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Sample records for amino-terminal extracellular domain

  1. Interaction of tau with the neural plasma membrane mediated by tau's amino-terminal projection domain

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The neuronal microtubule-associated protein tau is required for the development of cell polarity in cultured neurons. Using PC12 cells that stably express tau and tau amino-terminal fragments, we report that tau interacts with the neural plasma membrane through its amino-terminal projection domain. In differentiated PC12 transfectants, tau is found in growth cone-like structures in a nonmicrotubule-dependent manner. In hippocampal neurons, tau is differentially extracted by detergent and enri...

  2. The amino-terminal segment in the β-domain of δ-cadinene synthase is essential for catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Verónica; Grundy, Daniel J; Faraldos, Juan A; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2016-08-21

    Despite its distance from the active site the flexible amino-terminal segment (NTS) in the β-domain of the plant sesquiterpene cyclase δ-cadinene synthase (DCS) is essential for active site closure and desolvation events during catalysis. PMID:27431578

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Bag2 amino-terminal domain from Mus musculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amino-terminal domain of the Hsp70 co-chaperone Bag2 from M. musculus has been crystallized in native and selenomethionyl forms diffracting to 2.27 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively. Bag2, an atypical member of the Bag family of Hsp70 co-chaperones, acts as both an Hsp70 nucleotide-exchange factor and an inhibitor of the Hsp70-binding E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (carboxyl-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein). The amino-terminal domain of Bag2 (Bag2-NTD), which is required for inhibition of CHIP, has no sequence homologs in the PDB. Native and selenomethionyl (SeMet) forms of Bag2-NTD were crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. Native Bag2-NTD crystals diffracted to 2.27 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.5, b = 84.7, c = 114.1 Å. SeMet Bag2-NTD crystals diffracted to 3.10 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 53.3, c = 86.7 Å. Phases for the SeMet Bag2-NTD crystal were solved by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Initial phasing and model building using the 3.10 Å resolution SeMet Bag2-NTD data set suggested that Bag2-NTD forms a dimer and adopts a fold distinct from those of any domains annotated in the Pfam or SMART domain databases

  4. Role of the amino-terminal domains of MEKKs in the activation of NF kappa B and MAPK pathways and in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvin, Christelle; Guillon, Audrey; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Gerwins, Pär; Johnson, Gary L; Widmann, Christian

    2002-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) kinases (MEKKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are upstream regulators of MAPKs. Here, the role of the amino-terminal (N-terminal) domain of MEKK1-4 on the regulation of different intracellular signaling pathways, apoptosis, and cell proliferation has been assessed by comparing the responses induced by the full-length (FL) MEKKs to those induced by the kinase domains only. For each MEKK, the pattern of activation of NF kappa B, the ERK MAPK pathway, and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK pathway markedly differed between the kinase domain and the FL form. Similarly, cell proliferation and apoptosis were differently regulated by the FL MEKK and the corresponding kinase domain. Our data show that the N-terminal domain of the MEKKs determines the specificity and the strength of activation of various intracellular signaling pathways and cellular responses. PMID:11781136

  5. Natural variation of the amino-terminal glutamine-rich domain in Drosophila argonaute2 is not associated with developmental defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hain

    Full Text Available The Drosophila argonaute2 (ago2 gene plays a major role in siRNA mediated RNA silencing pathways. Unlike mammalian Argonaute proteins, the Drosophila protein has an unusual amino-terminal domain made up largely of multiple copies of glutamine-rich repeats (GRRs. We report here that the ago2 locus produces an alternative transcript that encodes a putative short isoform without this amino-terminal domain. Several ago2 mutations previously reported to be null alleles only abolish expression of the long, GRR-containing isoform. Analysis of drop out (dop mutations had previously suggested that variations in GRR copy number result in defects in RNAi and embryonic development. However, we find that dop mutations genetically complement transcript-null alleles of ago2 and that ago2 alleles with variant GRR copy numbers support normal development. In addition, we show that the assembly of the central RNAi machinery, the RISC (RNA induced silencing complex, is unimpaired in embryos when GRR copy number is altered. In fact, we find that GRR copy number is highly variable in natural D. melanogaster populations as well as in laboratory strains. Finally, while many other insects share an extensive, glutamine-rich Ago2 amino-terminal domain, its primary sequence varies drastically between species. Our data indicate that GRR variation does not modulate an essential function of Ago2 and that the amino-terminal domain of Ago2 is subject to rapid evolution.

  6. Resonance assignment of an engineered amino-terminal domain of a major ampullate spider silk with neutralized charge cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Daniel; Bauer, Joschka; Schweimer, Kristian; Scheibel, Thomas; Rösch, Paul; Schwarzinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Spider dragline fibers are predominantly made out of the major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) 1 and 2. The assembly of dissolved spidroin into a stable fiber is highly controlled for example by dimerization of its amino-terminal domain (NRN) upon acidification, as well as removal of sodium chloride along the spinning duct. Clustered residues D39, E76 and E81 are the most highly conserved residues of the five-helix bundle, and they are hypothesized to be key residues for switching between a monomeric and a dimeric conformation. Simultaneous replacement of these residues by their non-titratable analogues results in variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q, which is supposed to fold into an intermediate conformation between that of the monomeric and the dimeric state at neutral pH. Here we report the resonance assignment of Latrodectus hesperus NRN variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q at pH 7.2 obtained by high-resolution triple resonance NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26892754

  7. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    OpenAIRE

    Berrevoets, Cor; P. Doesburg; Steketee, Karine; Trapman, Jan; Brinkmann, Albert

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in this in vivo interaction were determined in more detail. Cotransfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and two-hybrid experiments in yeast revealed that two regions in the NH2-terminal domain are involved in the ...

  8. Identification of a direct interaction between residue 19 in the helical portion of calcitonin and the amino-terminal domain of the calcitonin receptor from photoaffinity cross-linking and mutational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Calcitonins (CTs) are 32 amino acid hormones with both peripheral and central actions mediated via specific cell surface receptors, which belong to the superfamily of class II G-protein coupled receptors. Chimeric receptor and mutational data suggested that the helical portion (residues 8-22) of salmon CT (sCT) is important for high affinity binding to the amino-terminal extracellular domain of the human CT receptor (hCTR). In this study, we have developed photoactive sCT analogues [Arg11,18, Bpa19]sCT and [Arg11, 18, Bpa19]sCT(8-32) that incorporate a photolabile Bpa (p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine) into position 19 of the helical domain of the ligand and used this to determine a specific receptor fragment proximate to it. These analogues saturably bound to the CTR with high affinity (IC50 = 3 nM) which was similar to that of the natural sCT and its antagonist (IC50 = 2 nM and 20 nM, respectively). Upon photolysis, radioiodinated 125I-[Arg11,18, Bpa19]sCT and 125I-[Arg11,18, Bpa19]sCT(8-32) efficiently and specifically cross-linked to hCTR stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells (Hollexl cells, ∼ 800,000 receptors per cell), generating a single radiolabeled band of ∼ 72-kDa on SDS/PAGE autoradiography. To identify the 'contact domain' within CTR involved in binding of 125I-[Arg11, 18, Bpa19]sCT and 125I-[Arg11,18, Bpa19]sCT(8-32), the radiolabeled band containing the ligand-receptor conjugate was subjected to chemical and enzymatic cleavage. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of the native receptor yielded a radiolabeled fragment of apparent Mr ∼ 31-kDa that shifted to Mr ∼ 14 kDa after deglycosylation. This receptor domain corresponded to amino acids 59-134 of the hCTR, located at the amino-terminal extracellular region of the receptor. These results provide the first direct demonstration of a contact domain between calcitonin and its receptor, and will contribute towards the modelling of CT-CTR interface. Copyright (2001) Australasian Society of

  9. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustgi, A.K.; Dyson, N.; Bernards, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved is the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/

  10. The amino-terminal GAF domain of Azotobacter vinelandii NifA binds 2-oxoglutarate to resist inhibition by NifL under nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Richard; Dixon, Ray

    2003-08-01

    The expression of genes required for the synthesis of molybdenum nitrogenase in Azotobacter vinelandii is controlled by the NifL-NifA transcriptional regulatory complex in response to nitrogen, carbon, and redox status. Activation of nif gene expression by the transcriptional activator NifA is inhibited by direct protein-protein interaction with NifL under conditions unfavorable for nitrogen fixation. We have recently shown that the NifL-NifA system responds directly to physiological concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, resulting in relief of NifA activity from inhibition by NifL under conditions when fixed nitrogen is limiting. The inhibitory activity of NifL is restored under conditions of excess combined nitrogen through the binding of the signal transduction protein Av GlnK to the carboxyl-terminal domain of NifL. The amino-terminal domain of NifA comprises a GAF domain implicated in the regulatory response to NifL. A truncated form of NifA lacking this domain is not responsive to 2-oxoglutarate in the presence of NifL, suggesting that the GAF domain is required for the response to this ligand. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate stoichiometric binding of 2-oxoglutarate to both the isolated GAF domain and the full-length A. vinelandii NifA protein with a dissociation constant of approximately 60 microm. Limited proteolysis experiments indicate that the binding of 2-oxoglutarate increases the susceptibility of the GAF domain to trypsin digestion and also prevents NifL from protecting these cleavage sites. However, protection by NifL is restored when the non-modified (non-uridylylated) form of Av GlnK is also present. Our results suggest that the binding of 2-oxoglutarate to the GAF domain of NifA may induce a conformational change that prevents inhibition by NifL under conditions when fixed nitrogen is limiting. PMID:12759352

  11. Amino-terminal domains of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E1 and E2 proteins participate in complex formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, J D; Howley, P M

    1995-01-01

    Interaction between the E1 and E2 papillomavirus proteins appear to play an important role in viral DNA replication, although the exact domains of each protein involved in this interaction have not been identified. Using bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) as a model for examining interactions between E1 and E2, we have used the two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion systems to map domains of BPV-1 E1 and E2 that interact in vivo and in vitro. In the two-hybrid system experime...

  12. The amino-terminal domain of human signal transducers and activators of transcription 1: Overexpression, purification and characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arati Prabhu; Evans Coutinho; Sudha Srivastava

    2005-12-01

    The dual functional signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins are latent cytoplasmic transcription factors that play crucial roles in host defense. Animals that lack these proteins are highly susceptible to microbial and viral infections and chemically induced primary tumours. We have over expressed the aminoterminal domain of human STAT1 (hSTAT1) in Escherichia coli and purified it by affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. The entire process has been monitored by gel electrophoresis. The pure protein has been characterized by mass spectrometry and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectroscopy. Our results indicate that the N-terminus of hSTAT1 exists as a dimer in solution.

  13. Improving solubility of NR2B amino-terminal domain of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expressed in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amino-terminal domains (ATDs) of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors contain binding sites for modulators and may serve as potential drug targets in neurological diseases. Here, three fusion tags (6xHis-, GST-, and MBP-) were fused to the ATD of NMDA receptor NR2B subunit (ATD2B) and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each tag's ability to confer enhanced solubility to ATD2B was assessed. Soluble ATD2B was successfully obtained as a MBP fusion protein. Dynamic light scattering revealed the protein (1 mg/ml) exists as monodispersed species at 25 oC. Functional studies using circular dichroism showed that the soluble MBP-ATD2B bound ifenprodil in a dose-dependent manner. The dissociation constants obtained for ifenprodil were similar in the absence (64 nM) and presence (116 nM) of saturating concentration of maltose. Moreover, the yield of soluble MBP-ATD2B is 18 times higher than the refolded 6xHis-ATD2B. We have reported a systematic comparison of three different affinity tagging strategies and identified a rapid and efficient method to obtain large amount of ATD2B recombinant protein for biochemical and structural studies

  14. Expression and T cell recognition of hybrid antigens with amino-terminal domains encoded by Qa-2 region of major histocompatibility complex and carboxyl termini of transplantation antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroynowski, I; Forman, J; Goodenow, R S; Schiffer, S G; McMillan, M; Sharrow, S O; Sachs, D H; Hood, L

    1985-05-01

    Coding potential of the Q6 gene from the Qa-2a region of BALB/c Crgl mice was analyzed by a combination of hybrid class I gene construction and DNA-mediated gene transfer. Recombinant genes were created by exon shuffling of the 5' coding region of the Q6 gene and the 3' coding region of a gene encoding a transplantation antigen (Kd, Dd, or Ld), or the inverse. Some of these hybrid class I genes were expressed in the transfected mouse fibroblasts (L cells). The hybrid class I molecules encoded by the 5' end of the Q6 gene and the 3' end of the Ld gene precipitated as 45,000 mol wt molecules associated with beta 2-microglobulin. The expression of the hybrid proteins indicates that 926 basepairs of the 5' flanking region upstream of the structural Q6 gene contain a promoter that functions as a transcription initiation site in L cells. The 3' portion of the Q6 gene appears to be responsible for the lack of cell surface expression of the intact Q6 and the hybrid Ld/Q6 genes in mouse fibroblasts. Accordingly, this portion of the Q6 class I gene may play a regulatory role in tissue-specific expression. Serological analyses of hybrid Q6 proteins suggested that Q6 may be a structural gene for CR (H-2 crossreactive) antigen found normally on subpopulations of lymphocytes. If this identification is correct, Q6 gene will define a new category of class I genes encoding approximately 40,000 mol wt molecules and carrying a characteristic truncated cytoplasmic tail. Analysis of L cells transfected with Q6 hybrid genes demonstrated also that the cytotoxic T cells specific for Qa-2a region-coded antigens recognize the amino-terminal alpha 1-alpha 2 domain of Q6 fusion products. This recognition can be blocked by anti-Qa-2a alloantiserum and monoclonal antibodies reactive with the alpha 3-beta 2-microglobulin portion of the Q6 hybrids. We propose that the structural requirements for the anti-Qa-2a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-specific epitopes on target molecules are the same as for anti

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal domain of pp60c-src molecules associated with polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Yonemoto, W; Jarvis-Morar, M; Brugge, J S; Bolen, J B; Israel, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the in vitro phosphorylation of cellular src protein (pp60c-src) molecules associated with the polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen in polyoma virus-transformed cells. These pp60c-src molecules possessed an enhanced tyrosyl kinase activity, migrated aberrantly on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, and contained a novel site of tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal region of the molecule. The pp60c-src molecules not associated with the middle-sized tumor antigen we...

  16. E2 polypeptides encoded by bovine papillomavirus type 1 form dimers through the common carboxyl-terminal domain: transactivation is mediated by the conserved amino-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, A A; Byrne, J C; Howley, P M

    1989-01-01

    The E2 open reading frame (ORF) of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) encodes positive- and negative-acting factors that regulate viral gene expression. The full-length ORF encodes a transactivator, and two transcriptional repressors are expressed from the 3' half of the ORF. Previous analysis has shown that a conserved C-terminal region of 101 amino acids, which is shared by E2 transactivator and repressor proteins, contains the specific DNA binding activity. Further analysis of the E2 transactivator shows that a conserved N-terminal domain of approximately 220 amino acids is crucial for the transcriptional activation function, whereas the variable internal region is not required. The E2 proteins bind to a sequence, ACCGN4CGGT, several copies of which are sufficient to constitute an E2-dependent enhancer. By using a gel retardation assay and proteins derived by in vitro transcription and translation, we were able to show that the E2 polypeptides bind as dimers to a single DNA binding site. The dimeric E2 proteins are stable in the absence of DNA and dimerization is mediated through the DNA binding domain. This may reveal an additional mechanism of repression that could potentially result from the formation of inactive heterodimers between transactivator and repressor species. PMID:2536165

  17. 1H NMR assignment and secondary structure of the Ca2+-free form of the amino-terminal epidermal growth factor like domain in coagulation factor X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood coagulation factor X is composed of discrete domains, two of which are homologous to the epidermal growth factor (EGF). The N-terminal EGF like domain in factor X (fX-EGFN), residues 45-86 of the intact protein contains a β-hydroxylated asparatic acid and has one Ca2+-binding site. Using 2D NMR techniques, the authors have made a full assignment of the 500-MHz 1H NMR spectrum of Ca2+-free fX-EGFN. On the basis of this assignment and complementary NOESY experiments, they have also determined the secondary structure of Ca2+-free fX-EGFN in water solution. Residues 45-49 are comparatively mobile, whereas residues 5-56 are constrained by two disulfide bonds to one side of an antiparallel β-sheet involving residues 59-64 and 67-72. Another antiparallel β-sheet involves residues 76-77 and 83-84. A small, parallel β-sheet connects residues 80-81 and 55-56 and thereby orients the two antiparallel β-sheets relative to each other. Four β-turns are identified, involving residues 50-53, 56-59, 64-67, 73-76. Residues 78-82 adopt an extended bend structure. On the basis of secondary structure and the location of the three disulfide bonds, they find that Asp 46, Asp 48, and Hya 63 are sufficiently close to each other to form a Ca2+-binding site. However, the amino terminus of the Ca2+-free form of fX-EGFN is not part of a triple-stranded β-sheet as in other EGF like peptides. Differences and similarities between fX-EGFN and murine EGF with respect to secondary structure and conformational shifts are discussed

  18. Plasmodium falciparum: an epitope within a highly conserved region of the 47-kDa amino-terminal domain of the serine repeat antigen is a target of parasite-inhibitory antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B A; Xing-Li, P; Suzue, K; Horii, T; Bzik, D J

    1997-02-01

    Previously, the Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen has been shown to be protective in primate models of malaria immunity and also to be a target of in vitro parasite-inhibitory antibodies. To further define parasite-inhibitory epitopes a series of deletions from the amino-terminal 47-kDa domain of the serine repeat antigen (SERA) were constructed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins. Several GST-SERA fusion proteins were used to vaccinate mice with Freund's adjuvant and the resulting immune sera were used to assay for the inhibition of P. falciparum invasion of erythrocytes in vitro. The minimal epitope shown to be the target of invasion-blocking antibodies was SERA amino acids 17-165. Additional GST-SERA deletion constructs of the 47-kDa domain were developed and evaluated for reactivity, by Western immunoblot analysis, with a parasite-inhibitory murine monoclonal antibody (mAb 43E5), a parasite-inhibitory pooled goat polyclonal sera, and a pooled human Nigerian immune serum. The parasite-inhibitory epitope defined by mAb 43E5 was mapped to SERA amino acids 17-110 and, at least, part of the epitope was defined to include amino acids in the region of amino acids 59-72. The parasite-inhibitory epitope recognized by mAb 43E5 appears to be well conserved between diverse geographical isolates of P. falciparum. The results have relevance for malaria vaccine development and suggest that an appropriately designed recombinant SERA antigen produced from a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli may be an effective component of a candidate malaria vaccine. PMID:9030663

  19. Amino-terminal domain of the v-fms oncogene product includes a functional signal peptide that directs synthesis of a transforming glycoprotein in the absence of feline leukemia virus gag sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleotide sequence of a 5' segment of the human genomic c-fms proto-oncogene suggested that recombination between feline leukemia virus and feline c-fms sequences might have occurred in a region encoding the 5' untranslated portion of c-fms mRNA. The polyprotein precursor gP180/sup gag-fms/ encoded by the McDonough strain of feline sarcoma virus was therefore predicted to contain 34 v-fms-coded amino acids derived from sequences of the c-fms gene that are not ordinarily translated from the proto-oncogene mRNA. The (gP180/sup gag-fms/) polyprotein was cotranslationally cleaved near the gag-fms junction to remove its gag gene-coded portion. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the resulting v-fms-coded glycoprotein, gp120/sup v-fms/, showed that the site of proteolysis corresponded to a predicted signal peptidase cleavage site within the c-fms gene product. Together, these analyses suggested that the linked gag sequences may not be necessary for expression of a biologically active v-fms gene product. The gag-fms sequences of feline sarcoma virus strain McDonough and the v-fms sequences alone were inserted into a murine retroviral vector containing a neomycin resistance gene. The authors conclude that a cryptic hydrophobic signal peptide sequence in v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms gene product within membranous organelles. It seems likely that the proteolytic cleavage of gP180/gag-fms/ is mediated by signal peptidase and that the amino termini of gp140/sup v-fms/ and the c-fms gene product are identical

  20. Insertion of tetracysteine motifs into dopamine transporter extracellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Navaroli

    Full Text Available The neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT is a major determinant of extracellular dopamine (DA levels and is the primary target for a variety of addictive and therapeutic psychoactive drugs. DAT is acutely regulated by protein kinase C (PKC activation and amphetamine exposure, both of which modulate DAT surface expression by endocytic trafficking. In order to use live imaging approaches to study DAT endocytosis, methods are needed to exclusively label the DAT surface pool. The use of membrane impermeant, sulfonated biarsenic dyes holds potential as one such approach, and requires introduction of an extracellular tetracysteine motif (tetraCys; CCPGCC to facilitate dye binding. In the current study, we took advantage of intrinsic proline-glycine (Pro-Gly dipeptides encoded in predicted DAT extracellular domains to introduce tetraCys motifs into DAT extracellular loops 2, 3, and 4. [(3H]DA uptake studies, surface biotinylation and fluorescence microscopy in PC12 cells indicate that tetraCys insertion into the DAT second extracellular loop results in a functional transporter that maintains PKC-mediated downregulation. Introduction of tetraCys into extracellular loops 3 and 4 yielded DATs with severely compromised function that failed to mature and traffic to the cell surface. This is the first demonstration of successful introduction of a tetracysteine motif into a DAT extracellular domain, and may hold promise for use of biarsenic dyes in live DAT imaging studies.

  1. THE ESCHERICHIA COLI SIGNAL PEPTIDE PEPTIDASE A IS A SERINE-LYSINE PROTEASE WITH A LYSINE RECRUITED TO THE NON-CONSERVED AMINO-TERMINAL DOMAIN IN THE S49 PROTEASE FAMILY

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peng; Shim, Eunjung; Cravatt, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Richard; Schoeniger, Joe; Kim, Apollos C.; Paetzel, Mark; Dalbey, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    The E. coli signal peptide peptidase A (SppA) is a serine protease which cleaves signal peptides after they have been proteolytically removed from exported proteins by signal peptidase processing. We present here results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of all the conserved serines of SppA in the carboxyl-terminal domain showing that only Ser 409 is essential for enzymatic activity. Also, we show that the serine hydrolase inhibitor FP-biotin inhibits SppA and modifies the protein, but doe...

  2. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD–linker domain–TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  3. Amino-terminated diamond surfaces: Photoelectron emission and photocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Di; Bandy, Jason A.; Li, Shuo; Hamers, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    We report a new approach to making stable negative electron-affinity diamond surfaces by terminating diamond with amino groups (also known as amine groups, -NH2). Previous studies have shown that negative electron affinity can be induced by terminating diamond surfaces with hydrogen, creating a surface dipole favorable toward electron emission. Here, we demonstrate that covalent tethering of positive charges in the form of protonated amino groups, -NH3+, also leads to negative electron affinity (NEA) and facile electron emission into vacuum and into water. Amino-terminated diamond was prepared using a very mild plasma discharge. Valence-band photoemission studies of the amino-terminated diamond samples show a characteristic "NEA" peak, demonstrating that the amino-terminated surface has NEA. Diamond's ability to emit electrons into water was evaluated using photochemical conversion of N2 to NH3. Time-resolved surface photovoltage studies were used to characterize charge separation at the diamond interface, and Mott-Schottky measurements were performed to characterize band-bending at the diamond-water interface. XPS studies show that the amino-terminated surfaces provide increased chemical resistance to oxidation compared with H-terminated diamond when illuminated with ultraviolet light.

  4. Identification of the first germline mutation in the extracellular domain of the follitropin receptor responsible for spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Anne; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Erkan, Sanly; Idil, Mehmet; Vassart, Gilbert; Pardo, Leonardo; Costagliola, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    The receptors for follitropin (FSHR), thyrotropin (TSHR), and lutropin/chorionic gonadotropin (LHCGR) are the members of the glycoprotein hormone (GPH) receptors (GPHR) family. They present a bipartite structure with a large extracellular amino-terminal domain (ECD), responsible for high-affinity hormone binding, and a carboxyl-terminal serpentine region, implicated in transduction of the activation signal. Spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (sOHSS) is a rare genetic condition in which human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) promiscuously stimulates the FSHR during the first trimester of pregnancy. Surprisingly, germline FSHR mutations responsible for the disease have so far been found only in the transmembrane helices of the serpentine region of the FSHR, outside the hormone binding domain. When tested functionally, all mutants were abnormally sensitive to both hCG and thyrotropin (TSH) while displaying constitutive activity. This loss of ligand specificity was attributed to the lowering of an intramolecular barrier of activation rather than to an increase of binding affinity. Here we report the first germline mutation responsible for sOHSS (c.383C>A, p.Ser128Tyr), located in the ECD of the FSHR. Contrary to the mutations described previously, the p.Ser128Tyr FSHR mutant displayed increase in affinity and sensitivity toward hCG and did not show any constitutive activity, nor promiscuous activation by TSH. Thus, sOHSS can be achieved from different molecular mechanisms involving each functional domains of the FSHR. Based on the structure of the FSHR/FSH complex and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we provide robust molecular models for the GPH/GPHR complexes and we propose a molecular explanation to the binding characteristics of the p.Ser128Tyr mutant. PMID:17721928

  5. Rearrangement of the Extracellular Domain/Extracellular Loop 1 Interface Is Critical for Thyrotropin Receptor Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarschmidt, Joerg; Nagel, Marcus B M; Huth, Sandra; Jaeschke, Holger; Moretti, Rocco; Hintze, Vera; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan; Meiler, Jens; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with a characteristic large extracellular domain (ECD). TSHR activation is initiated by binding of the hormone ligand TSH to the ECD. How the extracellular binding event triggers the conformational changes in the transmembrane domain (TMD) necessary for intracellular G protein activation is poorly understood. To gain insight in this process, the knowledge on the relative positioning of ECD and TMD and the conformation of the linker region at the interface of ECD and TMD are of particular importance. To generate a structural model for the TSHR we applied an integrated structural biology approach combining computational techniques with experimental data. Chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry yielded 17 unique distance restraints within the ECD of the TSHR, its ligand TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex. These structural restraints generally confirm the expected binding mode of TSH to the ECD as well as the general fold of the domains and were used to guide homology modeling of the ECD. Functional characterization of TSHR mutants confirms the previously suggested close proximity of Ser-281 and Ile-486 within the TSHR. Rigidifying this contact permanently with a disulfide bridge disrupts ligand-induced receptor activation and indicates that rearrangement of the ECD/extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) interface is a critical step in receptor activation. The experimentally verified contact of Ser-281 (ECD) and Ile-486 (TMD) was subsequently utilized in docking homology models of the ECD and the TMD to create a full-length model of a glycoprotein hormone receptor. PMID:27129207

  6. Uniform {sup 15}N- and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeling of proteins in mammalian cells and solution structure of the amino terminal fragment of u-PA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, A.P.; Petros, A.M.; Meadows, R.P.; Mazar, A.P.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Pederson, T.M.; Fesik, S.W. [Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) is a 54-kDa glycoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, a broad-specificity protease responsible for the degradation of fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. The u-PA protein consists of three individual modules: a growth factor domain (GFD), a kringle, and a serine protease domain. The amino terminal fragment (ATF) includes the GFD-responsible for u-PA binding to its receptor-and the kringle domains. This protein was expressed and uniformly {sup 15}N-and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled in mammalian cells by methods that will be described. In addition, we present the three-dimensional structure of ATF that was derived from 1299 NOE-derived distance restraints along with the {phi} angle and hydrogen bonding restraints. Although the individual domains in the structures were highly converged, the two domains are structurally independent. The overall structures of the individual domains are very similar to the structures of homologous proteins. However, important structural differences between the growth factor domain of u-PA and other homologous proteins were observed in the region that has been implicated in binding the urokinase receptor. These results may explain, in part, why other growth factors show no appreciable affinity for the urokinase receptor.

  7. Role of the Amino-Terminal Region of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae in Adherence to Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Han, Yiping; Hamada, Nobushiro; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae elicit many responses in eukaryotic cells, including mitogenicity, cytokine production, epithelial cell invasion, and cellular immune response. Specific domains of the major fimbrial protein (FimA) have been shown to be important in triggering some of these functions. The goal of the present study was to identify the domain(s) of P. gingivalis FimA responsible for specific interaction with human mucosal epithelial cells. Fimbriated P. gingivalis strains have been shown to bind to buccal epithelial cells, whereas nonfimbriated strains bind at low levels or not at all. This and other studies provide evidence that FimA mediates the adherence of P. gingivalis to oral epithelial cells. To determine the specific region(s) of P. gingivalis FimA involved in epithelial cell binding, specific antipeptide antibodies were used to inhibit the binding of iodinated purified fimbriae as well as the binding of P. gingivalis cells to epithelial cells. Antibodies directed against peptides 49 to 68 (VVMANTAGAMELVGKTLAEVK) and 69 to 90 (ALTTELTAENQEAAGLIMTAEP) were found to highly inhibit both the binding of fimbriae and the binding of P. gingivalis cells to epithelial cells. The antibody against FimA peptides 69 to 90 also reacted with P. gingivalis fimbriae in immunogold labeling and immunoblot analysis, thereby indicating that this peptide domain is exposed on the surface of fimbriae. Our results suggest that the amino-terminal domain corresponding to amino acid residues 49 to 90 of the fimbrillin protein is a major epithelial cell binding domain of P. gingivalis fimbriae. PMID:10531284

  8. Heterologous production of death ligands' and death receptors' extracellular domains: structural features and efficient systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Michiro

    2012-08-01

    The extracellular domains of death ligands and those of death receptors are closely related to many serious human diseases through the initiation of apoptosis. Recombinant production of the extracellular domains has been investigated due to demand for a large amount of purified samples, which are a prerequisite for their biochemical characterization and constitute the fundamentals of medical applications. This review focuses on the recombinant production of extracellular domains of the major members of death ligand and death receptor families using non-mammalian expression systems with an emphasis on Fas ligand and Fas receptor. In contrast to the efficient production of the functional extracellular domains of TRAIL, TNFα and LTα by intracellular expression systems using Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris, that of Fas ligand requires the secretory expression systems using P. pastoris or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the productivity in P. pastoris was largely dependent on tag sequence, potential N-glycosylation site and expressed protein region. On the other hand, the exploitation of insect cell systems is generally useful for the preparation of functional extracellular domains of death receptors containing many disulfide bridges in the absence of extended secondary structure, and a Bombyx mori larvae secretion system presented a superior productivity for human Fas receptor extracellular domain. Based on the results obtained so far, further efforts should be devoted to the artificial control of death ligand - death receptor interactions in order to make a contribution to medicine, represented by the development of novel biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22762186

  9. The Extracellular Domain of Neurotrophin Receptor p75 as a Candidate Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shepheard, Stephanie R.; Tim Chataway; David W Schultz; Rush, Robert A.; Mary-Louise Rogers

    2014-01-01

    Objective biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis would facilitate the discovery of new treatments. The common neurotrophin receptor p75 is up regulated and the extracellular domain cleaved from injured neurons and peripheral glia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We have tested the hypothesis that urinary levels of extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 serve as a biomarker for both human motor amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of the disease. The extracellul...

  10. Immunolocalization of an Amino-Terminal Fragment of Apolipoprotein E in the Pick's Disease Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Rohn, Troy T.; Day, Ryan J; Catlin, Lindsey W; Brown, Raquel J.; Rajic, Alexander J.; Poon, Wayne W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the risk factor for apolipoprotein E (apoE) polymorphism in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been well described, the role that apoE plays in other neurodegenerative diseases, including Pick's disease, is not well established. To examine a possible role of apoE in Pick's disease, an immunohistochemical analysis was performed utilizing a novel site-directed antibody that is specific for an amino-terminal fragment of apoE. Application of this antibody, termed the amino-terminal apoE cleava...

  11. Interfering amino terminal peptides and functional implications for heteromeric gap junction formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard David Veenstra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Connexin43 (Cx43 is widely expressed in many different tissues of the human body. In cells of some organs, Cx43 is co-expressed with other connexins (Cx, including Cx46 and Cx50 in lens, Cx40 in atrium, Purkinje fibers, and the blood vessel wall, Cx45 in heart, and Cx37 in the ovary. Interactions with the co-expressed connexins may have profound functional implications. The abilities of Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 to function in heteromeric gap junction combinations with Cx43 are well documented. Different studies disagree regarding the ability of Cx43 and Cx40 to produce functional heteromeric gap junctions with each other. We review previous studies regarding the heteromeric interactions of Cx43. The possibility of negative functional interactions between the cytoplasmic pore-forming amino terminal (NT domains of these connexins was assessed using pentameric connexin sequence-specific NT domain (iNT peptides applied to cells expressing homomeric Cx40, Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 gap junctions. A Cx43 iNT peptide corresponding to amino acids 9 to 13 (Ac-KLLDK-NH2 specifically inhibited the electrical coupling of Cx40 gap junctions in a transjunctional (Vj voltage-dependent manner without affecting the function of homologous Cx37, Cx46, Cx50, and Cx45 gap junctions. A Cx40 iNT (Ac-EFLEE-OH peptide counteracted the Vj-dependent block of Cx40 gap junctions, whereas a similarly charged Cx50 iNT (Ac-EEVNE-OH peptide did not, suggesting that these NT domain interactions are not solely based on electrostatics. These data are consistent with functional Cx43 heteromeric gap junction formation with Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 and suggest that Cx40 uniquely experiences functional suppressive interactions with a Cx43 NT domain sequence. These findings present unique functional implications about the heteromeric interactions between Cx43 and Cx40 that may influence cardiac conduction in atrial myocardium and the specialized conduction system.

  12. Amino-terminal sequence analysis of the Coccidioides immitis chitinase/immunodiffusion-complement fixation protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, S M; Zimmermann, C R; Pappagianis, D

    1993-01-01

    A chitinase isolated from Coccidioides immitis was subjected to amino-terminal protein sequence analysis. The resulting 18-amino-acid sequence was compared with the previously reported amino acid sequence of coccidioidal immunodiffusion-complement fixation (IDCF) antigen. From the homology of the two sequences, the results support the identification of the IDCF antigen with a chitinase.

  13. The extracellular domain of neurotrophin receptor p75 as a candidate biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R Shepheard

    Full Text Available Objective biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis would facilitate the discovery of new treatments. The common neurotrophin receptor p75 is up regulated and the extracellular domain cleaved from injured neurons and peripheral glia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We have tested the hypothesis that urinary levels of extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 serve as a biomarker for both human motor amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the SOD1(G93A mouse model of the disease. The extracellular domain of neurotrophin receptor p75 was identified in the urine of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients by an immuno-precipitation/western blot procedure and confirmed by mass spectrometry. An ELISA was established to measure urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75. The mean value for urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 from 28 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients measured by ELISA was 7.9±0.5 ng/mg creatinine and this was significantly higher (p<0.001 than 12 controls (2.6±0.2 ng/mg creatinine and 19 patients with other neurological disease (Parkinson's disease and Multiple Sclerosis; 4.1±0.2 ng/mg creatinine. Pilot data of disease progression rates in 14 MND patients indicates that p75NTR(ECD levels were significantly higher (p = 0.0041 in 7 rapidly progressing patients as compared to 7 with slowly progressing disease. Extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 was also readily detected in SOD1(G93A mice by immuno-precipitation/western blot before the onset of clinical symptoms. These findings indicate a significant relation between urinary extracellular neurotrophin receptor p75 levels and disease progression and suggests that it may be a useful marker of disease activity and progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  14. Characterization of the protease activity that cleaves the extracellular domain of β-dystroglycan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dystroglycan (DG) complex, composed of αDG and βDG, provides a link between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cortical cytoskeleton. Although the proteolytic processing of βDG was reported in various physiological and pathological conditions, its exact mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue using the cell culture system of rat schwannoma cell line RT4. We found that the culture medium of RT4 cells was enriched with the protease activity that degrades the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of βDG specifically. This activity was suppressed by the inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, but not by the inhibitors of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-8, and MMP-13. Zymography and RT-PCR analysis showed that RT4 cells secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 into the culture medium. Finally, active MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymes degraded the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of βDG. These results indicate (1) that RT4 cells secrete the protease activity that degrades the extracellular domain of βDG specifically and (2) that MMP-2 and MMP-9 may be involved in this process

  15. Two Stage Cadherin Kinetics Require Multiple Extracellular Domains but Not the Cytoplasmic Region*

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Yuan-Hung; Jiang, Ning; Li, Fang; Zhang, Fang; Zhu, Cheng; Leckband, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Micropipette manipulation measurements quantified the pre-steady state binding kinetics between cell pairs mediated by Xenopus cleavage stage cadherin. The time-dependence of the intercellular binding probability exhibits a fast forming, low probability binding state, which transitions to a slower forming, high probability state. The biphasic kinetics are independent of the cytoplasmic region, but the transition to the high probability state requires the third extracellular domain EC3. Deleti...

  16. Extracellular Domain N-Glycosylation Controls Human Thrombopoietin Receptor Cell Surface Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Albu, Roxana I.; Stefan N. Constantinescu

    2011-01-01

    The thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is a type I transmembrane protein that mediates the signaling functions of thrombopoietin (Tpo) in regulating megakaryocyte differentiation, platelet formation, and hematopoietic stem cell renewal. We probed the role of each of the four extracellular domain putative N-glycosylation sites for cell surface localization and function of the receptor. Single N-glycosylation mutants at any of the four sites were able to acquire the mature N-glycosylated pattern, b...

  17. Extracellular Domain N-Glycosylation Controls Human Thrombopoietin Receptor Cell Surface Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan N. Constantinescu

    2011-01-01

    The thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is a type I transmembrane protein that mediates the signaling functions of thrombopoietin (Tpo) in regulating megakaryocyte differentiation, platelet formation and hematopoietic stem cell renewal. We probed the role of each of the four extracellular domain putative N-glycosylation sites for cell surface localization and function of the receptor. Single N-glycosylation mutants at any of the four sites were able to acquire the mature N-glycosylated pattern, bu...

  18. The mannosylated extracellular domain of Her2/neu produced in P. pastoris induces protective antitumor immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Her2/neu is overexpressed in various human cancers of epithelial origin and is associated with increased metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Several attempts have been made using the extracellular domain of Her2/neu (ECD/Her2) as a prophylactic vaccine in mice with no success in tumor prevention. The extracellular domain of Her2/neu (ECD/Her2) was expressed in yeast P. pastoris, in a soluble highly mannosylated form. The immune response of the immunization with this recombinant ECD/Her2 was analyzed using immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis, proliferation and cytotoxicity assays as well as specific tumor growth assays. Mannosylated ECD/Her2 elicited a humoral response with HER2/neu specific antibodies in vaccinated mice, which were able to reduce the proliferation rate of cancer cells in vitro. Moreover, it elicited a cellular response with Her2/neu-specific CTL capable of lysing tumor cells, in vitro. When immunized Balb/c and HHD mice were challenged with Her2/neu-overexpressing cells, tumor growth was inhibited. Here we report on the efficacy of the extracellular domain of human Her2/neu produced in yeast P. pastoris, which confers mannosylation of the protein, to act as a potent anti-tumor vaccine against Her2/neu overexpressing tumors. Specific cellular and humoral responses were observed as well as efficacy

  19. Amino-terminal p53 mutations lead to expression of apoptosis proficient p47 and prognosticate better survival, but predispose to tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Phang, Beng Hooi; Othman, Rashidah; Bougeard, Gaelle; Chia, Ren Hui; Frebourg, Thierry; Tang, Choong Leong; Cheah, Peh Yean; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the amino-terminal transactivation domain of the tumor-suppressor p53 are mostly insertions or deletions, and result in loss of full-length p53 expression. However, these changes concomitantly result in the expression of a truncated p47 isoform, which retains the ability to selectively transactivate some apoptotic target genes. The selectivity appears to be due to a default feature, stemming from the lack of acetylation on K382 at the carboxyl terminus, which requires the amino t...

  20. Targeted amino-terminal acetylation of recombinant proteins in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Johnson

    Full Text Available One major limitation in the expression of eukaryotic proteins in bacteria is an inability to post-translationally modify the expressed protein. Amino-terminal acetylation is one such modification that can be essential for protein function. By co-expressing the fission yeast NatB complex with the target protein in E.coli, we report a simple and widely applicable method for the expression and purification of functional N-terminally acetylated eukaryotic proteins.

  1. PREPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST THE EXTRACELLULAR DOMAIN OF INTEGRIN α6 SUBUNIT-THE SPECIFIC LAMININ RECEPTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕天敬; 张青云; 周柔丽

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To prepare monoclonal antibody (McAb) against the Integrin α6 extracellular domain and identify its biological activities. Methods: Fusion-protein of integrin α6 extracellular domain (GST-IAGED) was expressed in E.coli. JM109 and used for immunizing BALB/C mice. The spleen cells from immunized mice were fused with SP2/0 cells and selectively cultured with HAT medium. ELISA and immunocytochemistry staining were used to select hybridomas. Results: One strain of hybridoma cells that secreted specific monoclonal antibody against integrin α6 extracellular domain was indentified. The immunoglobulin subclass of the McAb was IgG1. Conclusion: The McAb against the extracellular domain of integrin α6 was successfully prepared by using GST-IA6ED fusion protein expressed by E.Coli. And the McAb had positive reaction with human hepatocarcinoma cells-BEL-7402.

  2. Thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor extracellular domain chimeras as probes for thyrotropin receptor function.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayama, Y; Wadsworth, H L; Chazenbalk, G D; Russo, D.; Seto, P; Rapoport, B

    1991-01-01

    To define the sites in the extracellular domain of the human thyrotropin (TSH) receptor that are involved in TSH binding and signal transduction we constructed chimeric thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin (TSH-LH/CG) receptors. The extracellular domain of the human TSH receptor was divided into five regions that were replaced, either singly or in various combinations, with homologous regions of the rat LH/CG receptor. The chimeric receptors were stably expressed in Chinese ...

  3. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y; Troyanovsky, S

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self......-associate forming lateral dimers. Whereas it is widely excepted that lateral dimerization of cadherins is critical for adhesion, details of this process are not known. Yet, no evidence for physical association between different classic cadherins in cells expressing complex cadherin patterns has been reported. To...... study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P-cadherins. These...

  4. Phosphorylation sites in the amino-terminal region of mouse p53.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.; Eckhart, W

    1992-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an attractive mechanism for regulating the functions of p53. The p34cdc2 kinase, which is involved in regulation of the cell cycle, phosphorylates serine-315 of human p53 in vitro. Casein kinase II phosphorylates serine-389 of mouse p53 in vitro. The amino-terminal region of mouse p53 contains a cluster of potential serine phosphorylation sites. Those sites have been proposed to be sites for phosphorylation by a double-stranded DNA-dependent kinase (DNA-PK) from HeLa cells ...

