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Sample records for aminoacylation reaction integrated

  1. Site-directed mutagenesis of Arg58 and Asp86 of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli: effects on the GTPase reaction and aminoacyl-tRNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli was mutated separately at positions Asp86 and Arg58, in order to shed light both on the GTPase mechanism of elongation factor Tu and on the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. In addition, the binding of guanine nucleotides was investigated by determination...

  2. tRNAGlu increases the affinity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase for its inhibitor glutamyl-sulfamoyl-adenosine, an analogue of the aminoacylation reaction intermediate glutamyl-AMP: mechanistic and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Sébastien P; Kornblatt, Jack A; Barbeau, Xavier; Bonnaure, Guillaume; Lagüe, Patrick; Chênevert, Robert; Lapointe, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    For tRNA-dependent protein biosynthesis, amino acids are first activated by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) yielding the reaction intermediates aminoacyl-AMP (aa-AMP). Stable analogues of aa-AMP, such as aminoacyl-sulfamoyl-adenosines, inhibit their cognate aaRSs. Glutamyl-sulfamoyl-adenosine (Glu-AMS) is the best known inhibitor of Escherichia coli glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS). Thermodynamic parameters of the interactions between Glu-AMS and E. coli GluRS were measured in the presence and in the absence of tRNA by isothermal titration microcalorimetry. A significant entropic contribution for the interactions between Glu-AMS and GluRS in the absence of tRNA or in the presence of the cognate tRNAGlu or of the non-cognate tRNAPhe is indicated by the negative values of -TΔSb, and by the negative value of ΔCp. On the other hand, the large negative enthalpy is the dominant contribution to ΔGb in the absence of tRNA. The affinity of GluRS for Glu-AMS is not altered in the presence of the non-cognate tRNAPhe, but the dissociation constant Kd is decreased 50-fold in the presence of tRNAGlu; this result is consistent with molecular dynamics results indicating the presence of an H-bond between Glu-AMS and the 3'-OH oxygen of the 3'-terminal ribose of tRNAGlu in the Glu-AMS•GluRS•tRNAGlu complex. Glu-AMS being a very close structural analogue of Glu-AMP, its weak binding to free GluRS suggests that the unstable Glu-AMP reaction intermediate binds weakly to GluRS; these results could explain why all the known GluRSs evolved to activate glutamate only in the presence of tRNAGlu, the coupling of glutamate activation to its transfer to tRNA preventing unproductive cleavage of ATP.

  3. Development of a new method to identify aminoacylated RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ji

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A RT-PCR method is developed to isolate RNA aminoacylated on their 3’ end from large pools of RNA. The method is being applied in two separate projects. We are interested in isolating a new class of ribozymes that could successively catalyze the two chemical reactions leading to their own 3’ aminoacylation (ATP activation of an amino acid followed by 3' esterification of the RNA. The catalysis of each of the two reactions has independently been demonstrated for some RNA isolated with the SELEX methodology [1-2]. However, the coupling of both reactions on a same molecule has not been achieved yet. The identification of these still hypothetical ribozymes may help understand how the former translation system started in the absence of the aminoacyltRNA Synthetase, which catalyzes the above two reactions on tRNA in modern cells. In another project, we would like to identify the whole repertoire of aminoacylated RNA (the “aminoacylome” in cells. There are strong indications that other RNA besides tRNA and tmRNA may be aminoacylated for biological purposes [3-4].

  4. Polymer reaction engineering, an integrated approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2005-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Polymer Materials A Short History of Polymer Reaction Engineering The Position of Polymer Reaction Engineering Toward Integrated Polymer Reaction Engineering The Disciplines in Polymer Reaction Engineering The Future: Product-inspired Polymer Reaction

  5. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translatio...... of a complex between MtSerRS and MtArgRS provides a means by which methanogenic archaea can optimize an early step in translation under a wide range of extreme environmental conditions....

  6. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  7. A taxonomy of integral reaction path analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grcar, Joseph F.; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    2004-12-23

    W. C. Gardiner observed that achieving understanding through combustion modeling is limited by the ability to recognize the implications of what has been computed and to draw conclusions about the elementary steps underlying the reaction mechanism. This difficulty can be overcome in part by making better use of reaction path analysis in the context of multidimensional flame simulations. Following a survey of current practice, an integral reaction flux is formulated in terms of conserved scalars that can be calculated in a fully automated way. Conditional analyses are then introduced, and a taxonomy for bidirectional path analysis is explored. Many examples illustrate the resulting path analysis and uncover some new results about nonpremixed methane-air laminar jets.

  8. Computational Insights into the High-Fidelity Catalysis of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelnga, Mohamed M.

    Obtaining insights into the catalytic function of enzymes is an important area of research due to their widespread applications in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Among these enzymes, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known for their remarkable fidelity in catalyzing the aminoacylation reactions of tRNA in protein biosynthesis. Despite the exceptional execution of this critical function, mechanistic details of the reactions catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases remain elusive demonstrating the obvious need to explore their remarkable chemistry. During the PhD studies reported in this thesis the mechanism of aminoacylation, pre?transfer editing and post?transfer editing catalyzed by different aaRS have been established using multi-scale computational enzymology. In the first two chapters a detailed information about aaRS and the addressed questions was given in addition to an overview of the used computational methodology currently used to investigate the enzymatic mechanisms. The aminoacylation mechanism of threonine by Threonyl-tRNA synthetases, glutamine by Glutaminyl-tRNA synthetases and glutamate by Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases have been clearly unveiled in chapter 3 and 4. Also, valuable information regarding the role of cofactors and active site residues has been obtained. While investigating the post-transfer editing mechanisms, which proceed in a remote and distinct active site, two different scenarios were experimentally suggested for two types of threonyl-tRNA synthetase species to correct the misacylation of the structurally related serine. We explored these two mechanisms as in chapters 5 and 6. Moreover, the synthetic site in which the aminoacylation reaction is catalyzed, is also responsible for a second type of proofreading reaction called pre-transfer editing mechanism. In chapter 7, this latter mechanism has been elucidated for both Seryl-tRNA synthetases and Isoleucyl-tRNA synthetases against their non-cognate substrates

  9. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergast, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the highly purified aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex from rabbit reticulocytes was examined. The synthetase complex contained, in addition to eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, three unidentified proteins and was free of endogenous protein kinase activity. Incubation of the complex with casein kinase I in the presence of ATP resulted in the phosphorylation of four synthetases, the glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, methionyl-, and lysyl-tRNA synthetases. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I altered binding to tRNA-Sepharose such that the phosphorylated complex eluted at 190 mM NaCl instead of the 275 mM salt observed for the nonphosphorylated form. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I resulted in a significant inhibition of aminoacylation with the four synthetases; the activities of the nonphosphorylated synthetases were unchanged. One of the unidentified proteins in the complex (M/sub r/ 37,000) was also an excellent substrate for casein kinase I. A comparison of the properties and two-dimensional phosphopeptide pattern of this protein with that of casein kinase I suggest that the 37,000 dalton protein in the synthetase complex is an inactive form of casein kinase I. Two other protein kinases were shown to phosphorylate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the complex. The phosphorylation of threonyl-tRNA synthetase was also investigated. Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were shown to be phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with ( 32 P)orthophosphate

  10. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-01-01

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge

  11. Evolutionary anomalies among the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Handy, J.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Unexpected relationships among the various aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases continue to be uncovered. The question arises - is this mainly the result of promiscuous exchange, or is the confusion really a reflection of the differential loss of past duplications? Phylogenetic analysis may yet provide the answer.

  12. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... Discovery of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and importance ... The pioneering work of Fritz Lipmann on the high-energy ... the peculiar structural and functional relationships tRNAs ... a bulk of only 20 families of tRNA molecules in contrast ...... balance of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase; Science 242.

  13. Direct application of radioiodinated aminoacyl tRNA for radiolabeling nascent proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherberg, N.H.; Barokas, K.; Murata, Y.; Refetoff, S.

    1985-01-01

    A two-step procedure to incorporate 125 I-iodotyrosine into protein synthesized in a reticulocyte lysate is described. In the first step, the iodination of tyrosyl tRNA was catalyzed by a solid-state glycouril compound. More than one-third of 200 microCi of radioiodine became bound to 70 micrograms of aminoacyl tRNA after 15 min at 0 degrees C. The isotope was distributed in a three-to-one ratio of monoiodotyrosine to di-iodotyrosine. In the second step, the soluble product of the radioiodination was transferred directly into a nuclease-treated reticulocyte lysate coded with RNA isolated from the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2. Fractional recovery of radioiodine in nascent protein was maximally 7.6%. Reaction of the product of translation with antibody against alpha-antitrypsin separated an 125 I-containing protein having a molecular weight estimated as 47,000. The synthesis of unprocessed alpha-antitrypsin was confirmed by cleavage of the labeled protein with leader peptidase and by its displacement from immunocomplex formation with purified alpha-antitrypsin. The amount of 125 I incorporated into alpha-antitrypsin was proportionate to iodinated tRNA additions up to a concentration of 70 micrograms/ml. The synthesis of alpha-antitrypsin as detected in radioautograms after gel electrophoresis was more than twice as sensitive using radioiodinated aminoacyl tRNA as compared with [ 35 S]methionine. Iodine labeling of thyroxine-binding globulin was also demonstrated in the translation product of Hep G2 RNA. Since the specific activity of the radioiodine is high and the means for detection of the isotope efficient, the method described can facilitate the demonstration of quantitatively minor translation products

  14. Stereoselective aminoacylation of a dinucleoside monophosphate by the imidazolides of DL-alanine and N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profy, A. T.; Usher, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The aminoacylation of diinosine monophosphate was studied experimentally. When the acylating agent was the imidazolide of N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-DL-alanine, a 40 percent enantiomeric excess of the isomer was incorporated at the 2' site and the positions of equilibrium for the reversible 2'-3' migration reaction differed for the D and L enantiomers. The reactivity of the nucleoside hydroxyl groups was found to decrease on the order 2'(3') less than internal 2' and less than 5', and the extent of the reaction was affected by the concentration of the imidazole buffer. Reaction of IpI with imidazolide of unprotected DL-alanine, by contrast, led to an excess of the D isomer at the internal 2' site. Finally, reaction with the N-carboxy anhydride of DL-alanine occurred without stereoselection. These results are found to be relevant to the study of the evolution of optical chemical activity and the origin of genetically directed protein synthesis.

  15. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-07-26

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge-Kutta- Chebyshev (RKC) scheme is adjusted to integrate diffusion. Spatial operator is de- scretised by second-order finite differences on a uniform grid. The overall solution is advanced over S fractional stiff integrations, where S corresponds to the number of RKC stages. The behavior of the scheme is analyzed by applying it to three simple problems. The results show that it achieves second-order accuracy, thus, preserving the formal accuracy of the original RKC. The presented development sets the stage for future extensions, particularly, to multidimensional reacting flows with detailed chemistry.

  16. Aminoacyl-tRNA quality control is required for efficient activation of the TOR pathway regulator Gln3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Kyle; Mann, Rebecca; Kyle, Amanda; Reynolds, Noah; Ibba, Michael

    2017-09-14

    The aminoacylation status of the cellular tRNA pool regulates both general amino acid control (GAAC) and target of rapamycin (TOR) stress response pathways in yeast. Consequently, fidelity of translation at the level of aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining accuracy and sensitivity of stress responses. To investigate effects of translational quality control (QC) on cell physiology under stress conditions, phenotypic microarray analyses were used to identify changes in QC deficient cells. Nitrogen source growth assays showed QC deficient yeast grew differently compared to WT. The QC deficient strain was more tolerant to caffeine treatment than wild type through altered interactions with the TOR and GAAC pathways. Increased caffeine tolerance of the QC deficient strain was consistent with the observation that the activity of Gln3p, a transcription factor controlled by the TOR pathway, is decreased in the QC deficient strain compared to WT. GCN4 translation, which is typically repressed in the absence of nutritional stress, was enhanced in the QC deficient strain through TOR inhibition. QC did not impact cell cycle regulation; however, the chronological lifespan of QC deficient yeast strains decreased compared to wild type, likely due to translational errors and alteration of the TOR-associated regulon. These findings support the idea that changes in translational fidelity provide a mechanism of cellular adaptation by modulating TOR activity. This, in turn, supports a central role for aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis QC in the integrated stress response by maintaining the proper aa-tRNA pools necessary to coordinate the GAAC and TOR.

  17. Chemistry of aminoacylation of 5'-AMO and the origin of protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Much of our recent work has been a study of aminoacyl AMP derivatives. Elucidation of the character of aminoacyl AMP derivatives has made it obvious that AMP has characteristics which should allow it to preferentially catalyze the synthesis of L-amino acid peptides. The essential features which lead to this conclusion are that all l-amino acids (but not all D amino acids) when esterified to 5'-AMP preferentially (65 percent) distribute to the 3' position of the 5'-AMP; that esterification is predominantly at the 2' position; that 2', 3' diaminoacyl esters are readily formed; and that a peptide bond can be formed between adjacent 2',3' aminoacyl esters.

  18. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases database Y2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, M; Barciszewski, J

    2000-01-01

    The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARS) are a diverse group of enzymes that ensure the fidelity of transfer of genetic information from DNA into protein. They catalyse the attachment of amino acids to transfer RNAs and thereby establish the rules of the genetic code by virtue of matching the nucleotide triplet of the anticodon with its cognate amino acid. Currently, 818 AARS primary structures have been reported from archaebacteria, eubacteria, mitochondria, chloro-plasts and eukaryotic cells. The database is a compilation of the amino acid sequences of all AARSs, known to date, which are available as separate entries or alignments of related proteins via the WWW at http://rose.man.poznan.pl/aars/index.html

  19. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Mirando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis.

  20. Integration of metabolome data with metabolic networks reveals reporter reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Çakir, Tunahan; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Önsan, Zeynep Ilsen

    2006-01-01

    Interpreting quantitative metabolome data is a difficult task owing to the high connectivity in metabolic networks and inherent interdependency between enzymatic regulation, metabolite levels and fluxes. Here we present a hypothesis-driven algorithm for the integration of such data with metabolic...... network topology. The algorithm thus enables identification of reporter reactions, which are reactions where there are significant coordinated changes in the level of surrounding metabolites following environmental/genetic perturbations. Applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated by using data from...... is measured. By combining the results with transcriptome data, we further show that it is possible to infer whether the reactions are hierarchically or metabolically regulated. Hereby, the reported approach represents an attempt to map different layers of regulation within metabolic networks through...

  1. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary phasing of the heteromerization domain of the tRNA-export and aminoacylation cofactor Arc1p from yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simader, Hannes; Suck, Dietrich

    2006-01-01

    The heteromerization domain of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase cofactor from yeast was crystallized, complete selenomethionine MAD data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution and preliminary phasing reveals the presence of 20 monomers in the asymmetric unit. Eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) must be integrated into an efficient tRNA-export and shuttling machinery. This is reflected by the presence of additional protein–protein interaction domains and a correspondingly higher degree of complex formation in eukaryotic aaRSs. However, the structural basis of interaction between eukaryotic aaRSs and associated protein cofactors has remained elusive. The N-terminal heteromerization domain of the tRNA aminoacylation and export cofactor Arc1p has been cloned from yeast, expressed and purified. Crystals have been obtained belonging to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 222.32, b = 89.46, c = 126.79 Å, β = 99.39°. Calculated Matthews coefficients are compatible with the presence of 10–25 monomers in the asymmetric unit. A complete multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion data set has been collected from a selenomethionine-substituted crystal at 2.8 Å resolution. Preliminary phasing reveals the presence of 20 monomers organized in five tetramers per asymmetric unit

  2. Explicit integration of extremely stiff reaction networks: partial equilibrium methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidry, M W; Hix, W R; Billings, J J

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers (Guidry et al 2013 Comput. Sci. Disc. 6 015001 and Guidry and Harris 2013 Comput. Sci. Disc. 6 015002), we have shown that when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper, we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the approach to equilibrium and show that explicit asymptotic methods, combined with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that can plausibly deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that such explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been possible before in a number of fields. (paper)

  3. Variational nature, integration, and properties of Newton reaction path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofill, Josep Maria; Quapp, Wolfgang

    2011-02-21

    The distinguished coordinate path and the reduced gradient following path or its equivalent formulation, the Newton trajectory, are analyzed and unified using the theory of calculus of variations. It is shown that their minimum character is related to the fact that the curve is located in a valley region. In this case, we say that the Newton trajectory is a reaction path with the category of minimum energy path. In addition to these findings a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg algorithm to integrate these curves is also proposed.

  4. Variational nature, integration, and properties of Newton reaction path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofill, Josep Maria; Quapp, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    The distinguished coordinate path and the reduced gradient following path or its equivalent formulation, the Newton trajectory, are analyzed and unified using the theory of calculus of variations. It is shown that their minimum character is related to the fact that the curve is located in a valley region. In this case, we say that the Newton trajectory is a reaction path with the category of minimum energy path. In addition to these findings a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg algorithm to integrate these curves is also proposed.

  5. Kinetic proofreading at single molecular level: aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile and the role of water as an editor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantu Santra

    Full Text Available Proofreading/editing in protein synthesis is essential for accurate translation of information from the genetic code. In this article we present a theoretical investigation of efficiency of a kinetic proofreading mechanism that employs hydrolysis of the wrong substrate as the discriminatory step in enzyme catalytic reactions. We consider aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile which is a crucial step in protein synthesis and for which experimental results are now available. We present an augmented kinetic scheme and then employ methods of stochastic simulation algorithm to obtain time dependent concentrations of different substances involved in the reaction and their rates of formation. We obtain the rates of product formation and ATP hydrolysis for both correct and wrong substrates (isoleucine and valine in our case, respectively, in single molecular enzyme as well as ensemble enzyme kinetics. The present theoretical scheme correctly reproduces (i the amplitude of the discrimination factor in the overall rates between isoleucine and valine which is obtained as (1.8×10(2.(4.33×10(2 = 7.8×10(4, (ii the rates of ATP hydrolysis for both Ile and Val at different substrate concentrations in the aminoacylation of tRNA(Ile. The present study shows a non-michaelis type dependence of rate of reaction on tRNA(Ile concentration in case of valine. The overall editing in steady state is found to be independent of amino acid concentration. Interestingly, the computed ATP hydrolysis rate for valine at high substrate concentration is same as the rate of formation of Ile-tRNA(Ile whereas at intermediate substrate concentration the ATP hydrolysis rate is relatively low. We find that the presence of additional editing domain in class I editing enzyme makes the kinetic proofreading more efficient through enhanced hydrolysis of wrong product at the editing CP1 domain.

  6. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers delineate Class I and Class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, V. Joachim; Schroeder, Michael; Labudde, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the machinery that realizes protein biosynthesis in all organisms is still unclear. One key component of this machinery are aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS), which ligate tRNAs to amino acids while consuming ATP. Sequence analyses revealed that these enzymes can be divided into two complementary classes. Both classes differ significantly on a sequence and structural level, feature different reaction mechanisms, and occur in diverse oligomerization states. The one unifying aspect of both classes is their function of binding ATP. We identified Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers as most compact ATP binding motifs characteristic for each Class. Geometric analysis shows a structural rearrangement of the Backbone Brackets upon ATP binding, indicating a general mechanism of all Class I structures. Regarding the origin of aaRS, the Rodin-Ohno hypothesis states that the peculiar nature of the two aaRS classes is the result of their primordial forms, called Protozymes, being encoded on opposite strands of the same gene. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers were traced back to the proposed Protozymes and their more efficient successors, the Urzymes. Both structural motifs can be observed as pairs of residues in contemporary structures and it seems that the time of their addition, indicated by their placement in the ancient aaRS, coincides with the evolutionary trace of Proto- and Urzymes. PMID:29659563

  7. Cancer association study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase signaling network in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wan Kim

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs and ARS-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs exhibit remarkable functional versatility beyond their catalytic activities in protein synthesis. Their non-canonical functions have been pathologically linked to cancers. Here we described our integrative genome-wide analysis of ARSs to show cancer-associated activities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. We first selected 23 ARS/AIMPs (together referred to as ARSN, 124 cancer-associated druggable target genes (DTGs and 404 protein-protein interactors (PPIs of ARSs using NCI's cancer gene index. 254 GBM affymetrix microarray data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA were used to identify the probe sets whose expression were most strongly correlated with survival (Kaplan-Meier plots versus survival times, log-rank t-test <0.05. The analysis identified 122 probe sets as survival signatures, including 5 of ARSN (VARS, QARS, CARS, NARS, FARS, and 115 of DTGs and PPIs (PARD3, RXRB, ATP5C1, HSP90AA1, CD44, THRA, TRAF2, KRT10, MED12, etc. Of note, 61 survival-related probes were differentially expressed in three different prognosis subgroups in GBM patients and showed correlation with established prognosis markers such as age and phenotypic molecular signatures. CARS and FARS also showed significantly higher association with different molecular networks in GBM patients. Taken together, our findings demonstrate evidence for an ARSN biology-dominant contribution in the biology of GBM.

  8. Metabolomics in epidemiology: from metabolite concentrations to integrative reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Liam G; Inouye, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Metabolomics is becoming feasible for population-scale studies of human disease. In this review, we survey epidemiological studies that leverage metabolomics and multi-omics to gain insight into disease mechanisms. We outline key practical, technological and analytical limitations while also highlighting recent successes in integrating these data. The use of multi-omics to infer reaction rates is discussed as a potential future direction for metabolomics research, as a means of identifying biomarkers as well as inferring causality. Furthermore, we highlight established analysis approaches as well as simulation-based methods currently used in single- and multi-cell levels in systems biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  9. Determination of 35S-aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid specific radioactivity in small tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarel, A.M.; Ogunro, E.A.; Ferguson, A.G.; Lesch, M.

    1981-01-01

    Rate determination of protein synthesis utilizing tracer amino acid incorporation requires accurate assessment of the specific radioactivity of the labeled precursor aminoacyl-tRNA pool. Previously published methods presumably useful for the measurement of any aminoacyl-tRNA were unsuccessful when applied to [ 35 S]methionine, due to the unique chemical properties of this amino acid. Herein we describe modifications of these methods necessary for the measurement of 35 S-aminoacyl-tRNA specific radioactivity from small tissue samples incubated in the presence of [ 35 S]methionine. The use of [ 35 S]methionine of high specific radioactivity enables analysis of the methionyl-tRNA from less than 100 mg of tissue. Conditions for optimal recovery of 35 S-labeled dansyl-amino acid derivatives are presented and possible applications of this method are discussed

  10. Determination of /sup 35/S-aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid specific radioactivity in small tissue samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarel, A.M.; Ogunro, E.A.; Ferguson, A.G.; Lesch, M.

    1981-11-15

    Rate determination of protein synthesis utilizing tracer amino acid incorporation requires accurate assessment of the specific radioactivity of the labeled precursor aminoacyl-tRNA pool. Previously published methods presumably useful for the measurement of any aminoacyl-tRNA were unsuccessful when applied to (/sup 35/S)methionine, due to the unique chemical properties of this amino acid. Herein we describe modifications of these methods necessary for the measurement of /sup 35/S-aminoacyl-tRNA specific radioactivity from small tissue samples incubated in the presence of (/sup 35/S)methionine. The use of (/sup 35/S)methionine of high specific radioactivity enables analysis of the methionyl-tRNA from less than 100 mg of tissue. Conditions for optimal recovery of /sup 35/S-labeled dansyl-amino acid derivatives are presented and possible applications of this method are discussed.

  11. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    Two residues of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA were identified and subjected to mutational analysis. Lys-89 and Asn-90 were each replaced by either Ala or Glu. The four single mutants were denoted K89A, K89E, N90A, and N90E, respectively. The mutants...... were characterized with respect to thermal and chemical stability, GTPase activity, tRNA affinity, and activity in an in vitro translation assay. Most conspicuously tRNA affinities were reduced for all mutants. The results verify our structural analysis of elongation factor Tu in complex with aminoacyl....... Their functional roles are discussed in relation to the structure of elongation factor Tu in complex with aminoacyl-tRNA. Udgivelsesdato: 1996-Aug-23...

  12. Preferential hydrophobic interactions are responsible for a preference of D-amino acids in the aminoacylation of 5'-AMP with hydrophobic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C. Jr; Wickramasinghe, N. S.; Sabatini, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of aminoacyl AMP to model reactions at the 3' terminus of aminoacyl tRNA for the purpose of understanding the origin of protein synthesis. The present studies relate to the D, L preference in the esterification of 5'-AMP. All N-acetyl amino acids we studied showed faster reaction of the D-isomer, with a generally decreasing preference for D-isomer as the hydrophobicity of the amino acid decreased. The beta-branched amino acids, Ile and Val, showed an extreme preference for D-isomer. Ac-Leu, the gamma-branched amino acid, showed a slightly low D/L ratio relative to its hydrophobicity. The molecular basis for these preferences for D-isomer is understandable in the light of our previous studies and seems to be due to preferential hydrophobic interaction of the D-isomer with adenine. The preference for hydrophobic D-amino acids can be decreased by addition of an organic solvent to the reaction medium. Conversely, peptidylation with Ac-PhePhe shows a preference for the LL isomer over the DD isomer.

  13. Toward Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Directed Peptide Translation Using Ester Based Aminoacyl Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singhal, Abhishek; Bagnacani, Valentina; Corradini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Peptide synthesis is a fundamental feature of life. However, it still remains unclear how the contemporary translation apparatus evolved from primitive prebiotic systems and at which stage of the evolution peptide synthesis emerged. Using simple molecular architectures, in which aminoacyl transfe...

  14. Integrating reaction and analysis: investigation of higher-order reactions by cryogenic trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrollan Stockinger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the investigation of a higher-order reaction by on-column reaction gas chromatography is presented. The reaction and the analytical separation are combined in a single experiment to investigate the Diels–Alder reaction of benzenediazonium-2-carboxylate as a benzyne precursor with various anthracene derivatives, i.e. anthracene, 9-bromoanthracene, 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde and 9-anthracenemethanol. To overcome limitations of short reaction contact times at elevated temperatures a novel experimental setup was developed involving a cooling trap to achieve focusing and mixing of the reactants at a defined spot in a fused-silica capillary. This trap functions as a reactor within the separation column in the oven of a gas chromatograph. The reactants are sequentially injected to avoid undefined mixing in the injection port. An experimental protocol was developed with optimized injection intervals and cooling times to achieve sufficient conversions at short reaction times. Reaction products were rapidly identified by mass spectrometric detection. This new approach represents a practical procedure to investigate higher-order reactions at an analytical level and it simultaneously provides valuable information for the optimization of the reaction conditions.

  15. Inhibition by Siomycin and Thiostrepton of Both Aminoacyl-tRNA and Factor G Binding to Ribosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ll, Juan Modole; Cabrer, Bartolomé; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Azquez, David V

    1971-01-01

    Siomycin, a peptide antibiotic that interacts with the 50S ribosomal subunit and inhibits binding of factor G, is shown also to inhibit binding of aminoacyl-tRNA; however, it does not impair binding of fMet-tRNA and completion of the initiation complex. Moreover, unlike other inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA binding (tetracycline, sparsomycin, and streptogramin A), siomycin completely abolishes the GTPase activity associated with the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA catalyzed by factor Tu. A single-site interaction of siomycin appears to be responsible for its effect on both the binding of the aminoacyl-tRNA-Tu-GTP complex and that of factor G. PMID:4331558

  16. Contemporary Neighborhood Theories: Integration versus Romance and Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stever, James A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the integrative, romantic, and reactive theories of neighborhood government within the context of the urban reform movement and argues that the integrative theory is the one best suited for an effective political relationship between the neighborhood and the greater metropolis. (EB)

  17. Recoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases for synthetic biology by rational protein-RNA engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2014-12-19

    We have taken a rational approach to redesigning the amino acid binding and aminoacyl-tRNA pairing specificities of bacterial glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. The four-stage engineering incorporates generalizable design principles and improves the pairing efficiency of noncognate glutamate with tRNA(Gln) by over 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Better optimized designs of the protein-RNA complex include substantial reengineering of the globular core region of the tRNA, demonstrating a role for specific tRNA nucleotides in specifying the identity of the genetically encoded amino acid. Principles emerging from this engineering effort open new prospects for combining rational and genetic selection approaches to design novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that ligate noncanonical amino acids onto tRNAs. This will facilitate reconstruction of the cellular translation apparatus for applications in synthetic biology.

  18. Quality control in aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis its role in translational fidelity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms to achieve high levels of accuracy in aminoacylation. Editing functions in aaRSs contribute to the overall low error rate in protein synthesis. Over 40 years of research on aaRSs using structural, biochemical, and kinetic approaches has expanded our knowledge of their cellular roles and quality...... control mechanisms. Here, we review aaRS editing with an emphasis on the mechanistic and kinetic details of the process....

  19. The growing pipeline of natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors for malaria treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Saint-L?ger, Ad?la?de; Sinadinos, Christopher; Ribas de Pouplana, Llu?s

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health problem. Parasite resistance to existing drugs makes development of new antimalarials an urgency. The protein synthesis machinery is an excellent target for the development of new anti-infectives, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) have been validated as antimalarial drug targets. However, avoiding the emergence of drug resistance and improving selectivity to target aaRS in apicomplexan parasites, such as Plasmodium falciparum, remain crucial challenge...

  20. Measurement of resonance integral of the 90Sr(n,γ)91Sr reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Wada, Hiroaki; Katoh, Toshio; Harada, Hideo; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2001-01-01

    To obtain fundamental data for research on nuclear transmutation method of radioactive wastes, the resonance integral (I 0 ) of the 90 Sr(n,γ) 91 Sr reaction was measured with an activation method. (author)

  1. Integral excitation functions for proton and alpha induced reactions on target elements 22 <= Z <= 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, G.

    1979-01-01

    In the framework of a systematic study which is also important for certain cosmological questions a series of integral excitation functions of p- and α-induced nuclear reactions on target elements 22 [de

  2. Structural integration of separation and reaction systems: I. Integration of stage-wise processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Milan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural integration of separation processes, using multifunctional equipment, has been studied on four stage-wise liquid-liquid separations extraction, absorption, distillation, adsorption and on some combinations of these processes. It was shown for stage - wise processes that the ultimate aim of equipment integration is 3-way integration (by components by steps and by stages and that membrane multiphase contactors present concerning the equipment optimal solutions in many cases. First, by using partially integrated equipment and, later by developing fully integrated systems it was experimentally confirmed that structural 3-way integration produces much higher degrees of component separations and component enrichments in compact and safe equipment.

  3. The influence of prenatal X-irradiation on the activity of SRNA-aminoacyl synthetases in the developing rabbit brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, M.; Zgorzalewicz, B.

    1976-01-01

    The activities of sRNA-aminoacyl synthetases were investigated in the cerebral white and grey matter of rabbits subjected during their prenatal life to a single x-ray dose of 150 rad. The results of investigations have shown that ionizing radiation acting during intrauterine development of the experimental animal brings about a distinct depression of all sRNA-aminoacyl synthetase activities in the newborn irradiated litter. During the postnatal development of these animals the activities of some of the synthetases further decreased and even at adulthood, where they are normally very low, their activities were below the control values. The activities of some other synthetases, after the initial depression, showed no further decrease and at adulthood had values comparable to controls. The results indicate clearly that prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation also affects the steps of protein biosynthesis which depend on the activity of sRNA-aminoacyl synthetases. (author)

  4. Analysis of a nuclear backscattering and reaction data by the method of convolution integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.B.

    1979-02-01

    A quantitative description of nuclear backscattering and reaction processes is made. Various formulas pertinent to nuclear microanalysis are assembled in a manner useful for experimental application. Convolution integrals relating profiles of atoms in a metal substrate to the nuclear reaction spectra obtained in the laboratory are described and computed. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are explicitly included and shown to be important. Examples of the application of the method to simple backscattering, oxide films, and implanted gas are discussed. 7 figures, 1 table

  5. Mutations of the aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases SARS and WARS2 are implicated in the etiology of autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Luciana; Püttmann, Lucia; Kahrizi, Kimia; Garshasbi, Masoud; Hu, Hao; Stehr, Henning; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Otto, Sabine; Jensen, Lars R; Tzschach, Andreas; Jamali, Payman; Wienker, Thomas; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kuss, Andreas W

    2017-06-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is the hallmark of an extremely heterogeneous group of disorders that comprises a wide variety of syndromic and non-syndromic phenotypes. Here, we report on mutations in two aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that are associated with ID in two unrelated Iranian families. In the first family, we identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.514G>A, p.Asp172Asn) in the cytoplasmic seryl-tRNA synthetase (SARS) gene. The mutation affects the enzymatic core domain of the protein and impairs its enzymatic activity, probably leading to reduced cytoplasmic tRNA Ser concentrations. The mutant protein was predicted to be unstable, which could be substantiated by investigating ectopic mutant SARS in transfected HEK293T cells. In the second family, we found a compound heterozygous genotype of the mitochondrial tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (WARS2) gene, comprising a nonsense mutation (c.325delA, p.Ser109Alafs*15), which very likely entails nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and a missense mutation (c.37T>G, p.Trp13Gly). The latter affects the mitochondrial localization signal of WARS2, causing protein mislocalization. Including AIMP1, which we have recently implicated in the etiology of ID, three genes with a role in tRNA-aminoacylation are now associated with this condition. We therefore suggest that the functional integrity of tRNAs in general is an important factor in the development and maintenance of human cognitive functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Application of path integral method to heavy ion reactions, 1. General formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, J; Negishi, T [Tokyo Univ. of Education (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1976-03-01

    The semiclassical approach for heavy ion reactions has become more and more important in analyzing rapidly accumulating data. The purpose of this paper is to lay a quantum-mechanical foundation of the conventional semiclassical treatments in heavy ion physics by using Feynman's path integral method on the basis of the second paper of Pechukas, and discuss simple consequences of the formalism.

  7. A modified Gaussian integration method for thermal reaction rate calculation in U- and Pu-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.; Fredin, B.

    1966-01-01

    An advanced multi-group cell calculations a lot of data information is very often necessary, and hence the data administration will be elaborate, and the spectrum calculation will be time consuming. We think it is possible to reduce the necessary data information by using an effective reaction rate integration method well suited for U- and Pu-absorptions (author)

  8. Structural modeling of tissue-specific mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS2 defects predicts differential effects on aminoacylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya eEuro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of mitochondrial protein synthesis is dependent on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNAs. The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing have revealed the importance of the mtARS proteins for mitochondrial pathophysiology since nearly every nuclear gene for mtARS (out of 19 is now recognized as a disease gene for mitochondrial disease. Typically, defects in each mtARS have been identified in one tissue-specific disease, most commonly affecting the brain, or in one syndrome. However, mutations in the AARS2 gene for mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS have been reported both in patients with infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and in patients with childhood to adulthood-onset leukoencephalopathy. We present here an investigation of the effects of the described mutations on the structure of the synthetase, in an effort to understand the tissue-specific outcomes of the different mutations.The mtAlaRS differs from the other mtARSs because in addition to the aminoacylation domain, it has a conserved editing domain for deacylating tRNAs that have been mischarged with incorrect amino acids. We show that the cardiomyopathy phenotype results from a single allele, causing an amino acid change p.R592W in the editing domain of AARS2, whereas the leukodystrophy mutations are located in other domains of the synthetase. Nevertheless, our structural analysis predicts that all mutations reduce the aminoacylation activity of the synthetase, because all mtAlaRS domains contribute to tRNA binding for aminoacylation. According to our model, the cardiomyopathy mutations severely compromise aminoacylation whereas partial activity is retained by the mutation combinations found in the leukodystrophy patients. These predictions provide a hypothesis for the molecular basis of the distinct tissue-specific phenotypic outcomes.

  9. Natural aminoacyl tRNA synthetase fragment enhances cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E McCormick

    Full Text Available A naturally-occurring fragment of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS has been shown in higher eukaryotes to 'moonlight' as a pro-angiogenic cytokine in addition to its primary role in protein translation. Pro-angiogenic cytokines have previously been proposed to be promising therapeutic mechanisms for the treatment of myocardial infarction. Here, we show that systemic delivery of the natural fragment of TyRS, mini-TyrRS, improves heart function in mice after myocardial infarction. This improvement is associated with reduced formation of scar tissue, increased angiogenesis of cardiac capillaries, recruitment of c-kitpos cells and proliferation of myocardial fibroblasts. This work demonstrates that mini-TyrRS has beneficial effects on cardiac repair and regeneration and offers support for the notion that elucidation of the ever expanding repertoire of noncanonical functions of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases offers unique opportunities for development of novel therapeutics.

  10. The growing pipeline of natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors for malaria treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Sinadinos, Christopher; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2016-04-02

    Malaria remains a major global health problem. Parasite resistance to existing drugs makes development of new antimalarials an urgency. The protein synthesis machinery is an excellent target for the development of new anti-infectives, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) have been validated as antimalarial drug targets. However, avoiding the emergence of drug resistance and improving selectivity to target aaRS in apicomplexan parasites, such as Plasmodium falciparum, remain crucial challenges. Here we discuss such issues using examples of known inhibitors of P. falciparum aaRS, namely halofuginone, cladosporin and borrelidin (inhibitors of ProRS, LysRS and ThrRS, respectively). Encouraging recent results provide useful guidelines to facilitate the development of novel drug candidates which are more potent and selective against these essential enzymes.

