamicin 3-acetyltransferase and kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase enzymes used in the assay. It interferes with the homogeneous enzyme immunoassays for gentamicin and tobramycin (at concentrations greater than or equal to 105 and greater than or equal to104 USP units/L, respectively), but not with the commercially available homogeneous enzyme immunoassays for other drugs. Heparin interference with the homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for aminoglycosides requires both the heparin polyanion and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase bound to a cationic aminoglycoside. This interference can be reproduced with dextran sulfate (but not dextran), and does not occur with free enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) alone. Heparin interference with these two assays and at concentrations that may be present in intravenous infusions or in seriously underfilled blood-collection tubes is described

  9. Influence of monocytes and antibiotic treatment on tissue factor activity of endocardial vegetations in rabbits infected with Streptococcus sanguis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bancsi, M J; Veltrop, M H; Bertina, R M; Thompson, J

    1996-01-01

    A main feature in the pathogenesis of bacterial endocarditis is the activation of the coagulation system via the extrinsic pathway, resulting in the formation of infected endocardial vegetations. Earlier studies gave indirect evidence that monocytes play an important role in the procoagulant response during the course of the disease. In this study, we assessed the role of monocytes more directly. We compared weights and tissue factor activities (TFA) of endocardial vegetations of normal rabbi...

  10. In Vitro Activities of Antibiotics Alone and in Combination against Brucella melitensis at Neutral and Acidic pHs

    OpenAIRE

    Akova, Murat; Gür, Deniz; Livermore, David M; Kocagöz, Tanil; Akalin, H. Erdal

    1999-01-01

    Brucellae survive acidic pHs in phagolysosomes. Azithromycin, streptomycin, and quinolones were active against Brucella melitensis at pH 7.0 but not at pH 5.0; rifampin and doxycycline retained activity at pH 5.0. Regardless of pH, azithromycin-rifampin and ofloxacin-rifampin showed less synergy than established streptomycin-doxycycline and rifampin-doxycycline combinations.

  11. Comparative study of the effect of pharmaceutical additives on the elimination of antibiotic activity during the treatment of oxacillin in water by the photo-Fenton, TiO2-photocatalysis and electrochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Galvis, Efraim A; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Giraldo, Ana L; Flórez-Acosta, Oscar A; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2016-01-15

    Synthetic pharmaceutical effluents loaded with the β-lactam antibiotic oxacillin were treated using advanced oxidation processes (the photo-Fenton system and TiO2 photocatalysis) and chloride mediated electrochemical oxidation (with Ti/IrO2 anodes). Combinations of the antibiotic with excipients (mannitol or tartaric acid), an active ingredient (calcium carbonate, i.e. bicarbonate ions due to the pH) and a cleaning agent (sodium lauryl ether sulfate) were considered. Additionally, urban wastewater that had undergone biological treatment was doped with oxacillin and treated with the tested systems. The evolution of antimicrobial activity was monitored as a parameter of processes efficiency. Although the two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) differ only in the way they produce OH, marked differences were observed between them. There were also differences between the AOPs and the electrochemical system. Interestingly, each additive had a different effect on each treatment. For water loaded with mannitol, electrochemical treatment was the most suitable option because the additive did not significantly affect the efficiency of the system. Due to the formation of a complex with Fe(3+), tartaric acid accelerated the elimination of antibiotic activity during the photo-Fenton process. For TiO2 photocatalysis, the presence of bicarbonate ions contributed to antibiotic activity elimination through the possible formation of carbonate and bicarbonate radicals. Sodium lauryl ether sulfate negatively affected all of the processes. However, due to the higher selectivity of HOCl compared with OH, electrochemical oxidation showed the least inhibited efficiency. For the urban wastewater doped with oxacillin, TiO2 photocatalysis was the most efficient process. These results will help select the most suitable technology for the treatment of water polluted with β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:26479916

  12. Photocatalytic ozonation of urban wastewater and surface water using immobilized TiO2 with LEDs: Micropollutants, antibiotic resistance genes and estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Nuno F F; Sousa, José M; Macedo, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Ana R; Barreiros, Luisa; Pedrosa, Marta; Faria, Joaquim L; Pereira, M Fernando R; Castro-Silva, Sérgio; Segundo, Marcela A; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C; Silva, Adrián M T