  5. Crystal structure of the Sema-PSI extracellular domain of human RON receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinlin L Chao

    Full Text Available Human RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais receptor tyrosine kinase is a cell surface receptor for Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP. RON mediates signal transduction pathways that regulate cell adhesion, invasion, motility and apoptosis processes. Elevated levels of RON and its alternatively spliced variants are implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumor cells. The binding of MSP α/β heterodimer to the extracellular region of RON receptor induces receptor dimerization and activation by autophosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domains. The ectodomain of RON, containing the ligand recognition and dimerization domains, is composed of a semaphorin (Sema, Plexins-Semaphorins-Integrins domain (PSI, and four Immunoglobulins-Plexins-Transcription factor (IPT domains. High affinity association between MSP and RON is mediated by the interaction between MSP β-chain and RON Sema, although RON activation requires intact RON and MSP proteins. Here, we report the structure of RON Sema-PSI domains at 1.85 Å resolution. RON Sema domain adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold, followed by disulfide bond rich, cysteine-knot PSI motif. Comparison with the homologous Met receptor tyrosine kinase reveals that RON Sema-PSI contains distinguishing secondary structural features. These define the receptors' exclusive selectivity towards their respective ligands, RON for MSP and Met for HGF. The RON Sema-PSI crystal packing generates a homodimer with interface formed by the Sema domain. Mapping of the dimer interface using the RON homology to Met, MSP homology to Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, and the structure of the Met/HGF complex shows the dimer interface overlapping with the putative MSPβ binding site. The crystallographically determined RON Sema-PSI homodimer may represent the dimer assembly that occurs during ligand-independent receptor activation and/or the inhibition of the constitutive activity of RONΔ160 splice variant by the soluble RON

  6. Participation of the extracellular domain in (pro)renin receptor dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is a regulator of the renin–angiotensin system. • The region responsible for (P)RR dimerization was investigated. • (P)RR extracellular domain constructs were retained intracellularly. • The extracellular domain of (P)RR is responsible for its dimerization. • Novel insight into the regulatory mechanism of soluble (P)RR secretion is provided. - Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] induces the catalytic activation of prorenin, as well as the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway; as such, it plays an important regulatory role in the renin–angiotensin system. (P)RR is known to form a homodimer, but the region participating in its dimerization is unknown. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) as a carrier protein and a GST pull-down assay, we investigated the interaction of several (P)RR constructs with full-length (FL) (P)RR in mammalian cells. GST fusion proteins with FL (P)RR (GST-FL), the C-terminal M8-9 fragment (GST-M8-9), the extracellular domain (ECD) of (P)RR (GST-ECD), and the (P)RR ECD with a deletion of 32 amino acids encoded by exon 4 (GST-ECDd4) were retained intracellularly, whereas GST alone was efficiently secreted into the culture medium when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent localization of GST-ECD to the endoplasmic reticulum. The GST pull-down analysis revealed that GST-FL, GST-ECD, and GST-ECDd4 bound FLAG-tagged FL (P)RR, whereas GST-M8-9 showed little or no binding when transiently co-expressed in HEK293T cells. Furthermore, pull-down analysis using His-tag affinity resin showed co-precipitation of soluble (P)RR with FL (P)RR from a stable CHO cell line expressing FL h(P)RR with a C-terminal decahistidine tag. These results indicate that the (P)RR ECD participates in dimerization

  7. Participation of the extracellular domain in (pro)renin receptor dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Nakagawa, Chiharu [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Nishimura, Misa; Tsukamoto, Tomoko; Aoyama, Sho [Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Ebihara, Akio; Suzuki, Fumiaki [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Nakagawa, Tsutomu, E-mail: nakagawa@gifu-u.ac.jp [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is a regulator of the renin–angiotensin system. • The region responsible for (P)RR dimerization was investigated. • (P)RR extracellular domain constructs were retained intracellularly. • The extracellular domain of (P)RR is responsible for its dimerization. • Novel insight into the regulatory mechanism of soluble (P)RR secretion is provided. - Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] induces the catalytic activation of prorenin, as well as the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway; as such, it plays an important regulatory role in the renin–angiotensin system. (P)RR is known to form a homodimer, but the region participating in its dimerization is unknown. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) as a carrier protein and a GST pull-down assay, we investigated the interaction of several (P)RR constructs with full-length (FL) (P)RR in mammalian cells. GST fusion proteins with FL (P)RR (GST-FL), the C-terminal M8-9 fragment (GST-M8-9), the extracellular domain (ECD) of (P)RR (GST-ECD), and the (P)RR ECD with a deletion of 32 amino acids encoded by exon 4 (GST-ECDd4) were retained intracellularly, whereas GST alone was efficiently secreted into the culture medium when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent localization of GST-ECD to the endoplasmic reticulum. The GST pull-down analysis revealed that GST-FL, GST-ECD, and GST-ECDd4 bound FLAG-tagged FL (P)RR, whereas GST-M8-9 showed little or no binding when transiently co-expressed in HEK293T cells. Furthermore, pull-down analysis using His-tag affinity resin showed co-precipitation of soluble (P)RR with FL (P)RR from a stable CHO cell line expressing FL h(P)RR with a C-terminal decahistidine tag. These results indicate that the (P)RR ECD participates in dimerization.

  8. Active regions' setting of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of human interleukin-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The reliable three dimensional (3-D) structure of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (V106-P322) of human interleukin-6 receptor (hIL-6R) has been constructed by means of computer-guided homology modeling techniques using the crystal structure of the extracellular ligand-binding region (K52-L251) of human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) as templet. The space location of some key residues which influence the combination ability between the receptor and the ligand has been observed and the effects of point mutagenesis of the four conservative cysteine residues on the space conformation are analyzed. The results show that the space conformation of the side-chain carboxyl of E305 plays a key role in the ligand-binding ability. Furthermore, the space conformation of the side-chain carboxyl of E305 is very important for the electrostatic potential complementarity between hIL-6R and hIL-6 according to the docking method.

  9. Structural insights of ZIP4 extracellular domain critical for optimal zinc transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tuo; Sui, Dexin; Hu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The ZIP zinc transporter family is responsible for zinc uptake from the extracellular milieu or intracellular vesicles. The LIV-1 subfamily, containing nine out of the 14 human ZIP proteins, is featured with a large extracellular domain (ECD). The critical role of the ECD is manifested by disease-causing mutations on ZIP4, a representative LIV-1 protein. Here we report the first crystal structure of a mammalian ZIP4-ECD, which reveals two structurally independent subdomains and an unprecedented dimer centred at the signature PAL motif. Structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-based zinc uptake assays and mapping of the disease-causing mutations indicate that the two subdomains play pivotal but distinct roles and that the bridging region connecting them is particularly important for ZIP4 function. These findings lead to working hypotheses on how ZIP4-ECD exerts critical functions in zinc transport. The conserved dimeric architecture in ZIP4-ECD is also demonstrated to be a common structural feature among the LIV-1 proteins.

  10. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is the most common genetic neuropathy with an incidence of 1 in 2600. Several forms of CMT have been identified arising from different genomic abnormalities such as CMT1 including CMT1A, CMT1B, and CMTX. CMT1 with associated peripheral nervous system (PNS) demyelination, the most frequent diagnosis, demonstrates slowed nerve conduction velocities and segmental demyelination upon nerve biopsy. One of its subtypes, CMT1A, presents a 1.5-Mb duplication in the p11-p12 region of the human chromosome 17 which encodes peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). CMT1B, a less common form, arises from the mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene on chromosome 1, region q22-q23, which encodes the major structural component of the peripheral myelin. A rare type of CMT1 has been found recently and is caused by point mutations in early growth response gene 2 (EGR2), encoding a zinc finger transcription factor in Schwann cells. In addition, CMTX, an X-linked form of CMT, arises from a mutation in the connexin-32 gene. Myelin protein zero, associated with CMT1B, is a transmembrane protein of 219 amino acid residues. Human MPZ consists of three domains: 125 residues constitute the glycosylated immunoglobulin-like extracellular domain; 27 residues span the membrane; and 67 residues comprise the highly basic intracellular domain. MPZ makes up approximately 50% of the protein content of myelin, and is expressed predominantly in Schwann cells, the myelinating cell of the PNS. Myelin protein zero, a homophilic adhesion molecule, is a member of the immunoglobulin super-family and is essential for normal myelin structure and function. In addition, MPZ knockout mice displayed abnormal myelin that severely affects the myelination pathway, and overexpression of MPZ causes congenital hypomyelination of peripheral nerves. Myelin protein zero mutations account for {approx}5% of patients with CMT. To date, over 125

  11. Fate of circulating amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen in conscious pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Risteli, J; Olesen, H P; Nielsen, M D; Lorenzen, I

    The amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP, M(r) 42,000) is a promising marker for the formation of type III collagen of granulation tissue in experimental and clinical studies. The disposal kinetics of circulating PIIINP is, however, almost unknown. In conscious pigs with a...... of the plasma disappearance curve originated from the formation and disappearance of a high and a low molecular weight (MW) fraction as part of the degradation of PIIINP. The high MW fraction (approximately M(r) 90,000) was similar to a previously described, but not further characterized, PIIINP...... immunoreactive component. The existence of the low MW fraction (approximately M(r) 20,000) has not been reported before. The lymphatic recirculation of intact PIIINP was rapid, and the lymph-serum ratio was almost constant within 1 h of injection. We conclude that the t1/2 of circulating PIIINP is 58 min, that...

  12. Adsorption behavior of oxidized galactomannans onto amino terminated surfaces and their interaction with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierakowski, M.-R; Silva, Maria R.V. da [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Lab. de Biopolimeros]. E-mail: mrbiopol@quimica.ufpr.br; Freitas, R.A.; Moreira, Jose S.R. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Fujimoto, J.; Petri, D.F.S.; Cordeiro, Paulo R.D. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: dfsp@quim.iq.usp.br; Andrade, Fabiana D

    2001-07-01

    A galactomannan (CF) extracted from Cassia fastuosa seeds was purified and oxidized with (2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) to form a uronic acid-containing polysaccharide (CFOX) with a degree of oxidation (DO) of 0.22. The chemical structures of CF and CFOX were characterized. The adsorption behavior of CF and CFOX onto amino-terminated surfaces was studied by means of ellipsometric measurements. The influence of p H and ionic strength on the adsorption was also investigated. At p H 4, there was a maximum in the adsorbed amount caused by strong electrostatic attraction between the substrate and the oxidized galactomannans. There was no ionic strength effect on the adsorption behavior. The immobilization of bovine serum albumin onto CF and CFOX was studied as a function of p H. At the isoelectric point a maximum in the adsorbed amount was found. (author)

  13. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Extracellular Cholinesterase-Like Domain from Neuroligin-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehnke,J.; Jin, X.; Budreck, E.; Posy, S.; Scheiffele, P.; Hnoig, B.; Shapiro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLs) are catalytically inactive members of a family of cholinesterase-like transmembrane proteins that mediate cell adhesion at neuronal synapses. Postsynaptic neuroligins engage in Ca2+-dependent transsynaptic interactions via their extracellular cholinesterase domain with presynaptic neurexins (NRXs). These interactions may be regulated by two short splice insertions (termed A and B) in the NL cholinesterase domain. Here, we present the 3.3- Angstroms crystal structure of the ectodomain from NL2 containing splice insertion A (NL2A). The overall structure of NL2A resembles that of cholinesterases, but several structural features are unique to the NL proteins. First, structural elements surrounding the esterase active-site region differ significantly between active esterases and NL2A. On the opposite surface of the NL2A molecule, the positions of the A and B splice insertions identify a candidate NRX interaction site of the NL protein. Finally, sequence comparisons of NL isoforms allow for mapping the location of residues of previously identified mutations in NL3 and NL4 found in patients with autism spectrum disorders. Overall, the NL2 structure promises to provide a valuable model for dissecting NL isoform- and synapse-specific functions.

  15. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligand interactions: structural cross talk between ligands and the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham M West

    Full Text Available Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R. In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands.

  17. Solution structure and dynamics of C-terminal regulatory domain of Vibrio vulnificus extracellular metalloprotease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Heeyoun [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Eun [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Sup, E-mail: jsplee@mail.chosun.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have determined solution structures of vEP C-terminal regulatory domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 has a compact {beta}-barrel structure with eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution structure of vEP C-ter100 shares its molecular topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residues in the {beta}3 region of vEP C-ter100 might be important in putative ligand/receptor binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron ion. -- Abstract: An extracellular metalloprotease (vEP) secreted by Vibrio vulnificus ATCC29307 is a 45-kDa proteolytic enzyme that has prothrombin activation and fibrinolytic activities during bacterial infection. The action of vEP could result in clotting that could serve to protect the bacteria from the host defense machinery. Very recently, we showed that the C-terminal propeptide (C-ter100), which is unique to vEP, is involved in regulation of vEP activity. To understand the structural basis of this function of vEP C-ter100, we have determined the solution structure and backbone dynamics using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solution structure shows that vEP C-ter100 is composed of eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands with a unique fold that has a compact {beta}-barrel formation which stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding networks. Protein dynamics shows that the overall structure, including loops, is very rigid and stabilized. By structural database analysis, we found that vEP C-ter100 shares its topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase, despite low sequence homology between the two domains. Fluorescence assay reveals that vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron (Fe{sup 3+}). These findings suggest that vEP protease might recruit substrate molecules, such as collagen, by binding at C-ter100 and that vEP participates

  18. Solution structure and dynamics of C-terminal regulatory domain of Vibrio vulnificus extracellular metalloprotease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We have determined solution structures of vEP C-terminal regulatory domain. ► vEP C-ter100 has a compact β-barrel structure with eight anti-parallel β-strands. ► Solution structure of vEP C-ter100 shares its molecular topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase. ► Residues in the β3 region of vEP C-ter100 might be important in putative ligand/receptor binding. ► vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron ion. -- Abstract: An extracellular metalloprotease (vEP) secreted by Vibrio vulnificus ATCC29307 is a 45-kDa proteolytic enzyme that has prothrombin activation and fibrinolytic activities during bacterial infection. The action of vEP could result in clotting that could serve to protect the bacteria from the host defense machinery. Very recently, we showed that the C-terminal propeptide (C-ter100), which is unique to vEP, is involved in regulation of vEP activity. To understand the structural basis of this function of vEP C-ter100, we have determined the solution structure and backbone dynamics using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solution structure shows that vEP C-ter100 is composed of eight anti-parallel β-strands with a unique fold that has a compact β-barrel formation which stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding networks. Protein dynamics shows that the overall structure, including loops, is very rigid and stabilized. By structural database analysis, we found that vEP C-ter100 shares its topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase, despite low sequence homology between the two domains. Fluorescence assay reveals that vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron (Fe3+). These findings suggest that vEP protease might recruit substrate molecules, such as collagen, by binding at C-ter100 and that vEP participates in iron uptake from iron-withholding proteins of the host cell during infection.

  19. Hepatic and renal extraction of circulating type III procollagen amino-terminal propeptide and hyaluronan in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, K D; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Boesby, S;

    1989-01-01

    Hepatic and renal clearance of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and of the glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA) were investigated in a catheterization study of seven healthy anesthetized pigs. Two assays were used, in order to distinguish between the metabolism of...

  20. Differential Requirement of the Extracellular Domain in Activation of Class B G Protein-coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Hua; Yin, Yanting; Yang, Dehua; Liu, Bo; Hou, Li; Wang, Xiaoxi; Pal, Kuntal; Jiang, Yi; Feng, Yang; Cai, Xiaoqing; Dai, Antao; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the secretin-like (class B) family are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are important drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disorders and neuronal diseases. They consist of a large N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD) with the GPCR signature of seven transmembrane helices. Class B GPCRs are activated by peptide hormones with their C termini bound to the receptor ECD and their N termini bound to the TMD. It is thought that the ECD functions as an affinity trap to bind and localize the hormone to the receptor. This in turn would allow the hormone N terminus to insert into the TMD and induce conformational changes of the TMD to activate downstream signaling. In contrast to this prevailing model, we demonstrate that human class B GPCRs vary widely in their requirement of the ECD for activation. In one group, represented by corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R), parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type 1 receptor (PAC1R), the ECD requirement for high affinity hormone binding can be bypassed by induced proximity and mass action effects, whereas in the other group, represented by glucagon receptor (GCGR) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), the ECD is required for signaling even when the hormone is covalently linked to the TMD. Furthermore, the activation of GLP-1R by small molecules that interact with the intracellular side of the receptor is dependent on the presence of its ECD, suggesting a direct role of the ECD in GLP-1R activation. PMID:27226600

  1. The structure of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding , glycosylated F-spondin domain of F-spondin- A C2-domain variant in an extracellular matrix protein.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.; Lawler, J. (Biosciences Division); (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center); (Harvard Medical School)

    2011-05-10

    F-spondin is a multi-domain extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and a contact-repellent molecule that directs axon outgrowth and cell migration during development. The reelin{_}N domain and the F-spondin domain (FS domain) comprise a proteolytic fragment that interacts with the cell membrane and guides the projection of commissural axons to floor plate. The FS domain is found in F-spondins, mindins, M-spondin and amphiF-spondin. We present the crystal structure of human F-spondin FS domain at 1.95{angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a Ca{sup 2+}-binding C2 domain variant with an 8-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sandwich fold. Though the primary sequences of the FS domains of F-spondin and mindin are less than 36% identical, their overall structures are very similar. The unique feature of F-spondin FS domain is the presence of three disulfide bonds associated with the N- and C-termini of the domain and a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site. The integrin-binding motif found in mindin is not conserved in the F-spondin FS domain. The structure of the F-spondin FS domain completes the structural studies of the multiple-domain ECM molecule. The homology of its core structure to a common Ca{sup 2+}- and lipid-binding C2 domain suggests that the F-spondin FS domain may be responsible for part of the membrane targeting of F-spondin in its regulation of axon development. The structural properties of the FS domain revealed in this study pave the way for further exploration into the functions of F-spondin.

  2. The structure of the Ca2+-binding, glycosylated F-spondin domain of F-spondin - A C2-domain variant in an extracellular matrix protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawler Jack

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background F-spondin is a multi-domain extracellular matrix (ECM protein and a contact-repellent molecule that directs axon outgrowth and cell migration during development. The reelin_N domain and the F-spondin domain (FS domain comprise a proteolytic fragment that interacts with the cell membrane and guides the projection of commissural axons to floor plate. The FS domain is found in F-spondins, mindins, M-spondin and amphiF-spondin. Results We present the crystal structure of human F-spondin FS domain at 1.95Å resolution. The structure reveals a Ca2+-binding C2 domain variant with an 8-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich fold. Though the primary sequences of the FS domains of F-spondin and mindin are less than 36% identical, their overall structures are very similar. The unique feature of F-spondin FS domain is the presence of three disulfide bonds associated with the N- and C-termini of the domain and a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site. The integrin-binding motif found in mindin is not conserved in the F-spondin FS domain. Conclusion The structure of the F-spondin FS domain completes the structural studies of the multiple-domain ECM molecule. The homology of its core structure to a common Ca2+- and lipid-binding C2 domain suggests that the F-spondin FS domain may be responsible for part of the membrane targeting of F-spondin in its regulation of axon development. The structural properties of the FS domain revealed in this study pave the way for further exploration into the functions of F-spondin.

  3. Mg and Mc: mutations within the amino-terminal region of glycophorin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furthmayr, H; Metaxas, M N; Metaxas-Bühler, M

    1981-01-01

    M and N are the two common ("normal") alleles at the MN locus of the MNSs blood group system. The antigens M and N that they determine are located within the amino-terminal region of glycophorin A. In the serologically active and glycosylated (*) fragment of glycophorin AN the sequence is Leu-Ser*-Thr*-Thr*-Glu-, and in that of glycophorin AM it is Ser-Ser*-Thr*-Thr*-Gly-. Mg and Mc are very rare ("variant") alleles of M and N; as to the corresponding antigens, Mg is serologically quite distinct from M and N, while Mc is a compound of both. Erythrocytes of genotypes MgN, MgM, MgMg, and McM, which were the object of the present study, contain normal amounts of glycophorin A in their membrane. In glycophorin AMg the amino-terminal sequence is related to that of glycophorin AN by substitution of asparagine for threonine in position 4, and it is nonglycosylated: Leu-Ser-Thr-Asn-Glu-. The corresponding structure of glycophorin AMc is Ser-Ser*-Thr*-Thr*-Glu-; it is thus closely related to that of glycophorin AN and AM, by substitution of the amino acids in positions 1 or 5, respectively. All of these substitutions can be explained by single base changes. The distinctions in chemical structure not only confirm the location of M and N in this region of glycophorin A, because they are the only differences observed, but also indicate, because they are correlated with the distinctions in antigenic specificity, that M and N are structural genes coding for amino acid sequences. The finding that Mc contains structural features of both M and N suggests that these two forms of glycophorin A have evolved from a common ancestral gene by single base substitutions at sites in the genome coding for amino acids in positions 1 and 5 of the sequence. Carbohydrate structures, however, are also necessary for full expression of antigens M and N. Glycosylation during biosynthesis of residues within the polypeptide appears to depend on a particular protein structure. PMID:6166001

  4. The MUC1 extracellular domain subunit is found in nuclear speckles and associates with spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarsini Kumar

    Full Text Available MUC1 is a large transmembrane glycoprotein and oncogene expressed by epithelial cells and overexpressed and underglycosylated in cancer cells. The MUC1 cytoplasmic subunit (MUC1-C can translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. It is frequently assumed that the MUC1 extracellular subunit (MUC1-N does not enter the nucleus. Based on an unexpected observation that MUC1 extracellular domain antibody produced an apparently nucleus-associated staining pattern in trophoblasts, we have tested the hypothesis that MUC1-N is expressed inside the nucleus. Three different antibodies were used to identify MUC1-N in normal epithelial cells and tissues as well as in several cancer cell lines. The results of immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses as well as subcellular fractionation, Western blotting, and siRNA/shRNA studies, confirm that MUC1-N is found within nuclei of all cell types examined. More detailed examination of its intranuclear distribution using a proximity ligation assay, subcellular fractionation, and immunoprecipitation suggests that MUC1-N is located in nuclear speckles (interchromatin granule clusters and closely associates with the spliceosome protein U2AF65. Nuclear localization of MUC1-N was abolished when cells were treated with RNase A and nuclear localization was altered when cells were incubated with the transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB. While MUC1-N predominantly associated with speckles, MUC1-C was present in the nuclear matrix, nucleoli, and the nuclear periphery. In some nuclei, confocal microscopic analysis suggest that MUC1-C staining is located close to, but only partially overlaps, MUC1-N in speckles. However, only MUC1-N was found in isolated speckles by Western blotting. Also, MUC1-C and MUC1-N distributed differently during mitosis. These results suggest that MUC1-N translocates to the nucleus where it is expressed in nuclear speckles and that MUC1-N and MUC

  5. The agonist-binding domain of the calcium-sensing receptor is located at the amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O;

    1999-01-01

    inositol phosphate production when exposed to the cationic agonists Ca2+, Mg2+, and Ba2+ in transiently transfected tsA cells (a transformed HEK 293 cell line). The pharmacological profile of Ca/1a (EC50 values of 3.3, 2.6, and 3.9 mM for these cations, respectively) was very similar to that of the wild...

  6. A second disulfide bridge from the N-terminal domain to extracellular loop 2 dampens receptor activity in GPR39

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storjohann, Laura; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W

    2008-01-01

    . Disruption of the nonconserved disulfide bridge by mutagenesis led to an increase in the Zn (2+) potency. This phenotype, with an approximate 10-fold increase in agonist potency and a slight increase in E max, was mimicked by treatment of the wild-type receptor with TCEP at low concentrations, which had no......A highly conserved feature across all families of 7TM receptors is a disulfide bridge between a Cys residue located at the extracellular end of transmembrane segment III (TM-III) and one in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2). The zinc sensor GPR39 contains four Cys residues in the extracellular domains....... By using mutagenesis, treatment with the reducing agent TCEP, and a labeling procedure for free sulfhydryl groups, we identify the pairing of these Cys residues in two disulfide bridges: the prototypical bridge between Cys (108) in TM-III and Cys (210) in ECL-2 and a second disulfide bridge...

  7. Fringe Benefits: Functional and structural impacts of O-glycosylation on the extracellular domain of Notch receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Nadia A.; Haltiwanger, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    The Notch family of receptors plays essential roles in many phases of development, and dysregulation of Notch activity is increasingly recognized as a player in many diseases. O-Glycosylation of the Notch extracellular domain is essential for Notch activity, and tissue-specific alterations in the glycan structures are known to regulate activity. Here we review recent advances in identification and characterization of the enzymes responsible for glycosylating Notch and molecular mechanisms for...

  8. Use of amino terminal type III procollagen peptide (P3NP) assay in methotrexate therapy for psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, S; Subedi, D; Chowdhury, M M U

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis continues to be a risk in patients receiving methotrexate for psoriasis. Measurement of amino terminal levels of type III procollagen (P3NP) has been advocated as an effective non‐invasive test for ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis that could avoid liver biopsies. An audit was conducted to assess the practice of P3NP monitoring using guidelines produced by Manchester and whether the agreed levels correlate with histological severity. Sixty five patients with 174 P3NP assays and 30...

  9. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  10. Expression and Characterization of the Recombinant Human FLT-3 Ligand Extracellular Domain in Pichia Pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongtang Huang; Xishan Hao

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The FLT-3 ligand (fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 ligand, FL) is a recently described growth factor affecting early hematopoietic progenitor cells. The FL plays a key role in the growth and differentiation of primitive hematopoietic cells. To yield a high-level of recombinant human FL protein, a recombinant Pichia Pastoris (P. pastoris)strain was constructed.METHODS An artificial expression frame, with the same encoding protein sequence for the FL extracellular domain cDNA, was synthesized by using favored genetic codons of P. pastoris. P. pastoris strain KM71 cells were transformed with the endonuclease Bgl Ⅱ linearized recombined plasmid, pPIC9K-FL. The plasmid then was linerized in the 5'AOX1 site and integrated into the yeast KM71 genome. KM71 was transformed with pPIC9K plasmids as a control for the production of recombinant protein.Southern blotting and Northern blotting tests were used to screen the genotype of the recombined strain. Biological activity was demonstrated in vitro with culturing of CD34+cells.RESULTS The recombinant human FL protein expressed into the yeast culture supertant was identified on the basis of its molecular weight and Western blotting analysis. Numerous bands were observed in the 10~100 kDa molecular mass range. SDS-PAGE showed that the expressed product, a 20 kDa protein, was secreted into the medium in the form of a soluble molecule. Western-blot analyses showed good antigenicity and specificity against polyclonal antibodies. A sharp band and a smeared band were observed at a molecular mass of approximately 20 kDa by Western blotting. The recombinant human FL protein was the major protein component observed in the culture supernatant. The highest yield (108 mg/L) was obtained when expression was induced with 0.5% methanol for 96 h. Deglycosylation with PNGase F resulted in a decrease in apparent molecular mass from 20 kDa to 18 kDa forming three bands all of which were also detected by rabbit anti-FL antibodies

  11. Circulating HER2 Extracellular Domain and Response to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to demonstrate the association between HER2 and chemotherapy resistance in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Patients and methods: We performed a prospective assessment of the predictive value of the circulating HER2 extracellular domain (ECD) in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma using paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Serum samples were collected from 45 patients with metastatic breast carcinoma before first-line chemotherapy for metastatic disease and the levels of circulating HER2 ECD were measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Immunohistochemistry with anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody CB 11 was used to assess the expression of HER2 in the primary tumors. Results: When 450 fmol/ml was used as a cutoff, 18 patients (40%) had elevated HER2 ECD levels. Elevated levels of circulating HER2 ECD were associated with the expression of HER2 in the primary tumor tissue and with the metastatic tumor burden (evaluated with the marker CA 15-3; ρ= 0.032 and ρ= 0.002, respectively) but not with variables such as menopausal status. stage at diagnosis, previous adjuvant therapy, or the number of metastatic sites. The levels of circulating HER2 ECD correlated inversely with the response to treatment. The probability of obtaining a complete response to chemotherapy was significantly lower (ρ= 0.021) in patients with elevated HER2 ECD levels (0%; 95% confidence interval. 0-13%) in comparison with patients with non-elevated HER2 (26.9%; 95% confidence interval. ] 2-45%). In addition, the duration of clinical response was significantly shorter in patients with elevated HER2 ECD, in comparison with the cases with non-elevated HER2 (7.5 versus 11 months; ρ= 0.035). Conclusion: In conclusion, elevated levels of circulating HER2 ECD in patients with metastatic breast cancer correlate with reduced efficacy of a paclitaxel-doxorubicin chemotherapy combination. We suggest that the poor response rate associated with HER2 expression in advanced breast

  12. The matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-3 cleaves laminin receptor at two distinct sites between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence within the extracellular domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tosikazu AMANO; Olivia KWAK; Liezhen FU; Anastasia MARSHAK; Yun-Bo SHI

    2005-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stromelysin-3 (ST3) has long been implicated to play an important role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and cell fate determination during normal and pathological processes. However,like other MMPs, the molecular basis of ST3 function in vivo remains unclear due to the lack of information on its physiological substrates. Furthermore, ST3 has only weak activities toward all tested ECM proteins. Using thyroid hormone-dependent Xenopus laevis metamorphosis as a model, we demonstrated previously that ST3 is important for apoptosis and tissue morphogenesis during intestinal remodeling. Here, we used yeast two-hybrid screen with mRNAs from metamorphosing tadpoles to identify potential substrate of ST3 during development. We thus isolated the 37 kd laminin receptor precursor (LR). We showed that LR binds to ST3 in vitro and can be cleaved by ST3 at two sites,distinct from where other MMPs cleave. Through peptide sequencing, we determined that the two cleavage sites are in the extracellular domain between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cleavage sites are conserved in human LR. These results together with high levels of human LR and ST3 expression in carcinomas suggest that LR is a likely in vivo substrate of ST3 and that its cleavage by ST3 may alter cell-extracellular matrix interaction, thus, playing a role in mediating the effects of ST3 on cell fate and behavior observed during development and pathogenesis.

  13. An amino-terminal variant of the central cannabinoid receptor resulting from alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, D; Carillon, C; Kaghad, M; Calandra, B; Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Le Fur, G; Caput, D; Ferrara, P

    1995-02-24

    The cDNA sequences encoding the central cannabinoid receptor, CB1, are known for two species, rat and human. However, little information concerning the flanking, noncoding regions is presently available. We have isolated two overlapping clones from a human lung cDNA library with CB1 cDNA inserts. One of these, cann7, contains a short stretch of the CB1 coding region and 4 kilobase pairs (kb) of the 3'-untranslated region (UTR), including two polyadenylation signals. The other, cann6, is identical to cann7 upstream from the first polyadenylation signal, and in addition, it contains the whole coding region and extends for 1.8 kb into the 5'-UTR. Comparison of cann6 with the published sequence (Gérard, C. M., Mollereau, C., Vassart, G., and Parmentier, M. (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 129-134) shows the coding regions to be identical, but reveals important differences in the flanking regions. Notably, the cann6 sequence appears to be that of an immature transcript, containing 1.8 kb of an intronic sequence in the 5'-UTR. In addition, polymerase chain reaction amplification of the CB1 coding region in the IM-9 cell line cDNA resulted in two fragments, one containing the whole CB1 coding region and the second lacking a 167-base pair intron within the sequence encoding the amino-terminal tail of the receptor. This alternatively spliced form would translate to an NH2-terminal modified isoform (CB1A) of the receptor, shorter than CB1 by 61 amino acids. In addition, the first 28 amino acids of the putative truncated receptor are completely different from those of CB1, containing more hydrophobic residues. Rat CB1 mRNA is similarly alternatively spliced. A study of the distribution of the human CB1 and CB1A mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the presence of both CB1 and CB1A throughout the brain and in all the peripheral tissues examined, with CB1A being present in amounts of up to 20% of CB1. PMID:7876112

  14. Molecular mechanism of Zn2+ agonism in the extracellular domain of GPR39

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storjohann, Laura; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W

    2008-01-01

    -terminal segment. Surprisingly, substitution of Asp313 located in extracellular loop 3 greatly increased ligand-independent signaling and apparently eliminated Zn2+-induced activation. It is proposed that Zn2+ acts as an agonist for GPR39, not in the classical manner by directly stabilizing an active conformation...

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of the extracellular cellulase CBHI from Trichoderma harzianum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic domain of CHBI was purified from a cellular extract of T. harzianum. Diffraction-quality crystals were obtained and a native X-ray data set was collected using a synchrotron source. The filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum has a considerable cellulolytic activity that is mediated by a complex of enzymes which are essential for the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose. These enzymes were produced by the induction of T. harzianum with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) under submerged fermentation in a bioreactor. The catalytic core domain (CCD) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) was purified from the extracellular extracts and submitted to robotic crystallization. Diffraction-quality CBHI CCD crystals were grown and an X-ray diffraction data set was collected under cryogenic conditions using a synchrotron-radiation source

  16. Increased urine level of amino-terminal peptide derivatives of type III procollagen in patients with liver diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Koide, Norio; Ukida,Minoru; Kondo, Hideaki; Jitoku,Michihiro; Ono,Ryosaku; Tanabe,Takayoshi; Nagashima,Hideo

    1986-01-01

    The amino-terminal peptides of type III procollagen (PIIIP) in the urine of 40 patients with various liver diseases were determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay kit. The level of urinary PIIIP (uPIIIP) was correlated well with serum PIIIP (sPIIIP) in 9 patients, the coefficient of correlation being r = 0.836 (p less than 0.01) and the regression line being y = 1.42x + 24. Urinary PIIIP consisted of at least 4 different molecular species with molecular weights of 49 k, 18 k, 10 k and 4.6...

  17. Role of the Amino-Terminal Region of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae in Adherence to Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Han, Yiping; Hamada, Nobushiro; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae elicit many responses in eukaryotic cells, including mitogenicity, cytokine production, epithelial cell invasion, and cellular immune response. Specific domains of the major fimbrial protein (FimA) have been shown to be important in triggering some of these functions. The goal of the present study was to identify the domain(s) of P. gingivalis FimA responsible for specific interaction with human mucosal epithelial cells. Fimbriated P. gingivalis strains have ...

  18. Variable domain I of nematode CLEs directs post-translational targeting of CLE peptides to the extracellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianying; Joshi, Sneha; Korkin, Dmitry; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2010-12-01

    Effector proteins expressed in the esophageal gland cells of cyst nematodes are delivered into plant cells through a hollow, protrusible stylet. Although evidence indicates that effector proteins function in the cytoplasm of the syncytium, technical constraints have made it difficult to directly determine where nematode effector proteins are initially delivered: cytoplasm, extracellular space, or both. Recently, we demonstrated that soybean cyst nematode CLE (HgCLE) propeptides are delivered to the cytoplasm of syncytial cells. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that the variable domain (VD) sequence is then required for targeting cytoplasmically delivered nematode CLEs to the apoplast where they function as ligand mimics of endogenous plant CLE peptides. The fact that nematode CLEs are targeted through the gland cell secretory pathway and delivered as mature propeptides into plant cells makes it impossible for these proteins to be subsequently delivered to the extracellular space via co-translational translocation through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) secretory pathway of the host cell. However, when expressed in transgenic plants, if the mature nematode CLE propeptide harbored a functional cryptic signal peptide, it could possibly traffic to the apoplast through the ER secretory pathway by co-translational translocation. Here, we present evidence that VDI, the N-terminal sequence of the variable domain of HgCLE2, is sufficient for trafficking CLE peptides to the apoplast and that trafficking is indeed through an alternative pathway other than co-translational translocation. PMID:21150256

  19. The central domain of Rhizobium leguminosarum DctD functions independently to activate transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Huala, E; Stigter, J; Ausubel, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Sigma 54-dependent transcriptional activators such as Escherichia coli NtrC, Rhizobium meliloti NifA, and Rhizobium leguminosarum DctD share similar central and carboxy-terminal domains but differ in the structure and function of their amino-terminal domains. We have deleted the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal domains of R. leguminosarum DctD and have demonstrated that the central domain of DctD, like that of NifA, is transcriptionally competent.

  20. Enhanced cell attachment using a novel cell culture surface presenting functional domains from extracellular matrix proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, M. J.; Phillips, S R; Shah, D. S. H.; Athey, D.; Lakey, J H; Przyborski, S A

    2008-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the creation and maintenance of a realistic environment for cell growth in vitro, e.g. the consistency of the growth medium, the addition of supplements, and the surface on which the cells grow. The nature of the surface on which cells are cultured plays an important role in their ability to attach, proliferate, migrate and function. Components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are often used to coat glass or plastic surfaces to enhance cell attachment in vitro. Fra...

  1. Effect of amino-terminated substrates onto surface properties of cellulose esters and their interaction with lectins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Films of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and carboxymethylcellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) were deposited from ethyl acetate solutions onto bare silicon wafers (Si/SiO2) or amino-terminated surfaces (APS) by means of equilibrium adsorption. All surfaces were characterized by means of ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. The presence of amino groups on the support surface favored the adsorption of CAB and CMCAB, inducing the orientation of most polar groups to the surface and the exposition of alkyl group to the air. Such molecular orientation caused increase of the dispersive component of surface energy (γsd) and decrease of the polar component of surface energy (γsp) of cellulose esters in comparison to those values determined for films deposited onto bare Si/SiO2 wafers. Adsorption behavior of jacalin or concanavalin A onto CAB and CMCAB films was also investigated. The adsorbed amounts of lectins were more pronounced on cellulose esters with high (γsp) and total surface energy (γst) values. - Highlights: ► Amino groups on the substrate induce the orientation of cellulose esters polar groups. ► Amino terminated substrate caused decrease of surface energy of cellulose ester films. ► Lectins adsorbed preferentially onto cellulose esters with high surface energy.

  2. Effect of amino-terminated substrates onto surface properties of cellulose esters and their interaction with lectins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amim, Jorge [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 748, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Campus Macae, Av. Aluizio Gomes da Silva 50, 27930-560, Macae (Brazil); Petri, Denise F.S., E-mail: dfsp@usp.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 748, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-02-01

    Films of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and carboxymethylcellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) were deposited from ethyl acetate solutions onto bare silicon wafers (Si/SiO{sub 2}) or amino-terminated surfaces (APS) by means of equilibrium adsorption. All surfaces were characterized by means of ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. The presence of amino groups on the support surface favored the adsorption of CAB and CMCAB, inducing the orientation of most polar groups to the surface and the exposition of alkyl group to the air. Such molecular orientation caused increase of the dispersive component of surface energy ({gamma}{sub s}{sup d}) and decrease of the polar component of surface energy ({gamma}{sub s}{sup p}) of cellulose esters in comparison to those values determined for films deposited onto bare Si/SiO{sub 2} wafers. Adsorption behavior of jacalin or concanavalin A onto CAB and CMCAB films was also investigated. The adsorbed amounts of lectins were more pronounced on cellulose esters with high ({gamma}{sub s}{sup p}) and total surface energy ({gamma}{sub s}{sup t}) values. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino groups on the substrate induce the orientation of cellulose esters polar groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino terminated substrate caused decrease of surface energy of cellulose ester films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lectins adsorbed preferentially onto cellulose esters with high surface energy.

  3. Salmeterol's extreme β2 selectivity is due to residues in both extracellular loops and transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jillian G; Proudman, Richard G W; Hill, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmeterol is a long-acting β2-agonist, widely used as an inhaled treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It has very high β2-affinity (log KD -8.95) and is very selective for the β2-adrenoceptor (1000-fold selectivity over the β1-adrenoceptor). This study used a mutagenesis approach to determine the exact amino acids in the human β2-adrenoceptor responsible for this very high selectivity. Wild-type β2- and β1-adrenoceptors, chimeric β2/β1-adrenoceptors, and receptors with single-point mutations were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells, and affinity and function were studied using [(3)H]CGP 12177 [(-)-4-(3-tert-butylamino-2-hydroxypropoxy)-benzimidazol-2-one] whole-cell binding and [(3)H]cAMP accumulation. Extracellular loop 3 (and specifically amino acid K305) had the largest single effect by reducing salmeterol's affinity for the β2-adrenoceptor by 31-fold. H296 in transmembrane 6 also had a major effect (18-fold reduction in salmeterol affinity). Combining these, in the double mutant β2-H296K-K305D, reduced salmeterol's affinity by 275-fold, to within 4-fold of that of the β1-adrenoceptor, without affecting the affinity or selectivity of other β2-agonists (salbutamol, formoterol, fenoterol, clenbuterol, or adrenaline). Another important amino acid was Y308 in transmembrane 7, although this also affected the affinity and selectivity of other agonists. F194 in extracellular loop 2 and R304 in extracellular loop 3 also had minor effects. None of these mutations (including the double mutant β2-H296K-K305D) affected the efficacy or duration of action of salmeterol. This suggests that the high affinity and selectivity of salmeterol are due to specific amino acids within the receptor itself, but that the duration of action is at least in part due to other factors, for example lipophilicity. PMID:25324048

  4. Multicentric Carpotarsal Osteolysis Is Caused by Mutations Clustering in the Amino-Terminal Transcriptional Activation Domain of MAFB

    OpenAIRE

    Zankl, Andreas; Duncan, Emma L.; Leo, Paul J.; Clark, Graeme R.; Glazov, Evgeny A.; Addor, Marie-Claude; Herlin, Troels; Kim, Chong Ae; Leheup, Bruno P.; McGill, Jim; McTaggart, Steven; Mittas, Stephen; Mitchell, Anna L.; Mortier, Geert R.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Multicentric carpotarsal osteolysis (MCTO) is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by aggressive osteolysis, particularly affecting the carpal and tarsal bones, and is frequently associated with progressive renal failure. Using exome capture and next-generation sequencing in five unrelated simplex cases of MCTO, we identified previously unreported missense mutations clustering within a 51 base pair region of the single exon of MAFB, validated by Sanger sequencing. A further six unrelated s...

  5. A conformation change in the extracellular domain that accompanies desensitization of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Kenneth A; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P; McCleskey, Edwin W

    2007-04-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are thought to trigger some forms of acid-induced pain and taste, and to contribute to stroke-induced neural damage. After activation by low extracellular pH, different ASICs undergo desensitization on time scales from 0.1 to 10 s. Consistent with a substantial conformation change, desensitization slows dramatically when temperature drops (Askwith, C.C., C.J. Benson, M.J. Welsh, and P.M. Snyder. 2001. PNAS. 98:6459-6463). The nature of this conformation change is unknown, but two studies showed that desensitization rate is altered by mutations on or near the first transmembrane domain (TM1) (Coric, T., P. Zhang, N. Todorovic, and C.M. Canessa. 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278:45240-45247; Pfister, Y., I. Gautschi, A.-N. Takeda, M. van Bemmelen, S. Kellenberger, and L. Schild. 2006. J. Biol. Chem. 281:11787-11791). Here we show evidence of a specific conformation change associated with desensitization. When mutated from glutamate to cysteine, residue 79, which is some 20 amino acids extracellular to TM1, can be altered by cysteine-modifying reagents when the channel is closed, but not when it is desensitized; thus, desensitization appears to conceal the residue from the extracellular medium. D78 and E79 are a pair of adjacent acidic amino acids that are highly conserved in ASICs yet absent from epithelial Na(+) channels, their acid-insensitive relatives. Despite large effects on desensitization by mutations at positions 78 and 79-including a shift to 10-fold lower proton concentration with the E79A mutant-there are not significant effects on activation. PMID:17389250

  6. Calcium Influx of Mast Cells Is Inhibited by Aptamers Targeting the First Extracellular Domain of Orai1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Renshan; Yang, Yongqiang; Ran, Xinze; Yang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Using the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method, we identified oligonucleotides that bind to the first extracellular domain of the Orai1 protein with high affinities and high specificities. These ligands were isolated from a random single-strand DNA (ssDNA) library with 40 randomized sequence positions, using synthesized peptides with amino acid sequences identical to the first extracellular domain of the Orai1 protein as the targets for SELEX selection. Seven aptamers were obtained after 12 rounds of SELEX. An enzyme-linked oligonucleotide assay (ELONA) was performed to determine the affinities of the aptamers. Aptamer Y1 had the highest affinity (Kd = 1.72×10−8 mol/L) and was selected for functional experiments in mast cells. Using LAD2 cells with the human high-affinity IgE receptor and Ca2+ release activation channel (CRAC), we demonstrated that Aptamer Y1 blocked IgE-mediated β-hexosaminidase release from cells triggered by biotin-IgE and streptavidin. A specific binding assay showed that Aptamer Y1 not only bound the Orai1 peptide specifically but also that the Orai1 peptide did not bind significantly to other random oligonucleotide molecules. Furthermore, Aptamer Y1 regulation of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization was investigated by probing intracellular Ca2+ with a Fluo-4-AM fluorescent probe. We found that Aptamer Y1 inhibits Ca2+ influx into antigen-activated mast cells. These results indicate that the target of Aptamer Y1 in the degranulation pathway is upstream of Ca2+ influx. Therefore, these oligonucleotide agents represent a novel class of CRAC inhibitors that may be useful in the fight against allergic diseases. PMID:27390850

  7. Soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain inhibits FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and prevents nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Jiang, Yuan; An, Yuan; Zhao, Na; Zhao, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Yu, Chundong, E-mail: cdyu@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain (FGFR4-ECD) was effectively expressed. {yields} FGFR4-ECD inhibited FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling. {yields} FGFR4-ECD reduced palmitic acid-induced steatosis of HepG2 cells. {yields} FGFR4-ECD reduced tetracycline-induced fatty liver in mice. {yields} FGFR4-ECD partially restored tetracycline-repressed PPAR{alpha} expression. -- Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor that plays a crucial role in the regulation of hepatic bile acid and lipid metabolism. FGFR4 underlies high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis, suggesting that inhibition of FGFR4 activation may be an effective way to prevent or treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To determine whether neutralization of FGFR4 ligands by soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain (FGFR4-ECD) can inhibit the activation of FGFR4, we constructed FGFR4-ECD expression vector and showed that FGFR4-ECD was effectively expressed in cells and secreted into culture medium. FGFR4-ECD inhibited FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and reduced steatosis of HepG2 induced by palmitic acid in vitro. Furthermore, in a tetracycline-induced fatty liver model, expression of FGFR4-ECD in mouse liver reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids and partially restored the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), which promotes the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation but is repressed by tetracycline. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FGFR4-ECD can block FGFR4 signaling and prevent hepatic steatosis, highlighting the potential value of inhibition of FGFR4 signaling as a method for therapeutic intervention against NAFLD.

