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Sample records for aminoarabinose

  1. Deciphering the acylation pattern of Yersinia enterocolitica lipid A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Reinés

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria may modify their surface to evade the host innate immune response. Yersinia enterocolitica modulates its lipopolysaccharide (LPS lipid A structure, and the key regulatory signal is temperature. At 21°C, lipid A is hexa-acylated and may be modified with aminoarabinose or palmitate. At 37°C, Y. enterocolitica expresses a tetra-acylated lipid A consistent with the 3'-O-deacylation of the molecule. In this work, by combining genetic and mass spectrometric analysis, we establish that Y. enterocolitica encodes a lipid A deacylase, LpxR, responsible for the lipid A structure observed at 37°C. Western blot analyses indicate that LpxR exhibits latency at 21°C, deacylation of lipid A is not observed despite the expression of LpxR in the membrane. Aminoarabinose-modified lipid A is involved in the latency. 3-D modelling, docking and site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that LpxR D31 reduces the active site cavity volume so that aminoarabinose containing Kdo(2-lipid A cannot be accommodated and, therefore, not deacylated. Our data revealed that the expression of lpxR is negatively controlled by RovA and PhoPQ which are necessary for the lipid A modification with aminoarabinose. Next, we investigated the role of lipid A structural plasticity conferred by LpxR on the expression/function of Y. enterocolitica virulence factors. We present evidence that motility and invasion of eukaryotic cells were reduced in the lpxR mutant grown at 21°C. Mechanistically, our data revealed that the expressions of flhDC and rovA, regulators controlling the flagellar regulon and invasin respectively, were down-regulated in the mutant. In contrast, the levels of the virulence plasmid (pYV-encoded virulence factors Yops and YadA were not affected in the lpxR mutant. Finally, we establish that the low inflammatory response associated to Y. enterocolitica infections is the sum of the anti-inflammatory action exerted by pYV-encoded YopP and the

  2. Deciphering the acylation pattern of Yersinia enterocolitica lipid A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinés, Mar; Llobet, Enrique; Dahlström, Käthe M; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Llompart, Catalina M; Torrecabota, Nuria; Salminen, Tiina A; Bengoechea, José A

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria may modify their surface to evade the host innate immune response. Yersinia enterocolitica modulates its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) lipid A structure, and the key regulatory signal is temperature. At 21°C, lipid A is hexa-acylated and may be modified with aminoarabinose or palmitate. At 37°C, Y. enterocolitica expresses a tetra-acylated lipid A consistent with the 3'-O-deacylation of the molecule. In this work, by combining genetic and mass spectrometric analysis, we establish that Y. enterocolitica encodes a lipid A deacylase, LpxR, responsible for the lipid A structure observed at 37°C. Western blot analyses indicate that LpxR exhibits latency at 21°C, deacylation of lipid A is not observed despite the expression of LpxR in the membrane. Aminoarabinose-modified lipid A is involved in the latency. 3-D modelling, docking and site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that LpxR D31 reduces the active site cavity volume so that aminoarabinose containing Kdo(2)-lipid A cannot be accommodated and, therefore, not deacylated. Our data revealed that the expression of lpxR is negatively controlled by RovA and PhoPQ which are necessary for the lipid A modification with aminoarabinose. Next, we investigated the role of lipid A structural plasticity conferred by LpxR on the expression/function of Y. enterocolitica virulence factors. We present evidence that motility and invasion of eukaryotic cells were reduced in the lpxR mutant grown at 21°C. Mechanistically, our data revealed that the expressions of flhDC and rovA, regulators controlling the flagellar regulon and invasin respectively, were down-regulated in the mutant. In contrast, the levels of the virulence plasmid (pYV)-encoded virulence factors Yops and YadA were not affected in the lpxR mutant. Finally, we establish that the low inflammatory response associated to Y. enterocolitica infections is the sum of the anti-inflammatory action exerted by pYV-encoded YopP and the reduced activation of

  3. A transposon site hybridization screen identifies galU and wecBC as important for survival of Yersinia pestis in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kathryn A; Fukuto, Hana S; Pelletier, Mark; Romanov, Galina; Grabenstein, Jens P; Palmer, Lance E; Ernst, Robert; Bliska, James B

    2012-02-01

    Yersinia pestis is able to survive and replicate within murine macrophages. However, the mechanism by which Y. pestis promotes its intracellular survival is not well understood. To identify genes that are important for Y. pestis survival in macrophages, a library comprised of ∼31,500 Y. pestis KIM6+ transposon insertion mutants (input pool) was subjected to negative selection in primary murine macrophages. Genes underrepresented in the output pool of surviving bacteria were identified by transposon site hybridization to DNA oligonucleotide microarrays. The screen identified several genes known to be important for survival of Y. pestis in macrophages, including phoPQ and members of the PhoPQ regulon (e.g., pmrF). In addition, genes predicated to encode a glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase (wecB) and a UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase (wecC) were identified in the screen. Viable-count assays demonstrated that a KIM6+ galU mutant and a KIM6+ wecBC mutant were defective for survival in murine macrophages. The galU mutant was studied further because of its strong phenotype. The KIM6+ galU mutant exhibited increased susceptibility to the antimicrobial peptides polymyxin B and cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of the galU mutant migrated faster than the LOS of the parent KIM6+, suggesting the core was truncated. In addition, the analysis of LOS isolated from the galU mutant by mass spectrometry showed that aminoarabinose modification of lipid A is absent. Therefore, addition of aminoarabinose to lipid A and complete LOS core (galU), as well as enterobacterial common antigen (wecB and wecC), is important for survival of Y. pestis in macrophages.