    2016-05-01

    Photocatalytic ozonation was employed for the first time in continuous mode with TiO2-coated glass Raschig rings and light emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat urban wastewater as well as surface water collected from the supply area of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). Different levels of contamination and types of contaminants were considered in this work, including chemical priority substances (PSs) and contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), as well as potential human opportunistic antibiotic resistant bacteria and their genes (ARB&ARG). Photocatalytic ozonation was more effective than single ozonation (or even than TiO2 catalytic ozonation) in the degradation of typical reaction by-products (such as oxalic acid), and more effective than photocatalysis to remove the parent micropollutants determined in urban wastewater. In fact, only fluoxetine, clarithromycin, erythromycin and 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were detected after photocatalytic ozonation, by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) pre-concentration and LC-MS/MS analysis. In surface water, this treatment allowed the removal of all determined micropollutants to levels below the limit of detection (0.01-0.20 ng L(-1)). The efficiency of this process was then assessed based on the capacity to remove different groups of cultivable microorganisms and housekeeping (16S rRNA) and antibiotic resistance or related genes (intI1, blaTEM, qnrS, sul1). Photocatalytic ozonation was observed to efficiently remove microorganisms and ARGs. Although after storage total heterotrophic and ARB (to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, meropenem), fungi, and the genes 16S rRNA and intI1, increased to values close to the pre-treatment levels, the ARGs (blaTEM, qnrS and sul1) were reduced to levels below/close to the quantification limit even after 3-days storage of treated surface water or wastewater. Yeast estrogen screen (YES), thiazolyl blue tetrazolium reduction (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were also performed

  13. Lithocholic acid and derivatives: Antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Patrícia G G; Lemos, Telma L G; Almeida, Macia C S; de Souza, Juliana M O; Bizerra, Ayla M C; Santiago, Gilvandete M P; da Costa, José G M; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2015-12-01

    In order to develop bioactive lithocholic acid derivatives, we prepared fifteen semi-synthetic compounds through modification at C-3 and/or C-24. The reactions showed yields ranging from 37% to 100%. The structures of all compounds obtained were identified on the basis of their spectral data (IR, MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR). The activity of lithocholic acid and derivatives was evaluated against the growth of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The derivative 3α-formyloxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (LA-06) showed the best activity, with MIC values of 0.0790 mM against E. coli (Ec 27) and B. cereus in both cases, and 0.0395 mM against S. aureus (ATCC 12692). Lithocholic acid and the derivatives with MIC⩽1.2 mM were evaluated on the susceptibility of some bacterial pathogens to the aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin, amikacin and gentamicin was evaluated. There are no previously reported studies about these compounds as modifiers of the action of antibiotics or any other drugs. PMID:26216208

  14. Activities of beta-lactam antibiotics against Escherichia coli strains producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, G A; Carreras, I

    1990-01-01

    Seven extended-spectrum beta-lactamases related to TEM and four enzymes derived from SHV-1 were transferred to a common Escherichia coli host so that the activity of a variety of beta-lactams could be tested in a uniform genetic environment. For most derivatives, penicillinase activity was 10% or less than that of strains making TEM-1, TEM-2, or SHV-1 beta-lactamase, suggesting that reduced catalytic efficiency accompanied the broader substrate spectrum. Despite this deficit, resistance to az...

  15. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:22029522

  16. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greinwald John H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will

  17. Evidence that antibiotic of Pantoea agglomerans E325 is produced and active against Erwinia amylovora on stigmas of pomaceous blossoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325, the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight, previously was shown to produce a unique pH-sensitive inhibitor in vitro that is specific to E. amylovora. To evaluate antibiosis as a mode of antagonism of E325, Tn5 mutagenesis was used to generate...

  18. Antimicrobial activities of natural antimicrobial compounds against susceptible and antibiotic-resistant pathogens in the absence and presence of food

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to improve microbial food safety, we are studying the antimicrobial activities of different classes of natural compounds including plant essential oils, apple, grape, olive, and tea extracts, bioactive components, and seashell-derived chitosans against multiple foodborne pathogens in cu...

  19. Influence of inducible cross-resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramin B-type antibiotics in Enterococcus faecium on activity of quinupristin-dalfopristin in vitro and in rabbits with experimental endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fantin, B.; Leclercq, R.; Garry, L; Carbon, C

    1997-01-01

    The influence of inducible cross-resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) type antibiotics (inducible MLS(B) phenotype) on the activity of quinupristin-dalfopristin was investigated against Enterococcus faecium in vitro and in rabbits with experimental endocarditis. In vitro, quinupristin-dalfopristin displayed bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities against a MLS(B)-susceptible strain similar to those against two strains with the inducible MLS(B) phenotype. In ...

  20. The future of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellberg, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on 'push' incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  1. Immunomodulatory actions of antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minić Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antimicrob drugs and immune system interaction has been studied since the pioneer works of Metchnikoff. After the introduction of antibiotics in clinical practice this area has attracted little attention of investigators, because of the lack of standards. This is the reason that the studying of the influence of antibiotics on immune system is still at its beginning. Aim: To point out the immunomodulatory action of some antibiotics on certain components of immune system. Methods and results. The literaure findings show that antibiotics exspress immunomodulatory action on some components of immune system such as fagocytes (polymorphonucleary, macrophages, monocytes, cytokines, immunoglobulines, and on cellular immunity. The principles of antibiotics action on phagocyte are the inhibition of chemotaxis and oxidants production. Macrolides applied for a short time enchance the phagocytic functions while their long use leads to immunosupression. Some cephalosporines and rifampicin in therapeutic doses inhibit the oxydative metabolism of macrophages. Tetracyclines, clindamycines, chloramphenicol and tobramycin inhibit the synthesis of superoxyd anione. The action of some antibiotics on cytokine and specific antibodies is also important. Cellular immunity can be affected as well. After administration of certain antibiotics it takes 1-2 weeks to reestablish normal cellular immunity, and for other even more. Conclusion. There is still no clear standing on real effects of antibiotics on the immune system. Clinicians should search for more information from this new-old field of investigation in order to give more adequate therapy to patients.