  11. A separation-integrated cascade reaction to overcome thermodynamic limitations in rare-sugar synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Nina; Bosshart, Andreas; Failmezger, Jurek; Bechtold, Matthias; Panke, Sven

    2015-03-27

    Enzyme cascades combining epimerization and isomerization steps offer an attractive route for the generic production of rare sugars starting from accessible bulk sugars but suffer from the unfavorable position of the thermodynamic equilibrium, thus reducing the yield and requiring complex work-up procedures to separate pure product from the reaction mixture. Presented herein is the integration of a multienzyme cascade reaction with continuous chromatography, realized as simulated moving bed chromatography, to overcome the intrinsic yield limitation. Efficient production of D-psicose from sucrose in a three-step cascade reaction using invertase, D-xylose isomerase, and D-tagatose epimerase, via the intermediates D-glucose and D-fructose, is described. This set-up allowed the production of pure psicose (99.9%) with very high yields (89%) and high enzyme efficiency (300 g of D-psicose per g of enzyme). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, Randy D [Madison, WI; Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI

    2011-01-18

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  13. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  14. Factors that condition the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Alessia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    To describe and synthesise previous research on factors conditioning the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses. Spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions by health-care providers, are a main instrument for the continuous evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of every drug. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions by all health-care providers, in particular by nurses, is a major limitation to this system. An integrated review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus databases and Google Scholar. After evaluation for appropriateness related to inclusion/exclusion criteria, 16 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Two factors emerged from the study: (1) intrinsic factors related to nurses' knowledge and attitudes; (2) extrinsic factors related to nurses' interaction with health-care organisations and to the relationship between nurses and physicians. Nurses' attitudes that hinder reporting include ignorance, insecurity, fear and lethargy. Nurses are not fully aware of their role in adverse drug reaction reporting. Nurses must acquire greater knowledge to implement specific skills into their daily clinical practice. To improve nurses' reporting of adverse drug reactions, it is necessary to develop management approaches that modify both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A quantum generalization of intrinsic reaction coordinate using path integral centroid coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Motoyuki; Fujisaki, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) for quantum many-body systems described in terms of the mass-weighted ring polymer centroids in the imaginary-time path integral theory. This novel kind of reaction coordinate, which may be called the ''centroid IRC,'' corresponds to the minimum free energy path connecting reactant and product states with a least amount of reversible work applied to the center of masses of the quantum nuclei, i.e., the centroids. We provide a numerical procedure to obtain the centroid IRC based on first principles by combining ab initio path integral simulation with the string method. This approach is applied to NH 3 molecule and N 2 H 5 - ion as well as their deuterated isotopomers to study the importance of nuclear quantum effects in the intramolecular and intermolecular proton transfer reactions. We find that, in the intramolecular proton transfer (inversion) of NH 3 , the free energy barrier for the centroid variables decreases with an amount of about 20% compared to the classical one at the room temperature. In the intermolecular proton transfer of N 2 H 5 - , the centroid IRC is largely deviated from the ''classical'' IRC, and the free energy barrier is reduced by the quantum effects even more drastically.

  16. Unified path integral approach to theories of diffusion-influenced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüstel, Thorsten; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Building on mathematical similarities between quantum mechanics and theories of diffusion-influenced reactions, we develop a general approach for computational modeling of diffusion-influenced reactions that is capable of capturing not only the classical Smoluchowski picture but also alternative theories, as is here exemplified by a volume reactivity model. In particular, we prove the path decomposition expansion of various Green's functions describing the irreversible and reversible reaction of an isolated pair of molecules. To this end, we exploit a connection between boundary value and interaction potential problems with δ - and δ'-function perturbation. We employ a known path-integral-based summation of a perturbation series to derive a number of exact identities relating propagators and survival probabilities satisfying different boundary conditions in a unified and systematic manner. Furthermore, we show how the path decomposition expansion represents the propagator as a product of three factors in the Laplace domain that correspond to quantities figuring prominently in stochastic spatially resolved simulation algorithms. This analysis will thus be useful for the interpretation of current and the design of future algorithms. Finally, we discuss the relation between the general approach and the theory of Brownian functionals and calculate the mean residence time for the case of irreversible and reversible reactions.

  17. Exploring the evolutionary diversity and assembly modes of multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes: lessons from unicellular organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Daphné; Huot, Jonathan L; Bader, Gaétan; Enkler, Ludovic; Senger, Bruno; Becker, Hubert Dominique

    2014-11-28

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are ubiquitous and ancient enzymes, mostly known for their essential role in generating aminoacylated tRNAs. During the last two decades, many aaRSs have been found to perform additional and equally crucial tasks outside translation. In metazoans, aaRSs have been shown to assemble, together with non-enzymatic assembly proteins called aaRSs-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs), into so-called multi-synthetase complexes (MSCs). Metazoan MSCs are dynamic particles able to specifically release some of their constituents in response to a given stimulus. Upon their release from MSCs, aaRSs can reach other subcellular compartments, where they often participate to cellular processes that do not exploit their primary function of synthesizing aminoacyl-tRNAs. The dynamics of MSCs and the expansion of the aaRSs functional repertoire are features that are so far thought to be restricted to higher and multicellular eukaryotes. However, much can be learnt about how MSCs are assembled and function from apparently 'simple' organisms. Here we provide an overview on the diversity of these MSCs, their composition, mode of assembly and the functions that their constituents, namely aaRSs and AIMPs, exert in unicellular organisms. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Designing driver assistance systems with crossmodal signals: multisensory integration rules for saccadic reaction times apply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rike Steenken

    Full Text Available Modern driver assistance systems make increasing use of auditory and tactile signals in order to reduce the driver's visual information load. This entails potential crossmodal interaction effects that need to be taken into account in designing an optimal system. Here we show that saccadic reaction times to visual targets (cockpit or outside mirror, presented in a driving simulator environment and accompanied by auditory or tactile accessories, follow some well-known spatiotemporal rules of multisensory integration, usually found under confined laboratory conditions. Auditory nontargets speed up reaction time by about 80 ms. The effect tends to be maximal when the nontarget is presented 50 ms before the target and when target and nontarget are spatially coincident. The effect of a tactile nontarget (vibrating steering wheel was less pronounced and not spatially specific. It is shown that the average reaction times are well-described by the stochastic "time window of integration" model for multisensory integration developed by the authors. This two-stage model postulates that crossmodal interaction occurs only if the peripheral processes from the different sensory modalities terminate within a fixed temporal interval, and that the amount of crossmodal interaction manifests itself in an increase or decrease of second stage processing time. A qualitative test is consistent with the model prediction that the probability of interaction, but not the amount of crossmodal interaction, depends on target-nontarget onset asynchrony. A quantitative model fit yields estimates of individual participants' parameters, including the size of the time window. Some consequences for the design of driver assistance systems are discussed.

  19. Electromagnetic reactions of few-body systems with the Lorentz integral transform method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leidemann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Various electromagnetic few-body break-up reactions into the many-body continuum are calculated microscopically with the Lorentz integral transform (LIT) method. For three- and four-body nuclei the nuclear Hamiltonian includes two- and three-nucleon forces, while semirealistic interactions are used in case of six- and seven-body systems. Comparisons with experimental data are discussed. In addition various interesting aspects of the 4 He photodisintegration are studied: investigation of a tetrahedrical symmetry of 4 He and a test of non-local nuclear force models via the induced two-body currents

  20. Reactor dosimetry integral reaction rate data in LMFBR Benchmark and standard neutron fields: status, accuracy and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Ceulemans, H.; Vandeplas, P.; McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper provides conclusions that may be drawn regarding the consistency and accuracy of dosimetry cross-section files on the basis of integral reaction rate data measured in U.S. and European benchmark and standard neutron fields. In a discussion of the major experimental facilities CFRMF (Idaho Falls), BIGTEN (Los Alamos), ΣΣ (Mol, Bucharest), NISUS (London), TAPIRO (Roma), FISSION SPECTRA (NBS, Mol, PTB), attention is paid to quantifying the sensitivity of computed integral data relative to the presently evaluated accuracy of the various neutron spectral distributions. The status of available integral data is reviewed and the assigned uncertainties are appraised, including experience gained by interlaboratory comparisons. For all reactions studied and for the various neutron fields, the measured integral data are compared to the ones computed from the ENDF/B-IV and the SAND-II dosimetry cross-section libraries as well as to some other differential data in relevant cases. This comparison, together with the proposed sensitivity and accuracy assessments, is used, whenever possible, to establish how well the best cross-sections evaluated on the basis of differential measurements (category I dosimetry reactions) are reliable in terms of integral reaction rates prediction and, for those reactions for which discrepancies are indicated, in which energy range it is presumed that additional differential measurements might help. For the other reactions (category II), the inconsistencies and trends are examined. The need for further integral measurements and interlaboratory comparisons is also considered

  1. Two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction kinetics through second quantization path integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tiejun; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the study of rare events for a typical genetic switching model in systems biology, in this paper we aim to establish the general two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction systems. We build a formal approach to explicitly obtain the large deviation rate functionals for the considered two-scale processes based upon the second quantization path integral technique. We get three important types of large deviation results when the underlying two timescales are in three different regimes. This is realized by singular perturbation analysis to the rate functionals obtained by the path integral. We find that the three regimes possess the same deterministic mean-field limit but completely different chemical Langevin approximations. The obtained results are natural extensions of the classical large volume limit for chemical reactions. We also discuss its implication on the single-molecule Michaelis–Menten kinetics. Our framework and results can be applied to understand general multi-scale systems including diffusion processes. (paper)

  2. Vorticity field, helicity integral and persistence of entanglement in reaction-diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, J L; Arrayas, M

    2009-01-01

    We show that a global description of the stability of entangled structures in reaction-diffusion systems can be made by means of a helicity integral. A vorticity vector field is defined for these systems, as in electromagnetism or fluid dynamics. We have found under which conditions the helicity is conserved or lost through the boundaries of the medium, so the entanglement of structures observed is preserved or disappears during time evolution. We illustrate the theory with an example of knotted entanglement in a FitzHugh-Nagumo model. For this model, we introduce new non-trivial initial conditions using the Hopf fibration and follow the time evolution of the entanglement. (fast track communication)

  3. Vorticity field, helicity integral and persistence of entanglement in reaction-diffusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, J L; Arrayas, M [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-17

    We show that a global description of the stability of entangled structures in reaction-diffusion systems can be made by means of a helicity integral. A vorticity vector field is defined for these systems, as in electromagnetism or fluid dynamics. We have found under which conditions the helicity is conserved or lost through the boundaries of the medium, so the entanglement of structures observed is preserved or disappears during time evolution. We illustrate the theory with an example of knotted entanglement in a FitzHugh-Nagumo model. For this model, we introduce new non-trivial initial conditions using the Hopf fibration and follow the time evolution of the entanglement. (fast track communication)

  4. A Micro Polymerase Chain Reaction Module for Integrated and Portable DNA Analysis Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Morganti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the design, fabrication, and thermal characterization of a disposable miniaturized Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR module that will be integrated in a portable and fast DNA analysis system. It is composed of two independent parts: a silicon substrate with embedded heater and thermometers and a PDMS (PolyDiMethylSiloxane chamber reactor as disposable element; the contact between the two parts is assured by a mechanical clamping obtained using a Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier (PLCC. This PLCC is also useful, avoid the PCR mix evaporation during the thermal cycles. Finite Element Analysis was used to evaluate the thermal requirements of the device. The thermal behaviour of the device was characterized revealing that the temperature can be controlled with a precision of ±0.5°C. Different concentrations of carbon nanopowder were mixed to the PDMS curing agent in order to increase the PDMS thermal conductivity and so the temperature control accuracy.

  5. A bacterial acyl aminoacyl peptidase couples flexibility and stability as a result of cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Stefania; Ferrari, Cristian; Barbiroli, Alberto; Pesce, Alessandra; Lotti, Marina; Nardini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Life in cold environments requires an overall increase in the flexibility of macromolecular and supramolecular structures to allow biological processes to take place at low temperature. Conformational flexibility supports high catalytic rates of enzymes in the cold but in several cases is also a cause of instability. The three-dimensional structure of the psychrophilic acyl aminoacyl peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) reported in this paper highlights adaptive molecular changes resulting in a fine-tuned trade-off between flexibility and stability. In its functional form SpAAP is a dimer, and an increase in flexibility is achieved through loosening of intersubunit hydrophobic interactions. The release of subunits from the quaternary structure is hindered by an 'arm exchange' mechanism, in which a tiny structural element at the N terminus of one subunit inserts into the other subunit. Mutants lacking the 'arm' are monomeric, inactive and highly prone to aggregation. Another feature of SpAAP cold adaptation is the enlargement of the tunnel connecting the exterior of the protein with the active site. Such a wide channel might compensate for the reduced molecular motions occurring in the cold and allow easy and direct access of substrates to the catalytic site, rendering transient movements between domains unnecessary. Thus, cold-adapted SpAAP has developed a molecular strategy unique within this group of proteins: it is able to enhance the flexibility of each functional unit while still preserving sufficient stability. Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession number 5L8S. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Biomass pyrolysis and combustion integral and differential reaction heats with temperatures using thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiacheng; Igathinathane, C; Yu, Manlu; Pothula, Anand Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Integral reaction heats of switchgrass, big bluestem, and corn stalks were determined using thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC). Iso-conversion differential reaction heats using TGA/DSC pyrolysis and combustion of biomass were not available, despite reports available on heats required and released. A concept of iso-conversion differential reaction heats was used to determine the differential reaction heats of each thermal characteristics segment of these materials. Results showed that the integral reaction heats were endothermic from 30 to 700°C for pyrolysis of switchgrass and big bluestem, but they were exothermic for corn stalks prior to 587°C. However, the integral reaction heats for combustion of the materials followed an endothermic to exothermic transition. The differential reaction heats of switchgrass pyrolysis were predominantly endothermic in the fraction of mass loss (0.0536-0.975), and were exothermic for corn stalks (0.0885-0.850) and big bluestem (0.736-0.919). Study results provided better insight into biomass thermal mechanism. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Effector region of the translation elongation factor EF-Tu.GTP complex stabilizes an orthoester acid intermediate structure of aminoacyl-tRNA in a ternary complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, C; Limmer, S; Zeidler, W; Sprinzl, M

    1994-01-01

    tRNA(Val) from Escherichia coli was aminoacylated with [1-13C]valine and its complex with Thermus thermophilus elongation factor EF-Tu.GTP was analyzed by 13C NMR spectroscopy. The results suggest that the aminoacyl residue of the valyl-tRNA in ternary complex with bacterial EF-Tu and GTP is not attached to tRNA by a regular ester bond to either a 2'- or 3'-hydroxyl group; instead, an intermediate orthoester acid structure with covalent linkage to both vicinal hydroxyls of the terminal adenosine-76 is formed. Mutation of arginine-59 located in the effector region of EF-Tu, a conserved residue in protein elongation factors and the alpha subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins), abolishes the stabilization of the orthoester acid structure of aminoacyl-tRNA. PMID:8183898

  8. Predicting adverse drug reaction profiles by integrating protein interaction networks with drug structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang-Chin; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Jake Y

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has become increasingly important, due to the rising concern on serious ADRs that can cause drugs to fail to reach or stay in the market. We proposed a framework for predicting ADR profiles by integrating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with drug structures. We compared ADR prediction performances over 18 ADR categories through four feature groups-only drug targets, drug targets with PPI networks, drug structures, and drug targets with PPI networks plus drug structures. The results showed that the integration of PPI networks and drug structures can significantly improve the ADR prediction performance. The median AUC values for the four groups were 0.59, 0.61, 0.65, and 0.70. We used the protein features in the best two models, "Cardiac disorders" (median-AUC: 0.82) and "Psychiatric disorders" (median-AUC: 0.76), to build ADR-specific PPI networks with literature supports. For validation, we examined 30 drugs withdrawn from the U.S. market to see if our approach can predict their ADR profiles and explain why they were withdrawn. Except for three drugs having ADRs in the categories we did not predict, 25 out of 27 withdrawn drugs (92.6%) having severe ADRs were successfully predicted by our approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Integrating occupational therapy in treating combat stress reaction within a military unit: An intervention model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindi, Shahar; Galili, Giora; Volovic-Shushan, Shani; Adir-Pavis, Shirly

    2016-01-01

    Combat stress reaction (CR) is a syndrome with a wide range of symptoms including changes in soldiers' behaviors, emotional and physiological responses, avoidance and a decrease in both personal and military functioning. The short-term goal in treating CR is a speedy return to healthy functioning, whereas the long-term goal is to prevent the development of PTSD. Previous research has indicated that the achievement of this short-term goal affects the achievement of the long-term goal and vice versa. Effective treatment requires intervention by trained professionals proficient in reinforcing personal and functional identity without psychiatric labelling. The present paper presents a therapeutic model integrating OT in treating CR within a military setting. The model emphasizes the importance of preventing fixation to the role of 'patient' and a rapid return to maximal functioning. Based on Kielhofner's Model of Human Occupation, which aims to promote adaptive and efficient functioning by engaging soldiers in tasks supporting their military identity, empowering functionality, and increasing their perceived competency. The model emphasizes the therapeutic milieu within a military environment. Practical application of this model focuses on interdisciplinary aspects and client-focused application. The paper describes an assessment process for each soldier entering the CR unit and a treatment model integrating OT.

  10. 11th IUBMB Focused Meeting on the Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Sailing a New Sea of Complex Functions in Human Biology and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francklyn, Christopher; Roy, Herve; Alexander, Rebecca

    2018-05-01

    The 11th IUBMB Focused Meeting on Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases was held in Clearwater Beach, Florida from 29 October⁻2 November 2017, with the aim of presenting the latest research on these enzymes and promoting interchange among aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) researchers. Topics covered in the meeting included many areas of investigation, including ARS evolution, mechanism, editing functions, biology in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their organelles, their roles in human diseases, and their application to problems in emerging areas of synthetic biology. In this report, we provide a summary of the major themes of the meeting, citing contributions from the oral presentations in the meeting.

  11. A Reaction Database for Small Molecule Pharmaceutical Processes Integrated with Process Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development of a reaction database with the objective to collect data for multiphase reactions involved in small molecule pharmaceutical processes with a search engine to retrieve necessary data in investigations of reaction-separation schemes, such as the role of organic......; compounds participating in the reaction; use of organic solvents and their function; information for single step and multistep reactions; target products; reaction conditions and reaction data. Information for reactor scale-up together with information for the separation and other relevant information...

  12. Cross section measurement and integral test for several activation reactions using T + d and thick-Li + d sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumais, J.R.; Tanaka, S.; Odano, N.; Iwasaki, S.; Sugiyama, K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent activities on the area of the cross section measurement for several activation reactions at Department of Nucl. Eng., Tohoku Univ. are described. The first subject is the cross section measurement for (n,2n) reaction on aluminum using the RTNS-II neutron source. Cross sections with rather small error band were obtained for the incident neutron energies from 14 to 14.7 MeV. The second one is the status of the program for the integral experiments on several reactions using the thick Li + d source at Tohoku Fast Neutron Lab. The experimental results showed the usefullness of the source as a tool for the cross section assessment. (author)

  13. A combined reaction class approach with integrated molecular orbital+molecular orbital (IMOMO) methodology: A practical tool for kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Thanh N.; Maity, Dilip K.; Truong, Thanh-Thai T.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new practical computational methodology for predicting thermal rate constants of reactions involving large molecules or a large number of elementary reactions in the same class. This methodology combines the integrated molecular orbital+molecular orbital (IMOMO) approach with our recently proposed reaction class models for tunneling. With the new methodology, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the computational cost by several orders of magnitude while compromising the accuracy in the predicted rate constants by less than 40% over a wide range of temperatures. Another important result is that the computational cost increases only slightly as the system size increases. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  14. Recognition of tRNAs with a long variable arm by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukalo M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotic cells three tRNA species, tRNASer, tRNALeu and tRNATyr, possess a long variable arm of 11–20 nucleotides (type 2 tRNA rather than usual 4 or 5 nucleotides (type 1 tRNA. In this review we have summarized the results of our research on the structural basis for recognition and discrimination of type 2 tRNAs by Thermus thermophilus seryl-, tyrosyl- and leucyl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, TyrRS and LeuRS obtained by X-ray crystallography and chemical probing tRNA in solution. Crystal structures are now known of all three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases complexed with type 2 tRNAs and the different modes of tRNA recognition represented by these structures will be discussed. In particular, emphasis will be given to the results on recognition of characteristic shape of type 2 tRNAs by cognate synthetases. In tRNASer, tRNATyr and tRNALeu the orientation of the long variable arm with respect to the body of the tRNA is different and is controlled by different packing of the core. In the case of SerRS the N-terminal domain and in the case of TyrRS, the C-terminal domain, bind to the characteristic long variable arm of the cognate RNA, thus recognizing the unique shape of the tRNA. The core of T. thermophilus tRNALeu has several layers of unusual base-pairs, which are revealed by the crystal structure of tRNALeu complexed with T. thermophilus LeuRS and by probing a ligand-free tRNA by specific chemical reagents in solution. In the crystal structure of the LeuRS-tRNALeu complex the unique D-stem structure is recognized by the C-terminal domain of LeuRS and these data are in good agreement with those obtained in solution. LeuRS has canonical class I mode of tRNA recognition, approaching the tRNA acceptor stem from the D-stem and minor groove of the acceptor stem side. SerRS also has canonical class II mode of tRNA recognition and approaches tRNASer from opposite, variable stem and major groove of acceptor stem site. And finally, TyrRS in strong

  15. A Reaction Database for Small Molecule Pharmaceutical Processes Integrated with Process Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Papadakis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a reaction database with the objective to collect data for multiphase reactions involved in small molecule pharmaceutical processes with a search engine to retrieve necessary data in investigations of reaction-separation schemes, such as the role of organic solvents in reaction performance improvement. The focus of this reaction database is to provide a data rich environment with process information available to assist during the early stage synthesis of pharmaceutical products. The database is structured in terms of reaction classification of reaction types; compounds participating in the reaction; use of organic solvents and their function; information for single step and multistep reactions; target products; reaction conditions and reaction data. Information for reactor scale-up together with information for the separation and other relevant information for each reaction and reference are also available in the database. Additionally, the retrieved information obtained from the database can be evaluated in terms of sustainability using well-known “green” metrics published in the scientific literature. The application of the database is illustrated through the synthesis of ibuprofen, for which data on different reaction pathways have been retrieved from the database and compared using “green” chemistry metrics.

  16. Design and Integration for Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil via Transesterification Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Abbaspour Aghdam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Biodiesel is Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME which is used as a renewable fuel in diesel engines. Extraction of lipid from various flora sources, including Sunflower, Palm, Canola or animal oils, with a Trans-Esterification reaction between alcohol and Triglyceride (TG, leads to production of Biodiesel and Glycerin. The production cost of biodiesel is so important that is now considered as the greatest obstacle during scale-up process. In this research, a model-type of biodiesel production unit (using vegetable oil source, was designed by Aspen HYSYS V7.2 software, then a great deal of the attempt was employed to optimize the overall yield against the processing parameters including: mass and energy consumption load, as well as some technical discussion regarding associated apparatuses. Materials and Methods Process Design The simulation was carried out using Aspen HYSYS V7.2 employing Triolein (as TG, Oleic acid (as Free Fatty Acid (FFA, and Oleat as biodiesel. Avoiding side-stream reactions as well as trans-esterification, the FFA content was taken to a mere 0.05% (%mass. Feed stream was considered as product of NaOH-catalyzed bi-reactor system operating at 60˚C and 1 atm with the overall conversion of 70% using two series reactors. The ratio of TG to Alcohol is 1:3, however, owing to establish an appropriate reactor performance; this ratio was applied as 1:6 practically. The design was mainly intended to produce 480 m3d-1 biodiesel with mass concentration of 99.65%. Methanol was used in this investigation due to low cost, accessibility and handling considerations. NRTL was taken as the Equation of State (EOS for the process and should be used PRSV equation in the decanter. Thermal Integration Energy consumption was taken into account as basis of optimization in this study. Table 2 demonstrates the thermal characteristics of all streams consist of source and down-streams, while outlet stream like glycerol streams were neglected to

  17. Integrated treatment of olive mill wastewater (OMW) by the combination of Fenton's reaction and anaerobic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gohary, F.A.; Badawy, M.I.; El-Khateeb, M.A.; El-Kalliny, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of an integrated treatment scheme consisting of wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) followed by two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor (10 l each) for the treatment of olive mill wastewater was the subject of this study. The diluted wastewater (1:1) was pre-treated using Fenton's reaction. Optimum operating conditions namely, pH, H 2 O 2 dose, Fe +2 , COD:H 2 O 2 ratio and Fe +2 :H 2 O 2 ratio were determined. The UASB reactor was fed continuously with the pre-treated wastewater. The hydraulic retention time was kept constant at 48 h (24 h for each stage). The conventional parameters such as COD, BOD, TOC, TKN, TP, TSS, oil and grease, and total phenols were determined. The concentrations of polyphenolic compounds in raw wastewater and effluents of each treatment step were measured using HPLC. The results indicated a good quality final effluent. Residual concentrations of individual organic compounds ranged from 0.432 mg l -1 for ρ-hydroxy-benzaldhyde to 3.273 mg l -1 for cinnamic acid

  18. Determination of the interfacial area of a continuous integrated mixer/separator (CINC) using a chemical reaction method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, B.; Jansma, W. J.; Winkelman, J. G. M.; Heeres, H. J.

    The effect of the liquid flow rates (18-100 mL/min) and rotor frequency (30-60 Hz) on the interfacial area of a liquid-liquid system in a CINC-V02 continuous integrated mixer/separator have been studied using a chemical reaction method. Topical specific interfacial areas were in the range of 3.2 x

  19. Integral measurement of the $^{12}$C(n,p)$^{12}$B reaction up to 10 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Žugec, P; Bosnar, D; Ventura, A; Mengoni, A; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M.A; Cosentino, L; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dressler, R; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Finocchiaro, P; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Heinitz, S; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Meo, S Lo; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mastromarco, M; Mendoza, E; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Musumarra, A; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T

    2016-01-01

    The integral measurement of the $^{12}$C(n,p)$^{12}$B reaction was performed at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN. The total number of $^{12}$B nuclei produced per neutron pulse of the n_TOF beam was determined using the activation technique in combination with a time of flight technique. The cross section is integrated over the n_TOF neutron energy spectrum from reaction threshold at 13.6 MeV to 10 GeV. Having been measured up to 1 GeV on basis of the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction, the neutron energy spectrum above 200 MeV has been reevaluated due to the recent extension of the cross section reference for this particular reaction, which is otherwise considered a standard up to 200 MeV. The results from the dedicated GEANT4 simulations have been used to evaluate the neutron flux from 1 GeV up to 10 GeV. The experimental results related to the $^{12}$C(n,p)$^{12}$B reaction are compared with the evaluated cross sections from major libraries and with the predictions of different GEANT4 models, which m...

  20. [Impact of sperm DNA and acrosome integrity and acrosome reaction rate on outcomes of rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongzhi; Li, Dawen; Cheng, Junping; Huo, Zhongchao; Huang, Hongyi; Xiao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of sperm DNA integrity rate, acrosome integrity rate and acrosome reaction rate on the outcomes of rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This retrospective analysis was conducted among 97 infertile couples receiving rescue ICSI due to failure of in vitro fertilization procedures in our Reproductive Medicine Center. Of these 97 women, 41 had clinical pregnancy and 56 did not, and the effects of sperm DNA integrity rate (estimated by DNA fragmentation index, DFI), acrosome integrity rate and acrosome reaction rate on rescue ICSI outcomes were analyzed. No significant difference was found in paternal age, testosterone value, testicular volume, FSH, female patient' age or the number of eggs retrieved between the two groups (P>0.05), but the infertility years was significantly shorter in the pregnancy group than in the non-pregnancy group (Prate and cleavage rate were similar between the two groups (P>0.05), but the good embryo rate was significantly higher in the pregnancy group (Preaction rate did not differ significantly between the two groups (P>0.05), but the acrosome integrity rate was significantly higher in the pregnancy group (Prate, acrosome integrity or acrosome reaction rate were not correlated with the fertilization rate, cleavage rate or good embryo rate (P>0.05). The pregnancy rate, twin and single fetus rates were 42.3%, 10.3% and 32.0% in this cohort after recue ICSI, respectively. Rescue ICSI is an effective treatment after failed in vitro fertilization procedure, and sperm acrosome integrity rate is associated with the outcome of rescue ICSI.

  1. Micro flow reactor chips with integrated luminescent chemosensors for spatially resolved on-line chemical reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hoera, Christian; Meier, Robert J; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-10-21

    Real-time chemical reaction monitoring in microfluidic environments is demonstrated using luminescent chemical sensors integrated in PDMS/glass-based microscale reactors. A fabrication procedure is presented that allows for straightforward integration of thin polymer layers with optical sensing functionality in microchannels of glass-PDMS chips of only 150 μm width and of 10 to 35 μm height. Sensor layers consisting of polystyrene and an oxygen-sensitive platinum porphyrin probe with film thicknesses of about 0.5 to 4 μm were generated by combining spin coating and abrasion techniques. Optimal coating procedures were developed and evaluated. The chip-integrated sensor layers were calibrated and investigated with respect to stability, reproducibility and response times. These microchips allowed observation of dissolved oxygen concentration in the range of 0 to over 40 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 368 μg L(-1). The sensor layers were then used for observation of a model reaction, the oxidation of sulphite to sulphate in a microfluidic chemical reactor and could observe sulphite concentrations of less than 200 μM. Real-time on-line monitoring of this chemical reaction was realized at a fluorescence microscope setup with 405 nm LED excitation and CCD camera detection.

  2. Extracting integrated and differential cross sections in low energy heavy-ion reactions from backscattering measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargsyan, V. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Adamian, G. G., E-mail: adamian@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Antonenko, N. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Mathematical Physics Department, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Diaz-Torres, A. [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas, I-38123 Villazzano, Trento (Italy); Gomes, P. R. S. [de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litorânea, s/n, Niterói, R.J. 24210-340 (Brazil); Lenske, H. [Institut für Theoretische Physik der Justus–Liebig–Universität, D–35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2016-07-07

    We suggest new methods to extract elastic (quasi-elastic) scattering angular distribution and reaction (capture) cross sections from the experimental elastic (quasi-elastic) backscattering excitation function taken at a single angle.

  3. A method for integrating and ranking the evidence for biochemical pathways by mining reactions from text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Makoto; Ohta, Tomoko; Rak, Rafal; Rowley, Andrew; Kell, Douglas B.; Pyysalo, Sampo; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: To create, verify and maintain pathway models, curators must discover and assess knowledge distributed over the vast body of biological literature. Methods supporting these tasks must understand both the pathway model representations and the natural language in the literature. These methods should identify and order documents by relevance to any given pathway reaction. No existing system has addressed all aspects of this challenge. Method: We present novel methods for associating pathway model reactions with relevant publications. Our approach extracts the reactions directly from the models and then turns them into queries for three text mining-based MEDLINE literature search systems. These queries are executed, and the resulting documents are combined and ranked according to their relevance to the reactions of interest. We manually annotate document-reaction pairs with the relevance of the document to the reaction and use this annotation to study several ranking methods, using various heuristic and machine-learning approaches. Results: Our evaluation shows that the annotated document-reaction pairs can be used to create a rule-based document ranking system, and that machine learning can be used to rank documents by their relevance to pathway reactions. We find that a Support Vector Machine-based system outperforms several baselines and matches the performance of the rule-based system. The success of the query extraction and ranking methods are used to update our existing pathway search system, PathText. Availability: An online demonstration of PathText 2 and the annotated corpus are available for research purposes at http://www.nactem.ac.uk/pathtext2/. Contact: makoto.miwa@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23813008

  4. An integrated open framework for thermodynamics of reactions that combines accuracy and coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Flamholz, Avi; Lubling, Yaniv; Davidi, Dan; Milo, Ron

    2012-08-01

    The laws of thermodynamics describe a direct, quantitative relationship between metabolite concentrations and reaction directionality. Despite great efforts, thermodynamic data suffer from limited coverage, scattered accessibility and non-standard annotations. We present a framework for unifying thermodynamic data from multiple sources and demonstrate two new techniques for extrapolating the Gibbs energies of unmeasured reactions and conditions. Both methods account for changes in cellular conditions (pH, ionic strength, etc.) by using linear regression over the ΔG(○) of pseudoisomers and reactions. The Pseudoisomeric Reactant Contribution method systematically infers compound formation energies using measured K' and pK(a) data. The Pseudoisomeric Group Contribution method extends the group contribution method and achieves a high coverage of unmeasured reactions. We define a continuous index that predicts the reversibility of a reaction under a given physiological concentration range. In the characteristic physiological range 3μM-3mM, we find that roughly half of the reactions in Escherichia coli's metabolism are reversible. These new tools can increase the accuracy of thermodynamic-based models, especially in non-standard pH and ionic strengths. The reversibility index can help modelers decide which reactions are reversible in physiological conditions. Freely available on the web at: http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il. Website implemented in Python, MySQL, Apache and Django, with all major browsers supported. The framework is open-source (code.google.com/p/milo-lab), implemented in pure Python and tested mainly on Linux. ron.milo@weizmann.ac.il Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. An integrated open framework for thermodynamics of reactions that combines accuracy and coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Flamholz, Avi; Lubling, Yaniv; Davidi, Dan; Milo, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The laws of thermodynamics describe a direct, quantitative relationship between metabolite concentrations and reaction directionality. Despite great efforts, thermodynamic data suffer from limited coverage, scattered accessibility and non-standard annotations. We present a framework for unifying thermodynamic data from multiple sources and demonstrate two new techniques for extrapolating the Gibbs energies of unmeasured reactions and conditions. Results: Both methods account for changes in cellular conditions (pH, ionic strength, etc.) by using linear regression over the ΔG○ of pseudoisomers and reactions. The Pseudoisomeric Reactant Contribution method systematically infers compound formation energies using measured K′ and pKa data. The Pseudoisomeric Group Contribution method extends the group contribution method and achieves a high coverage of unmeasured reactions. We define a continuous index that predicts the reversibility of a reaction under a given physiological concentration range. In the characteristic physiological range 3μM–3mM, we find that roughly half of the reactions in Escherichia coli's metabolism are reversible. These new tools can increase the accuracy of thermodynamic-based models, especially in non-standard pH and ionic strengths. The reversibility index can help modelers decide which reactions are reversible in physiological conditions. Availability: Freely available on the web at: http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il. Website implemented in Python, MySQL, Apache and Django, with all major browsers supported. The framework is open-source (code.google.com/p/milo-lab), implemented in pure Python and tested mainly on Linux. Contact: ron.milo@weizmann.ac.il Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22645166

  6. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; Oliveira, Cesar de

    2016-09-01

    to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. identificar e sintetizar estudos que examinam as interações medicamentosas (IM) e reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM) em idosos polimedicados. revisão integrativa de estudos publicados de janeiro de 2008 a dezembro de 2013, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão, nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE e EMBASE. foram analisados 47 estudos de texto completo, incluindo 14,624,492 idosos (≥ 60 anos): 24 (51,1%) sobre RAM, 14 (29,8%) sobre IM e 9 estudos (19,1%) que investigaram tanto IM como RAM. Encontramos uma variedade de desenhos metodológicos. Os estudos revisados reforçaram que a polifarmácia é um processo multifatorial, e os preditores e a prescrição inadequada estão associados a

  7. eEF1A Mediates the Nuclear Export of SNAG-Containing Proteins via the Exportin5-Aminoacyl-tRNA Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Mingot

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Exportin5 mediates the nuclear export of double-stranded RNAs, including pre-microRNAs, adenoviral RNAs, and tRNAs. When tRNAs are aminoacylated, the Exportin5-aminoacyl (aa-tRNA complex recruits and coexports the translation elongation factor eEF1A. Here, we show that eEF1A binds to Snail transcription factors when bound to their main target, the E-cadherin promoter, facilitating their export to the cytoplasm in association with the aa-tRNA-Exportin5 complex. Snail binds to eEF1A through the SNAG domain, a protein nuclear export signal present in several transcription factor families, and this binding is regulated by phosphorylation. Thus, we describe a nuclear role for eEF1A and provide a mechanism for protein nuclear export that attenuates the activity of SNAG-containing transcription factors.

  8. Safety Evaluation for IHTS Integrity due to the Steam Generator Sodium-Water Reaction Event in the PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang-Jun; Lee, Kwi Lim; Ha, Kwi-Seok; Lee, Seung Won; Jeong, Taekyeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, the integrity of the IHTS and SG by the SWR event are evaluated using the SWAAMII code. A sodium has a chemical characteristics to rigorously react the water or steam and produce the high pressure waves and high temperature reaction heat. It has an excellent characteristics as a reactor coolant. But, there is an event to be considered in the sodium cooled fast reactor design. The Sodium-Water Reaction (SWR) event can be occurred by the water or steam leaks due to the break of the steam generator tubes. The propagated high pressure waves threathen the structural integrity of the affected Intermediate Heat Transport System (IHTS) and steam generator. If the IHTS pipes are failed, the sodium of the IHTS can be released to the containment building. To the peak pressure point of view, it is performed to evaluate the integrity of the major components due to the SWR event in the SG. The generated peak pressures due to the five SG tubes simultaneous break event are within the range of the design pressure for the SG, IHX and IHTS including the related pipes.

  9. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-08

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  10. An integrated high temperature environmental cell for atom probe tomography studies of gas-surface reactions: Instrumentation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.R.; Bagot, P.A.J.; Rajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated environmental cell has been designed and developed for the latest generation of Atom Probe Tomography LEAP™ instruments, allowing controlled exposure of samples to gases at high temperatures. Following treatment, samples can be transferred through the LEAP vacuum system for subsequent APT analysis, which provides detailed information on changes to chemical microstructures following the reactions with near-atomic resolution. A full description of the cell is presented, along with some sample results on the oxidation of aluminum and two platinum-group alloys, demonstrating the capability of combining exposure/characterization functionality in a single instrument. - Highlights: • Designed and built atom probe environmental cell for in situ reactions. • Investigated Al oxidation, and demonstrated improvement with new cell. • in situ APT analysis of Pt-alloys showed surface segregation of Rh and Ir

  11. An integrated one-chip-sensor system for microRNA quantitative analysis based on digital droplet polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Masahiko; Wiederkehr, Rodrigo Sergio; Cai, Qing; Majeed, Bivragh; Fiorini, Paolo; Stakenborg, Tim; Matsuno, Toshinobu

    2016-04-01

    A silicon microfluidic chip was developed for microRNA (miRNA) quantitative analysis. It performs sequentially reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction in a digital droplet format. Individual processes take place on different cavities, and reagent and sample mixing is carried out on a chip, prior to entering each compartment. The droplets are generated on a T-junction channel before the polymerase chain reaction step. Also, a miniaturized fluorescence detector was developed, based on an optical pick-up head of digital versatile disc (DVD) and a micro-photomultiplier tube. The chip integrated in the detection system was tested using synthetic miRNA with known concentrations, ranging from 300 to 3,000 templates/µL. Results proved the functionality of the system.