  4. Comparison of lipids A of several Salmonella and Escherichia strains by 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karibian, D; Deprun, C; Caroff, M

    1993-01-01

    Plasma desorption mass spectrometry has recently been used with success to characterize underivatized lipid A preparations: the major molecular species present give signals indicating their masses, from which probable compositions could be inferred by using the overall composition determined by chemical analyses. In the present study, plasma desorption mass spectrometry was used to compare structures in lipid A preparations isolated from several smooth and rough strains of Escherichia and Salmonella species. Preparations isolated from strains of both genera revealed considerable variation in degree of heterogeneity (number of fatty acids and presence or absence of hexadecanoic acid, phosphorylethanolamine, and aminoarabinose). Molecular species usually associated with Salmonella lipid A were found in preparations from Escherichia sp. In addition, preparations from three different batches of lipid A from one strain of Salmonella minnesota showed significant differences in composition. These results demonstrate that preparations used for biological and structural analyses should be defined in terms of their particular molecular constituents and that no generalizations based on analysis of a single preparation should be made. PMID:8491718

  5. Role of bacterial surface structures on the interaction of Klebsiella pneumoniae with phagocytes.

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    Catalina March

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis is a key process of the immune system. The human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well known example of a pathogen highly resistant to phagocytosis. A wealth of evidence demonstrates that the capsule polysaccharide (CPS plays a crucial role in resistance to phagocytosis. The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum shares with mammalian macrophages the ability to phagocytose and kill bacteria. The fact that K. pneumoniae is ubiquitous in nature and, therefore, should avoid predation by amoebae, poses the question whether K. pneumoniae employs similar means to counteract amoebae and mammalian phagocytes. Here we developed an assay to evaluate K. pneumoniae-D. discoideum interaction. The richness of the growth medium affected the threshold at which the cps mutant was permissive for Dictyostelium and only at lower nutrient concentrations the cps mutant was susceptible to predation by amoebae. Given the critical role of bacterial surface elements on host-pathogen interactions, we explored the possible contribution of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS and outer membrane proteins (OMPs to combat phagoyctosis by D. discoideum. We uncover that, in addition to the CPS, the LPS O-polysaccharide and the first core sugar participate in Klebsiella resistance to predation by D. discoideum. K. pneumoniae LPS lipid A decorations are also necessary to avoid predation by amoebae although PagP-dependent palmitoylation plays a more important role than the lipid A modification with aminoarabinose. Mutants lacking OMPs OmpA or OmpK36 were also permissive for D. discoideium growth. Except the LPS O-polysaccharide mutants, all mutants were more susceptible to phagocytosis by mouse alveolar macrophages. Finally, we found a correlation between virulence, using the pneumonia mouse model, and resistance to phagocytosis. Altogether, this work reveals novel K. pneumoniae determinants involved in resistance to phagocytosis and supports the notion that Dictyostelium amoebae

  6. Identification and Characterization of Two Klebsiella pneumoniae lpxL Lipid A Late Acyltransferases and Their Role in Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Grant; Dumigan, Amy; Kidd, Timothy; Hobley, Laura

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae causes a wide range of infections, from urinary tract infections to pneumonia. The lipopolysaccharide is a virulence factor of this pathogen, although there are gaps in our understanding of its biosynthesis. Here we report on the characterization of K. pneumoniae lpxL, which encodes one of the enzymes responsible for the late secondary acylation of immature lipid A molecules. Analysis of the available K. pneumoniae genomes revealed that this pathogen's genome encodes two orthologues of Escherichia coli LpxL. Using genetic methods and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that LpxL1 catalyzes the addition of laureate and LpxL2 catalyzes the addition of myristate. Both enzymes acylated E. coli lipid A, whereas only LpxL2 mediated K. pneumoniae lipid A acylation. We show that LpxL1 is negatively regulated by the two-component system PhoPQ. The lipid A produced by the lpxL2 mutant lacked the 2-hydroxymyristate, palmitate, and 4-aminoarabinose decorations found in the lipid A synthesized by the wild type. The lack of 2-hydroxymyristate was expected since LpxO modifies the myristate transferred by LpxL2 to the lipid A. The absence of the other two decorations is most likely caused by the downregulation of phoPQ and pmrAB expression. LpxL2-dependent lipid A acylation protects Klebsiella from polymyxins, mediates resistance to phagocytosis, limits the activation of inflammatory responses by macrophages, and is required for pathogen survival in the wax moth (Galleria mellonella). Our findings indicate that the LpxL2 contribution to virulence is dependent on LpxO-mediated hydroxylation of the LpxL2-transferred myristate. Our studies suggest that LpxL2 might be a candidate target in the development of anti-K. pneumoniae drugs. PMID:28652313