  2. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  3. Urgent Need to Antibiotic Pharmacokinetic Services for Iranian Health Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Hayatshahi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the emergence of both Gram negative and Gram positive resistant bacterial strains in the recent years, makes it more prominent to utilize the existed antibiotics in an appropriate and justified way in the treatment of drug resistant infections. Many of the agents currently used to treat bacterial, viral and fungal infections do not need to be pharmacokinetically monitored; it means we do not require their serum levels in order to adjust the dose in a routine manner. Examples of these antibiotics are penicillins, cephalosporins, macrolides, tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, etc. Of course these agents need dose adjustment based on renal and hepatic functions. On the other hand there are antibiotics which need to be monitored through their serum levels because of three main following reasons: 1-      To avoid overdosing patient and reduce the incidence of toxicities. 2-      To avoid underdosing patient, this may lead to the emergence of resistant strains and treatment failure. 3-      To optimize the dose of antibiotic to achieve the bactericidal or bacteriostatic effects needed to suppress the infective agent. At this point, we are using vancomycin as a broad spectrum Gram positive agent and aminoglycosides both for the synergism for Gram positive coverage and also for treatment of Gram negative infection in combination with other agents. According to the guidelines published by the accredited organizations like Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA and American Society of Healthcare Pharmacists (ASHP, it is crucially important to perform therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM for both vancomycin and aminoglycosides based on their serum levels for all patients on these agents. In the other word, it is a wrong antibiotic therapy without monitoring the levels. Almost in all medical centers nationwide including teaching hospitals the clinicians prescribe vancomycin very often and aminoglycosides like gentamicin and

  4. Antibacterial activities of selected Cameroonian spices and their synergistic effects with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fankam Aimé G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR phenotypes is a major public health problem today in the treatment of bacterial infections. The present study was designed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of eleven Cameroonian spices on a panel of twenty nine Gram negative bacteria including MDR strains. Methods The phytochemical analysis of the extracts was carried out by standard tests meanwhile the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for all antimicrobial assays. Results Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids, phenols and tannins in all plants extracts. The results of the antibacterial assays indicated that all tested extracts exert antibacterial activities, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values varying from 32 to 1024 μg/ml. The extracts from Dichrostachys glomerata, Beilschmiedia cinnamomea, Aframomum citratum, Piper capense, Echinops giganteus, Fagara xanthoxyloïdes and Olax subscorpioïdea were the most active. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor, PAßN, the activity of the extract from D. glomerata significantly increased on 69.2% of the tested MDR bacteria. At MIC/5, synergistic effects were noted with the extract of D. glomerata on 75% of the tested bacteria for chloramphenicol (CHL, tetracycline (TET and norfloxacin (NOR. With B. cinnamomea synergy were observed on 62.5% of the studied MDR bacteria with CHL, cefepime (FEP, NOR and ciprofloxacin (CIP and 75% with erythromycin (ERY. Conclusion The overall results provide information for the possible use of the studied extracts of the spices in the control of bacterial infections involving MDR phenotypes.

  5. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  6. Biosynthesis of Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Van Lanen, Steven G.; Shen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The enediyne polyketides are secondary metabolites isolated from a variety of Actinomycetes. All members share very potent anticancer and antibiotic activity, and prospects for the clinical application of the enediynes has been validated with the recent marketing of two enediyne derivatives as anticancer agents. The biosynthesis of these compounds is of interest because of the numerous structural features that are unique to the enediyne family. The gene cluster for five enediynes has now been...

  7. Uncialamycin, a new enediyne antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Julian; Wang, Hao; Taylor, Terry; Warabi, Kaoru; Huang, Xin-Hui; Andersen, Raymond J

    2005-11-10

    [structure: see text] Laboratory cultures of an undescribed streptomycete obtained from the surface of a British Columbia lichen produce uncialamycin (1), a new enediyne antibiotic. The structure of uncialamycin (1) has been elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data. Uncialamycin (1) exhibits potent in vitro antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative human pathogens, including Burkholderia cepacia, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:16268546

  8. Minocycline: far beyond an antibiotic

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido-Mesa, N; Zarzuelo, A; Gálvez, J

    2013-01-01

    Minocycline is a second-generation, semi-synthetic tetracycline that has been in therapeutic use for over 30 years because of its antibiotic properties against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It is mainly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris and some sexually transmitted diseases. Recently, it has been reported that tetracyclines can exert a variety of biological actions that are independent of their anti-microbial activity, including anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic acti...

  9. In vitro activities of aztreonam, piperacillin, and ticarcillin combined with amikacin against amikacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. cepacia isolates from children with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Aronoff, S C; Klinger, J D

    1984-01-01

    Amikacin, combined with aztreonam, piperacillin, or ticarcillin, synergistically inhibited amikacin-resistant sputum isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. cepacia from children with cystic fibrosis. Ticarcillin-amikacin was the least active combination. Aminoglycoside resistance should not preclude the use of beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combinations in the treatment of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis.