  12. Simulation of biodiesel combustion in a light-duty diesel engine using integrated compact biodiesel–diesel reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Jo-Han

    2013-01-01

    This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study is performed to investigate the combustion characteristics and emissions formation processes of biodiesel fuels in a light-duty diesel engine. A compact reaction mechanism with 80 species and 303 reactions is used to account for the effects of chemical...... kinetics. Here, the mechanism is capable of emulating biodiesel–diesel mixture of different blending levels and biodiesel produced from different feedstock. The integrated CFD-kinetic model was validated against a test matrix which covers the entire saturated–unsaturated methyl ester range typical...... of biodiesel fuels, as well as the biodiesel–diesel blending levels. The simulated cases were then validated for in-cylinder pressure profiles and peak pressure values/timings. Errors in the peak pressure values did not exceed 1%, while the variations in peak pressure timings were kept within 1.5 crank angle...

  13. Person-based differences in pay reactions: A compensation-activation theory and integrative conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Ingrid Smithey; Shaw, Jason D

    2018-06-07

    Compensation research has focused traditionally on how pay design characteristics (e.g., pay level, individual or group incentives) relate to average employee outcomes and, in toto, on how these outcomes affect organizational performance. Recently, scholars have begun to pay more attention to how individuals vary in the strength of their reactions to pay. Empirical research in several disciplines examines how the interplay of pay systems and person-based characteristics (psychological individual differences, demographics, and relative performance or position in a group) relate to important work-related outcomes. We develop a compensation-activation theory that frames compensation design characteristics as workplace "situations" providing cues that activate individuals' corresponding fundamental social motives made salient due to chronic or transient person-based characteristics. Where activation occurs, stronger-than-average responses to the compensation "situation" are expected. Using the theory as a lens, we synthesize and reinterpret existing research on person-based reactions to pay characteristics, including sorting, incentive/motivational effects, and effects on collective pay system reactions and unit/organizational outcomes. We conclude with a research agenda aimed at refining compensation-activation theory and advancing the study of compensation as it affects individual and organizational outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. A Systems Approach towards an Intelligent and Self-Controlling Platform for Integrated Continuous Reaction Sequences**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Richard J; Battilocchio, Claudio; Fitzpatrick, Daniel E; Sliwinski, Eric; Hawkins, Joel M; Ley, Steven V

    2015-01-01

    Performing reactions in flow can offer major advantages over batch methods. However, laboratory flow chemistry processes are currently often limited to single steps or short sequences due to the complexity involved with operating a multi-step process. Using new modular components for downstream processing, coupled with control technologies, more advanced multi-step flow sequences can be realized. These tools are applied to the synthesis of 2-aminoadamantane-2-carboxylic acid. A system comprising three chemistry steps and three workup steps was developed, having sufficient autonomy and self-regulation to be managed by a single operator. PMID:25377747

  15. Investigation of structural integrity for turbine generator foundation affected by alkali-silica reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryo Fujimoto; Hiroshi Shimizu; Hisashi Sekimoto; Yuichi Watanabe; Tatsuya Ishikawa

    2005-01-01

    Turbine Generator Foundation is a reinforced concrete structure having a table deck to support equipments and columns to support the table deck. After operation of the plant, the expansion of the table deck in turbine longitudinal axis in the structure has been observed. By investigation of concrete material property, it is found that the expansion has been caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). In this study, we evaluate the material properties of the structure affected by ASR and safety margin of capacity of the structure by nonlinear analysis using beam element model with those material properties. (authors)

  16. Towards an Integrative Understanding of tRNA Aminoacylation-Diet-Host-Gut Microbiome Interactions in Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Elena L; Perry, George

    2018-03-26

    Transgenic mice used for Alzheimer's disease (AD) preclinical experiments do not recapitulate the human disease. In our models, the dietary tryptophan metabolite tryptamine produced by human gut microbiome induces tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) deficiency with consequent neurodegeneration in cells and mice. Dietary supplements, antibiotics and certain drugs increase tryptamine content in vivo. TrpRS catalyzes tryptophan attachment to tRNA trp at initial step of protein biosynthesis. Tryptamine that easily crosses the blood-brain barrier induces vasculopathies, neurodegeneration and cell death via TrpRS competitive inhibition. TrpRS inhibitor tryptophanol produced by gut microbiome also induces neurodegeneration. TrpRS inhibition by tryptamine and its metabolites preventing tryptophan incorporation into proteins lead to protein biosynthesis impairment. Tryptophan, a least amino acid in food and proteins that cannot be synthesized by humans competes with frequent amino acids for the transport from blood to brain. Tryptophan is a vulnerable amino acid, which can be easily lost to protein biosynthesis. Some proteins marking neurodegenerative pathology, such as tau lack tryptophan. TrpRS exists in cytoplasmic (WARS) and mitochondrial (WARS2) forms. Pathogenic gene variants of both forms cause TrpRS deficiency with consequent intellectual and motor disabilities in humans. The diminished tryptophan-dependent protein biosynthesis in AD patients is a proof of our model-based disease concept.

  17. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  18. Multifunctional Hydrogel with Good Structure Integrity, Self-Healing, and Tissue-Adhesive Property Formed by Combining Diels-Alder Click Reaction and Acylhydrazone Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Du, Jie; Wang, Gang; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-04

    Hydrogel, as a good cartilage tissue-engineered scaffold, not only has to possess robust mechanical property but also has to have an intrinsic self-healing property to integrate itself or the surrounding host cartilage. In this work a double cross-linked network (DN) was designed and prepared by combining Diels-Alder click reaction and acylhydrazone bond. The DA reaction maintained the hydrogel's structural integrity and mechanical strength in physiological environment, while the dynamic covalent acylhydrazone bond resulted in hydrogel's self-healing property and controlled the on-off switch of network cross-link density. At the same time, the aldehyde groups contained in hydrogel further promote good integration of the hydrogel to surrounding tissue based on aldehyde-amine Schiff-base reaction. This kind of hydrogel has good structural integrity, autonomous self-healing, and tissue-adhesive property and simultaneously will have a good application in tissue engineering and tissue repair field.

  19. Structural integrity of callosal midbody influences intermanual transfer in a motor reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bove, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Training one hand on a motor task results in performance improvements in the other hand, also when stimuli are randomly presented (nonspecific transfer). Corpus callosum (CC) is the main structure involved in interhemispheric information transfer; CC pathology occurs in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and is related to altered performance of tasks requiring interhemispheric transfer of sensorimotor information. To investigate the role of CC in nonspecific transfer during a pure motor reaction-time task, we combined motor behavior with diffusion tensor imaging analysis in PwMS. Twenty-two PwMS and 10 controls, all right-handed, were asked to respond to random stimuli with appropriate finger opposition movements with the right (learning) and then the left (transfer) hand. PwMS were able to improve motor performance reducing response times with practice with a trend similar to controls and preserved the ability to transfer the acquired motor information from the learning to the transfer hand. A higher variability in the transfer process, indicated by a significantly larger standard deviation of mean nonspecific transfer, was found in the PwMS group with respect to the control group, suggesting the presence of subtle impairments in interhemispheric communication in some patients. Then, we correlated the amount of nonspecific transfer with mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values, indicative of microstructural damage, obtained in five CC subregions identified on PwMS's FA maps. A significant correlation was found only in the subregion including posterior midbody (Pearson's r = 0.74, P = 0.003), which thus seems to be essential for the interhemispheric transfer of information related to pure sensorimotor tasks. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. An integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer for chemical and photo- reaction dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowalter, Steven J; Chen, Kuang; Rellergert, Wade G; Sullivan, Scott T; Hudson, Eric R

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a linear quadrupole trap with a simple time-of-flight mass spectrometer with medium-mass resolution (m/Δm ∼ 50) geared towards the demands of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics experiments. By utilizing a novel radial ion extraction scheme from the linear quadrupole trap into the mass analyzer, a device with large trap capacity and high optical access is realized without sacrificing mass resolution. This provides the ability to address trapped ions with laser light and facilitates interactions with neutral background gases prior to analyzing the trapped ions. Here, we describe the construction and implementation of the device as well as present representative ToF spectra. We conclude by demonstrating the flexibility of the device with proof-of-principle experiments that include the observation of molecular-ion photodissociation and the measurement of trapped-ion chemical reaction rates. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  1. An integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer for chemical and photo- reaction dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen Kuang; Rellergert, Wade G.; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a linear quadrupole trap with a simple time-of-flight mass spectrometer with medium-mass resolution (m/Δm∼ 50) geared towards the demands of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics experiments. By utilizing a novel radial ion extraction scheme from the linear quadrupole trap into the mass analyzer, a device with large trap capacity and high optical access is realized without sacrificing mass resolution. This provides the ability to address trapped ions with laser light and facilitates interactions with neutral background gases prior to analyzing the trapped ions. Here, we describe the construction and implementation of the device as well as present representative ToF spectra. We conclude by demonstrating the flexibility of the device with proof-of-principle experiments that include the observation of molecular-ion photodissociation and the measurement of trapped-ion chemical reaction rates.

  2. Integrated microreactor for enzymatic reaction automation: An easy step toward the quality control of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Yoann; Mas, Silvia; Coussot, Gaelle; Bartley, Killian; Montels, Jérôme; Morel, Jacques; Perrin, Catherine

    2017-12-15

    The main purpose of the present work is to provide a fully integrated miniaturized electrophoretic methodology in order to facilitate the quality control of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This methodology called D-PES, which stands for Diffusion-mediated Proteolysis combined with an Electrophoretic Separation, permits to perform subsequently mAb tryptic digestion and electrophoresis separation of proteolysis products in an automated manner. Tryptic digestion conditions were optimized regarding the influence of enzyme concentration and incubation time in order to achieve similar enzymatic digestion efficiency to that obtained with the classical methodology (off-line). Then, the optimization of electrophoretic separation conditions concerning the nature of background electrolyte (BGE), ionic strength and pH was realized. Successful and repeatable electrophoretic profiles of three mAbs digests (Trastuzumab, Infliximab and Tocilizumab), comparable to the off-line digestion profiles, were obtained demonstrating the feasibility and robustness of the proposed methodology. In summary, the use of the proposed and optimized in-line approach opens a new, fast and easy way for the quality control of mAbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  4. Integral cross-section measurements for investigating the emission of complex particles in 14 MeV neutron-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaim, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the off-line techniques used for the determination of integral cross-section data are reviewed and, as a critical check, some typical data sets are compared. The systematic trends reported in the cross-section data for (n,d), (n,t), (n, 3 He) and (n,α) reactions are discussed. A brief discussion of the possible reaction mechanisms is given. Some of the applications of the data are outlined. (author)

  5. Effect of reverse Boudouard reaction catalyst on the performance of solid oxide carbon fuel cells integrated with a dry gasifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun-Kyung; Mehran, Muhammad Taqi; Mushtaq, Usman; Lim, Tak-Hyoung; Lee, Jong-Won; Lee, Seung-Bok; Park, Seok-Joo; Song, Rak-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of K_2CO_3 catalyst in carbon fuel improves the performance of SO-CFC. • Thermal and electrochemical analyses done to elucidate the catalytic enhancement. • Material characterization of SO-CFC performed after long-term degradation test. - Abstract: A solid oxide carbon fuel cell (SO-CFC) integrated with a dry gasifier was operated on activated carbon fuel and the effect of adding a reverse Boudouard gasification catalyst on the performance and long-term operation characteristics of the SO-CFC was investigated. The reactivity of the carbon fuels for the Boudouard gasification reaction was analyzed by a thermal analysis at various operating conditions. The SO-CFC was then operated on gasified fuel gas consisting of CO_2 and CO obtained from the integrated dry gasifier. The SO-CFC operated on activated carbon fuel with 5 wt.% K_2CO_3 achieved a maximum power density of 202, 262, and 271 mW/cm"2 at 750, 800, and 850 °C, respectively; the SO-CFC fueled with activated carbon fuel without a catalyst meanwhile yielded maximum power density of 168 mW/cm"2 at 850 °C. By using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the effect of adding the catalyst on the gasification products and subsequently on the performance of the SO-CFC was studied. A long-term degradation test was conducted by continuously operating the SO-CFC at 50 mA/cm"2 for 518 h at 750 °C. During the long-term degradation test, the average degradation rate of the SO-CFC was found to be 183 mV/kh. The post-mortem SEM and XRD analyses of the SO-CFC after the long-term test revealed the presence of carbon deposits and oxidation of Ni at the anode, causing a relatively higher degree of degradation in the SO-CFC integrated with the dry gasifier during the long-term operation. The addition of the K_2CO_3 based dry gasification catalyst significantly enhances the performance of the SO-CFC integrated with dry gasification, but during long-term operation, the degradation rate is found

  6. Steric and thermodynamic limits of design for the incorporation of large unnatural amino acids in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armen, Roger S; Schiller, Stefan M; Brooks, Charles L

    2010-06-01

    Orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pairs from archaea have been evolved to facilitate site specific in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins in Escherichia coli. Using this approach, unnatural amino acids have been successfully incorporated with high translational efficiency and fidelity. In this study, CHARMM-based molecular docking and free energy calculations were used to evaluate rational design of specific protein-ligand interactions for aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. A series of novel unnatural amino acid ligands were docked into the p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine tRNA synthetase, which revealed that the binding pocket of the enzyme does not provide sufficient space for significantly larger ligands. Specific binding site residues were mutated to alanine to create additional space to accommodate larger target ligands, and then mutations were introduced to improve binding free energy. This approach was used to redesign binding sites for several different target ligands, which were then tested against the standard 20 amino acids to verify target specificity. Only the synthetase designed to bind Man-alpha-O-Tyr was predicted to be sufficiently selective for the target ligand and also thermodynamically stable. Our study suggests that extensive redesign of the tRNA synthatase binding pocket for large bulky ligands may be quite thermodynamically unfavorable.

  7. Small-angle X-ray Solution Scattering Study of the Multi-aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complex Reveals an Elongated and Multi-armed particle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, José; Renault, Louis; Pérez, Javier; Mirande, Marc

    2013-01-01

    In animal cells, nine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with the three auxiliary proteins p18, p38, and p43 to form a stable and conserved large multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS), whose molecular mass has been proposed to be between 1.0 and 1.5 MDa. The complex acts as a molecular hub for coordinating protein synthesis and diverse regulatory signal pathways. Electron microscopy studies defined its low resolution molecular envelope as an overall rather compact, asymmetric triangular shape. Here, we have analyzed the composition and homogeneity of the native mammalian MARS isolated from rabbit liver and characterized its overall internal structure, size, and shape at low resolution by hydrodynamic methods and small-angle x-ray scattering in solution. Our data reveal that the MARS exhibits a much more elongated and multi-armed shape than expected from previous reports. The hydrodynamic and structural features of the MARS are large compared with other supramolecular assemblies involved in translation, including ribosome. The large dimensions and non-compact structural organization of MARS favor a large protein surface accessibility for all its components. This may be essential to allow structural rearrangements between the catalytic and cis-acting tRNA binding domains of the synthetases required for binding the bulky tRNA substrates. This non-compact architecture may also contribute to the spatiotemporal controlled release of some of its components, which participate in non-canonical functions after dissociation from the complex. PMID:23836901

  8. Elongation factor Ts directly facilitates the formation and disassembly of the Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu·GTP·aminoacyl-tRNA ternary complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Benjamin J; Altman, Roger B; Ferrao, Ryan; Alejo, Jose L; Kaur, Navdep; Kanji, Joshua; Blanchard, Scott C

    2013-05-10

    Aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) enters the ribosome in a ternary complex with the G-protein elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and GTP. EF-Tu·GTP·aa-tRNA ternary complex formation and decay rates are accelerated in the presence of the nucleotide exchange factor elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts). EF-Ts directly facilitates the formation and disassociation of ternary complex. This system demonstrates a novel function of EF-Ts. Aminoacyl-tRNA enters the translating ribosome in a ternary complex with elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and GTP. Here, we describe bulk steady state and pre-steady state fluorescence methods that enabled us to quantitatively explore the kinetic features of Escherichia coli ternary complex formation and decay. The data obtained suggest that both processes are controlled by a nucleotide-dependent, rate-determining conformational change in EF-Tu. Unexpectedly, we found that this conformational change is accelerated by elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts), the guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for EF-Tu. Notably, EF-Ts attenuates the affinity of EF-Tu for GTP and destabilizes ternary complex in the presence of non-hydrolyzable GTP analogs. These results suggest that EF-Ts serves an unanticipated role in the cell of actively regulating the abundance and stability of ternary complex in a manner that contributes to rapid and faithful protein synthesis.

  9. The α-Amino Group of the Threonine Substrate As The General Base During tRNA Aminoacylation: A New Version of Substrate Assisted Catalysis Predicted by Hybrid DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, WenJuan; Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Gauld, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Density functional theory-based methods in combination with large chemical models have been used to investigate the mechanism of the second half-reaction catalyzed by Thr-tRNA synthetase; aminoacyl transfer from Thr-AMP onto the A763'OH of the cognate tRNA. In particular, we have examined pathways in which an active site His309 residue is either protonated or neutral (i.e., potentially able to act as a base). In the protonated His309-assisted mechanism, the rate-limiting step is formation of the tetrahedral intermediate. The barrier for this step is 155.0 kJ mol−1 and thus, such a pathway is concluded to not be enzymatically feasible. For the neutral His309-assisted mechanism two models were used with the difference being whether Lys465 was included. For either model the barrier of the rate-limiting step is below the upper-thermodynamic enzymatic limit of ∼125 kJ mol−1. Specifically, without Lys465 the rate-limiting barrier is 122.1 kJ mol−1 and corresponds to a rotation about the tetrahedral intermediates Ccarb—OH bond. For the model with Lys465 the rate-limiting barrier is slightly lower and corresponds to the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate. Importantly, for both neutral His309’ models the neutral amino group of the threonyl substrate directly acts as the proton accepter; in the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate the A763'OH proton is directly transferred onto the Thr-NH2. Therefore, the overall mechanism follows a general substrate assisted catalytic mechanism. PMID:21942566

  10. Integrated treatment of olive mill wastewater (OMW) by the combination of Fenton's reaction and anaerobic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gohary, F.A.; Badawy, M.I. [Water Pollution Department, National Research Center (NRC), Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); El-Khateeb, M.A. [Water Pollution Department, National Research Center (NRC), Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: elkhateebcairo@yahoo.com; El-Kalliny, A.S. [Water Pollution Department, National Research Center (NRC), Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-03-15

    The use of an integrated treatment scheme consisting of wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) followed by two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor (10 l each) for the treatment of olive mill wastewater was the subject of this study. The diluted wastewater (1:1) was pre-treated using Fenton's reaction. Optimum operating conditions namely, pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose, Fe{sup +2}, COD:H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ratio and Fe{sup +2}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ratio were determined. The UASB reactor was fed continuously with the pre-treated wastewater. The hydraulic retention time was kept constant at 48 h (24 h for each stage). The conventional parameters such as COD, BOD, TOC, TKN, TP, TSS, oil and grease, and total phenols were determined. The concentrations of polyphenolic compounds in raw wastewater and effluents of each treatment step were measured using HPLC. The results indicated a good quality final effluent. Residual concentrations of individual organic compounds ranged from 0.432 mg l{sup -1} for {rho}-hydroxy-benzaldhyde to 3.273 mg l{sup -1} for cinnamic acid.

  11. Integral measurement of the {sup 12}C(n, p){sup 12}B reaction up to 10 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zugec, P.; Bosnar, D. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Colonna, N.; Barbagallo, M.; Mastromarco, M.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Ventura, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Mengoni, A. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Altstadt, S.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Weigand, M. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Perkowski, J. [Uniwersytet Lodzki, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L.; Leong, L.S.; Tassan-Got, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IPN, Orsay (France); Becares, V.; Cano-Ott, D.; Garcia, A.R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Valenta, S. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Belloni, F.; Mondalaers, W.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P. [European Commission JRC, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Berthoumieux, E.; Fraval, K.; Gunsing, F. [CEA/Saclay - IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Billowes, J.; Ware, T.; Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Ferrari, A.; Guerrero, C.; Losito, R.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Tsinganis, A.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiss, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Calvino, F.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Riego, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Carrapico, C.; Goncalves, I.F.; Sarmento, R.; Vaz, P. [Universidade de Lisboa, C2TN-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Cortes-Giraldo, M.A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Cosentino, L.; Finocchiaro, P. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Giubrone, G.; Tain, J.L. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Dressler, R.; Heinitz, S.; Kivel, N.; Schumann, D. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Duran, I.; Tarrio, D. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Eleftheriadis, C.; Manousos, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Ganesan, S.; Gurusamy, P.; Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (India); Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wien (Austria); Jenkins, D.G.; Vermeulen, M.J. [University of York, York, Heslington (United Kingdom); Kaeppeler, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lo Meo, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Massimi, C.; Mingrone, F.; Vannini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna (IT); INFN, Bologna (IT); Mastinu, P. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (IT); Milazzo, P.M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (IT); Mirea, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Magurele (RO); Musumarra, A. [Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia DFA, Catania (IT); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (IT); Paradela, C. [European Commission JRC, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (BE); Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (ES); Pavlik, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Wien (AT); Rauscher, T. [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, Hatfield (GB); University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (CH); Wallner, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Wien (AT); Australian National University, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Canberra (AU)

    2016-04-15

    The integral measurement of the {sup 12}C(n, p){sup 12}B reaction was performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility nTOF at CERN. The total number of {sup 12}B nuclei produced per neutron pulse of the nTOF beam was determined using the activation technique in combination with a time-of-flight technique. The cross section is integrated over the nTOF neutron energy spectrum from reaction threshold at 13.6 MeV to 10 GeV. Having been measured up to 1GeV on basis of the {sup 235}U(n, f) reaction, the neutron energy spectrum above 200 MeV has been re-evaluated due to the recent extension of the cross section reference for this particular reaction, which is otherwise considered a standard up to 200 MeV. The results from the dedicated GEANT4 simulations have been used to evaluate the neutron flux from 1 GeV up to 10 GeV. The experimental results related to the {sup 12}C(n, p){sup 12}B reaction are compared with the evaluated cross sections from major libraries and with the predictions of different GEANT4 models, which mostly underestimate the {sup 12}B production. On the contrary, a good reproduction of the integral cross section derived from measurements is obtained with TALYS-1.6 calculations, with optimized parameters. (orig.)

  12. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  13. Systems Concepts for Integrated Air Defense of Multinational Mobile Crisis Reaction Forces (Concepts de systemes pour la defense aerienne integree de forces internationales mobiles d'intervention en situation de crise)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    The meeting proceedings from this symposium on System Concepts for Integrated Air Defense of Multinational Mobile Crisis Reaction Forces was organized and sponsored by the Systems Concepts and Integration (SCI...

  14. Establishment of the BOSPOR-80 machine library of evaluated threshold reaction cross-sections and its testing by means of integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.M.; Zolotarev, K.I.; Pashchenko, A.B.; Plyaskin, V.I.

    1982-08-01

    A paper was published in 1979 containing a compilation of experimental data on the cross-sections of (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) threshold reactions and recommended excitation functions. A further paper considered the development of evaluation methods based on the use of theoretical model calculations, an increase in the number of recommended excitation functions, correction of the recommended cross-sections on the basis of integral experiments and allowance for recent experimental data. To satisfy the wide circle of users, BOSPOR-80 - a machine library of evaluated threshold reaction cross-sections - was set up

  15. An integral experiment on thorium oxide/depleted uranium cylinders with D-T neutrons for 232Th(n, 2n) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, S.; Yang, Y.W.; Lu, X.X.; Liu, R.; Jiang, L.; Zhu, T.H.; Wang, M.; Qin, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An integral experiment for 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction was carried out on the newly-established ThO 2 /depleted uranium cylinders. • 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction rate distribution was obtained in the assemblies with an uncertainty of about 7%. • Experiments were analyzed by MCNP code with ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. • Experimental results could be used to re-evaluate the cross sections of 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction. - Abstract: In order to verify the evaluated cross sections of 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction for the conceptual design of the thorium based subcritical blanket in the fusion–fission hybrid reactor, an integral experiment on thorium oxide/depleted uranium cylinders was carried out with D-T neutrons using the activation technique. 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction rate distribution was obtained at the central axis direction in the assemblies with an uncertainty of about 7%. Experiments were analyzed by using MCNP code with ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries to validate the nuclear data libraries of 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction, the calculated results with JENDL-4.0 agree with the measurements the best with discrepancies within the experimental uncertainty. The average values of C/E for the three benchmark assemblies are 1.058, 1.044 and 0.980. Calculations with different evaluated libraries in the benchmark assemblies show a large discrepancy. The experimental results can be used to re-evaluate the cross sections of the 232 Th(n, 2n) reaction

  16. Elongation Factor Ts Directly Facilitates the Formation and Disassembly of the Escherichia coli Elongation Factor Tu·GTP·Aminoacyl-tRNA Ternary Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Benjamin J.; Altman, Roger B.; Ferrao, Ryan; Alejo, Jose L.; Kaur, Navdep; Kanji, Joshua; Blanchard, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA enters the translating ribosome in a ternary complex with elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and GTP. Here, we describe bulk steady state and pre-steady state fluorescence methods that enabled us to quantitatively explore the kinetic features of Escherichia coli ternary complex formation and decay. The data obtained suggest that both processes are controlled by a nucleotide-dependent, rate-determining conformational change in EF-Tu. Unexpectedly, we found that this conformational change is accelerated by elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts), the guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for EF-Tu. Notably, EF-Ts attenuates the affinity of EF-Tu for GTP and destabilizes ternary complex in the presence of non-hydrolyzable GTP analogs. These results suggest that EF-Ts serves an unanticipated role in the cell of actively regulating the abundance and stability of ternary complex in a manner that contributes to rapid and faithful protein synthesis. PMID:23539628

  17. Elongation Factor Tu Prevents Misediting of Gly-tRNA(Gly Caused by the Design Behind the Chiral Proofreading Site of D-Aminoacyl-tRNA Deacylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Brata Routh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available D-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase (DTD removes D-amino acids mischarged on tRNAs and is thus implicated in enforcing homochirality in proteins. Previously, we proposed that selective capture of D-aminoacyl-tRNA by DTD's invariant, cross-subunit Gly-cisPro motif forms the mechanistic basis for its enantioselectivity. We now show, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy-based binding studies followed by biochemical assays with both bacterial and eukaryotic systems, that DTD effectively misedits Gly-tRNAGly. High-resolution crystal structure reveals that the architecture of DTD's chiral proofreading site is completely porous to achiral glycine. Hence, L-chiral rejection is the only design principle on which DTD functions, unlike other chiral-specific enzymes such as D-amino acid oxidases, which are specific for D-enantiomers. Competition assays with elongation factor thermo unstable (EF-Tu and DTD demonstrate that EF-Tu precludes Gly-tRNAGly misediting at normal cellular concentrations. However, even slightly higher DTD levels overcome this protection conferred by EF-Tu, thus resulting in significant depletion of Gly-tRNAGly. Our in vitro observations are substantiated by cell-based studies in Escherichia coli that show that overexpression of DTD causes cellular toxicity, which is largely rescued upon glycine supplementation. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that DTD is an RNA-based catalyst, since it uses only the terminal 2'-OH of tRNA for catalysis without the involvement of protein side chains. The study therefore provides a unique paradigm of enzyme action for substrate selection/specificity by DTD, and thus explains the underlying cause of DTD's activity on Gly-tRNAGly. It also gives a molecular and functional basis for the necessity and the observed tight regulation of DTD levels, thereby preventing cellular toxicity due to misediting.

  18. Recovery Act: An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a Reaction Transport Model that Couples Chemical Reactions of Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation with Spatial and Temporal Flow Variations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saar, Martin O. [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Seyfried, Jr., William E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Longmire, Ellen K. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-06-24

    A total of 12 publications and 23 abstracts were produced as a result of this study. In particular, the compilation of a thermodynamic database utilizing consistent, current thermodynamic data is a major step toward accurately modeling multi-phase fluid interactions with solids. Existing databases designed for aqueous fluids did not mesh well with existing solid phase databases. Addition of a second liquid phase (CO2) magnifies the inconsistencies between aqueous and solid thermodynamic databases. Overall, the combination of high temperature and pressure lab studies (task 1), using a purpose built apparatus, and solid characterization (task 2), using XRCT and more developed technologies, allowed observation of dissolution and precipitation processes under CO2 reservoir conditions. These observations were combined with results from PIV experiments on multi-phase fluids (task 3) in typical flow path geometries. The results of the tasks 1, 2, and 3 were compiled and integrated into numerical models utilizing Lattice-Boltzmann simulations (task 4) to realistically model the physical processes and were ultimately folded into TOUGH2 code for reservoir scale modeling (task 5). Compilation of the thermodynamic database assisted comparisons to PIV experiments (Task 3) and greatly improved Lattice Boltzmann (Task 4) and TOUGH2 simulations (Task 5). PIV (Task 3) and experimental apparatus (Task 1) have identified problem areas in TOUGHREACT code. Additional lab experiments and coding work has been integrated into an improved numerical modeling code.

  19. Measurements of the thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral for the 108Pd(n,γ)109Pd reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Do, Nguyen Van; Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun

    2018-06-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross-section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 108Pd(n,γ)109Pd reaction have been measured relative to that of the monitor reaction 197Au(n,γ)198Au. The measurements were carried out using the neutron activation with the cadmium ratio method. Both the samples and monitors were irradiated with and without cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness. The induced activities of the reaction products were measured with a well calibrated HPGe γ-ray detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the results, the necessary corrections for the counting losses were made. The thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral of the 108Pd(n,γ)109Pd reaction were determined to be σ0,Pd = 8.68 ± 0.41 barn and I0,Pd = 245.6 ± 24.8 barn, respectively. The obtained results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  20. Accurate Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Deep Well D+ + HD Reaction: Product Ro-vibrational State-Resolved Integral and Differential Cross Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haixiang; Zhu, Weimin; Su, Wenli; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin

    2018-03-08

    The H + + H 2 reaction and its isotopic variants as the simplest triatomic ion-molecule reactive system have been attracting much interests, however there are few studies on the titled reaction at state-to-state level until recent years. In this work, accurate state-to-state quantum dynamics studies of the titled reaction have been carried out by a reactant Jacobi coordinate-based time-dependent wave packet approach on diabatic potential energy surfaces constructed by Kamisaka et al. Product ro-vibrational state-resolved information has been calculated for collision energies up to 0.2 eV with maximal total angular momentum J = 40. The necessity of including all K-component for accounting the Coriolis coupling for the reaction has been illuminated. Competitions between the two product channels, (D + + HD' → D' + + HD and D + + HD' → H + + DD') were investigated. Total integral cross sections suggest that resonances enhance the reactivity of channel D + + HD'→ H + + DD', however, resonances depress the reactivity of the another channel D + + HD' → D' + + HD. The structures of the differential cross sections are complicated and depend strongly on collision energies of the two channels and also on the product rotational states. All of the product ro-vibrational state-resolved differential cross sections for this reaction do not exhibit rigorous backward-forward symmetry which may indicate that the lifetimes of the intermediate resonance complexes should not be that long. The dynamical observables of this deuterated isotopic reaction are quite different from the reaction of H + + H 2 → H 2 + H + reported previously.

  1. Application of semi-empirical modeling and non-linear regression to unfolding fast neutron spectra from integral reaction rate data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, Y.D.

    1976-01-01

    A semi-empirical analytical expression representing a fast reactor neutron spectrum has been developed. This expression was used in a non-linear regression computer routine to obtain from measured multiple foil integral reaction data the neutron spectrum inside the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility. In this application six parameters in the analytical expression for neutron spectrum were adjusted in the non-linear fitting process to maximize consistency between calculated and measured integral reaction rates for a set of 15 dosimetry detector foils. In two-thirds of the observations the calculated integral agreed with its respective measured value to within the experimental standard deviation, and in all but one case agreement within two standard deviations was obtained. Based on this quality of fit the estimated 70 to 75 percent confidence intervals for the derived spectrum are 10 to 20 percent for the energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV, 10 to 50 percent for 1 MeV to 10 MeV and 50 to 90 percent for 10 MeV to 18 MeV. The analytical model has demonstrated a flexibility to describe salient features of neutron spectra of the fast reactor type. The use of regression analysis with this model has produced a stable method to derive neutron spectra from a limited amount of integral data

  2. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  3. The D(+) + H2 reaction: differential and integral cross sections at low energy and rate constants at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Lezana, Tomás; Scribano, Yohann; Honvault, Pascal

    2014-08-21

    The D(+) + H2 reaction is investigated by means of a time independent quantum mechanical (TIQM) and statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods. Differential cross sections and product rotational distributions obtained with these two theoretical approaches for collision energies between 1 meV and 0.1 eV are compared to analyze the dynamics of the process. The agreement observed between the TIQM differential cross sections and the SQM predictions as the energy increases revealed the role played by the complex-forming mechanism. The importance of a good description of the asymptotic regions is also investigated by calculating rate constants for the title reaction at low temperature.

  4. Perceived Control and Psychological Contract Breach as Explanations of the Relationships Between Job Insecurity, Job Strain and Coping Reactions: Towards a Theoretical Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Elst, Tinne; De Cuyper, Nele; Baillien, Elfi; Niesen, Wendy; De Witte, Hans

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to further knowledge on the mechanisms through which job insecurity is related to negative outcomes. Based on appraisal theory, two explanations-perceived control and psychological contract breach-were theoretically integrated in a comprehensive model and simultaneously examined as mediators of the job insecurity-outcome relationship. Different categories of outcomes were considered, namely work-related (i.e. vigour and need for recovery) and general strain (i.e. mental and physical health complaints), as well as psychological (i.e. job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and behavioural coping reactions (i.e. self-rated performance and innovative work behaviour). The hypotheses were tested using data of a heterogeneous sample of 2413 Flemish employees by means of both single and multiple mediator structural equation modelling analyses (bootstrapping method). Particularly, psychological contract breach accounted for the relationship between job insecurity and strain. Both perceived control and psychological contract breach mediated the relationships between job insecurity and psychological coping reactions, although the indirect effects were larger for psychological contract breach. Finally, perceived control was more important than psychological contract breach in mediating the relationships between job insecurity and behavioural coping reactions. This study meets previous calls for a theoretical integration regarding mediators of the job insecurity-outcome relationship. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. [Integrity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  6. Duplication of Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial EF-Tu: pre-adaptation to T-arm truncation and exclusion of bulky aminoacyl residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Aya; Suematsu, Takuma; Aihara, Koh-Ki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoh-Ichi

    2017-03-07

    Translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) delivers aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) to ribosomes in protein synthesis. EF-Tu generally recognizes aminoacyl moieties and acceptor- and T-stems of aa-tRNAs. However, nematode mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs frequently lack all or part of the T-arm that is recognized by canonical EF-Tu. We previously reported that two distinct EF-Tu species, EF-Tu1 and EF-Tu2, respectively, recognize mt tRNAs lacking T-arms and D-arms in the mitochondria of the chromadorean nematode Caenorhabditis elegans C. elegans EF-Tu2 specifically recognizes the seryl moiety of serylated D-armless tRNAs. Mitochondria of the enoplean nematode Trichinella possess three structural types of tRNAs: T-armless tRNAs, D-armless tRNAs, and cloverleaf tRNAs with a short T-arm. Trichinella mt EF-Tu1 binds to all three types and EF-Tu2 binds only to D-armless Ser-tRNAs, showing an evolutionary intermediate state from canonical EF-Tu to chromadorean nematode (e.g. C. elegans ) EF-Tu species. We report here that two EF-Tu species also participate in Drosophila melanogaster mitochondria. Both D. melanogaster EF-Tu1 and EF-Tu2 bound to cloverleaf and D-armless tRNAs. D. melanogaster EF-Tu1 has the ability to recognize T-armless tRNAs that do not evidently exist in D. melanogaster mitochondria, but do exist in related arthropod species. In addition, D. melanogaster EF-Tu2 preferentially bound to aa-tRNAs carrying small amino acids, but not to aa-tRNAs carrying bulky amino acids. These results suggest that the Drosophila mt translation system could be another intermediate state between the canonical and nematode mitochondria-type translation systems. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Work Values, Cognitive Strategies, and Applicant Reactions in a Structured Pre-Employment Interview for Ethical Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Donna R.; Hollwitz, John

    2000-01-01

    Notes that companies emphasize ethical behavior, and schools and professional groups devote many resources to applied ethics training. Describes initial construct validation of a structured ethical integrity pre-employment interview. Reviews evidence relating to cognitive and impression management strategies used when college students encounter an…

  8. Valyl-tRNA synthetase gene of Escherichia coli K12: Molecular genetic characterization and homology within a family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, J.D. III.

    1988-01-01

    This work reports the subcloning and characterization of the molecular elements necessary for the expression of the Escherichia coli valS gene encoding valyl-tRNA synthetase. The valS gene was subcloned from plasmid pLC26-22 by genetic complementation of a valS ts strain. The DNA region encoding the valS structural gene was determined by in vitro coupled transcription-translation assays. Cells transformed with a plasmid containing a full length copy of the valS gene enhanced in vivo valyl-tRNA synthetase specific activity twelve-fold. DNA sequences flanking the valS structural gene are presented. The transcription initiation sites of the valS gene were determined, in vivo and in vitro, by S1 nuclease protection studies, primer-extension analysis and both [α- 32 P]labeled and [γ- 32 P]end-labeled in vitro transcription assays. The DNA sequence of the valS gene of Escherichia coli has been determined. Significant similarity at the primary sequence level was detected between valyl-tRNA synthetase of E. coli and other known branched-chain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. An extended open reading frame (ORF) encoded on the DNA strand opposite the valS structural gene is described

  9. Assembly of the novel five-component apicomplexan multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex is driven by the hybrid scaffold protein Tg-p43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M van Rooyen

    Full Text Available In Toxoplasma gondii, as in other eukaryotes, a subset of the amino-acyl-tRNA synthetases are arranged into an abundant cytoplasmic multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS complex. Through a series of genetic pull-down assays, we have identified the enzymes of this complex as: methionyl-, glutaminyl-, glutamyl-, and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases, and we show that the N-terminal GST-like domain of a partially disordered hybrid scaffold protein, Tg-p43, is sufficient for assembly of the intact complex. Our gel filtration studies revealed significant heterogeneity in the size and composition of isolated MARS complexes. By targeting the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases subunit, which was found exclusively in the complete 1 MDa complex, we were able to directly visualize MARS particles in the electron microscope. Image analyses of the negative stain data revealed the observed heterogeneity and instability of these complexes to be driven by the intrinsic flexibility of the domain arrangements within the MARS complex. These studies provide unique insights into the assembly of these ubiquitous but poorly understood eukaryotic complexes.