  8. Protective Effect of an Antibody against Specific Extracellular Domain of TLR2 on Agonists-Driven Inflammatory and Allergic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianwu; Cai, Jun; Peng, Yanxia; Zhang, Lifang; Lan, Qiaofen; Chen, Yanwen; Liao, Huanjin; Xie, Tong; Wu, Ping; Pan, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Specific blocking strategies of TLR2-mediated inflammatory signaling and hypersensitivity reactions may offer novel therapeutic strategies to prevent a variety of diseases. In this study, we investigated the blocking effects of a new anti-TLR2 antibody anti-T20 against a 20 mer peptide T20 located in the extracellular specific domain of mouse TLR2. In addition, the effects of the anti-T20 in vitro, measuring the inhibition of the IL-6 and TNF-α production in response to PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, were determined. In vivo, the effects of anti-T20 on a lethal anaphylaxis model using PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice, including the rectal temperature and mortality, and serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 were assayed. The results showed that anti-T20 specifically bound to TLR2 and significantly inhibited PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-driven TNF-α and IL-6 production by RAW264.7 cells. Also, anti-T20 protected OVA allergic mice from PGN-induced lethal anaphylaxis, and the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 of anti-T20 treated PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice were decreased as compared to isotype control of anti-T20 treated mice. In summary, this study produced a new antibody against the specific extracellular domain of TLR2 which has protective effect on TLR2 agonists-driven inflammatory and allergic response.

  9. Biophysical characterization of the olfactomedin domain of myocilin, an extracellular matrix protein implicated in inherited forms of glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Orwig

    Full Text Available Myocilin is an eye protein found in the trabecular extracellular matrix (TEM, within the anatomic region that controls fluid flow. Variants of myocilin, localized to its olfactomedin (OLF domain, have been linked to inherited forms of glaucoma, a disease associated with elevated intraocular pressure. OLF domains have also been implicated in psychiatric diseases and cancers by their involvement in signaling, neuronal growth, and development. However, molecular characterization of OLFs has been hampered by challenges in recombinant expression, a hurdle we have recently overcome for the myocilin OLF domain (myoc-OLF. Here, we report the first detailed solution biophysical characterization of myoc-OLF to gain insight into its structure and function. Myoc-OLF is stable in the presence of glycosaminoglycans, as well as in a wide pH range in buffers with functional groups reminiscent of such glycosaminoglycans. Circular dichroism (CD reveals significant β-sheet and β-turn secondary structure. Unexpectedly, the CD signature is reminiscent of α-chymotrypsin as well as another ocular protein family, the βγ-crystallins. At neutral pH, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and CD melts indicate a highly cooperative transition with a melting temperature of ∼55 °C. Limited proteolysis combined with mass spectrometry reveals that the compact core structural domain of OLF consists of approximately residues 238-461, which retains the single disulfide bond and is as stable as the full myoc-OLF construct. The data presented here inform new testable hypotheses for interactions with specific TEM components, and will assist in design of therapeutic agents for myocilin glaucoma.

  10. Characterization and amino-terminal sequence of phospholipase A2-II from the venom of Agkistrodon bilineatus (common cantil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikai, T; Komori, Y; Ohara, A; Yagihashi, S; Ohizumi, Y; Sugihara, H

    1994-01-01

    1. Phospholipase A2 was isolated from the venom of Agkistrodon bilineatus by Sephadex G-75 and CM-Cellulose column chromatographies. 2. The purified phospholipase A2 gave a single band on disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ODS-HPLC. 3. The enzyme preparation had a mol. wt of 14,000, isoelectric point of pH 10.12 and possessed 121 amino acid residues. 4. The enzyme hydrolyzed the phospholipids phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl inositol and phosphatidyl serine. 5. The contraction of mouse diaphragm was inhibited by phospholipase A2-II. 6. Phospholipase A2 activity of this preparation was inhibited by ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, ethyleneglycol (beta-aminoethyl) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, p-bromophenacyl bromide or N-bromosuccinimide, but not by iodoacetic acid or diisopropyl fluorophosphate. 7. The amino-terminal sequence of the PLA2-II was determined. PMID:8138046

  11. The structure of the Ca2+-binding, glycosylated F-spondin domain of F-spondin - A C2-domain variant in an extracellular matrix protein

    OpenAIRE

    Lawler Jack; Tan Kemin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background F-spondin is a multi-domain extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and a contact-repellent molecule that directs axon outgrowth and cell migration during development. The reelin_N domain and the F-spondin domain (FS domain) comprise a proteolytic fragment that interacts with the cell membrane and guides the projection of commissural axons to floor plate. The FS domain is found in F-spondins, mindins, M-spondin and amphiF-spondin. Results We present the crystal structure of hum...

  12. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.-Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  13. Congenital hyperthyroidism caused by a solitary toxic adenoma harboring a novel somatic mutation (serine281-->isoleucine) in the extracellular domain of the thyrotropin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, P.; Muirhead, S; Jourdain, N; Gu, W. X.; Jameson, J L; Rodd, C

    1997-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations in the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor have been identified as a cause of hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas, and germline mutations have been found in familial nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism and sporadic congenital hyperthyroidism. All mutations reported to date have been located in the transmembrane domain. We now report an example of an activating mutation in the extracellular, TSH-binding domain, found in a male infant with congenital hyperthyroidism due to a toxic a...

  14. Deleting the Redundant TSH Receptor C-Peptide Region Permits Generation of the Conformationally Intact Extracellular Domain by Insect Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Salazar, Larry M; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2015-07-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) extracellular domain (ECD) comprises a N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and an hinge region (HR), the latter contributing to ligand binding and critical for receptor activation. The crystal structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain component has been solved, but previous attempts to generate conformationally intact complete ECD or the isolated HR component for structural analysis have failed. The TSHR HR contains a C-peptide segment that is removed during spontaneous TSHR intramolecular cleavage into disulfide linked A- and B-subunits. We hypothesized that deletion of the redundant C-peptide would overcome the obstacle to generating conformationally intact TSHR ECD protein. Indeed, lacking the C-peptide region, the TSHR ECD (termed ECD-D1) and the isolated HR (termed HR-D1) were secreted into medium of insect cells infected with baculoviruses coding for these modified proteins. The identities of TSHR ECD-D1 and HR-D1 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting using TSHR-specific monoclonal antibodies. The TSHR-ECD-D1 in conditioned medium was folded correctly, as demonstrated by its ability to inhibit radiolabeled TSH binding to the TSH holoreceptor. The TSHR ECD-D1 purification was accomplished in a single step using a TSHR monoclonal antibody affinity column, whereas the HR-D1 required a multistep protocol with a low yield. In conclusion, we report a novel approach to generate the TSHR ECD, as well as the isolated HR in insect cells, the former in sufficient amounts for structural studies. However, such studies will require previous complexing of the ECD with a ligand such as TSH or a thyroid-stimulating antibody. PMID:25860033

  15. Structural Studies on the Extracellular Domain of Sensor Histidine Kinase YycG from Staphylococcus aureus and Its Functional Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Truc; Choi, Jongkeun; Lee, Sangho; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-07-31

    Bacterial two-component signal transduction systems are used to adapt to fluctuations in the environment. YycG, a key two-component histidine kinase in Staphylococcus aureus, plays an essential role in cell viability and regulates cell wall metabolism, biofilm formation, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. For these reasons, YycG is considered a compelling target for the development of novel antibiotics. However, to date, the signaling mechanism of YycG and its stimulus are poorly understood mainly because of a lack of structural information on YycG. To address this deficiency, we determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of S. aureus YycG (YycGex) at 2.0-Å resolution. The crystal structure indicated two subunits with an extracellular Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) topology packed into a dimer with interloop interactions. Disulfide scanning using cysteine-substituted mutants revealed that YycGex possessed dimeric interfaces not only in the loop but also in the helix α1. Cross-linking studies using intact YycG demonstrated that it was capable of forming high molecular weight oligomers on the cell membrane. Furthermore, we also observed that two auxiliary proteins of YycG, YycH and YycI, cooperatively interfered with the multimerization of YycG. From these results, we propose that signaling through YycG is regulated by multimerization and binding of YycH and YycI. These structural studies, combined with biochemical analyses, provide a better understanding of the signaling mechanism of YycG, which is necessary for developing novel antibacterial drugs targeting S. aureus. PMID:27389096

  16. Measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) employing the ADVIA Centaur platform. Validation, reference interval and comparison to UniQ RIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Heickendorff, Lene; Nexo, Ebba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) was introduced as a part of the hepatic cirrhotic marker enhanced liver fibrosis™ test on the automated ADVIA Centaur® immunoassay platform (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA). In...

  17. Contribution of cysteine residues in the extracellular domain of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus to its function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melero José A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mature F protein of all known isolates of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV contains fifteen absolutely conserved cysteine (C residues that are highly conserved among the F proteins of other pneumoviruses as well as the paramyxoviruses. To explore the contribution of the cysteines in the extracellular domain to the fusion activity of HRSV F protein, each cysteine was changed to serine. Mutation of cysteines 37, 313, 322, 333, 343, 358, 367, 393, 416, and 439 abolished or greatly reduced cell surface expression suggesting these residues are critical for proper protein folding and transport to the cell surface. As expected, the fusion activity of these mutations was greatly reduced or abolished. Mutation of cysteine residues 212, 382, and 422 had little to no effect upon cell surface expression or fusion activity at 32°C, 37°C, or 39.5°C. Mutation of C37 and C69 in the F2 subunit either abolished or reduced cell surface expression by 75% respectively. None of the mutations displayed a temperature sensitive phenotype.

  18. Non-Linear and Flexible Regions of the Human Notch1 Extracellular Domain Revealed by High-Resolution Structural Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshuhn, Philip C.; Sheppard, Devon; Taylor, Paul; Whiteman, Pat; Lea, Susan M.; Handford, Penny A.; Redfield, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Notch receptor is a key component of a core metazoan signaling pathway activated by Delta/Serrate/Lag-2 ligands expressed on an adjacent cell. This results in a short-range signal with profound effects on cell-fate determination, cell proliferation, and cell death. Key to understanding receptor function is structural knowledge of the large extracellular portion of Notch which contains multiple repeats of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Here we investigate the EGF4-13 region of human Notch1 (hN1) using a multidisciplinary approach. Ca2+-binding measurements, X-ray crystallography, {1H}-15N heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings support a non-linear organization for the EGF4-13 region with a rigid, bent conformation for EGF4-7 and a single flexible linkage between EGF9 and EGF10. These data allow us to construct an informed model for EGF10-13 which, in conjunction with comparative binding studies, demonstrates that EGF10 has an important role in determining Notch receptor sensitivity to Dll-4. PMID:26996961

  19. Increased urine level of amino-terminal peptide derivatives of type III procollagen in patients with liver diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koide,Norio

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The amino-terminal peptides of type III procollagen (PIIIP in the urine of 40 patients with various liver diseases were determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay kit. The level of urinary PIIIP (uPIIIP was correlated well with serum PIIIP (sPIIIP in 9 patients, the coefficient of correlation being r = 0.836 (p less than 0.01 and the regression line being y = 1.42x + 24. Urinary PIIIP consisted of at least 4 different molecular species with molecular weights of 49 k, 18 k, 10 k and 4.6 k as estimated by column chromatography on Sephadex G-100. Furthermore. uPIIIP was found to be significantly elevated in acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and other liver diseases, in which the elevation of sPIIIP has been reported by others. The mean values +/- standard deviations of uPIIIP were 44.0 +/- 32.0, 60.4 +/- 32.0, 62.0 +/- 46.5, 53.0 +/- 27.1 and 48.1 +/- 22.8 ng/ml for the respective liver diseases, and 13.2 +/- 4.5 for the non-hepatic disease group.

  20. Improved bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides by addition of amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardo, M Daben; Cervantes, Jorge L; Salazar, Juan C; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M

    2014-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates to help circumvent antibiotic resistance, which is an increasing clinical problem. Amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs are known to actively form reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon metal binding. The combination of these two peptidic constructs could lead to a novel class of dual-acting antimicrobial agents. To test this hypothesis, a set of ATCUN binding motifs were screened for their ability to induce ROS formation, and the most potent were then used to modify AMPs with different modes of action. ATCUN binding motif-containing derivatives of anoplin (GLLKRIKTLL-NH2), pro-apoptotic peptide (PAP; KLAKLAKKLAKLAK-NH2), and sh-buforin (RAGLQFPVGRVHRLLRK-NH2) were synthesized and found to be more active than the parent AMPs against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria. The lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for the ATCUN-anoplin peptides are attributed to the higher pore-forming activity along with their ability to cause ROS-induced membrane damage. The addition of the ATCUN motifs to PAP also increases its ability to disrupt membranes. DNA damage is the major contributor to the activity of the ATCUN-sh-buforin peptides. Our findings indicate that the addition of ATCUN motifs to AMPs is a simple strategy that leads to AMPs with higher antibacterial activity and possibly to more potent, usable antibacterial agents. PMID:24803240

  1. Use of amino terminal type III procollagen peptide (P3NP) assay in methotrexate therapy for psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Subedi, D; Chowdhury, M M U

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis continues to be a risk in patients receiving methotrexate for psoriasis. Measurement of amino terminal levels of type III procollagen (P3NP) has been advocated as an effective non‐invasive test for ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis that could avoid liver biopsies. An audit was conducted to assess the practice of P3NP monitoring using guidelines produced by Manchester and whether the agreed levels correlate with histological severity. Sixty five patients with 174 P3NP assays and 30 liver biopsies were reviewed between the years 1999 and 2003. Total number of patient‐methotrexate years was 278.9 and the mean cumulative dose of methotrexate received was 2000 (SD 1838) mg. A higher cumulative dose of methotrexate correlated significantly with high mean and maximum P3NP levels. Of the 30 liver biopsies, 26 (86.6%) showed normal histology or mild to moderate steatosis, three had focal fibrosis, and one had early cirrhosis. A median P3NP value of 5.8 μg/l or higher had a stronger correlation with histological severity. It is concluded that P3NP assay is a valuable adjunct to the clinical management of patients receiving long term methotrexate that can avoid or reduce unnecessary liver biopsies. PMID:16679477

  2. Structure of the H107R variant of the extracellular domain of mouse NKR-P1A at 2.3 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the H107R variant of the extracellular domain of mouse NKR-P1A was determined using X-ray diffraction from a merohedrally twinned crystal. The structure of the H107R variant of the extracellular domain of the mouse natural killer cell receptor NKR-P1A has been determined by X-ray diffraction at 2.3 Å resolution from a merohedrally twinned crystal. Unlike the structure of the wild-type receptor in space group I4122 with a single chain per asymmetric unit, the crystals of the variant belonged to space group I41 with a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Different degrees of merohedral twinning were detected in five data sets collected from different crystals. The mutation does not have a significant impact on the overall structure, but led to the binding of an additional phosphate ion at the interface of the molecules

  3. Single-channel SCAM Identifies Pore-lining Residues in the First Extracellular Loop and First Transmembrane Domains of Cx46 Hemichannels

    OpenAIRE

    KRONENGOLD, J.; Trexler, E B; Bukauskas, F.F.; Bargiello, T A; Verselis, V K

    2003-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels provide an important pathway for direct intercellular transmission of signaling molecules. Previously we showed that fixed negative charges in the first extracellular loop domain (E1) strongly influence charge selectivity, conductance, and rectification of channels and hemichannels formed of Cx46. Here, using excised patches containing Cx46 hemichannels, we applied the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) at the single channel level to residues in E1 to ...

  4. Alteration of the mode of antibacterial action of a defensin by the amino-terminal loop substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Al-M is an engineered fungal defensin with the n-loop of an insect defensin. ► Al-M adopts a native defensin-like structure with high antibacterial potency. ► Al-M kills bacteria through a membrane disruptive mechanism. ► This work sheds light on the functional evolution of CSαβ-type defensins. -- Abstract: Ancient invertebrate-type and classical insect-type defensins (AITDs and CITDs) are two groups of evolutionarily related antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that adopt a conserved cysteine-stabilized α-helical and β-sheet (CSαβ) fold with a different amino-terminal loop (n-loop) size and diverse modes of antibacterial action. Although they both are identified as inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis, only CITDs evolved membrane disruptive ability by peptide oligomerization to form pores. To understand how this occurred, we modified micasin, a fungus-derived AITDs with a non-membrane disruptive mechanism, by substituting its n-loop with that of an insect-derived CITDs. After air oxidization, the synthetic hybrid defensin (termed Al-M) was structurally identified by circular dichroism (CD) and functionally evaluated by antibacterial and membrane permeability assays and electronic microscopic observation. Results showed that Al-M folded into a native-like defensin structure, as determined by its CD spectrum that is similar to that of micasin. Al-M was highly efficacious against the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium with a lethal concentration of 1.76 μM. As expected, in contrast to micasin, Al-M killed the bacteria through a membrane disruptive mechanism of action. The alteration in modes of action supports a key role of the n-loop extension in assembling functional surface of CITDs for membrane disruption. Our work provides mechanical evidence for evolutionary relationship between AITDs and CITDs.

  5. Characterization of translational inhibitors from Phytolacca americana. Amino-terminal sequence determination and antibody-inhibitor conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorn, M J; Larrick, J; Piatak, M; Wilson, K J

    1984-10-23

    Two translational inhibitors (pokeweed antiviral protein and pokeweed antiviral protein II) isolated from the leaves of the pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, were characterized as to their behavior during reverse-phase HPLC and their amino-terminal sequences. Alignment of the sequences demonstrated that a substantial degree of homology was present (10 of 29 identical residues). Pokeweed antiviral protein was shown by reverse-phase chromatography to be composed of at least two components, pokeweed antiviral proteina and pokeweed antiviral proteinb, which comigrated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, shared identical N-terminal amino-acid sequences through residue 31, and had similar specific activities in a cell-free translation inhibition assay. Pokeweed antiviral protein II was covalently coupled to a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the transferrin receptor (anti-transferrin receptor). The disulfide-linked conjugate inhibited protein synthesis in the human breast tumor cell line MCF-7, whereas anti-transferrin receptor, pokeweed antiviral protein II, or an immunotoxin composed of an irrelevant antiserum and pokeweed antiviral protein II, were nontoxic. The inhibitory dose 50% of anti-transferrin receptor-pokeweed antiviral protein II for MCF-7 cells was 0.7 nM, whereas the corresponding ricin A chain conjugate (anti-transferrin receptor-ricin A chain) was more potent with a inhibitory dose 50% of 0.1 nM. Pokeweed antiviral protein II can be added to the growing list of translation inhibitors that are effective as components of immunotoxins in vitro. Additional studies will be needed to determine whether pokeweed antiviral protein II immunotoxins provide advantageous properties for in vivo applications. PMID:6091760

  6. Alteration of the mode of antibacterial action of a defensin by the amino-terminal loop substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bin [Group of Animal Innate Immunity, State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, 100101 Beijing (China); Zhu, Shunyi, E-mail: Zhusy@ioz.ac.cn [Group of Animal Innate Immunity, State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, 100101 Beijing (China)

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-M is an engineered fungal defensin with the n-loop of an insect defensin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-M adopts a native defensin-like structure with high antibacterial potency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-M kills bacteria through a membrane disruptive mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work sheds light on the functional evolution of CS{alpha}{beta}-type defensins. -- Abstract: Ancient invertebrate-type and classical insect-type defensins (AITDs and CITDs) are two groups of evolutionarily related antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that adopt a conserved cysteine-stabilized {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet (CS{alpha}{beta}) fold with a different amino-terminal loop (n-loop) size and diverse modes of antibacterial action. Although they both are identified as inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis, only CITDs evolved membrane disruptive ability by peptide oligomerization to form pores. To understand how this occurred, we modified micasin, a fungus-derived AITDs with a non-membrane disruptive mechanism, by substituting its n-loop with that of an insect-derived CITDs. After air oxidization, the synthetic hybrid defensin (termed Al-M) was structurally identified by circular dichroism (CD) and functionally evaluated by antibacterial and membrane permeability assays and electronic microscopic observation. Results showed that Al-M folded into a native-like defensin structure, as determined by its CD spectrum that is similar to that of micasin. Al-M was highly efficacious against the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium with a lethal concentration of 1.76 {mu}M. As expected, in contrast to micasin, Al-M killed the bacteria through a membrane disruptive mechanism of action. The alteration in modes of action supports a key role of the n-loop extension in assembling functional surface of CITDs for membrane disruption. Our work provides mechanical evidence for evolutionary relationship between AITDs and CITDs.

  7. Cloning and high level expression of the biologically active extracellular domain of Macaca mulatta CD40 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shengyun; Wan, Lin; Yang, Hao; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-03-01

    The CD40-mediated immune response contributes to a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases. CD40 antagonists have potential as novel therapies for immune disorders. However, the CD40 pathway has not been well characterized in the rhesus monkey Macaca mulatta, which is a valuable animal model for human immune disease. An 834 bp transcript was cloned from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of rhesus monkey using specific primers designed according to the predicted sequence of M. mulatta CD40 (mmCD40) in GenBank. Sequence analysis demonstrated that mmCD40 is highly homologous to human CD40 (hCD40), with an amino acid sequence identity of 94%. Genes encoding the extracellular domain of mmCD40 and the Fc fragment of the hIgG1 were inserted into a pPIC9K plasmid to produce mmCD40Ig by Pichia pastoris. Approximately 15-20 mg of the mmCD40Ig protein with ∼90% purity could be recovered from 1 L of culture. The purified mmCD40Ig protein can form dimers and can specifically bind CD40L-positive cells. Additionally, the mmCD40Ig protein can bind hCD40L protein in phosphate buffered saline and form a stable combination in a size-exclusion chromatography assay using a Superdex 200 column. Moreover, mmCD40Ig is as efficient as M. mulatta CTLA4Ig (mmCTLA4Ig) to suppress Con A-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Additionally, mmCD40Ig only showed mild immunosuppressive activity in a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) system. These results suggest that mmCD40Ig secreted by P. pastoris was productive and functional, and it could be used as a tool for pathogenesis and therapies for chronic inflammatory diseases in a M. mulatta model. PMID:26586612

  8. Antibodies to the extracellular receptor domain restore the hormone-insensitive kinase and conformation of the mutant insulin receptor valine 382.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, C; Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Dolais-Kitabgi, J; Taylor, S; Accili, D; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-05-25

    A mutation substituting a valine for phenylalanine at residue 382 in the insulin receptor alpha-subunit has been found in two sisters with a genetic form of extreme insulin resistance. This receptor mutation impairs the ability of the hormone to activate autophosphorylation of solubilized receptors and phosphorylation of substrates (Accili, D., Mosthaf, L., Ullrich, A., and Taylor, S. I. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 434-439). We have previously demonstrated that in native receptors insulin induces a conformational change in the receptor beta-subunit, which is thought to be necessary for receptor activation (Baron, V., Gautier, N., Komoriya, A., Hainaut, P., Scimeca, J. C., Mervic, M., Lavielle, S., Dolais-Kitabgi, J., and Van Obberghen, E. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4634-4641). Hence, it was thought that a defect in this conformational change might explain the functional defect of the mutant receptor. This appears to be the case, as we demonstrate here that the mutant receptor is locked in its inactive configuration. However, we found two monoclonal antibodies, directed to the extracellular domain, which are capable of restoring the mutant receptor kinase activity. The activation of the mutant receptor was accompanied by restoration of conformational changes in the beta-subunit C terminus. From these data, we draw the two following conclusions. (i) A causal link exists between receptor kinase activation and the occurrence of conformational changes. (ii) Ligands other than insulin, such as antibodies, which perturb the extracellular domain, can function as alternative ways to restore the mutant receptor kinase. PMID:8388389

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of the extracellular domain of the 4-1BB ligand, a member of the TNF family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Jung-Sue; Kim, Dong-Uk [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byungchan; Kwon, Byoung Se [Immunomodulation Research Center, Ulsan University, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Soo, E-mail: hscho8@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular domain of the 4-1BB ligand fused with glutathione-S-transferase was expressed in Escherichia coli (Origami) and purified by using affinity and ion-exchange column chromatographic methods. Crystals of the 4-1BB ligand were obtained at 290 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The 4-1BB ligand, a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family, is an important co-stimulatory molecule that plays a key role in the clonal expansion and survival of CD8+ T cells. Signalling through binding of the 4-1BB ligand and 4-1BB has been reported to enhance CD8+ T-cell expansion and protect activated CD8+ T cells from death. The 4-1BB ligand is an integral protein expressed on activated antigen-presenting cells. The extracellular domain of the 4-1BB ligand fused with glutathione-S-transferase was expressed in Escherichia coli (Origami) and purified by using affinity and ion-exchange column chromatographic methods. Crystals of the 4-1BB ligand were obtained at 290 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from these crystals to 2.8 Å resolution and the crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 114.6, b = 73.8, c = 118.50 Å, β = 115.5°.

  10. A Conformation Change in the Extracellular Domain that Accompanies Desensitization of Acid-sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) 3

    OpenAIRE

    Cushman, Kenneth A.; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2007-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are thought to trigger some forms of acid-induced pain and taste, and to contribute to stroke-induced neural damage. After activation by low extracellular pH, different ASICs undergo desensitization on time scales from 0.1 to 10 s. Consistent with a substantial conformation change, desensitization slows dramatically when temperature drops (Askwith, C.C., C.J. Benson, M.J. Welsh, and P.M. Snyder. 2001. PNAS. 98:6459–6463). The nature of this conformation chang...

  11. An amino-terminal segment of hantavirus nucleocapsid protein presented on hepatitis B virus core particles induces a strong and highly cross-reactive antibody response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core particles tolerate the insertion of the amino-terminal 120 amino acids (aa) of the Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein. Here, we demonstrate that the insertion of 120 amino-terminal aa of N proteins from highly virulent Dobrava and Hantaan hantaviruses allows the formation of chimeric core particles. These particles expose the inserted foreign protein segments, at least in part, on their surface. Analysis by electron cryomicroscopy of chimeric particles harbouring the Puumala virus (PUUV) N segment revealed 90% T = 3 and 10% T = 4 shells. A map computed from T = 3 shells shows additional density splaying out from the tips of the spikes producing the effect of an extra shell of density at an outer radius compared with wild-type shells. The inserted Puumala virus N protein segment is flexibly linked to the core spikes and only partially icosahedrally ordered. Immunisation of mice of two different haplotypes (BALB/c and C57BL/6) with chimeric core particles induces a high-titered and highly cross-reactive N-specific antibody response in both mice strains

  12. pH-dependent structural change of the extracellular sensor domain of the DraK histidine kinase from Streptomyces coelicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We described the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular sensory domain (ESD) of DraK histidine kinase. ► The ESD of DraK showed a reversible pH-dependent conformational change in a wide pH range. ► The E83 is an important residue for the pH-dependent conformational change. -- Abstract: Recently, the DraR/DraK (Sco3063/Sco3062) two-component system (TCS) of Streptomycescoelicolor has been reported to be involved in the differential regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis. However, it has not been shown that under which conditions and how the DraR/DraK TCS is activated to initiate the signal transduction process. Therefore, to understand the sensing mechanism, structural study of the sensory domain of DraK is highly required. Here, we report the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular sensory domain (ESD) of DraK. We observed a reversible pH-dependent conformational change of the ESD in a pH range of 2.5–10. Size-exclusion chromatography and AUC (analytical ultracentrifugation) data indicated that the ESD is predominantly monomeric in solution and exists in equilibrium between monomer and dimer states in acidic condition. Using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) and CD (circular dichroism) spectroscopy, our findings suggest that the structure of the ESD at low pH is more structured than that at high pH. In particular, the glutamate at position 83 is an important residue for the pH-dependent conformational change. These results suggest that this pH-dependent conformational change of ESD may be involved in signal transduction process of DraR/DraK TCS

  13. Evidence against extracellular exposure of a highly immunogenic region in the C-terminal domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus gp41 transmembrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postler, Thomas S; Martinez-Navio, José M; Yuste, Eloísa; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2012-01-01

    protein with a single membrane-spanning domain and without any extracellular loops. PMID:22072749

  14. Hepatocyte permissiveness to Plasmodium infection is conveyed by a short and structurally conserved region of the CD81 large extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Yalaoui

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasion of hepatocytes by Plasmodium sporozoites is a prerequisite for establishment of a malaria infection, and thus represents an attractive target for anti-malarial interventions. Still, the molecular mechanisms underlying sporozoite invasion are largely unknown. We have previously reported that the tetraspanin CD81, a known receptor for the hepatitis C virus (HCV, is required on hepatocytes for infection by sporozoites of several Plasmodium species. Here we have characterized CD81 molecular determinants required for infection of hepatocytic cells by P. yoelii sporozoites. Using CD9/CD81 chimeras, we have identified in CD81 a 21 amino acid stretch located in a domain structurally conserved in the large extracellular loop of tetraspanins, which is sufficient in an otherwise CD9 background to confer susceptibility to P. yoelii infection. By site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated the key role of a solvent-exposed region around residue D137 within this domain. A mAb that requires this region for optimal binding did not block infection, in contrast to other CD81 mAbs. This study has uncovered a new functionally important region of CD81, independent of HCV E2 envelope protein binding domain, and further suggests that CD81 may not interact directly with a parasite ligand during Plasmodium infection, but instead may regulate the function of a yet unknown partner protein.

  15. Flexible Structure of Peptide-Bound Filamin A Mechanosensor Domain Pair 20-21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonne Seppälä

    Full Text Available Filamins (FLNs are large, multidomain actin cross-linking proteins with diverse functions. Besides regulating the actin cytoskeleton, they serve as important links between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton by binding cell surface receptors, functioning as scaffolds for signaling proteins, and binding several other cytoskeletal proteins that regulate cell adhesion dynamics. Structurally, FLNs are formed of an amino terminal actin-binding domain followed by 24 immunoglobulin-like domains (IgFLNs. Recent studies have demonstrated that myosin-mediated contractile forces can reveal hidden protein binding sites in the domain pairs IgFLNa18-19 and 20-21, enabling FLNs to transduce mechanical signals in cells. The atomic structures of these mechanosensor domain pairs in the resting state are known, as well as the structures of individual IgFLN21 with ligand peptides. However, little experimental data is available on how interacting protein binding deforms the domain pair structures. Here, using small-angle x-ray scattering-based modelling, x-ray crystallography, and NMR, we show that the adaptor protein migfilin-derived peptide-bound structure of IgFLNa20-21 is flexible and adopts distinctive conformations depending on the presence or absence of the interacting peptide. The conformational changes reported here may be common for all peptides and may play a role in the mechanosensor function of the site.

  16. Expression and Characterization of the Extracellular Domain of Human HER2 from Escherichia Coli, and Production of Polyclonal Antibodies Against the Recombinant Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Feng, Xue; Qu, Jiao; Han, Wenqi; Liu, Zi; Li, Xu; Zou, Ming; Zhen, Yuhong; Zhu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. In this study, the whole extracellular domain gene of HER2 was amplified by RT-PCR from human breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. The genes of membrane-distal region (A) and membrane proximal region (B) of HER2 extracellular domain were amplified from the cloned template, and then inserted into the expression vector pET-28a and pET-30a, respectively. The recombinant expression vectors were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced by isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for expression of proteins His-A and His-B. The expressed proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot. The optimization of culture conditions led us to accomplish the recombinant protein induction with 1.0 mM IPTG at 37 °C for 8 h, and both proteins were expressed in the insoluble form. Both proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using Ni-NTA sepharose column. Balb/c mice were immunized with the purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by ELISA testing and had good specificity by western blot detection. The HER2 ECD proteins His-A and His-B could be expressed in E. coli and were suitable for production of high titer antibodies against HER2 ECD. PMID:25906688

  17. Extra-domain B in Oncofetal Fibronectin Structurally Promotes Fibrillar Head-to-tail Dimerization of Extracellular Matrix Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefner, André; Gebauer, Michaela; Skerra, Arne

    2012-01-01

    The type III extra-domain B (ED-B) is specifically spliced into fibronectin (Fn) during embryogenesis and neoangiogenesis, including many cancers. The x-ray structure of the recombinant four-domain fragment FnIII7B89 reveals a tightly associated, extended head-to-tail dimer, which is stabilized via pair-wise shape and charge complementarity. A tendency toward ED-B-dependent dimer formation in solution was supported by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. When amending the model with the known three-dimensional structure of the FnIII10 domain, its RGD loop as well as the adhesion synergy region in FnIII9–10 become displayed on the same face of the dimer; this should allow simultaneous binding of at least two integrins and, thus, receptor clustering on the cell surface and intracellular signaling. Insertion of ED-B appears to stabilize overall head-to-tail dimerization of two separate Fn chains, which, together with alternating homodimer formation via disulfide bridges at the C-terminal Fn tail, should lead to the known macromolecular fibril formation. PMID:22442152

  18. A DNA vaccine against extracellular domains 1-3 of flk-1 and its immune preventive and therapeutic effects against H22 tumor cell in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lü; Zhao-Yin Qin; Wen-Bin Yang; Yin-Xin Qi; Yi-Min Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a DNA vaccine against extracellular domains 1-3 of fetal liver kinase-1 (flk-1), and to investigate its preventive and therapeutic effect against H22 cellin vivo.METHODS: Flk-1 DNA vaccine was produced by cloning extracellular domains 1-3 of flk-1 and by inserting the cloned gene into pcDNA3.1 (+). Fifteen mice were divided into 3 groups and inoculated by vaccine, plasmid and saline respectively to detect specific T lymphocyte response. Thirty Mice were equally divided into preventive group and therapeutic group. Preventive group was further divided into V, P, and S subgroups, namely immunized by vaccine,pcDNA3.1 (+) and saline, respectively, and attacked by H22 cell. Therapeutical group was divided into 3 subgroups of V, P and S, and attacked by H22, then treated with vaccine, pcDNA3.1 (+) and saline, respectively. The tumor size, tumor weight, mice survival time and tumor latency period were compared within these groups. Furthermore,intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was assessed by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1 (+) flk-1-domains 1-3 was successfully constructed and could raise specific CTL activity. In the preventive group and therapeutic group,tumor latency period and survival time were significantly longer in vaccine subgroup than that in P and S subgroups (P<0.05); the tumor size, weight and MVD were significantly less in vaccine subgroup than that in P and S subgroups (P<0.05). The survival time of therapeutic vaccine subgroup was significantly shorter than that of preventive vaccine subgroup (P<0.05); the tumor size, and MVD of therapeutic vaccine subgroup were significantly greater than that of preventive vaccine subgroup (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: DNA vaccine against flk-1 domains 1-3 can stimulate potent specific CTL activity; and has distinctive prophylactic effect on tumor H22; and also can inhibit the tumor growthin vivo. This vaccine may be used as an adjuvant therapy because it is less effective on

  19. Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide testing to assist the diagnostic evaluation of heart failure in symptomatic primary care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, P.; Collinson, P.O.

    2008-01-01

    When used for the evaluation of symptomatic patients in general practice, amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) testing is highly sensitive, with an excellent negative predictive value for cost-effective exclusion of the diagnosis of heart failure (HF). Importantly (similar...... to other NP assays), lower values for NT-proBNP are expected among patients with HF in the primary care setting compared with patients with acute dyspnea. Among primary care patients with dyspnea, a noncardiac source of dyspnea is most likely in patients with findings below the recommended age......-stratified NT-proBNP cut points. Conversely, an NT-proBNP result above the age-stratified primary care cut points does not absolutely indicate the presence of HF; a more directed cardiovascular workup is indicated Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2/4...

  20. The amino-terminal structure of human fragile X mental retardation protein obtained using precipitant-immobilized imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufeng; Chen, Zhenhang; Fu, Yanjun; He, Qingzhong; Jiang, Lun; Zheng, Jiangge; Gao, Yina; Mei, Pinchao; Chen, Zhongzhou; Ren, Xueqin

    2015-03-01

    Flexibility is an intrinsic property of proteins and essential for their biological functions. However, because of structural flexibility, obtaining high-quality crystals of proteins with heterogeneous conformations remain challenging. Here, we show a novel approach to immobilize traditional precipitants onto molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to facilitate protein crystallization, especially for flexible proteins. By applying this method, high-quality crystals of the flexible N-terminus of human fragile X mental retardation protein are obtained, whose absence causes the most common inherited mental retardation. A novel KH domain and an intermolecular disulfide bond are discovered, and several types of dimers are found in solution, thus providing insights into the function of this protein. Furthermore, the precipitant-immobilized MIPs (piMIPs) successfully facilitate flexible protein crystal formation for five model proteins with increased diffraction resolution. This highlights the potential of piMIPs for the crystallization of flexible proteins.

  1. Genomic structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 and comparison of genomic structures of extracellular domains of mGluR family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 7, coupled with a chemical neurotransmitter L-glutamate, plays an important role in the development of many psychiatric and neurological disorders. To study the biological and genetic mechanism of the mGluR7-related diseases, a physical map covering the full-length mGluR7 genomic sequence has been constructed through seed clone screening and fingerprinting database searching. These BAC clones in the physical map have been sequenced with shotgun strategy and assembled by Phred-Phrap-Consed software; the error rate of the final genomic sequence is less than 0.01%. mGluR7 spans 880 kb genomic region, the GC content and repeat content of mGluR7 genomic sequence are 38% and 37.5% respectively. mGluR7 has a typical "house-keeping" promoter and consists of 11 exons, with introns ranging from 6 kb to 285 kb. mGluR7a and mGluR7b are two known alternatively splicing variants. Comparing the genomic structures of extracellular domains of mGluR family, their genomic structures can be subdivided into three groups, which are consistent with that of proteins. Although the genomic organization of mGluR7's group is conserved, the majority of introns in the extracellular segments vary dramatically. It is an obvious trend of the increasing intron size inverse proportion to phylogenetic time. Variation of genomic structure is higher than that of protein, which is attributed to the species characteristic regulation of gene expression.

  2. Stability of the Human Papillomavirus Type 18 E2 Protein Is Regulated by a Proteasome Degradation Pathway through Its Amino-Terminal Transactivation Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Bellanger, Sophie; Demeret, Caroline; Goyat, Sylvain; Thierry, Françoise

    2001-01-01

    The E2 proteins of papillomaviruses regulate both viral transcription and DNA replication. The human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E2 protein has been shown to repress transcription of the oncogenic E6 and E7 genes, inducing growth arrest in HeLa cells. Using HPV18 E2 fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP), we showed that this protein was short-lived in transfected HeLa cells. Real-time microscopy experiments indicated that the E2-dependent signal increased for roughly 24 h after trans...

  3. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    Query of GenBank with the amino acid sequence of human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (mGluR2) identified a predicted gene product of unknown function on BAC clone CIT987SK-A-69G12 (located on chromosome band 16p12) as a homologous protein. The transcript, entitled GPRC5B, was cloned f...

  4. Experimental and computational evidence for hydrogen bonding interaction between 2′-deoxyadenosine conjugate adduct and amino-terminated organic film on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szwajca, A., E-mail: Anna.Szwajca@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, A" . Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89 b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Krzywiecki, M. [Institute of Physics-CSE, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego 22B, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Pluskota-Karwatka, D. [Faculty of Chemistry, A" . Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89 b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-08-03

    A simple method for immobilization of malonaldehyde-acetaldehyde conjugate adduct with DNA base onto an amino-terminated surface of silicon from water solution is proposed. The Si(001) surface which contains OH groups was modified with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) to serve as a linker between the silica surface and the organic adduct. The 2′-deoxyadenosine adduct was adsorbed on the APTMS/Si surface from acetonitrile/water solution. This nucleoside derivative is stable under laboratory conditions and emits a natural fluorescence, allowing for its adsorption on the APTMS/Si surface to be easily verified by fluorescence microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The degree of surface coverage by the adduct was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis of the XPS spectra revealed bands at 400.2 eV and 533.1 eV which are characteristic of a hydrogen bonded –NH{sub 2} and –OH group. This observation implies that the free electron donating –NH{sub 2} groups from the APTMS layer makes hydrogen bonds with the fluorescent adduct and immobilize it on the surface. The wetting angle of the APTMS/Si surface before and after adsorption of the nucleoside derivative does not differ significantly, which points to the involvement of an – OH group from 2′-deoxyadenosine to be involved in hydrogen bonding. These experimental results were further supported using quantum chemical calculations to demonstrate that the 2′deoxyadenosine adduct makes hydrogen bonds with the APTMS molecule. Furthermore, this hydrogen bond involves the –NH{sub 2} group from APTMS and –OH group at carbon atoms C3 and C6 from the deoxyribose ring of 2′deoxyadenosine. - Highlights: • DNA base adduct was immobilized onto amino-terminated silicon surface. • Hydrogen bonds were observed between aminosilane molecules and deoxyribose ring. • Fluorescent film was characterized by

  5. Experimental and computational evidence for hydrogen bonding interaction between 2′-deoxyadenosine conjugate adduct and amino-terminated organic film on Si(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method for immobilization of malonaldehyde-acetaldehyde conjugate adduct with DNA base onto an amino-terminated surface of silicon from water solution is proposed. The Si(001) surface which contains OH groups was modified with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) to serve as a linker between the silica surface and the organic adduct. The 2′-deoxyadenosine adduct was adsorbed on the APTMS/Si surface from acetonitrile/water solution. This nucleoside derivative is stable under laboratory conditions and emits a natural fluorescence, allowing for its adsorption on the APTMS/Si surface to be easily verified by fluorescence microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The degree of surface coverage by the adduct was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis of the XPS spectra revealed bands at 400.2 eV and 533.1 eV which are characteristic of a hydrogen bonded –NH2 and –OH group. This observation implies that the free electron donating –NH2 groups from the APTMS layer makes hydrogen bonds with the fluorescent adduct and immobilize it on the surface. The wetting angle of the APTMS/Si surface before and after adsorption of the nucleoside derivative does not differ significantly, which points to the involvement of an – OH group from 2′-deoxyadenosine to be involved in hydrogen bonding. These experimental results were further supported using quantum chemical calculations to demonstrate that the 2′deoxyadenosine adduct makes hydrogen bonds with the APTMS molecule. Furthermore, this hydrogen bond involves the –NH2 group from APTMS and –OH group at carbon atoms C3 and C6 from the deoxyribose ring of 2′deoxyadenosine. - Highlights: • DNA base adduct was immobilized onto amino-terminated silicon surface. • Hydrogen bonds were observed between aminosilane molecules and deoxyribose ring. • Fluorescent film was characterized by spectroscopy and

  6. Agglutination of human erythrocytes by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine-651 on the extracellular domain of band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyotake, Kento; Ochiai, Hideharu; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Clustering of band 3, chloride/bicarbonate exchanger, has been reported in Zn(2+)-treated human erythrocytes. However, the agglutination of human erythrocytes is also induced by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine on band 3. Identification of histidine that interacts with Zn(2+)ion remains to be determined. The Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes was unaffected by chymotrypsin cleavage of the small loop region containing His-547 in the extracellular domain of band 3. On the other hand, papain digestion of the large loop region containing His-651 in band 3 inhibited such Zn(2+)-induced agglutination. Moreover, Zn(2+)-induced erythrocyte agglutination was inhibited by the peptide (ARGWVIHPLG) containing His-651, but not by the peptide such as ARGWVIRPLG, which His-651 was substituted by arginine. Among 10 kinds of animal erythrocytes tested, interestingly, no agglutination by Zn(2+)ions was observed in cow cells only that the forth amino acid in the upstream from His-669 on the large loop of cow band 3 is aspartate (Asp-665) instead of glycine. As expected, the agglutination of human erythrocytes by Zn(2+) ions was inhibited in the presence of aspartate. These data indicate that the interaction of Zn(2+) ion with His-651 residue of band 3 plays an important role in the Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes. PMID:26859120

  7. Crystal structure of the PAC1R extracellular domain unifies a consensus fold for hormone recognition by class B G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Kumar

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is a member of the PACAP/glucagon family of peptide hormones, which controls many physiological functions in the immune, nervous, endocrine, and muscular systems. It activates adenylate cyclase by binding to its receptor, PAC1R, a member of class B G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR. Crystal structures of a number of Class B GPCR extracellular domains (ECD bound to their respective peptide hormones have revealed a consensus mechanism of hormone binding. However, the mechanism of how PACAP binds to its receptor remains controversial as an NMR structure of the PAC1R ECD/PACAP complex reveals a different topology of the ECD and a distinct mode of ligand recognition. Here we report a 1.9 Å crystal structure of the PAC1R ECD, which adopts the same fold as commonly observed for other members of Class B GPCR. Binding studies and cell-based assays with alanine-scanned peptides and mutated receptor support a model that PAC1R uses the same conserved fold of Class B GPCR ECD for PACAP binding, thus unifying the consensus mechanism of hormone binding for this family of receptors.