  10. Sn doping induced enhancement in the activity of ZnO nanostructures against antibiotic resistant S. aureus bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tariq Jan,1 Javed Iqbal,1 Muhammad Ismail,2 M Zakaullah,3 Sajjad Haider Naqvi,4 Noor Badshah51Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology, Department of Physics, International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan; 2Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering, Islamabad, Pakistan; 3Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan; 4Department of Biochemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan; 5Department of Basic Science, University of Engineering and Technology, Peshawar, PakistanAbstract: Highly ionic metal oxide nanostructures are attractive, not only for their physiochemical properties but also for antibacterial activity. Zinc oxide (ZnO nanostructures are known to have inhibitory activity against many pathogens but very little is known about doping effects on it. The antibacterial activity of undoped ZnO and tin (Sn doped ZnO nanostructures synthesized by a simple, versatile, and wet chemical technique have been investigated against Escherichia coli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial strains. It has been interestingly observed that Sn doping enhanced the inhibitory activity of ZnO against S. aureus more efficiently than the other two bacterial strains. From cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS production studies it is found that Sn doping concentration in ZnO does not alter the cytotoxicity and ROS production very much. It has also been observed that undoped and Sn doped ZnO nanostructures are biosafe and biocompatible materials towards SH-SY5Y Cells. The observed behavior of ZnO nanostructures with Sn doping is a new way to prevent bacterial infections of S. aureus, especially on skin, when using these nanostructures in creams or lotions in addition to their sunscreen property as an ultraviolet filter. Structural investigations have confirmed the formation of a single phase wurtzite structure of ZnO. The morphology of ZnO nanostructures is found to vary

  11. Nationwide German Multicenter Study on Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcal Bloodstream Isolates and Comparative In Vitro Activities of Quinupristin-Dalfopristin

    OpenAIRE

    von Eiff, Christof; Reinert, Ralf René; Kresken, Michael; Brauers, Johannes; Hafner, Dieter; Peters, Georg

    2000-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant gram-positive bacteria have become an increasing problem in the last two decades. In order to evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in staphylococcal bloodstream isolates in Germany, 2,042 staphylococci collected in 21 tertiary-care hospitals were investigated during a 3-year period (March 1996 to March 1999). Altogether, 1,448 S. aureus isolates and 594 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) that comprised 13 different species were included. Furthermore, the ...

  12. Studies of viomycin, an anti-tuberculosis antibiotic: copper(ii) coordination, DNA degradation and the impact on delta ribozyme cleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokowa-Sołtys, K; Barbosa, N A; Kasprowicz, A; Wieczorek, R; Gaggelli, N; Gaggelli, E; Valensin, G; Wrzesiński, J; Ciesiołka, J; Kuliński, T; Szczepanik, W; Jeżowska-Bojczuk, M

    2016-05-17

    Viomycin is a basic peptide antibiotic, which is among the most effective agents against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. In this paper we provide the characteristics of its acid base properties, coordination preferences towards the Cu(ii) ions, as well as the reactivity of the resulting complexes against plasmid DNA and HDV ribozyme. Careful coordination studies throughout the wide pH range allow for the characterisation of all the Cu(ii)-viomycin complex species. The assignment of proton chemical shifts was achieved by NMR experiments, while the DTF level of theory was applied to support molecular structures of the studied complexes. The experiments with the plasmid DNA reveal that at the physiological levels of hydrogen peroxide the Cu(ii)-viomycin complex is more aggressive against DNA than uncomplexed metal ions. Moreover, the degradation of DNA by viomycin can be carried out without the presence of transition metal ions. In the studies of antigenomic delta ribozyme catalytic activity, viomycin and its complex are shown to modulate the ribozyme functioning. The molecular modelling approach allows the indication of two different locations of viomycin binding sites to the ribozyme. PMID:27143296

  13. A study of the catalytic role of a gold electrode in the electrochemical activation of four macrolide antibiotics in sodium bicarbonate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka L. Avramov Ivić

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the cyclic voltammetry, it has been shown that hydrogen evolution at a gold electrode is necessary in the electrochemical activation of azithromycin dihydrate and erythromycin A. After four hours of the potential holding at –1.2 V vs. SCE, the pH of the electrolyte has been changed from 8.40 to 8.96; from 8.40 to 8.77 in the presence of erythromycin A, and from 8.40 to 9.18 in the presence of azithromycin, indicating the reaction of the hydrogen species with antibiotics. This effect has been confirmed by using the phenolphthalein indicator and by analysing colours of the solutions by UV-Vis, as well as by FTIR spectroscopy. Under the identical experimental conditions at the gold electrode, in contrast to azithromycin dihydrate and erythromycin A, roxithromycin and midecamycin electroactivity promotion has been obtained during the first forward sweep starting from the area of a double layer region.