  10. Automation and integration of polymerase chain reaction with capillary electrophoresis for high throughput genotyping and disease diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, N.

    1999-02-12

    Genotyping is to detect specific loci in the human genome. These loci provide important information for forensic testing, construction of genetic linkage maps, gene related disease diagnosis and pharmacogenetic research. Genotyping is becoming more and more popular after these loci can be easily amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Capillary electrophoresis has its unique advantages for DNA analysis due to its fast heat dissipation and ease of automation. Four projects are described in which genotyping is performed by capillary electrophoresis emphasizing different aspects. First, the author demonstrates a principle to determine the genotype based on capillary electrophoresis system. VNTR polymorphism in the human D1S80 locus was studied. Second, the separation of four short tandem repeat (STR) loci vWF, THO1, TPOX and CSF1PO (CTTv) by using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was studied in achieving high resolution and preventing rehybridization of the DNA fragments. Separation under denaturing, non-denaturing conditions and at elevated temperature was discussed. Third, a 250 {micro}m i.d., 365 {micro}m o.d. fused silica capillary was used as the microreactor for PCR. Fourth, direct PCR from blood was studied to simplify the sample preparation for genotyping to minimum.

  11. Dairy products and the Maillard reaction: A promising future for extensive food characterization by integrated proteomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Simona; Renzone, Giovanni; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea

    2017-03-15

    Heating of milk and dairy products is done using various technological processes with the aim of preserving microbiological safety and extending shelf-life. These treatments result in chemical modifications in milk proteins, mainly generated as a result of the Maillard reaction. Recently, different bottom-up proteomic methods have been applied to characterize the nature of these structural changes and the modified amino acids in model protein systems and/or isolated components from thermally-treated milk samples. On the other hand, different gel-based and shotgun proteomic methods have been utilized to assign glycation, oxidation and glycoxidation protein targets in diverse heated milks. These data are essential to rationalize eventual, different nutritional, antimicrobial, cell stimulative and antigenic properties of milk products, because humans ingest large quantities of corresponding thermally modified proteins on a daily basis and these molecules also occur in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. This review provides an updated picture of the procedures developed for the proteomic characterization of variably-heated milk products, highlighting their limits as result of concomitant factors, such as the multiplicity and the different concentration of the compounds to be detected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Water permeability, hybrid layer long-term integrity and reaction mechanism of a two-step adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Geneviève; Dabsie, Firas; Delannée, Mathieu; Akon, Bernadette; Sharrock, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate the reaction mechanism of formation of the hybrid layer by a HEMA-containing self-etch adhesive and to study fluid filtration, contact angle and interfacial ultrastructure by SEM following a 1 year ageing period. Acidic behaviour and chemical interactions between Silorane System Adhesive and dentine were studied by potentiometric titrations, atomic absorption spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The hydrophilicity of the adhesive was evaluated using the sessile drop method and dentine permeability by hydraulic conductance. The morphological study of the dentine/adhesive system interface was conducted using SEM. The Silorane System Adhesive behaved as a multi-acid with several different pK(a) values. When the adhesive was in contact with dentine, the acid was progressively consumed and calcium ions were released. The acrylate substituted phosphonate bound strongly to apatite crystals. The polyacrylic acid copolymer reacted with calcium ions and formed an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN). Water contact angle measurements showed rapid spreading on primer (angles reached 15 degrees at 30s) and larger contact angles when the Silorane bonding layer was added (from over 60 degrees to 44 degrees ). A thick, homogeneous hybrid layer was observed both initially and after 1 year of ageing, with a corresponding hydraulic conductance of -48.50% initially and -52.07% at 12 months. The Silorane System Adhesive is capable of both dissolving calcium ions and binding to apatite surfaces. The results showed the hydrophilicity of the adhesive, which formed an IPN-like hybrid layer that conserved adequate impermeability over a 1-year period. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. IC-tagged proteins are able to interact with each other and perform complex reactions when integrated into muNS-derived inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Otero-Romero, Iria; Benavente, Javier; Martinez-Costas, Jose M

    2011-09-20

    We have recently developed a versatile tagging system (IC-tagging) that causes relocation of the tagged proteins to ARV muNS-derived intracellular globular inclusions. In the present study we demonstrate (i) that the IC-tag can be successfully fused either to the amino or carboxyl terminus of the protein to be tagged and (ii) that IC-tagged proteins are able to interact between them and perform complex reactions that require such interactions while integrated into muNS inclusions, increasing the versatility of the IC-tagging system. Also, our studies with the DsRed protein add some light on the structure/function relationship of the evolution of DsRed chromophore. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Wafer-scale laser pantography: Fabrication of n-metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors and small-scale integrated circuits by direct-write laser-induced pyrolytic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, B.M.; Herman, I.P.; Mitlitsky, F.; Hyde, R.A.; Wood, L.L.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of processes sufficient for manufacture of n-metal-oxide-semiconductor (n-MOS) transistors by a laser-induced direct-write process has been demonstrated separately, and integrated to yield functional transistors. Gates and interconnects were fabricated of various combinations of n-doped and intrinsic polysilicon, tungsten, and tungsten silicide compounds. Both 0.1-μm and 1-μm-thick gate oxides were micromachined with and without etchant gas, and the exposed p-Si [100] substrate was cleaned and, at times, etched. Diffusion regions were doped by laser-induced pyrolytic decomposition of phosphine followed by laser annealing. Along with the successful manufacture of working n-MOS transistors and a set of elementary digital logic gates, this letter reports the successful use of several laser-induced surface reactions that have not been reported previously

  15. Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshio; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1997-03-01

    The thermal neutron(2,200 m/s neutron) capture cross section({sigma}{sub 0}) and the resonance integral(I{sub 0}) of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs were measured by an activation method. Targets of radioactive cesium, which include {sup 135}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and stable {sup 133}Cs, were irradiated with reactor neutrons within or without a Cd shield case. The ratio of the number of nuclei of {sup 135}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs was measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. This ratio and the ratio of activity of {sup 136}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs were used for deduction of the {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of {sup 135}Cs. The {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{sigma}){sup 136}Cs were 8.3 {+-} 0.3 barn and 38.1 {+-} 2.6 barn, respectively. (author)

  16. Reactions at surfaces in the atmosphere: integration of experiments and theory as necessary (but not necessarily sufficient) for predicting the physical chemistry of aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-09-28

    While particles have significant deleterious impacts on human health, visibility and climate, quantitative understanding of their formation, composition and fates remains problematic. Indeed, in many cases, even qualitative understanding is lacking. One area of particular uncertainty is the nature of particle surfaces and how this determines interactions with gases in the atmosphere, including water, which is important for cloud formation and properties. The focus in this Perspective article is on some chemistry relevant to airborne particles and especially to reactions occurring on their surfaces. The intent is not to provide a comprehensive review, but rather to highlight a few selected examples of interface chemistry involving inorganic and organic species that may be important in the lower atmosphere. This includes sea salt chemistry, nitrate and nitrite ion photochemistry, organics on surfaces and heterogeneous reactions of oxides of nitrogen on proxies for airborne mineral dust and boundary layer surfaces. Emphasis is on the molecular level understanding that can only be gained by fully integrating experiment and theory to elucidate these complex systems.

  17. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions...... of equality in the three societies. Finally, it shows that family relations play a central role in immigrants’ and refugees’ establishment of a new life in the receiving societies, even though the welfare society takes on many of the social and economic functions of the family....

  18. The multicenter study of a new assay for simultaneous detection of multiple anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in myositis and interstitial pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Nakashima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Autoantibodies to aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs are useful in the diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM with interstitial pneumonia (IP. We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA system using a mixture of recombinant ARS antigens and tested its utility in a multicenter study. METHODS: We prepared six recombinant ARSs: GST-Jo-1, His-PL-12, His-EJ and GST-KS expressed in Escherichia coli, and His-PL-7 and His-OJ expressed in Hi-5 cells. After confirming their antigenic activity, with the exception of His-OJ, we developed our ELISA system in which the five recombinant ARSs (without His-OJ were mixed. Efficiency was confirmed using the sera from 526 Japanese patients with connective tissue disease (CTD (IIM n = 250, systemic lupus erythematosus n = 91, systemic sclerosis n = 70, rheumatoid arthritis n = 75, Sjögren's syndrome n = 27 and other diseases n = 13, 168 with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP and 30 healthy controls collected from eight institutes. IIPs were classified into two groups; idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF (n = 38 and non-IPF (n = 130. RESULTS were compared with those of RNA immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: Sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were 97.1% and 99.8%, respectively when compared with the RNA immunoprecipitation assay. Anti-ARS antibodies were detected in 30.8% of IIM, 2.5% of non-myositis CTD, and 10.7% of IIP (5.3% of IPF and 12.3% of non-IPF. Anti-ARS-positive non-IPF patients were younger and more frequently treated with glucocorticoids and/or immunosuppressants than anti-ARS-negative patients. CONCLUSION: A newly established ELISA detected anti-ARS antibodies as efficiently as RNA immunoprecipitation. This system will enable easier and wider use in the detection of anti-ARS antibodies in patients with IIM and IIP.

  19. A review on microscale polymerase chain reaction based methods in molecular diagnosis, and future prospects for the fabrication of fully integrated portable biomedical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nae Yoon

    2018-05-08

    Since the advent of microfabrication technology and soft lithography, the lab-on-a-chip concept has emerged as a state-of-the-art miniaturized tool for conducting the multiple functions associated with micro total analyses of nucleic acids, in series, in a seamless manner with a miniscule volume of sample. The enhanced surface-to-volume ratio inside a microchannel enables fast reactions owing to increased heat dissipation, allowing rapid amplification. For this reason, PCR has been one of the first applications to be miniaturized in a portable format. However, the nature of the basic working principle for microscale PCR, such as the complicated temperature controls and use of a thermal cycler, has hindered its total integration with other components into a micro total analyses systems (μTAS). This review (with 179 references) surveys the diverse forms of PCR microdevices constructed on the basis of different working principles and evaluates their performances. The first two main sections cover the state-of-the-art in chamber-type PCR microdevices and in continuous-flow PCR microdevices. Methods are then discussed that lead to microdevices with upstream sample purification and downstream detection schemes, with a particular focus on rapid on-site detection of foodborne pathogens. Next, the potential for miniaturizing and automating heaters and pumps is examined. The review concludes with sections on aspects of complete functional integration in conjunction with nanomaterial based sensing, a discussion on future prospects, and with conclusions. Graphical abstract In recent years, thermocycler-based PCR systems have been miniaturized to palm-sized, disposable polymer platforms. In addition, operational accessories such as heaters and mechanical pumps have been simplified to realize semi-automatted stand-alone portable biomedical diagnostic microdevices that are directly applicable in the field. This review summarizes the progress made and the current state of this

  20. Oxidation of D-glucose and D-fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions. Part I. An integral reaction scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, H.G.J.; Kuster, B.F.M.

    1971-01-01

    The homogeneous oxidn. of D-glucose and D-fructose with O in aq., alk. solns. is studied, and a reaction scheme proposed to account for the obsd. reaction products. Formation of enolate anions is followed by non-oxidative reactions (involving double-bond migration and cleavage) and by oxidative

  1. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases had only a marginal role in the origin of the organization of the genetic code: Evidence in favor of the coevolution theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Massimo

    2017-11-07

    The coevolution theory of the origin of the genetic code suggests that the organization of the genetic code coevolved with the biosynthetic relationships between amino acids. The mechanism that allowed this coevolution was based on tRNA-like molecules on which-this theory-would postulate the biosynthetic transformations between amino acids to have occurred. This mechanism makes a prediction on how the role conducted by the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs), in the origin of the genetic code, should have been. Indeed, if the biosynthetic transformations between amino acids occurred on tRNA-like molecules, then there was no need to link amino acids to these molecules because amino acids were already charged on tRNA-like molecules, as the coevolution theory suggests. In spite of the fact that ARSs make the genetic code responsible for the first interaction between a component of nucleic acids and that of proteins, for the coevolution theory the role of ARSs should have been entirely marginal in the genetic code origin. Therefore, I have conducted a further analysis of the distribution of the two classes of ARSs and of their subclasses-in the genetic code table-in order to perform a falsification test of the coevolution theory. Indeed, in the case in which the distribution of ARSs within the genetic code would have been highly significant, then the coevolution theory would be falsified since the mechanism on which it is based would not predict a fundamental role of ARSs in the origin of the genetic code. I found that the statistical significance of the distribution of the two classes of ARSs in the table of the genetic code is low or marginal, whereas that of the subclasses of ARSs statistically significant. However, this is in perfect agreement with the postulates of the coevolution theory. Indeed, the only case of statistical significance-regarding the classes of ARSs-is appreciable for the CAG code, whereas for its complement-the UNN/NUN code-only a marginal

  2. Detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using an ON-OFF switching of regenerated biosensor based on a locked nucleic acid-integrated and toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Ling, Yu; Lu, Lu; Chen, Ning Yu; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2014-03-04

    Although various strategies have been reported for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detection, development of a time-saving, specific, and regenerated electrochemical sensing platform still remains a realistic goal. In this study, an ON-OFF switching of a regenerated biosensor based on a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-integrated and toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction technique is constructed for detection of SNPs. The LNA-integrated and methylene blue-labeled capture probe with an external toehold is designed to switch on the sensing system. The mutant-type DNA probe completes complementary with the capture probe to trigger the strand displacement reaction, which switches off the sensing system. However, when the single-base mismatched wild-type DNA probe is presented, the strand displacement reaction cannot be achieved; therefore, the sensing system still keeps the ON state. This DNA sensor is stable over five reuses. We further testify that the LNA-integrated sequence has better recognition ability for SNPs detection compared to the DNA-integrated sequence. Moreover, this DNA senor exhibits a remarkable discrimination capability of SNPs among abundant wild-type targets and 6000-fold (m/m) excess of genomic DNA. In addition, it is selective enough in complex and contaminant-ridden samples, such as human urine, soil, saliva, and beer. Overall, these results demonstrate that this reliable DNA sensor is easy to be fabricated, simple to operate, and stable enough to be readily regenerated.

  3. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction using electron linac-based neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Do; Pham, Duc Khue; Kim, Tien Thanh; Kim, Guinyun; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won

    2011-01-01

    The thermal neutron cross-section and the resonance integral of the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction have been measured by the activation method using a 197Au(n,γ) 198Au monitor reaction as a single comparator. The high-purity natural Ho and Au foils with and without a cadmium shield case of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated in a neutron field of the Pohang neutron facility. The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a calibrated p-type high-purity Ge detector. The correction factors for the γ-ray attenuation ( Fg), the thermal neutron self-shielding ( Gth), the resonance neutron self-shielding ( Gepi) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ( α) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross-section for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction has been determined to be 59.7 ± 2.5 barn, relative to the reference value of 98.65 ± 0.09 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. By assuming the cadmium cut-off energy of 0.55 eV, the resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction is 671 ± 47 barn, which is determined relative to the reference value of 1550 ± 28 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. The present results are, in general, good agreement with most of the previously reported data within uncertainty limits.

  4. From Cycling Between Coupled Reactions to the Cross-Bridge Cycle: Mechanical Power Output as an Integral Part of Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Diederichs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP delivery and its usage are achieved by cycling of respective intermediates through interconnected coupled reactions. At steady state, cycling between coupled reactions always occurs at zero resistance of the whole cycle without dissipation of free energy. The cross-bridge cycle can also be described by a system of coupled reactions: one energising reaction, which energises myosin heads by coupled ATP splitting, and one de-energising reaction, which transduces free energy from myosin heads to coupled actin movement. The whole cycle of myosin heads via cross-bridge formation and dissociation proceeds at zero resistance. Dissipation of free energy from coupled reactions occurs whenever the input potential overcomes the counteracting output potential. In addition, dissipation is produced by uncoupling. This is brought about by a load dependent shortening of the cross-bridge stroke to zero, which allows isometric force generation without mechanical power output. The occurrence of maximal efficiency is caused by uncoupling. Under coupled conditions, Hill’s equation (velocity as a function of load is fulfilled. In addition, force and shortening velocity both depend on [Ca2+]. Muscular fatigue is triggered when ATP consumption overcomes ATP delivery. As a result, the substrate of the cycle, [MgATP2−], is reduced. This leads to a switch off of cycling and ATP consumption, so that a recovery of [ATP] is possible. In this way a potentially harmful, persistent low energy state of the cell can be avoided.

  5. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  6. INFLUENCE OF SODIUM NUCLEOSPERMATE ON THE NATURE OF THE BODY’S INTEGRATED REACTIONS IN COMBINED MODALITY TREATMENT FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Yengibaryan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of adaptation responses to sodium nucleospermate during postoperative chemotherapy was studied in 20 patients with stage III–IV head and neck cancer. Unidirectional transition of different background reactions to acute and chronic stress with leucocytosis level of 14,0×109 /L was observed after injecting the agent. This effect was short-term and reversible. On day 6, the development of anti-stress reactions of training and activation with increase in the level of lymphocytes and upper normal limits of leukocyte count was registered, thus showing positive biological and clinical effect.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF REACTION-DRIVEN IONIC TRANSPORT MEMBRANES (ITMs) TECHNOLOGY: PHASE IV/BUDGET PERIOD 6 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Studer

    2012-03-01

    Air Products and Chemicals, along with development participants and in association with the U.S. Department of Energy, has made substantial progress in developing a novel air separation technology. Unlike conventional cryogenic processes, this method uses high-temperature ceramic membranes to produce high-purity oxygen. The membranes selectively transport oxygen ions with high flux and infinite theoretical selectivity. Reaction-driven ceramic membranes are fabricated from non-porous, multi-component metallic oxides, operate at temperatures typically over 700°C, and have exceptionally high oxygen flux and selectivity. Oxygen from low-pressure air permeates as oxygen ions through the ceramic membrane and is consumed through chemical reactions, thus creating a chemical driving force that pulls oxygen ions across the membrane at high rates. The oxygen reacts with a hydrocarbon fuel in a partial oxidation process to produce a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture – synthesis gas. This project expands the partial-oxidation scope of ITM technology beyond natural gas feed and investigates the potential for ITM reaction-driven technology to be used in conjunction with gasification and pyrolysis technologies to provide more economical routes for producing hydrogen and synthesis gas. This report presents an overview of the ITM reaction-driven development effort, including ceramic materials development, fabrication and testing of small-scale ceramic modules, ceramic modeling, and the investigation of gasifier integration schemes

  8. Paths of lateral gene transfer of lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with a unique evolutionary transition stage of prokaryotes coding for class I and II varieties by the same organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the premise that lateral gene transfer (LGT is a dominant evolutionary force is still in considerable dispute, the case for widespread LGT in the family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS is no longer contentious. aaRSs are ancient enzymes, guarding the fidelity of the genetic code. They are clustered in two structurally unrelated classes. Only lysine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS is found both as a class 1 and a class 2 enzyme (LysRS1-2. Remarkably, in several extant prokaryotes both classes of the enzyme coexist, a unique phenomenon that has yet to receive its due attention. Results We applied a phylogenetic approach for determining the extent and origin of LGT in prokaryotic LysRS. Reconstructing species trees for Archaea and Bacteria, and inferring that their last common ancestors encoded LysRS1 and LysRS2, respectively, we studied the gains and losses of both classes. A complex pattern of LGT events emerged. In specific groups of organisms LysRS1 was replaced by LysRS2 (and vice versa. In one occasion, within the alpha proteobacteria, a LysRS2 to LysRS1 LGT was followed by reversal to LysRS2. After establishing the most likely LGT paths, we studied the possible origins of the laterally transferred genes. To this end, we reconstructed LysRS gene trees and evaluated the likely origins of the laterally transferred genes. While the sources of LysRS1 LGTs were readily identified, those for LysRS2 remain, for now, uncertain. The replacement of one LysRS by another apparently transits through a stage simultaneously coding for both synthetases, probably conferring a selective advantage to the affected organisms. Conclusion The family of LysRSs features complex LGT events. The currently available data were sufficient for identifying unambiguously the origins of LysRS1 but not of LysRS2 gene transfers. A selective advantage is suggested to organisms encoding simultaneously LysRS1-2.

  9. Integration of On-Column Chemical Reactions in Protein Characterization by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: Cross-Path Reactive Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Jake W; Carrick, Ian; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2018-01-16

    Profiling of complex proteins by means of mass spectrometry (MS) frequently requires that certain chemical modifications of their covalent structure (e.g., reduction of disulfide bonds), be carried out prior to the MS or MS/MS analysis. Traditionally, these chemical reactions take place in the off-line mode to allow the excess reagents (the majority of which interfere with the MS measurements and degrade the analytical signal) to be removed from the protein solution prior to MS measurements. In addition to a significant increase in the analysis time, chemical reactions may result in a partial or full loss of the protein if the modifications adversely affect its stability, e.g,, making it prone to aggregation. In this work we present a new approach to solving this problem by carrying out the chemical reactions online using the reactive chromatography scheme on a size exclusion chromatography (SEC) platform with MS detection. This is achieved by using a cross-path reaction scheme, i.e., by delaying the protein injection onto the SEC column (with respect to the injection of the reagent plug containing a disulfide-reducing agent), which allows the chemical reactions to be carried out inside the column for a limited (and precisely controlled) period of time, while the two plugs overlap inside the column. The reduced protein elutes separately from the unconsumed reagents, allowing the signal suppression in ESI to be avoided and enabling sensitive MS detection. The new method is used to measure fucosylation levels of a plasma protein haptoglobin at the whole protein level following online reduction of disulfide-linked tetrameric species to monomeric units. The feasibility of top-down fragmentation of disulfide-containing proteins is also demonstrated using β 2 -microglobulin and a monoclonal antibody (mAb). The new online technique is both robust and versatile, as the cross-path scheme can be readily expanded to include multiple reactions in a single experiment (as

  10. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  11. Giant resonance spectroscopy of 40Ca with the (e,e'x) reaction (II): Multipole decomposition of 4π-integrated spectra and angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesener, H.; Helm, U.; Huck, V.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Rangacharyulu, C.; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Stascheck, A.; Strauch, S.; Ryckebusch, J.; Carter, J.

    2001-01-01

    The present article is the second out of three on a study of the 40 Ca(e,e'x) reaction discussing the multipole decomposition of the measured cross sections and the analysis of angular correlations. The decomposition of the strongly overlapping E0, E1 and E2 giant resonance strengths using the (e,e'x; x=p,α) reaction in 40 Ca is discussed for excitation energies between 10 and about 21 MeV. Two extraction methods are presented based on the variation of the form factors for the different multipoles. The resulting B(E1) strength distribution is in good agreement with (γ,x) photoabsorption data. The summed B(E2) and B(E0) strength is highly fragmented and spread out over the energy region investigated. Microscopic continuum RPA calculations including the coupling of the basic particle-hole states to the low-lying surface vibrations are capable of reproducing the strength distributions quite accurately. Exhaustion of the energy-weighted sum rules (EWSR) for the various decay channels is presented. A complete decomposition of E0, E1 and E2 contributions in 40 Ca is possible for (e,e'α) angular correlations populating the 36 Ar ground state. Contrary to expectations, the form factors of isoscalar E0 and E2 strengths in the 40 Ca(e,e'α 0 ) reaction exhibit increasing differences towards smaller momentum transfers. Angular correlations for proton decay into low-lying states of 39 K are compared to a self-consistent continuum RPA calculation which allows a systematic description of the strong variations observed as a function of 40 Ca excitation energy and momentum transfer. The success implies that direct knock-out models of the 40 Ca(e,e'p) reaction are too simple. Furthermore, the shapes of the angular correlations seem to be determined largely by the final-state interaction, in particular by charge exchange reactions in the nuclear medium

  12. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  13. Advanced Development of a Compact 5-15 lbf Lox/Methane Thruster for an Integrated Reaction Control and Main Engine Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; McManamen, John Patrick; Sooknanen, Josh; Studak, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the advanced development and testing of a compact 5 to 15 lbf LOX/LCH4 thruster for a pressure-fed integrated main engine and RCS propulsion system to be used on a spacecraft "vertical" test bed (VTB). The ability of the RCS thruster and the main engine to operate off the same propellant supply in zero-g reduces mass and improves mission flexibility. This compact RCS engine incorporates several features to dramatically reduce mass and parts count, to ease manufacturing, and to maintain acceptable performance given that specific impulse (Isp) is not the driver. For example, radial injection holes placed on the chamber body for easier drilling, and high temperature Haynes 230 were selected for the chamber over other more expensive options. The valve inlets are rotatable before welding allowing different orientations for vehicle integration. In addition, the engine design effort selected a coil-on-plug ignition system which integrates a relay and coil with the plug electrode, and moves some exciter electronics to avionics driver board. The engine injector design has small dribble volumes to target minimum pulse widths of 20 msec. and an efficient minimum impulse bit of less than 0.05 lbf-sec. The propellants, oxygen and methane, were chosen because together they are a non-toxic, Mars-forward, high density, space storable, and high performance propellant combination that is capable of pressure-fed and pump-fed configurations and integration with life support and power subsystems. This paper will present the results of the advanced development testing to date of the RCS thruster and the integration with a vehicle propulsion system.

  14. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Castro-Dominguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS. Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR for MSR, (ii a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  15. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.

  16. Reactions of Molecular Dications: Collision Energy Dependence of integral Cross Sections of Processes in CHCl2+ + Ar, D2 Systems from Guided Beam Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, Jana; Thissen, R.; Žabka, Ján; Franceschi, P.; Dutuit, O.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 228, - (2003), s. 487-495 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Grant - others:Barrande(FR) 2002-013-01 04713TC/2002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Dications * integral cross-sections * charge transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.361, year: 2003

  17. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  18. Conformation and functioning of tRNAs: cross-linked tRNAs as substrate for tRNA nucleotidyl-transferase and aminoacyl synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, D.S.; Thomas, G.; Favre, A.

    1974-01-01

    The behavior of mixed E. coli tRNAs ''cross-linked'' by irradiation with near ultraviolet light (310-400 nm) has been compared to that of the intact molecules in two enzymatic processes. No change in the rate and extent of the repair of the pCpCpA 3' terminus of tRNA by purified E. coli tRNA nucleotidyltransferase can be detected. In contrast, complex data were obtained in the acylation reaction. They can be understood using other tRNA specific modifications as well as our present knowledge of E. coli tRNA sequences and rare base content [fr

  19. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  20. A computational systems biology software platform for multiscale modeling and simulation: Integrating whole-body physiology, disease biology, and molecular reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eEissing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, in silico studies and trial simulations already complement experimental approaches in pharmaceutical R&D and have become indispensable tools for decision making and communication with regulatory agencies. While biology is multi-scale by nature, project work and software tools usually focus on isolated aspects of drug action, such as pharmacokinetics at the organism scale or pharmacodynamic interaction on the molecular level. We present a modeling and simulation software platform consisting of PK-Sim® and MoBi® capable of building and simulating models that integrate across biological scales. A prototypical multiscale model for the progression of a pancreatic tumor and its response to pharmacotherapy is constructed and virtual patients are treated with a prodrug activated by hepatic metabolization. Tumor growth is driven by signal transduction leading to cell cycle transition and proliferation. Free tumor concentrations of the active metabolite inhibit Raf kinase in the signaling cascade and thereby cell cycle progression. In a virtual clinical study, the individual therapeutic outcome of the chemotherapeutic intervention is simulated for a large population with heterogeneous genomic background. Thereby, the platform allows efficient model building and integration of biological knowledge and prior data from all biological scales. Experimental in vitro model systems can be linked with observations in animal experiments and clinical trials. The interplay between patients, diseases, and drugs and topics with high clinical relevance such as the role of pharmacogenomics, drug-drug or drug-metabolite interactions can be addressed using this mechanistic, insight driven multiscale modeling approach.

  1. Allergic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that don't bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the ... more venom. If the person has emergency allergy medicine on ...

  2. Development, Evaluation, and Integration of a Quantitative Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Diagnostic Test for Ebola Virus on a Molecular Diagnostics Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnops, Lieselotte; Van den Eede, Peter; Pettitt, James; Heyndrickx, Leo; De Smet, Birgit; Coppens, Sandra; Andries, Ilse; Pattery, Theresa; Van Hove, Luc; Meersseman, Geert; Van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Vergauwe, Nicolas; Thijs, Rein; Jahrling, Peter B; Nauwelaers, David; Ariën, Kevin K

    2016-10-15

     The 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa resulted in accelerated development of rapid diagnostic tests for emergency outbreak preparedness. We describe the development and evaluation of the Idylla™ prototype Ebola virus test, a fully automated sample-to-result molecular diagnostic test for rapid detection of Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) and Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV).  The Idylla™ prototype Ebola virus test can simultaneously detect EBOV and SUDV in 200 µL of whole blood. The sample is directly added to a disposable cartridge containing all reagents for sample preparation, RNA extraction, and amplification by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The performance was evaluated with a variety of sample types, including synthetic constructs and whole blood samples from healthy volunteers spiked with viral RNA, inactivated virus, and infectious virus.  The 95% limits of detection for EBOV and SUDV were 465 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL (1010 copies/mL) and 324 PFU/mL (8204 copies/mL), respectively. In silico and in vitro analyses demonstrated 100% correct reactivity for EBOV and SUDV and no cross-reactivity with relevant pathogens. The diagnostic sensitivity was 97.4% (for EBOV) and 91.7% (for SUDV), the specificity was 100%, and the diagnostic accuracy was 95.9%.  The Idylla™ prototype Ebola virus test is a fast, safe, easy-to-use, and near-patient test that meets the performance criteria to detect EBOV in patients with suspected Ebola. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The H + HeH(+) → He + H2(+) reaction from the ultra-cold regime to the three-body breakup: exact quantum mechanical integral cross sections and rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fazio, Dario

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we present a quantum mechanical scattering study of the title reaction from 1 mK to 2000 K. Total integral cross sections and thermal rate constants are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data and with simpler theoretical models to understand the range of validity of the approximations used in the previous studies. The obtained quantum reactive observables have been found to be nearly insensitive to the roto-vibrational energy of the reactants at high temperatures. More sensitive to the reactant's roto-vibrational energy are the data in the cold and ultra-cold regimes. The implications of the new data presented here in the early universe scenario are also discussed and analyzed.

  4. Pressure-driven one-step solid phase-based on-chip sample preparation on a microfabricated plastic device and integration with flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hong Hanh; Trinh, Kieu The Loan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we fabricate a monolithic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microdevice on which solid phase-based DNA preparation and flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) units were functionally integrated for one-step sample preparation and amplification operated by pressure. Chelex resin, which is used as a solid support for DNA preparation, can capture denatured proteins but releases DNA, and the purified DNA can then be used as a template in a subsequent amplification process. Using the PMMA microdevices, DNA was successfully purified from both Escherichia coli and human hair sample, and the plasmid vector inserted in E. coli and the D1S80 locus in human genomic DNA were successfully amplified from on-chip purified E. coli and human hair samples. Furthermore, the integration potential of the proposed sample preparation and flow-through PCR units was successfully demonstrate on a monolithic PMMA microdevice with a seamless flow, which could pave the way for a pressure-driven, simple one-step sample preparation and amplification with greatly decreased manufacture cost and enhanced device disposability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR assays integrated with an internal control for quantification of bovine, porcine, chicken and turkey species in food and feed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan R Shehata

    Full Text Available Food adulteration and feed contamination are significant issues in the food/feed industry, especially for meat products. Reliable techniques are needed to monitor these issues. Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR assays were developed and evaluated for detection and quantification of bovine, porcine, chicken and turkey DNA in food and feed samples. The ddPCR methods were designed based on mitochondrial DNA sequences and integrated with an artificial recombinant plasmid DNA to control variabilities in PCR procedures. The specificity of the ddPCR assays was confirmed by testing both target species and additional 18 non-target species. Linear regression established a detection range between 79 and 33200 copies of the target molecule from 0.26 to 176 pg of fresh animal tissue DNA with a coefficient of determination (R2 of 0.997-0.999. The quantification ranges of the methods for testing fortified heat-processed food and feed samples were 0.05-3.0% (wt/wt for the bovine and turkey targets, and 0.01-1.0% (wt/wt for pork and chicken targets. Our methods demonstrated acceptable repeatability and reproducibility for the analytical process for food and feed samples. Internal validation of the PCR process was monitored using a control chart for 74 consecutive ddPCR runs for quantifying bovine DNA. A matrix effect was observed while establishing calibration curves with the matrix type under testing, and the inclusion of an internal control in DNA extraction provides a useful means to overcome this effect. DNA degradation caused by heating, sonication or Taq I restriction enzyme digestion was found to reduce ddPCR readings by as much as 4.5 fold. The results illustrated the applicability of the methods to quantify meat species in food and feed samples without the need for a standard curve, and to potentially support enforcement activities for food authentication and feed control. Standard reference materials matching typical manufacturing processes are needed for

  6. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the experimental and theoretical situation regarding transfer reactions and inelastic scattering. In the first category there is little (very little) precision data for heavy projectiles and consequently almost no experience with quantitative theoretical analysis. For the inelastic scattering the rather extensive data strongly supports the coupled channels models with collective formfactors. At the most back angles, at intensities about 10 -5 of Rutherford scattering, a second, compound-like mechanism becomes dominant. The description of the interplay of these two opposite mechanisms provides a new challenge for our understanding

  7. Can rapid integrated polymerase chain reaction-based diagnostics for gastrointestinal pathogens improve routine hospital infection control practice? A diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, Louise; Macfarlane-Smith, Louissa; Buchanan, James; Anson, Luke; Davies, Kerrie; O'Connor, Lily; Ashwin, Helen; Pike, Graham; Dingle, Kate E; Peto, Timothy Ea; Wordsworth, Sarah; Walker, A Sarah; Wilcox, Mark H; Crook, Derrick W

    2014-08-01

    Every year approximately 5000-9000 patients are admitted to a hospital with diarrhoea, which in up to 90% of cases has a non-infectious cause. As a result, single rooms are 'blocked' by patients with non-infectious diarrhoea, while patients with infectious diarrhoea are still in open bays because of a lack of free side rooms. A rapid test for differentiating infectious from non-infectious diarrhoea could be very beneficial for patients. To evaluate MassCode multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the simultaneous diagnosis of multiple enteropathogens directly from stool, in terms of sensitivity/specificity to detect four common important enteropathogens: Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp. and norovirus. A retrospective study of fixed numbers of samples positive for C. difficile (n = 200), Campylobacter spp. (n = 200), Salmonella spp. (n = 100) and norovirus (n = 200) plus samples negative for all these pathogens (n = 300). Samples were sourced from NHS microbiology laboratories in Oxford and Leeds where initial diagnostic testing was performed according to Public Health England methodology. Researchers carrying out MassCode assays were blind to this information. A questionnaire survey, examining current practice for infection control teams and microbiology laboratories managing infectious diarrhoea, was also carried out. MassCode assays were carried out at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. Further multiplex assays, carried out using Luminex, were run on the same set of samples at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. The questionnaire was completed by various NHS trusts. Sensitivity and specificity to detect C. difficile, Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and norovirus. Nucleic acids were extracted from 948 clinical samples using an optimised protocol (200 Campylobacter spp., 199 C. difficile, 60 S. enterica, 199 norovirus and 295 negative samples; some samples contained more than one pathogen). Using the Mass

  8. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.; Richardson, K.; Fenton, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactions' marks a new development in the study of television as an agency of public policy debate. During the Eighties, nuclear energy became a major international issue. The disasters at Three-mile Island and Chernobyl created a global anxiety about its risks and a new sensitivity to it among politicians and journalists. This book is a case-study into documentary depictions of nuclear energy in television and video programmes and into the interpretations and responses of viewers drawn from many different occupational groupings. How are the complex and specialist arguments about benefit, risk and proof conveyed through the different conventions of commentary, interview and film sequence? What symbolic associations does the visual language of television bring to portrayals of the issue? And how do viewers make sense of various and conflicting accounts, connecting what they see and hear on the screen with their pre-existing knowledge, experience and 'civic' expectations. The authors examine some of the contrasting forms and themes which have been used by programme makers to explain and persuade, and then give a sustained analysis of the nature and sources of viewers' own accounts. 'Nuclear Reactions' inquires into the public meanings surrounding energy and the environment, spelling out in its conclusion some of the implications for future media treatments of this issue. It is also a key contribution to the international literature on 'television knowledge' and the processes of active viewing. (author)

  9. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  10. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  11. Chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, Brian.

    1991-01-01

    Chain Reaction is a work of recent American political history. It seeks to explain how and why America came to depend so heavily on its experts after World War II, how those experts translated that authority into political clout, and why that authority and political discretion declined in the 1970s. The author's research into the internal memoranda of the Atomic Energy Commission substantiates his argument in historical detail. It was not the ravages of American anti-intellectualism, as so many scholars have argued, that brought the experts back down to earth. Rather, their decline can be traced to the very roots of their success after World War II. The need to over-state anticipated results in order to garner public support, incessant professional and bureaucratic specialization, and the sheer proliferation of expertise pushed arcane and insulated debates between experts into public forums at the same time that a broad cross section of political participants found it easier to gain access to their own expertise. These tendencies ultimately undermined the political influence of all experts. (author)

  12. Microscopic description of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatov, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The genealogical series method has been extended to the continuous spectrum of the many-body systems. New nonlinear integral equations have been formulated to perform the microscopical description of the nuclear reactions with arbitrary number of particles. The way to solve them numerically is demonstrated

  13. Fusion chain reaction - a chain reaction with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, A.; Shvarts, D.

    1975-01-01

    When a DT-plasma is compressed to very high density, the particles resulting from nuclear reactions give their energy mostly to D and T ions, by nuclear collisions, rather than to electrons as usual. Fusion can thus proceed as a chain reaction, without the need of thermonuclear temperatures. In this paper, we derive relations for the suprathermal ion population created by a fusion reaction. Numerical integration of these equations shows that a chain reaction can proceed in a cold infinite DT-plasma at densities above 8.4x10 27 ions.cm -3 . Seeding the plasma with a small amount of 6 Li reduces the critical density to 7.2x10 27 ions.cm -3 (140000times the normal solid density). (author)

  14. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  15. Reactions the private life of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Through an innovative, closely integrated design of images and text, and his characteristically clear, precise, and economical exposition, Peter Atkins explains the processes involved in chemical reactions. He begins by introducing a 'tool kit' of basic reactions, such as precipitation, corrosion, and catalysis, and concludes by showing how these building blocks are brought together in more complex processes such as photosynthesis.