  8. The BR domain of PsrP interacts with extracellular DNA to promote bacterial aggregation; structural insights into pneumococcal biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Tim; Mikaelsson, Cecilia; Beaussart, Audrey; Kikhney, Alexey; Deshmukh, Maya; Wolniak, Sebastian; Pathak, Anuj; Ebel, Christine; Löfling, Jonas; Fogolari, Federico; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Svergun, Dmitri; Nygren, Per-Åke; Achour, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    The major human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of disease and death worldwide. Pneumococcal biofilm formation within the nasopharynx leads to long-term colonization and persistence within the host. We have previously demonstrated that the capsular surface-associated pneumococcal serine rich repeat protein (PsrP), key factor for biofilm formation, binds to keratin-10 (KRT10) through its microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM)-related globular binding region domain (BR187–385). Here, we show that BR187–385 also binds to DNA, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and size exclusion chromatography. Further, heterologous expression of BR187–378 or the longer BR120–378 construct on the surface of a Gram-positive model host bacterium resulted in the formation of cellular aggregates that was significantly enhanced in the presence of DNA. Crystal structure analyses revealed the formation of BR187–385 homo-dimers via an intermolecular β-sheet, resulting in a positively charged concave surface, shaped to accommodate the acidic helical DNA structure. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism studies indicate that the aggregate-enhancing N-terminal region of BR120–166 adopts an extended, non-globular structure. Altogether, our results suggest that PsrP adheres to extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix and thus promotes pneumococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27582320

  9. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor Subunits Play a Direct Structural Role in Synaptic Contact Formation via Their N-terminal Extracellular Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura E; Nicholson, Martin W; Arama, Jessica E; Mercer, Audrey; Thomson, Alex M; Jovanovic, Jasmina N

    2016-07-01

    The establishment of cell-cell contacts between presynaptic GABAergic neurons and their postsynaptic targets initiates the process of GABAergic synapse formation. GABAA receptors (GABAARs), the main postsynaptic receptors for GABA, have been recently demonstrated to act as synaptogenic proteins that can single-handedly induce the formation and functional maturation of inhibitory synapses. To establish how the subunit composition of GABAARs influences their ability to induce synaptogenesis, a co-culture model system incorporating GABAergic medium spiny neurons and the HEK293 cells, stably expressing different combinations of receptor subunits, was developed. Analyses of HEK293 cell innervation by medium spiny neuron axons using immunocytochemistry, activity-dependent labeling, and electrophysiology have indicated that the γ2 subunit is required for the formation of active synapses and that its effects are influenced by the type of α/β subunits incorporated into the functional receptor. To further characterize this process, the large N-terminal extracellular domains (ECDs) of α1, α2, β2, and γ2 subunits were purified using the baculovirus/Sf9 cell system. When these proteins were applied to the co-cultures of MSNs and α1/β2/γ2-expressing HEK293 cells, the α1, β2, or γ2 ECD each caused a significant reduction in contact formation, in contrast to the α2 ECD, which had no effect. Together, our experiments indicate that the structural role of GABAARs in synaptic contact formation is determined by their subunit composition, with the N-terminal ECDs of each of the subunits directly participating in interactions between the presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, suggesting the these interactions are multivalent and specific. PMID:27129275

  10. M2e通用流感疫苗的研究进展%Universal influenza vaccine based on the extracellular domain of M2 protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花艳红; 王希良

    2009-01-01

    M2基质蛋白是A型流感病毒膜蛋白,在A型流感病毒的生命周期中,M2具有重要的生物学功能,已成为抗病毒药物研究的靶蛋白.其胞外区M2e(M2 eetodomain,M2e)为24个氨基酸残基,该片段在多病毒株中具有极高的保守性.针对M2e产生IgG型抗体能够防止流感病毒引发的死亡,减少动物模型中流感的发病率.了解有关M2e疫苗的研究进展,以及关于M2e作为A型流感疫苗靶抗原的关键问题很重要.%Matrix protein M2 (M2) is the membrane protein of Influenza A with an extracellular domain of 24 amino acid residues, which is strongly conserved across virus strains. M2 plays an important role in the life cy-cle of the Influenza A virus and has been the target of antiviral drugs. IgG subtype antibodies directed against M2e can prevent death from influenza and reduce morbidity in animal models for influenza disease. This review summarizes the findings on M2e vaccine candidates and addresses some key questions about this Influenza A vaccine target.

  11. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domains of the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines: characterization of antibody and chemokine binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournamille, Christophe; Filipe, Anne; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Gane, Pierre; Lisowska, Elwira; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2003-09-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC), a seven-transmembrane glycoprotein carrying the Duffy (Fy) blood group, acts as a widely expressed promiscuous chemokine receptor. In a structure-function study, we analysed the binding of chemokines and anti-Fy monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to K562 cells expressing 39 mutant forms of DARC with alanine substitutions spread out on the four extracellular domains (ECDs). Using synthetic peptides, we defined previously the Fy6 epitope (22-FEDVW-26), and we characterized the Fya epitope as the linear sequence 41-YGANLE-46. In agreement with these results, mutations of F22-E23, V25 and Y41, G42, N44, L45 on ECD1 abolished the binding of anti-Fy6 and anti-Fya mAbs to K562 cells respectively, Anti-Fy3 binding was abolished by D58-D59 (ECD1), R124 (ECD2), D263 and D283 (ECD4) substitutions. Mutations of C51 (ECD1), C129 (ECD2), C195 (ECD3) and C276 (ECD4 severely reduced anti-Fy3 and CXC-chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL-8) binding. CXCL-8 binding was also abrogated by mutations of F22-E23, P50 (ECD1) and D263, R267, D283 (ECD4). These results defined the Fya epitope and suggested that (1) two disulphide bridges are involved in the creation of an active chemokine binding pocket; (2) a limited number of amino acids in ECDs 1-4 participate in CXCL-8 binding; and (3) Fy3 is a conformation-dependent epitope involving all ECDs. We also showed that N-glycosylation of DARC occurred on N16SS and did not influence antibody and chemokine binding. PMID:12956774

  12. Serum procollagen 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP) in prostate cancer; pitfalls of its use as an early surrogate marker for bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procollagen 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP) is a bone formation marker and has been shown to have a strong association with the extent of bone metastases (BM) in patients with advanced prostate cancer. More recently, its levels were found to be affected by androgen deprivation therapies and bisphosphonates. We investigated the role of P1NP as a surrogate marker of sub-radiological skeletal metastases in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure (BF). BePrepared is a prospective longitudinal substudy of RADAR trial in which serial P1NPs were collected at regular intervals for 123 patients who had completed RADAR protocol treatment. There was no trend identified in P1NP levels prior to diagnosis of BM. We found that there was no difference in P1NP concentrations at the time of diagnosis of BM in the group that developed BM compared with P1NP levels in groups with only nodal metastases or BF. In the group of patients who did not experience BF, P1NP was affected by previous luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-agonist and bisphosphonate therapy. Hence, patients who received an 18-month course of androgen deprivation without bisphosphonates had significantly higher P1NP values than patients with shorter androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) course combined with a course of bisphosphonates. P1NP is not a sensitive serum marker of early BM in high-risk prostate cancer patients with BF and low prostate-specific antigen levels as its levels are affected by prior history of bone remodelling therapies such as ADT and bisphosphonates.

  13. Effect of peptides corresponding to extracellular domains of serotonin 1B/1D receptors and melanocortin 3 and 4 receptors on hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakova, E A; Derkach, K V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-03-01

    The ligand-recognizing part of G protein-coupled receptors consists of their extracellular loops and N-terminal domain. Identification of these sites is essential for receptor mapping and for the development and testing of new hormone system regulators. The peptides corresponding by their structure to extracellular loop 2 of serotonin 1B/1D receptor (peptide 1), extracellular loop 3 of melanocortin 3 receptor (peptide 2), and N-terminal domain of melanocortin 4 (peptide 3) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. In synaptosomal membranes isolated from rat brain, peptide 1 (10(-5)-10(-4) M) attenuated the effects of 5-nonyloxytryptamine (selective agonist of serotonin 1B/1D receptor) and to a lesser extent serotonin and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine acting on all the subtypes of serotonin receptor 1. Peptide 2 (10(-5)-10(-4) M) significantly reduced the adenylate cyclase-stimulating effect of γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (agonist of melanocortin receptor 3), but had no effect on the adenylate cyclase effect of THIQ (agonist melanocortin receptor 4). Peptide 3 reduced the adenylate cyclase-stimulating effects of THIQ and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (non-selective agonist of melanocortin receptors 3 and 4), but did not modulate the effect of γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The effect of peptide 3 was weaker: it was observed at peptide 3 concentration of 10(-4) M. Peptides 1-3 did no change the adenylate cyclase-modulating effects of hormones acting through non-homologous receptors. Thus, the synthesized peptides specifically inhibited the regulatory effects of hormones acting through homologous receptors. This suggests that the corresponding extracellular domains are involved in ligand recognition and binding and determine functional activity of the receptor. PMID:24770752

  14. Disposable amperometric magnetoimmunosensor for the sensitive detection of the cardiac biomarker amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Novel and sensitive amperometric magnetoimmunosensor for NT-proBNP detection. •Indirect competitive immunoassay onto HOOC-MBs and Au/SPEs as transducers. •Excellent analytical performance at levels clinically relevant in human serum. •Useful in clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cardiac diseases. -- Abstract: A novel amperometric magnetoimmunosensor using an indirect competitive format is developed for the sensitive detection of the amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). The immunosensor design involves the covalent immobilization of the antigen onto carboxylic-modified magnetic beads (HOOC-MBs) activated with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), and further incubation in a mixture solution containing variable concentrations of the antigen and a fixed concentration of an HRP-labeled detection antibody. Accordingly, the target NT-proBNP in the sample and that immobilized on the MBs compete for binding to a fixed amount of the specific HRP-labeled secondary antibody. The immunoconjugate-bearing MBs are captured by a magnet placed under the surface of a disposable gold screen-printed electrode (Au/SPE). The amperometric responses measured at –0.10 V (vs. a Ag pseudo-reference electrode), upon addition of 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as electron transfer mediator and H2O2 as the enzyme substrate, are used to monitor the affinity reaction. The developed magnetoimmunosensor provides attractive analytical characteristics in 10-times diluted human serum samples, exhibiting a linear range of clinical usefulness (0.12–42.9 ng mL−1) and a detection limit of 0.02 ng mL−1, which can be used in clinical diagnosis of chronic heart failure in the elderly and for classifying patients at risk of death after heart transplantation. The magnetoimmunosensor was successfully applied to the analysis of spiked human serum samples

  15. Disposable amperometric magnetoimmunosensor for the sensitive detection of the cardiac biomarker amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban-Fernández de Ávila, Berta, E-mail: berta.efa@quim.ucm.es; Escamilla-Gómez, Vanessa, E-mail: vaneeg@quim.ucm.es; Campuzano, Susana, E-mail: susanacr@quim.ucm.es; Pedrero, María, E-mail: mpedrero@quim.ucm.es; Pingarrón, José M., E-mail: pingarro@quim.ucm.es

    2013-06-19

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Novel and sensitive amperometric magnetoimmunosensor for NT-proBNP detection. •Indirect competitive immunoassay onto HOOC-MBs and Au/SPEs as transducers. •Excellent analytical performance at levels clinically relevant in human serum. •Useful in clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cardiac diseases. -- Abstract: A novel amperometric magnetoimmunosensor using an indirect competitive format is developed for the sensitive detection of the amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). The immunosensor design involves the covalent immobilization of the antigen onto carboxylic-modified magnetic beads (HOOC-MBs) activated with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), and further incubation in a mixture solution containing variable concentrations of the antigen and a fixed concentration of an HRP-labeled detection antibody. Accordingly, the target NT-proBNP in the sample and that immobilized on the MBs compete for binding to a fixed amount of the specific HRP-labeled secondary antibody. The immunoconjugate-bearing MBs are captured by a magnet placed under the surface of a disposable gold screen-printed electrode (Au/SPE). The amperometric responses measured at –0.10 V (vs. a Ag pseudo-reference electrode), upon addition of 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as electron transfer mediator and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the enzyme substrate, are used to monitor the affinity reaction. The developed magnetoimmunosensor provides attractive analytical characteristics in 10-times diluted human serum samples, exhibiting a linear range of clinical usefulness (0.12–42.9 ng mL{sup −1}) and a detection limit of 0.02 ng mL{sup −1}, which can be used in clinical diagnosis of chronic heart failure in the elderly and for classifying patients at risk of death after heart transplantation. The magnetoimmunosensor was successfully applied to the analysis of spiked human serum

  16. Extracellular Membrane-proximal Domain of HAb18G/CD147 Binds to Metal Ion-dependent Adhesion Site (MIDAS) Motif of Integrin β1 to Modulate Malignant Properties of Hepatoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Wu, Jiao; Song, Fei; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that HAb18G/CD147 interacts with the integrin variants α3β1 and α6β1. However, the mechanism of the interaction remains largely unknown. In this study, mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT), a mammalian two-hybrid method, was used to study the CD147-integrin β1 subunit interaction. CD147 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells was interfered with by small hairpin RNA. Nude mouse xenograft model and metastatic model of HCC were used to detect the role of CD147 in carcinogenesis and metastasis. We found that the extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 (I-type domain) binds at the metal ion-dependent adhesion site in the βA domain of the integrin β1 subunit, and Asp179 in the I-type domain of HAb18G/CD147 plays an important role in the interaction. The levels of the proteins that act downstream of integrin, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phospho-FAK, were decreased, and the cytoskeletal structures of HCC cells were rearranged bearing the HAb18G/CD147 deletion. Simultaneously, the migration and invasion capacities, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, colony formation rate in vitro, and tumor growth and metastatic potential in vivo were decreased. These results indicate that the interaction of HAb18G/CD147 extracellular I-type domain with the integrin β1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif activates the downstream FAK signaling pathway, subsequently enhancing the malignant properties of HCC cells. PMID:22130661

  17. Extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 binds to metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif of integrin β1 to modulate malignant properties of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Wu, Jiao; Song, Fei; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2012-02-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that HAb18G/CD147 interacts with the integrin variants α3β1 and α6β1. However, the mechanism of the interaction remains largely unknown. In this study, mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT), a mammalian two-hybrid method, was used to study the CD147-integrin β1 subunit interaction. CD147 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells was interfered with by small hairpin RNA. Nude mouse xenograft model and metastatic model of HCC were used to detect the role of CD147 in carcinogenesis and metastasis. We found that the extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 (I-type domain) binds at the metal ion-dependent adhesion site in the βA domain of the integrin β1 subunit, and Asp(179) in the I-type domain of HAb18G/CD147 plays an important role in the interaction. The levels of the proteins that act downstream of integrin, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phospho-FAK, were decreased, and the cytoskeletal structures of HCC cells were rearranged bearing the HAb18G/CD147 deletion. Simultaneously, the migration and invasion capacities, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, colony formation rate in vitro, and tumor growth and metastatic potential in vivo were decreased. These results indicate that the interaction of HAb18G/CD147 extracellular I-type domain with the integrin β1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif activates the downstream FAK signaling pathway, subsequently enhancing the malignant properties of HCC cells. PMID:22130661

  18. GFP-based evaluation system of recombinant expression through the secretory pathway in insect cells and its application to the extracellular domains of class C GPCRs

    OpenAIRE

    Ashikawa, Yuji; Ihara, Makoto; Matsuura, Noriko; Fukunaga, Yuko; Kusakabe, Yuko; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2011-01-01

    Applications of the GFP-fusion technique have greatly facilitated evaluations of the amounts and qualities of sample proteins used for structural analyses. In this study, we applied the GFP-based sample evaluation to secreted protein expression by insect cells. We verified that a GFP variant, GFPuv, retains proper folding and monodispersity within all expression spaces in Sf9 cells, such as the cytosol, organelles, and even the extracellular space after secretion, and thus can serve as a prop...

  19. Evidence against Extracellular Exposure of a Highly Immunogenic Region in the C-Terminal Domain of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Transmembrane Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Postler, Thomas S.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Yuste, Eloísa; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2012-01-01

    The generally accepted model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein topology includes a single membrane-spanning domain. An alternate model has been proposed which features multiple membrane-spanning domains. Consistent with the alternate model, a high percentage of HIV-1-infected individuals produce unusually robust antibody responses to a region of envelope, the so-called “Kennedy epitope,” that in the conventional model should be in the cytoplasm. Here we sho...

  20. Optimization screening for the B cell epitope of the extracellular domain of the follicle stimulating hormone receptor%卵泡刺激素受体(FSHR)胞外区B细胞表位的优化筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨利华; 李鸥; 王树峰; 梁志清; 吴玉章; 何畏

    2012-01-01

    目的:采用生物信息学技术,对前期研究获得的卵泡刺激素受体(FSHR)的B细胞表位肽段进一步筛选、优化,以获得理想的FSHR靶标抗原.方法:①利用InsightⅡ分子模拟软件寻找FSHR与FSH相互作用的区域.②应用DNA STAR 软件中的Protein模块对优化后抗原进行综合分析.③肽结合实验对优化后抗原进行免疫原性检测.结果:≥5个氨基酸片段的柔性区域位于FSHR第30 - 44、52 - 65、112 - 121、174 - 182、190 - 210、223 - 245区段.当FSHR胞外区第37位缬氨酸被赖氨酸或谷氨酸替代时,具有较好的亲水性及抗原性.而肽结合实验证实肽32 - 44具有更好的免疫原性.结论:FSHR胞外区肽段32-44有可能成为避孕疫苗的理想抗原.%Objective; To obtain the desired antigen targeting - FSHR, we screened and optimized the B cell epitope for the extracellular domain of the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) . Methods; ①Insight II molecular simulation software was used to i-dentity amino acid sites of interaction interface between FSH and FSHR. ②The secondary structure and surface properties of the extracellular domain of FSHR, such as physical and chemical properties, hydrophilicity, antigenicity and plasticity, were analyzed by a variety of methods. ③The peptide of the epitopes was synthesized and used for coating streptavidin plate. The immunogenicity of the peptides was determined. Results; Many distinct antigenic epitopes in the extracellular domain of FSHR were identified by computation, the possible location of which was in the regions of 30 ~ 44, 52 ~ 65 , 112 ~ 121, 174 ~ 182, 190 ~ 210 and 223 ~ 245. When the FSHR ectodomain 37th valine was replaced by lysine and glutamic acid, the antigen had better hydrophilicity and antigenic. However, the peptide 32-44 was confirmed the best immunogenicity in ELISA assay. Conclusion; FSHR ectodomain peptide 32 ~44 can be the ideal contraceptive vaccine antigens.

  1. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2) Phosphorylation Sites and Docking Domain on the Nuclear Pore Complex Protein Tpr Cooperatively Regulate ERK2-Tpr Interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vomastek, Tomáš; Iwanicky, M. P.; Burack, W. R.; Tiwari, D.; Kumar, D.; Parsons, J. T.; Weber, M. J.; Nandicoori, V. K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 22 (2008), s. 6954-6966. ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : erk * docking domain * cell growth Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.942, year: 2008

  2. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins

  3. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [Pathology and Microbiology Department, 986495 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  4. Expression cloning and chromosomal mapping of the leukocyte activation antigen CD97, a new seven-span transmembrane molecule of the secretin receptor superfamily with an unusual extracellular domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, J. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[Max Planck Society, Berlin-Buch (Germany); Hamann, D.; Lier, R.A.W. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-15

    CD97 is a monomeric glycoprotein of 75 to 85 kDa that is induced rapidly on the surface of most leukocytes upon activation. We herein report the isolation of a cDNA encoding human CD97 by expression cloning in COS cells. The 3-kb cDNA clone encodes a mature polypeptide chain of 722 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 79 kDa. Within the C-terminal part of the protein, a region with seven hydrophobic segments was identified, suggesting that CD97 is a seven-span transmembrane molecule. Sequence comparison indicates that CD97 is the first leukocyte Ag in a recently described superfamily that includes the receptors for secretin, calcitonin, and other mammalian and insect peptide hormones. Different from these receptors, CD97 has an extended extracellular region of 433 amino acids that possesses three N-terminal epidermal growth factor-like domains, two of them with a calcium-binding site, and single Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif. The existence of structural elements characteristic for extracellular matrix proteins in a seven-span transmembrane molecule makes CD97 a receptor potentially involved in both adhesion and signaling processes early after leukocyte activation. The gene encoding CD97 is localized on chromosome 19 (19p13.12-13.2).

  5. Recognition of peptidoglycan and beta-lactam antibiotics by the extracellular domain of the Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maestro, B.; Nováková, Linda; Hesek, D.; Lee, M.; Leyva, E.; Mobashery, S.; Sanz, J.M.; Branny, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 585, č. 2 (2011), s. 357-363. ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/07/P082; GA ČR GA204/08/0783; GA AV ČR IAA600200801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Signal transduction * Penicillin-binding protein and Ser/Thr protein kinase-associated domain * Peptidoglycan Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.538, year: 2011

  6. Expression of Human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Flt-1 Extracellular Domain 1-3 Loop cDNA in Pichia pastoris, Purification of the Expressed Product and Detection of Its Biological Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To express human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor Flt-1 extracellular domain 1-3 loop cDNA in Pichia. Pastroris, and to purify the expressed product and detect its biological activity. Methods By inserting human Flt-1 (1-3 loop) cDNA coding 316 amino acid residues into Pichia pastoris expression vector pPIC9K containing AOX1 promoter and the sequences of α secreting signal peptides, a recombinant expression plasmid pPIC9K/Flt-1 (1-3) was constructed and transformed to yeast host strain GS115, then His+ Muts phenotype transformant was screened out and cultured in flasks, and Flt-1 (1-3) was expressed under the induction of 1% methanol. Results SDS-PAGE showed that after being induced with 1% methanol for 4d, the expressed product existed in supernatant in the form of soluble molecule and contained 60% of total protein expressed. Western blot showed good antigenicity and specificity of expressed product. After being purified by CM-Sepharose FF and Sephacryl S-100 chromatography, the purity of the expressed product reached above 90%. Biological assay proved that the expressed product could bind to hVEGF165 and inhibit the proliferation of HUVEC stimulated by hVEGF165. Conclusion Human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor Flt-1 extracellular domain 1-3 loop was successfully expressed. The study lays a foundation for further application of the expressed product in the treatment of vasoformation related diseases, such as tumor and diabetic retinopathy.

  7. Three-dimensional structure and function study on the active region in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of human IL-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任蕴芳; 冯健男; 曲红; 李松; 沈倍奋

    2000-01-01

    In this study the three-dimensional (3-D) model of the ligand-binding domain (V106-P322) of human interleukin-6 receptor (hlL-6 R) was constructed by computer-guided ho-mology modeling technique using the crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain (K52-L251) of human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) as templet. Furthermore, the active binding region of the 3-D model of hlL-6R with the ligand (hlL-6) was predicted. In light of the structural characteristics of the active region, a hydrophobic pocket shielded by two hydrophilic residues (E115 and E505) of the region was identified by a combination of molecular modelling and the site-directed or double-site mutation of the twelve crucial residues in the ligand-binding domain of hIL-6R (V106-P322). We observed and analyzed the effects of these mutants on the spatial conformation of the pocket-like region of hlL-6 R. The results indicated that any site-directed mutation of the five Cys residues (four conservative Cys residues: Cyst 21, Cys132, Cys165, Cys1

  8. Cloning of a soluble isoform of the SgIGSF adhesion molecule that binds the extracellular domain of the membrane-bound isoform.

    OpenAIRE

    Koma, Yu-ichiro; Ito, Akihiko; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Watabe, Kenji; OKADA, Morihito; Tsubota, Noriaki; Iseki, Shoichi; Kitamura, Yukihiko

    2004-01-01

    SgIGSF (spermatogenic immunoglobulin superfamily) is a recently identified intercellular adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily. In a mast-cell cDNA library, we found a clone that resulted from the retention of intron 7 within the mature SgIGSF message. This clone was predicted to encode a soluble isoform of SgIGSF (sSgIGSF) with 336 amino-acid residues because its open reading frame ended just before the transmembrane domain. We constructed a plasmid expressing sSgIGSF fused to ...

  9. Structural model and stability studies of the extracellular domain of the human amyloid precursor protein obtained using small angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the precursor of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which is centrally related to the genesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, APP has been suggested to mediate and/or participate in events that lead to neuronal degeneration in AD. Human APP exists in various isoforms, of which the major ones contain 695, 751 and 770 aminoacids. Proteolytic cleavage of APP by α- or β-secretases releases the extracellular soluble fragments sAPPα and sAPPβ, respectively. Despite the fact that sAPPα plays important roles in both physiological and pathological processes in the brain, very little is known about the structure and stability of this protein. We have recently presented a structural model of sAPPα695 obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements (Gralle et al., Biophys. J. 83,3513-3524). The elongated shape of the reported model is in agreement with the circular dichroism and secondary structure predictions based on the aminoacid sequence of APP. This suggests that a significant fraction of APP (30% of the aminoacid residues) is not involved in standard secondary structure elements. We now report high resolution SAXS models and studies of folding and stabilities of both sAPPα695 and sAPPα770. These high resolution measurements allows the calculation of models up to subdomain structure (4 angstrom resolution). These models enable the prediction of hydrodynamic parameters of these proteins which can be compared with measured values. SAXS measurements of the denaturation of sAPPα695 and sAPPα770 by GdnHCl and urea revealed a multi-step folding pathway for both sAPPα isoforms. The stepwise denaturation process can be correlated to the three-dimensional models. (author)

  10. Three-dimensional structure and function study on the active region in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of human IL-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this study the three-dimensional (3-D) model of the ligand-binding domain (V106-P322) of human interleukin-6 receptor (hIL-6 R) was constructed by computer-guided homology modeling technique using the crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain (K52-L251) of human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) as templet. Furthermore, the active binding region of the 3-D model of hIL-6R with the ligand (hIL-6) was predicted. In light of the structural characteristics of the active region, a hydrophobic pocket shielded by two hydrophilic residues (E115 and E505) of the region was identified by a combination of molecular modelling and the site-directed or double-site mutation of the twelve crucial residues in the ligand-binding domain of hIL-6R (V106-P322). We observed and analyzed the effects of these mutants on the spatial conformation of the pocket-like region of hIL-6 R. The results indicated that any site-directed mutation of the five Cys residues (four conservative Cys residues: Cys121, Cys132, Cys165, Cys176; near membrane Cys residue: Cys193) or each double-site mutation of the five residues in WSEWS motif of hIL-6R (V106-P322) makes the corresponding spatial conformation of the pocket region block the linkage between hIL-6 R and hIL-6. However, the influence of the site-directed mutation of Cys211 and Cys277 individually on the conformation of the pocket region benefits the interaction between hIL-6R and hIL-6. Our study suggests that the predicted hydrophobic pocket in the 3-D model of hIL-6R (V106-P322) is the critical molecular basis for the binding of hIL-6R with its ligand, and the active pocket may be used as a target for designing small hIL-6R-inhibiting molecules in our further study.

  11. Domains Required for Transcriptional Activation Show Conservation in the Mga Family of Virulence Gene Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Vahling, Cheryl M.; McIver, Kevin S.

    2006-01-01

    Mga, or the multigene regulator of the group A streptococcus (GAS) (Streptococcus pyogenes), is a transcriptional regulator of virulence genes important for colonization and immune evasion. All serotypes of the GAS possess one of two divergent mga alleles (mga-1 or mga-2), and orthologues of Mga have also been identified in other pathogenic streptococci. To date, the only functional motifs established within Mga are two amino-terminal DNA-binding domains (HTH-3 and HTH-4). To uncover novel do...

  12. Crystal structure of extracellular domain of human lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1), the ligand for natural killer receptor-P1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Shunsuke; Matsubara, Haruki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Tamaoki, Takaharu; Okabe, Yuki; Fukuhara, Hideo; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Krayukhina, Elena; Uchiyama, Susumu; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence has revealed the pivotal roles of C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) in the regulation of a wide range of immune responses. Human natural killer cell receptor-P1A (NKRP1A) is one of the CTLRs and recognizes another CTLR, lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) on target cells to control NK, NKT and Th17 cells. The structural basis for the NKRP1A-LLT1 interaction was limitedly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ectodomain of LLT1. The plausible receptor-binding face of the C-type lectin-like domain is flat, and forms an extended β-sheet. The residues of this face are relatively conserved with another CTLR, keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin, which binds to the CTLR member, NKp65. A LLT1-NKRP1A complex model, prepared using the crystal structures of LLT1 and the keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin-NKp65 complex, reasonably satisfies the charge consistency and the conformational complementarity to explain a previous mutagenesis study. Furthermore, crystal packing and analytical ultracentrifugation revealed dimer formation, which supports a complex model. Our results provide structural insights for understanding the binding modes and signal transduction mechanisms, which are likely to be conserved in the CTLR family, and for further rational drug design towards regulating the LLT1 function. PMID:25826155

  13. Autoantibody in pemphigus serum, specific for the 59 kD keratin, selectively binds the surface of keratinocytes: evidence for an extracellular keratin domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have identified a novel IgG antikeratin autoantibody in the serum of a Brazilian pemphigus foliaceus patient (Cascas-42). This antibody is specific for the 59 kD acidic murine keratin and its 56.5 kD human counterpart (Moll's catalogue number10), and is distinct from the pemphigus antibody system. Antikeratin autoantibodies present in the Cascas-42 serum were purified by affinity chromatography with a 59 kD murine keratin-agarose column (IAP-Cascas-42 antibodies). The specificity of the IAP-Cascas-42 antibodies was tested by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy against epidermal cryosections, trypsin-dissociated keratinocytes, and epidermal cell cultures. The serum was also tested with extracts from unlabeled and surface 125I-labeled keratinocytes (Iodo-Gen method) by immunoblot analysis of one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The IAP-Cascas-42 antibodies bind the intercellular spaces of murine epidermis, and the cell surfaces of viable, dissociated murine keratinocytes, as well as murine epidermal cells in culture by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. These autoantibodies did not stain cytoplasmic keratins and did not react with parallel human epidermal substrates. The Cascas-42 serum identified the 59 kD murine acidic keratin and its 56.5 kD human counterpart in epidermal extracts by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis. In addition, surface radioiodination of viable murine keratinocytes selectively labeled the 59 kD keratin suggesting that a domain of this molecule is exposed on the cell surface. The 125I-labeled 59 kD keratin was also recognized by the Cascas-42 serum by immunoblotting and autoradiography

  14. Receptor complementation and mutagenesis reveal SR-BI as an essential HCV entry factor and functionally imply its intra- and extra-cellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Dreux

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV entry into cells is a multi-step and slow process. It is believed that the initial capture of HCV particles by glycosaminoglycans and/or lipoprotein receptors is followed by coordinated interactions with the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI, a major receptor of high-density lipoprotein (HDL, the CD81 tetraspanin, and the tight junction protein Claudin-1, ultimately leading to uptake and cellular penetration of HCV via low-pH endosomes. Several reports have indicated that HDL promotes HCV entry through interaction with SR-BI. This pathway remains largely elusive, although it was shown that HDL neither associates with HCV particles nor modulates HCV binding to SR-BI. In contrast to CD81 and Claudin-1, the importance of SR-BI has only been addressed indirectly because of lack of cells in which functional complementation assays with mutant receptors could be performed. Here we identified for the first time two cell types that supported HCVpp and HCVcc entry upon ectopic SR-BI expression. Remarkably, the undetectable expression of SR-BI in rat hepatoma cells allowed unambiguous investigation of human SR-BI functions during HCV entry. By expressing different SR-BI mutants in either cell line, our results revealed features of SR-BI intracellular domains that influence HCV infectivity without affecting receptor binding and stimulation of HCV entry induced by HDL/SR-BI interaction. Conversely, we identified positions of SR-BI ectodomain that, by altering HCV binding, inhibit entry. Finally, we characterized alternative ectodomain determinants that, by reducing SR-BI cholesterol uptake and efflux functions, abolish HDL-mediated infection-enhancement. Altogether, we demonstrate that SR-BI is an essential HCV entry factor. Moreover, our results highlight specific SR-BI determinants required during HCV entry and physiological lipid transfer functions hijacked by HCV to favor infection.

  15. 端胺基非异氰酸酯预聚体嵌段共聚聚醚型聚氨酯%Prepolymers of Amino-terminal Non-isocyanate Block Copolymerized with Polyether-based Polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋赫; 邓新华; 孙元

    2012-01-01

    Modified polyether polyurethane and its film were prepared from prepolymer of amino- terminal non-isocyanate polyurethane and prepolymer of polyether-based polyurethane via block copolymerization. Synthesis condition of non-isocyanate prepolymer was analyzed; The impact of film-forming temperature and value of NCO and NH2 ratio on mechanical properties of membrane were investigated; Mechanical properties of different polyurethane materials were compared; Degree of phase separation was studied using differential scanning calorimetry(DSC). It showed that carbamate group was introduced into the amino-terminal non-isocyanate prepolymer; The best film-forming temperature was 140 ℃; When NCO/NH2 of prepolymer was 1/0. 9, the best performance was obtained, tensile strength of 25.1 MPa, modulus of 100% elongation of 5 MPa. Compared with regular polyurethane, polyurethane block with amino-terminal non-isocyanate polyurethane prepolymer had higher mechanical properties; DSC curves showed two different glass transition temperatures indicating phase separation.%用端胺基非异氰酸酯基聚氨酯预聚体与聚醚型聚氨酯预聚体嵌段共聚制备了改性聚醚型聚氨酯及其膜,分析了端胺基非异氰酸酯基聚氨酯预聚体,考查了聚醚型聚氨脂树脂成膜温度和预聚体的NCO/NH2配比对膜力学性能的影响,同时对比了聚氨酯材料的力学性能,采用差示扫描量热法(DSC)研究了相分离程度。结果表明,合成的端胺基非异氰酸酯基聚氨酯预聚体中成功地引入了氨基甲酸酯基团;最佳成膜温度为140℃;当预聚体的NCO/NH2=1/0.9(摩尔比,下同)时膜的性能最好,拉伸强度为25.1MPa,伸长100%模量为5MPa;与普通聚氨酯相比,端胺基非异氰酸酯基聚氨酯预聚体嵌段的聚氨酯力学性能更高;DSC曲线显示其有2个不同的玻璃化转变温度,相分离明昂。

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Hatano, Ken-ichi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2007-09-01

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å.

  18. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  19. Crystal structure of the kinesin motor domain reveals a structural similarity to myosin

    OpenAIRE

    Kull, F. Jon; Sablin, Elena P.; Lau, Rebecca; Fletterick, Robert J; Vale, Ronald D.

    1996-01-01

    Kinesin is the founding member of a superfamily of microtubule-based motor proteins that perform force-generating tasks such as organelle transport and chromosome segregation1,2. It has two identical ~960-amino-acid chains containing an amino-terminal globular motor domain, a central α-helical region that enables dimer formation through a coiled-coil, and a carboxy-terminal tail domain that binds light chains and possibly an organelle receptor1. The kinesin motor domain of ~340 amino acids, w...

  20. Influence of PAS Domain Flanking Regions on Oligomerisation and Redox Signalling By NifL

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Little; Peter Slavny; Ray Dixon

    2012-01-01

    Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domains constitute a typically dimeric, conserved α/β tertiary fold of approximately 110 amino acids that perform signalling roles in diverse proteins from all kingdoms of life. The amino terminal PAS1 domain of NifL from Azotobacter vinelandii accommodates a redox-active FAD group; elevation of cytosolic oxygen concentrations result in FAD oxidation and a concomitant conformational re-arrangement that is relayed via a short downstream linker to a second PAS domain, PAS2. A...

  1. Proteomic database mining opens up avenues utilizing extracellular protein phosphorylation for novel therapeutic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yalak, Garif; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in extracellular signaling suggest that extracellular protein phosphorylation is a regulatory mechanism outside the cell. The list of reported active extracellular protein kinases and phosphatases is growing, and phosphorylation of an increasing number of extracellular matrix molecules and extracellular domains of trans-membrane proteins is being documented. Here, we use public proteomic databases, collagens – the major components of the extracellular matrix, extracell...

  2. Genetic analysis of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein functional domains involved in cell-surface expression and cell-to-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. To delineate functional domains of the SARS-CoV S glycoprotein, single point mutations, cluster-to-lysine and cluster-to-alanine mutations, as well as carboxyl-terminal truncations were investigated in transient expression experiments. Mutagenesis of either the coiled-coil domain of the S glycoprotein amino terminal heptad repeat, the predicted fusion peptide, or an adjacent but distinct region, severely compromised S-mediated cell-to-cell fusion, while intracellular transport and cell-surface expression were not adversely affected. Surprisingly, a carboxyl-terminal truncation of 17 amino acids substantially increased S glycoprotein-mediated cell-to-cell fusion suggesting that the terminal 17 amino acids regulated the S fusogenic properties. In contrast, truncation of 26 or 39 amino acids eliminating either one or both of the two endodomain cysteine-rich motifs, respectively, inhibited cell fusion in comparison to the wild-type S. The 17 and 26 amino-acid deletions did not adversely affect S cell-surface expression, while the 39 amino-acid truncation inhibited S cell-surface expression suggesting that the membrane proximal cysteine-rich motif plays an essential role in S cell-surface expression. Mutagenesis of the acidic amino-acid cluster in the carboxyl terminus of the S glycoprotein as well as modification of a predicted phosphorylation site within the acidic cluster revealed that this amino-acid motif may play a functional role in the retention of S at cell surfaces. This genetic analysis reveals that the SARS-CoV S glycoprotein contains extracellular domains that regulate cell fusion as well as distinct endodomains that function in intracellular transport, cell-surface expression, and cell fusion

  3. Nuclear import, virion incorporation, and cell cycle arrest/differentiation are mediated by distinct functional domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahalingam, S.; Ayyavoo, V; M. Patel; Kieber-Emmons, T; Weiner, D B

    1997-01-01

    The vpr gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a virion-associated protein that is essential for efficient viral replication in monocytes/macrophages. Vpr is primarily localized in the nucleus when expressed in the absence of other viral proteins. Vpr is packaged efficiently into viral particles through interactions with the p6 domain of the Gag precursor polyprotein p55gag. We developed a panel of expression vectors encoding Vpr molecules mutated in the amino-terminal...

  4. The Evolution of Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or “adhesome” also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology. PMID:21160071

  5. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ScottChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  6. The pulmonary extracellular lining.

    OpenAIRE

    George, G; Hook, G E

    1984-01-01

    The extracellular lining of the lungs is reviewed. The pulmonary extracellular lining is a complex mixture of phospholipids, proteins and carbohydrates which is absolutely essential for the maintenance of normal pulmonary functions such as gas exchange. Without the lining the lungs would collapse. Alterations in the pulmonary extracellular lining may underlie some disease conditions induced by toxic agents, especially those which interfere with the formation of pulmonary surfactant. The extra...

  7. Identification and characterization of a novel NOD-like receptor family CARD domain containing 3 gene in response to extracellular ATP stimulation and its role in regulating LPS-induced innate immune response in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) head kidney macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoli; Hao, Gaixiang; Geng, Xuyun; Zhan, Wenbin; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) family with a caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) containing 3 (NLRC3) protein is an important cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that negatively regulates innate immune response in mammals. Hitherto, the immunological significance of NLRC3 protein in fish remains largely uncharacterized. Here we identified and characterized a novel NLRC3 gene (named poNLRC3) implicated in regulation of fish innate immunity from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. The poNLRC3 protein is a cytoplasmic protein with an undefined N-terminal domain, a NACHT domain, a fish-specific NACHT associated domain, six LRR motifs, and a C-terminal fish-specific PYR/SPYR (B30.2) domain but only shares less than 40% sequence identities with the known Japanese flounder NLRC proteins. poNLRC3 gene is ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues and is dominantly expressed in the Japanese flounder head kidney macrophages (HKMs). We for the first time showed that poNLRC3 expression was significantly modulated by the stimulation of extracellular ATP, an important danger/damage-associated molecular pattern in activating innate immunity in P. olivaceus. Importantly, we revealed that poNLRC3 plays an important role in positively regulating ATP-induced IL-1beta and IL-6 gene expression, suggesting the involvement of poNLRC3 in extracellular ATP-mediated immune signaling. In addition, we showed that poNLRC3 mRNA expression was up-regulated in response to LPS and Edwardsiella tarda immune challenges. Finally, we showed that down-regulating the endogenous poNLRC3 expression with small interfering RNA significantly reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in the Japanese flounder HKM cells. Altogether, we have identified a novel inducible fish NLR member, poNLRC3, which is involved in extracellular ATP-mediated immune signaling and may positively regulate the LPS-induced innate immune response in the Japanese

  8. Extracellular modulators of Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    Wnt morphogens are secreted signalling proteins that play leading roles in embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis throughout life. Wnt signalling is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including posttranslational modification of Wnts, antagonist binding (to Wnts or their receptors), and regulation of the availability of Wnt receptors. Recent crystallographic, structure-guided biophysical and cell-based studies have advanced our understanding of how Wnt signalling is regulated at the cell surface. Structures include Wnt in complex with the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled, extracellular fragments of Wnt co-receptor LRP6, LRP6-binding antagonists Dickkopf and Sclerostin, antagonists 5T4/WAIF1 and Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1), as well as Frizzled-ubiquitin ligases ZNRF3/RNF43 (in isolation and in complexes with Wnt signalling promoters R-spondins and LGR5). We review recent discoveries and remaining questions. PMID:25460271

  9. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  10. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization of...... the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF...

  11. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona;

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are one of the several types of cell-derived vesicles with a diameter of 30-100 nm. These extracellular vesicles are recognized as potential markers of human diseases such as cancer. However, their use in diagnostic tests requires an objective and high-throughput method to define...

  12. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  13. Genetic variation at chemokine receptor CCR5 in leporids: alteration at the 2nd extracellular domain by gene conversion with CCR2 in Oryctolagus, but not in Sylvilagus and Lepus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, C R; Esteves, P J; Ferrand, N; van der Loo, W

    2006-06-01

    Whereas in its natural host (Sylvilagus sps.) the effects of myxoma virus infections are benign, in European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), it causes a highly infectious disease with very high mortality rate, known as myxomatosis. There is evidence that, as with HIV-1 virus in human, myxoma virus may use chemokine receptors such as CCR5 of the host target cell for entry and activation of pathways of immune avoidance. We have characterized and compared CCR5 genes of leporid species with different susceptibility levels to myxomatosis. The CCR5 protein of O. cuniculus differs markedly from all those known from other species. The most striking was the replacement of a specific peptide motif of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) by a motif, which in other species characterizes the CCR2 molecules. While absent in Sylvilagus and Lepus species, this CCR2 imposed CCR5-ECL2 alteration was observed in all genomes of 25 European rabbits, representing the subspecies O. cuniculus algirus and O. cuniculus cuniculus. Allelic variation at the rabbit CCR5 locus confirmed that the gene conversion predates the subspecies split (1-2 Ma). PMID:16596402

  14. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  15. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Greenleaf, Arno L., E-mail: arno.greenleaf@duke.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2010-06-18

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  16. Two-domain structure of the td intron-encoded endonuclease I-TevI correlates with the two-domain configuration of the homing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, V; Kowalski, J C; Dansereau, J T; Hauer, C R; Belfort, M

    1997-02-01

    I-TevI, the T4 td intron-encoded endonuclease, catalyzes the first step in intron homing by making a double-strand break in the intronless allele within a sequence designated the homing site. The 28 kDa enzyme, which interacts with the homing site over a span of 37 bp, binds as a monomer, contacting two domains of the substrate. In this study, limited proteolysis experiments indicate that I-TevI consists of two domains that behave as discrete physical entities as judged by a number of functional and structural criteria. Overexpression clones for each domain were constructed and the proteins were purified. The carboxy-terminal domain has DNA-binding activity coincident with the primary binding region of the homing site and binds with the same affinity as the full-length enzyme. The isolated amino-terminal domain, contains the conserved GIY-YIG motif, consistent with its being the catalytic domain. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved arginine residue within the extended motif rendered the full-length protein catalytically inactive, although DNA-binding was maintained. This is the first evidence that the GIY-YIG motif is important for catalytic activity. An enzyme with an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain connected by a flexible linker is in accord with the bipartite structure of the homing site. PMID:9048944

  17. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...... theoretical constructs that can explain language choice which were supposed to be a more powerful explanatory tool than more obvious (and observable) parameters like topic, place (setting) and interlocutor. In the meantime, at least in Scandinavia, the term ‘domain’ has been taken up in the debate among...