  14. Activities of beta-lactam antibiotics against Escherichia coli strains producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, G A; Carreras, I

    1990-05-01

    Seven extended-spectrum beta-lactamases related to TEM and four enzymes derived from SHV-1 were transferred to a common Escherichia coli host so that the activity of a variety of beta-lactams could be tested in a uniform genetic environment. For most derivatives, penicillinase activity was 10% or less than that of strains making TEM-1, TEM-2, or SHV-1 beta-lactamase, suggesting that reduced catalytic efficiency accompanied the broader substrate spectrum. Despite this deficit, resistance to aztreonam, carumonam, cefdinir, cefepime, cefixime, cefmenoxime, cefotaxime, cefotiam, cefpirome, cefpodoxime, ceftazidime, ceftibuten, ceftizoxime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, and E1040 was enhanced. For strains producing TEM-type enzymes, however, MICs of carumonam, cefepime, cefmenoxime, cefotiam, cefpirome, and ceftibuten were 8 micrograms/ml or less. Susceptibilities of cefmetazole, cefotetan, cefoxitin, flomoxef, imipenem, meropenem, moxalactam, temocillin, FCE 22101, and Sch 34343 were unaffected. FCE 22101, imipenem, meropenem, and Sch 34343 were inhibitory for all strains at 1 microgram/ml or less. In E. coli an OmpF- porin mutation in combination with an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase enhanced resistance to many of these agents, but generally by only fourfold. Hyperproduction of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase increased resistance to 7-alpha-methoxy beta-lactams but not that to temocillin. When tested at 8 micrograms/ml, clavulanate was more potent than sulbactam or tazobactam in overcoming resistance to ampicillin, while cefoperazone-sulbactam was more active than ticarcillin-clavulanate or piperacillin-tazobactam, especially against TEM-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. PMID:2193623

  15. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Sory Diarra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics in feed (growth promoters need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2,600 regulated chicken producers. There are several antibiotics approved as feed additives available for poultry farmers. Feed recipes and mixtures greatly vary geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While sporadic reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno

  16. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, Moussa S; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  17. [Antibiotics during pregnancy and breast feeding: consequences for the treatment of respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léophonte, P

    1988-01-01

    Respiratory infections are the second most frequent cause for antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy, after genito-urinary infections. Overall, antibiotics are relatively innocuous. The following should be avoided: the tetracyclines, cotrimoxazole, chloramphenicol, metronidazole and the quinolones. Aminoglycosides should be administered controlling the plasma level. The beta-lactones (principally the penicillins) and the macrolides sold in France, are without any danger. Nevertheless, the rise in distribution volume and the overall physiological changes which accompany the developing pregnancy, particularly in the third trimester lead to a diminution in the serum concentration of these antibiotics and imply an adaptation, often a doubling, of the therapeutic dose administered. From the epidemiological data concerning the organisms involved in the respiratory infections, nearly the totality of extra-hospital infections may be cured by macrolides or penicillins (ampicillin). During more serious infections (nosocomial, or the immuno-depressed) the maternal prognosis should take precedence, adjusting the antibiotic to the organism, before the toxic risk to the child. All the antibiotics are excreted in the mother milk, but in very small quantities; they are generally destroyed in the digestive tract of the child so that the risk of any secondary effect during lactation is minimal. PMID:3041503

  18. Utilization Pattern of Antibiotics in Different Wards of Sari Imam Khomeini Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ebrahimzadeh, Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Due to an increase in cases of irrational drug prescription and it's health and economic consequences, evaluation of the rational use of drugs seemed necessary. Among drug groups antibiotics are greatly significant.Materials and Methods: Utilization pattern of antibiotics in different wards of Sari Imam Khomeini teaching hospital in the first half of 2000 and 2005 were reviewed. ATC/DDD (Anatomic, Therapeutic, Chemical/ Defined Daily Dose methodology was used.Results: Data showed, use of antibiotics jumped from 95.4 DBDs (DDD per patient’s bed-days to 124 DBDs. Distribution of different class of anti-microbial, showed the highest increase in use of vancomycin and clindamycin. Use of cotrimoxazole and aminoglycosides remained fairly unchanged, howerrs consumption of Penicillin G dropped. In year 2005, ICU ward followed by gynecology, were among the University Hospital departments with the highest consumption of antibiotics. Cefazolin was the most prescribed antibiotics during this study.Conclusion: It appers that there is a need for more national drug policities and drug education program for health care professionals. Evaluation of drug distribution in hospitals seems to be necessary.Key words:

  19. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  20. Resistance pattern of clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus against five groups of antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the samples received in pathology laboratory, Pakistan institute of Medical Science, Islamabad, 5069 samples had bacterial growth, among these 2580 (51%) samples were Gram-positive cocci and 1688 were Staphylococcus aureus during a period of two years. Out of these Gram-positive cocci 56% were resistant to penicillin group, 27% were resistant to cephalosporin group, 22% were resistant to aminoglycoside group 15% were resistant to quinolone group and 31% were resistant to other antibiotics (cotrimaxazole, erythromycin, aztreonam, vancomycin, nitrofurantion and meropenam). Antibio-grams of Gram-positive cocci were determined against various antibiotics by disc diffusion method. The rate of resistance to most of the antibiotics such as ampicillin, piperacillin, carbenicillin, penicillin, cephradine, cefotaxime, erythromycin, ceclor, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimexazole (septran), gentamicin, meropenem, ceftazidime, erythromycin, tobramycin, enoxacin was higher when tested against the isolates collected from pus as compared to those from blood and urine. Antibiotic resistant strains were more prevalent in pus samples than other clinical isolates (blood and urine). The randomly selected 155 strains of Staphylococcus aureus when tested against five groups of antibiotics showed resistance rate against ampicillin (92%), cephradine (92%), cephradine (60%), and gentamicin (58%). However intermediate resistance was found in case of vancomicin (38%), in hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. (author)

  1. Osteopontin That Is Elevated in the Airways during COPD Impairs the Antibacterial Activity of Common Innate Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anele Gela

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections of the respiratory tract contribute to exacerbations and disease progression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. There is also an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease in COPD. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood but include impaired mucociliary clearance and structural remodeling of the airways. In addition, antimicrobial proteins that are constitutively expressed or induced during inflammatory conditions are an important part of the airway innate host defense. In the present study, we show that osteopontin (OPN, a multifunctional glycoprotein that is highly upregulated in the airways of COPD patients co-localizes with several antimicrobial proteins expressed in the airways. In vitro, OPN bound lactoferrin, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI, midkine, human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP but showed low or no affinity for lysozyme and LL-37. Binding of OPN impaired the antibacterial activity against the important bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OPN reduced lysozyme-induced killing of S. pneumoniae, a finding that could be explained by binding of OPN to the bacterial surface, thereby shielding the bacteria. A fragment of OPN generated by elastase of P. aeruginosa retained some inhibitory effect. Some antimicrobial proteins have additional functions. However, the muramidase-activity of lysozyme and the protease inhibitory function of SLPI were not affected by OPN. Taken together, OPN can contribute to the impairment of innate host defense by interfering with the function of antimicrobial proteins, thus increasing the vulnerability to acquire infections during COPD.

  2. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexi Bi

    Full Text Available Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa.

  3. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Dexi; Xie, Yingzhou; Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  4. PREVALENCE OF ENTEROCOCCAL INFECTIONS AND THEIR ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HLAR IN SOUTH EAST RAJASTHAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudev

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Enterococci are Gram positive bacteria, which mainly form gastrointestinal flora. Enterococcus has consistently ranked among the most frequent pathogen causing significant hospital-acquired infections. They were classified as group D streptococci. Clinically, the most important species associated with human infections are E. faecalis and E. faecium. Enterococcus develops acquired resistance to several classes of antibiotics either by mutation or by transfer of plasmids and transposons. The acquisition of highlevel aminoglycoside resistance and vancomycin resistance limits the therapeutic options available for clinicians. The present study was undertaken to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the Enterococcus spp. with special reference to High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance (HLAR. MATERIAL AND METHODS The present study was done at tertiary care health centre in South East Rajasthan. A total of 100 isolates taken from both OPD and IPD patients for a period of one year are included in the study. RESULTS A total 100 isolates of Enterococcus from various clinical samples were taken for the current study. In the current study seven species were identified which are E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. raffinosus, E. durans, E. mundtii, E. gallinarum, and E. solitarius. Among all the species, E. faecalis (57 was the predominant isolate in all the samples followed by E. faecium (33, E. raffinosus (4, E. durans and E. mundtii (2 each, E. gallinarum and E. solitarius (1 each. CONCLUSION Enterococcal infections are difficult to treat, as this bacterium has intrinsic resistance to various antibiotics and also can acquire resistance against other antibiotics available for treatment. In the case of complicated Enterococcus infection combination of cephalosporin and aminoglycoside are usually used, but in High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance (HLAR even this combination is unable to inhibit the organism. So it is important to test

  5. Chemical constituents of Parmotrema lichexanthonicum Eliasaro and Alder: isolation, structure modification and evaluation of antibiotic and cytotoxic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the lichen Parmotrema lichexantonicum were isolated the depsidone salazinic acid, the xanthone lichexanthone, and the depside atranorin. The two major compounds, salazinic acid and lichexanthone, were selected for structure modifications. Salazinic acid afforded O-alkyl salazinic acids, some of them potentially cytotoxic against tumor cell lines (HCT-8, SF-295 and MDA/ MB - 435). From lichexanthone were obtained norlichexanthone, 3-O-methylnorlichexanthone, 3-O-methyl-6-O-prenylnorlichexanthone, 3,6-di-O-prenyl-norlichexanthone, 3,6-bis[(3,3-dimethyloxyran-2-il)methoxy] -1-hydroxy-8-methyl-9H-xanten-9-one and 3,6-bis[3-(dimethylamine)propoxy]-1-hydroxy-8-methyl- 9H-xanten-9-one. The last compound was the most active against S. aureus. (author)

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Alters Growth Activity, Autolysis, and Antibiotic Tolerance in a Human Host-Adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Christensen, Anne-Mette; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph;

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among members of polymicrobial infections or between pathogens and the commensal flora may determine disease outcomes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are important opportunistic human pathogens and are both part of the polymicrobial infection communities in human...... hosts. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro interaction between S. aureus and a collection of P. aeruginosa isolates representing different evolutionary steps of a dominant lineage, DK2, that have evolved through decades of growth in chronically infected patients. While the early adapted P....... aeruginosa DK2 strains outcompeted S. aureus during coculture on agar plates, we found that later P. aeruginosa DK2 strains showed a commensal-like interaction, where S. aureus was not inhibited by P. aeruginosa and the growth activity of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of S. aureus. This effect...