  16. Statistical theory of precompound nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, H.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to show the application of the Grassmann-integration method (or the graded-symmetry method) to a pre-equilibrium process in nuclear reactions. The Grassmann-integration method for random systems was first introduced by Efetov and later largely extended and applied to nuclear physics by Verbaarschot, Weidenmuller and Zirnbauer (referred to as VWZ). They have applied it to the equilibrium nuclear reactions; namely; the compound-nucleus reactions. It will be shown in this paper that this method is also applicable to non-equilibrium nuclear reactions. Applying this method to precompound nuclear reactions, the authors have obtained the same expression of the cross-section as Agassi, Weidenmuller and Mantzouranis (referred to as AWM) in the weak-coupling limit. In the general case their results show an important modification to AWM

  17. Program BETA for simulation of particle decays and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takhtamyshev, G.G.; Merkulova, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Program BETA is designed for simulation of particle decays and reactions. The program also produces integration over the phase space and decay rate or the reaction cross section are calculated as a result of such integration. At the simulation process the adaptive random number generator SMART may be used, what is found to be useful for some difficult cases

  18. Biomarkers of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel F; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions can be caused by a wide range of therapeutics. Adverse drug reactions affect many bodily organ systems and vary widely in severity. Milder adverse drug reactions often resolve quickly following withdrawal of the casual drug or sometimes after dose reduction. Some adverse drug reactions are severe and lead to significant organ/tissue injury which can be fatal. Adverse drug reactions also represent a financial burden to both healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, a number of stakeholders would benefit from development of new, robust biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and prognostication of adverse drug reactions. There has been significant recent progress in identifying predictive genomic biomarkers with the potential to be used in clinical settings to reduce the burden of adverse drug reactions. These have included biomarkers that can be used to alter drug dose (for example, Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and azathioprine dose) and drug choice. The latter have in particular included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) biomarkers which identify susceptibility to immune-mediated injuries to major organs such as skin, liver, and bone marrow from a variety of drugs. This review covers both the current state of the art with regard to genomic adverse drug reaction biomarkers. We also review circulating biomarkers that have the potential to be used for both diagnosis and prognosis, and have the added advantage of providing mechanistic information. In the future, we will not be relying on single biomarkers (genomic/non-genomic), but on multiple biomarker panels, integrated through the application of different omics technologies, which will provide information on predisposition, early diagnosis, prognosis, and mechanisms. Impact statement • Genetic and circulating biomarkers present significant opportunities to personalize patient therapy to minimize the risk of adverse drug reactions. ADRs are a significant heath issue

  19. Treatment and Managing Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of reactions. Learn more here. Milk Egg Peanut Tree Nuts Soy Wheat Fish Shellfish Sesame Other Food ... a severe reaction. Consider wearing an emergency medical identification (e.g., bracelet, other jewelry). What to Read ...

  20. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  1. Preequilibrium Nuclear Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1988-01-01

    After a survey on existing experimental data on precompound reactions and a description of preequilibrium reactions, theoretical models and quantum mechanical theories of preequilibrium emission are presented. The 25 papers of this meeting are analyzed separately

  2. Managing Your Emotional Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Managing Your Emotional Reactions KidsHealth / For Teens / Managing Your Emotional Reactions ... Think about what you might do next time. Emotions 101 The skills we use to manage our ...

  3. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the ...

  4. Proton induced reactions on Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni. Measurement and hybrid model analysis of integral excitation functions and their application in model calculation for the production of cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueck, R.

    1983-01-01

    By means of the stacked foil technique 67 excitation functions of p induced reactions on the target elements Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni were measured in the energy range between 45 and 200 MeV. For residual nuclei with 42 [de

  5. Integral or integrated marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davčik Nebojša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing theorists and experts try to develop business efficient organization and to get marketing performance at higher, business integrated level since its earliest beginnings. The core issue in this paperwork is the dialectic and practical approach dilemma should we develop integrated or integral marketing approach in the organization. The presented company cases as well as dialectic and functional explanations of this dilemma clearly shows that integrated marketing is narrower approach than integral marketing if we take as focal point new, unique and completed entity. In the integration the essence is in getting different parts together, which do not have to make necessary the new entity. The key elements in the definition of the integral marketing are necessity and holistic, e.g. necessity to develop new, holistic entity.

  6. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  7. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  8. Maillard Reaction: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia d'Almeida Francisquini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is an important subject of study in food science and technology and different areas of knowledge are involved such as chemistry, food engineering, nutrition and food technology. The objective of this paper is to present the basic concepts of the Maillard reaction, such as the reaction stages, the main compounds producced and some technological consequences for dairy products.

  9. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  10. Nuclear data for production of the therapeutic radionuclides {sup 32}P, {sup 64}Cu, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 9}Y and {sup 153}Sm via the (n,p) reaction: Evaluation of excitation function and its validation via integral cross-section measurement using a 14 MeV d(Be) neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abyad, M. [Institut fuer Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Cyclotron Facility, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); Spahn, I. [Institut fuer Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary); Sudar, S. [Institut fuer Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary); Morsy, M. [Cyclotron Facility, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); Comsan, M.N.H. [Cyclotron Facility, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); Csikai, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen (Hungary); Qaim, S.M. [Institut fuer Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: s.m.qaim@fz-juelich.de; Coenen, H.H. [Institut fuer Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Nuclear data for production of the therapeutic radionuclides {sup 32}P, {sup 64}Cu, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 9}Y and {sup 153}Sm via (n,p) reactions on the target nuclei {sup 32}S, {sup 64}Zn, {sup 67}Zn, {sup 89}Y, {sup 9}Zr and {sup 153}Eu, respectively, are discussed. The available information on each excitation function was analysed. From the recommended data set for each reaction the average integrated cross section for a standard 14 MeV d(Be) neutron field was deduced. The spectrum-averaged cross section was also measured experimentally. A comparison of the integrated value with the integral measurement served to validate the excitation function within about 15%. A fast neutron source appears to be much more effective than a fission reactor for production of the above-mentioned radionuclides in a no-carrier-added form via the (n,p) process. In particular, the possibility of production of high specific activity {sup 153}Sm is discussed.

  11. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Conservation Laws in Biochemical Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdi, Adam; Ferragut, Antoni; Valls, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We study the existence of linear and nonlinear conservation laws in biochemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics. It is straightforward to compute the linear conservation laws as they are related to the left null-space of the stoichiometry matrix. The nonlinear conservation laws...... are difficult to identify and have rarely been considered in the context of mass-action reaction networks. Here, using the Darboux theory of integrability, we provide necessary structural (i.e., parameterindependent) conditions on a reaction network to guarantee the existence of nonlinear conservation laws...

  13. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  14. Reaction rates for neutrino processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalitin, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some integrals involved in neutrino processes are evaluated by transformation to a special system of reference - usually to the center of mass system (CM). Rather simple analytic expressions are obtained for reaction rates and, though less simple, for moments. An interesting result thus obtained is for an isotropic interaction (in CM) of a neutrino with a monoenergetic isotropic gas of extreme relativistic electrons: it is found that the probability of the scattered neutrino to have energy in a certain range is independent of this energy. (Auth.)

  15. A practical contribution to the dosimetry of fast neutrons in radio-protection - determination of the integrated dose in man using the 32S(n, p)32P reaction (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidhauer, J.; Chabidon, M.

    1963-01-01

    The problem of fast neutron dosimetry using activation is studied from the radio-protection point of view. The practical development of methods for analyzing phosphorus 32 produced by the activation of sulphur 32 in human hair by the reaction 32 S(n, p) 32 P is described. The sensitivity obtained is 5 rad. A preliminary study was made of the variations in the natural sulphur and phosphorus concentrations. (authors) [fr

  16. Integral-preserving integrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, D I; Quispel, G R W

    2004-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations having a first integral may be solved numerically using one of several methods, with the integral preserved to machine accuracy. One such method is the discrete gradient method. It is shown here that the order of the method can be bootstrapped repeatedly to higher orders of accuracy. The method is illustrated using the Henon-Heiles system. (letter to the editor)

  17. RKC time-stepping for advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwer, J.G.; Sommeijer, B.P.; Hundsdorfer, W.

    2004-01-01

    The original explicit Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) method is a stabilized second-order integration method for pure diffusion problems. Recently, it has been extended in an implicit-explicit manner to also incorporate highly stiff reaction terms. This implicit-explicit RKC method thus treats diffusion terms explicitly and the highly stiff reaction terms implicitly. The current paper deals with the incorporation of advection terms for the explicit method, thus aiming at the implicit-explicit RKC integration of advection-diffusion-reaction equations in a manner that advection and diffusion terms are treated simultaneously and explicitly and the highly stiff reaction terms implicitly

  18. Langevin dynamics of A+A reactions in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancho, J M; Romero, A H; Lacasta, A M; Lindenberg, Katja

    2007-01-01

    We propose a set of Langevin equations of motion together with a reaction rule for the study of binary reactions. Our scheme is designed to address this problem for arbitrary friction γ and temperature T. It easily accommodates the inclusion of a substrate potential, and it lends itself to straightforward numerical integration. We test this approach on diffusion-limited (γ → ∞) as well as ballistic (γ = 0) A+A → P reactions for which there are extensive exact and approximate theoretical results as well as extensive Monte Carlo results. We reproduce the known results using our integration scheme, and also present new results for the ballistic reactions

  19. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sobrado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  20. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  1. Knock-out reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Forest, T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that the primary motivation for performing high energy single nucleon knock-out reactions is based on the concept of quasi-elastic scattering. The validity of and corrections to the partial wave impulse approximation and kinematical invariance of knock-out reactions and tests of the reaction mechanism are treated. The effect of distortions on the momentum distribution in the effective momentum approximation for given parameters are plotted. 12 references

  2. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  3. Thermonuclear reaction listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    The following 10 elements, including T, are well known as nuclear fusion fuels: p, D, T, 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B, ( 12 C, 13 C), where 12 C and 13 C are considered only in the calculation of Q value. Accordingly the number of the thermonuclear reactions is 55, and 78, if including carbon elements. The reactions have some branches. For the branches having two and three reaction products, the reaction products, Q value and threshold energy are calculated by using a computer. We have investigated those of the branches having more than three products from the papers of Ajzenberg-Selove and so on. And also, by the same papers, we check whether the above mentioned branch has been observed or not. The results are as follows: (I) the number of reactions which have Q 0 branches only with γ ray production, and Q 0 and neutron production is 36(17), and (IV) that of reactions whose branch with Q > 0 does not produce neutrons is 9(3). The value in the parentheses shows the number of the case of the carbon elements. For 55 thermonuclear reactions induced by lighter nuclides than 11 B, the reaction products, the values of Q and threshold energy, and the papers with reaction cross section data are presented in the tables. (author)

  4. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M Allen [Berkeley, CA; Beeman, Barton V [San Mateo, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Hadley, Dean R [Manteca, CA; Landre, Phoebe [Livermore, CA; Lehew, Stacy L [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter A [Pleasanton, CA

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  5. Tattoo reaction: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea. In this series we present three cases of tattoo reaction.

  6. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  7. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described

  8. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  9. Fluorogenic organocatalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeisolsadati Oskouei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we introduce fluorescence spectroscopy as a new tool to gain insight into the interactions between the substrates and catalyst during organocatalytic reactions. The ultimate goal is to resolve the kinetics of the binding and reaction steps and obtain detailed understanding of the

  10. Applications of Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  11. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ... leave the person alone and watch carefully for reactions affecting the entire body. Note: If a chemical gets into the eyes, the eyes should be ...

  12. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  13. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1977-06-01

    To complement discussions on the role of γ rays in heavy ion induced reactions, the author discusses the role played by particle detection. Transfer reactions are part of this subject and are among those in which one infers the properties of the residual nucleus in a reaction by observing the emerging light nucleus. Inelastic scattering ought not be excluded from this subject, although no particles are transferred, because of the role it plays in multistep reactions and in fixing O.M. parameters describing the entrance channel of the reaction. Heavy ion transfer reaction studies have been under study for some years and yet this research is still in its infancy. The experimental techniques are difficult and the demands on theory rigorous. One of the main products of heavy ion research has been the thrust to re-examine the assumptions of reaction theory and now include many effects neglected for light ion analysis. This research has spurred the addition of multistep processes to simple direct processes and coupled channel calculations. (J.R.)

  14. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  15. The Reaction Wheel Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Daniel J; Spong, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    This monograph describes the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, the newest inverted-pendulum-like device for control education and research. We discuss the history and background of the reaction wheel pendulum and other similar experimental devices. We develop mathematical models of the reaction wheel pendulum in depth, including linear and nonlinear models, and models of the sensors and actuators that are used for feedback control. We treat various aspects of the control problem, from linear control of themotor, to stabilization of the pendulum about an equilibrium configuration using linear control, t

  16. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  17. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  18. Nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuca, S.; Antalik, R.; Kristiak, J.

    1988-01-01

    The collection contains full texts of 37 contributions; all fall within the INIS Subject Scope. The topics treated include some unsolved problems of nuclear reactions and relevant problems of nuclear structure at low and intermediate energies. (Z.S.)

  19. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  20. Statistical nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the statistical model of nuclear reactions is presented. The main relations are described, together with the ingredients necessary to perform practical calculations. In addition, a substantial overview of the width fluctuation correction factor is given. (author)

  1. Photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of medium energy nuclear reactions induced by real photons are reviewed. Special emphasis is put on high accuracy experiments that will become possible with the next generation of electron accelerators. (orig.)

  2. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Blood transfusion reaction Images Surface proteins causing rejection References Choate JD, Maitta RW, Tormey CA, Wu ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 177. Hall JE. Blood types; transfusion; tissue and organ transplantation. In: Hall JE, ...

  3. Sequential charged particle reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Jun-ichi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    The effective cross sections for producing the sequential reaction products in F82H, pure vanadium and LiF with respect to the 14.9-MeV neutron were obtained and compared with the estimation ones. Since the sequential reactions depend on the secondary charged particles behavior, the effective cross sections are corresponding to the target nuclei and the material composition. The effective cross sections were also estimated by using the EAF-libraries and compared with the experimental ones. There were large discrepancies between estimated and experimental values. Additionally, we showed the contribution of the sequential reaction on the induced activity and dose rate in the boundary region with water. From the present study, it has been clarified that the sequential reactions are of great importance to evaluate the dose rates around the surface of cooling pipe and the activated corrosion products. (author)

  4. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... preferences, recipients should not respond to the applicant actually hired on the basis of their (the recipients') racial preferences. My account decomposes the meritocratic ideal into four separate norms, one of which applies to recipients rather than to selectors. Finally, it defends the view that reaction...... qualifications based on antimeritocratic reactions, while not unproblematic, are not entirely irrelevant from the point of view of merit. Notably, selectors need not discount them when no one - including the targets of the objectionable preferences - is unfairly disadvantaged. Because not all problematic...

  5. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CADRs).1 ... patient's management is thought to be responsible for the reaction. Some clinical ... In SJS/TEN hypotension, diarrhoea, hypothermia and confusion suggest ... and a pain management team, centred around a good core of experienced ...

  6. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

      When, in a competitive sphere, people are selected on the basis of qualifications only, their chances of acquiring positions of advantage may seem to depend entirely upon their abilities, not discriminatory bias. However, if reaction qualifications - i.e. characteristics which contribute...... to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... of merit. Specifically, it preserves symmetry between negative evaluations of antimeritocratic bases of selection and negative evaluations of qualifications rooted in comparable antimeritocratic reactions. So if employers should not select among applicants on the basis of their (the employers') racial...

  7. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    Nozzle reaction and hose tension are analyzed using conservation of fluid momentum and assuming steady, inviscid flow and a flexible hose in frictionless contact with the ground. An expression that is independent of the bend angle is derived for the hose tension. If this tension is exceeded owing...... to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  8. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  9. Spallation reactions: calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Current methods for calculating spallation reactions over various energy ranges are described and evaluated. Recent semiempirical fits to existing data will probably yield the most accurate predictions for these reactions in general. However, if the products in question have binding energies appreciably different from their isotropic neighbors and if the cross section is approximately 30 mb or larger, then the intranuclear-cascade-evaporation approach is probably better suited. (6 tables, 12 figures, 34 references) (U.S.)

  10. Electromagnetic Reactions and Few-Nucleon Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacca Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an update on recent theoretical studies of electromagnetic reactions obtained by using the Lorentz integral transform method. The 4He nucleus will be the main focus of this report: results for the photo-disintegration and the electro-disintegration processes will be shown, as well as a recent calculation of polarizability effects in muonic atoms. We also discuss the exciting possibility to investigate inelastic reactions for mediummass nuclei in coupled-cluster theory, highlighted by the recent application to the 16O photo-nuclear cross section.

  11. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  12. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  13. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  14. Retroviral DNA Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  15. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Sigeki; Sato, Keiji; Sugiura, Hideshi; Iwata, Hisashi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  16. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Sigeki [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sugiura, Hideshi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Iwata, Hisashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  17. Non-equilibrium reaction rates in chemical kinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy

    2018-05-01

    Within the recently proposed asymptotic method for solving the Boltzmann equation for chemically reacting gas mixture, the chemical kinetic equations has been derived. Corresponding one-temperature non-equilibrium reaction rates are expressed in terms of specific heat capacities of the species participate in the chemical reactions, bracket integrals connected with the internal energy transfer in inelastic non-reactive collisions and energy transfer coefficients. Reactions of dissociation/recombination of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules are considered. It is shown that all reaction rates are the complex functions of the species densities, similarly to the unimolecular reaction rates. For determining the rate coefficients it is recommended to tabulate corresponding bracket integrals, additionally to the equilibrium rate constants. Correlation of the obtained results with the irreversible thermodynamics is established.

  18. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  19. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    OpenAIRE

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either ...

  20. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  1. Modeling of Reaction Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to model the reaction calorimeter in order to calculate the heat of absorption which is the most important parameter in this work. Reaction calorimeter is an apparatus which is used in measuring the heat of absorption of CO2 as well as the total pressure in vapor phase based on vapor-liquid equilibrium state. Mixture of monoethanolamine (MEA) and water was used as a solvent to absorb the CO2.Project was divided in to three parts in order to make the programming...

  2. Introduction to nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This introduction to nuclear reaction phenomena is aimed primarily but not exclusively at readers at the undergraduate student level. An overview of the subject is presented in the first two chapters entitled - Some background information and Introduction to nuclear reactions. The third chapter reviews scattering theory with emphasis on the underlying physical ideas and also provides schematic entrees to the more advanced topics. The physical models which have been developed to account for the various aspects of nuclear phenomena are described in more detail in chapter 4. References and exercises are appended to each chapter. (U.K.)

  3. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  4. DSMC Modeling of Flows with Recombination Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    its exact analytic integration to provide equally simple temperature dependent reaction rate constant. This is mostly due to the discrete internal... discrete rotational mode may be replaced by its continuous analog, the vibrational mode cannot be simplified this way due to large energy spacing...Rogasinsky, “Analysis of the numerical techniques of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method in the rarefied gas dynamics,” Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math

  5. (MIRC) reaction w

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudesh Kumari

    eco-friendly solvents, high yields and easy work-up procedure. Keywords. Ethylene glycol; 4-hydroxycoumarin; ... ability and also compatibility with most organic and inorganic compounds. Because of these properties it is ..... phenyl amino)-2H-chromen-2-one (8a) was isolated from the reaction mixture to confirm the ...

  6. Explaining competitive reaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    Changes in promotional expenditure decisions for a brand, as in other marketing decisions, should be based on the expected impact on purchase and consumption behavior as well as on the likely reactions by competitors. Purchase behavior may be predicted from estimated demand functions. Competitive

  7. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ulcers. Affected individuals may complain of a burning sensation and mouth sensitivity to cold, hot, and spicy foods. Lichenoid ... melon, and pineapple, are all associated with this syndrome. You should inform your ... reaction in the mouth, though some are more common than others. If ...

  8. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  9. Reaction schemes of immunoanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaage, M.; Barbet, J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors apply a general theory for multiple equilibria to the reaction schemes of immunoanalysis, competition and sandwich. This approach allows the manufacturer to optimize the system and provide the user with interpolation functions for the standard curve and its first derivative as well, thus giving access to variance [fr

  10. Allergic reactions in anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Menné, T

    2005-01-01

    a significant number of patients at unnecessary risk. Some patients may be labelled with a wrong allergy, leading to unnecessary warnings against harmless substances, and some patients may be put at risk of subsequent re-exposure to the real allergen. Patients with suspected allergic reactions during...

  11. Reaction product imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  12. Integrated economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratton, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This article offers ideas for evaluating integrated solid waste management systems through the use of a conceptual cost overview. The topics of the article include the integrated solid waste management system; making assumptions about community characteristics, waste generation rates, waste collection responsibility, integrated system components, sizing and economic life of system facilities, system implementation schedule, facility ownership, and system administration; integrated system costs; integrated system revenues; system financing; cost projections; and making decisions

  13. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  14. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  15. A study on sodium-concrete reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pae, Jae Huem; Min, Byung Hoon; Lee, Joon Sik; Lee, Choong Hui; Chung, Ki Hong; Keum, Choong Ki [Suwon University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Sodium is commonly used as a coolant in liquid metal reactor. A large amount of its leakage may be possible in hypothetical accidents, even though the possibility is very low. In case that the leaked hot sodium comes in direct contact with structural concrete of liquid metal reactor, the reactor`s integrity can be challenged by the rupture of structure materials, hydrogen generation and its explosion, and release of radioactive aerosols due to sodium-concrete reaction. The knowledge of sodium-concrete reaction is evaluated to be one of the important and indispensable technologies for the establishment of safety measure in liquid metal reactor. In this study, the experimental facility of sodium-concrete reaction is to be designed, constructed and operated. And the reaction phenomena of sodium-concrete reaction is also to be analyzed through the experimental results. The aim of this study is to establish the measure of safety and protection for sodium-related facilities and to secure one of the fundamental technologies of liquid metal reactor safety. 47 refs., 7 figs., 13 tab.

  16. Re-evaluation of microscopic and integral cross-section data for important dosimetry reactions. Re-evaluation of the excitation functions for the 24Mg(n,p)24Na, 32S(n,p)32P, 60Ni(n,p)60m+gCo, 63Cu(n,2n)62Cu, 65Cu(n,2n)64Cu, 64Zn(n,p)64Cu, 115In(n,2n)114mIn, 127I(n,2n)126I, 197Au(n,2n)196Au and 199Hg(n,n')199mHg reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotarev, K.I.

    2008-08-01

    Re-evaluations of cross sections and their associated covariance matrices have been carried out for ten dosimetry reactions: - excitation functions for the 63 Cu(n,2n) 62 Cu, 65 Cu(n,2n) 64 Cu, 64 Zn(n,p) 64 Cu, 115 In(n,2n) 114m In and 199 Hg(n,n') 199m Hg reactions were re-evaluated over the neutron energy range from threshold to 20 MeV; - excitation functions for the 24 Mg(n,p) 24 Na, 32 S(n,p) 32 P and 60 Ni(n,p) 60m+g Co were reevaluated in the energy range from threshold to 21 MeV; - excitation functions for the 127 I(n,2n) 126 I and 197 Au(n,2n) 196 Au reactions were reevaluated in the energy range from threshold to 32 and 40 MeV, respectively. Benchmark calculations performed for 235 U thermal fission and 252 Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectra show that the integral cross sections derived from the newly evaluated excitation functions exhibit improved agreement with related experimental data when compared with the equivalent data from the IRDF-2002 library. (author)

  17. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T J

    1987-02-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis.

  18. Photooxidative reactions of psoralens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapenko, A.Ya.; Sukhorukov, V.L.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism and biological significance of photooxidative reactions of psoralens are reviewed. Skin-photosensitizing activities of bifunctional and monofunctional psoralens are compared. Antioxidants tocopherols and butilated hydroxytoluene inhibit photochemical reactions of psoralens responsible for induction of erythema. The same antioxidants do not inhibit PUVA-therapy of psriasis. Though psoralens can generate singlet oxygen under UVA-irradiation (315 - 400 nm), nevertheless singlet oxygen does not play significant role in 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) sensitized photooxidation of tocopherol or dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). SH-compounds enhance the rate of 8-MOP sensitized photooxidation of DOPA by a factor of four, simultaneously the rate of oxidation of SH-groups is enhanced many fold in the presence of DOPA. Under UVA-irradiation in organic solvents psoralens are photooxidized. Dimeric photooxidized psoralens are easily destructed in water medium, their destruction induce oxidation of unsaturated lipids and DOPA. (author)

  19. Solar nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, G

    1978-04-01

    The current state of neutrino solar astrophysics is outlined, showing the contradictions between the experimental results of solar neutrino detection and the standard solar models constructed on the basis of the star structure and development theory, which give values for high-energy neutrino fluxes considerably exceeding the upper experimental limit. A number of hypotheses interpreting the experimental results are summarized. The hypotheses are critically assessed and experiments are recommended for refining or verifying experimental data. Also dealt with are nuclear reactions in the Sun, as is the attempt to interpret the anomalous by high /sup 3/He fluxes from the Sun and the relatively small amounts of solar neutrinos and gamma quanta. The importance is emphasized of the simultaneous and complex measurement of the fluxes of neutrons, gamma radiation, and isotopes of hydrogen, helium, and boron from the Sun as indicators of nuclear reactions in the Sun.

  20. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  1. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis. PMID:3548601

  2. Hadron reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.D.B.; Martin, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of hadron scattering at high energies are reviewed in such a way as to combine the ideas of the parton model and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with Regge theory and phenomenology. After a brief introduction to QCD and the basic features of hadron scattering data, scaling and the dimensional counting rules, the parton structure of hadrons, and the parton model for large momentum transfer processes, including scaling violations are discussed. Hadronic jets and the use of parton ideas in soft scattering processes are examined, attention being paid to Regge theory and its applications in exclusive and inclusive reactions, the relationship to parton exchange being stressed. The mechanisms of hadron production which build up cross sections, and hence the underlying Regge singularities, and the possible overlap of Regge and scaling regions are discussed. It is concluded that the key to understanding hadron reaction mechanisms seems to lie in the marriage of Regge theory with QCD. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is revised the nuclear reactions which present an interest in astrophysics regarding the explanation of some problems such as the relative quantity of the elements, the structure and evolution of the stars. The principal object of the study is the determination of the experimental possibilities in the field of astrophysics, of an accelerator Van de Graaff's 700 KeV type. Two hundred nuclear reactions approximately, were found, and nothing or very little has been done in the intervals of energy which are of interest. Since the bombardment energies and the involved sections are low in some cases, there are real possibilities, for the largest number of stars to obtain important statistical data with the above mentioned accelerator, taking some necessary precautions. (author)

  4. Effect of Nicotine on Audio and Visual Reaction Time in Dipping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicotine through blood is harmful and as there are fewer studies in India with respect to nicotines influence on reaction time especially in the smokeless tobacco users we studied this. Reaction time is a measure of the sensorimotor integration in a person. We used a PC 1000 Hz reaction timer to record the audio and visual ...

  5. Calculation of reaction energies and adiabatic temperatures for waste tank reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, L.L.

    1995-10-01

    Continual concern has been expressed over potentially hazardous exothermic reactions that might occur in Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. These tanks contain many different oxidizable compounds covering a wide range of concentrations. The chemical hazards are a function of several interrelated factors, including the amount of energy (heat) produced, how fast it is produced, and the thermal absorption and heat transfer properties of the system. The reaction path(s) will determine the amount of energy produced and kinetics will determine the rate that it is produced. The tanks also contain many inorganic compounds inert to oxidation. These compounds act as diluents and can inhibit exothermic reactions because of their heat capacity and thus, in contrast to the oxidizable compounds, provide mitigation of hazardous reactions. In this report the energy that may be released when various organic and inorganic compounds react is computed as a function of the reaction-mix composition and the temperature. The enthalpy, or integrated heat capacity, of these compounds and various reaction products is presented as a function of temperature; the enthalpy of a given mixture can then be equated to the energy release from various reactions to predict the maximum temperature which may be reached. This is estimated for several different compositions. Alternatively, the amounts of various diluents required to prevent the temperature from reaching a critical value can be estimated. Reactions taking different paths, forming different products such as N{sub 2}O in place of N{sub 2} are also considered, as are reactions where an excess of caustic is present. Oxidants other than nitrate and nitrite are considered briefly.

  6. Calculation of reaction energies and adiabatic temperatures for waste tank reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.

    1995-10-01

    Continual concern has been expressed over potentially hazardous exothermic reactions that might occur in Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. These tanks contain many different oxidizable compounds covering a wide range of concentrations. The chemical hazards are a function of several interrelated factors, including the amount of energy (heat) produced, how fast it is produced, and the thermal absorption and heat transfer properties of the system. The reaction path(s) will determine the amount of energy produced and kinetics will determine the rate that it is produced. The tanks also contain many inorganic compounds inert to oxidation. These compounds act as diluents and can inhibit exothermic reactions because of their heat capacity and thus, in contrast to the oxidizable compounds, provide mitigation of hazardous reactions. In this report the energy that may be released when various organic and inorganic compounds react is computed as a function of the reaction-mix composition and the temperature. The enthalpy, or integrated heat capacity, of these compounds and various reaction products is presented as a function of temperature; the enthalpy of a given mixture can then be equated to the energy release from various reactions to predict the maximum temperature which may be reached. This is estimated for several different compositions. Alternatively, the amounts of various diluents required to prevent the temperature from reaching a critical value can be estimated. Reactions taking different paths, forming different products such as N 2 O in place of N 2 are also considered, as are reactions where an excess of caustic is present. Oxidants other than nitrate and nitrite are considered briefly

  7. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  8. Polyneutron Chain Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John C. Fisher

    2000-01-01

    Although helium atoms do not form molecules, a sufficiently large number will bind into a stable liquid droplet. A comparable situation is expected for neutrons, with a sufficiently large number binding into a stable droplet of neutron matter. Such polyneutron droplets can be viewed as isotopes of an element with nuclear charge Z=0, tentatively denoted neutrium, symbol Nt. Because of the relatively weak binding of neutrons compared with that of a mix of neutrons and protons, the minimum number of neutrons required for stability of a droplet is fairly large. Early estimates of ∼60 may be reduced to a dozen or so by the BCS pairing interaction. The Nt entries with N≥12 are new to the table of isotopes. Because all of them are beta-unstable, none is expected to persist as a free particle. Yet, some may occasionally be produced by means to be described below, and it is of interest to examine their decay chains and their interactions with charged nuclei to ascertain how their presence might be revealed. Although these reactions are interesting, they cannot be taken seriously without identifying a source for the initial Nt isotope that begins the chain. Here, we consider possible interactions between 16 O and A Nt. Although there is no strong interaction between them, we can expect a very weak residual attraction that can form a loosely bound 16 O A Nt nuclear molecule. This is not a compound nucleus in the usual sense because, considered as fluids, the 16 O and A Nt droplets are immiscible. For a droplet with fewer than about 60 neutrons, beta decay of A Nt is prevented by the buildup of Coulomb energy associated with transforming A Nt into A H in close proximity to 16 O. Thus, it is possible that 16 O A Nt molecules can persist indefinitely and that a few of them may be present in ordinary water as supermassive oxygen nuclei. Because the binding of these molecules is weak, the A Nt component can tunnel to an adjacent nucleus, and if the adjacent nucleus is 18 O, a

  9. Gauge Integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Some authors have formalized the integral in the Mizar Mathematical Library (MML. The first article in a series on the Darboux/Riemann integral was written by Noboru Endou and Artur Korniłowicz: [6]. The Lebesgue integral was formalized a little later [13] and recently the integral of Riemann-Stieltjes was introduced in the MML by Keiko Narita, Kazuhisa Nakasho and Yasunari Shidama [12].

  10. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  11. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  12. Insect bite reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some

  13. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  14. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2014-03-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and

  15. Comparing chemical reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardelli, Luca; Tribastone, Mirco; Tschaikowski, Max

    2017-01-01

    We study chemical reaction networks (CRNs) as a kernel model of concurrency provided with semantics based on ordinary differential equations. We investigate the problem of comparing two CRNs, i.e., to decide whether the solutions of a source and of a target CRN can be matched for an appropriate...... choice of initial conditions. Using a categorical framework, we extend and unify model-comparison approaches based on dynamical (semantic) and structural (syntactic) properties of CRNs. Then, we provide an algorithm to compare CRNs, running linearly in time with respect to the cardinality of all possible...... comparisons. Finally, using a prototype implementation, CAGE, we apply our results to biological models from the literature....

  16. Gravitational radiation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro

    2006-01-01

    We give a short personally-biased review on the recent progress in our understanding of gravitational radiation reaction acting on a point particle orbiting a black hole. The main motivation of this study is to obtain sufficiently precise gravitational waveforms from inspiraling binary compact starts with a large mass ratio. For this purpose, various new concepts and techniques have been developed to compute the orbital evolution taking into account the gravitational self-force. Combining these ideas with a few supplementary new ideas, we try to outline a path to our goal here. (author)

  17. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  18. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  19. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and experimental

  20. Muscle response to pneumatic hand tool torque reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwin, R G; VanBergeijk, E; Armstrong, T J

    1989-06-01

    Surface electromyography was used for studying the effects of torque reaction force acting against the hand, on forearm muscle activity and grip force for five subjects operating right angle, air shut-off nutrunners. Four tools having increasing spindle torque were operated using short and long torque reaction times. Nutrunner spindle torque ranged between 30 Nm and 100 Nm. Short torque reaction time was considered 0.5 s while long torque reaction time was 2 s. Peak horizontal force was the greatest component of the reaction force acting against the hand and accounted for more than 97% of the peak resultant hand force. Peak hand force increased from 89 N for the smallest tool to 202 N for the largest tool. Forearm muscle rms EMG, scaled for grip force, indicated average flexor activity during the Torque-reaction phase was more than four times greater than the Pre-start and Post Shut-off phases, and two times greater than the Run-down phase. Flexor EMG activity during the Torque-reaction phase increased for increasing tool peak spindle torque. Average flexor rms EMG activity, scaled for grip force, during the Torque-reaction phase increased from 372 N for the 30 Nm nutrunner to 449 N for the 100 Nm nutrunner. Flexor rms EMG activity averaged during the Torque-reaction phase and scaled for grip force was 390 N for long torque reaction times and increased to 440 N for short torque reaction times. Flexor rms EMG integrated over the torque reaction phase was 839 Ns for long torque reaction times and decreased to 312 Ns for short torque reaction times. The average latency between tool spindle torque onset and peak initial flexor rms EMG for long torque reaction times was 294 ms which decreased to 161 ms for short torque reaction times. The average latency between peak tool spindle torque, just prior to tool shut-off, and peak final rms EMG for long torque reaction times was 97 ms for flexors and 188 ms for extensors, which decreased for short torque reaction times to 47

  1. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  2. Substitution reactions of technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, T.

    1997-01-01

    Substitution reactions of a series of technetium complexes are considered in comparison with corresponding reactions of rhenium. Rhenium and technetium complexes are rather inert in substitution reactions, the latter are characterized by greater rate constants when they proceed according to dissociative mechanism. In rare cases when k Tc /k Re id little it is assumed that the reaction proceeds according to the associative mechanism. (author)

  3. The nuclear reaction matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenciglowa, E.M.; Kung, C.L.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Osnes, E.; and Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1976-01-01

    Different definitions of the reaction matrix G appropriate to the calculation of nuclear structure are reviewed and discussed. Qualitative physical arguments are presented in support of a two-step calculation of the G-matrix for finite nuclei. In the first step the high-energy excitations are included using orthogonalized plane-wave intermediate states, and in the second step the low-energy excitations are added in, using harmonic oscillator intermediate states. Accurate calculations of G-matrix elements for nuclear structure calculations in the Aapprox. =18 region are performed following this procedure and treating the Pauli exclusion operator Q 2 /sub p/ by the method of Tsai and Kuo. The treatment of Q 2 /sub p/, the effect of the intermediate-state spectrum and the energy dependence of the reaction matrix are investigated in detail. The present matrix elements are compared with various matrix elements given in the literature. In particular, close agreement is obtained with the matrix elements calculated by Kuo and Brown using approximate methods

  4. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  5. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Long life reaction control system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciullo, Thomas J.; Judd, Craig

    1993-02-01

    Future single stage to orbit systems will utilize oxygen/hydrogen propellants in their main propulsion means due to the propellant's high energy content and environmental acceptability. Operational effectiveness studies and life cycle cost studies have indicated that minimizing the number of different commodities on a given vehicle not only reduces cost, but reduces the ground span times in both the pre- and postflight operations. Therefore, oxygen and hydrogen should be used for the reaction controls systems, eliminating the need to deal with toxic or corrosive fluids. When the hydrogen scramjet powered NASP design development began in 1985, new system design studies considered overall integration of subsystems; in the context of that approach, O2/H2 reaction controls system were more than competitive with storable propellant systems and had the additional benefits of lower life cycle cost, rapid turnaround times, and O2 and H2 commodities for use throughout the vehicle. Similar benefits were derived in rocket-powered SSTO vehicles.