  18. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  19. Distribution and Evolution of von Willebrand/Integrin A Domains: Widely Dispersed Domains with Roles in Cell Adhesion and ElsewhereD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Whittaker, Charles A.; Hynes, Richard O.

    2002-01-01

    The von Willebrand A (VWA) domain is a well-studied domain involved in cell adhesion, in extracellular matrix proteins, and in integrin receptors. A number of human diseases arise from mutations in VWA domains. We have analyzed the phylogenetic distribution of this domain and the relationships among ∼500 proteins containing this domain. Although the majority of VWA-containing proteins are extracellular, the most ancient ones, present in all eukaryotes, are all intracellul...

  20. Receptor-like Kinase CrRLK1-L Subfamily: Novel Motifs in Extracellular Domain and Biological Functions in Plants%植物类受体激酶CrRLK1-L亚家族及其生物学功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩永峰; 杨倩; 张胜伟; 孙大业; 孙颖

    2011-01-01

    CrRLKl-L receptor-like kinases (RLKs) possess novel motifs with unknown functions in the extracellular domain and the typical Ser/Thr kinase domain in the intracellular region. CrRLKl-L subfamily spread broadly in angiosperm, however, no homologs of CrRLKl-L proteins exist in animals and microorganisms. CrRLKl-L RLKs express extensively in most of tissues, and mainly involve in signal exchanging between male and female gametophytes, the sensing of cell-wall-integrality and cell elongation control of the vegetative organs, and also in the response of cell to diverse biotic stress, etc. CrRLKl-L RLKs commonly localize on plasm-membrane, and their kinase activity is essential for their biological functions. Therefore, CrRLKl-L RLKs can function as cell surface sensor for extracellular signal and initiate a signal transduction that largely independent of the known phytohormone signaling pathways. Detailed study of CrRLKl-L RLKs gene functions will be helpful for our understanding the molecular mechanisms in the special biological processes in plant, especially in sexual reproduction in that optimal utilization will benefit the agriculture production in future.%植物CrRLK1-L亚家族类受体激酶的胞外域具有新颖结构基序,但功能大都未知.该家族成员广泛存在于被子植物中,但在动物和微生物中不存在其同源物.CrRLK1-L家族成员相对较少,但组织表达非常广泛.它们定位于细胞质膜上,并且部分成员的定位还具有极性,这与其参与雌雄配子体的识别和受精作用密切相关.该家族成员普遍具有激酶活性,该活性对其功能的发挥至关重要.目前仅报道在拟南芥中参与助细胞与花粉的识别和调控营养组织的细胞伸长,但参与这些生物学过程的作用机制似乎独立于已知的信号通路之外,可能有自身独特的信号传导机制.所以对这一类具特有结构基序的类受体激酶基因的功能研究,将有助于解析植物特有生物

  1. Mutation-induced quisqualic acid and ibotenic acid affinity at the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4: ligand selectivity results from a synergy of several amino acid residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are key modulators of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The eight mGluR subtypes are seven trans-membrane-spanning proteins that possess a large extracellular amino-terminal domain in which the endogenous ligand binding pocke...

  2. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald;

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and...... motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin......, or basement membrane glycoproteins, but also in terms of matrix rigidity. This can regulate the release and subsequent biol. activity of matrix-bound growth factors, for example, transforming growth factor-β. In the environment of tumors, there may be changes in cell populations and their receptor...

  3. Domain Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  4. Discoidin domain receptors in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to disease progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  5. Conserved Residues in the HAMP Domain Define a New Family of Proposed Bipartite Energy Taxis Receptors▿

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Kathryn T; Igor B Zhulin; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; DiRita, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    HAMP domains, found in many bacterial signal transduction proteins, generally transmit an intramolecular signal between an extracellular sensory domain and an intracellular signaling domain. Studies of HAMP domains in proteins where both the input and output signals occur intracellularly are limited to those of the Aer energy taxis receptor of Escherichia coli, which has both a HAMP domain and a sensory PAS domain. Campylobacter jejuni has an energy taxis system consisting of the domains of A...

  6. Self-assembly of human plasma fibrinogens on binary organosilane monolayers with micro domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption behavior and self-assembly of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on binary methyl- and amino-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The binary SAMs were fabricated through self-assembly mechanism of organosilane molecules. The height of domains is the domain height is 0.8 ± 0.2 nm from the AFM topographic image. It corresponds to the domain height is 0.8 ± 0.2 nm from the AFM topographic image. It corresponds to the difference between the length of the alkyl chain of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and that of n-(6-aminohexyl)aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AHAPS). The fibrinogen solution used ultrapure water as the solvent and its pH was adjusted at 3 and 10. From the AFM results at pH 3, HPF only formed network structures on the OTS domains of the binary SAM at early immersion times, and then the network structures expanded and connected between OTS domains through the AHAPS surface at long immersion times. In this case, a few HPFs are discretely adsorbed on the AHAPS surface. However, HPF is uniformly adsorbed on the binary SAM under the other conditions of pH.

  7. Extracellular enzymes of Legionella pneumophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Thorpe, T C; Miller, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    All strains of Legionella pneumophila tested produced detectable levels of extracellular protease, phosphatase, lipase, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, and beta-lactamase activity. Weak starch hydrolysis was also demonstrated for all strains. Elastase, collagenase, phospholipase C, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase, neuraminidase, or coagulase were not detected in any of these laboratory-maintained strains.

  8. Keratin 8 phosphorylation in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase occurs within the amino- and carboxyl-terminal end domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, S; Tokui, T; Yano, T; Inagaki, M

    1996-04-01

    We reported earlier that phosphorylation in vitro of keratin filaments reconstituted from rat type I keratin 18 and type II keratin 8 by cAPM-dependent protein kinase induces disassembly of the keratin filament structure. Keratin 8 rather than keratin 18 was the major target of the kinase. We have now identified the sites on rat keratin 8 for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Sequential analysis of the purified phosphoropeptides, together with the known primary sequence, revealed that four major sites, Ser-12, Ser-23, Ser-36, and Ser-50, and three minor sites, Ser-8, Ser-33, Ser-42, are located in the amino-terminal head domain, while three minor sites, Ser-416, Ser-423 and Ser-425 locate in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain. PMID:8660345

  9. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  10. Extracellular metalloproteinases in Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Alane B; Almeida, Flávia V S; Bronzato, Leandro S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2003-03-01

    The detection of extracellular proteinases in Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid isolated from tomato fruits, is demonstrated in this paper. Maximal production occurred at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth. These enzymes exhibited selective substrate utilization in SDS-PAGE, being more active with gelatin; hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin were not degraded. Three proteinases were detected in SDS-PAGE-gelatin, with apparent molecular masses between 94 and 70 kDa. The proteolytic activity was completely blocked by 1,10-phenanthroline and strongly inhibited by EDTA, whereas a partial inhibition was observed with trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) and soybean trypsin inhibitor; phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride weakly inhibited the enzymes. This inhibition profile indicated that these extracellular proteinases belong to the metalloproteinase class. PMID:12795409

  11. Extracellular matrix in ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; Irving-Rodgers, H F; van Wezel, I L

    2000-05-25

    A lot is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones, but less is known about the roles of extracellular matrix in the control of follicular growth and development. In this review we focus on the specialized extracellular matrix of the basal laminas that are present in ovarian follicles. These include the follicular basal lamina itself, the Call-Exner bodies of the membrana granulosa, the subendothelial and arteriole smooth muscle basal laminas in the theca, and the basal lamina-like material of the thecal matrix. We discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition, that many of its components are produced by the granulosa cells, and that the follicular basal laminas of different follicles have different ultrastructural appearances, linked to the shape of the aligning granulosa cells. All these studies suggest that the follicular basal lamina is extremely dynamic during follicular development. PMID:10963877

  12. Ethylene Controls Autophosphorylation of the Histidine Kinase Domain in Ethylene Receptor ETR1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Voet-van-Vormizeele; Georg Groth

    2008-01-01

    Perception of the phytohormone ethylene is accomplished by a small family of integral membrane receptors.In Arabidopsis,five ethylene receptor proteins are known,including ethylene resistant 1 (ETR1).The hydrophobic aminoterminal domain of these receptors contains the ethylene-binding site while the carboxyl-terminal part consists of a histidine kinase domain and a response regulator domain,which are well known elements found in bacterial two-component signaling.The soluble membrane-extrinsic carboxyl-terminal part of the receptor,which is likely to play an important role in signal transduction,showed intrinsic kinase activity when expressed and purified on its own.However,a correlation between signal input and autokinase activity was not established in these studies,as receptors were missing the transmembrane amino-terminal sensor domain.Thus,it is still unclear whether autophosphorylation occurs in response to perception of the ethylene signal.Here,we report on autophosphorylation studies of purified full-length ETR1.Autokinase activity of the purified receptor is controlled by ethylene or by ethylene agonists like the π-acceptor compound cyanide.In fact,both signal molecules were able to completely turn off the intrinsic kinase activity.Furthermore,the observed inhibition of autophosphorylation in ETR1 by both molecules could be prevented when the ethylene antagonist 1-methyl-cyclopropene (MCP) was applied.

  13. FH3, a domain found in formins, targets the fission yeast formin Fus1 to the projection tip during conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J; Nielsen, O; Egel, R; Hagan, I M; Nielsen, Olaf

    1998-01-01

    Formins are involved in diverse aspects of morphogenesis, and share two regions of homology: FH1 and FH2. We describe a new formin homology region, FH3. FH3 is an amino-terminal domain that differs from the Rho binding site identified in Bni1p and p140mDia. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe formin Fus1...... is required for conjugation, and is localized to the projection tip in cells of mating pairs. We replaced genomic fus1+ with green fluorescent protein (GFP)- tagged versions that lacked either the FH1, FH2, or FH3 domain. Deletion of any FH domain essentially abolished mating. FH3, but neither FH1...... nor FH2, was required for Fus1 localization. An FH3 domain-GFP fusion protein localized to the projection tips of mating pairs. Thus, the FH3 domain alone can direct protein localization. The FH3 domains of both Fus1 and the S. pombe cytokinesis formin Cdc12 were able to localize GFP to the spindle...

  14. Biochemistry of the extracellular matrix of Volvox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumper, M; Hallmann, A

    1998-01-01

    The volvocine algae range in complexity from unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular organisms in the genus Volvox. The transition from unicellularity to multicellularity in the Volvocales is a recent event in evolution. Thus, these organisms provide a unique opportunity for exploring the development of a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell wall of a unicellular ancestor. The ECM of Volvox is divided into four main zones: The flagellar, boundary, cellular, and deep zones. Each zone is defined by ultrastructure and by characteristic ECM glycoproteins. Volvox ECM is modified under developmental control or in response to external stimuli, like the sex-inducing pheromone or stress factors. The structures of more than 10 ECM glycoproteins from a single species of Volvox are now known in molecular detail and are compared to other algal and plant cell wall/ECM glycoproteins. Although usually classified as hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, the striking feature of all algal ECM glycoproteins is a modular composition. Rod-shaped hydroxyproline-rich modules are combined with hydroxyproline-free domains that meet the multiple functional requirements of a complex ECM. The algal ECM provides another example of the combinatorial advantage of shuffling modules that is so evident in the evolution of the metazoan ECMs. PMID:9496634

  15. Insights into function of PSI domains from structure of the Met receptor PSI domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSI domains are cysteine-rich modules found in extracellular fragments of hundreds of signaling proteins, including plexins, semaphorins, integrins, and attractins. Here, we report the solution structure of the PSI domain from the human Met receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase critical for proliferation, motility, and differentiation. The structure represents a cysteine knot with short regions of secondary structure including a three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and two α-helices. All eight cysteines are involved in disulfide bonds with the pattern consistent with that for the PSI domain from Sema4D. Comparison with the Sema4D structure identifies a structurally conserved core comprising the N-terminal half of the PSI domain. Interestingly, this part links adjacent SEMA and immunoglobulin domains in the Sema4D structure, suggesting that the PSI domain serves as a wedge between propeller and immunoglobulin domains and is responsible for the correct positioning of the ligand-binding site of the receptor

  16. Zn-binding AZUL domain of human ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ube3A (also referred to as E6AP for E6 Associated Protein) is a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase implicated in the development of Angelman syndrome by controlling degradation of synaptic protein Arc and oncogenic papilloma virus infection by controlling degradation of p53. This article describe the solution NMR structure of the conserved N-terminal domain of human Ube3A (residues 24-87) that contains two residues (Cys44 and Arg62) found to be mutated in patients with Angelman syndrome. The structure of this domain adopts a novel Zn-binding fold we called AZUL (Amino-terminal Zn-finger of Ube3a Ligase). The AZUL domain has a helix-loop-helix architecture with a Zn ion coordinated by four Cys residues arranged in Cys-X4-Cys-X4-Cys-X28-Cys motif. Three of the Zn-bound residues are located in a 23-residue long and well structured loop that connects two α-helicies.

  17. Zn-binding AZUL domain of human ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Molecular Microbial and Structural Biology (United States); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano, E-mail: sirano.dhepaganon@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H., E-mail: carrow@uhnresearch.ca [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Ube3A (also referred to as E6AP for E6 Associated Protein) is a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase implicated in the development of Angelman syndrome by controlling degradation of synaptic protein Arc and oncogenic papilloma virus infection by controlling degradation of p53. This article describe the solution NMR structure of the conserved N-terminal domain of human Ube3A (residues 24-87) that contains two residues (Cys44 and Arg62) found to be mutated in patients with Angelman syndrome. The structure of this domain adopts a novel Zn-binding fold we called AZUL (Amino-terminal Zn-finger of Ube3a Ligase). The AZUL domain has a helix-loop-helix architecture with a Zn ion coordinated by four Cys residues arranged in Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 28}-Cys motif. Three of the Zn-bound residues are located in a 23-residue long and well structured loop that connects two {alpha}-helicies.

  18. Dictyostelium nucleomorphin is a member of the BRCT-domain family of cell cycle checkpoint proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-11-18

    A search of the Dictyostelium genome project database (http://dictybase.org/db/cgi-bin/blast.pl) with nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates the nuclear number, predicted it to be encoded by a larger gene containing a putative breast cancer carboxy-terminus domain (BRCT). Using RT-PCR, Northern and Western blotting we have identified a differentially expressed, 2318 bp cDNA encoding a protein isoform of Dictyostelium NumA with an apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa that we have called NumB. It contains a single amino-terminal BRCT-domain spanning residues 125-201. Starvation of shaking cultures reduces NumA expression by approximately 88+/-5.6%, whereas NumB expression increases approximately 35+/-3.5% from vegetative levels. NumC, a third isoform that is also expressed during development but not growth, remains to be characterized. These findings suggest NumB may be a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. PMID:15535983

  19. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy; Ackerman, Mark; Marsden, Gary; Bødker, Susanne; Wyche, Susan; Reddy, Madhu

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  20. Single Cell Responses to Spatially Controlled Photosensitized Production of Extracellular Singlet Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian Wett; Sinks, Louise E.; Breitenbach, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    The response of individual HeLa cells to extracellularly produced singlet oxygen was examined. The spatial domain of singlet oxygen production was controlled using the combination of a membrane-impermeable Pd porphyrin-dendrimer, which served as a photosensitizer, and a focused laser, which serve...

  1. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  2. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  3. EXTRACELLULAR HSPs: The Complicated Roles of Extracellular HSPs in Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Keith Calderwood

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular heat shock proteins (HSPs interact with the immune system in a very complex manner. Many such HSPs exert powerful effects on the immune response, playing both stimulatory and regulatory roles. However, the influence of the HSPs on immunity appears to be black or white in nature - rarely neutral. Thus the HSPs can act as dominant antigens and can comprise key components of anti-tumor vaccines. They can also function as powerful immunoregulatory agents and, as such are employed to treat inflammatory diseases or to extend the lifespan of tissue transplants. Small modifications in the cellular milieu have been shown to flip the allegiances of HSPs from immunoregulatory agents towards a potent inflammatory alignment. These mutable properties of HSPs may be related to the ability of these proteins to interact with multiple receptors often with mutually confounding properties in immune cells. Therefore, understanding the complex immune properties of HSPs may help us to harness their potential in treatment of a range of conditions.

  4. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system that......In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth of...

  5. BRCA1 Zinc RING Finger Domain Disruption Alters Caspase Response in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruk Patricia A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequently occurring 185delAG mutation occurs in the amino-terminal zinc RING domain of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1. We sought to determine differential cell viability and apoptotic response of human ovarian surface epithelial cells with and without the 185delAG mutation. Results BRCA1wt and BRCA1+ cells were treated with staurosporine. Cell proliferation assays showed BRCA1wt cells grew to a greater extent compared to BRCA1+ cells. Trypan blue exclusion assays confirmed this observation. Western immunoblot analysis revealed that caspase 3 levels were higher after staurosporine treatment in BRCA1+ cells than in wild type cells, while full length DNA Fragmentation Factor 45 levels were lower in BRCA1+ cells. While there was no significant difference in levels of excision repair cross complementing protein1 (ERCC1 with BRCA1 status, BRCA1+ cells demonstrated cleavage of polyribose ADP polymerase (PARP before wild type cells. Conclusions Disruption of the BRCA1 RING domain caused altered cell viability and caspase-dependent apoptotic response after chemotoxic stress.

  6. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  7. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  8. Ligand Binding Sensitivity of the Extracellular Loop Two of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Bertalovitz, Alexander C.; Ahn, Kwang H.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor thought to bind ligands primarily within its helical bundle. Evidence suggests, however, that the extracellular domain may also play a role. We have previously shown that the C-terminus of the extracellular loop 2 of CB1 is important in binding some compounds; receptors with mutations in this region (F268W, P269A, H270A, and I271A) bound some agonists with severely reduced affinity relative to the wild-type receptor. I...

  9. Molecular Logic of Neuronal Self-Recognition through Protocadherin Domain Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Thu, Chan Aye; Goodman, Kerry Marie;

    2015-01-01

    Self-avoidance, a process preventing interactions of axons and dendrites from the same neuron during development, is mediated in vertebrates through the stochastic single-neuron expression of clustered protocadherin protein isoforms. Extracellular cadherin (EC) domains mediate isoform...

  10. Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor: structural and functional features and association with diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Hauache

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently cloned extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays an essential role in the regulation of extracellular calcium homeostasis. This receptor is expressed in all tissues related to this control (parathyroid glands, thyroid C-cells, kidneys, intestine and bones and also in tissues with apparently no role in the maintenance of extracellular calcium levels, such as brain, skin and pancreas. The CaR amino acid sequence is compatible with three major domains: a long and hydrophilic aminoterminal extracellular domain, where most of the activating and inactivating mutations described to date are located and where the dimerization process occurs, and the agonist-binding site is located, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain involved in the signal transduction mechanism from the extracellular domain to its respective G protein, and a carboxyterminal intracellular tail, with a well-established role for cell surface CaR expression and for signal transduction. CaR cloning was immediately followed by the association of genetic human diseases with inactivating and activating CaR mutations: familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism are caused by CaR-inactivating mutations, whereas autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism is secondary to CaR-activating mutations. Finally, we will comment on the development of drugs that modulate CaR function by either activating (calcimimetic drugs or antagonizing it (calcilytic drugs, and on their potential therapeutic implications, such as medical control of specific cases of primary and uremic hyperparathyroidism with calcimimetic drugs and a potential treatment for osteoporosis with a calcilytic drug.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  12. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  13. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an or...

  14. Optical ATP Biosensor for Extracellular ATP Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C; Huang, C.-Y.C.; Lin, W-C

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular Adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) is an important multi-functional molecule which can mediate numerous physiological activities by activating purinergic P2 receptors. The objective of this study was to develop a novel optical ATP sensor for in-situ extracellular ATP measurement in biological tissues. The optical ATP sensor was made by applying two layers of sol-gel coating to the end of an optical fiber probe end. The first layer contained ruthenium complex for sensing changes in ...

  15. Extracellular acid proteases produced by Saccharomycopsis lipolytica.

    OpenAIRE

    T. Yamada; Ogrydziak, D M

    1983-01-01

    Saccharomycopsis lipolytica CX161-1B produced at least three extracellular acid proteases during exponential growth in medium containing glycerol, Difco Proteose Peptone, and mineral salts at pH 3.4 (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.). Little extracellular acid protease activity was produced with glutamic acid as the sole nitrogen source, somewhat higher levels were obtained with peptone, and much higher levels were obtained with Difco Proteose Peptone. The relative amounts of the three prot...

  16. Role of extracellular adenosine in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    FENCKOVÁ, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects of the role for extracellular adenosine in Drosophila. Reverse genetic, molecular and microscopic methods together with the most forefront Drosophila research techniques have been applied to elucidate the role of adenosine signaling in the regulation of development, physiology and metabolism of Drosophila larvae. The thesis helps to establish the model for extracellular adenosine as a stress-signal for the release of energy stores. It also describes the e...

  17. Kinetic and structural analysis of mutant CD4 receptors that are defective in HIV gp120 binding

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hao; Myszka, David G.; Tendian, Susan W.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Sweet, Ray W.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    1996-01-01

    The T-cell antigen coreceptor CD4 also serves as the receptor for the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV. Extensive mutational analysis of CD4 has implicated residues from a portion of the extracellular amino-terminal domain (D1) in gp120 binding. However, none of these proteins has been fully characterized biophysically, and thus the precise effects on molecular structure and binding interactions are unknown. In the present study, we produced soluble versions of three...

  18. ADAMTS: a novel family of extracellular matrix proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, B L

    2001-01-01

    ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a novel family of extracellular proteases found in both mammals and invertebrates. Members of the family may be distinguished from the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family members based on the multiple copies of thrombospondin 1-like repeats they carry. With at least nine members in mammals alone, the ADAMTS family members are predicted by their structural domains to be extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with a wide range of activities and functions distinct from members of the ADAM family that are largely anchored on the cell surface. ADAMTS2 is a procollagen N-proteinase, and the mutations of its gene are responsible for Human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII C and bovine dermatosparaxis. ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 are aggrecanases implicated in the degradation of cartilage aggrecan in arthritic diseases. Other members of the ADAMTS family have also been implicated in roles during embryonic development and angiogenesis. Current and future studies on this emerging group of ECM proteases may provide important insights into developmental or pathological processes involving ECM remodeling. PMID:11167130

  19. Topography of the TH5 Segment in the Diphtheria Toxin T-Domain Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienker, Paul K; Wu, Zhengyan; Finkelstein, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The translocation domain (T-domain) of diphtheria toxin contains 10 α helices in the aqueous crystal structure. Upon exposure to a planar lipid bilayer under acidic conditions, it inserts to form a channel and transport the attached amino-terminal catalytic domain across the membrane. The TH5, TH8, and TH9 helices form transmembrane segments in the open-channel state, with TH1-TH4 translocated across the membrane. The TH6-TH7 segment also inserts to form a constriction that occupies only a small portion of the total channel length. Here, we have examined the TH5 segment in more detail, using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. We constructed a series of 23 mutant T-domains with single cysteine residues at positions in and near TH5, monitored their channel formation in planar lipid bilayers, and probed for an effect of thiol-specific reagents added to the solutions on either side of the membrane. For 15 of the mutants, the reagent caused a decrease in single-channel conductance, indicating that the introduced cysteine residue was exposed within the channel lumen. We also found that reaction caused large changes in ionic selectivity for some mutant channels. We determined whether reaction occurred in the open state or in the brief flicker-closed state of the channel. Finally, we compared the reaction rates from either side of the membrane. Our experiments are consistent with the hypotheses that the TH5 helix has a transmembrane orientation and remains helical in the open-channel state; they also indicate that the middle of the helix is aligned with the constriction in the channel. PMID:26645703

  20. Extracellular O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine: Its biology and relationship to human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsutaka; Ogawa; Koichi; Furukawa; Tetsuya; Okajima

    2014-01-01

    The O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine(O-GlcNAc)ylation of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins regulates basic cellular functions and is involved in the etiology of neurodegeneration and diabetes. Intracellular O-GlcNAcylation is catalyzed by a single O-GlcNAc transferase, O-GlcNAc transferase(OGT). Recently, an atypical O-GlcNAc transferase, extracellular O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine(EOGT), which is responsible for the modification of extracellular O-GlcNAc, was identified. Although both OGT and EOGT are regulated through the common hexosamine biosynthesis pathway, EOGT localizes to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and transfers GlcNAc to epidermal growth factor-like domains in an OGT-independent manner. In Drosophila, loss of Eogt gives phenotypes similar to those caused by defects in the apical extracellular matrix. Dumpy, a membrane-anchored apical extracellular matrix protein, was identified as a major O-GlcNAcylated protein, and EOGT mediates Dumpy-dependent cell adhesion. In mammals, extracellular O-GlcNAc was detected on extracellular proteins including heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2, Nell1, laminin subunit alpha-5, Pamr1, and transmembrane proteins, including Notch receptors. Although the physiological function of O-GlcNAc in mammals has not yet been elucidated, exome sequencing identified homozygous EOGT mutations in patients with Adams-Oliver syndrome, a rare congenital disorder characterized by aplasia cutis congenita and terminal transverse limb defects. This review summarizes the current knowledge of extracellular O-GlcNAc and its implications in the pathological processes in Adams-Oliver syndrome.

  1. The role of cell-extracellular matrix interactions in glomerular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2012-05-15

    Glomerulosclerosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix within the glomeruli of the kidney, glomerular cell death, and subsequent loss of functional glomeruli. While in physiological situations the levels of extracellular matrix components are kept constant by a tight balance between formation and degradation, in the case of injury that results in fibrosis there is increased matrix deposition relative to its breakdown. Multiple factors control matrix synthesis and degradation, thus contributing to the development of glomerulosclerosis. This review focuses primarily on the role of cell-matrix interactions, which play a critical role in governing glomerular cell cues in both healthy and diseased kidneys. Cell-extracellular matrix interactions are made possible by various cellular receptors including integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan. Upon binding to a selective extracellular matrix protein, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that can either downregulate or upregulate matrix synthesis and deposition. This, together with the observation that changes in the expression levels of matrix receptors have been documented in glomerular disease, clearly emphasizes the contribution of cell-matrix interactions in glomerular injury. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby extracellular matrix receptors regulate matrix homeostasis in the course of glomerular injury is therefore critical for devising more effective therapies to treat and ideally prevent glomerulosclerosis. PMID:22417893

  2. Domain Modeling: NP_000631.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_000631.1 chrX CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE TERNARY COMPLEX BETWEEN OVINE PLACENTAL LACTOGEN AND THE EXTRACELL...ULAR DOMAIN OF THE RAT PROLACTIN RECEPTOR c1f6fc_ chrX/NP_000631.1/NP_000631.1_apo_135-332.pdb blast 0 ...

  3. Domain Modeling: NP_061978.5 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_061978.5 chr6 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE TERNARY COMPLEX BETWEEN OVINE PLACENTAL LACTOGEN AND THE EXTRACELL...ULAR DOMAIN OF THE RAT PROLACTIN RECEPTOR c1f6fc_ chr6/NP_061978.5/NP_061978.5_apo_2268-2454.pdb psi-blast 0 ...

  4. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  5. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. PMID:26382969

  6. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  7. A Nonoligomerizing Mutant Form of Helicobacter pylori VacA Allows Structural Analysis of the p33 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivera, Christian; Campbell, Anne M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Pyburn, Tasia M; Foegeding, Nora J; Barke, Theresa L; Spiller, Benjamin W; McClain, Mark S; Ohi, Melanie D; Lacy, D Borden; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori secretes a pore-forming VacA toxin that has structural features and activities substantially different from those of other known bacterial toxins. VacA can assemble into multiple types of water-soluble flower-shaped oligomeric structures, and most VacA activities are dependent on its capacity to oligomerize. The 88-kDa secreted VacA protein can undergo limited proteolysis to yield two domains, designated p33 and p55. The p33 domain is required for membrane channel formation and intracellular toxic activities, and the p55 domain has an important role in mediating VacA binding to cells. Previous studies showed that the p55 domain has a predominantly β-helical structure, but no structural data are available for the p33 domain. We report here the purification and analysis of a nonoligomerizing mutant form of VacA secreted by H. pylori The nonoligomerizing 88-kDa mutant protein retains the capacity to enter host cells but lacks detectable toxic activity. Analysis of crystals formed by the monomeric protein reveals that the β-helical structure of the p55 domain extends into the C-terminal portion of p33. Fitting the p88 structural model into an electron microscopy map of hexamers formed by wild-type VacA (predicted to be structurally similar to VacA membrane channels) reveals that p55 and the β-helical segment of p33 localize to peripheral arms but do not occupy the central region of the hexamers. We propose that the amino-terminal portion of p33 is unstructured when VacA is in a monomeric form and that it undergoes a conformational change during oligomer assembly. PMID:27382020

  8. Destabilization of Heterologous Proteins Mediated by the GSK3β Phosphorylation Domain of the β-Catenin Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhan Kong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in development and cellular processes. The hallmark of canonical Wnt signaling activation is the stabilization of β-catenin protein in cytoplasm and/or nucleus. The stability of β-catenin is the key to its biological functions and is controlled by the phosphorylation of its amino-terminal degradation domain. Aberrant activation of β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of human cancers. It has been recently suggested that GSK3βmay play an essential role in regulating global protein turnover. Here, we investigate if the GSK3β phosphorylation site-containing degradation domain of β-catenin is sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins. Methods and Results: We engineer chimeric proteins by fusing β-catenin degradation domain at the N- and/or C-termini of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. In both transient and stable expression experiments, the chimeric GFP proteins exhibit a significantly decreased stability, which can be effectively antagonized by lithium and Wnt1. An activating mutation in the destruction domain significantly stabilizes the fusion protein. Furthermore, GSK3 inhibitor SB-216763 effectively increases the GFP signal of the fusion protein. Conversely, the inhibition of Wnt signaling with tankyrase inhibitor XAV939 results in a decrease in GFP signal of the fusion proteins, while these small molecules have no significant effects on the mutant destruction domain-GFP fusion protein. Conclusion: Our findings strongly suggest that the β-catenin degradation domain may be sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins in Wnt signaling-dependent manner. It is conceivable that the chimeric GFP proteins may be used as a functional reporter to measure the dynamic status of β-catenin signaling, and to identify potential anticancer drugs that target β-catenin signaling.

  9. Characterization of ApuB, an Extracellular Type II Amylopullulanase from Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003▿

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Neirynck, Sabine; Ryan, Sinead; Steidler, Lothar; Van Sinderen, Douwe

    2008-01-01

    The apuB gene of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 was shown to encode an extracellular amylopullulanase. ApuB is composed of a distinct N-terminally located α-amylase-containing domain which hydrolyzes α-1,4-glucosidic linkages in starch and related polysaccharides and a C-terminally located pullulanase-containing domain which hydrolyzes α-1,6 linkages in pullulan, allowing the classification of this enzyme as a bifunctional class II pullulanase. A knockout mutation of the apuB gene in B. breve ...

  10. Three distinct epitopes on the extracellular face of the glucagon receptor determine specificity for the glucagon amino terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Steffen; Gram, Christian; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans;

    2003-01-01

    Asp385 --> Glu glucagon receptor mutant that specifically rescued Ala2-glucagon. The results show that three distinct epitopes of the glucagon receptor core domain determine specificity for the N terminus of glucagon. We suggest a glucagon receptor binding model in which the extracellular ends of TM2...

  11. Origin of life: LUCA and extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S.; Forterre, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cells from the three domains of life produce extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs), suggesting that EMV production is an important aspect of cellular physiology. EMVs have been implicated in many aspects of cellular life in all domains, including stress response, toxicity against competing strains, pathogenicity, detoxification and resistance against viral attack. These EMVs represent an important mode of inter-cellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids between cells. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of EMV biology and their various roles. We focus on the role of membrane vesicles in early cellular evolution and how they would have helped shape the nature of the last universal common ancestor. A membrane-protected micro-environment would have been a key to the survival of spontaneous molecular systems and efficient metabolic reactions. Interestingly, the morphology of EMVs is strongly reminiscent of the morphology of some virions. It is thus tempting to make a link between the origin of the first protocell via the formation of vesicles and the origin of viruses.

  12. Role of the extracellular and intracellular loops of follicle stimulating hormone receptor in its function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antara A Banerjee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR is a leucine rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors, which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR. Its cognate ligand, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH binds to and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD consisting of leucine rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD. The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs and three intracellular loops (ILs and ends in a short cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the extracellular domain (ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone-receptor internalization, recycling of hormone receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function.

  13. The pherophorins: common, versatile building blocks in the evolution of extracellular matrix architecture in Volvocales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Green algae of the order Volvocales provide an unrivalled opportunity for exploring the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity. They range from unicells, like Chlamydomonas, through homocytic colonial forms with increasing cooperation of individual cells, like Gonium or Pandorina, to heterocytic multicellular forms with different cell types and a complete division of labour, like Volvox. A fundamental requirement for the evolution of multicellularity is the development of a complex, multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM has many functions, which can change under developmental control or as a result of environmental factors. Here molecular data from 15 novel proteins are presented. These proteins have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Gonium pectorale, Pandorina morum and Volvox carteri, and all belong to a single protein family, the pherophorins. Pherophorin-V1 is shown to be a glycoprotein localized to the 'cellular zone' of the V. carteri ECM. Pherophorin-V1 and -V2 mRNAs are strongly induced not only by the sex inducer, which triggers sexual development at extremely low concentrations, but also by mechanical wounding. Like the extensins of higher plants, which are also developmentally controlled or sometimes inducible by wounding, the pherophorins contain a (hydroxy-)proline-rich (HR) rod-like domain and are abundant within the extracellular compartment. In contrast to most extensins, pherophorins have additional globular A and B domains on both ends of the HR domains. Therefore pherophorins most closely resemble a particular class of higher plant extensin, the solanaceous lectins (e.g. potato lectin), suggesting multivalent carbohydrate-binding functions are present within the A and B domains and are responsible for cross-linking. Our results suggest that pherophorins are used as the building blocks for the extracellular scaffold throughout the Volvocales, with the characteristic mesh sizes in different ECM structures being

  14. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  15. Further characterization of Renibacterium salmoninarum extracellular products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, T A; Bannister, L A; Griffiths, S G; Lynch, W H

    1997-10-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonids, releases high concentrations of extracellular protein in tissues of infected fish. The extracellular protein consists almost entirely of a 57-kDa protein and derivatives of degradation and aggregation of the same molecule. The 57-kDa protein and its derivatives were fractionated into defined ranges of molecular mass. Separated fractions continued to produce degradation and aggregation products. One-dimensional electrophoretic separation of extracellular protein revealed a number of proteolytically active bands from > 100 to approximately 18 kDa associated with various 57-kDa protein derivatives in the different molecular mass fractions. Two-dimensional separation of extracellular protein showed that continued degradation and aggregation, similar both in location and behavior to some of the 57-kDa protein derivatives, was also displayed by the proteolytically active bands after their separation. Effects of reducing agents and sulfhydryl group proteinase inhibitors indicated a common mechanism for the proteolytically active polypeptides characteristic of a thiol proteinase. The results suggested that the 57-kDa protein and some of its derivatives undergo autolytic cleavage, releasing a proteolytically active polypeptide(s) of at least 18 kDa. Soluble polysaccharide-like material also was detected in extracellular products and tissue from infected fish. Antiserum to the polysaccharide-like material cross-reacted with O-polysaccharide of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida, suggesting some structural similarity between these polysaccharides. The polysaccharide and the proteolytic activity associated with the 57-kDa protein derivatives should be investigated with respect to the pathogenesis of R. salmoninarum infections. PMID:9480644

  16. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cheng. W. Y., Cyclic 3', 5'-nucleotide phosphodiestrase: demonstration of an activator, Biochm. Biophys. Res. Commun.,1970, 38: 533-538.[2]Boynton, A. L., Whitfield, J. F., MacManus, J. P., Calmodulin stimulates DNA synthesis by rat liver cells, BBRC.1980,95(2): 745-749.[3]Gorbacherskaya, L. V., Borovkova, T. V., Rybin, U. O. et al., Effect of exogenous calmodulin on lymphocyte proliferation in normal subjects, Bull Exp. Med. Biol., 1983, 95: 361-363.[4]Wong, P. Y.-K., Lee, W. H., Chao, PH.-W., The role of calmodulin in prostaglandin metabolism, Ann. NY Acad. Sci.,1980, 356: 179-189.[5]Mac Neil, S., Dawson, R. A., Crocker, G. et al., Effects of extracellular calmodulin and calmodulin antagonists on B16 melanoma cell growth, J. Invest. Dermatol., 1984, 83: 15-19.[6]Crocker, D. G., Dawson, R. A., Mac Neil, S. et al., An extracellular role for calmodulin-like activity in cell proliferation,Biochem. J., 1988, 253: 877-884.[7]Polito. V. S., Calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors: effect on pollen germination and tube growth, in Pollen: Biology and Implications for Plant Breeding (eds. Mulvshy, D. L., Ottaviaro, E.), New York: Elsevier, 1983.53-60.[8]Biro, R. L., Sun, D. Y., Roux, S. J.et al., Characterization of oat calmodulin and radioimmunoassay of its subcellular distribution, Plant Physiol., 1984,75: 382-386.[9]Terry, M. E., Bonner, B. A., An examination of centrifugation as a method of extracting an extracellular solution from peas, and its use for the study of IAA-induced growth, Plant Physiol., 1980, 66: 321-325.[10]Josefina, H. N., Aldasars, J. J., Rodriguez, D., Localization of calmodulin on embryonic Cice aricium L, in Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Calcium in Plant Development (ed. Trewavas, A. J.), New York, London: Plenum Press, 1985, 313.[11]Dauwalder, M., Roux, S. J., Hardison, L., Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedling: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices, Planta, 1986, 168: 461

  17. Functions of the conserved thrombospondin carboxy-terminal cassette in cell-extracellular matrix interactions and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josephine C

    2004-06-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are extracellular, multidomain, calcium-binding glycoproteins that function at cell surfaces, in extracellular matrix (ECM) and as bridging molecules in cell-cell interactions. TSPs are multifunctional and modulate cell behavior during development, wound-healing, immune response, tumor growth and in the homeostasis of adult tissues. TSPs are assembled as oligomers that are composed of homologous polypeptides. In all the TSP polypeptides, the most highly-conserved region is the carboxyl-region, which contains a characteristic set of domains comprising EGF domains, TSP type 3 repeats and a globular carboxy-terminal domain. This large region is termed here the thrombospondin carboxy-terminal cassette (TSP-CTC). The strong conservation of the TSP-CTC suggests that it may mediate ancestral functions that are shared by all TSPs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the TSP-CTC and areas of future interest. PMID:15094125

  18. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  19. Imprinting and evolution of two Kruppel-type zinc-finger genes, ZIM3 and ZNF264, located in the PEG3/USP29 imprinted domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Bergmann, A; Wehri, E; Lu, X; Stubbs, L

    2001-09-01

    We have isolated Kruppel-type (C2H2) zinc-finger genes, ZIM3 (zinc-finger gene 3 from imprinted domain) and ZNF264, located downstream of human and mouse USP29 genes (encoding ubiquitin-specific processing protease 29). In human, both ZIM3 and ZNF264 encode zinc-finger proteins with Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) A and B domains at the amino-terminal regions of the predicted proteins. In contrast, mouse Zim3 and Zfp264 seem to have lost protein-coding capability based on the lack of open reading frames (ORFs) in their cDNA sequences. In particular, the 3' end of the Zim3 transcript overlaps with the coding region of the adjacent gene Usp29 in an antisense orientation, indicating the conversion of mouse Zim3 into an antisense transcript gene for Usp29. The expression patterns of ZIM3 and ZNF264 have been largely conserved between human and mouse, with testis-specific expression of ZIM3 and ubiquitous expression of ZNF264, but high expression levels in adult testes in both species. Our studies also demonstrate that both mouse genes are imprinted with maternal expression of Zim3 in adult testes and paternal expression of Zfp264 in neonatal and adult brain. The reciprocal imprinting of two neighboring mouse genes, Zim3 and Zfp264, is consistent with a pattern observed frequently in other imprinted domains, and suggests that the imprinting of these two genes might be coregulated. PMID:11543637

  20. Investigation of interactions at the extracellular loops of the relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Petrie, Emma J; Chen, Catherine Z; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2014-12-12

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  1. Investigation of Interactions at the Extracellular Loops of the Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 (RXFP1)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A.; Petrie, Emma J.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  2. Mapping proteolytic cancer cell-extracellular matrix interfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, K.A.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    For cancer progression and metastatic dissemination, cancer cells migrate and penetrate through extracellular tissues. Cancer invasion is frequently facilitated by proteolytic processing of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cellular regions mediating proteolysis are diverse and depen

  3. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  4. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  5. Adapting Mathematical Domain Reasoners

    CERN Document Server

    Heeren, Bastiaan

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical learning environments help students in mastering mathematical knowledge. Mature environments typically offer thousands of interactive exercises. Providing feedback to students solving interactive exercises requires domain reasoners for doing the exercise-specific calculations. Since a domain reasoner has to solve an exercise in the same way a student should solve it, the structure of domain reasoners should follow the layered structure of the mathematical domains. Furthermore, learners, teachers, and environment builders have different requirements for adapting domain reasoners, such as providing more details, disallowing or enforcing certain solutions, and combining multiple mathematical domains in a new domain. In previous work we have shown how domain reasoners for solving interactive exercises can be expressed in terms of rewrite strategies, rewrite rules, and views. This paper shows how users can adapt and configure such domain reasoners to their own needs. This is achieved by enabling users...

  6. Decellularized musculofascial extracellular matrix for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A; Chang, David W.; Zhang, Qixu

    2013-01-01

    Ideal scaffolds that represent native extracellular matrix (ECM) properties of musculofascial tissues have great importance in musculofascial tissue engineering. However, detailed characterization of musculofascial tissues’ ECM (particularly, of fascia) from large animals is still lacking. In this study, we developed a decellularization protocol for processing pig composite musculofascial tissues. Decellularized muscle (D-muscle) and decellularized fascia (D-fascia), which are two important c...

  7. Design of Artificial Modular Extracellular Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Gräter, Stefan V. W.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular functions such as cell growth, adhesion and differentiation are essentially controlled by the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical, chemical and structural properties of the ECM are consequently crucial for the selection of cells at interfaces and the formation of tissues. The objective of this thesis was to develop an artificial ECM to determine and control the parameters influencing the crosstalk between cells and their surroundings on a molecular level. Artificia...

  8. Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Outflow Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Kate E Keller; Mini, Aga; Bradley, John M.; Kelley, Mary J.; Acott, Ted S.

    2008-01-01

    Normal homeostatic adjustment of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) involves remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the trabecular meshwork (TM). This entails sensing elevated IOP, releasing numerous activated proteinases to degrade existing ECM and concurrent biosynthesis of replacement ECM components. To increase or decrease IOP, the quantity, physical properties and/or organization of new components should be somewhat different from those replaced in order to modify outflow resistan...

  9. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addit...

  10. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond b...