  7. Stability of active prophages in industrial Lactococcus lactis strains in the presence of heat, acid, osmotic, oxidative and antibiotic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chun-Hoong; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Beatson, Scott A; Bansal, Nidhi; Turner, Mark S

    2016-03-01

    system that maintains prophages in the dormant state in cheese making lactococcal strains is very tight and that several stressors encountered singularly are not predicted to be major inducers of prophage activation. PMID:26773254

  8. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  9. Identification of clinically antibiotic resistant genes Aac(3-IIa and Aac(6’-Ib in wastewater samples by multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Samadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used in medical centers, particularly to treat infections. The resistance developed against these agents is a huge concern in health care. A number of researchers have reported that hospital and municipal wastewaters are among the most important dissemination sources of these agent into the environment. Some, however, do not agree with this opinion. In the present study, the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes was investigated in raw and effluent wastewater from hospital and municipal wastewater treatment plants. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 30 samples were taken according to sampling principles and cold cycle and transferred to the molecular laboratory. DNA was extracted by the freeze-thaw method using a kit (Promega. The genes aac(3-IIa and aac(6’-Ib which code aminoglycoside resistance were examined in this study. Results: The results indicated that the studied genes are present in 35% of urban and hospital wastewaters, and their frequency percentage is higher in hospital wastewater (52% than urban wastewater (48%. The studied genes were identified in 61% of raw hospital wastewater samples; however, they were not detected in the output wastewater from the studied treatment plants. Conclusion: Although, the studied genes were not detected in the final effluent, there is a high potential for their release into the environment. The current study demonstrated that the coding genes of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance are present in raw urban and hospital wastewaters. In the case of improper exploitation of wastewater treatment plants, the output water can contaminate other environmental sections, such as soil and water resources, and result in the emission of these contaminants.

  10. Squalamine: an aminosterol antibiotic from the shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K S; Wehrli, S; Roder, H; Rogers, M; Forrest, J N; McCrimmon, D; Zasloff, M

    1993-02-15

    In recent years, a variety of low molecular weight antibiotics have been isolated from diverse animal species. These agents, which include peptides, lipids, and alkaloids, exhibit antibiotic activity against environmental microbes and are thought to play a role in innate immunity. We report here the discovery of a broad-spectrum steroidal antibiotic isolated from tissues of the dogfish shark Squalus acanthias. This water-soluble antibiotic, which we have named squalamine, exhibits potent bactericidal activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In addition, squalamine is fungicidal and induces osmotic lysis of protozoa. The chemical structure of the antibiotic 3 beta-N-1-(N-[3-(4-aminobutyl)]- 1,3-diaminopropane)-7 alpha,24 zeta-dihydroxy-5 alpha-cholestane 24-sulfate has been determined by fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy and NMR. Squalamine is a cationic steroid characterized by a condensation of an anionic bile salt intermediate with spermidine. The discovery of squalamine in the shark implicates a steroid as a potential host-defense agent in vertebrates and provides insights into the chemical design of a family of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:8433993

  11. Antibiotic induced meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Three patients with antibiotic induced meningitis, one following penicillin with seven episodes, are reported on--the first well documented description of penicillin induced meningitis. In this patient episodes of headache and nuchal rigidity appeared with and without CSF pleocytosis. Two patients had a total of five episodes of antibiotic induced meningitis after trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) administration. The features common to all three patients were myalgia, confusion ...

  12. Antibiotic Precautions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fayock, Kristopher; Voltz, Matthew; Sandella, Bradley; Close, Jeremy; Lunser, Matthew; Okon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment for bacterial infections in patients of all ages. Athletes who maximally train are at risk for illness and various infections. Routinely used antibiotics have been linked to tendon injuries, cardiac arrhythmias, diarrhea, photosensitivity, cartilage issues, and decreased performance. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles published from 1989 to 2012 obtained through searching MEDLINE and OVID. Also, the Food and Drug Administration website w...

  13. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Summary A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  14. Synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T; Auclair, Karine

    2011-03-01

    A convenient synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4'-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  15. Worldwide Disseminated armA Aminoglycoside Resistance Methylase Gene Is Borne by Composite Transposon Tn1548

    OpenAIRE

    Galimand, M.; Sabtcheva, S.; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T.