  7. Kinetics of chemical reactions initiated by hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1977-01-01

    Modern ideas about kinetics of chemical reactions of hot atoms are generalized. The main points of the phenomenological theories (''kinetic theory'' of Wolfgang-Estrup hot reactions and the theory of ''reactions integral probability'' of Porter) are given. Physico-chemical models of elastic and non-elastic collisions are considered which are used in solving Boltzmann integro-differential equations and stochastic equations in the Porter theory. The principal formulas are given describing probabilities or yields of chemical reactions, initiated with hot atoms, depending on the distribution functions of hot particles with respect to energy. Briefly described are the techniques and the results of applying the phenomenological theories for interpretation of the experimental data obtained during nuclear reactions with hot atoms, photochemical investigations, etc. 96 references are given

  8. Retroviral DNA Integration Directed by HIV Integration Protein in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Fujiwara, Tamio; Craigie, Robert

    1990-09-01

    Efficient retroviral growth requires integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. As a first step in analyzing the mechanism of integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA, a cell-free system was established that models the integration reaction. The in vitro system depends on the HIV integration (IN) protein, which was partially purified from insect cells engineered to express IN protein in large quantities. Integration was detected in a biological assay that scores the insertion of a linear DNA containing HIV terminal sequences into a λ DNA target. Some integration products generated in this assay contained five-base pair duplications of the target DNA at the recombination junctions, a characteristic of HIV integration in vivo; the remaining products contained aberrant junctional sequences that may have been produced in a variation of the normal reaction. These results indicate that HIV IN protein is the only viral protein required to insert model HIV DNA sequences into a target DNA in vitro.

  9. Interorganisational Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Frølich, Anne

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite many initiatives to improve coordination of patient pathways and intersectoral cooperation, Danish health care is still fragmented, lacking intra- and interorganisational integration. This study explores barriers to and facilitators of interorganisational integration...... at a university hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Our results can be grouped into five influencing areas for interorganisational integration: communication/information transfer, committed leadership, patient engagement, the role and competencies of the general practitioner...... and organisational culture. Proposed solutions to barriers in each area hold the potential to improve care integration as experienced by individuals responsible for supporting and facilitating it. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care relate to clinical, professional, functional and normative integration...

  10. Vertical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antill, N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on the trend in international energy companies towards vertical integration in the gas chain from wellhead to power generation, horizontal integration in refining and marketing businesses, and the search for larger projects with lower upstream costs. The shape of the petroleum industry in the next millennium, the creation of super-major oil companies, and the relationship between size and risk are discussed. The dynamics of vertical integration, present events and future developments are considered. (UK)

  11. Nuclear reactions an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown – mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos – to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.   The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no ...

  12. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10 19 W/cm 2 . In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that μCi of 62 Cu can be generated via the (γ,n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10 19 Wcm -2

  13. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.

    1990-01-01

    At all times and at all astrophysical scales, nuclear reactions have played and continue to play a key role. This concerns the energetics as well as the production of nuclides (nucleosynthesis). After a brief review of the observed composition of various objects in the universe, and especially of the solar system, the basic ingredients that are required in order to build up models for the chemical evolution of galaxies are sketched. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the stellar yields through an overview of the important burning episodes and nucleosynthetic processes that can develop in non-exploding or exploding stars. Emphasis is put on the remaining astrophysical and nuclear physics uncertainties that hamper a clear understanding of the observed characteristics, and especially compositions, of a large variety of astrophysical objects

  14. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly; Kim, Young Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M. partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M. species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions

  15. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  16. Integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2005-01-01

    Two distinct but related approaches hold the solutions to many mathematical problems--the forms of expression known as differential and integral equations. The method employed by the integral equation approach specifically includes the boundary conditions, which confers a valuable advantage. In addition, the integral equation approach leads naturally to the solution of the problem--under suitable conditions--in the form of an infinite series.Geared toward upper-level undergraduate students, this text focuses chiefly upon linear integral equations. It begins with a straightforward account, acco

  17. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  18. Reaction mechanisms of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, R W

    2000-01-01

    This text provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanisms, suitable for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate study and/or research. The topic has important research applications in the metallurgical industry and is of interest in the science of biochemistry, biology, organic, inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. In addition to coverage of substitution reactions in four-, five- and six-coordinate complexes, the book contains further chapters devoted to isomerization and racemization reactions, to the general field of redox reactions, and to the reactions of coordinated ligands. It is relevant in other fields such as organic, bioinorganic and biological chemistry, providing a bridge to organic reaction mechanisms. The book also contains a chapter on the kinetic background to the subject with many illustrative examples which should prove useful to those beginning research. Provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanis...

  19. Calculation of reaction energies and adiabatic temperatures for waste tank reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    Continual concern has been expressed over potentially hazardous exothermic reactions that might occur in underground Hanford waste tanks. These tanks contain many different oxidizable compounds covering a wide range of concentrations. Several may be in concentrations and quantities great enough to be considered a hazard in that they could undergo rapid and energetic chemical reactions with nitrate and nitrite salts that are present. The tanks also contain many inorganic compounds inert to oxidation. In this report the computed energy that may be released when various organic and inorganic compounds react is computed as a function of the reaction mix composition and the temperature. The enthalpy, or integrated heat capacity, of these compounds and various reaction products is presented as a function of temperature, and the enthalpy of a given mixture can then be equated to the energy release from various reactions to predict the maximum temperature that may be reached. This is estimated for several different compositions. Alternatively, the amounts of various diluents required to prevent the temperature from reaching a critical value can be estimated

  20. Numerical time integration for air pollution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Verwer (Jan); W. Hundsdorfer (Willem); J.G. Blom (Joke)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractDue to the large number of chemical species and the three space dimensions, off-the-shelf stiff ODE integrators are not feasible for the numerical time integration of stiff systems of advection-diffusion-reaction equations [ fracpar{c{t + nabla cdot left( vu{u c right) = nabla cdot left(

  1. Audiovocal Integration in Adults Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Torrey; Chon, HeeCheong; Han, Woojae

    2012-01-01

    Background: Altered auditory feedback can facilitate speech fluency in adults who stutter. However, other findings suggest that adults who stutter show anomalies in "audiovocal integration", such as longer phonation reaction times to auditory stimuli and less effective pitch tracking. Aims: To study audiovocal integration in adults who stutter…

  2. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase single-nucleotide polymorphisms that lead to defects in refolding but not aminoacylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Reynolds, Noah M; Yadavalli, Srujana S

    2011-01-01

    Defects in organellar translation are the underlying cause of a number of mitochondrial diseases, including diabetes, deafness, encephalopathy, and other mitochondrial myopathies. The most common causes of these diseases are mutations in mitochondria-encoded tRNAs. It has recently become apparent...

  3. Integrated Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    1999-01-01

    A homepage on the internet with course material, lecture plan, student exercises, etc. Continuesly updated during the course Integrated Design (80402, 80403)......A homepage on the internet with course material, lecture plan, student exercises, etc. Continuesly updated during the course Integrated Design (80402, 80403)...

  4. Organising integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Runo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Sweden, as in many other countries, there has been a succession of trends in the organisation of health care and other welfare services. These trends have had different implications for the integration of services in the health and welfare system. Aims: One aim is to discuss...... the implications of different organisational trends for the integration of health and welfare services. Another aim is to introduce a Swedish model of financial coordination as a flexible way to organise integration. Organisational trends: In the 1960’s there was an expansion of health and welfare services leading...... an increasing lack of integration in the health and welfare system. In the 2000’s, there has been a re-centralisation through mergers of hospitals, regions and state agencies. It has become clear, however, that mergers do not promote integration but rather increase the bureaucratisation of the system. Model...

  5. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  6. The integration of immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Bauböck, Rainer

    1995-01-01

    from the Table of Contents: Migration and integration - Basic concepts and definitions; Immigration and Integration policies; The legal framework for integration; Dimension of social integration; Cultural integration; Conclusions;

  7. Integrative psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2008-09-01

    The main purposes of the article are to present the history of integration in psychotherapy, the reasons of the development integrative approaches, and the approaches to integration in psychotherapy. Three approaches to integration in psychotherapy exist: theoretical integration, theoretical eclecticism, and common factors in different psychotherapeutic trends. In integrative psychotherapy, the basic epistemology, theory, and clinical practice are based on the phenomenology, field theory, holism, dialogue, and co-creation of dialogue in the therapeutic relationship. The main criticism is that integrative psychotherapy suffers from confusion and many unresolved controversies. It is difficult to theoretically and methodologically define the clinically applied model that is based on such a different epistemological and theoretical presumptions. Integrative psychotherapy is a synthesis of humanistic psychotherapy, object relations theory, and psychoanalytical self psychology. It focuses on the dynamics and potentials of human relationships, with a goal of changing the relations and understanding internal and external resistances. The process of integrative psychotherapy is primarily focused on the developmental-relational model and co-creation of psychotherapeutic relationship as a single interactive event, which is not unilateral, but rather a joint endeavor by both the therapist and the patient/client. The need for a relationship is an important human need and represents a process of attunement that occurs as a response to the need for a relationship, a unique interpersonal contact between two people. If this need is not met, it manifests with the different feelings and various defenses. To meet this need, we need to have another person with whom we can establish a sensitive, attuned relationship. Thus, the therapist becomes this person who tries to supplement what the person did not receive. Neuroscience can be a source of integration through different therapies. We

  8. Integration of Chandrasekhar's integral equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tasuku

    2003-01-01

    We solve Chandrasekhar's integration equation for radiative transfer in the plane-parallel atmosphere by iterative integration. The primary thrust in radiative transfer has been to solve the forward problem, i.e., to evaluate the radiance, given the optical thickness and the scattering phase function. In the area of satellite remote sensing, our problem is the inverse problem: to retrieve the surface reflectance and the optical thickness of the atmosphere from the radiance measured by satellites. In order to retrieve the optical thickness and the surface reflectance from the radiance at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA), we should express the radiance at TOA 'explicitly' in the optical thickness and the surface reflectance. Chandrasekhar formalized radiative transfer in the plane-parallel atmosphere in a simultaneous integral equation, and he obtained the second approximation. Since then no higher approximation has been reported. In this paper, we obtain the third approximation of the scattering function. We integrate functions derived from the second approximation in the integral interval from 1 to ∞ of the inverse of the cos of zenith angles. We can obtain the indefinite integral rather easily in the form of a series expansion. However, the integrals at the upper limit, ∞, are not yet known to us. We can assess the converged values of those series expansions at ∞ through calculus. For integration, we choose coupling pairs to avoid unnecessary terms in the outcome of integral and discover that the simultaneous integral equation can be deduced to the mere integral equation. Through algebraic calculation, we obtain the third approximation as a polynomial of the third degree in the atmospheric optical thickness

  9. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  10. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  11. The Glaser–Hay reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Mie Højer; Jensen, Jonas; Tortzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative Glaser–Hay coupling of two terminal alkynes to furnish a butadiyne is a key reaction for acetylenic scaffolding. Although the reaction is performed under rather simple conditions [CuCl/TMEDA/O2 (air)], the mechanism is still under debate. Herein we present detailed studies...... on the scope of this reaction by using both 13C NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. The former method was used to study the kinetics of the coupling of aryl-substituted alkynes as the aryl carbon resonances of the reactants and products have similar NOEs and relaxation times. The reaction was found...... to be zero-order with respect to the terminal alkyne reactant under standard preparative conditions. Moreover, as the reaction proceeded, a clear change to slower reaction kinetics was observed, but it was still apparently zero-order. The onset of this change was found to depend on the catalyst loading...

  12. The Paterno-Buchi reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Yding; Schalk, Oliver; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    The Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction between an excited carbonyl compound and an alkene has been widely studied, but so far little is known about the excited-state dynamics of the reaction. In this investigation, we used a compound in which a formyl and a vinyl group are attached to a [2.......2]paracyclophane in order to obtain a model system in pre-reactive conformation for the PB reaction. We studied the excited-state dynamics of the isolated molecule in a molecular beam using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results show that inter-system crossing...... within two picoseconds competes efficiently with the reaction in the singlet manifold. Thus, the PB reaction in this model system takes place in the triplet state on a time scale of nanoseconds. This result stresses the importance of triplet states in the excited-state pathway of the PB reaction...

  13. Limits for Stochastic Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelletti, Daniele

    Reaction systems have been introduced in the 70s to model biochemical systems. Nowadays their range of applications has increased and they are fruitfully used in dierent elds. The concept is simple: some chemical species react, the set of chemical reactions form a graph and a rate function...... is associated with each reaction. Such functions describe the speed of the dierent reactions, or their propensities. Two modelling regimes are then available: the evolution of the dierent species concentrations can be deterministically modelled through a system of ODE, while the counts of the dierent species...... at a certain time are stochastically modelled by means of a continuous-time Markov chain. Our work concerns primarily stochastic reaction systems, and their asymptotic properties. In Paper I, we consider a reaction system with intermediate species, i.e. species that are produced and fast degraded along a path...

  14. Metal-free bioconjugation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, Sander S; van Delft, Floris L

    2013-01-01

    The recent strategy to apply chemical reactions to address fundamental biological questions has led to the emergence of entirely new conjugation reactions that are fast and irreversible, yet so mild and selective that they can be performed even in living cells or organisms. These so-called bioorthogonal reactions open novel avenues, not only in chemical biology research, but also in many other life sciences applications, including the modulation of biopharmaceuticals by site-specific modification approaches.

  15. Multistep processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The theories of nuclear reactions are reviewed with particular attention to the recent work on multistep processes. The evidence for compound nucleus and direct interaction reactions is described together with the results of comparisons between theories and experimental data. These theories have now proved inadequate, and there is evidence for multistep processes that take place after the initial direct stage but long before the attainment of the statistical equilibrium characteristic of compound nucleus processes. The theories of these reactions are described and it is shown how they can account for the experimental data and thus give a comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactions. (author)

  16. Integrated, Continuous Emulsion Creamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Wesley G; Hackler, Amber L; Cavett, Valerie J; Price, Alexander K; Paegel, Brian M

    2017-12-19

    Automated and reproducible sample handling is a key requirement for high-throughput compound screening and currently demands heavy reliance on expensive robotics in screening centers. Integrated droplet microfluidic screening processors are poised to replace robotic automation by miniaturizing biochemical reactions to the droplet scale. These processors must generate, incubate, and sort droplets for continuous droplet screening, passively handling millions of droplets with complete uniformity, especially during the key step of sample incubation. Here, we disclose an integrated microfluidic emulsion creamer that packs ("creams") assay droplets by draining away excess oil through microfabricated drain channels. The drained oil coflows with creamed emulsion and then reintroduces the oil to disperse the droplets at the circuit terminus for analysis. Creamed emulsion assay incubation time dispersion was 1.7%, 3-fold less than other reported incubators. The integrated, continuous emulsion creamer (ICEcreamer) was used to miniaturize and optimize measurements of various enzymatic activities (phosphodiesterase, kinase, bacterial translation) under multiple- and single-turnover conditions. Combining the ICEcreamer with current integrated microfluidic DNA-encoded library bead processors eliminates potentially cumbersome instrumentation engineering challenges and is compatible with assays of diverse target class activities commonly investigated in drug discovery.

  17. Integrated services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafcouloff, S.; Michel, G.; Trice, M.; Clark, G.; Cosad, C.; Forbes, K.

    1995-01-01

    Integrated services is the name given to several services grouped together under a single contract. Four key factors determine the success of integrated services projects: teamwork, common objectives, technology, and shared benefits. For oil companies, integration means smoother, more efficient operations by bringing service companies on board as part of the team. For the service industry, it means a radical change in the way business is conducted, taking on more responsibility in return for greater incentives. This article reviews the need for change and the approach Schlumberger has adopted to meet this challenge. 20 figs., 20 refs

  18. Integrated services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chafcouloff, S.; Michel, G.; Trice, M. [Schlumberger Integrated Project Management Group, Montrouge (France); Clark, G. [Schlumberger Testing Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Cosad, C.; Forbes, K. [Schlumberger Integrated Project Management Group, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Integrated services is the name given to several services grouped together under a single contract. Four key factors determine the success of integrated services projects: teamwork, common objectives, technology, and shared benefits. For oil companies, integration means smoother, more efficient operations by bringing service companies on board as part of the team. For the service industry, it means a radical change in the way business is conducted, taking on more responsibility in return for greater incentives. This article reviews the need for change and the approach Schlumberger has adopted to meet this challenge. 20 figs., 20 refs

  19. Customer magazines: Effects of commerciality on readers’ reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reijmersdal, E.A.; Neijens, P.C.; Smit, E.G.

    2010-01-01

    This study is the first to focus on effects of commerciality of customer magazines on readers’ reactions. The experiment (N=349 students) involves six versions of the same customer magazine that vary along two dimensions of commerciality: the amount of brand integration (0%, 50%, or 100%) and the

  20. Progress in microscopic direct reaction modeling of nucleon induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.; Lechaftois, F.; Peru, S.; Pillet, N.; Robin, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2015-12-15

    A microscopic nuclear reaction model is applied to neutron elastic and direct inelastic scatterings, and pre-equilibrium reaction. The JLM folding model is used with nuclear structure information calculated within the quasi-particle random phase approximation implemented with the Gogny D1S interaction. The folding model for direct inelastic scattering is extended to include rearrangement corrections stemming from both isoscalar and isovector density variations occurring during a transition. The quality of the predicted (n,n), (n,n{sup '}), (n,xn) and (n,n{sup '}γ) cross sections, as well as the generality of the present microscopic approach, shows that it is a powerful tool that can help improving nuclear reactions data quality. Short- and long-term perspectives are drawn to extend the present approach to more systems, to include missing reactions mechanisms, and to consistently treat both structure and reaction problems. (orig.)

  1. A practical contribution to the dosimetry of fast neutrons in radio-protection - determination of the integrated dose in man using the {sup 32}S(n, p){sup 32}P reaction (1963); Contribution pratique a la dosimetrie des neutrons rapides en radioprotection - determination de la dose integree par reaction {sup 32}S(n, p){sup 32}P chez l'homme (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidhauer, J; Chabidon, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The problem of fast neutron dosimetry using activation is studied from the radio-protection point of view. The practical development of methods for analyzing phosphorus 32 produced by the activation of sulphur 32 in human hair by the reaction {sup 32}S(n, p){sup 32}P is described. The sensitivity obtained is 5 rad. A preliminary study was made of the variations in the natural sulphur and phosphorus concentrations. (authors) [French] Le probleme de la dosimetrie des neutrons rapides par activation est etudie sous l'angle de la radioprotectlon. Une mise au point pratique de methodes d'analyae du phosphore 32 induit par activation du soufre 32 des cheveux humains par reaction {sup 32}S(n, p){sup 32}P est exposee. La sensibilite obtenue est de 5 rad. Les variations du soufre et du phosphore naturels ont fait l'objet d'une etude preliminaire. (auteurs)

  2. INTEGRATED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioara-Bianca BUBOIU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Accepting and valuing people with disabilities is a key aspect of social policies promoted worldwide. The implementation of these policies aim normalize the lives of people with disabilities through full integration in the society to which they belong. Removing discrimination and social barriers equates to a maturing of the society, maturing translated by accepting diversity that surrounds us. Each person must be appreciated at its true value regardless of its condition of normality or deviation from it. Valuing individuals can be achieved only through a full acceptance in society, by assigning statuses and fulfilling social roles. School integration of children with special educational needs in mainstream education is a challenge and involves many aspects to be successful. It is the premise of social integration, the basis for future socio-professional insertion. Integrated education is the first step towards a world of equal opportunities, a world without discrimination.

  3. Integral cryptanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Wagner, David

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers a cryptanalytic approach called integral cryptanalysis. It can be seen as a dual to differential cryptanalysis and applies to ciphers not vulnerable to differential attacks. The method is particularly applicable to block ciphers which use bijective components only.......This paper considers a cryptanalytic approach called integral cryptanalysis. It can be seen as a dual to differential cryptanalysis and applies to ciphers not vulnerable to differential attacks. The method is particularly applicable to block ciphers which use bijective components only....

  4. Systems integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemieniuch, C E; Sinclair, M A

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a view of systems integration, from an ergonomics/human factors perspective, emphasising the process of systems integration as is carried out by humans. The first section discusses some of the fundamental issues in systems integration, such as the significance of systems boundaries, systems lifecycle and systems entropy, issues arising from complexity, the implications of systems immortality, and so on. The next section outlines various generic processes for executing systems integration, to act as guides for practitioners. These address both the design of the system to be integrated and the preparation of the wider system in which the integration will occur. Then the next section outlines some of the human-specific issues that would need to be addressed in such processes; for example, indeterminacy and incompleteness, the prediction of human reliability, workload issues, extended situation awareness, and knowledge lifecycle management. For all of these, suggestions and further readings are proposed. Finally, the conclusions section reiterates in condensed form the major issues arising from the above.

  5. Functional Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Pierre; DeWitt-Morette, Cecile

    2010-06-01

    Acknowledgements; List symbols, conventions, and formulary; Part I. The Physical and Mathematical Environment: 1. The physical and mathematical environment; Part II. Quantum Mechanics: 2. First lesson: gaussian integrals; 3. Selected examples; 4. Semiclassical expansion: WKB; 5. Semiclassical expansion: beyond WKB; 6. Quantum dynamics: path integrals and operator formalism; Part III. Methods from Differential Geometry: 7. Symmetries; 8. Homotopy; 9. Grassmann analysis: basics; 10. Grassmann analysis: applications; 11. Volume elements, divergences, gradients; Part IV. Non-Gaussian Applications: 12. Poisson processes in physics; 13. A mathematical theory of Poisson processes; 14. First exit time: energy problems; Part V. Problems in Quantum Field Theory: 15. Renormalization 1: an introduction; 16. Renormalization 2: scaling; 17. Renormalization 3: combinatorics; 18. Volume elements in quantum field theory Bryce DeWitt; Part VI. Projects: 19. Projects; Appendix A. Forward and backward integrals: spaces of pointed paths; Appendix B. Product integrals; Appendix C. A compendium of gaussian integrals; Appendix D. Wick calculus Alexander Wurm; Appendix E. The Jacobi operator; Appendix F. Change of variables of integration; Appendix G. Analytic properties of covariances; Appendix H. Feynman's checkerboard; Bibliography; Index.

  6. Reaction mechanisms in zeolite catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozanska, X.; Santen, van R.A.; Auerbach, S.C.; Carrado, K.A.; Dutta, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    A review; described are the most basic mechanistic reaction steps that are induced by zeolite catalysts. Details on the zeolitic properties that are relevant to mol. reactivity are also provided. The theor. methods and models at hand to allow the investigation of these reaction steps and that have

  7. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  8. Quantum wave packet study of D+OF reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurban, M.; Karabulut, E.; Tutuk, R.; Goektas, F.

    2010-01-01

    The quantum dynamics of the D+OF reaction on the adiabatic potential energy surface of the ground 1 3 A ' state has been studied by using a time-dependent quantum real wave packet method. The state-to-state and state-to-all reaction probabilities for total angular momentum J = 0 have been calculated. The probabilities for J > 0 have been calculated by J-shifting the J = 0 results by means of capture model. Then, the integral cross sections and initial state selected rate constants have been calculated. The initial state-selected reaction probabilities and reaction cross section show threshold but not manifest any resonances and the initial state selected rate constants are sensitive to the temperature.

  9. Sodium concrete reaction - Structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferskakis, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structuralchemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  10. STUDIES ON ENDOTHELIAL REACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Nathan Chandler

    1923-01-01

    operative. On the other hand, there may be an increase in the phagocytic activity of the endothelium of the sinusoids which might take up more bacteria under these changed conditions. Several investigators have claimed, recently, that there is an increased activity of the liver endothelium following splenectomy, their experiments being directed chiefly toward determining the fate of the erythrocytes. Pearce (1918) in reporting the effects of experimental splenectomy in dogs, states that there are definite compensatory changes in the lymph nodes, in the form of an increased proliferation of endothelial phagocytes, and that the stellate cells of the liver sinusoids often show a similar compensatory increase in number. In both cases the cells are, apparently, formed in situ rather than transported to the organs. He says: ‘Such findings suggest the development of a compensatory function on the part of the lymph-nodes and possibly the liver,’ and suggests that, in times of stress ‘the stellate cells of the liver thus assume, in part at least, the function of destroying red blood-corpuscles by phagocytosis.’ Incidentally, he presents an excellent discussion of the history and subject of splenectomy. Motohashi (1922) reports a great increase in the hemophagic power of the hepatic endothelium and an increase in the number of endothelial elements, after some 45 days following splenectomy in rabbits. Nishikawa and Takagi (1922) have observed similar phenomena with white rats, the Kupffer cells taking up erythrocytes in large numbers in splenectomized animals, whereas controls never show similar propensities on the part of these cells. It may be that different substances cause different reactions on the part of the hepatic endothelium. Contributory Experiment.—A side experiment was performed with five rabbits, two splenectomized and three controls, into which uniform doses of pneumococci were injected intravenously. They all died of septicemia after a few days. The results

  11. Dechlorinating reaction of organic chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahata, Taneaki; Kihara, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Ohuchi, Misao

    1996-06-01

    Dechlorination has been examined by the reaction between iron, aluminum powder or CaO and organic chlorides such as C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Progress of the reaction was analyzed with mass spectrometer. The reaction between iron and organic chloride was rapidly occurred at the temperature between 350 and 440degC in an atmosphere of argon. Above 380degC, more than 99.5% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, approximately 60% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed by the reaction with aluminium powder within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, reaction between C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CaO powder were occurred rapidly in an atmosphere of argon to form CaCl{sub 2} and free carbon. Also in an atmosphere of air, nearly the same result was obtained. In this reaction, CaCl{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} were formed. CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was also decomposed by the reaction with iron at the temperature between 380 and 440degC. In the reaction, FeCl{sub 2}, carbon and hydrogen were formed. CH{sub 3}{sup +} and CH{sub 4} were observed during the dechlorinating reaction of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Variation in particle size of iron powder such as 100, 150 and 250 mesh did not affect the reaction rate. (author)

  12. Fourier spectral methods for fractional-in-space reaction-diffusion equations

    KAUST Repository

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Kay, David; Burrage, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    approximation of these models is demanding and imposes a number of computational constraints. In this paper, we introduce Fourier spectral methods as an attractive and easy-to-code alternative for the integration of fractional-in-space reaction

  13. Integrated Toys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Eva

    2005-01-01

    the theoretical foundations of play and learning. In this presentation, we explore pedagogical potentials of new technologies and traditional toys integrated into a physical and virtual toy (hereinafter called integrated toy) with specific focus on the open-ended toy and non-formal learning. The integrated toy......Toys play a crucial role in supporting children’s learning and creation of meaning in their everyday life. Children also play with toys out of an interest to interact with others e.g. peers and adults. Tendencies of digital technology in toys have led to greater opportunities for manipulation...... and interaction supporting children’s play and learning such that technology is ever-present in the play environments of children. Although electronics have been deployed in tools for play and learning, most of it has facilitated individual learning. Computer games, for instance, most often are designed...

  14. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  15. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel.

  16. Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference brings together all significant issues of practical importance for interested readers in one single volume. While covering homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, the text is unique in focusing on such important aspects as using different reaction media, microwave techniques or catalyst recycling. It also provides a comprehensive treatment of modern-day coupling reactions and emphasizes those topics that show potential for future development, such as continuous flow systems, water as a reaction medium, and catalyst immobilization, among others. With i

  17. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  18. Basic reactions induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the basic reactions resulting from exposure to high energy radiation. In the initial stages energy is absorbed, but not necessarily at random, giving radical and ion species which may then react to promote the final chemical change. However, it is possible to intervene at intermediate stages to modify or reduce the radiation effect. Under certain conditions enhanced reactions are also possible. Several expressions are given to calculate radiation yield in terms of energy absorbed. Some analogies between radiation-induced reactions in polymers, and those studied in radiobiology are outlined. (author)

  19. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Zone of reactions and space-time structure of fireball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchishkin, D.; Muskeyev, A.; Yezhov, S.

    2010-01-01

    A zone of reactions is determined and then exploited as a tool in studying the space-time structure of an interacting system formed in a collision of relativistic nuclei. The time dependence of the reaction rates integrated over spatial coordinates is also considered. Evaluations are made with the help of the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The relation of the boundaries of different zones of reactions and the hypersurfaces of sharp chemical and kinetic freeze-outs is discussed.

  1. Differential cross section measurement for the 6Li(n,t)4He Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guohui; Tang Guoyou; Chen Jinxiang; Shi Zhaomin

    2002-01-01

    The differential cross sections and integrated cross sections of the 6 Li(n,t) 4 He reaction were measured at 1.85 and 2.67 MeV by using a gridded ionization chamber. Neutrons were produced through the T(p, n) 3 He reaction. The absolute neutron flux was determined through the 238 U(n, f) reaction. Present results are compared with existing data

  2. Differential cross section measurement for the {sup 6}Li(n,t){sup 4}He Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guohui, Zhang; Guoyou, Tang; Jinxiang, Chen; Zhaomin, Shi [Beijing Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Heavy Ion Physics and MOE Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics; Zemin, Chen [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Physics; Gledenov, Yu M; Sedysheva, M; Khuukhenkhuu, G [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2002-06-01

    The differential cross sections and integrated cross sections of the {sup 6}Li(n,t){sup 4}He reaction were measured at 1.85 and 2.67 MeV by using a gridded ionization chamber. Neutrons were produced through the T(p, n){sup 3}He reaction. The absolute neutron flux was determined through the {sup 238}U(n, f) reaction. Present results are compared with existing data.

  3. Dynamic Modelling and Identification of Precipitation Reactions in Full-Scale WWTP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Tait, Stephan; Flores-Alsina, Xavier

    , this paper evaluates plant-wide modelling of precipitation reactions using a generic approach integrated within activated sludge and anaerobic models. Preliminary results of anaerobic digester sludge in batch system suggest that the model is able to simulate the dynamics of precipitation reactions. Kinetic...

  4. Scientific integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Vahakangas, Kirsi; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2008-01-01

    consent was obtained.Integrity is central to environmental health research searching for causal relations. It requires open communication and trust and any violation (i.e., research misconduct, including fabrication or falsification of data, plagiarism, conflicting interests, etc.) may endanger...

  5. Integrated marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    St. John Health consists of nine hospitals throughout southern Michigan. Recently, in an attempt to brand the system as the state's premiere place for medical services, the system launched 'Real Medicine', a campaign that brands all nine hospitals together. Using print, radio, and television spots, the effort also integrates direct mail collateral and brochures to reach consumers.

  6. Integrative teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Robert; Smids, Annejoke; Kors, Ninja

    2007-01-01

    This is an article about the integration of instrumental teaching, aural skills and keyboard skills and music theory at the pre-tertiary level. Team teaching and discipline crossover offer a possible solution to students’ inability to apply skills taught by specialists in separate fields. A personal

  7. Box Integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.

    2006-06-01

    By a "box integral" we mean here an expectation $\\langle|\\vec r - \\vec q|^s \\rangle$ where $\\vec r$runs over the unit $n$-cube,with $\\vec q$ and $s$ fixed, explicitly:\\begin eqnarray*&&\\int_01 \\cdots \\int_01 \\left((r_1 - q_1)2 + \\dots+(r_n-q_n)2\\right)^ s/2 \\ dr_1 \\cdots dr_n.\\end eqnarray* The study ofbox integrals leads one naturally into several disparate fields ofanalysis. While previous studies have focused upon symbolic evaluationand asymptotic analysis of special cases (notably $s = 1$), we workherein more generally--in interdisciplinary fashion--developing resultssuch as: (1) analytic continuation (in complex $s$), (2) relevantcombinatorial identities, (3) rapidly converging series, (4) statisticalinferences, (5) connections to mathematical physics, and (6)extreme-precision quadrature techniques appropriate for these integrals.These intuitions and results open up avenues of experimental mathematics,with a view to new conjectures and theorems on integrals of thistype.

  8. Effects of ion and electron screening on thermonuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of screening by ions and electrons on thermonuclear reaction rates in stellar plasmas are considered. The enhancement of the reaction rate ranges from negligible to extremely large (on the order of 10 26 or greater). In order to calculate these effects, the potential about a given reacting nucleus is determined. First, Boltzmann-Vlasov and Poisson-Boltzmann equations are solved to yield a Yukawa potential. A suitable approximation to this potential is integrated in the action integral to give the barrier penetration. The screened reaction rate is then found by the saddle-point method. In developing a general formalism to calculate the screened reaction rate and the screening factor, effects due to the finite size of the nucleus are considered and found to be negligible. An expression for the screening factor for resonant reaction rates is also derived. A different and relatively simple approach, based on work of Stewart and Pyatt (1966), is used to find the barrier penetration from the action integral in two approximations: a modified Coulomb potential and a constant-shift potential. Screening factors are calculated for carbon burning at T 6 = 100 and T 6 = 400 for a wide range of densities and also for several examples in late stellar evolution. These screening factors are, for the most part, greater than those given by most others by a few percent at low density to 4 or more orders of magnitude at T 6 = 100 and rho = 10 10 g/cm 3 . Near the edge of the crystalline lattice region, however, they are significantly lower than those of some others. The increase in reaction rates for carbon burning indicates that carbon ignition may occur at lower densities than previously thought and may affect the density at which a supernova shock may occur

  9. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  10. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  11. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  12. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  13. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fischer

    Full Text Available Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  14. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  15. 'Sum rules' for preequilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1981-03-01

    Evidence that suggests a correct relationship between the optical transmission matrix, P, and the several correlation widths, gamma sub(n), found in nsmission matrix, P, and the several correlation widths, n, found in multistep compound (preequilibrium) nuclear reactions, is presented. A second sum rule is also derived within the shell model approach to nuclear reactions. Indications of the potential usefulness of the sum rules in preequilibrium studies are given. (Author) [pt

  16. Medium effects in direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakoc, M; Bertulani, C

    2013-01-01

    We discuss medium corrections of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections and their influence on direct reactions at intermediate energies ≳50 MeV/nucleon. The results obtained with free NN cross sections are compared with those obtained with a geometrical treatment of Pauli-blocking and Dirac-Bruecker methods. We show that medium corrections may lead to sizable modifications for collisions at intermediate energies and that they are more pronounced in reactions involving weakly bound nuclei.

  17. Charged particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal reason for setting up the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged-particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The main goal of NACRE network was the transparency in the procedure of calculating the rates. More specifically this compilation aims at: 1. updating the experimental and theoretical data; 2. distinctly identifying the sources of the data used in rate calculation; 3. evaluating the uncertainties and errors; 4. providing numerically integrated reaction rates; 5. providing reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. The compilation is concerned with the reaction rates that are large enough for the target lifetimes shorter than the age of the Universe, taken equal to 15 x 10 9 y. The reaction rates are provided for temperatures lower than T = 10 10 K. In parallel with the rate compilation a cross section data base has been created and located at the site http://pntpm.ulb.ac.be/nacre..htm. (authors)

  18. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  19. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  20. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  1. Inflammatory and redox reactions in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Tina; Biasi, Fiorella; Calfapietra, Simone; Nano, Mario; Poli, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    It has been established that there is a relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer development. The constant colonic inflammation typical of inflammatory bowel diseases is now considered a risk factor for colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. The inflammatory network of signaling molecules is also required during the late phases of carcinogenesis, to enable cancer cells to survive and to metastasize. Oxidative reactions are an integral part of the inflammatory response, and are generally associated with CRC development. However, when the malignant phenotype is acquired, increased oxidative status induces antioxidant defenses in cancer cells, favoring their aggressiveness. This contradictory behavior of cancer cells toward redox status is of great significance for potential anticancer therapies. This paper summarizes the essential background information relating to the molecules involved in regulating oxidative stress and inflammation during carcinogenesis. Understanding more of their function in CRC stages might provide the foundation for future developments in CRC treatment. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Void Measurement by the ({gamma}, n) Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouhani, S Zia

    1962-09-15

    It is proposed to use the ({gamma}, n) reaction for the measurement of the integrated void volume fraction in two phase flow of D{sub 2}O inside a duct. This method is applicable to different channel geometries, and it is shown to be insensitive to the pattern of void distribution over the cross-sectional area of the channels The method has been tested on mock-ups of voids in a round duct of 6 mm inside diameter. About 40 m.c. {sup 24}Na was used as a source of gamma-rays. The test results show that the maximum measured error in this arrangement is less than 2.5 % (net void) for a range of 2.7 % to 44.44 % actual void volume fractions.

  3. Void Measurement by the (γ, n) Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhani, S. Zia

    1962-09-01

    It is proposed to use the (γ, n) reaction for the measurement of the integrated void volume fraction in two phase flow of D 2 O inside a duct. This method is applicable to different channel geometries, and it is shown to be insensitive to the pattern of void distribution over the cross-sectional area of the channels The method has been tested on mock-ups of voids in a round duct of 6 mm inside diameter. About 40 m.c. 24 Na was used as a source of gamma-rays. The test results show that the maximum measured error in this arrangement is less than 2.5 % (net void) for a range of 2.7 % to 44.44 % actual void volume fractions

  4. Reaction time for trimolecular reactions in compartment-based reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Chen, Minghan; Erban, Radek; Cao, Yang

    2018-05-01

    Trimolecular reaction models are investigated in the compartment-based (lattice-based) framework for stochastic reaction-diffusion modeling. The formulae for the first collision time and the mean reaction time are derived for the case where three molecules are present in the solution under periodic boundary conditions. For the case of reflecting boundary conditions, similar formulae are obtained using a computer-assisted approach. The accuracy of these formulae is further verified through comparison with numerical results. The presented derivation is based on the first passage time analysis of Montroll [J. Math. Phys. 10, 753 (1969)]. Montroll's results for two-dimensional lattice-based random walks are adapted and applied to compartment-based models of trimolecular reactions, which are studied in one-dimensional or pseudo one-dimensional domains.

  5. Randomness in multi-step direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Akkermans, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors propose a quantum-statistical framework that provides an integrated perspective on the differences and similarities between the many current models for multi-step direct reactions in the continuum. It is argued that to obtain a statistical theory two physically different approaches are conceivable to postulate randomness, respectively called leading-particle statistics and residual-system statistics. They present a new leading-particle statistics theory for multi-step direct reactions. It is shown that the model of Feshbach et al. can be derived as a simplification of this theory and thus can be founded solely upon leading-particle statistics. The models developed by Tamura et al. and Nishioka et al. are based upon residual-system statistics and hence fall into a physically different class of multi-step direct theories, although the resulting cross-section formulae for the important first step are shown to be the same. The widely used semi-classical models such as the generalized exciton model can be interpreted as further phenomenological simplification of the leading-particle statistics theory

  6. Toward Direct Reaction-in-Flight Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmy, Jerry; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Gooden, Matthew; Hayes, Anna; Rusev, Gencho; Caggiano, Joseph; Hatarik, Robert; Henry, Eugene; Tonchev, Anton; Yeaman, Charles; Bhike, Megha; Krishichayan, Krishi; Tornow, Werner

    2016-03-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutrons having energies greater than the equilibrium 14.1 MeV value can be produced via Reaction-in-Flight (RIF) interactions between plasma atoms and upscattered D or T ions. The yield and spectrum of these RIF produced neutrons carry information on the plasma properties as well as information on the stopping power of ions under plasma conditions. At NIF the yield of these RIF neutrons is predicted to be 4-7 orders of magnitude below the peak 14 MeV neutron yield. The current generation of neutron time of flight (nTOF) instrumentation has so far been incapable of detecting these low-yield neutrons primarily due to high photon backgrounds. To date, information on RIF neutrons has been obtained in integral activation experiments using reactions with high energy thresholds such as 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm and 209Bi(n,4n) 206Bi. Initial experiments to selectively suppress photon backgrounds have been performed at TUNL using pulsed monoenergetic neutron beams of 14.9, 18.5, 24.2, and 28.5 MeV impinging on a Bibenzyl scintillator. By placing 5 cm of Pb before the scintillator we were able to selectively suppress the photons from the flash occurring at the production target and enhance the n/_signal by ~6 times.