  11. Extracellular Aldonolactonase from Myceliophthora thermophila▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Beeson, William T.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Hausmann, Corinne D.; Cate, Jamie H.D.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Fungi secrete many different enzymes to deconstruct lignocellulosic biomass, including several families of hydrolases, oxidative enzymes, and many uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the isolation, characterization, and primary sequence analysis of an extracellular aldonolactonase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila (synonym Sporotrichum thermophile). The lactonase is a 48-kDa glycoprotein with a broad pH optimum. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucono-δ-lac...

  12. Extracellular enzymes of Fusarium graminearum isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Eleonora Kikot; Roque Alberto Hours; Teresa María Alconada

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum isolates from three different agroecological regions in Argentina were examined according to the production of different extracellular enzyme activities of potential biotechnological interest: pectinases (PGase: polygalacturonase and PMGase: polymethylgalacturonase), cellulase (CMCase: carboxymethylcellulase) and hemicellulase (xylanase). The isolates were grown in minimum salt medium supplemented with 0.25% glucose, 0.125% citric pectin and 0.125% oat bran as carbon sour...

  13. Extracellular TG2: emerging functions and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Belkin, Alexey M.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the transglutaminase family of Ca2+-dependent cross-linking enzymes. Unlike other family members, TG2 is a multifunctional protein, which has several other well documented enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions. A significant body of evidence accumulated over the last decade reveals multiple and complex activities of this protein on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix (ECM), including its role in the regulation of...

  14. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    OpenAIRE

    Sayaka Oshikawa; Hiroko Sonoda; Masahiro Ikeda

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs fro...

  15. A constant current source for extracellular microiontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T; Dillman, N; Weiss, M L

    1995-12-01

    A sophisticated constant-current source suitable for extracellular microiontophoresis of tract-tracing substances, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Biocytin or Fluoro-Gold, is described. This design uses a flyback switched-mode power supply to generate controllable high-voltage and operational amplifier circuitry to regulate current and provide instrumentation. Design features include a fast rise time, +/- 2000 V supply (stable output in current and voltage monitoring, and separate pumping and holding current settings. Three features of this constant-current source make it especially useful for extracellular microiontophoresis. First, the output voltage monitor permits one to follow changes in the microelectrode resistance during current injection. Second, the voltage-limit (or out-of-compliance) indicator circuitry will sound an alarm when the iontophoretic pump is unable to generate the desired current, such as when the micropipette is blocked. Third, the high-compliance voltage power supply insures up to +/- 20 microA of current through 100 M omega resistance. This device has proven itself to be a reliable constant-current source for extracellular microiontophoresis in the laboratory. PMID:8788057

  16. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling. PMID:26152529

  17. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  18. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand–receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers

  19. Structure modification and extracellular polymeric substances conversion during sewage sludge biodrying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Krafft, Thomas; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Wang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Biodrying, an economical and energy-saving biomass waste treatment, removes water from waste using the biological heat generated by organic matter degradation. Technical limitations associated with dewatering complicate the biodrying of sewage sludge. This study investigated the sludge alteration associated with its water removal, focusing on sludge form, extracellular polymeric substances, and free water release. An auto-feedback control technology was used for the biodrying; a scanning electron microscope was used to record the morphological change; three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was used to analyze extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) variation, and time domain reflectometry was used to assess the free water release. Over the 20-day biodrying, there was a 62% water removal rate during the first thermophilic phase. Biodrying created a hollow and stratified sludge structure. Aromatic proteins and soluble microbial byproducts in the EPS were significantly degraded. The thermophilic phase was the phase resulting in the greatest free water release. PMID:27262096

  20. Neutrophil extracellular traps in sheep mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, Salvatore; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Rocca, Stefano; Cacciotto, Carla; Alberti, Alberto; Marogna, Gavino; Uzzau, Sergio; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are structures composed of DNA, histones, and antimicrobial proteins that are released extracellularly by neutrophils and other immune cells as a means for trapping and killing invading pathogens. Here, we describe NET formation in milk and in mammary alveoli of mastitic sheep, and provide a dataset of proteins found in association to these structures. Nucleic acid staining, immunomicroscopy and fluorescent in-situ hybridization of mastitic mammary tissue from sheep infected with Streptococcus uberis demonstrated the presence of extranuclear DNA colocalizing with antimicrobial proteins, histones, and bacteria. Then, proteomic analysis by LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometry provided detailed information on protein abundance changes occurring in milk upon infection. As a result, 1095 unique proteins were identified, of which 287 being significantly more abundant in mastitic milk. Upon protein ontology classification, the most represented localization classes for upregulated proteins were the cytoplasmic granule, the nucleus, and the mitochondrion, while function classes were mostly related to immune defence and inflammation pathways. All known NET markers were massively increased, including histones, granule proteases, and antimicrobial proteins. Of note was the detection of protein arginine deiminases (PAD3 and PAD4). These enzymes are responsible for citrullination, the post-translational modification that is known to trigger NET formation by inducing chromatin decondensation and extracellular release of NETs. As a further observation, citrullinated residues were detected by tandem mass spectrometry in histones of samples from mastitic animals. In conclusion, this work provides novel microscopic and proteomic information on NETs formed in vivo in the mammary gland, and reports the most complete database of proteins increased in milk upon bacterial mastitis. PMID:26088507

  1. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  2. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  3. The N-terminal domain of the Drosophila retinoblastoma protein Rbf1 interacts with ORC and associates with chromatin in an E2F independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ahlander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor protein can function as a DNA replication inhibitor as well as a transcription factor. Regulation of DNA replication may occur through interaction of Rb with the origin recognition complex (ORC. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the interaction of Drosophila Rb, Rbf1, with ORC. Using expression of proteins in Drosophila S2 cells, we found that an N-terminal Rbf1 fragment (amino acids 1-345 is sufficient for Rbf1 association with ORC but does not bind to dE2F1. We also found that the C-terminal half of Rbf1 (amino acids 345-845 interacts with ORC. We observed that the amino-terminal domain of Rbf1 localizes to chromatin in vivo and associates with chromosomal regions implicated in replication initiation, including colocalization with Orc2 and acetylated histone H4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that Rbf1 can associate with ORC and chromatin through domains independent of the E2F binding site. We infer that Rbf1 may play a role in regulating replication directly through its association with ORC and/or chromatin factors other than E2F. Our data suggest an important role for retinoblastoma family proteins in cell proliferation and tumor suppression through interaction with the replication initiation machinery.

  4. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  5. Extracellular polymeric bacterial coverages as minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, A; Saa, Alberto; Teschke, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces formed by extracellular polymeric substances enclosing individual and some small communities of {\\it Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans} on plates of hydrophobic silicon and hydrophilic mica are analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy imaging. Accurate nanoscale descriptions of such coverage surfaces are obtained. The good agreement with the predictions of a rather simple but realistic theoretical model allows us to conclude that they correspond, indeed, to minimal area surfaces enclosing a given volume associated with the encased bacteria. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first shape characterization of the coverage formed by these biomolecules, with possible applications to the study of biofilms.

  6. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  7. Extracellular matrix of the developing ovarian follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving-Rodgers, Helen F; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2006-09-01

    There are many different types of extracellular matrices in the different follicle compartments. These have different roles in follicle development and atresia, and they change in composition during these processes. This review focuses on basal lamina matrix in particular, and considers follicular fluid, the newly identified focimatrix, and thecal matrices. When follicles commence growing, the follicular basal lamina changes in its composition from containing all six alpha chains of type IV collagen to only alpha1 and alpha2. Perlecan and nidogen-1 and -2 subsequently become components of the follicular basal lamina, and there is an increase in the amount of laminin chains alpha1, beta2, and gamma1, in the bovine at least. Late in follicular development and on atresia some follicles contain laminin alpha2. On atresia the follicular basal lamina is not degraded, as occurs in ovulation, but can be breached by cells from the thecal layer when it is not aligned by granulosa cells. A novel type of basal lamina-like matrix, called focimatrix (abbreviated from focal intraepithelial matrix), develops between the cells of the membrana granulosa as aggregates of basal lamina material. It does not envelop cells and so cannot perform functions of basal lamina as currently understood. It is hypothesized that focimatrix assists or initiates depolarization of the membrana granulosa necessary for the transformation into luteal cells. The largest osmotically active molecules in follicular fluid are hyaluronan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, including versican and inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor. It has been suggested that these might be responsible for the formation of follicular fluid by creating an osmotic gradient across the follicular wall. The formation, development, and then either ovulation or regression of follicles requires considerable tissue remodeling, cellular replication, and specialization. The expectation of researchers is that extracellular matrix will be

  8. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper's group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  9. Structure-function Aspects of Extracellular Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Cell Surface Receptors in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhang; Bart PHJ Thomma

    2013-01-01

    Plants exploit several types of cell surface receptors for perception of extracellular signals, of which the extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR)-containing receptors form the major class. Although the function of most plant eLRR receptors remains unclear, an increasing number of these receptors are shown to play roles in innate immunity and a wide variety of developmental processes. Recent efforts using domain swaps, gene shuffling analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, interaction studies, and crystallographic analyses resulted in the current knowledge on ligand binding and the mechanism of activation of plant eLRR receptors. This review provides an overview of eLRR receptor research, specifically summarizing the recent understanding of interactions among plant eLRR receptors, their co-receptors and corresponding ligands. The functions of distinct eLRR receptor domains, and their role in structure, ligand perception and multimeric complex formation are discussed.

  10. Role of an Absolutely Conserved Tryptophan Pair in the Extracellular Domain of Cys-Loop Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Nina; Lynagh, Timothy; Yu, Rilei; Biggin, Philip C; Pless, Stephan A

    2016-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors mediate fast synaptic transmission in the nervous system, and their dysfunction is associated with a number of diseases. While some sequence variability is essential to ensure specific recognition of a chemically diverse set of ligands, other parts of the underlying amino acid ...

  11. Binding domains of stimulatory and inhibitory thyrotropin (TSH) receptor autoantibodies determined with chimeric TSH-lutropin/chorionic gonadotropin receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayama, Y; Wadsworth, H L; Russo, D.; Chazenbalk, G D; Rapoport, B

    1991-01-01

    We examined the relative effects of thyrotropin (TSH) and TSH receptor autoantibodies in the sera of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease on three TSH-lutropin/chorionic gonadotropin (LH/CG) receptor extracellular domain chimeras. Each chimera binds TSH with high affinity. Only the chimera with TSH receptor extracellular domains ABC (amino acids 1-260) had a functional (cAMP) response to thyroid stimulatory IgG. The chimeras with TSH receptor domains CD (amino acids 171-360) and DE (amino...

  12. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for extracellular recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueggemann, Dorothea; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhaeusser, Andreas [CNI Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology and Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems 2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Electrophysiological activity of electrogenic cells is currently recorded with planar bioelectronic interfaces such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs). In this work, a novel concept of biocompatible nanostructured gold MEAs for extracellular signal recording is presented. MEAs were fabricated using clean room technologies, e.g. photolithography and metallization. Subsequently, they were modified with gold nanopillars of approximately 300 to 400 nm in height and 60 nm width. The nanostructuring process was carried out with a template-assisted approach using nanoporous aluminium oxide. Impedance spectroscopy of the resulting nanostructures showed higher capacitances compared to planar gold. This confirmed the expected increase of the surface area via nanostructuring. We used the nanostructured microelectrodes to record extracellular potentials from heart muscle cells (HL1), which were plated onto the chips. Good coupling between the HL1 cells and the nanostructured electrodes was observed. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio of nanopillar-MEAs was increased by a factor of 2 compared to planar MEAs. In future applications this nanopillar concept can be adopted for distinct interface materials and coupling to cellular and molecular sensing components.

  13. Diamagnetic (Condon) domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the first systematic review of experimental research on diamagnetic (aka Condon) domains that form in nonmagnetic metals at low temperatures due to the development of Landau levels. A variety of methods were used to study the domains. Muon spectroscopy studies showed such domains to be present in all metals studied, pointing to the universal nature of the phenomenon. For silver, the domain structure size as measured by Hall microsensors turned out to be an order of magnitude larger than expected. In beryllium, it was found that domains do not come to the surface but rather remain in the bulk of the crystal. The magnetostriction of beryllium during domain formation is measured. It is shown that magnetization current in a domain wall is entirely caused by the charge density gradient in the wall, due to the lattice being deformed oppositely in neighboring domains. It is observed for the first time that the de Haas-van Alphen effect exhibits hysteresis at the transition to the domain state, and this fact was used for the experimental determination of the phase diagrams for the domain states of silver and beryllium. (reviews of topical problems)

  14. Homotypic interactions of the infectious bursal disease virus proteins VP3, pVP2, VP4, and VP5: mapping of the interacting domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus of chicken, encodes five proteins. Of these, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1) is specified by the smaller genome segment, while the large segment directs synthesis of a nonstructural protein (VP5) and a structural protein precursor from which the capsid proteins pVP2 and VP3 as well as the viral protease VP4 are derived. Using the recently redefined processing sites of the precursor, we have reevaluated the homotypic interactions of the viral proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system. Except for VP1, which interacted weakly, all proteins appeared to self-associate strongly. Using a deletion mutagenesis approach, we subsequently mapped the interacting domains in these polypeptides, where possible confirming the observations made in the two-hybrid system by performing coimmunoprecipitation analyses of tagged protein constructs coexpressed in avian culture cells. The results revealed that pVP2 possesses multiple interaction domains, consistent with available structural information about this external capsid protein. VP3-VP3 interactions were mapped to the amino-terminal part of the polypeptide. Interestingly, this domain is distinct from two other interaction domains occurring in this internal capsid protein: while binding to VP1 has been mapped to the carboxy-terminal end of the protein, interaction with the genomic dsRNA segments has been suggested to occur just upstream thereof. No interaction sites could be assigned to the VP4 protein; any deletion applied abolished its self-association. Finally, one interaction domain was detected in the central, most hydrophobic region of VP5, supporting the idea that this virulence determinant may function as a membrane pore-forming protein in infected cells

  15. Multiple Roles of the Extracellular Vestibule Amino Acid Residues in the Function of the Rat P2X4 Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokic, Milos Boro; Stojilkovic, S. S.; Vávra, Vojtěch; Kuzyk, Pavlo; Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Zemková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), e59411. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110910; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic P2X receptor channels * transmembrane domain * extracellular vestibule * gating * ivermectin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  16. Cx23, a connexin with only four extracellular-loop cysteines, forms functional gap junction channels and hemichannels

    OpenAIRE

    Iovine, M. Kathryn; Gumpert, Anna; Falk, Matthias; Mendelson, Tamra C.

    2007-01-01

    Gap junction channels may be comprised of either connexin or pannexin proteins (innexins and pannexins). Membrane topologies of both families are similar, but sequence similarity is lacking. Recently, connexin-like sequences have been identified in mammalian and zebrafish genomes that have only four conserved cysteines in the extracellular domains (Cx23), a feature of the pannexins. Phylogenetic analyses of the non-canonical “C4” connexins reveal that these sequences are indeed connexins. Fun...

  17. Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K. (CUA); (Einstein); (NIH); (Scripps)

    2012-12-10

    Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

  18. Method for the selective measurement of amino-terminal variants of procalcitonin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struck, J.; Strebelow, M.; Tietz, S.; Alonso, C.; Morgenthaler, N.G.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.; Bergmann, A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Procalcitonin (PCT) is an established marker for diagnosing and monitoring bacterial infections. Full-length PCT [116 amino acids that make up procalcitonin (PCT1-116)] can be truncated, leading to des-Ala-Pro-PCT (des-Alanin-Prolin-Procalcitonin; PCT3-116). Current immunoassays for PCT

  19. Amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in children with latent rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin P Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Serum NT-proBNP did not distinguish between latent RHD cases and the controls. Sex and within-family exposures may confound this result. More investigation into biomarker-based RHD detection is warranted.

  20. Amino-terminal sequence of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus is a structural component of the virion envelope which stimulates production of high titers of herpes simplex virus type-common neutralizing antibody. The authors caried out automated N-terminal amino acid sequencing studies on radiolabeled preparations of gD-1 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 1) and gD-2 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 2). Although some differences were noted, particularly in the methionine and alanine profiles for gD-1 and gD-2, the amino acid sequence of a number of the first 30 residues of the amino terminus of gD-1 and gD-2 appears to be quite similar. For both proteins, the first residue is a lysine. When we compared out sequence data for gD-1 with those predicted by nucleic acid sequencing, the two sequences could be aligned (with one exception) starting at residue 26 (lysine) of the predicted sequence. Thus, the first 25 amino acids of the predicted sequence are absent from the polypeptides isolated from infected cells

  1. Hyaluronic acid changes of the extracellular matrix in colon carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arab MR.; Allahyari A.; Sargolzaie Aval F.; Rafighdoost H; Karimi M

    2007-01-01

    Background: The extracellular matrix is a complex three-dimensional network of proteins and glycosaminoglycans, which have important roles in cellular physiology and cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Any changes in the extracellular matrix of tumors may be implicated in cellular transformation and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to identify changes in the hyaluronic acid of the stroma of colonic carcinoma.Methods: Paraffin blocks of 30 patients with colon carc...

  2. Regulation of extracellular slime production by Actinomyces viscosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ooshima, T; Kuramitsu, H K

    1981-01-01

    Extracellular slime polysaccharides produced two Actinomyces viscosus strains, T14V and T14AV, were compared. In various media containing glucose, T14Av produced abundant extracellular viscous slime polysaccharide, whereas T14V produced lower levels. Furthermore, fractionation of these polysaccharides showed that the two extracellular polysaccharides differed in molecular size and net charge. Since there was a significant difference in the relative abilities of chemically defined medium and c...

  3. Extracellular Acidification Alters Lysosomal Trafficking in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kristine Glunde; Sandra E. Guggino; Meiyappan Solaiyappan; Pathak, Arvind P.; Yoshitaka Ichikawa; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2003-01-01

    Cancer cells invade by secreting degradative enzymes, which are sequestered in lysosomal vesicles. In this study, the impact of an acidic extracellular environment on lysosome size, number, and distance from the nucleus in human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and breast cancer cells of different degrees of malignancy was characterized because the physiological microenvironment of tumors is frequently characterized by extracellular acidity. An acidic extracellular pH (pHe) resulted in a dist...

  4. Diverse Biological Functions of Extracellular Collagen Processing Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Trackman, Philip C.

    2005-01-01

    Collagens are abundant proteins in higher organisms, and are formed by a complex biosynthetic pathway involving intracellular and extracellular post-translational modifications. Starting from simple soluble precursors, this interesting pathway produces insoluble functional fibrillar and non-fibrillar elements of the extracellular matrix. The present review highlights recent progress and new insights into biological regulation of extracellular procollagen processing, and some novel functions o...

  5. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  6. Frustratingly Easy Domain Adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach to domain adaptation that is appropriate exactly in the case when one has enough ``target'' data to do slightly better than just using only ``source'' data. Our approach is incredibly simple, easy to implement as a preprocessing step (10 lines of Perl!) and outperforms state-of-the-art approaches on a range of datasets. Moreover, it is trivially extended to a multi-domain adaptation problem, where one has data from a variety of different domains.

  7. CULTURAL DOMAINS: TRANSLATION PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Negro Alousque

    2009-01-01

    Much of the lexis of a language has a cultural referent and is thus specific to a speech community. The meaning of culturally marked words is often difficult to grasp without some cultural knowledge and poses translation problems, particularly when the words are associated with cultural domains (Nida, 2001). In the present paper we focus on the French cultural domain of cooking. After outlining the elements of the domain, we analyse the difficulties in translating the lexical units from the d...

  8. Visualizing latent domain knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C.; Kuljis, J; Paul, RJ

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge discovery and data mining commonly rely on finding salient patterns of association from a vast amount of data. Traditional citation analysis of scientific literature draws insights from strong citation patterns. Latent domain knowledge, in contrast to the mainstream domain knowledge, often consists of highly relevant but relatively infrequently cited scientific works. Visualizing latent domain knowledge presents a significant challenge to knowledge discovery and quantitative studies...

  9. Autotransporters with GDSL passenger domains: molecular physiology and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Kolmar, Harald; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2011-07-01

    Autotransporters are large proteins produced and secreted by Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of an N-terminal passenger domain, which typically harbours enzymatic activity and exerts a virulence function, and a C-terminal membrane anchor domain. Somehow, the membrane domain facilitates the transport of the passenger domain into the extracellular space. Several autotransporters possess hydrolase passenger domains that belong to the GDSL family of lipolytic enzymes. GDSL autotransporters represent a functionally distinct family and are characterized by several features of their passenger domains; these include 1) the absence of a conserved right-handed parallel β-helix, 2) lipolytic activity, and thus the capability to hydrolyse membranes, and 3) covalent attachment to the respective C-terminal β-domain, with the hydrolase domain exposed to the exterior. The esterase EstA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a typical enzyme of this type. Its physiological role was studied, its potential biotechnological application has been demonstrated, and its crystal structure was solved recently. Furthermore, it is capable of displaying different classes of enzymes in a range of Gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli, and FACS-based high-throughput screening for enantioselective esterases could be achieved using EstA. PMID:21598370

  10. A Novel Molecular Diagnostic of Glioblastomas: Detection of an Extracellular Fragment of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase μ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Burden-Gulley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently found that normal human brain and low-grade astrocytomas express the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ and that the more invasive astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, downregulate full-length PTPμ expression. Loss of PTPμ expression in GBMs is due to proteolytic cleavage that generates an intracellular and potentially a cleaved and released extracellular fragment of PTPμ. Here, we identify that a cleaved extracellular fragment containing the domains required for PTPμ-mediated adhesion remains associated with GBM tumor tissue. We hypothesized that detection of this fragment would make an excellent diagnostic tool for the localization of tumor tissue within the brain. To this end, we generated a series of fluorescently tagged peptide probes that bind the PTPμ fragment. The peptide probes specifically recognize GBM cells in tissue sections of surgically resected human tumors. To test whether the peptide probes are able to detect GBM tumors in vivo, the PTPμ peptide probes were tested in both mouse flank and intracranial xenograft human glioblastoma tumor model systems. The glial tumors were molecularly labeled with the PTPμ peptide probes within minutes of tail vein injection using the Maestro FLEX In Vivo Imaging System. The label was stable for at least 3 hours. Together, these results indicate that peptide recognition of the PTPμ extracellular fragment provides a novel molecular diagnostic tool for detection of human glioblastomas. Such a tool has clear translational applications and may lead to improved surgical resections and prognosis for patients with this devastating disease.

  11. Acid potentiation of the capsaicin receptor determined by a key extracellular site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordt, S E; Tominaga, M; Julius, D

    2000-07-01

    The capsaicin (vanilloid) receptor, VR1, is a sensory neuron-specific ion channel that serves as a polymodal detector of pain-producing chemical and physical stimuli. The response of VR1 to capsaicin or noxious heat is dynamically potentiated by extracellular protons within a pH range encountered during tissue acidosis, such as that associated with arthritis, infarction, tumor growth, and other forms of injury. A molecular determinant for this important physiological activity was localized to an extracellular Glu residue (E600) in the region linking the fifth transmembrane domain with the putative pore-forming region of the channel. We suggest that this residue serves as a key regulatory site of the receptor by setting sensitivity to other noxious stimuli in response to changes in extracellular proton concentration. We also demonstrate that protons, vanilloids, and heat promote channel opening through distinct pathways, because mutations at a second site (E648) selectively abrogate proton-evoked channel activation without diminishing responses to other noxious stimuli. Our findings provide molecular evidence for stimulus-specific steps in VR1 activation and offer strategies for the development of novel analgesic agents. PMID:10859346

  12. Extracellular matrix motion and early morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Rongish, Brenda J; Smith, Christopher M; Filla, Michael B; Czirok, Andras; Bénazéraf, Bertrand; Little, Charles D

    2016-06-15

    For over a century, embryologists who studied cellular motion in early amniotes generally assumed that morphogenetic movement reflected migration relative to a static extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold. However, as we discuss in this Review, recent investigations reveal that the ECM is also moving during morphogenesis. Time-lapse studies show how convective tissue displacement patterns, as visualized by ECM markers, contribute to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Computational image analysis distinguishes between cell-autonomous (active) displacements and convection caused by large-scale (composite) tissue movements. Modern quantification of large-scale 'total' cellular motion and the accompanying ECM motion in the embryo demonstrates that a dynamic ECM is required for generation of the emergent motion patterns that drive amniote morphogenesis. PMID:27302396

  13. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina; Genazzani, Armando A; Sethi, Jaswinder K

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro-environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro-environment. PMID:27128025

  14. Extracellular enzymes of Fusarium graminearum isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Eleonora Kikot

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum isolates from three different agroecological regions in Argentina were examined according to the production of different extracellular enzyme activities of potential biotechnological interest: pectinases (PGase: polygalacturonase and PMGase: polymethylgalacturonase, cellulase (CMCase: carboxymethylcellulase and hemicellulase (xylanase. The isolates were grown in minimum salt medium supplemented with 0.25% glucose, 0.125% citric pectin and 0.125% oat bran as carbon sources and/or enzyme inducers. PGase activity was detected early (after two days of incubation in all the cultures; it was found to be the highest for all the isolates. PMGase was high only for those isolates of the II region. CMCase and endoxylanase activities were particularly found at late stages (after four and seven days of incubation, respectively and the maximum values were lower than pectinase activities.

  15. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  16. Extracellular vesicles in lung microenvironment and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yu; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in various lung diseases. EVs are released by a variety of cells, including respiratory cells and immune cells, and they encapsulate various molecules, such as proteins and microRNAs, as modulators of intercellular communication. Cancer cell-derived EVs play crucial roles in promoting tumor progression and modifying their microenvironment. By contrast, noncancerous cell-derived EVs demonstrate protective functions against injury, such as tissue recovery and repair, to maintain physiological homeostasis. Airway cells in contact with harmful substances may alter their EV composition and modify the balanced reciprocal interactions with surrounding mesenchymal cells. We summarize the novel findings of EV function in various lung diseases, primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. PMID:26231094

  17. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  18. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  19. Pneumolysin activates neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Nel, J; Theron, A J; Durandt, C; Tintinger, G R; Pool, R; Mitchell, T J; Feldman, C; Anderson, R

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the potential of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), to activate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in vitro. Isolated human blood neutrophils were exposed to recombinant Ply (5-20 ng ml(-1) ) for 30-90 min at 37°C and NET formation measured using the following procedures to detect extracellular DNA: (i) flow cytometry using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Ruby; (ii) spectrofluorimetry using the fluorophore, Sytox(®) Orange (5 μM); and (iii) NanoDrop(®) technology. These procedures were complemented by fluorescence microscopy using 4', 6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) (nuclear stain) in combination with anti-citrullinated histone monoclonal antibodies to visualize nets. Exposure of neutrophils to Ply resulted in relatively rapid (detected within 30-60 min), statistically significant (P DNA impregnated with both citrullinated histone and myeloperoxidase. Microscopy revealed that NETosis appeared to be restricted to a subpopulation of neutrophils, the numbers of NET-forming cells in the control and Ply-treated systems (10 and 20 ng ml(-1) ) were 4·3 (4·2), 14.3 (9·9) and 16·5 (7·5), respectively (n = 4, P < 0·0001 for comparison of the control with both Ply-treated systems). Ply-induced NETosis occurred in the setting of retention of cell viability, and apparent lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species and Toll-like receptor 4. In conclusion, Ply induces vital NETosis in human neutrophils, a process which may either contribute to host defence or worsen disease severity, depending on the intensity of the inflammatory response during pneumococcal infection. PMID:26749379

  20. Identification of a Receptor for Extracellular Renalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Velazquez, Heino; Chang, John; Safirstein, Robert; Desir, Gary V.

    2015-01-01

    Background An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI) and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI) in wild type (WT) mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase. Methods and Results RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase. Conclusions PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling. PMID:25906147

  1. Identification of a receptor for extracellular renalase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI in wild type (WT mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase.RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase.PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling.

  2. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Homology Domain Is Essential for Activation of the A-Type Natriuretic Peptide Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Potter, Lincoln R.; Hunter, Tony

    1998-01-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A) is the biological receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Activation of the NPR-A guanylyl cyclase requires ANP binding to the extracellular domain and ATP binding to a putative site within its cytoplasmic region. The allosteric interaction of ATP with the intracellular kinase homology domain (KHD) is hypothesized to derepress the carboxyl-terminal guanylyl cyclase catalytic domain, resulting in the synthesis of the second messenger, cyclic GMP. H...

  3. Topological Domain Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents Topological Domain Theory as a powerful and flexible framework for denotational semantics. Topological Domain Theory models a wide range of type constructions and can interpret many computational features. Furthermore, it has close connections to established frameworks for denotational semantics, as well as to well-studied mathematical theories, such as topology and computable analysis.

  4. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  5. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  6. Extracellular superoxide dismutase attenuates release of pulmonary hyaluronan from the extracellular matrix following bleomycin exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Zelko, Igor N.; Folz, Rodney J

    2010-01-01

    The major pulmonary antioxidant enzyme involved in the protection of the lung interstitium from oxidative stress is extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD). It has been previously shown that EC-SOD knockout mice are more susceptible to bleomycin induced lung injury, however, the molecular mechanism(s) remains unclear. We report here that bleomycin-induced lung damage, in EC-SOD KO mice, is associated with increased hyaluronan release into alveolar fluid. Analysis of hyaluronan synthase ge...

  7. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    OpenAIRE

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C...

  8. The extracellular proteome of Rhizobium etli CE3 in exponential and stationary growth phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza-Hernández Guillermo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extracellular proteome or secretome of symbiotic bacteria like Rhizobium etli is presumed to be a key element of their infection strategy and survival. Rhizobia infect the roots of leguminous plants and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. To find out the possible role of secreted proteins we analyzed the extracellular proteome of R. etli CE3 in the exponential and stationary growth phases in minimal medium, supplemented with succinate-ammonium. Results The extracellular proteins were obtained by phenol extraction and identified by LC-ESI MS/MS. We identified 192 and 191 proteins for the exponential and stationary phases respectively. Using the software Signal P, we predicted signal peptides for 12.95% and 35.60% of the proteins identified in the exponential and stationary phases, respectively, which could therefore be secreted by the Sec pathway. For the exponential growth phase, we found in abundance proteins like the ribosomal proteins, toxins and proteins belonging to the group "defence mechanisms". For the stationary growth phase, we found that the most abundant proteins were those with unknown function, and in many of these we identified characteristic domains of proteases and peptidases. Conclusions Our study provided the first dataset of the secretome of R. etli and its modifications, which may lead to novel insights into the adaptive response of different stages of growth. In addition, we found a high number of proteins with unknown function; these proteins could be analyzed in future research to elucidate their role in the extracellular proteome of R. etli.

  9. The subunit structure of the extracellular hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. The hemoglobin of Biomphalaria glabrata was purified to homogeneity by a two step purification protocol using a gel filtration column (Superose 6 HR/Pharmacia ) followed by an anion exchange chromatography (MONO-Q Sepharose/Pharmacia). The dissociation products were analysed by a 5 - 15 % Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis containing Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS-PAGE) giving a band of 270 K Daltons and a band of 180 K Daltons after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol. The same profile was obtained in a 3.5 % Agarose gel electrophoresis containing SDS (SDS-AGE) showing additional bands of higher molecular weight. These bands were proposed to be monomers, dimers and trimers and, after reduction in a Bidimensional SDS-AGE, the proposed monomers and dimers were decomposed in two and four bands that were interpreted as 1 - 4 chains. The hemoglobin was digested by four different proteases ( Thrombin, Trypsin, Chymotrypsin and Subtilisin ) showing several equivalent fragments with molecular weights multiples of its minimum molecular weight ( 17.7 K Daltons). The circular dichroism spectrum of the protein showed a characteristic high α-helix content. We proposed that this hemoglobin is a pentamer of approx. 360 K Daltons subunits each formed by two 180 K Daltons chains linked in pairs by disulfide bridges and each of these chains comprises ten Heme binding domains. These data were compared to other Planorbidae extracellular hemoglobins. Up to now, the quaternary structure of this hemoglobin (shape and disposition of the subunits) is unknown. It is intended to elucidate its structure by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering in Brazilian National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (LNLS). (author)

  10. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  11. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corr...

  12. Crystal structure of cardiac troponin C regulatory domain in complex with cadmium and deoxycholic acid reveals novel conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alison Yueh; Lee, Jaeyong; Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Tibbits, Glen F; Paetzel, Mark

    2011-10-28

    The amino-terminal regulatory domain of cardiac troponin C (cNTnC) plays an important role as the calcium sensor for the troponin complex. Calcium binding to cNTnC results in conformational changes that trigger a cascade of events that lead to cardiac muscle contraction. The cardiac N-terminal domain of TnC consists of two EF-hand calcium binding motifs, one of which is dysfunctional in binding calcium. Nevertheless, the defunct EF-hand still maintains a role in cNTnC function. For its structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, human cNTnC with the wild-type primary sequence was crystallized under a novel crystallization condition. The crystal structure was solved by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure displays several novel features. Firstly, both EF-hand motifs coordinate cadmium ions derived from the crystallization milieu. Secondly, the ion coordination in the defunct EF-hand motif accompanies unusual changes in the protein conformation. Thirdly, deoxycholic acid, also derived from the crystallization milieu, is bound in the central hydrophobic cavity. This is reminiscent of the interactions observed for cardiac calcium sensitizer drugs that bind to the same core region and maintain the "open" conformational state of calcium-bound cNTnC. The cadmium ion coordination in the defunct EF-hand indicates that this vestigial calcium binding site retains the structural and functional elements that allow it to coordinate a cadmium ion. However, it is a result of, or concomitant with, large and unusual structural changes in cNTnC. PMID:21920370

  13. Feature-Level Domain Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Kouw, Wouter M.; Krijthe, Jesse H.; Loog, Marco; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Domain adaptation is the supervised learning setting in which the training and test data originate from different domains: the so-called source and target domains. In this paper, we propose and study a domain adaption approach, called feature-level domain adaptation (flda), that models the dependence between two domains by means of a feature-level transfer distribution. The domain adapted classifier is trained by minimizing the expected loss under this transfer distribution. Our empirical eva...

  14. Spatial and frequency domain ring source models for the single muscle fiber action potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Kaj-åge; R., Plonsey

    1994-01-01

    In the paper, single-fibre models for the extracellular action potential are developed that will allow the potential to the evaluated at an arbitrary field point in the extracellular space. Fourier-domain models are restricted in that they evaluate potentials at equidistant points along a line...... parallel to the fibre axis. Consequently, they cannot easily evaluate the potential at the boundary nodes of a boundary-element electrode model. The Fourier-domain models employ axial-symmetric ring source models, and thereby provide higher accuracy that the line source model, where the source is lumped...... examples including anisotropy show that the spatial models require extreme care in the integration procedure owing to the singularity in the weighting functions. With adequate sampling, the spatial models can evaluate extracellular potentials with high accuracy....

  15. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asti, Esterina; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Lee, Tae Hoon; Rak, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Brain tumors can be viewed as multicellular 'ecosystems' with increasingly recognized cellular complexity and systemic impact. While the emerging diversity of malignant disease entities affecting brain tissues is often described in reference to their signature alterations within the cellular genome and epigenome, arguably these cell-intrinsic changes can be regarded as hardwired adaptations to a variety of cell-extrinsic microenvironmental circumstances. Conversely, oncogenic events influence the microenvironment through their impact on the cellular secretome, including emission of membranous structures known as extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs serve as unique carriers of bioactive lipids, secretable and non-secretable proteins, mRNA, non-coding RNA, and DNA and constitute pathway(s) of extracellular exit of molecules into the intercellular space, biofluids, and blood. EVs are also highly heterogeneous as reflected in their nomenclature (exosomes, microvesicles, microparticles) attempting to capture their diverse origin, as well as structural, molecular, and functional properties. While EVs may act as a mechanism of molecular expulsion, their non-random uptake by heterologous cellular recipients defines their unique roles in the intercellular communication, horizontal molecular transfer, and biological activity. In the central nervous system, EVs have been implicated as mediators of homeostasis and repair, while in cancer they may act as regulators of cell growth, clonogenicity, angiogenesis, thrombosis, and reciprocal tumor-stromal interactions. EVs produced by specific brain tumor cell types may contain the corresponding oncogenic drivers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) in glioblastoma (and hence are often referred to as 'oncosomes'). Through this mechanism, mutant oncoproteins and nucleic acids may be transferred horizontally between cellular populations altering their individual and collective phenotypes. Oncogenic pathways

  16. Structure of the C-type lectin carbohydrate recognition domain of human tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Nielsen, B B; Rasmussen, H;

    1998-01-01

    Tetranectin (TN) is a C-type lectin involved in fibrinolysis, being the only endogenous ligand known to bind specifically to the kringle 4 domain of plasminogen. TN was originally isolated from plasma, but shows a wide tissue distribution. Furthermore, TN has been found in the extracellular matrix...

  17. Domain-Specific Multimodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessellund, Anders

    Enterprise systems are complex artifacts. They are hard to build, manage, understand, and evolve. Existing software development paradigms fail to properly address challenges such as system size, domain complexity, and software evolution when development is scaled to enterprise systems. We propose...... domain-specific multimodeling as a development paradigm to tackle these challenges in a language-oriented manner. The different concerns of a system are conceptually separated and made explicit as independent domain-specific languages. This approach increases productivity and quality by raising the...

  18. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  19. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension, formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows: pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  20. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  1. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  2. Relevance of extracellular DNA in rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramellara, Giacomo; Ascher, Judith; Baraniya, Divyashri; Arfaioli, Paola; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Hawes, Martha

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for future development is the manipulation of the rhizosphere to produce sustainable and efficient agriculture production systems. Using Omics approaches, to define the distinctive features of eDNA systems and structures, will facilitate progress in rhizo-enforcement and biocontrol studies. The relevance of these studies results clear when we consider the plethora of ecological functions in which eDNA is involved. This fraction can be actively extruded by living cells or discharged during cellular lysis and may exert a key role in the stability and variability of the soil bacterial genome, resulting also a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for plants due to the root's capacity to directly uptake short DNA fragments. The adhesive properties of the DNA molecule confer to eDNA the capacity to inhibit or kill pathogenic bacteria by cation limitation induction, and to facilitate formation of biofilm and extracellular traps (ETs), that may protect microorganisms inhabiting biofilm and plant roots against pathogens and allelopathic substances. The ETs are actively extruded by root border cells when they are dispersed in the rhizosphere, conferring to plants the capacity to extend an endogenous pathogen defence system outside the organism. Moreover, eDNA could be involved in rhizoremediation in heavy metal polluted soil acting as a bioflotation reagent.

  3. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; LIU Binbin; XIONG Jinshui; YAN Jingchun

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension,formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100 ℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows:pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  4. Tumorigenic potential of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, S; Hymowitz, M; Rollo, E E; Mann, R; Conner, C E; Cao, J; Foda, H D; Tompkins, D C; Toole, B P

    2001-06-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  5. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  6. Roles of extracellular matrix in follicular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F; Lavranos, T C; Irvine, C M; Krupa, M

    1999-01-01

    The cellular biology and changes in the extracellular matrix of ovarian follicles during their development are reviewed. During growth of the bovine ovarian follicle the follicular basal lamina doubles 19 times in surface area. It changes in composition, having collagen IV alpha 1-26 and laminin alpha 1, beta 2 and gamma 1 at the primordial stage, and collagen IV alpha 1 and alpha 2, reduced amounts of alpha 3-alpha 5, and a higher content of laminin alpha 1, beta 2 and gamma 1 at the antral stage. In atretic antral follicles laminin alpha 2 was also detected. The follicular epithelium also changes from one layer to many layers during follicular growth. It is clear that not all granulosal cells have equal potential to divide, and we have evidence that the granulosal cells arise from a population of stem cells. This finding has important ramifications and supports the concept that different follicular growth factors can act on different subsets of granulosal cells. In antral follicles, the replication of cells occurs in the middle layers of the membrana granulosa, with older granulosal cells towards the antrum and towards the basal lamina. The basal cells in the membrana granulosa have also been observed to vary in shape between follicies. In smaller antral follicles, they were either columnar or rounded, and in follicles > 5 mm the cells were all rounded. The reasons for these changes in matrix and cell shapes are discussed in relation to follicular development. PMID:10692866

  7. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  8. Conserved Domain Database (CDD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CDD is a protein annotation resource that consists of a collection of well-annotated multiple sequence alignment models for ancient domains and full-length proteins.

  9. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  10. Extracellular vesicles are the Trojan horses of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles have recently emerged as a novel mode of viral propagation exploited by both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. In particular non-enveloped viruses utilize the hosts' production of extracellular vesicles to exit from cells non-lytically and to hide and manipulate the immune system. Moreover, challenging the long held idea that viruses behave as independent genetic units, extracellular vesicles enable multiple viral particles and genomes to collectively traffic in and out of cells, which can promote genetic cooperativity among viral quasispecies and enhance the fitness of the overall viral population. PMID:27232382

  11. Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents: Differences in stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents (Gd-CA) are either linear or macrocyclic chelates available as ionic or non-ionic preparations. The molecular structure whether cyclic or linear and ionicity determines the stability of Gd-CA. Linear chelates are flexible open chains which do not offer a strong binding to Gd3+. In contrast, the macrocyclic chelates offer a strong binding to Gd3+ by the virtue of being preorganized rigid rings of almost optimal size to cage the gadolinium atom. Non-ionic preparations are also less stable in comparison to the ionic ones as the binding between Gd3+ with the negatively charged carboxyl groups is stronger in comparison to that with amides or alcohol in the non-ionic preparations. According to stability constants and kinetic measurements, the most stable Gd-CM is the ionic-macrocyclic chelate Gd-DOTA and the least stable agents are the non-ionic linear chelates gadodiamide and gadoversetamide. In vivo data confirmed the low stability of non-ionic linear chelates but no significant difference was observed amongst the macrocyclic agents whether ionic (Gd-DOTA) or non-ionic such as Gd-HP-DO3A and Gd-BT-DO3A. The stability of Gd-CA seems to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of the serious complication of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Gd-CA of low stability are likely to undergo transmetallation and release free Gd ions that deposit in tissue and attract circulating fibrocytes to initiate the process of fibrosis. No cases of NSF have been observed so far after the exclusive use of the stable macrocyclic Gd-CA

  12. Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents: Differences in stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, S.K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sameh.morcos@sth.nhs.uk

    2008-05-15

    Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents (Gd-CA) are either linear or macrocyclic chelates available as ionic or non-ionic preparations. The molecular structure whether cyclic or linear and ionicity determines the stability of Gd-CA. Linear chelates are flexible open chains which do not offer a strong binding to Gd{sup 3+}. In contrast, the macrocyclic chelates offer a strong binding to Gd{sup 3+} by the virtue of being preorganized rigid rings of almost optimal size to cage the gadolinium atom. Non-ionic preparations are also less stable in comparison to the ionic ones as the binding between Gd{sup 3+} with the negatively charged carboxyl groups is stronger in comparison to that with amides or alcohol in the non-ionic preparations. According to stability constants and kinetic measurements, the most stable Gd-CM is the ionic-macrocyclic chelate Gd-DOTA and the least stable agents are the non-ionic linear chelates gadodiamide and gadoversetamide. In vivo data confirmed the low stability of non-ionic linear chelates but no significant difference was observed amongst the macrocyclic agents whether ionic (Gd-DOTA) or non-ionic such as Gd-HP-DO3A and Gd-BT-DO3A. The stability of Gd-CA seems to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of the serious complication of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Gd-CA of low stability are likely to undergo transmetallation and release free Gd ions that deposit in tissue and attract circulating fibrocytes to initiate the process of fibrosis. No cases of NSF have been observed so far after the exclusive use of the stable macrocyclic Gd-CA.

  13. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  14. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  15. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  16. Starch‐binding domains in the CBM45 family – low‐affinity domains from glucan, water dikinase and α‐amylase involved in plastidial starch metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Baumann, Martin; Abou Hachem, Maher;

    2011-01-01

    organisms. Isolated domains from representatives of each of the two classes of enzyme carrying CBM45‐type domains, the Solanum tuberosumα‐glucan, water dikinase and the Arabidopsis thaliana plastidial α‐amylase 3, were expressed as recombinant proteins and characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry......Starch‐binding domains are noncatalytic carbohydrate‐binding modules that mediate binding to granular starch. The starch‐binding domains from the carbohydrate‐binding module family 45 (CBM45, ) are found as N‐terminal tandem repeats in a small number of enzymes, primarily from photosynthesizing...... extracellular microbial amylolytic enzymes. This suggests that low‐affinity starch‐binding domains are a recurring feature in plastidial starch metabolism, and supports the hypothesis that reversible binding, effectuated through low‐affinity interaction with starch granules, facilitates dynamic regulation of...