    2005-01-01

    The armA (aminoglycoside resistance methylase) gene, which confers resistance to 4,6-disubstituted deoxystreptamines and fortimicin, was initially found in Klebsiella pneumoniae BM4536 on IncL/M plasmid pIP1204 of ca. 90 kb which also encodes the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M-3. Thirty-four enterobacteria from various countries that were likely to produce a CTX-M enzyme since they were more resistant to cefotaxime than to ceftazidime were studied. The armA gene was detected in 12 clinic...

  16. Correction of ATM gene function by aminoglycoside-induced read-through of premature termination codons

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chun, Helen H.; Nahas, Shareef A.; Mitui, Midori; Gamo, Kristin M.; Du, Liutao; Gatti, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 14% of genetic mutations in patients with ataxia-telangiectsia (A-T) are single-nucleotide changes that result in primary premature termination codons (PTCs), either UAA, UAG, or UGA. The purpose of this study was to explore a potential therapeutic approach for this subset of patients by using aminoglycosides to induce PTC read-through, thereby restoring levels of full-length ATM (A-T mutated) protein. In experiments using a modified in vitro cDNA coupled transcription/translati...

  17. Clonal origin of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii isolates in a Danish county

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norskov-Lauritsen, N.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Hedegaard, J.; Fussing, V.; Mortensen, K.K.; Sperling-Petersen, H.U.; Schonheyder, H.C.

    2001-01-01

    During 1997, attention was drawn to an increased frequency of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii in a Danish county, when a total of 24 resistant C. freundii isolates was detected. In this study, 15 such isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, riboprinting and partial ...... dihydrofolate reductase gene in a class I integron. The source of the strain remains unresolved. Representative isolates were obtained from various specimens from hospitals and general practice throughout the county, with no evidence of patient-to-patient transmission....

  18. [Prophylactic antibiotics in neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, G; Iacob, Simona; Cojocaru, Inimioara

    2007-01-01

    Because of a low risk of infection (around 2-3%), prophylactic use of antibiotics in neurosurgery is a controversial issue. Some neurosurgeons consider that there are strong arguments against the use of antimicrobials (promotion of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, superinfection and adverse drug reactions) and meticulous aseptic techniques could be more usefully than prophylactic antibiotics. On the other hand, despite of being rare, the consequences of a neurosurgical infection can be dramatic and may result in a rapid death, caused by meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation or sepsis. Clinical studies emphasized that the most important factors influencing the choice of antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery is the patient's immune status, virulence of the pathogens and the type of surgery ("clean contaminated"--procedure that crosses the cranial sinuses, "clean non-implant"--procedure that does not cross the cranial sinuses, CSF shunt surgery, skull fracture). Prophylaxis has become the standard of care for contaminated and clean-contaminated surgery, also for surgery involving insertion of artificial devices. The antibiotic (first/second generation of cephalosporins or vancomycin in allergic patients) should recover only the cutaneous possibly contaminating flora (S. aureus, S. epidermidis) and should be administrated 30' before the surgical incision, intravenously in a single dose. Most studies pointed that identification of the risk factors for infections, correct asepsis and minimal prophylactic antibiotic regimen, help neurosurgeons to improve patient care and to decrease mortality without selecting resistant bacteria. PMID:18293694

  19. Sol-gel synthesis of thorn-like ZnO nanoparticles endorsing mechanical stirring effect and their antimicrobial activities: Potential role as nano-antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Farhan; Ansari, Akhter H.; Hameedullah, M.; Ahmad, Ejaz; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Zia, Qamar; Baig, Umair; Zaheer, Mohd Rehan; Alam, Mohammad Mezbaul; Khan, Abu Mustafa; AlOthman, Zeid A.; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2016-01-01

    The effect of mechanical stirring on sol-gel synthesis of thorn-like ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and antimicrobial activities is successfully reported in this study. The in-house synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, TGA, DSC and UV-visible spectroscopy. The X-Ray Diffraction analysis revealed the wurtzite crystal lattice for ZnO-NPs with no impurities present. The diametric measurements of the synthesized thorn-like ZnO-NPs (morphology assessed by SEM) were well accounted to be less than 50 nm with the help of TEM. Relative decrease in aspect ratio was observed on increasing the agitation speed. The UV-visible spectroscopy showed the absorption peaks of the ZnO-NPs existed in both UVA and UVB region. A hypsochromic shift in λmax was observed when stirring pace was increased from 500 rpm to 2000 rpm. The FTIR spectroscopy showed the absorption bands of the stretching modes of Zn-O between 500 cm−1 to 525 cm−1. The Thermal analysis studies revealed better stability for ZnO-NPs prepared at 2000 rpm (ZnO-2000 rpm). TGA revealed the weight loss between two main temperatures ranges viz. around (90 °C–120 °C) and (240 °C–280 °C). Finally, the effect of ZnO-NPs prepared at different stirring conditions on the growth of Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis), Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and a fungi (Candida albicans) were examined; which showed good antibacterial as well as antifungal properties. These findings introduce a simple, inexpensive process to synthesize ZnO-NPs using conventional methods without the use of sophisticated equipments and its application as a potent nano-antibiotic. PMID:27349836

  20. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.