  7. Nuclear reaction rates and the nova outburst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.G.; Iliadis, C.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we examined the consequences of improving the nuclear reaction library on our simulations of TNRs on 1.25M, WD and 1.35M, WDS. We have found that the changes in the rates have affected the nucleosynthesis predictions of our calculations but not, to any great extent, the gross features. In addition, we have used a lower mass accretion rate than in our previous studies in order to accrete (and eject) more material. This has, as expected, caused the peak values of some important parameters to increase over our previous studies at the same WD mass. However, because some important reaction rates have declined in the new compilation this has not increased the abundances for nuclei above aluminum and, in fact, they have declined while the abundances of both 26 Al and 27 Al have increased at both WD masses. In contrast, the abundance of 22 Na has declined at both WD masses over the values predicted in our earlier work. This has important implications with respect to predictions of the observability of novae with INTEGRAL

  8. Characteristic of the Pressurized Continuous Bunsen Reaction using HIx Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical hydrogen production process (SI process consists of the Bunsen reaction section, the H2SO4 decomposition section and the HI decomposition section. The HIx solution (HI-I2-H2O could be recycled to Bunsen reaction section from the HI decomposition section in the operation of the integrated SI process. The phase separation characteristic of the Bunsen reaction using the HIx solution was similar to that of SO2-I2-H2O system. However, the amount of produced H2SO4 phase was too small. To solve this problem, the study was carried out by the pressurized continuous Bunsen reaction. Bunsen reactions were performed at variation of feed rate of SO2/O2 gas in 3 bar of atmosphere. Also, it was performed to check the effects of the residence time in the reservoir on the characteristics of Bunsen products. As the results, the concentration of H2SO4 and HI in Bunsen products was increased with increasing the amounts of SO2. When the residence time in the reservoir increased, the concentration of H2SO4 and HI in HIx phase was decreased by reverse Bunsen reaction.

  9. Exchange Reactions. Proceedings of the Symposium on Exchange Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of chemical reactions are of great interest to chemists. The study of exchange reactions in particular helps to shed light on the dynamics of chemical change, providing an insight into the structures and the reactivities of the chemical species involved. The main theme of this meeting was the subject of oxidation-reduction reactions in which the net result is the transfer of one or more electrons between the different oxidation states of the same element. Other studies reported included the transfer of protons, atoms, complex ligands or organic radicals between molecules. Heterogeneous exchange, which is of importance in many cases of catalytic action, was also considered. For a long time isotopic tracers have formed the most convenient means of studying exchange reactions and today a considerable amount of work continues to be done with their aid. Consequently, several papers presented at this Symposium reported on work carried out by purely radiochemical tracer methods. In recognition, however, of the important role which nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance play in this field, in particular in the study of fast reactions, a number of reports on investigations in which these techniques had been used was included in the programme. By kind invitation of the United States Government the Symposium on Exchange Reactions was held from 31 May to 4 June at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, Long Island, N.Y., USA. It was attended by 46 participants from nine countries and one inter-governmental organization. The publication of these Proceedings makes the contents of the papers and the discussion available to a wider audience

  10. A comprehensive survey of nuclear reactions; Panorama des reactions nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugnon, J. [Liege Univ., IFPA, AGO Dept. (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    The various mechanisms of nuclear reactions are surveyed and classified in different regimes, based on the notions of coherent mechanisms and hard versus soft processes. The emphasis is put on the concepts at the basis of the understanding of these regimes and on the elements of nuclear structure which are involved in these different regimes, as well as the on the possibility of extracting this information. Due to lack of space and for pedagogical reasons, the discussion is limited to nucleon-induced and light-ion-induced reactions. However, a few remarks are given concerning some specific probes, such as weakly bound projectiles or neutron-rich nuclei. (author)

  11. SOLVENTLESS MIGRATORY-INSERTION REACTIONS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The product formed by reaction of an alkyl or aryl cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyl .... (as also observed from the NMR tube experiments) that the solventless reaction between ... As can be seen from Figure 3, the reaction rate in the melt.

  12. Spallation reactions - physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelic, A.; Ricciardi, M.; Schmidt, K-H.

    2009-01-01

    Spallation reactions have become an ideal tool for studying the equation of state and thermal instabilities of nuclear matter. In astrophysics, the interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium have to be understood in detail for deducing their original composition and their production mechanisms. Renewed interest in spallation reactions with protons around 1 GeV came up recently with the developments of spallation neutron sources. The project of an accelerator-driven system (ADS) as a technological solution for incinerating the radioactive waste even intensified the efforts for better understanding the physics involved in the spallation process. Experiments on spallation reactions were performed for determining the production cross sections and properties of particles, fragments and heavy residues. Traditional experiments on heavy residues, performed in direct kinematics, were limited to the direct observation of long-lived radioactive nuclides and did not provide detailed information on the kinematics of the reaction. Therefore, an innovative experimental method has been developed, based on inverse kinematics, which allowed to identify all reaction residues in-flight, using the high resolution magnetic spectrometer FRS of GSL Darmstadt. It also gives direct access to the reaction kinematics. An experimental campaign has been carried out in a Europe-wide collaboration, investigating the spallation of several nuclei ranging from 56 Fe to 238 U Complementary experiments were performed with a full-acceptance detection system, yielding total fission cross sections. Recently, another detection system using the large acceptance ALADIN dipole and the LAND neutron detector was introduced to measure light particles in coincidence with the heavy residues. Another intense activity was dedicated to developing codes, which cover nuclear reactions occurring in an ADS. The first phase of the reaction is successfully described by a sequence of quasi-free nucleon

  13. Modeling of fluctuating reaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipshtat, A.; Biham, O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Various dynamical systems are organized as reaction networks, where the population size of one component affects the populations of all its neighbors. Such networks can be found in interstellar surface chemistry, cell biology, thin film growth and other systems. I cases where the populations of reactive species are large, the network can be modeled by rate equations which provide all reaction rates within mean field approximation. However, in small systems that are partitioned into sub-micron size, these populations strongly fluctuate. Under these conditions rate equations fail and the master equation is needed for modeling these reactions. However, the number of equations in the master equation grows exponentially with the number of reactive species, severely limiting its feasibility for complex networks. Here we present a method which dramatically reduces the number of equations, thus enabling the incorporation of the master equation in complex reaction networks. The method is examplified in the context of reaction network on dust grains. Its applicability for genetic networks will be discussed. 1. Efficient simulations of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar clouds. Azi Lipshtat and Ofer Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004), 170601. 2. Modeling of negative autoregulated genetic networks in single cells. Azi Lipshtat, Hagai B. Perets, Nathalie Q. Balaban and Ofer Biham, Gene: evolutionary genomics (2004), In press

  14. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  15. Reaction layer growth and reaction heat of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels using centrifugally atomized powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Han, Young Soo; Park, Jong Man; Park, Soon Dal; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2003-01-01

    The growth behavior of reaction layers and heat generation during the reaction between U-Mo powders and the Al matrix in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels were investigated. Annealing of 10 vol.% U-10Mo/Al dispersion fuels at temperatures from 500 to 550 deg. C was carried out for 10 min to 36 h to measure the growth rate and the activation energy for the growth of reaction layers. The concentration profiles of reaction layers between the U-10Mo vs. Al diffusion couples were measured and the integrated interdiffusion coefficients were calculated for the U and Al in the reaction layers. Heat generation of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels with 10-50 vol.% of U-Mo fuel during the thermal cycle from room temperature to 700 deg. C was measured employing the differential scanning calorimetry. Exothermic heat from the reaction between U-Mo and the Al matrix is the largest when the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel is about 30 vol.%. The unreacted fraction in the U-Mo powders increases as the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel increases from 30 to 50 vol.%

  16. Dynamic effects in fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G. F.; Esbensen, H.

    2002-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions offer a useful tool to study the spectroscopy of halo nuclei, but the large extent of the halo wave function makes the reaction theory more difficult. The simple reaction models based on the eikonal approximation for the nuclear interaction or first-order perturbation theory for the Coulomb interaction have systematic errors that they investigate here, comparing to the predictions of complete dynamical calculations. They find that stripping probabilities are underpredicted by the eikonal model, leading to extracted spectroscopy strengths that are two large. In contrast, the Coulomb excitation is overpredicted by the simple theory. They attribute this to a screening effect, as is well known in the Barkas effect on stopping powers. The errors decrease with beam energy as E(sub beam)(sup -1), and are not significant at beam energies above 50 MeV/u. At lower beam energies, the effects should be taken into account when extracting quantitative spectroscopic strengths

  17. Fragmentation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrain, R.

    1984-08-01

    Projectile and nuclear fragmentation are defined and processes referred to are recalled. The two different aspects of fragmentation are considered but the emphasis is also put on heavy ion induced reactions. The preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL to study peripheral heavy ions induced reactions at intermediate energy are presented. The results of this experiment will illustrate the characteristics of projectile fragmentation and this will also give the opportunity to study projectile fragmentation in the transition region. Then nuclear fragmentation is considered which is associated with more central collisions in the case of heavy ion induced reactions. This aspect of fragmentation is also ilustrated with two heavy ion experiments in which fragments emitted at large angle have been observed

  18. Effects of reaction channels in subbarrier fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasso, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this lecture we consider some aspects of fusion reactions between heavy ions at bombarding energies which are below or close to that of the Coulomb barrier. This problem has been traditionally confronted with simple barrier penetration calculations. So we start with a very brief review of what we can call the ''conventional'' procedure. (orig.)

  19. Effective dynamics along given reaction coordinates, and reaction rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-22

    In molecular dynamics and related fields one considers dynamical descriptions of complex systems in full (atomic) detail. In order to reduce the overwhelming complexity of realistic systems (high dimension, large timescale spread, limited computational resources) the projection of the full dynamics onto some reaction coordinates is examined in order to extract statistical information like free energies or reaction rates. In this context, the effective dynamics that is induced by the full dynamics on the reaction coordinate space has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this article, we contribute to this discussion: we first show that if we start with an ergodic diffusion process whose invariant measure is unique then these properties are inherited by the effective dynamics. Then, we give equations for the effective dynamics, discuss whether the dominant timescales and reaction rates inferred from the effective dynamics are accurate approximations of such quantities for the full dynamics, and compare our findings to results from approaches like Mori-Zwanzig, averaging, or homogenization. Finally, by discussing the algorithmic realization of the effective dynamics, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic techniques like the "equation-free" approach and the "heterogeneous multiscale method" can be seen as special cases of our approach.

  20. Estimation of the reaction efficiency in polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalam, N.

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is largely used in molecular biology for increasing the copy number of a specific DNA fragment. The succession of 20 replication cycles makes it possible to multiply the quantity of the fragment of interest by a factor of 1 million. The PCR technique has

  1. Reaction rate of propene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2011-10-01

    The reaction rate of propene pyrolysis was investigated based on the elementary reactions proposed in Qu et al., J Comput Chem 2009, 31, 1421. The overall reaction rate was developed with the steady-state approximation and the rate constants of the elementary reactions were determined with the variational transition state theory. For the elementary reaction having transition state, the vibrational frequencies of the selected points along the minimum energy path were calculated with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were improved with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction without transition state, the frequencies were calculated with CASSCF/6-311G(d,p) and the energies were refined with the multireference configuration interaction method MRCISD/6-311G(d,p). The rate constants were evaluated within 200-2000 K and the fitted three-parameter expressions were obtained. The results are consistent with those in the literatures in most cases. For the overall rate, it was found that the logarithm of the rate and the reciprocal temperature have excellent linear relationship above 400 K, predicting that the rate follows a typical first-order law at high temperatures of 800-2000 K, which is also consistent with the experiments. The apparent activation energy in 800-2000 K is 317.3 kJ/mol from the potential energy surface of zero Kelvin. This value is comparable with the energy barriers, 365.4 and 403.7 kJ/mol, of the rate control steps. However, the apparent activation energy, 215.7 kJ/mol, developed with the Gibbs free energy surface at 1200 K is consistent with the most recent experimental result 201.9 ± 0.6 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clozapine-associated extrapyramidal reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E S; Marken, P A; Ruehter, V L

    2000-05-01

    To report a case of extrapyramidal reaction associated with a dosage increase of clozapine. A 44-year-old white man with a 20-year history of chronic paranoid schizophrenia was admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility. His prior medications restarted on admission were clozapine 650 mg at bedtime, haloperidol 10 mg at bedtime, clonazepam 2 mg/d, and aspirin 325 mg/d. Two days after admission (hospital day 3), clozapine and clonazepam were discontinued, and he was prescribed haloperidol 5 mg every morning and 10 mg every evening. Stabilization occurred over the following 24 days, with progressively lower dosages of haloperidol and increasing dosages of clozapine. Haloperidol was discontinued on day 24. On day 47, the patient was agitated and making bizarre statements; thus, the morning dose of clozapine was increased by 50 mg (total 450 mg/d). On day 48 at 2200, a dystonic reaction was diagnosed; he received intramuscular diphenhydramine 50 mg, which caused the reaction to subside. At the time of the adverse reaction, he was prescribed clozapine 450 mg/d, vitamin E 400 IU three times daily, aspirin 325 mg/d, and acetaminophen, milk of magnesia, and Maalox as needed. Although the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) is significantly lower with clozapine than with conventional agents, elevated clozapine blood concentrations have been reported to cause EPS; other reports have cited severe dystonias and dyskinesias on abrupt clozapine withdrawal. Considering the medications prescribed at the time and the discontinuation of haloperidol 24 days before the event, clozapine was the most likely cause of the extrapyramidal reaction. Regardless of anticipated safety associated with novel antipsychotics such as clozapine, reports of dystonic reactions must be taken into account and patients monitored appropriately.

  3. Angular distributions in quasi-fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetzenkirchen, K.; Kratz, J.V.; Lucas, R.; Poitou, J.; Gregoire, C.; Wirth, G.; Bruechle, W.; Suemmerer, K.

    1985-10-01

    Angular distributions for fission-like fragments were measured in the systems 50 Ti, 56 Fe + 208 Pb by applying an off-line KX-ray activation technique. The distributions d 2 sigma/dTHETAdZ exhibit forward-backward asymmetries that are strongly Z-dependent. They result from a process (quasi-fission) which yields nearly symmetric masses in times comparable to the rotational period of the composite system. A method for obtaining the variance of the tilting angular momentum, K 0 2 , from these skewed, differential angular distributions is described. The results indicate that the tilting mode is not fully excited in quasi-fission reactions. The results are compared to the sum of the variances of all statistical spin components, measured via γ-multiplicities. Integration of the angular distributions d 2 sigma/dTHETAdZ over all values of Z yields integral angular distributions dsigma/dTHETA and dsigma/dΩ symmetric around 90 0 . The associated unusually large anisotropies do not at all provide an adequate basis for tests or modifications of the transition state theory. A deconvolution of d 2 sigma/dTHETAdZ is performed with gaussian distributions depending on rotational angles ΔTHETA extending over a range of up to 540 0 . From the mean values a time scale for the evolution of K 0 is calculated. (orig.)

  4. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...... for symmetric and asymmetric multi-species electrolytes and is not limited to a range of surface potentials. Numerical simulations are presented, for the case of a CaCO3 electrolyte solution in contact with a surface with rate-controlled protonation/deprotonation reactions. The surface charge and potential...... are determined by the surface reactions, and therefore they depends on the bulk solution composition and concentration...

  5. Integrated Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael; Nielsen, M. W.; Strømann-Andersen, Jakob Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    and describe the decision process. Specific attention is given to how the engineering input was presented and how it was able to facilitate the design development. Site and context, building shape, organization of functions and HVAC-systems were all included to obtain a complete picture of the building......, low-energy consumption, and high-quality indoor environment. We use this case study to investigate how technical knowledge about building performance can be integrated into the conceptual design stage. We have selected certain points during the design process that represented design challenges...

  6. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...... and this contributes to the diversity in flavor, color, texture, and shelf life. The review concludes that these reactions are still only incompletely understood and that they represent an interesting area for fundamental research and also represent a fertile field for product development through a more conscious use...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures....

  7. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  8. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klipstein, David H. [Reaction Design, San Diego, CA (United States); Robinson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  9. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  10. Dynamics of traveling reaction pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovzhenko, A. Yu.; Rumanov, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of activator losses is accompanied by the decay of a traveling reaction pulse. In a ring reactor, this propagation threshold is present simultaneously with a threshold related to the ring diameter. The results of numerical experiments with pulses of an exothermal reaction reveal the transition from pulse propagation to a homogeneous hot regime, established regimes with periodic variations of the pulse velocity, and oscillatory decay of the pulse. When the medium becomes 'bistable' as a result of the variation in parameters, this factor does not prevent the propagation of pulses, but leads to changes in the pulse structure

  11. Theory of inclusive pionic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Salcedo, L.L.; Strottman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A theory is developed for all the inclusive pion nuclear reactions, quasielastic, single charge exchange, double charge exchange and absorption, around the resonance region. The theory is based on the isobar hole model and makes an expansion in the number of particle-hole excitations. Up to 3p3h for pion absorption and 2p2h for quasielastic or charge exchange, where good convergence is found, are considered. The results obtained with this theory agree remarkably well with experiment for the different reactions and different nuclei in a wide region of energies around resonance

  12. Adverse reactions associated with acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, E A; Bateman, D N

    2009-02-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most common agents deliberately ingested in self-poisoning episodes and a leading cause of acute liver failure in the western world. Acetylcysteine is widely acknowledged as the antidote of choice for paracetamol poisoning, but its use is not without risk. Adverse reactions, often leading to treatment delay, are frequently associated with both intravenous and oral acetylcysteine and are a common source of concern among treating physicians. A systematic literature review investigating the incidence, clinical features, and mechanisms of adverse effects associated with acetylcysteine. A variety of adverse reactions to acetylcysteine have been described ranging from nausea to death, most of the latter due to incorrect dosing. The pattern of reactions differs with oral and intravenous dosing, but reported frequency is at least as high with oral as intravenous. The reactions to the intravenous preparation result in similar clinical features to true anaphylaxis, including rash, pruritus, angioedema, bronchospasm, and rarely hypotension, but are caused by nonimmunological mechanisms. The precise nature of this reaction remains unclear. Histamine now seems to be an important mediator of the response, and there is evidence of variability in patient susceptibility, with females, and those with a history of asthma or atopy are particularly susceptible. Quantity of paracetamol ingestion, measured through serum paracetamol concentration, is also important as higher paracetamol concentrations protect patients against anaphylactoid effects. Most anaphylactoid reactions occur at the start of acetylcysteine treatment when concentrations are highest. Acetylcysteine also affects clotting factor activity, and this affects the interpretation of minor disturbances in the International Normalized Ratio in the context of paracetamol overdose. This review discusses the incidence, clinical features, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, and

  13. Photonuclear reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant feature of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies is the excitation of the δ resonance and one can therefore use such reactions to study the dynamics of δ propagation in a nucleus. Following an introductory section the author comments on photoabsorption on a single nucleon in Section II. A review of the δ-n Greens function and of the photonuclear amplitude is given in Section III. Results for photoabsorption on 4 He are shown in Section IV and compared with the data. Coherent π 0 photoproduction is discussed in Section V and calculations for 12 C are compared to recent measurements. (Auth.)

  14. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  15. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    12 janv. 2012 ... Key words: Métastase, rate, colon, carcinome. Received: 28/12/2011 - Accepted: 09/01/2012 - Published: ... tomodensitométriques au moment du diagnostic du cancer primitif ou lors du suivi radiologique régulier des patients atteints de cancers. Le recours à la TEP-FDG couplée au scanner serait d'un ...

  16. Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

      My concern is to understand augmentation as an emergent modality - among many others in ‘the expanding digital field' (Søndergaard M. , Transformative Creativity in the Expanded Digital Field, 2009)' - attributed to the production of contemporary art and the ‘archive of knowledge' in the (art) ...

  17. Integrated controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollaway, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    During 1984, all portions of the Nova control system that were necessary for the support of laser activation and completion of the Nova project were finished and placed in service on time. The Nova control system has been unique in providing, on schedule, the capabilities required in the central control room and in various local control areas throughout the facility. The ambitious goal of deploying this system early enough to use it as an aid in the activation of the laser was accomplished; thus the control system made a major contribution to the completion of Nova activation on schedule. Support and enhancement activities continued during the year on the VAX computer systems, central control room, operator consoles and displays, Novanet data communications network, system-level software for both the VAX and LSI-11 computers, Praxis control system computer language, software management tools, and the development system, which includes office terminals. Computational support was also supplied for a wide variety of test fixtures required by the optical and mechanical subsystems. Significant new advancements were made in four areas in integrated controls this year: the integration software (which includes the shot scheduler), the Praxis language, software quality assurance audit, and software development and data handling. A description of the accomplishments in each of these areas follows

  18. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porz, F.

    1982-10-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 1500 0 C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE) [de

  19. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  20. Palladium-Catalysed Coupling Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Johannes G.; Beller, M; Blaser, HU

    2012-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed coupling reactions have gained importance as a tool for the production of pharmaceutical intermediates and to a lesser extent also for the production of agrochemicals, flavours and fragrances, and monomers for polymers. In this review only these cases are discussed where it seems

  1. Reactions to threatening health messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoor, Gill A; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Kalagi, Janice; de Groot, Lianne; Grootjans, Karlijne; Huschens, Alexander; Köhninger, Constanze; Kölgen, Lizan; Pelssers, Isabelle; Schütt, Toby; Thomas, Sophia; Ruiter, Robert A C; Kok, Gerjo

    2012-11-21

    Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93). Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72). Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal.

  2. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramstein B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  3. Reactions of ethanol on Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Liu, Feng; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption and reactions of ethanol on Ru(0001) were studied with temperatureprogrammed desorption (TPD) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Ethanol was found to adsorb intact onto Ru(0001) below 100 K. Heating to 250 K resulted in formation of ethoxy groups, which undergo

  4. Runaway Reaction: Solving for X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Solveig A.

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the runaway reaction as it was displayed by Barry, a 14-year-old eighth-grade boy with learning disabilities. It identifies some of the common characteristics of this response and proposes school intervention methods. Functional behavioral assessments and strength-based assessments are encouraged, along with using strategy…

  5. Exchange effects in direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMere, M.; Kanellopoulos, E.J.; Suenkel, W.; Tang, Y.C.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of antisymmetrization in direct reactions is examined by studying the properties of the coupling-normalization kernel function occurring in a resonating-group formulation. From this study, one obtains useful information concerning the general behavior of direct-reactiion processes and some justification for the use of three-body models in phenomenological analyses

  6. Scattering theory and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1988-01-01

    In this course, scattering theory and chemical reactions are presented including scattering of one particle by a potential, n-particle systems, colinear triatomic molecules and the study of reactive scattering for 3-dimensional triatomic systems. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  7. Recyclization reactions leading to benzimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamedov, Vakhid A; Murtazina, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    The published data on the recyclization reactions that afford benzimidazoles are generalized and systematized. Both classical and new methods of benzimidazole synthesis are considered. Attention is focused on the publications over the recent 10-15 years; of the earlier publications, only those unknown to the wide circle of chemists are analyzed.

  8. Recyclization reactions leading to benzimidazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Vakhid A.; Murtazina, Anna M.

    2011-05-01

    The published data on the recyclization reactions that afford benzimidazoles are generalized and systematized. Both classical and new methods of benzimidazole synthesis are considered. Attention is focused on the publications over the recent 10-15 years; of the earlier publications, only those unknown to the wide circle of chemists are analyzed.

  9. Reactants encapsulation and Maillard Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.; Fogliano, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades many efforts have been addressed to the control of Maillard Reaction products in different foods with the aim to promote the formation of compounds having the desired color and flavor and to reduce the concentration of several potential toxic molecules. Encapsulation, already

  10. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  11. Multidimensional singular integrals and integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhlin, Solomon Grigorievich; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    1965-01-01

    Multidimensional Singular Integrals and Integral Equations presents the results of the theory of multidimensional singular integrals and of equations containing such integrals. Emphasis is on singular integrals taken over Euclidean space or in the closed manifold of Liapounov and equations containing such integrals. This volume is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of some theorems on linear equations in Banach spaces, followed by a discussion on the simplest properties of multidimensional singular integrals. Subsequent chapters deal with compounding of singular integrals

  12. Sound speeds vision through preparation, not integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, S.A.; van der Burg, E.

    2013-01-01

    In manual choice reaction time (RT) tasks, people respond faster to a visual target stimulus when it is accompanied by a task-irrelevant tone than when it is presented alone. This intersensory facilitation effect is often attributed to multisensory integration, but here we show it to be a reflection

  13. Reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koda, Seiichiro; Nakamura, Kazumoto; Hoshino, Takashi; Hikita, Tsutomu

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde was investigated in a fast flow reactor equipped with a time-of-flight type mass spectrometer under reduced pressure. Main reaction products were carbon monoxide, ethylene, ethane, methane, and propanal. Consideration of the distributions of the reaction products under various reaction conditions showed that hydrogen atoms attacked the C=C double bond, especially its inner carbon side under reduced pressure. Resulting hot radicals caused subsequent reactions. The relative value of the apparent bimolecular rate constant of the reaction against that of trans-2-butene with hydrogen atoms was 1.6+-0.2, which supported the above-mentioned initial reaction. (auth.)

  14. Classical kinematic model for direct reactions of oriented reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, I.; Prisant, M.G.; Levine, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A simple kinematic model based on the concept of an orientation-dependent critical configuration for reaction is introduced and applied. The model serves two complementary purposes. In the predictive mode the model provides an easily implemented procedure for computing the reactivity of oriented reagents (including those actually amenable to measure) from a given potential energy surface. The predictions of the model are compared against classical trajectory results for the H + D 2 reaction. By use of realistic potential energy surfaces the model is applied to the Li + HF and O + HCl reactions where the HX molecules are pumped by a polarized laser. A given classical trajectory is deemed reactive or not according to whether it can surmount the barrier at that particular orientation. The essential difference with the model of Levine and Bernstein is that the averaging over initial conditions is performed by using a Monte Carlo integration. One can therefore use the correct orientation-dependent shape (and not only height) of the barrier to reaction and, furthermore, use oriented or aligned reagents. Since the only numerical step is a Monte Carlo sampling of initial conditions, very many trajectories can be run. This suffices to determine the reaction cross section for different initial conditions. To probe the products, they have employed the kinematic approach of Elsum and Gordon. The result is a model where, under varying initial conditions, examining final-state distributions or screening different potential energy surfaces can be efficiently carried out

  15. Optimizing Chemical Reactions with Deep Reinforcement Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Li, Xiaocheng; Zare, Richard N

    2017-12-27

    Deep reinforcement learning was employed to optimize chemical reactions. Our model iteratively records the results of a chemical reaction and chooses new experimental conditions to improve the reaction outcome. This model outperformed a state-of-the-art blackbox optimization algorithm by using 71% fewer steps on both simulations and real reactions. Furthermore, we introduced an efficient exploration strategy by drawing the reaction conditions from certain probability distributions, which resulted in an improvement on regret from 0.062 to 0.039 compared with a deterministic policy. Combining the efficient exploration policy with accelerated microdroplet reactions, optimal reaction conditions were determined in 30 min for the four reactions considered, and a better understanding of the factors that control microdroplet reactions was reached. Moreover, our model showed a better performance after training on reactions with similar or even dissimilar underlying mechanisms, which demonstrates its learning ability.

  16. Department of Nuclear Reaction - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzanowski, A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: This year 1999 can be considered as very successful. Not only that we have published 33 papers in journals listed by the Philadelphia Institute of Science but because our hard work allowed us to obtain new and exciting results. A group of theoretical papers concerned with application of correlation among random matrices elements developed for statistical aspects of nuclear coupling into continuum to study of the collective effects in brain activity and stock market dynamics. These papers arose quite an interest and got several citations. Studies of the nonpartonic components in the nucleon structure function led to better understanding of the higher-twist effects. It was shown that inclusion of the terms of the order of 1/Q 4 improves fits to the experimental data. A review paper summarizing results on the role of the leading baryon in high energy reactions appeared in Progress on Nuclear and Particle Physics. Studies on multistep transfer reactions of light heavy ions in collaboration with the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences in Kiev have explained angular distributions of many reactions using the coupled channel theory. We have shown that it is possible to determine energy dependence of the optical model potential for such unstable nuclei like 8 Be. Further studies of mechanism of near threshold light meson production in collaboration with Juelich and Jagiellonian University were performed. Within COSY 10 and COSY 11 collaborations new data on the isospin symmetry breaking in pionic reactions and strange meson accompanied by hyperons emission were obtained. Together with colleagues from the Flerov Nuclear Reaction Laboratory we have started experiments with radioactive beams. Using magnetic separator COMBAS velocity distributions of isotopes with 2 ≤Z≤11 in reactions induced by 16 O on 9 Be were obtained. At the high resolution radioactive beam channel ACCULINA reactions induced by 6 He and 8 He nuclei were studied

  17. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  18. Multiresponse modelling of the caramelisation reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Quintas, Mafalda; Guimarães, Carla; Baylina, João; Brandão, Teresa R. S.; Silva, Cristina L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Multiresponse modelling is a powerful tool for studying complex kinetics of reactions occurring in food products. This modelling technique uses information of reactants and products involved, allowing insightful kinetic parameters estimation and helping in clarifying reaction mechanisms. One example of a complex reaction that occurs in food processing is the caramelisation reaction. Caramelisation is the common name for a group of reactions observed when carbohydrates are exposed to high temp...

  19. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  20. Vanadocene reactions with hydroxy acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latyaeva, V.N.; Lineva, A.N.; Zimina, S.V.; Ehllert, O.G.; Arsen'eva, T.I.

    1984-01-01

    To prepare a series of vanadium cyclopentadienylcarboxylates soluble in water, the vanadocene reactions with lactic, γ-oxybutyric-, salicylic,- gallic-, orotic-, and acetylsalicylic acids have been studied. To determine the influence of cyclopentadienyl groups, bound with a vanadium atom, on the physiological activity of the complexes formed, vanadium halides are made to react with lactic acid. Only the vanadocene reaction with orotic acid was conducted in an aqueous medium, other interactions were realized in the diethyl ether, toluene, T, H, P medium. The interaction of vanadocene and vanadium halides with lactic-, salicylic-, acetylsalicylic- and gallic acids was found to lead to the formation of water-soluble vanadium complexes of Cp 2 , VOCOR or CpV (OCOR) 2 type. The data on the produced compounds yield, their IR spectra, decomposition temperatures, solubility, effective magnetic moments are presented

  1. Allergic reactions in red tattoos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton Carlsen, K; Køcks, M; Sepehri, M

    2016-01-01

    to be feasible for chemical analysis of red pigments in allergic reactions. Raman spectroscopy has a major potential for fingerprint screening of problematic tattoo pigments in situ in skin, ex vivo in skin biopsies and in tattoo ink stock products, thus, to eliminate unsafe ink products from markets.......AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy as a screening technique for chemical characterisation of tattoo pigments in pathologic reacting tattoos and tattoo ink stock products to depict unsafe pigments and metabolites of pigments. MATERIALS/METHODS: Twelve...... dermatome shave biopsies from allergic reactions in red tattoos were analysed with Raman spectroscopy (A 785-nm 300 mW diode laser). These were referenced to samples of 10 different standard tattoo ink stock products, three of these identified as the culprit inks used by the tattooist and thus by history...

  2. Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Takuya; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2011-10-07

    The dehydrogenative cycloaddition of dieneynes, which possess a diene in the form of a styrene moiety and a dienophile in the form of an alkyne moiety, produces naphthalene derivatives when heated. It was found that a key requirement of this process is the presence of a silyl group attached to the alkyne moiety, which forces a dehydrogenation reaction to occur. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Caging in high energy reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ache, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of caging high energy reactions is considered. It is noted that there is no easy and unambiguous way, short of a complete and very tedious product and mechanistic analysis, which is feasible only for very few systems, to determine the contribution made by caging. It is emphasized that some products resulting from the hot reaction with a certain substrate may be formed via caging while others are not. In research on the mechanism of caging the results of Roots work on the reactions of hot 18 F with the CF 3 CH 3 system seem to provide evidence for caging, with 18 F being the caged moiety, thus proceeding via a radical--radical recombination mechanism. Their work with H 2 S additive also seems to indicate that scavenging via hydrogen abstraction from H 2 S to form does not interfere with the radical--radical recombination consistent with Bunkers molecular approach to explain the cage effects. In other research a series of observations resulting from stereochemical and combined stereochemical density variation techniques seem to favor a caged-complex. It is clear that a more conclusive answer can only be reached by more systematic studies, utilizing the whole range of nuclear reactions such as (n,2n), (n,γ) and E.C. processes in mechanistically well defined systems to elucidate the effect of variations in the recoil energies, by carrying out studies in different solvents or host substances to assess the effect of the physical parameters, such as molecule size and intermolecular interactions on the escape probability or caging efficiencies

  4. Reactions to threatening health messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ten Hoor Gill A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. Methods We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93. Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72. Results Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal.

  5. Reactions to threatening health messages

    OpenAIRE

    ten Hoor, Gill A; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Kalagi, Janice; de Groot, Lianne; Grootjans, Karlijne; Huschens, Alexander; K?hninger, Constanze; K?lgen, Lizan; Pelssers, Isabelle; Sch?tt, Toby; Thomas, Sophia; Ruiter, Robert AC; Kok, Gerjo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence th...

  6. Statistical theory of breakup reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Descouvemont, Pierre; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with loosely bound exotic nuclei (CDCC), based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCC s ), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels. (author)

  7. Nuclear reaction studies: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaler, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    A principal focus of recent research has been the three-body problem. A great deal of effort has been devoted to the creation of a computer program to calculate physical observables in the three body problem below 1 GeV. Successful results have been obtained for the triton. Additional work concerns scattering of K + mesons from nuclei, antinucleon physics, relativistic nuclear physics and inclusive reactions

  8. Free radical reactions of daunorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houee-Levin, C.

    1991-01-01

    Daunorubicin is an antitumor antibiotic activated in vivo by reduction. Its mechanism of action involves DNA and topoisomerase attack, but side effects are cytotoxicity related to free radical formation. Therefore the mechanism of the one-electron reduction of the drug and the reactions of the daunorubicin transients towards compounds of biological interest have been studied by the methods of radiolysis, in order to provide possible explanations of the drug mechanism of action. Their relative importance in cellular conditions is discussed [fr

  9. Statistical theory of breakup reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A., E-mail: carlos.bertulani@tamuc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX (United States); Descouvemont, Pierre, E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels (Belgium); Hussein, Mahir S., E-mail: hussein@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Estudos Avancados

    2014-07-01

    We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with loosely bound exotic nuclei (CDCC), based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCC{sub s}), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels. (author)

  10. Tuberculin reaction and BCG scar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Aaby, Peter

    2015-01-01

    rate ratio (MRR) comparing children with a BCG scar with those without was 0.42 (95% CI = 0.19; 0.93). There was a similar tendency for TST positivity: MRR = 0.47 (95% CI = 0.14; 1.54). For LBW children who had both a positive TST reaction and a scar, the MRR was 0.22 (95% CI = 0.05; 0.87). For NBW...

  11. Integrated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick-Giles, Lynsey; Checkland, Kath

    2018-03-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to try and understand how several organisations in one area in England are working together to develop an integrated care programme. Weick's (1995) concept of sensemaking is used as a lens to examine how the organisations are working collaboratively and maintaining the programme. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative methods included: non-participant observations of meetings, interviews with key stakeholders and the collection of documents relating to the programme. These provided wider contextual information about the programme. Comprehensive field notes were taken during observations and analysed alongside interview transcriptions using NVIVO software. Findings This paper illustrates the importance of the construction of a shared identity across all organisations involved in the programme. Furthermore, the wider policy discourse impacted on how the programme developed and influenced how organisations worked together. Originality/value The role of leaders from all organisations involved in the programme was of significance to the overall development of the programme and the sustained momentum behind the programme. Leaders were able to generate a "narrative of success" to drive the programme forward. This is of particular relevance to evaluators, highlighting the importance of using multiple methods to allow researchers to probe beneath the surface of programmes to ensure that evidence moves beyond this public narrative.

  12. Sequential series for nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumo, Ko

    1975-01-01

    A new time-dependent treatment of nuclear reactions is given, in which the wave function of compound nucleus is expanded by a sequential series of the reaction processes. The wave functions of the sequential series form another complete set of compound nucleus at the limit Δt→0. It is pointed out that the wave function is characterized by the quantities: the number of degrees of freedom of motion n, the period of the motion (Poincare cycle) tsub(n), the delay time t sub(nμ) and the relaxation time tausub(n) to the equilibrium of compound nucleus, instead of the usual quantum number lambda, the energy eigenvalue Esub(lambda) and the total width GAMMAsub(lambda) of resonance levels, respectively. The transition matrix elements and the yields of nuclear reactions also become the functions of time given by the Fourier transform of the usual ones. The Poincare cycles of compound nuclei are compared with the observed correlations among resonance levels, which are about 10 -17 --10 -16 sec for medium and heavy nuclei and about 10 -20 sec for the intermediate resonances. (auth.)