  17. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde;

    then employed digital image analysis to remove the bacterial biomass from the microscopic images and adequately calculate extracellular pH values. As a proof of concept, we monitored the extracellular pH drop in six replicate dental biofilms fermenting glucose. The observed pH drops differed between...... been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit to monitor horizontal pH gradients in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic techniques, such as fluorescence lifetime imaging or p...... differ considerably, and only extracellular pH in dental biofilms affects the underlying tooth. We here developed a method to reliably monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilm microscopically with the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4. Fluorescent emissions of CSNARF- 4 can be used to calculate...

  18. EVpedia : A community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Kyong Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I.; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W.; Christina Gross, Julia; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Hill, Michelle M.; Nolte-'T Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; Van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, Francois; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N.; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Roh, Tae Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stepień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yánez-Mó, Maria; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. Results: We prese

  19. Extracellular Neurotransmitter Receptor Clustering: Think Outside the Box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kneussel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Postsynaptic submembrane scaffolds cluster neurotransmitter receptors through intracellular protein-protein interactions. Growing evidence supports the view that extracellular factors can be almost as important to trigger synaptic receptor aggregation.

  20. Genome degeneration affects both extracellular and intracellular bacterial endosymbionts

    OpenAIRE

    Feldhaar, Heike; Gross, Roy

    2009-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterial endosymbionts of insects are a paradigm for reductive genome evolution. A study published recently in BMC Biology demonstrates that similar evolutionary forces shaping genome structure may also apply to extracellular endosymbionts.

  1. Rhizobium leguminosarum mutants incapable of normal extracellular polysaccharide production.

    OpenAIRE

    Napoli, C; Albersheim, P

    1980-01-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium leguminosarum which are deficient in normal polysaccharide production have been isolated and characterized. A correlation between diminished production of extracellular polysaccharide and reduced infection and nodulation efficiency has been observed.

  2. [Extracellular vesicles and their role in hematological malignancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepiel, Andrea; Kutszegi, Nóra; Cs Sági, Judit; Kelemen, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; F Semsei, Ágnes; Buzás, Edit; Erdélyi, Dániel János

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are produced in all organisms. The most intensively investigated categories of extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. Among a very wide range of areas, their role has been confirmed in intercellular communication, immune response and angiogenesis (in both physiological and pathological conditions). Their alterations suggest the potential use of them as biomarkers. In this paper the authors give an insight into the research of extracellular vesicles in general, and then focus on published findings in hematological malignancies. Quantitative and qualitative changes of microvesicles and exosomes may have value in diagnostics, prognostics and minimal residual disease monitoring of hematological malignancies. The function of extracellular vesicles in downregulation of natural killer cells' activity has been demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, microvesicles seem to play a role in drug resistance. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1379-1384. PMID:27569460

  3. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  4. Domain Theory for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mikkel

    Concurrent computation can be given an abstract mathematical treatment very similar to that provided for sequential computation by domain theory and denotational semantics of Scott and Strachey. A simple domain theory for concurrency is presented. Based on a categorical model of linear logic and...... nondeterministic dataflow. The domain theory can be generalised to presheaf models, providing a more refined treatment of nondeterministic branching and supporting notions of bisimulation. The operational semantics for HOPLA is guided by the idea that derivations of transitions in the operational semantics should...... correspond to elements of the presheaf denotations. Similar guidelines lead to an operational semantics for the first-order fragment of Affine HOPLA. An extension of the operational semantics to the full language is based on a stable denotational semantics which associates to each computation the minimal...

  5. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  6. Extracellular Recordings of Field Potentials from Single Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey L.; Cooper, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Open microfluidic channels were used to separate the extracellular space around a cardiomyocyte into three compartments: the cell ends and a central partition (insulating gap). The microchannels were filled with buffer solution and overlaid with paraffin oil, thus forming the cavities for the cell ends. The central part of the cardiomyocyte rested on the partition between two adjacent microchannels and was entirely surrounded by the paraffin oil. This arrangement increased the extracellular e...

  7. Role of extracellular DNA in Candida albicans biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Margarida; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2009-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix in bacterial biofilms. However, in Candida albicans there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (ecDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. The main objective of this work was to examine the effect of Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase) treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm as indicators of the role of ecDNA in biofilm structure and developm...

  8. The Interaction of Thrombospondins with Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Kemin; Lawler, Jack William

    2009-01-01

    The thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of five matricellular proteins that appear to function as adapter molecules to guide extracellular matrix synthesis and tissue remodeling in a variety of normal and disease settings. Various TSPs have been shown to bind to fibronectin, laminin, matrilins, collagens and other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The importance of TSP-1 in this context is underscored by the fact that it is rapidly deposited at the sites of tissue damage by platelets. An a...

  9. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Marlise I.; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H. S.; Campanella, Osvaldo H.; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria...

  10. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Marlise eKlein; Geelsu eHwang; Paulo eSantos; Osvaldo eCampanella; Hyun eKoo

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria....

  11. Extracellular slime associated with Proteus mirabilis during swarming.

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, S. J.; Stewart, K R; Williams, F. D.

    1983-01-01

    Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to visualize the extracellular slime of Proteus mirabilis swarm cells. Slime was observed with phase-contrast microscopy after fixation in hot sulfuric acid-sodium borate. Ruthenium red was used to stain slime for transmission electron microscopy. Copious quantities of extracellular slime were observed surrounding swarm cells; the slime appeared to provide a matrix through which the cells could migr...

  12. Extracellular and membrane-bound proteases from Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mäntsälä, P; Zalkin, H

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis YY88 synthesizes increased amounts of extracellular and membrane-bound proteases. More than 99% of the extracellular protease activity is accounted for by an alkaline serine protease and a neutral metalloprotease. An esterase having low protease activity accounts for less than 1% of the secreted protease. These enzymes were purified to homogeneity. Molecular weights of approximately 28,500 and 39,500 were determined for the alkaline and neutral proteases, respectively. The e...

  13. Production Of Extracellular Enzymes By Some Soil Yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Falih, A. M. [عبد الله مساعد خلف الفالح

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of soil yeasts, Geotrichum candidum, Geotrichum capitatum and Williopsis californica to produce extracellular enzymes (amylase, cellulase and protease) in vitro compared with that of a laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It appears that the soil yeasts studied here were less amylolytic yeasts except the yeast G. candidum, which was highly effective at extracellular amylase production. The soil yeast W. californica was an average producer of cellu...

  14. Extracellular Ligninolytic Enzymes in Bjerkandera adusta and Lentinus squarrosulus

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Astha; Upadhyay, R. C.; Singh, Surendra

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular ligninolytic enzyme activities were determined in two white-rot fungi, Bjerkandera adusta and Lentinus squarrosulus. To investigate the activity of extracellular enzymes, cultures were incubated over a period of 20 days in nutrient rich medium (NRM) and nutrient poor medium under static and shaking conditions. Enzymatic activity was varied with media and their incubation conditions. The highest level of Aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO) was detected under shaking condition of both medi...

  15. Regulation of intracellular signaling by extracellular glycan remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Randy B.; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is coated with carbohydrates. By virtue of their extracellular position and recognizable chemical features, cell surface glycans mediate many receptor-ligand interactions. Recently, mammalian extracellular hydrolytic enzymes have been shown to modify the structure of cell surface glycans and consequently, alter their binding properties. These cell surface glycan remodeling events can cause rapid changes in critical signal transduction phenomena. This re...

  16. Dopamine transporters govern diurnal variation in extracellular dopamine tone

    OpenAIRE

    Ferris, Mark J.; España, Rodrigo A.; Locke, Jason L.; Konstantopoulos, Joanne K.; Rose, Jamie H.; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism for diurnal (i.e., light/dark) oscillations in extracellular dopamine tone in mesolimbic and nigrostriatal systems is unknown. This is because, unlike other neurotransmitter systems, variation in dopamine tone does not correlate with variation in dopamine cell firing. The current research pinpoints the dopamine transporter as a critical governor of diurnal variation in both extracellular dopamine tone and the intracellular availability of releasable dopamine. These data describe...

  17. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  19. Large domain graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xuesong; Magnuson, Carl W.; Venugopal, Archana; Vogel, Eric M.; Rodney S. Ruoff; Colombo, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition has received a lot of attention recently owing to the ease with which large area films can be grown, but growth of large domain or equivalently large grain size has not been reported yet. In this brevia, we report on a CVD process that yields graphene with domains of hundreds of micrometers, by very low pressure CVD, less than 50 mTorr, and very low precursor flow rates using methane as the source of carbon on the inside of copper foil enclosures a...

  20. Extracellular magnesium and calcium blockers modulate macrophage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libako, Patrycja; Nowacki, Wojciech; Castiglioni, Sara; Mazur, Andrzej; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, partly because it antagonizes calcium (Ca) and inhibits L-type Ca channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of different concentrations of extracellular Mg, with or without Ca-channel blockers, in macrophages. A macrophage-like cell line J774.E was cultured in different concentrations of extracellular Mg and exposed to i) the phorbol ester PMA to induce the production of reactive oxygen species ii) lipopolysaccharide to induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, or iii) ovalbumin to study endocytosis. The Ca antagonists verapamil and/or TMB-8 were used to interfere with Ca homeostasis. Different concentrations of extracellular Mg did not impact on endocytosis, while Ca antagonists markedly decreased it. Low extracellular Mg exacerbated, whereas Ca antagonists inhibited, PMA-induced production of free radicals. Ca blockers prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription and release of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, while extracellular Mg had only a marginal effect. Ca channel inhibitors markedly reduced the activity of J774.E cells, thus underscoring the critical role of Ca in the non-specific immune response, a role which was, in some instances, also modulated by extracellular Mg. PMID:27160489

  1. Cyanobacterial reuse of extracellular organic carbon in microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Rhona K; Mayali, Xavier; Lee, Jackson Z; Craig Everroad, R; Hwang, Mona; Bebout, Brad M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacterial organic matter excretion is crucial to carbon cycling in many microbial communities, but the nature and bioavailability of this C depend on unknown physiological functions. Cyanobacteria-dominated hypersaline laminated mats are a useful model ecosystem for the study of C flow in complex communities, as they use photosynthesis to sustain a more or less closed system. Although such mats have a large C reservoir in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), the production and degradation of organic carbon is not well defined. To identify extracellular processes in cyanobacterial mats, we examined mats collected from Elkhorn Slough (ES) at Monterey Bay, California, for glycosyl and protein composition of the EPS. We found a prevalence of simple glucose polysaccharides containing either α or β (1,4) linkages, indicating distinct sources of glucose with differing enzymatic accessibility. Using proteomics, we identified cyanobacterial extracellular enzymes, and also detected activities that indicate a capacity for EPS degradation. In a less complex system, we characterized the EPS of a cyanobacterial isolate from ES, ESFC-1, and found the extracellular composition of biofilms produced by this unicyanobacterial culture were similar to that of natural mats. By tracing isotopically labeled EPS into single cells of ESFC-1, we demonstrated rapid incorporation of extracellular-derived carbon. Taken together, these results indicate cyanobacteria reuse excess organic carbon, constituting a dynamic pool of extracellular resources in these mats. PMID:26495994

  2. Ingression Progression Complexes Control Extracellular Matrix Remodelling during Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Arcones, Irene; Sacristan, Carlos; Filali-Mouncef, Yasmina; Roncero, Cesar; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells must coordinate contraction of the actomyosin ring at the division site together with ingression of the plasma membrane and remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to support cytokinesis, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In eukaryotes, glycosyltransferases that synthesise ECM polysaccharides are emerging as key factors during cytokinesis. The budding yeast chitin synthase Chs2 makes the primary septum, a special layer of the ECM, which is an essential process during cell division. Here we isolated a group of actomyosin ring components that form complexes together with Chs2 at the cleavage site at the end of the cell cycle, which we named ‘ingression progression complexes’ (IPCs). In addition to type II myosin, the IQGAP protein Iqg1 and Chs2, IPCs contain the F-BAR protein Hof1, and the cytokinesis regulators Inn1 and Cyk3. We describe the molecular mechanism by which chitin synthase is activated by direct association of the C2 domain of Inn1, and the transglutaminase-like domain of Cyk3, with the catalytic domain of Chs2. We used an experimental system to find a previously unanticipated role for the C-terminus of Inn1 in preventing the untimely activation of Chs2 at the cleavage site until Cyk3 releases the block on Chs2 activity during late mitosis. These findings support a model for the co-ordinated regulation of cell division in budding yeast, in which IPCs play a central role. PMID:26891268

  3. Extracellular heat shock protein 90 binding to TGFβ receptor I participates in TGFβ-mediated collagen production in myocardial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Raquel; Merino, David; Gómez, Jenny M; Nistal, J Francisco; Hurlé, María A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Villar, Ana V

    2016-10-01

    The pathological remodeling heart shows an increase in left ventricular mass and an excess of extracellular matrix deposition that can over time cause heart failure. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is the main cytokine controlling this process. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to play a critical role in TGFβ signaling by stabilizing the TGFβ signaling cascade. We detected extracellular Hsp90 in complex with TGFβ receptor I (TGFβRI) in fibroblasts and determined a close proximity between both proteins suggesting a potential physical interaction between the two at the plasma membrane. This was supported by in silico studies predicting Hsp90 dimers and TGFβRI extracellular domain interaction. Both, Hsp90aa1 and Hsp90ab1 isoforms participate in TGFβRI complex. Extracellular Hsp90 inhibition lessened the yield of collagen production as well as the canonical TGFβ signaling cascade, and collagen protein synthesis was drastically reduced in Hsp90aa1 KO mice. These observations together with the significant increase in activity of Hsp90 at the plasma membrane pointed to a functional cooperative partnership between Hsp90 and TGFβRI in the fibrotic process. We propose that a surface population of Hsp90 extracellularly binds TGFβRI and this complex behaves as an active participant in collagen production in TGFβ-activated fibroblasts. We also offer an in vivo insight into the role of Hsp90 and its isoforms during cardiac remodeling in murine aortic banding model suffering from pathological cardiac remodeling and detect circulating Hsp90 overexpressed in remodeling mice. PMID:27418101

  4. Atomic Pseudo-Valuation Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Stines, Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-valuation domains have been studied since their introduction in 1978 by Hedstrom and Houston. Related objects, boundary valuation domains, were introduced by Maney in 2004. Here, it is shown that the class of atomic pseudo-valuation domains coincides with the class of boundary valuation domains. It is also shown that power series rings and generalized power series rings give examples of pseudo-valuation domains whose congruence lattices can be characterized. The paper also introduces, and makes use of, a sufficient condition on the group of divisibility of a domain to guarantee that it is a pseudo-valuation domain.

  5. The Crystal Structure of the Heparin-Binding Reelin-N Domain of F-Spondin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Liu, Jin-huan; Lawler, Jack; Wang, Jia-huai (BIDMC); (DFCI)

    2008-09-23

    The extracellular matrix protein F-spondin mediates axon guidance during neuronal development. Its N-terminal domain, termed the reelin-N domain, is conserved in F-spondins, reelins, and other extracellular matrix proteins. In this study, a recombinant human reelin-N domain has been expressed, purified, and shown to bind heparin. The crystal structure of the reelin-N domain resolved to 2.0 {angstrom} reveals a variant immunoglobulin-like fold and potential heparin-binding sites. Substantial conformational variations even in secondary structure are observed between the two chemically identical reelin-N domains in one crystallographic asymmetric unit. The variations may result from extensive, highly specific interactions across the interface of the two reelin-N domains. The calculated values of buried surface area and the interface's shape complementarity are consistent with the formation of a weak dimer. The homophilic asymmetric dimer can potentially offer advantages in binding to ligands such as glycosaminoglycans, which may, in turn, bridge the two reelin-N domains and stabilize the dimer.

  6. Domain: Labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Mulders, J.; Wadensjö, E.; Hasselhorn, H.M.; Apt, W.

    2015-01-01

    This domain chapter is dedicated to summarize research on the effects of labour market contextual factors on labour market participation of older workers (aged 50+) and identify research gaps. While employment participation and the timing of (early) retirement is often modelled as an individual deci

  7. Skyrmions and domain walls

    OpenAIRE

    Piette, B.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the 3+1 dimensional Skyrme model with a mass term different from the usual one. We show that this new model possesses domain walls solutions. We describe how, in the equivalent 2+1 dimensional model, the Skyrmion is absorbed by the wall.

  8. Content and persistence of extracellular DNA in native soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The long-term persistence of soil extracellular DNA is questionable because of high potential activity of nucleases produced by soil microorganisms. By the other hand, the relative persistence of DNA-like biopolymers could be due to their adsorption on clay minerals and humus substances in soil. High-specific and ultra sensitive reagent PicoGreenTM (Molecular Probes) permits the quantitative assessment of microbial dsDNA in diluted soil extracts giving a good tool for tracing the DNA fate in soil. Our goal was to determine intracellular and extracellular DNA content in cambisol (loamy sand) and in chernozem (silty loam) soils and to investigate the possible adsorption and degradation of extracellular DNA in soil. Optimized procedure of mechanical and enzymatic destruction of cell walls was used for direct extraction of microbial DNA with Tris-EDTA buffer (Blagodatskaya et al., 2003). Extracellular dsDNA was determined in distilled water and in Tris-EDTA extracts without enzymatic or mechanical treatments. DNA content was determined after addition of PicoGreen to diluted soil extracts. Degradation of extracellular DNA was traced during 24 h incubation of 2 µg lambda-phage DNA in soil. Possible DNA adsorption to soil matrix was determined by recovery of lambda -phage DNA added to autoclaved soil. Extracellular dsDNA was absent in water extracts of both soils. The content of extracellular dsDNA extracted by Tris-EDTA buffer was 0.46 µg/g in chernozem and 1.59 µg/g in cambisol amounting 0.43 and 2.8% of total dsDNA content in these soils, respectively. 100% and 64.8% of added extracellular lambda -phage dsDNA was found in cambisol and chernozem soils, respectively, in 5 h after application. 39% and 73.5% of added DNA disappeared in cambisol and in chernozem, respectively, during 24 h incubation. Degradation rate of extracellular DNA depended on microbial biomass content, which was 2.5 times higher in chernozem as compared to cambisol. Maximum adsorption of DNA by

  9. Heat treatment of peach fruit: modifications in the extracellular compartment and identification of novel extracellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Claudia A; Budde, Claudio O; Borsani, Julia; Lombardo, Verónica A; Lauxmann, Martin A; Andreo, Carlos S; Lara, María V; Drincovich, María F

    2012-11-01

    Ripening of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) fruit is accompanied by dramatic cell wall changes that lead to softening. Post-harvest heat treatment is effective in delaying softening and preventing some chilling injury symptoms that this fruit exhibits after storage at low temperatures. In the present work, the levels of twelve transcripts encoding proteins involved in cell wall metabolism, as well as the differential extracellular proteome, were examined after a post-harvest heat treatment (HT; 39 °C for 3 days) of "Dixiland" peach fruit. A typical softening behaviour, in correlation with an increase in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase-1 (PpACO1), was observed for peach maintained at 20 °C for 3 days (R3). Six transcripts encoding proteins involved in cell wall metabolism significantly increased in R3 with respect to peach at harvest, while six showed no modification or even decreased. In contrast, after HT, fruit maintained their firmness, exhibiting low PpACO1 level and significant lower levels of the twelve cell wall-modifying genes than in R3. Differential proteomic analysis of apoplastic proteins during softening and after HT revealed a significant decrease of DUF642 proteins after HT; as well as an increase of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) after softening. The presence of GAPC in the peach extracellular matrix was further confirmed by in situ immunolocalization and transient expression in tomato fruit. Though further studies are required to establish the function of DUF642 and GAPC in the apoplast, this study contributes to a deeper understanding of the events during peach softening and after HT with a focus on this key compartment. PMID:22902552

  10. Fuzzy Bases of Fuzzy Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Sanping Rao; Qingguo Li

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to develop quantitative domain theory over frames. Firstly, we propose the notion of a fuzzy basis, and several equivalent characterizations of fuzzy bases are obtained. Furthermore, the concept of a fuzzy algebraic domain is introduced, and a relationship between fuzzy algebraic domains and fuzzy domains is discussed from the viewpoint of fuzzy basis. We finally give an application of fuzzy bases, where the image of a fuzzy domain can be preserved under some special ...

  11. Atomic Pseudo-Valuation Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Stines, Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-valuation domains have been studied since their introduction in 1978 by Hedstrom and Houston. Related objects, boundary valuation domains, were introduced by Maney in 2004. Here, it is shown that the class of atomic pseudo-valuation domains coincides with the class of boundary valuation domains. It is also shown that power series rings and generalized power series rings give examples of pseudo-valuation domains whose congruence lattices can be characterized. The paper also introduces, ...

  12. Cross-Domain Sparse Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Sparse coding has shown its power as an effective data representation method. However, up to now, all the sparse coding approaches are limited within the single domain learning problem. In this paper, we extend the sparse coding to cross domain learning problem, which tries to learn from a source domain to a target domain with significant different distribution. We impose the Maximum Mean Discrepancy (MMD) criterion to reduce the cross-domain distribution difference of sparse codes, and also ...

  13. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  14. Interaction with Shc prevents aberrant Erk activation in the absence of extracellular stimuli

    KAUST Repository

    Suen, KinMan

    2013-05-01

    Control mechanisms that prevent aberrant signaling are necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis. We describe a new mechanism by which the adaptor protein Shc directly binds the MAP kinase Erk, thus preventing its activation in the absence of extracellular stimuli. The Shc-Erk complex restricts Erk nuclear translocation, restraining Erk-dependent transcription of genes, including those responsible for oncogenic growth. The complex forms through unique binding sites on both the Shc PTB domain and the N-terminal lobe of Erk. Upon receptor tyrosine kinase stimulation, a conformational change within Shc - induced through interaction with the phosphorylated receptor - releases Erk, allowing it to fulfill its role in signaling. Thus, in addition to its established role in promoting MAP kinase signaling in stimulated cells, Shc negatively regulates Erk activation in the absence of growth factors and thus could be considered a tumor suppressor in human cells. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  16. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced

  17. Chemical shift assignments of the fibronectin III like domains 7-8 of type VII collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Seeger, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Type VII collagen (Col7) is important for skin stability. This is underlined by the severe skin blistering phenotype in the Col7 related diseases dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). Col7 has a large N-terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) that is followed by the triple helical collagenous domain. The NC1 domain has subdomains with homology to adhesion molecules and mediates important interactions within the extracellular matrix. An 185 amino acid long part of the NC1-subdomain termed fibronectin III like domains 7 and 8 (FNIII7-8) was investigated. Antibodies against this region are pathogenic in a mouse model of EBA and one reported missense mutations of Col7 lies within these domains. The nearly complete NMR resonance assignment of recombinant FNIII7-8 of Col7 is reported. PMID:26364055

  18. Evidence That the Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH) Receptor Transmembrane Domain Influences Kinetics of TSH Binding to the Receptor Ectodomain*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.; Rapoport, Basil

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-induced reduction in ligand binding affinity (negative cooperativity) requires TSH receptor (TSHR) homodimerization, the latter involving primarily the transmembrane domain (TMD) but with the extracellular domain (ECD) also contributing to this association. To test the role of the TMD in negative cooperativity, we studied the TSHR ECD tethered to the cell surface by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that multimerizes despite the absence of the TMD. ...

  19. Regulation of Adherence and Virulence by the Entamoeba histolytica Lectin Cytoplasmic Domain, Which Contains a β2 Integrin Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Vines, Richard R.; Ramakrishnan, Girija; Rogers, Joshua B.; Lockhart, Lauren A.; Mann, Barbara J.; Petri, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Killing of human cells by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica requires adherence via an amebic cell surface lectin. Lectin activity in the parasite is regulated by inside-out signaling. The lectin cytoplasmic domain has sequence identity with a region of the β2 integrin cytoplasmic tail implicated in regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion. Intracellular expression of a fusion protein containing the cytoplasmic domain of the lectin has a dominant negative effect on extracellular lectin-mediat...

  20. Mutational Analysis of Intracellular Loops Identify Cross Talk with Nucleotide Binding Domains of Yeast ABC Transporter Cdr1p

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The ABC transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p) of Candida albicans, which plays a major role in antifungal resistance, has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) that are interconnected by extracellular (ECLs) and intracellular (ICLs) loops. To examine the communication interface between the NBDs and ICLs of Cdr1p, we subjected all four ICLs to alanine scanning mutagenesis, replacing each of the 85 residues with an alanine. The resulting ICL mutant library was an...

  1. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest;

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer...... is above 100%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has...

  2. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the extra-cellular space affects proliferation, differentiation and morphogenetic events regulated by the two molecules

    OpenAIRE

    R. Scardigli; Cargiolo, C; Tosoni, D.; Borello, U; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Sciorati, C.; Cannata, S.; E. Clementi; Brunelli, S.; Cossu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh) to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane rece...

  3. The extracellular matrix modulates the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, Michael W; Mouw, Janna K; Weaver, Valerie M

    2014-12-01

    The extracellular matrix regulates tissue development and homeostasis, and its dysregulation contributes to neoplastic progression. The extracellular matrix serves not only as the scaffold upon which tissues are organized but provides critical biochemical and biomechanical cues that direct cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation and modulate vascular development and immune function. Thus, while genetic modifications in tumor cells undoubtedly initiate and drive malignancy, cancer progresses within a dynamically evolving extracellular matrix that modulates virtually every behavioral facet of the tumor cells and cancer-associated stromal cells. Hanahan and Weinberg defined the hallmarks of cancer to encompass key biological capabilities that are acquired and essential for the development, growth and dissemination of all human cancers. These capabilities include sustained proliferation, evasion of growth suppression, death resistance, replicative immortality, induced angiogenesis, initiation of invasion, dysregulation of cellular energetics, avoidance of immune destruction and chronic inflammation. Here, we argue that biophysical and biochemical cues from the tumor-associated extracellular matrix influence each of these cancer hallmarks and are therefore critical for malignancy. We suggest that the success of cancer prevention and therapy programs requires an intimate understanding of the reciprocal feedback between the evolving extracellular matrix, the tumor cells and its cancer-associated cellular stroma. PMID:25381661

  4. Vitamin A Deficiency and Alterations in the Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Barber

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A or retinol which is the natural precursor of several biologically active metabolites can be considered the most multifunctional vitamin in mammals. Its deficiency is currently, along with protein malnutrition, the most serious and common nutritional disorder worldwide. It is necessary for normal embryonic development and postnatal tissue homeostasis, and exerts important effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These actions are produced mainly by regulating the expression of a variety of proteins through transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Extracellular matrix proteins are among those whose synthesis is known to be modulated by vitamin A. Retinoic acid, the main biologically active form of vitamin A, influences the expression of collagens, laminins, entactin, fibronectin, elastin and proteoglycans, which are the major components of the extracellular matrix. Consequently, the structure and macromolecular composition of this extracellular compartment is profoundly altered as a result of vitamin A deficiency. As cell behavior, differentiation and apoptosis, and tissue mechanics are influenced by the extracellular matrix, its modifications potentially compromise organ function and may lead to disease. This review focuses on the effects of lack of vitamin A in the extracellular matrix of several organs and discusses possible molecular mechanisms and pathologic implications.

  5. Domain-specific languages

    OpenAIRE

    Jasný, Vojtěch

    2009-01-01

    The topic of the thesis are domain-specific languages (DSL) and their use in software development. The target audience are developers interested in learning more about this progressive area of software development. It starts with a necessary theoretical introduction to programming languages. Then, a classification of DSLs is given and software development methodologies based on DSLs are described, notably Language Oriented Programming and Intentional Programming. Another important piece in co...

  6. Implementing maritime domain awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    CHDS State/Local As an attempt to gain understanding of everything in the global maritime environment that can impact the security of the United States, the Maritime Domain Awareness initiative is one of the most ambitious projects ever undertaken by the U.S. government. Information that falls under the prevue of MDA is tremendously diverse and complex, having application in the regulatory, law enforcement, and military arenas. As such, MDA is a multi-agency effort that encompasses 16 resp...

  7. Extracellular proteome of Trichoderma harzianum to identify proteins with biotechnological value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ambrosino P; Lorito M; Scala V; Marra R; Vinale F; Soriente I; Ferraioli S; Carbone V; Ruocco M; Woo S L

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichoderma harzianum strain T22 parasitizes and controls many phytopatogenic fungi and is applied commercially as biological control agent. The production of hydrolitic enzymes appears to be a key factor in the parasitic process. We tested the endo-esochitinolitic and glucanolitic activities of culture filtrates of T22 grown under carbon and nitrogen starvation or in presence of biomass or cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea , Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum. The highest level of enzimatic activities was found in culture where the mycoparasite interacted with a phytopathogenic fungus. Therefore we used a proteomic approach to investigate changes in the complex mixture of extracellular proteins secreted by T. harzianum strain T22 in order to identify proteins of potential biotechnology value for commercial and industrial use. Proteome technology has greatly enhanced our ability to conduct functional genomics studies. Nevertheless only a few studies have been published so far on the fungal extracellular proteome. Sample preparation remains the most critical step in analyses based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and it requires to be optimized for each specific application. In this study, our first aim was to set up the extraction protocol of the extracellular proteins secreted by T . harzianum strain T22 when it was grown in vitro . The secreted proteins were analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and substantial changes in the extracellular proteome of the mycoparasite have been observed. Comparing the 2D maps of the fungus grown in minimal medium with glycerol as carbon source (used as control condition) with those obtained in inducing conditions, a lot of novel proteins appeared. The higher number of novel and upregulated spots was obtained in the presence of Rhizoctonia solani biomass. Other spots were specifically up-regulated by the interaction with different plant pathogens. Differentially expressed

  8. Domain decomposition method for solving elliptic problems in unbounded domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational aspects of the box domain decomposition (DD) method for solving boundary value problems in an unbounded domain are discussed. A new variant of the DD-method for elliptic problems in unbounded domains is suggested. It is based on the partitioning of an unbounded domain adapted to the given asymptotic decay of an unknown function at infinity. The comparison of computational expenditures is given for boundary integral method and the suggested DD-algorithm. 29 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Comparison of the domain and frequency domain state feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present explicitly the equivalence of the time domain and frequency domain state feedbacks, as well as the dynamic state feedback and a modified frequency domain state feedback, from the closed-loop transfer function point of view. The difference of the two approaches is also shown

  10. On Free Z-domains%自由Z-domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚丽娟; 徐晓泉

    2011-01-01

    给出由偏序集生成的自由Z-domain,讨论自由Z-domain和偏序集的Dedekind-MacNeille完备化的一些性质.%The free Z-domains generated by posets are given.Some properties of tte free Z-domains and the Dedekind-MacNeille completions of posets are investigated.

  11. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  12. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  13. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    to various persistent infections in humans and animals, and to a variety of complications in industry, where solid–water interfaces occur. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation is necessary for creating strategies to control biofilms. Recent studies have shown that......Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, leads...... extracellular DNA is an important component of the extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms. The present chapter is focussed on extracellular DNA as matrix component in biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an example from the Gram-negative bacteria, and Streptococcus and Staphylococcus as examples...

  14. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  15. Basic Components of Connective Tissues and Extracellular Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kjær, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant components of the extracellular matrix and many types of soft tissues. Elastin is another major component of certain soft tissues, such as arterial walls and ligaments. Many other molecules, though lower in quantity, function as essential components...... network. Laminins contribute to the structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular functions such as adhesion, differentiation, migration, stability of phenotype, and resistance towards apoptosis. Though the primary role of fibrinogen is in clot formation, after conversion to fibrin...... by thrombin, it also binds to a variety of compounds, particularly to various growth factors, and as such fibrinogen is a player in cardiovascular and extracellular matrix physiology. Elastin, an insoluble polymer of the monomeric soluble precursor tropoelastin, is the main component of elastic fibers...

  16. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  17. Drosophila eiger mutants are sensitive to extracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Schneider

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We showed previously that eiger, the Drosophila tumor necrosis factor homolog, contributes to the pathology induced by infection with Salmonella typhimurium. We were curious whether eiger is always detrimental in the context of infection or if it plays a role in fighting some types of microbes. We challenged wild-type and eiger mutant flies with a collection of facultative intracellular and extracellular pathogens, including a fungus and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The response of eiger mutants divided these microbes into two groups: eiger mutants are immunocompromised with respect to extracellular pathogens but show no change or reduced sensitivity to facultative intracellular pathogens. Hence, eiger helps fight infections but also can cause pathology. We propose that eiger activates the cellular immune response of the fly to aid clearance of extracellular pathogens. Intracellular pathogens, which can already defeat professional phagocytes, are unaffected by eiger.

  18. Extracellular Protease Activity of Enteropathogenic Escherechia coli on Mucin Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI BUDIARTI

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC causes gastrointestinal infections in human. EPEC invasion was initiated by attachment and aggressive colonization on intestinal surface. Attachment of EPEC alter the intestine mucosal cells. Despite this, the pathogenic mechanism of EPEC infectior has not been fully understood. This research hypothesizes that extracellular proteolytic enzymes is necessary for EPEC colonization. The enzyme is secreted into gastrointestinal milieu and presumably destroy mucus layer cover the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to assay EPEC extracellular protease enzyme by using mucin substrate. The activity of EPEC extracellular proteolytic enzyme on 1% mucin substrate was investigated. Non-pathogenic E. coli was used as a negative control. Positive and tentative controls were Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella. Ten EPEC strains were assayed, seven of them were able to degrade mucin, and the highest activity was produced by K1.1 strain. Both positive and tentative controls also showed the ability to digest 0.20% mucin.

  19. Various domains of the B-cell regulatory molecule CD72 has diverged at different rates in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Cathrine Bie; Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Fredholm, Merete;

    2007-01-01

    highly transcribed in lymph node, thymus and lung tissues as well as in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The predicted porcine CD72 polypeptide shows conservation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs and an extracellular C-type lectin domain. Compared to CD72 sequences from other mammals as...

  20. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmanova, Maria; Osidak, Egor; Domogatsky, Sergey; Rodin, Sergey; Domogatskaya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity), viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D) and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement), and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems. PMID:26351461

  1. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Akhmanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity, viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement, and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems.

  2. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Iraci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain.

  3. Polyunsaturated Lipids Regulate Membrane Domain Stability by Tuning Membrane Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Lorent, Joseph H; Lin, Xubo; Skinkle, Allison D; Surma, Michal A; Stockenbojer, Emily A; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Levental, Ilya

    2016-04-26

    The plasma membrane (PM) serves as the functional interface between a cell and its environment, hosting extracellular signal transduction and nutrient transport among a variety of other processes. To support this extensive functionality, PMs are organized into lateral domains, including ordered, lipid-driven assemblies termed lipid rafts. Although the general requirements for ordered domain formation are well established, how these domains are regulated by cell-endogenous mechanisms or exogenous perturbations has not been widely addressed. In this context, an intriguing possibility is that dietary fats can incorporate into membrane lipids to regulate the properties and physiology of raft domains. Here, we investigate the effects of polyunsaturated fats on the organization of membrane domains across a spectrum of membrane models, including computer simulations, synthetic lipid membranes, and intact PMs isolated from mammalian cells. We observe that the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid is robustly incorporated into membrane lipids, and this incorporation leads to significant remodeling of the PM lipidome. Across model systems, docosahexaenoic acid-containing lipids enhance the stability of ordered raft domains by increasing the order difference between them and coexisting nonraft domains. The relationship between interdomain order disparity and the stability of phase separation holds for a spectrum of different perturbations, including manipulation of cholesterol levels and high concentrations of exogenous amphiphiles, suggesting it as a general feature of the organization of biological membranes. These results demonstrate that polyunsaturated fats affect the composition and organization of biological membranes, suggesting a potential mechanism for the extensive effects of dietary fat on health and disease. PMID:27119640

  4. Biogenesis and Functions of Exosomes and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Florian; Baur, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Research on extracellular vesicles (EVs) is a new and emerging field that is rapidly growing. Many features of these structures still need to be described and discovered. This concerns their biogenesis, their release and cellular entrance mechanisms, as well as their functions, particularly in vivo. Hence our knowledge on EV is constantly evolving and sometimes changing. In our review we summarize the most important facts of our current knowledge about extracellular vesicles and described some of the assumed functions in the context of cancer and HIV infection. PMID:27317183

  5. Production of extracellular fatty acid using engineered Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As an alternative for economic biodiesel production, the microbial production of extracellular fatty acid from renewable resources is receiving more concerns recently, since the separation of fatty acid from microorganism cells is normally involved in a series of energy-intensive steps. Many attempts have been made to construct fatty acid producing strains by targeting genes in the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway, while few studies focused on the cultivation process and the mass transfer kinetics. Results In this study, both strain improvements and cultivation process strategies were applied to increase extracellular fatty acid production by engineered Escherichia coli. Our results showed overexpressing ‘TesA and the deletion of fadL in E. coli BL21 (DE3 improved extracellular fatty acid production, while deletion of fadD didn’t strengthen the extracellular fatty acid production for an undetermined mechanism. Moreover, the cultivation process controls contributed greatly to extracellular fatty acid production with respect to titer, cell growth and productivity by adjusting the temperature, adding ampicillin and employing on-line extraction. Under optimal conditions, the E. coli strain (pACY-‘tesA-ΔfadL produced 4.8 g L−1 extracellular fatty acid, with the specific productivity of 0.02 g h−1 g−1dry cell mass, and the yield of 4.4% on glucose, while the ratios of cell-associated fatty acid versus extracellular fatty acid were kept below 0.5 after 15 h of cultivation. The fatty acids included C12:1, C12:0, C14:1, C14:0, C16:1, C16:0, C18:1, C18:0. The composition was dominated by C14 and C16 saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Using the strain pACY-‘tesA, similar results appeared under the same culture conditions and the titer was also much higher than that ever reported previously, which suggested that the supposedly superior strain did not necessarily perform best for the efficient production of desired

  6. Extracellular vesicles round off communication in the nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Vivian; Ruiz-Cañada, Catalina; Wendler, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Functional neural competence and integrity require interactive exchanges among sensory and motor neurons, interneurons and glial cells. Recent studies have attributed some of the tasks needed for these exchanges to extracellular vesicles (such as exosomes and microvesicles), which are most prominently involved in shuttling reciprocal signals between myelinating glia and neurons, thus promoting neuronal survival, the immune response mediated by microglia, and synapse assembly and plasticity. Such vesicles have also been identified as important factors in the spread of neurodegenerative disorders and brain cancer. These extracellular vesicle functions add a previously unrecognized level of complexity to transcellular interactions within the nervous system. PMID:26891626

  7. Extracellular proteins limit the dispersal of biogenic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J.W.; Weber, P.K.; Martin, M.C.; Gilbert, B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution secondary ion microprobe spectrometry, synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated the intimate association of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization. Experiments involving synthetic zinc sulfide nanoparticles and representative amino acids indicated a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticle aggregation. These findings suggest that microbially derived extracellular proteins can limit the dispersal of nanoparticulate metal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation, that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurface fluid flow.

  8. Extracellular Vesicles as Biomarkers of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Perez-Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and typically manifests in multiple organs. The damage caused by this disorder is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including microvesicles (also known as microparticles, apoptotic bodies, and exosomes, are recognized vehicles of intercellular communication, carrying autoantigens, cytokines, and surface receptors. Therefore, the evidence of EVs and their cargo as biomarkers of autoimmune disease is rapidly expanding. This review will focus on biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, their pathophysiological roles, and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in inflammatory disease, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  9. Extracellular ATP signaling and homeostasis in plant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Chunlan; Zhang, Xuan; Deng, Shurong; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) is now recognized as an important signaling agent in plant growth and defense response to environmental stimuli. eATP has dual functions in plant cell signaling, which is largely dependent on its concentration in the extracellular matrix (ECM). A lethal level of eATP (extremely low or high) causes cell death, whereas a moderate level of eATP benefits plant growth and development. Ecto-apyrases (Nucleoside Triphosphate-Diphosphohydrolase) help control the eATP concentr...

  10. Summarization by domain ontology navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of the subject. In between these two extremes, conceptual summaries encompass selected concepts derived using background knowledge. We address in this paper an approach where conceptual summaries are provided through a conceptualization as given by an ontology. The ontology guiding the summarization can...... be a simple taxonomy or a generative domain ontology. A domain ontology can be provided by a preanalysis of a domain corpus and can be used to condense improved summaries that better reflects the conceptualization of a given domain....

  11. Domain Engineering: An Empirical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Charles; Frakes, William B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a summary and analysis of data gathered from thirteen domain engineering projects, participant surveys, and demographic information. Taking a failure modes approach, project data is compared to an ideal model of the DARE methodology, revealing valuable insights into points of failure in the domain engineering process. This study suggests that success is a function of the domain analyst’s command of a specific set of domain engineering concepts and skills, the time invested...

  12. A Convenient Category of Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo; Schröder, Matthias; Simpson, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We motivate and define a category of topological domains, whose objects are certain topological spaces, generalising the usual ω-continuous dcppos of domain theory. Our category supports all the standard constructions of domain theory, including the solution of recursive domain equations. It also supports the construction of free algebras for (in)equational theories, can be used as the basis for a theory of computability, and provides a model of parametric polymorphism.

  13. A convenient category of domains

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo; Schröder, Matthias; Simpson, Alex

    2007-01-01

    We motivate and define a category of "topological domains", whose objects are certain topological spaces, generalising the usual $omega$-continuous dcppos of domain theory. Our category supports all the standard constructions of domain theory, including the solution of recursive domain equations. It also supports the construction of free algebras for (in)equational theories, provides a model of parametric polymorphism, and can be used as the basis for a theory of computab...

  14. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  15. Domain Bridging Associations Support Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Kötter, Tobias; Thiel, Kilian; Berthold, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to support creativity through assisting the discovery of unexpected associations across different domains. This is achieved by integrating information from heterogeneous domains into a single network, enabling the interactive discovery of links across the corresponding information resources. We discuss three different pattern of domain crossing associations in this context.

  16. Detecting cell-adhesive sites in extracellular matrix using force spectroscopy mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell microenvironment is composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), which contains specific binding sites that allow the cell to adhere to its surroundings. Cells employ focal adhesion proteins, which must be able to resist a variety of forces to bind to ECM. Current techniques for detecting the spatial arrangement of these adhesions, however, have limited resolution and those that detect adhesive forces lack sufficient spatial characterization or resolution. Using a unique application of force spectroscopy, we demonstrate here the ability to determine local changes in the adhesive property of a fibronectin substrate down to the resolution of the fibronectin antibody-functionalized tip diameter, ∼ 20 nm. To verify the detection capabilities of force spectroscopy mapping (FSM), changes in loading rate and temperature were used to alter the bond dynamics and change the adhesion force. Microcontact printing was also used to pattern fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated fibronectin in order to mimic the discontinuous adhesion domains of native ECM. Fluorescent detection was used to identify the pattern while FSM was used to map cell adhesion sites in registry with the initial fluorescent image. The results show that FSM can be used to detect the adhesion domains at high resolution and may subsequently be applied to native ECM with randomly distributed cell adhesion sites.

  17. An efficient method for refolding the extracellular portion of CD147 from the total bacterial lysate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Song; Xin Zhang; Yifei Li; Qiang Ru; Xiaobai Ren; Bin Xia; Zhi-Nan Chen

    2011-01-01

    CD147 is a widely expressed transmembrane protein that mediates signal transduction,and it plays important roles in many physiological and pathological processes,such as tumor invasion and metastasis.The extracellular portion of CD147 (CD147EC) is responsible for its functional interactions with different signaling molecules.Due to the existence of two disulfide bonds,CD147EC is mainly expressed as an inclusion body in Escherichia coli.Here,we report a convenient rapid-dilution refolding protocol that enables the refolding of CD147EC efficiently from total bacterial lysate instead of pure inclusion bodies.Using this method,over 25 mg of CD147EC can be purified from 1 1 of bacterial culture in M9 medium.The refolded CD147EC is well folded as characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR),and it can induce the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in fibroblast cells.The described protocol is also applicable to the refolding of two immunoglobulin domains of CD147EC individually.Interestingly,we noticed that little protein was produced for the C-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of CD147EC by bacteria in M9 medium,even though it was overexpressed in LuriaBertani (LB) medium.However,when the pH of the bacterial culture in M9 medium was adjusted in accordance with that in LB medium during growth,comparable expression level could be achieved.