  13. Anaphylactic reactions presenting with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmazgul, Emrullah; Kutlu, Ali; Dogru, Salim; Ozalper, Veysel; Cetindagli, Ibrahim; Sezer, Ogun; Salmanoglu, Musa; Kilic, Erol; Karabacak, Ercan; Ozturk, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Although a few case reports about hypertensive anaphylaxis (HA) are available in the present literature, there is no study about the prevalence of HA. In this study, we review our cases with anaphylaxis presenting with hypertension and ascertain its prevalence. The documents of the patients who had anaphylactic reactions after the procedures performed for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases in GATA Haydarpasa Clinic of Allergy and Immunology between January 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Within the study period, 324 patients had undergone 4332 procedures in which 62 of them had developed anaphylaxis. During the procedures, the rate of anaphylaxis was found to be 1.43 %. The rate of HA among the anaphylaxis patients was 12.9 % (8 of 62 patients). During treatments, 2 patients received adrenaline injections without any adverse reaction. HA may be seen at a considerable rate during an anaphylactic reaction. Anaphylaxis and hypertension can be recovered by adrenaline injection when required. According to the best of our knowledge, this study is the first original study about the prevalence of HA in English-language medical literature.

  14. Composite membrane with integral rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

    2015-01-27

    Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

  15. Department of Nuclear Reaction - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzanowski, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Our research in 2001 can be characterized by a wide range of various subjects e.g. search for new physics in Au + Au collisions at the energy in the centre of mass per nucleon pair √ s NN = 200 GeV through hunting dibaryon formation in p + p → K + + D (dibaryon) reaction to the application of the random matrix theory taken from nuclear reaction studies in the analysis of fluctuations of the stock exchange time and space correlations. Heavy ion reactions have been studied in a broad range of energies. At low energy of the 12 C ions (E CM = 25.57 MeV), delivered by the Warsaw U200P cyclotron, the reactions induced on 11 B target were studied. Coupling effects between various reaction channels were found. At the energies corresponding to the liquid-to-gas phase transition, the onset of the flow phenomena was found in the multifragmentation of the 197 Au nuclei induced by a sequence of projectiles p, 4 He, 12 C of the energies from 1-3 GeV per nucleon. Finally, evidence of the melting of the baryonic structure of the colliding nuclei was found at the highest available energies of 200 GeV per nucleon pair, in the collision of gold nuclei studied at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider within the BRAHMS and PHOBOS collaboration. We entered a new collaboration HIRES with the aim to discover S = -1 dibaryonic state by studying the reaction p+p → K + +D. So far many attempts to prove experimentally the existence of a dibaryonic state failed. We hope to use the unique properties of the Big Karl spectrometer to prove the existence of a sharp peak in the energy spectra of kaons. To do so, we have to reduce strongly the background of pions. A diffusely reflective threshold Cherenkov detector made from silica aerogel was designed. Preliminary tests indicate that pionic signals can be reduced by a factor of 58. Extensive studies of the mechanism of generating collective levels and the energy gap by means of diagonalizing matrices with random elements ended up with

  16. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavamurthy, S.

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems

  17. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshavamurthy, Srihari [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems.

  18. Radiation reactions and care of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochhead, J.N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Many of the radiation reactions which may occur in patients following radiotherapy and the care of these reactions are described. These include the systemic reaction, reactions of the blood and skin, reactions occurring after treatment of the breast and chest wall, reactions after irradiation of the mouth and throat, intrathoracic tumours, the abdominal alimentary tract and pelvis, bone, the CNS and the eye. Patient care during the treatment of children and also during treatment using small sealed sources is also described. (U.K.)

  19. Metal-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Luiz C.; Lucca Junior, Emilio C. de; Ferreira, Marco A. B.; Polo, Ellen C., E-mail: ldias@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-12-15

    The aldol reaction is one of the most powerful and versatile methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Traditionally, this reaction was developed in a stoichiometric version; however, great efforts in the development of chiral catalysts for aldol reactions were performed in recent years. Thus, in this review article, the development of metal-mediated chiral catalysts in Mukaiyama-type aldol reaction, reductive aldol reaction and direct aldol reaction are discussed. Moreover, the application of these catalysts in the total synthesis of complex molecules is discussed. (author)

  20. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  1. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-05-04

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  2. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  3. iADRs: towards online adverse drug reaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Li, He-Yi; Du, Jhih-Wei; Feng, Wen-Yu; Lo, Chiao-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-12-01

    Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) is one of the most important issues in the assessment of drug safety. In fact, many adverse drug reactions are not discovered during limited pre-marketing clinical trials; instead, they are only observed after long term post-marketing surveillance of drug usage. In light of this, the detection of adverse drug reactions, as early as possible, is an important topic of research for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, large numbers of adverse events and the development of data mining technology have motivated the development of statistical and data mining methods for the detection of ADRs. These stand-alone methods, with no integration into knowledge discovery systems, are tedious and inconvenient for users and the processes for exploration are time-consuming. This paper proposes an interactive system platform for the detection of ADRs. By integrating an ADR data warehouse and innovative data mining techniques, the proposed system not only supports OLAP style multidimensional analysis of ADRs, but also allows the interactive discovery of associations between drugs and symptoms, called a drug-ADR association rule, which can be further developed using other factors of interest to the user, such as demographic information. The experiments indicate that interesting and valuable drug-ADR association rules can be efficiently mined.

  4. Reaction rate studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in sections of rat liver using four tetrazolium salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butcher, R. G.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction rate of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in liver sections from fed and starved rats has been monitored by the continuous measurement at 37 degrees C of the reaction product as it is formed using scanning and integrating microdensitometry. Control media lacked either substrate

  5. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: During last year the physicists of the Department of Nuclear Reactions were involved in many experiments and projects: -Low energy nuclear reactions: For the first time a heavy ion beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron C-200 was used to investigate elastic and inelastic scattering of 12 C ions from 12 C target. The experiment is a part of a long range programme devoted to study the energy dependence of the nucleus-nucleus interactions. -Multifragmentation of relativistic heavy ions: Multifragmentation reactions induced by 12 C on different heavy targets and at different energies were studied in experiments performed at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung by the ALADIN Collaboration. These asymmetric systems were investigated in order to study the interplay between preequilibrium and equilibrium phenomena in the nuclear liquid - gas phase transition. -The structure of nucleons: A novel, two-structure description of the Roper resonance was proposed on the basis of the α-p scattering data reanalysed by means of a T-matrix formalism. -Atomic physics: Emission of the X-rays by fast heavy ions (S, Ti, Fe) as they traverse the matter (thin carbon or other light element foil) was investigated in a series of experiments performed at University of Erlangen. It was demonstrated, that the characteristic K α X-rays emitted by a heavy ion can serve as a tool for Z-value control of the ion. -Material research: Semiconductor heterostructures were investigated by means of Rutherford Back Scattering and Channeling methods using the 2 MeV α particles from the Van de Graaff accelerator ''Lech'' at the Department. The following reports present the results and major successes which were achieved in 1999. (author)

  6. Neutral currents in semileptonic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschos, E.A.

    1975-05-01

    The evidence for weak neutral currents is analyzed in semileptonic reactions with special emphasis on their Lorentz and internal symmetry structure. It is found that present observations are consistent with the expectations of gauge theories, but other possibilities can not be ruled out. Of particular interest in this respect is the presence of a large isoscalar component. The excitation of the Δ-resonance by neutral currents is analyzed, and pion-nucleon mass distributions are presented. Charge asymmetries sensitive to isoscalar-isovector interferences are discussed. (U.S.)

  7. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  8. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however......, not a sufficient condition in order to establish genuine tunneling as a result of quantum dynamics. This proposition is illustrated for a two-dimensional model potential describing dissociative sticking of N-2 on Ru(s). It is suggested that the remarkable heavy atom tunneling, found in this system, is related...

  9. Fragmentation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, G.; Roesel, F.; Trautmann, D.; Shyam, R.

    1983-10-01

    Fragmentation processes in nuclear collisions are reviewed. The main emphasis is put on light ion breakup at nonrelativistic energies. The post- and prior-form DWBA theories are discussed. The post-form DWBA, appropriate for the ''spectator breakup'' describes elastic as well as inelastic breakup modes. This theory can also account for the stripping to unbound states. The theoretical models are compared to typical experimental results to illustrate the various possible mechanisms. It is discussed, how breakup reactions can be used to study high-lying single particle strength in the continuum; how it can yield information about momentum distributions of fragments in the nucleus. (orig.)

  10. The first nuclear chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    The author offers his recollections of the experimental efforts beginning in 1939 which culminated in the Chain Reaction in the squash court on December 2, 1942. Recalled are Columbia University experiments which did much to establish the feasibility of the chain in natural uranium and which stimulated the creation of the Manhattan District. The Columbia group moved to the University of Chicago, where, in early summer of 1942, construction and analysis of a number of subcritical reactors (piles) gave assurance with a high probability that only a reasonable amount of uranium and moderator would be required

  11. Giant resonances: reaction theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de; Foglia, G.A.

    1989-09-01

    The study of giant resonances through the use of reaction theory approach is presented and discussed. Measurements of cross-sections to the many available decay channels following excitation of giant multipole resonances (GMR) led one to view these phenomena as complicated dynamical syndromes so that theoretical requirements for their study must be extended beyond the traditional bounds of nuclear structure models. The spectra of decay products following GMR excitation in heavy nuclei are well described by statistical model (Hauser-Feshback, HF) predictions indicated that spreading of the collective modes plays a major role in shaping exclusive cross-sections. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Department of Nuclear Reactions has had a very productive year. We have carried out our work in close collaborations with physicists from many laboratories, home and foreign. The following reports cover three major domains of our activities: nuclear, material and atomic physics. * Nuclear physics: In collaboration with scientists from Ukraine experimental studies of nuclear reaction induced by heavy ions from the Warsaw Cyclotron have been performed. The aim of the experiments is to study nuclear reactions leading to the exotic light nuclei in exit channels and energy dependence of the nucleus - nucleus interactions. Proton induced charge-exchange reactions were investigated theoretically by means of multistep-direct model. Good agreement with the experimental data was achieved. A novel approach to the problem of the nuclear liquid → gas phase transition was proposed, based on synergetics - a domain of science dealing with self-organization in macroscopic systems. Decay properties of the Roper resonance were studied. Final analysis of the analysing powers for the polarized deuterons scattered on protons was accomplished. Experimental programme of the near-threshold meson production in proton - proton scattering has been started in collaboration with Forschungszentrum. Juelich. * Atomic physics: Spectra of the X-rays emitted by energetic sulphur ions scattered off carbon atoms were analysed in order to study the role of the multiple charge states of the inner shells in the dynamics of the collision process. Ionization probabilities in collision of oxygen ions with gold atoms were measured. The observed disagreement of the experimental data with the theoretical predictions suggest a strong effect generated by the sub-shell couplings. * Materials research: Ion channelling method was applied to investigate transformation of the defects in Al x Ga 1-x As crystalline layers. Activities of our colleagues in didactics have grown considerably. Lectures

  13. Invasive Intraneural Interfaces: Foreign Body Reaction Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Fiorenza; Ranieri, Federico; Vadalà, Gianluca; Zollo, Loredana; Di Pino, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Intraneural interfaces are stimulation/registration devices designed to couple the peripheral nervous system (PNS) with the environment. Over the last years, their use has increased in a wide range of applications, such as the control of a new generation of neural-interfaced prostheses. At present, the success of this technology is limited by an electrical impedance increase, due to an inflammatory response called foreign body reaction (FBR), which leads to the formation of a fibrotic tissue around the interface, eventually causing an inefficient transduction of the electrical signal. Based on recent developments in biomaterials and inflammatory/fibrotic pathologies, we explore and select the biological solutions that might be adopted in the neural interfaces FBR context: modifications of the interface surface, such as organic and synthetic coatings; the use of specific drugs or molecular biology tools to target the microenvironment around the interface; the development of bio-engineered-scaffold to reduce immune response and promote interface-tissue integration. By linking what we believe are the major crucial steps of the FBR process with related solutions, we point out the main issues that future research has to focus on: biocompatibility without losing signal conduction properties, good reproducible in vitro/in vivo models, drugs exhaustion and undesired side effects. The underlined pros and cons of proposed solutions show clearly the importance of a better understanding of all the molecular and cellular pathways involved and the need of a multi-target action based on a bio-engineered combination approach. PMID:28932181

  14. Analysis of π+p→π0(eta)Δ++ and related reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Fazal-e-Aleem; Rafique, Muhammad

    1984-01-01

    The differential and integrated cross sections and density matrix elements for the reactions π + p→ π 0 (eta)Δ ++ and the reactions π - p→π - Δ + , K + p→K 0 Δ ++ and K - n→K-bar 0 Δ - which are related to them by SU(2) and SU(3) are fitted by using a simple Regge pole model with phenomenological residue functions. (author)

  15. Approximation of the cross-sections for charged-particle emission reactions near the threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badikov, S.A.; Pashchenko, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    We perform an analytical approximation of the energy dependence of the cross-sections for the reactions (n,p) and (n,γ) from the BOSPOR library, correct them for the latest differential and integral experimental data using the common features, characteristic of the energy dependence of the threshold reaction cross-section and making some physical assumptions. 19 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Dibaryon resonances in photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwille, W.J.

    1981-11-01

    The author gives a review about the production of dibaryon resonances in photon reactions on deuterium targets. Especially he considers the reactions γ + d → p + n, γ + d → p + X, and γ + d → p + N + π. (HSI)

  17. An efficient catalyst for asymmetric Reformatsky reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rate enantioselectivity using N,N-dialkylnorephedrines as chiral ligands. ..... temperatures also, there was no product conversion. ... Optimization of reaction conditions for asymmetric Reformatsky reaction between benzaldehyde and α-.

  18. Scattering and transfer reactions with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    From the elastic scattering analysis the input parameters are found for the inelastic scattering analysis and the transfer reactions of the heavy ion reactions. The main theme reported is the likeness and conection among these processes. (L.C.) [pt

  19. High PT electronuclear reactions and spin observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The main arguments of the following topics are reviewed: the high transverse momentum exclusive reactions, the determination of various spin observables and the production of different flavours in reactions induced by real and virtual photons

  20. The mechanism of the modified Ullmann reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperotto, Elena; Klink, Gerard P.M. van; Koten, Gerard van; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    The copper-mediated aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions developed by Fritz Ullmann and Irma Goldberg required stoichiometric amounts of copper and very high reaction temperatures. Recently, it was found that addition of relatively cheap ligands (diamines, aminoalcohols, diketones, diols)

  1. Catalyst Initiation in the Oscillatory Carbonylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Novakovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium(II iodide is used as a catalyst in the phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction that has demonstrated oscillatory behaviour in both pH and heat of reaction. In an attempt to extract the reaction network responsible for the oscillatory nature of this reaction, the system was divided into smaller parts and they were studied. This paper focuses on understanding the reaction network responsible for the initial reactions of palladium(II iodide within this oscillatory reaction. The species researched include methanol, palladium(II iodide, potassium iodide, and carbon monoxide. Several chemical reactions were considered and applied in a modelling study. The study revealed the significant role played by traces of water contained in the standard HPLC grade methanol used.

  2. Amazing variational approach to chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Francisco M.

    2009-01-01

    In this letter we analyse an amazing variational approach to chemical reactions. Our results clearly show that the variational expressions are unsuitable for the analysis of empirical data obtained from chemical reactions.

  3. Organic chemistry - Fast reactions 'on water'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Efficient reactions in aqueous organic chemistry do not require soluble reactants, as had been thought. A newly developed ‘on-water’ protocol is characterized by short reaction times, and the products are easy to isolate.

  4. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO 2 laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D 2 CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D 2 CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D 2 CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 μm ir fluorescence from D 2 CO is proportional to the square of the D 2 CO pressure in pure D 2 CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D 2 CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm 2 at 946.0 cm -1 . The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D 2 CO. In H 2 CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF 4 - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel

  5. Integrated fuel processor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed

  6. Catalysis of Nuclear Reactions by Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoglavšek, Matej

    2018-01-01

    Electron screening enhances nuclear reaction cross sections at low energies. We studied the nuclear reaction 1H(19F,αγ)16O in inverse kinematics in different solid hydrogen targets. Measured resonance strengths differed by up to a factor of 10 in different targets. We also studied the 2H(p,γ)3He fusion reaction and observed electrons emitted as reaction products instead of γ rays. In this case electron screening greatly enhances internal conversion probability.

  7. Mapping students' ideas about chemical reactions at different educational levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fan

    Understanding chemical reactions is crucial in learning chemistry at all educational levels. Nevertheless, research in science education has revealed that many students struggle to understand chemical processes. Improving teaching and learning about chemical reactions demands that we develop a clearer understanding of student reasoning in this area and of how this reasoning evolves with training in the discipline. Thus, we have carried out a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews as the main data collection tool to explore students reasoning about reaction mechanism and causality. The participants of this study included students at different levels of training in chemistry: general chemistry students (n=22), organic chemistry students (n=16), first year graduate students (n=13) and Ph.D. candidates (n=14). We identified major conceptual modes along critical dimensions of analysis, and illustrated common ways of reasoning using typical cases. Main findings indicate that although significant progress is observed in student reasoning in some areas, major conceptual difficulties seem to persist even at the more advanced educational levels. In addition, our findings suggest that students struggle to integrate important concepts when thinking about mechanism and causality in chemical reactions. The results of our study are relevant to chemistry educators interested in learning progressions, assessment, and conceptual development.

  8. Synthesis of hexagonal gold nanoparticles using a microfluidic reaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Chen-Hsun; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Huang, Chih-Chia; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2008-01-01

    A new microfluidic reaction system capable of mixing, transporting and reacting is developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. It allows for a rapid and a cost-effective approach to accelerate the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The microfluidic reaction chip is made from micro-electro-mechanical-system technologies which integrate a micro-mixer, micro-pumps, a micro-valve, micro-heaters and a micro temperature sensor on a single chip. Successful synthesis of dispersed gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated within a shorter period of time, as compared to traditional methods. It is experimentally found that precise control of the mixing/heating time for gold salts and reducing agents plays an essential role in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The growth process of hexagonal gold nanoparticles by a thermal aqueous approach is also systematically studied by using the same microfluidic reaction system. The development of the microfluidic reaction system could be promising for the synthesis of functional nanoparticles for future biomedical applications

  9. Estimation of parameter sensitivities for stochastic reaction networks

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, Ankit

    2016-01-07

    Quantification of the effects of parameter uncertainty is an important and challenging problem in Systems Biology. We consider this problem in the context of stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks where the dynamics is described as a continuous-time Markov chain whose states represent the molecular counts of various species. For such models, effects of parameter uncertainty are often quantified by estimating the infinitesimal sensitivities of some observables with respect to model parameters. The aim of this talk is to present a holistic approach towards this problem of estimating parameter sensitivities for stochastic reaction networks. Our approach is based on a generic formula which allows us to construct efficient estimators for parameter sensitivity using simulations of the underlying model. We will discuss how novel simulation techniques, such as tau-leaping approximations, multi-level methods etc. can be easily integrated with our approach and how one can deal with stiff reaction networks where reactions span multiple time-scales. We will demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of our approach using many examples from the biological literature.

  10. Multi-step direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    In recent years a variety of statistical theories has been developed concerning multistep direct (MSD) nuclear reactions. In addition, dominant in applications is a whole class of semiclassical models that may be subsumed under the heading of 'generalized exciton models'; these are basically MSD-type extensions on top of compound-like concepts. In this report the relation between their underlying statistical MSD-postulates are highlighted. A command framework is sketched that enables to generate the various MSD theories through assigning statistical properties to different parts of the nuclear Hamiltonian. Then it is shown that distinct forms of nuclear randomness are embodied in the mentioned theories. All these theories appear to be very similar at a qualitative level. In order to explain the high energy-tails and forward-peaked angular distribution typical for particles emitted in MSD reactions, it is imagined that the incident continuum particle stepwise looses its energy and direction in a sequence of collisions, thereby creating new particle-hole pairs in the target system. At each step emission may take place. The statistical aspect comes in because many continuum states are involved in the process. These are supposed to display chaotic behavior, the associated randomness assumption giving rise to important simplifications in the expression for MSD emission cross sections. This picture suggests that mentioned MSD models can be interpreted as a variant of essentially one and the same theory. 113 refs.; 25 figs.; 9 tabs

  11. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The last year of the twentieth-century was productive for our Department. Although the name of the Department suggests that we are all involved in investigations of nuclear reactions, in fact our activities are spread over three major domains: nuclear, atomic and material physics. Some of the projects we were involved in the last year have been realized using national facilities and accelerators, like the Van de Graaff accelerator of our Department at 69 Hoza Street, Warsaw Cyclotron U-200P of Warsaw University, and compact C30 cyclotron of our Institute at Swierk. Other projects were done abroad, using facilities of the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Institute de Physique Nucleaire at Orsay, and Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg in Erlangen. We carried out our work in close collaborations with physicists from many laboratories, Polish and foreign. - Low energy nuclear reactions. In collaboration with scientists from Ukraine experiments, using heavy ion beam provided by the Warsaw Cyclotron, were started. The aim of the experiments is to study nuclear reactions leading to the exotic light nuclei in exit channels and energy dependence of the nucleus - nucleus interaction. Efforts were made to develop a multistep direct model of nuclear reactions. In the model contributions due to the low energy collective excitations were taken into account. Good agreement with the experimental data was achieved. - Multifragmentation of relativistic heavy ions. ALADIN Collaboration studied multifragmentation reactions induced by relativistic heavy ions. The main activities of our scientists concentrated on an upgrade of the detecting system in order to replace photo multipliers with large area avalanche photodiodes in the central section of the TOF-wall. Some tests of the photodiodes manufactured by Advanced Photonix Inc. were performed using standard β - and γ-sources. - Structure of a nucleon. Decay properties of the Roper resonance were studied. A

  12. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  13. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  14. Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Lavjay; Calogiuri, Gianfranco

    2017-06-01

    To describe hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. PubMed search of articles published during the past 30 years with an emphasis on publications in the past decade. Case reports and review articles describing hypersensitivity reactions in the context of hemodialysis. Pharmacologic agents are the most common identifiable cause of hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis. These include iron, erythropoietin, and heparin, which can cause anaphylactic or pseudoallergic reactions, and topical antibiotics and anesthetics, which lead to delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Many hypersensitivity reactions are triggered by complement activation and increased bradykinin resulting from contact system activation, especially in the context of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use. Several alternative pharmacologic preparations and dialyzer membranes are available, such that once an etiology for the reaction is established, recurrences can be prevented without affecting the quality of care provided to patients. Although hypersensitivity reactions are uncommon in patients receiving hemodialysis, they can be life-threatening. Moreover, considering the large prevalence of the end-stage renal disease population, the implications of such reactions are enormous. Most reactions are pseudoallergic and not mediated by immunoglobulin E. The multiplicity of potential exposures and the complexity of the environment to which patients on dialysis are exposed make it challenging to identify the precise cause of these reactions. Great diligence is needed to investigate hypersensitivity reactions to avoid recurrence in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of atoms during a chemical transformation. This strategy of determining reaction mechanisms is illustrated in the article with several examples. Introduction. When a reaction is carried out, the primary effort goes towards the identification of the product(s) of the reaction. A more time consuming endeavour, however, is the ...

  16. Chemistry and reaction kinetics of biowaste torrefaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der M.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses the question of how the chemistry and reaction kinetics of torrefaction are influenced by reaction conditions and the effects occuring during the reaction. This research question can be specified by questions such as, what controls their kinetics during torrefaction and what

  17. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Allergic reactions seen in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Görücü Coşkuner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy can be defined as inappropriate and harmful response to harmless and ordinary materials. Allergic reactions, like in other fields of dentistry, can also be seen in the field of orthodontics. The reactions that occur against orthodontic materials can be seen as irritant or hypersensitivity reactions. The main reason of the irritant reactions is friction between soft tissues and orthodontic appliances. However, the reason of the hypersensitivity reactions is usually the antigenicity of the materials. Hypersensitivity reactions are usually seen as allergic contact dermatitis on face and neck; the occurrence of mucosal-gingival reactions and dermal and systemic reactions are rare. Latex, metal and acrylic resins are the most common allergens in orthodontics. Apart from these materials, allergic reactions can occur against bonding materials, extraoral appliances, disinfectants and antimicrobial agents. The reactions that occur against extraoral appliances usually result from metallic and elastic parts of the appliances or the appliance parts that are in contact with skin. Orthodontists should be aware of the allergic reactions to protect their patients’ health. The aim of this review was to evaluate the allergic reactions seen in orthodontic patients and discuss the cautions that orthodontists can take.

  19. Modelling Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based notion of "submicro representations of chemical reactions". Based on three structural models of matter (the simple particle model, the atomic model and the free electron model of metals), we suggest there are two major models of reaction in school chemistry curricula: (a) reactions that are simple…

  20. Chain chemical reactions during matrix devitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkalov, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    Investigation results of chain reaction mechanisms, proceeding at devitrification of glass-like matrices under the effect of γ-irradiation are summarized. Peculiarities of kinetics and mechanism of chain reactions proceeding at devitrification are considered: hydrocarbon chlorination, polymerization of vinyl monomers, copolymerization and graft polymerization. Possible application aspects of the chain reaction conducting during matrix devitrification are also considered

  1. Polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, K.; Ishihara, M.; Takahashi, N.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents a few key experiments which provide direct evidence of the polarization phenomena in heavy-ion reactions. The theory of polarization observables and measurements is given with the necessary formulae. The polarization phenomena is described and studies of product nuclear polarization in heavy-ion reactions are discussed. Studies of heavy-ion reactions induced by polarized beams are examined

  2. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  3. Definite Integrals using Orthogonality and Integral Transforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard S. Cohl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We obtain definite integrals for products of associated Legendre functions with Bessel functions, associated Legendre functions, and Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind using orthogonality and integral transforms.

  4. Single-molecule chemical reactions on DNA origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    as templates for building materials with new functional properties. Relatively large nanocomponents such as nanoparticles and biomolecules can also be integrated into DNA nanostructures and imaged. Here, we show that chemical reactions with single molecules can be performed and imaged at a local position...... on a DNA origami scaffold by atomic force microscopy. The high yields and chemoselectivities of successive cleavage and bond-forming reactions observed in these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of post-assembly chemical modification of DNA nanostructures and their potential use as locally......DNA nanotechnology and particularly DNA origami, in which long, single-stranded DNA molecules are folded into predetermined shapes, can be used to form complex self-assembled nanostructures. Although DNA itself has limited chemical, optical or electronic functionality, DNA nanostructures can serve...

  5. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  6. Integrated project delivery : The designer as integrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, J.W.F.; Koolwijk, J.S.J.; van Doorn, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Process innovation related to integrated project delivery is an important topic in the building industry. Studies on process innovation through the use of integrated contracts usually focus on contractors, and particularly on the possibility of forward integration into the building process. Three

  7. Unified connected theory of few-body reaction mechanisms in N-body scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzou, W. N.; Redish, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    A unified treatment of different reaction mechanisms in nonrelativistic N-body scattering is presented. The theory is based on connected kernel integral equations that are expected to become compact for reasonable constraints on the potentials. The operators T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) are approximate transition operators that describe the scattering proceeding through an arbitrary reaction mechanism A. These operators are uniquely determined by a connected kernel equation and satisfy an optical theorem consistent with the choice of reaction mechanism. Connected kernel equations relating T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) to the full T/sub +-//sup ab/ allow correction of the approximate solutions for any ignored process to any order. This theory gives a unified treatment of all few-body reaction mechanisms with the same dynamic simplicity of a model calculation, but can include complicated reaction mechanisms involving overlapping configurations where it is difficult to formulate models.

  8. Successful medical treatment of a severe reaction to red tattoo pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Stephanie; Jagdeo, Jared

    2014-10-01

    Tattoo allergies are often eczematous skin rashes that can be complicated by ulceration and infection. These allergies are difficult to resolve, sometimes requiring surgical or laser intervention, with varying success. Here we present a case of a 29-year-old woman with a serious skin allergic reaction to red tattoo ink that ulcerated and became secondarily infected. The patient expressed a desire to have the tattoo allergic reaction treated while preserving the cosmetic appearance of her tattoo for sentimental reasons. This case is being presented to provide an effective treatment algorithm for managing allergic tattoo reactions with ulceration and co-infection, while preserving the aesthetic integrity of the tattoo.

  9. Total cross-sections for reactions of high energy particles (including elastic, topological, inclusive and exclusive reactions). Subvol. b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schopper, H.; Moorhead, W.G.; Morrison, D.R.O.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present a compilation of cross-sections (i.e. reaction rates) of elementary particles at high energy. The data are presented in the form of tables, plots and some fits, which should be easy for the reader to use and may enable him to estimate cross-sections for presently unmeasured energies. We have analyzed all the data published in the major Journals and Reviews for momenta of the incoming particles larger than ≅ 50 MeV/c, since the early days of elementary particle physics and, for each reaction, we have selected the best cross-section data available. We have restricted our attention to integrated cross-sections, such as total cross-sections, exclusive and inclusive cross-sections etc., at various incident beam energies. We have disregarded data affected by geometrical and/or kinematical cuts which would make them not directly comparable to other data at different energies. Also, in the case of exclusive reactions, we have left out data where not all of the particles in the final state were unambiguously identified. This work contains reactions induced by neutrinos, gammas, charged pions, kaons, nucleons, antinucleons and hyperons. (orig./HSI)

  10. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In 2002, the Department has been involved in two new experimental programmes. Our colleagues led by Prof. Pawel Zupranski joined a large international collaboration HERMES and took part in experiments at DESY devoted to the study of the spin structure of the nucleon. Another group directed by Associate Prof. Bogdan Zwieglinski has worked on a conceptual design of a new generation detector PANDA (Proton-Antiproton Detection) which will be used in future experiments at GSI. Moreover, the experimental programmes covering three major domains of our scientific activities: nuclear physics, materials research and atomic physics were continued. - Nuclear physics: Experimental studies of nuclear reactions induced by heavy ions provided by the Warsaw U-200P Cyclotron were performed in collaboration with scientists from the Institute for Nuclear Studies in Kiev, Ukraine. The aim of the experiments was to investigate isotopic effects in the scattering of 11 B from carbon nuclides. Also, excited states of 6 Li predicted theoretically but never seen in experiments were investigated by means of one-neutron transfer reactions. Proton induced reactions were investigated theoretically by means of the multistep-direct model. Good agreement with the experimental data was achieved. The mechanism of fragments production in collisions of 197 Au with a gold target in the wide range of energies was studied by ALADIN and INDRA Collaborations. The production of η mesons from proton - proton collisions was investigated experimentally at the Juelich Cooler Synchrotron COSY. - Atomic physics: The ionisation of Au, Bi, Th and U atoms by Si ions was investigated in collaboration with the Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce, and the University of Erlangen-Nuernberg. - Materials research: The sensitivity of the Solid State Nuclear Track PM-355 detectors was tested against intensive gamma and electron radiation. Moreover, using a monoenergetic sulphur ion beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron, the

  11. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  12. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  13. Alkyne Benzannulation Reactions for the Synthesis of Novel Aromatic Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Samuel J; Lehnherr, Dan; Arslan, Hasan; J Uribe-Romo, Fernando; Dichtel, William R

    2017-11-21

    Aromatic compounds and polymers are integrated into organic field effect transistors, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices, and redox-flow batteries. These compounds and materials feature increasingly complex designs, and substituents influence energy levels, bandgaps, solution conformation, and crystal packing, all of which impact performance. However, many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of interest are difficult to prepare because their substitution patterns lie outside the scope of current synthetic methods, as strategies for functionalizing benzene are often unselective when applied to naphthalene or larger systems. For example, cross-coupling and nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions rely on prefunctionalized arenes, and even directed metalation methods most often modify positions near Lewis basic sites. Similarly, electrophilic aromatic substitutions access single regioisomers under substrate control. Cycloadditions provide a convergent route to densely functionalized aromatic compounds that compliment the above methods. After surveying cycloaddition reactions that might be used to modify the conjugated backbone of poly(phenylene ethynylene)s, we discovered that the Asao-Yamamoto benzannulation reaction is notably efficient. Although this reaction had been reported a decade earlier, its scope and usefulness for synthesizing complex aromatic systems had been under-recognized. This benzannulation reaction combines substituted 2-(phenylethynyl)benzaldehydes and substituted alkynes to form 2,3-substituted naphthalenes. The reaction tolerates a variety of sterically congested alkynes, making it well-suited for accessing poly- and oligo(ortho-arylene)s and contorted hexabenzocoronenes. In many cases in which asymmetric benzaldehyde and alkyne cycloaddition partners are used, the reaction is regiospecific based on the electronic character of the alkyne substrate. Recognizing these desirable features, we broadened the substrate scope to include silyl

  14. Plasma and controlled thermonuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitsa, P.

    1980-01-01

    The principle and prospects are given of three methods of achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction. The original and so far most promising TOKAMAK method is presented invented in the USSR. Another method is the heating of a sphere about 1 mm in diameter from a mixture of deuterium and tritium by focused laser light from all sides. The third method consists in continuous plasma heating. A rope-like plasma discharge at a temperature of more than a million K results in the gas from microwave oscillations. The discharge is placed in a magnetic field and the ion temperature is increased by magneto-acoustic waves. A reactor is proposed operating on this principle and problems are pointed out which will have to be resolved. (M.S.)

  15. Plasma and controlled thermonuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitsa, P

    1980-06-01

    The principle and prospects are given of three methods of achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction. The original and so far most promising TOKAMAK method is presented invented in the USSR. Another method is the heating of a sphere about 1 mm in diameter from a mixture of deuterium and tritium by focused laser light from all sides. The third method consists in continuous plasma heating. A rope-like plasma discharge at a temperature of more than a million K results in the gas from microwave oscillations. The discharge is placed in a magnetic field and the ion temperature is increased by magneto-acoustic waves. A reactor is proposed operating on this principle and problems are pointed out which will have to be resolved.

  16. Selected aspects of fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this lecture, we present selected aspects of nuclear fusion. The importance of the initial geometry of the reaction and its relation to fusion barrier are first discussed. The effect of deformation leading to the notion of barrier distribution is then illustrated. After a brief overview of the advantages of macroscopic theories, the dynamics of nuclear system under large amplitude motion is reviewed. The di-nuclear concept is presented to understand the competition between fusion and quasi-fission. This concept is then generalized to account for the dissipative dynamics in multidimensional collective space. The last part of this lecture is devoted to new aspects encountered with radioactive beams specific properties of very extended neutron rich system, influence of pygmy or soft dipole resonances and charge exchange far from stability are discussed. (author)

  17. Department of Nuclear Reactions - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzanowski, A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The year 1998 can be considered as very successful both in harvesting important results from the existing collaborations as well as establishing new ones. In the frame of the COSY-11 collaboration cross section for η' production in p-p collision close to the threshold has been measured. In the region of excess energy between 1.5 and 4.1 MeV the η' cross sections are much lower than those of the π 0 and η production. There seems to be no indication that N * resonance doorway-like state governs the reaction mechanisms. The determined coupling constant g η'pp appears to be consistent with the prediction of the simple quark model. Results were published in Phys. Rev. Letters. Using the GEM detector, investigations of the isospin symmetry breaking were performed. Two reactions channels 3 Heπ 0 and 3 Hπ + from the reaction at proton momenta 700, 767, and 825 MeV/c were measured. Data analysis is in progress. The model of the meson cloud in the nucleon which is a speciality of our department has been successfully applied to explain the leading proton and neutron cross sections from the e + or e - proton collisions at the HERA ring. General formulas to calculate polarization of the particles with spin transmitted through the barrier in the presence of strong magnetic fields were obtained. New collaboration between our laboratory and the Institute for Nuclear Research in Kiev has been established. One PhD thesis was completed in the frame of this collaboration. We joined the new collaboration with Lund University concerning studies of hot nuclear matter properties using heavy ions from CELSIUS ring. First test of the phoswich detector for the forward wall was performed in Uppsala. Isoscalar giant dipole resonance strength distribution 3 ℎω has been evaluated in 208 Pb in the space of 1p1h and 2p2h excitation. The centroid energy of this state can directly be related to the nuclear incompressibility module. Our result indicates rather large values of

  18. Photonuclear spallation reactions in Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, S.; Imamura, M.; Miyachi, T.

    1986-06-01

    Formation yields of 24 radioactive nuclides by the interaction of bremsstrahlung in the maximum end-point energies of 100 MeV - 1 GeV with Cu have been measured by direct γ-ray counting of irradiated targets. The yields in the mass range of 42 to 60 except for 60 Cu were analysed by non-linear least-squares fit to construct the mass yield and charge dispersion curves in spallation reactions. From the parameter values obtained, the energy dependence of the slope of the mass yield curve and the relationship between target N/Z and the most probable product N/Z were investigated in comparison with the results of proton, α and heavy ion-induced spallations of Cu. The characteristics of photon-induced spallations are discussed. (author)

  19. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In spite of reduced personnel the number of papers published and in press exceeded fifty, almost ten more than a year ago. Another good sign is the growing number of PhD students. The following short reports cover the three major domains of our scientific activities: nuclear, material and atomic physics. Nuclear physics: The structure of light nuclei was investigated, and studies of nuclear reactions induced by heavy ions were performed including experiments at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of Warsaw University. The experiments were carried out in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Research from Kiev, Ukraine. Proton induced reactions on zirconium were investigated theoretically by means of a multistep-direct model extended for the unbound particle - hole states. Good agreement with the experimental data was achieved. Isospin effects in multifragmentation of relativistic heavy ions were studied by the ALADIN Collaboration. Elements of a new generation detector PANDA were tested experimentally using a proton beam provided by the C-30 compact cyclotron at Swierk. Evidence of a narrow baryon state was found in a quasi - real photoproduction on the deuterium target by the HERMES Collaboration. Atomic physics: Ionisation of selected heavy elements by sulphur ions was investigated in collaboration with the Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce. Materials research: Hydrogen release from ultrahigh molecular weight polythene was investigated by means of an α - particle beam from the Van de Graaff accelerator of our Department. Last but not least, many of our colleagues have been involved in education. Lectures on nuclear physics, accelerators, detectors used in nuclear research as well as nuclear methods applied in solid state studies for students from many high schools of Warsaw and for students of Warsaw University were given by Dr. Andrzej Korman and Dr. Lech Nowicki. Also, our Department made a significant contribution to the 7 th Science

  20. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.