  18. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  19. Metaphors, domains and embodiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Botha

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of metaphorical meaning constitution and meaning (in- variance have revealed the significance of semantic and semiotic domains and the contexts within which they function as basis for the grounding of metaphorical meaning. In this article some of the current views concerning the grounding of metaphorical meaning in experience and embodiment are explored. My provisional agreement with Lakoff, Johnson and others about the “conceptual” nature of metaphor rests on an important caveat, viz. that this bodily based conceptual structure which lies at the basis of linguistic articulations of metaphor, is grounded in a deeper ontic structure of the world and of human experience. It is the “metaphorical” (actually “analogical” ontological structure of this grounding that is of interest for the line of argumentation followed in this article. Because Johnson, Lakoff and other’s proposal to ground metaphorical meaning in embodiment and neural processes is open to being construed as subjectivist and materialist, I shall attempt to articulate the contours of an alternative theory of conceptual metaphor, meaning and embodiment which counteracts these possibilities. This theory grounds metaphorical meaning and meaning change in an ontological and anthropological framework which recognises the presence and conditioning functioning of radially ordered structures for reality. These categorisations in which humankind, human knowledge and reality participate, condition and constrain (ground analogical and metaphorical meaning transfer, cross-domain mappings, and blends in cognition and in language, provide the basis for the analogical concepts found in these disciplines.

  20. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins......, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well...

  1. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Therapeutic Potential of Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The intense research focus on stem and progenitor cells could be attributed to their differentiation potential to generate new cells to replace diseased or lost cells in many highly intractable degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis, and heart diseases. However, experimental and clinical studies have increasingly attributed the therapeutic efficacy of these cells to their secretion. While stem and progenitor cells secreted many therapeutic molecules, none of these molecules singly or in combination could recapitulate the functional effects of stem cell transplantations. Recently, it was reported that extracellular vesicles (EVs could recapitulate the therapeutic effects of stem cell transplantation. Based on the observations reported thus far, the prevailing hypothesis is that stem cell EVs exert their therapeutic effects by transferring biologically active molecules such as proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA from the stem cells to injured or diseased cells. In this respect, stem cell EVs are similar to EVs from other cell types. They are both primarily vehicles for intercellular communication. Therefore, the differentiating factor is likely due to the composition of their cargo. The cargo of EVs from different cell types are known to include a common set of proteins and also proteins that reflect the cell source of the EVs and the physiological or pathological state of the cell source. Hence, elucidation of the stem cell EV cargo would provide an insight into the multiple physiological or biochemical changes necessary to affect the many reported stem cell-based therapeutic outcomes in a variety of experimental models and clinical trials.

  2. Extracellular matrix alterations in human corneas with bullous keratopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljubimov, A V; Burgeson, R E; Butkowski, R J; Couchman, J R; Wu, R R; Ninomiya, Y; Sado, Y; Maguen, E; Nesburn, A B; Kenney, M C

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE. To uncover abnormalities of extracellular matrix (ECM) distribution in human corneas with pseudophakic and aphakic bullous keratopathy (PBK/ABK). METHODS. Indirect immunofluorescence with antibodies to 27 ECM components was used on frozen sections of 14 normal and 20 PBK/ABK corneas...

  3. Radiosulfate determination of extracellular fluid volume in morbid obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimeddini, M.K.; Feig, P.U.; McAloon, M.

    1982-11-01

    A case is reported illustrating the difficulties in clinically assessing the degree of extracellular fluid volume overload in morbidly obese states. It is suggested that the measurement of the volume of distribution of orally administered radiosulfate may be of value in the clinical management of such patients.

  4. Radiosulfate determination of extracellular fluid volume in morbid obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case is reported illustrating the difficulties in clinically assessing the degree of extracellular fluid volume overload in morbidly obese states. It is suggested that the measurement of the volume of distribution of orally administered radiosulfate may be of value in the clinical management of such patients. (orig.)

  5. Extracellular clusterin promotes neuronal network complexity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wicher, Grzegorz; Velsecchi, Isabel; Charnay, Yves; Aldskogius, Hakan; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex

    2008-01-01

    of cellular debris. Intracellularly, clusterin may regulate signal transduction and is upregulated after cell stress. After neural injury, clusterin may be involved in nerve cell survival and postinjury neuroplasticity. In this study, we investigated the role of extracellular clusterin on neuronal...

  6. Glia and extracellular space in the aging brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    London : The Parthenon Publishing Group, 2003 - (Genazzani, A.), s. 3-11 ISBN 1-84214-168-6 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Glia * extracellular space * aging brain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Extracellular Recognition of Oomycetes during Biotrophic Infection of Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaymakers, Tom M; Van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular recognition of pathogens by plants constitutes an important early detection system in plant immunity. Microbe-derived molecules, also named patterns, can be recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on the host cell membrane that trigger plant immune responses. Most knowledge on extracellular pathogen detection by plants comes from research on bacterial and fungal pathogens. For oomycetes, that comprise some of the most destructive plant pathogens, mechanisms of extracellular pattern recognition have only emerged recently. These include newly recognized patterns, e.g., cellulose-binding elicitor lectin, necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1-like proteins (NLPs), and glycoside hydrolase 12, as well as their receptors, e.g., the putative elicitin PRR elicitin response and the NLP PRR receptor-like protein 23. Immunity can also be triggered by the release of endogenous host-derived patterns, as a result of oomycete enzymes or damage. In this review we will describe the types of patterns, both pathogen-derived exogenous and plant-derived endogenous ones, and what is known about their extracellular detection during (hemi-)biotrophic oomycete infection of plants. PMID:27446136

  8. Extracellular Hemicellulolytic Enzymes from the Maize Endophyte Acremonium zeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The maize endophyte Acremonium zeae was examined for production of extracellular enzymes that hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose. The most prominent enzyme activity in cell-free culture media from A. zeae NRRL 6415 was xylanase, with a specific activity of 60 U/mg from cultures grown on crude co...

  9. The Role of Extracellular Matrix Quality in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jacob Hull; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Genovese, Federica; Johnson, Simon; Svensson, Birte; Jacobsen, Susanne; Hägglund, Per; Leeming, Diana Julie

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) quality in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). In PF, the highly ordered structure of collagens and elastin within the ECM of the lung is severely disrupted and lacks its original tissue quality. Discussions about the ECM have...

  10. Astrocytes and extracellular matrix in extrasynaptic volume transmission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vargová, Lýdia; Syková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 369, č. 1654 (2014). ISSN 0962-8436 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11867S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : extracellular space * diffusion * astrocytes Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 7.055, year: 2014

  11. Stroma and extracellular matrix proteins in canine tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mukaratirwa, Sydney

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, studies on temporal and spatial changes in stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in canine gastrointestinal (GIT) tumours and canine transmissible venereal (CTVT) tumours are described. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic transformation of fibroblasts to myofib

  12. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  13. Extracellular Xylella fastidiosa genomic DNA enhances biofilm formation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is a Gram negative, xylem-limited bacterium that causes Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevine, as well as other diseases of economically important crops and landscape plants. Many bacteria produce large amounts of extracellular DNA, which may function as a matrix component in b...

  14. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Phytopathogenicity of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Chernov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the phytopathogenicity of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 (a ubiquitous mycoplasma that is one of the five common species of cell culture contaminants and is a causative agent for phytomycoplasmoses in Oryza sativa L. plants was studied. Data on the ability of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 to penetrate from the nutrient medium into overground parts of Oryza sativa L. through the root system and to cause alterations in ultrastructural organization of the plants were presented. As a result of the analysis of ultrathin leaf sections of plants grown in medium with A. laidlawii PG8 vesicles, we detected significant changes in tissue ultrastructure characteristic to oxidative stress in plants as well as their cultivation along with bacterial cells. The presence of nucleotide sequences of some mycoplasma genes within extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 allowed a possibility to use PCR (with the following sequencing to perform differential detection of cells and bacterial vesicles in samples under study. The obtained data may suggest the ability of extracellular vesicles of the mycoplasma to display in plants the features of infection from the viewpoint of virulence criteria—invasivity, infectivity—and toxigenicity—and to favor to bacterial phytopathogenicity.

  15. Filtration recovery of extracellular DNA from environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    qPCR methods are able to analyze DNA from microbes within hours of collecting water samples, providing the promptest notification and public awareness possible when unsafe pathogenic levels are reached. Health risk, however, may be overestimated by the presence of extracellular ...

  16. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilschut, Karlijn J. [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Haagsman, Henk P. [Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelen, Bernard A.J., E-mail: b.a.j.roelen@uu.nl [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  17. Proteomic analysis of the extracellular matrix in idiopathic pes equinovarus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, M.; Eckhardt, Adam; Herget, J.; Mikšík, Ivan; Dungl, P.; Chomiak, J.; Frydrychová, M.; Burian, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 401, 1-2 (2015), s. 133-139. ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01948S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : collagens * extracellular matrix * pes equinovarus * proteomics Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 2.393, year: 2014

  18. CORN FIBER HYDROLYSIS BY THERMOBIFIDA FUSCA EXTRACELLULAR ENZYMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermobifida fusca was grown on cellulose (Solka-Flok), xylan, or corn fiber, and the supernatant extracellular enzymes were concentrated. SDS gels showed markedly different protein patterns for the three different carbon sources. Activity assays on a variety of synthetic and natural substrates sh...

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Gibberella zeae extracellular lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. zeae extracellular lipase has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Fusarium head blight, one of the most destructive crop diseases, is mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum (known in its sexual stage as Gibberella zeae). F. graminearum secretes various extracellular enzymes that have been hypothesized to be involved in host infection. One of the extracellular enzymes secreted by this organism is the G. zeae extracellular lipase (GZEL), which is encoded by the FGL1 gene. In order to solve the crystal structure of GZEL and to gain a better understanding of the biological functions of the protein and of possible inhibitory mechanisms of lipase inhibitors, recombinant GZEL was crystallized at 291 K using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. A data set was collected to 2.8 Å resolution from a single flash-cooled crystal (100 K). The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.4, b = 91.0, c = 195.8 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The presence of four molecules was assumed per asymmetric unit, which gave a Matthews coefficient of 2.6 Å3 Da−1

  20. The framing of scientific domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Christensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    according to the agents that are charting them. As such, power in a Foucauldian sense is unavoidable in outlining a domain. Originality/value 1. The UNISIST models are applied to the domain of art history; and 2. the article discusses the instability of a scientific domain as well as, at the same time, the......Purpose: By using the UNISIST models this article argues for the necessity of domain analysis in order to qualify scientific information seeking. The models better understanding of communication processes in a scientific domain and embraces the point that domains are always both unstable over time...... and changeable according to the specific perspective. This understanding is even more important today as numerous digitally generated information tools as well as collaborative and interdisciplinary research are blurring the domain borders. Nevertheless, researchers navigate “intuitively” in “their...

  1. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione. PMID:26105794

  2. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Wei Chang; Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual ...

  3. X-ray Structure of Gelatinase A Catalytic Domain Complexed with a Hydroxamate Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanaraj, Venugopal; Williams, Mark G.; Ye, Qi-Zhuang; Molina, Franck; Linda L. Johnson; Ortwine, Daniel F.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Rubin, J. Ron; Skeean, Richard W.; White, Andy D.; Humblet, Christine; Hupe, Donald J.; Tom L Blundell

    1999-01-01

    Gelatinase A is a key enzyme in the family of matrix metalloproteinases (matrixins) that are involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix. As this process is an integral part of tumour cell metastasis and angiogenesis, gelatinase is an important target for therapeutic intervention. The X-ray crystal structure of the gelatinase A catalytic domain (GaCD) complexed with batimastat (BB94), a hydroxamate inhibitor, shows an active site with a large S1' specificity pocket. The structure ...

  4. Cloning of the functional domains of TSP-1 for protein expression

    OpenAIRE

    Zangi, Shadi

    2009-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is a multifunctional extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is released from platelets α-granule to regulate angiogenesis process. TSP-1 is well-known as an inhibitory factor of angiogenesis that binds to angiogenesis stimulating factors, for example fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), to inhibit angiogenesis. We have cloned TSP-1 domains separately to allow studying of the...

  5. Analysis of "knockout, knockin" mice that express a functional Fas Ligand molecule lacking the intracellular domain

    OpenAIRE

    Lückerath, Katharina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Fas Ligand (FasL; CD95L; CD178; TNSF6) is a 40 kDa glycosylated type II transmembrane protein with 279 aa in mice and 281 aa in humans that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family. The extracellular domain (ECD) harbors a TNF homology domain, the receptor binding site, a motif for self assembly and trimerization, and several putative N-glycosylation and a metalloprotease cleavage site/s. The cytoplasmic tail of FasL is the longest of all TNFL family members and contains several cons...

  6. Structure of the calcium-rich signature domain of human thrombospondin-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C. Britt; Bernstein, Douglas A.; Annis, Douglas S.; Misenheimer, Tina M. (UW)

    2010-07-13

    Thrombospondins (THBSs) are secreted glycoproteins that have key roles in interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the 2.6-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the glycosylated signature domain of human THBS2, which includes three epidermal growth factor-like modules, 13 aspartate-rich repeats and a lectin-like module. These elements interact extensively to form three structural regions termed the stalk, wire and globe. The THBS2 signature domain is stabilized by these interactions and by a network of 30 bound Ca{sup 2+} ions and 18 disulfide bonds. The structure suggests how genetic alterations of THBSs result in disease.

  7. A common theme in extracellular fluids of beetles: extracellular superoxide dismutases crucial for balancing ROS in response to microbial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretscher, René R; Streicher, Priska E; Strauß, Anja S; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Wang, Ding; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical for balancing the level of reactive oxygen species in the extracellular matrix of eukaryotes. In the present study we have detected constitutive SOD activity in the haemolymph and defensive secretions of different leaf beetle species. Exemplarily, we have chosen the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae, as representative model organism to investigate the role of extracellular SODs in antimicrobial defence. Qualitative and quantitative proteome analyses resulted in the identification of two extracellular Cu/Zn SODs in the haemolymph and one in the defensive secretions of juvenile P. cochleariae. Furthermore, quantitative expression studies indicated fat body tissue and defensive glands as the main synthesis sites of these SODs. Silencing of the two SODs revealed one of them, PcSOD3.1, as the only relevant enzyme facilitating SOD activity in haemolymph and defensive secretions in vivo. Upon challenge with the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, PcSOD3.1-deficient larvae exhibited a significantly higher mortality compared to other SOD-silenced groups. Hence, our results serve as a basis for further research on SOD regulated host-pathogen interactions. In defensive secretions PcSOD3.1-silencing affected neither deterrent production nor activity against fungal growth. Instead, we propose another antifungal mechanism based on MRJP/yellow proteins in the defensive exudates. PMID:27068683

  8. Meeting report: discussions and preliminary findings on extracellular RNA measurement methods from laboratories in the NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise C. Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs have been identified in all tested biofluids and have been associated with a variety of extracellular vesicles, ribonucleoprotein complexes and lipoprotein complexes. Much of the interest in exRNAs lies in the fact that they may serve as signalling molecules between cells, their potential to serve as biomarkers for prediction and diagnosis of disease and the possibility that exRNAs or the extracellular particles that carry them might be used for therapeutic purposes. Among the most significant bottlenecks to progress in this field is the lack of robust and standardized methods for collection and processing of biofluids, separation of different types of exRNA-containing particles and isolation and analysis of exRNAs. The Sample and Assay Standards Working Group of the Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium is a group of laboratories funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop such methods. In our first joint endeavour, we held a series of conference calls and in-person meetings to survey the methods used among our members, placed them in the context of the current literature and used our findings to identify areas in which the identification of robust methodologies would promote rapid advancements in the exRNA field.

  9. Glia and extracellular matrix changes affect extracellular diffusion and volume transmission in the brain in health and disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vargová, Lýdia; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, S1 (2011), S38. ISSN 0894-1491. [European meeting on Glial Cells in Health and Disease /10./. 13.09.2011-17.09.2011, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : diffusion * extracellular matrix * extrasynaptic transmission Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  10. The WIF domain of the human and Drosophila Wif-1 secreted factors confers specificity for Wnt or Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, David; Sierra, Javier; Ortigão-Farias, João Ramalho; Guerrero, Isabel

    2012-10-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt signaling pathways are crucial for development as well as for adult stem cell maintenance in all organisms from Drosophila to humans. Aberrant activation of these pathways has been implicated in many types of human cancer. During evolution, organisms have developed numerous ways to fine-tune Wnt and Hh signaling. One way is through extracellular modulators that directly interact with Wnt or Hh, such as the Wnt inhibitory factor (Wif-1) family of secreted factors. Interestingly, Wif-1 family members have divergent functions in the Wnt and Hh pathways in different organisms. Whereas vertebrate Wif-1 blocks Wnt signaling, Drosophila Wif-1 [Shifted (Shf)] regulates only Hh distribution and spreading through the extracellular matrix. Here, we investigate which parts of the Shf and human Wif-1 (WIF1) proteins are responsible for functional divergence. We analyze the behavior of domain-swap (the Drosophila and human WIF domain and EGF repeats) chimeric constructs during wing development. We demonstrate that the WIF domain confers the specificity for Hh or Wg morphogen. The EGF repeats are important for the interaction of Wif-1 proteins with the extracellular matrix; Drosophila EGF repeats preferentially interact with the glypican Dally-like (Dlp) when the WIF domain belongs to human WIF1 and with Dally when the WIF domain comes from Shf. These results are important both from the evolutionary perspective and for understanding the mechanisms of morphogen distribution in a morphogenetic field. PMID:22951645

  11. Protein domain organisation: adding order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummerfeld Sarah K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domains are the building blocks of proteins. During evolution, they have been duplicated, fused and recombined, to produce proteins with novel structures and functions. Structural and genome-scale studies have shown that pairs or groups of domains observed together in a protein are almost always found in only one N to C terminal order and are the result of a single recombination event that has been propagated by duplication of the multi-domain unit. Previous studies of domain organisation have used graph theory to represent the co-occurrence of domains within proteins. We build on this approach by adding directionality to the graphs and connecting nodes based on their relative order in the protein. Most of the time, the linear order of domains is conserved. However, using the directed graph representation we have identified non-linear features of domain organization that are over-represented in genomes. Recognising these patterns and unravelling how they have arisen may allow us to understand the functional relationships between domains and understand how the protein repertoire has evolved. Results We identify groups of domains that are not linearly conserved, but instead have been shuffled during evolution so that they occur in multiple different orders. We consider 192 genomes across all three kingdoms of life and use domain and protein annotation to understand their functional significance. To identify these features and assess their statistical significance, we represent the linear order of domains in proteins as a directed graph and apply graph theoretical methods. We describe two higher-order patterns of domain organisation: clusters and bi-directionally associated domain pairs and explore their functional importance and phylogenetic conservation. Conclusion Taking into account the order of domains, we have derived a novel picture of global protein organization. We found that all genomes have a higher than expected

  12. CONSERVED FUNCTIONAL DOMAINS OF THE RNA-POLYMERASE-III GENERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR BRF

    OpenAIRE

    Khoo, B; Brophy, B; Jackson, S P

    1994-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two components of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) general transcription factor TFIIIB are the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the B-related factor (BRF), so called because its amino-terminal half is homologous to the Pol II transcription factor IIB (TFIIB). We have cloned BRF genes from the yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida albicans, Despite the large evolutionary distance between these species and S. cerevisiae, the BRF proteins are conserved highly. Althou...

  13. Mapping the major antigenic domains of the native flagellar antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, W.; Luft, B J; Schubach, W; Dattwyler, R J; Gorevic, P D

    1992-01-01

    Purified flagellar protein (p41) of Borrelia burgdorferi (strain B31) was subjected to chemical cleavage with hydroxylamine or proteolysis with V8 protease, endoproteinase Asp-N, or alpha-chymotrypsin. The resulting polypeptides were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their positions in the published DNA sequence of the p41 protein were determined by amino-terminal sequencing and amino acid analysis. Epitope specificities of antibody binding by a mono...

  14. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Tran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  15. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease. PMID:27336156

  16. Starch-binding domains in the CBM45 family--low-affinity domains from glucan, water dikinase and α-amylase involved in plastidial starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaring, Mikkel A; Baumann, Martin J; Abou Hachem, Maher; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Natsuko; Santelia, Diana; Sigurskjold, Bent W; Zeeman, Samuel C; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2011-04-01

    Starch-binding domains are noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules that mediate binding to granular starch. The starch-binding domains from the carbohydrate-binding module family 45 (CBM45, http://www.cazy.org) are found as N-terminal tandem repeats in a small number of enzymes, primarily from photosynthesizing organisms. Isolated domains from representatives of each of the two classes of enzyme carrying CBM45-type domains, the Solanum tuberosumα-glucan, water dikinase and the Arabidopsis thaliana plastidial α-amylase 3, were expressed as recombinant proteins and characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to verify the conformational integrity of an isolated CBM45 domain, revealing a surprisingly high thermal stability (T(m) of 84.8 °C). The functionality of CBM45 was demonstrated in planta by yellow/green fluorescent protein fusions and transient expression in tobacco leaves. Affinities for starch and soluble cyclodextrin starch mimics were measured by adsorption assays, surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry analyses. The data indicate that CBM45 binds with an affinity of about two orders of magnitude lower than the classical starch-binding domains from extracellular microbial amylolytic enzymes. This suggests that low-affinity starch-binding domains are a recurring feature in plastidial starch metabolism, and supports the hypothesis that reversible binding, effectuated through low-affinity interaction with starch granules, facilitates dynamic regulation of enzyme activities and, hence, of starch metabolism. PMID:21294843

  17. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Chung

    Full Text Available Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its

  18. Functional analysis of the domains of the C elegans Ror receptor tyrosine kinase CAM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changsung; Forrester, Wayne C

    2003-12-15

    cam-1 encodes a Caenorhabditis elegans orphan receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the Ror family that is required for cell migration and to orient cell polarity. Ror RTKs share a common domain structure. The predicted extracellular region contains immunoglobulin (Ig), cysteine-rich (CRD), and kringle (Kri) domains. Intracellularly are tyrosine kinase (Kin) and serine- and threonine (S/T)-rich domains. To investigate the functional requirement for CAM-1 domains in mediating cell migration, we engineered deletions that remove various domains and assessed the ability of these CAM-1 derivatives to rescue cam-1 mutant phenotypes. We find that the Ig, Kri, Kin, and S/T domains are dispensable for cell migration, but the CRD is required. Surprisingly, the entire intracellular region of CAM-1 is not required for proper cell migration. Most notably, a version of CAM-1 from which all domains besides the CRD and transmembrane domains have been deleted is able to rescue the migration of a single cell type, although not those of other cell types. Our results show that CAM-1 does not function exclusively as a canonical RTK and that it may function, at least in part, to regulate the distribution of a secreted ligand-possibly a Wnt protein. PMID:14651925

  19. Crystal Structure of the Passenger Domain of the Escherichia coli Autotransporter EspP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shekeb; Mian, Hira S.; Sandercock, Linda E.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Pai, Emil F. (Toronto); (OCI)

    2013-03-07

    Autotransporters represent a large superfamily of known and putative virulence factors produced by Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of an N-terminal 'passenger domain' responsible for the specific effector functions of the molecule and a C-terminal '{beta}-domain' responsible for translocation of the passenger across the bacterial outer membrane. Here, we present the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the passenger domain of the extracellular serine protease EspP, produced by the pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 and a member of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs). Like the previously structurally characterized SPATE passenger domains, the EspP passenger domain contains an extended right-handed parallel {beta}-helix preceded by an N-terminal globular domain housing the catalytic function of the protease. Of note, however, is the absence of a second globular domain protruding from this {beta}-helix. We describe the structure of the EspP passenger domain in the context of previous results and provide an alternative hypothesis for the function of the {beta}-helix within SPATEs.

  20. Domain wall networks on solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domain wall networks on the surface of a soliton are studied in a simple theory. It consists of two complex scalar fields, in 3+1 dimensions, with a global U(1)xZn symmetry, where n>2. Solutions are computed numerically in which one of the fields forms a Q ball and the other field forms a network of domain walls localized on the surface of the Q ball. Examples are presented in which the domain walls lie along the edges of a spherical polyhedron, forming junctions at its vertices. It is explained why only a small restricted class of polyhedra can arise as domain wall networks

  1. Gears, Pregears and Related Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Philip R.; Porter, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We study conformal mappings from the unit disk to one-toothed gear-shaped planar domains from the point of view of the Schwarzian derivative. Gear-shaped (or "gearlike") domains fit into a more general category of domains we call "pregears" (images of gears under Mobius transformations), which aid in the study of the conformal mappings for gears and which we also describe in detail. Such domains being bounded by arcs of circles, the Schwarzian derivative of the Riemann mapping is known to be ...

  2. Comparison of adjuvant activity of N- and C-terminal domain of gp96 in a Her2-positive breast cancer model

    OpenAIRE

    Pakravan, Nafiseh; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    It has been frequently reported that gp96 acts as a strong biologic adjuvant. Some studies have even investigated adjuvant activity of the gp96 C- or N-terminal domain. The controversy surrounding adjuvant activity of gp96 terminal domains prompted us to compare adjuvant activity of gp96 C- or N-terminal domain toward Her2/neu, as DNA vaccine in a Her2/neu-positive breast cancer model. To do so, mice were immunized with DNA vaccine consisting of transmembrane and extracellular domain (TM + EC...

  3. Campylobacter jejuni biofilms contain extracellular DNA and are sensitive to DNase I treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Helen L.; Hanman, Kate; Reuter, Mark; Betts, Roy P.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms make an important contribution to survival and transmission of bacterial pathogens in the food chain. The human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is known to form biofilms in vitro in food chain-relevant conditions, but the exact roles and composition of the extracellular matrix are still not clear. Extracellular DNA has been found in many bacterial biofilms and can be a major component of the extracellular matrix. Here we show that extracellular DNA is also an important component of the...

  4. Extracellular Nucleic Acids in Blood of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa E. Muravlyova; Vilen B. Molotov-Luchanskiy; Dmitriy A. Klyuyev; Ryszhan E. Bakirova; Ludmila A. Demidchik; Evgeniya A. Kolesnikova

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of extracellular nucleic acids and acid-soluble precursors of nucleic acids in blood of patients with different forms and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were evaluated. The significant increase of the content of extracellular RNA and acid-soluble precursors of nucleic acids in plasma of patients with COPD was detected. The decrease of extracellular RNA in plasma of patients with COPD worsening was diagnosed. Extracellular DNA in plasma and red bloo...

  5. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  6. Lipid-Targeting Peptide Probes for Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Aaron D; Yin, Hang

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells are under intense investigation for their roles in cell-cell communication and cancer progression. However, individual vesicles have been difficult to probe as their small size renders them invisible by conventional light microscopy. However, as a consequence of their small size these vesicles possess highly curved lipid membranes that offer an unconventional target for curvature-sensing probes. In this article, we present a strategy for using peptide-based biosensors to detect highly curved membranes and the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine, we delineate several assays used to validate curvature- and lipid-targeting mechanisms, and we explore potential applications in probing extracellular vesicles released from sources such as apoptotic cells, cancer cells, or activated platelets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2327-2332, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26909741

  7. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps - the dark side of neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were discovered as extracellular strands of decondensed DNA in complex with histones and granule proteins, which were expelled from dying neutrophils to ensnare and kill microbes. NETs are formed during infection in vivo by mechanisms different from those originally described in vitro. Citrullination of histones by peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is central for NET formation in vivo. NETs may spur formation of autoantibodies and may also serve as scaffolds for thrombosis, thereby providing a link among infection, autoimmunity, and thrombosis. In this review, we present the mechanisms by which NETs are formed and discuss the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of NET formation. We conclude that NETs may be of more importance in autoimmunity and thrombosis than in innate immune defense. PMID:27135878

  9. Binding and Transformation of Extracellular DNA in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Peng; HUANG Qiao-Yun; ZHANG Xue-Wen; CHEN Hao

    2005-01-01

    DNA is the genetic material of various organisms. Extracellular DNA adsorbed or bound on surface-active particles in soils has been shown to persist for long periods against nucleases degradation and still retain the ability to transform competent cells. This paper reviews some recent advances on the binding and transformation of extracellular DNA in soils,which is fundamental to understanding the nature of the soil, regulating biodiversity, and assessing the risk of releasing genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) as well as being helpful for development of the genetic evolutional theory of bacteria. Several influencing factors, such as soil pH, ionic strength, soil surface properties, and characteristics of the DNA polymer, are discussed. To date, the understanding of the type of molecular binding sites and the conformation of adsorbed and bound DNA to soil particles is still in its infancy.

  10. Telocytes and Their Extracellular Vesicles—Evidence and Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretoiu, Dragos; Xu, Jiahong; Xiao, Junjie; Cretoiu, Sanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Entering the new millennium, nobody believed that there was the possibility of discovering a new cellular type. Nevertheless, telocytes (TCs) were described as a novel kind of interstitial cell. Ubiquitously distributed in the extracellular matrix of any tissue, TCs are regarded as cells with telopodes involved in intercellular communication by direct homo- and heterocellular junctions or by extracellular vesicle (EVs) release. Their discovery has aroused the interest of many research groups worldwide, and many researchers regard them as potentially regenerative cells. Given the experience of our laboratory, where these cells were first described, we review the evidence supporting the fact that TCs release EVs, and discuss alternative hypotheses about their future implications. PMID:27529228

  11. biosynthesis of extracellular cholesterol oxidase by irradiated streptomyces species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    streptomyces sp.culture produced extracellular cholesterol oxidase (COD)at favorable conditions (o.5 g/L cholesterol. 200 Gy, 300 C, ph 7 and 100 r.p.m) at the end of 6 days incubation period. an extracellular enzyme activity (cholesterol degradation %) of 95.36 was achieved during the stationary phase, a specific activity of 1.34 e.u was possible by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, 1.7 by ultrafiltration and 4.1 E.U/mg protein by sephadex G100 column . COD was stable over a ph range of 6-9 for 1 h .at 300C, the enzyme was also stable up 400C it retained 95.4% of the original activity but when heated up to 500C for 1 h it retained only 65% of the original activity

  12. Neutrophil extracellular traps: Their role in periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Swarna, Chakrapani; Devulapalli, Narasimha Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. Since their discovery, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during infections. Extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation along with other antimicrobial molecules. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophil extracellular trap production in the regulation of immune response and its role in periodontal disease. PMID:25624623

  13. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances in marine biogeochemical processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N.B.

    research. M ICROBIAL extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) pro- duced by both prokaryotes (eubacteria and archaebacteria) and eukaryotes (phytoplankton, fungi, and algae) have been a topic of current research interest. The importance of microbial... and the marine food web (Figure 4). The entire biogeochemical process in Figure 4 can be segregated into biotic and abiotic controlled pro- esses. The photosynthetic fixation of atmospheric carbon by phytoplankton, its aggregation and formation of marin snow...

  14. Astrocytes and diffusive spread of substances in brain extracellular space

    OpenAIRE

    Sherpa, Ang D.; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Brain function is based on communication between individual cells, neurons and glia. From a traditional point of view, neurons play a central role in the fast transfer of information in the central nervous system while astrocytes, major type of glia, serve as housekeeping elements maintaining homeostasis of the extracellular microenvironment. This view has dramatically changed in recent years as many findings ascribe new roles to astrocytes. It is becoming evident that astrocytes communica...

  15. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases modulate capacitation of human spermatozoa.

    OpenAIRE

    Luconi, M.; Barni, T.; Vannelli, G B; C. Krausz; Marra, F; Benedetti, P A; Evangelista, V.; Francavilla, S.; Properzi, G; g. Forti; Baldi, E

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates the presence of p21 Ras and of a protein with characteristics similar to mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), also known as extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), in mammalian spermatozoa, suggesting the occurrence of the Ras/ERK cascade in these cells. In the present study we investigated the subcellular localization of ERKs and their biological functions in human spermatozoa. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunoele...

  16. Gene evolution and functions of extracellular matrix proteins in teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides physical support for tissues, but it is also critical for tissue development, homeostasis and disease. Over 300 ECM molecules have been defined as comprising the “core matrisome” in mammals through the analysis of whole genome sequences. During tooth development, the structure and functions of the ECM dynamically change. In the early stages, basement membranes (BMs) separate two cell layers of the dental epithelium and the mesenchyme. Later in ...

  17. Erwinia carotovora extracellular proteases : characterization and role in soft rot

    OpenAIRE

    Kyöstiö, Sirkka R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) strain EC14, a Gram-negative bacterium, causes soft rot on several crops, including potato. Maceration of potato tuber tissue is caused by secreted pectolytic enzymes. Other cell-degrading enzymes may also have roles in pathogenesis, including cellulases, phospholipases, and protease(s). The objectives of this research were to (1) characterize Ecc extracellular protease (Prt) and (2) elucidate its role in potato soft rot. A gene enc...

  18. An extracellular polymer at the interface of magnetic bioseparations

    OpenAIRE

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar L.; Morgado, Patricia I.; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A.; Azevedo, Ana; Aires-Barros, Raquel; Roque, A. Cecilia A.

    2014-01-01

    FucoPol, a fucose-containing extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) produced by bacterium Enterobacter A47 using glycerol as the carbon source, was employed as a coating material for magnetic particles (MPs), which were subsequently functionalized with an artificial ligand for the capture of antibodies. The performance of the modified MPs (MP–EPS-22/8) for antibody purification was investigated using direct magnetic separation alone or combined with an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) composed of ...

  19. Extracellular matrix synthesis in vascular disease: hypertension, and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ponticos, M.; Smith, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vascular network provides both a structural and regulatory role. The ECM is a dynamic composite of multiple proteins that form structures connecting cells within the network. Blood vessels are distended by blood pressure and, therefore, require ECM components with elasticity yet with enough tensile strength to resist rupture. The ECM is involved in conducting mechanical signals to cells. Most importantly, ECM regulates cellular function through chemical s...

  20. Tuberculosis Immunopathology: The Neglected Role of Extracellular Matrix Destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Elkington, Paul T.; D'Armiento, Jeanine M; Friedland, Jon S

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix in the lung must be destroyed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis— the agent that causes tuberculosis (TB)—to spread. The current paradigm proposes that this destruction occurs as a result of the action of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, and lipids that mediate TB-associated necrosis in the lung. However, this view neglects the fact that lung matrix can only be degraded by proteases. We propose an original conceptual framework of TB immunopathology th...

  1. Extracellular electrical activity from the photoreceptors of midge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A A Babrekar; G R Kulkarni; B B Nath; P B Vidyasagar

    2004-09-01

    The ontogeny of photosensitivity has been studied in a holometabolous insect, the midge Chironomus ramosus. The life cycle of midges shifts from an aquatic environment to a non-aquatic environment. Extracellular electrical activity of photoreceptor organs was recorded at larval and adult stages. We found an increase in photosensitivity as the larva metamorphosed to the adult stage. This is the first report of changes in photosensitivity during the development of any insect described in an ecological context.

  2. Hippocampal extracellular GABA correlates with metabolism in human epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, J.W.; Cavus, I.; Kim, J.; Hetherington, H P.; Spencer, D. D.

    2008-01-01

    As the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in human brain, GABA is an important modulator of hyperexcitability in epilepsy patients. Given the high energetic cost of neurotransmission and synaptic activity, GABA concentrations may be hypothesized to correlate with metabolic function. We studied human epilepsy patients undergoing intracranial EEG monitoring for seizure localization to examine microdialysis measures of extracellular GABA (ecGABA), pre-operative MR spectroscopic measures of neuron...

  3. Purification and characterization of an extracellular protease of Legionella pneumophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Dreyfus, L A; Iglewski, B H

    1986-01-01

    An extracellular proteolytic enzyme of Legionella pneumophila was purified by sequential batch separation with DEAE-cellulose, hydrophobic interaction chromatography with octyl-Sepharose, and ion-exchange chromatography with DEAE-Bio-Gel A (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Richmond, Calif.). The resulting protease preparation was determined to be homogeneous by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Although free of contaminating proteins, the purified ...

  4. Therapeutic Applications of Extracellular Vesicles: Clinical Promise and Open Questions

    OpenAIRE

    György, Bence; Hung, Michelle E.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Leonard, Joshua N.

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an updated perspective on rapidly proliferating efforts to harness extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic applications. We summarize current knowledge, emerging strategies, and open questions pertaining to clinical potential and translation. Potentially useful EVs comprise diverse products of various cell types and species. EV components may also be combined with liposomes and nanoparticles to facilitate manufacturing as well as product safety and evaluation. Potent...

  5. Detection of extracellular toxin(s) produced by Vibrio vulnificus.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreger, A; Lockwood, D.

    1981-01-01

    Conditions are described for the production, in high titers, a heat-labile, antigenic, extracellular toxin(s) by Vibrio vulnificus, a recently recognized human pathogen. Bacteriologically sterile culture filtrate preparations obtained from mid-logarithmic-phase cultures of the bacterium possessed cytolytic activity against mammalian erythrocytes, cytotoxic activity for Chinese hamster ovary cells, vascular permeability factor activity in guinea pig skin, and lethal activity for mice. The spec...

  6. The extracellular matrix as a cell survival factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith, J E; Fazeli, B; Schwartz, M A

    1993-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) or apoptosis is a naturally occurring cell suicide pathway induced in a variety of cell types. In many cases, PCD is induced by the withdrawal of specific hormones or growth factors that function as survival factors. In this study, we have investigated the potential role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a cell survival factor. Our results indicate that in the absence of any ECM interactions, human endothelial cells rapidly undergo PCD, as determined by cell mor...

  7. Extrasynaptic transmission and the diffusion parameters of the extracellular space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Vargová, Lýdia

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, 1-2 (2008), s. 5-13. ISSN 0197-0186 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/04/0753 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Diffusion * Extracellular volume * Magnetic resonance Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.228, year: 2008

  8. Detection of Extracellular Enzyme Activities in Ganoderma neo-japonicum

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Woo-Sik; Park, Ha-Na; Cho, Doo-Hyun; Yoo, Young-Bok; Park, Seung-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Ganoderma to produce extracellular enzymes, including β-glucosidase, cellulase, avicelase, pectinase, xylanase, protease, amylase, and ligninase was tested in chromogenic media. β-glucosidase showed the highest activity, among the eight tested enzymes. In particular, Ganoderma neo-japonicum showed significantly stronger activity for β-glucosidase than that of the other enzymes. Two Ganoderma lucidum isolates showed moderate activity for avicelase; however, Ganoderma neo-japonic...

  9. Microdiversity of extracellular enzyme genes among sequenced prokaryotic genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Amy E; Martiny, Adam C.; Allison, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between prokaryotic traits and phylogeny is important for predicting and modeling ecological processes. Microbial extracellular enzymes have a pivotal role in nutrient cycling and the decomposition of organic matter, yet little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding these enzymes. In this study, we analyzed 3058 annotated prokaryotic genomes to determine which taxa have the genetic potential to produce alkaline phosphatase, chitinase and ...

  10. Detection of Extracellular enzymes Activities in Various Fusarium spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Yoon, Ji Hwan; Kim, Seong Hwan; Hong, Seung Beom; Cheon, Youngah; Ko, Seung Ju

    2007-01-01

    Thirty seven species of Fusarium were evaluated for their ability of producing extracellular enzymes using chromogenic medium containing substrates such as starch, cellobiose, CM-cellulose, xylan, and pectin. Among the tested species Fusarium mesoamericanum, F. graminearum, F. asiaticum, and F. acuminatum showed high β-glucosidase acitivity. Xylanase activity was strongly detected in F. proliferatum and F. oxysporum. Strong pectinase activity was also found in F. oxysporum and F. proliferatum...

  11. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorca-Guiliani A; Erler JT

    2013-01-01

    Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Exten...

  12. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes produced by human pathogenic vibrio species

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Vibrio produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes to obtain nutrients via digestion of various protein substrates. However, the enzymes secreted by human pathogenic species have been documented to modulate the bacterial virulence. Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed vibriolysin. The vibriolysin from V. vulnificus, a causative agent of serious systemic infection, is a major toxic factor e...

  13. Structure and Function of the Stratum Corneum Extracellular Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) extracellular matrix (ECM) is enriched in lipids that are organized into lamellar bilayers, whose molecular architecture is now known. Although these bilayers are important for the permeability barrier, the ECM contains not only lipids but also enzymes, structural proteins, and antimicrobial peptides that impact barrier function. Yet, how such diverse components affect barrier function remains largely unknown. Static models of the epidermis may not do justice to the E...

  14. Production of extracellular proteolytic enzymes by Beauveria bassiana

    OpenAIRE

    Józefa Chrzanowska; Maria Kołaczkowska

    2014-01-01

    The production of proteolytic enzymes by two strains of Beauveria bassiana 278, B. bassiana 446 and one strain of Ascosphera apis 496 was analysed. It was demonstrated that the strain of B. bassiana 278 proved to be the best producer of basic and acid proteases. The influence of different environmental factors such as nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes was assessed. In addition the acid protease from B. bassiana was partially characterized.

  15. Direct visualization of specifically modified extracellular glycans in living animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attreed, Matthew; Desbois, Muriel; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Bülow, Hannes E

    2012-05-01

    Modification patterns of heparan sulfate coordinate protein function in metazoans, yet in vivo imaging of such non-genetically encoded structures has been impossible. Here we report a transgenic method in Caenorhabditis elegans that allows direct live imaging of specific heparan sulfate modification patterns. This experimental approach reveals a dynamic and cell-specific heparan sulfate landscape and could in principle be adapted to visualize and analyze any extracellular molecule in vivo. PMID:22466794

  16. Direct visualization of specifically modified extracellular glycans in living animals

    OpenAIRE

    Attreed, Matthew; Desbois, Muriel; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Bülow, Hannes E.

    2012-01-01

    Modification patterns of the extracellular glycan heparan sulfate coordinate protein function in metazoans, yet in vivo imaging of such non-genetically encoded structures has been impossible. Here we report a transgenic method in Caenorhabditis elegans that allows direct live imaging of specific heparan sulfate modification patterns. This experimental approach reveals a dynamic and cell-specific heparan sulfate landscape and could in principle be adapted to visualize and analyze any extracell...

  17. Production of extracellular proteolytic enzymes by Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józefa Chrzanowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The production of proteolytic enzymes by two strains of Beauveria bassiana 278, B. bassiana 446 and one strain of Ascosphera apis 496 was analysed. It was demonstrated that the strain of B. bassiana 278 proved to be the best producer of basic and acid proteases. The influence of different environmental factors such as nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes was assessed. In addition the acid protease from B. bassiana was partially characterized.

  18. Solubilization of Leonardite by an Extracellular Fraction from Coriolus versicolor

    OpenAIRE

    Pyne, John W.; Stewart, Dorothy L.; Fredrickson, James; Wilson, Bary W.

    1987-01-01

    Coriolus versicolor has previously been shown to degrade leonardite, an oxidized form of lignite. An extracellular fraction containing protein purified from a C. versicolor culture solubilized leonardite in vitro. Expression of the activity did not require the presence of leonardite and appeared during idiophase. During ion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography, leonardite-biosolubilizing activity eluted with syringaldazine oxidase activity and with protein, as measured by A280 an...

  19. Cardiac Extracellular Vesicles in Normal and Infarcted Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Alexander N. Orekhov; Yuri V Bobryshev

    2016-01-01

    Heart is a complex assembly of many cell types constituting myocardium, endocardium and epicardium that intensively communicate to each other in order to maintain the proper cardiac function. There are many types of intercellular intracardiac signals, with a prominent role of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, for long-distant delivering of complex messages. Cardiomyocytes release EVs, whose content could significantly vary depending on the stimulus. In stress, ...

  20. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haqqani Arsalan S; Delaney Christie E; Tremblay Tammy-Lynn; Sodja Caroline; Sandhu Jagdeep K; Stanimirovic Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes) and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes). Extracellular microvesicles contain ...