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Sample records for amifostine

  1. Amifostine - a radioprotector in locally advanced head and neck tumors

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    Schoenekaes, K.G.; Wagner, W. [Paracelsus-Strahlenklinik, Osnabrueck (Germany); Prott, F.J. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenonkologie

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: There are some preliminary informations about the beneficial use of amifostine in avoiding side effects in patients with head and neck tumors who underwent radiotherapy. Patients and method: Amifostine was given as daily intravenous application (500 mg) 10 to 15 minutes prior to radiotherapy in 20 patients. The results were compared with another collective of patients which was similar. Results: According to the WHO score mucositis became manifest in 10 patients (Grade I) and 4 patients (Grade II) in the amifostine group vs 9 patients (Grade II), 6 patients (Grade III) and 1 patient (Grade IV) in the control group. Xerostomia has been seen in 15 patients (Grade I) and 5 patients (Grade II) after administration of amifostine. Without the drug 2 patients suffered from xerostomia (Grade I), 8 patients (Grade II) and 8 patients (Grade III), respectively. Administering amifostine had been feasible and non problematic. Only a small rate of toxic side effects like nausea (11%) or emesis (4%) was documented. Conclusions: Amifostine is an effective radioprotector decreasing acute and late side effects in patients with head and neck tumors. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Bisher gibt es nur wenige Informationen ueber den Nutzen von Amifostin bezueglich der Verminderung oder Vermeidung von Nebenwirkungen einer Radiatio bei Patienten mit Tumoren im HNO-Trakt. Patienten und Methode: Amifostin wurde als intravenoese Kurzinfusion mit einer Dosis von 500 mg zehn bis 15 Minuten vor der Bestrahlung bei 20 Patienten appliziert. Die unter Radiatio aufgetretenen Nebenwirkungen wurden nach WHO bzw. nach dem Oral Assessment Guide nach Eilers ausgewertet und mit einem entsprechenden historischen Kollektiv der Klinik verglichen. Ergebnisse: In der Amifostin-Gruppe wurde bei zehn Patienten eine Mukositis Grad I und bei vier Patienten eine Mukositis Grad II nach WHO beobachtet. Grad-III- und Grad-IV-Nebenwirkungen traten nicht auf. In der Kontrollgruppe waren dagegen bei neun

  2. The Effect of Amifostine on Submandibular Gland Histology after Radiation

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    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of amifostine on submandibular gland histology in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective submandibular gland histologic slide review of HNSCC patients receiving chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with three different levels of amifostine exposure. We used six scoring parameters: fatty replacement, lobular architecture degeneration, interstitial fibrosis, ductal degeneration, acinar degeneration, and inflammatory component presence. Results. Differences in gender, tumor stage, amifostine dose, age, number of days after neck dissection, and smoking history (pack years exposure were not significant between the three groups, although there was a difference between groups in the primary subsite (P=0.006. The nonparametric Cuzick's test for histologic parameters with varied amifostine treatment showed no significance among the three groups. Conclusions. Although patients did not receive a full dose of amifostine due to side effects, varying doses of amifostine had no apparent evident cytoprotective effects in three groups of cancer patients treated with primary chemoradiation.

  3. Alteration of radiation-induced hematotoxicity by amifostine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, Felix; Bechtold, Christine; Rudat, Volker; Strnad, Vratislav; Tsekos, Alexander; Fischer, Karin; Henke, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether amifostine can reduce radiation hematotoxicity. Patients and Methods: Seventy-three patients undergoing radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck at the university clinics of Freiburg, Heidelberg, and Erlangen were evaluated. All received 60 Gy (50-70 Gy) at 5x2 Gy fractions per week employing standard techniques. Thirty-five were randomized to receive 200 mg/m 2 amifostine i.v. 30 min before radiation; 38 served as control patients. Blood counts (total n=501) were determined before, during, and while completing radiotherapy. Changes of leukocyte, platelet, and hemoglobin levels were determined and compared using the t test. Results: The blood hemoglobin level and the platelet count were not affected by irradiation, for either the amifostine-treated or control patients. Similarly, the leukocyte counts of amifostine-treated patients did not change during irradiation. However, control patients experienced a decrease in leukocyte count from 8.1 x 10 3 /mm 3 to 5.8x10 3 /mm 3 (difference: 2.3x10 3 /mm 3 ). This seems to be line specific: Whereas amifostine does not affect lymphocyte count, a radiation-induced decrease of neutrophil granulocytes seems to be prevented. Conclusion: Amifostine protects from radiation hematotoxicity, particularly affecting the granulocytopoiesis. These data confirm results from our former study

  4. Amifostine - a radioprotector in locally advanced head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenekaes, K.G.; Wagner, W.; Prott, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: There are some preliminary informations about the beneficial use of amifostine in avoiding side effects in patients with head and neck tumors who underwent radiotherapy. Patients and method: Amifostine was given as daily intravenous application (500 mg) 10 to 15 minutes prior to radiotherapy in 20 patients. The results were compared with another collective of patients which was similar. Results: According to the WHO score mucositis became manifest in 10 patients (Grade I) and 4 patients (Grade II) in the amifostine group vs 9 patients (Grade II), 6 patients (Grade III) and 1 patient (Grade IV) in the control group. Xerostomia has been seen in 15 patients (Grade I) and 5 patients (Grade II) after administration of amifostine. Without the drug 2 patients suffered from xerostomia (Grade I), 8 patients (Grade II) and 8 patients (Grade III), respectively. Administering amifostine had been feasible and non problematic. Only a small rate of toxic side effects like nausea (11%) or emesis (4%) was documented. Conclusions: Amifostine is an effective radioprotector decreasing acute and late side effects in patients with head and neck tumors. (orig.) [de

  5. Supportive use of amifostine in patients with head and neck tumors undergoing radio-chemotherapy. Is it possible to limit the duration of the application of amifostine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, K.; Muecke, R.; Hamann, D.; Ziegler, P.G.; Fietkau, R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Amifostine is a new cancer-supporting agent to protect normal tissue in patients receiving radio-chemotherapy. The main question of our study is whether the application of amifostine can be limited on the duration of chemotherapy in patients with advanced head and neck tumors undergoing radio-chemotherapy. Patients and methods: In a randomized study 14 patients were treated with amifostine (500 mg, day 1 to 5 and 29 to 33) during concurrent radio-chemotherapy with carboplatin (70 mg/m 2 , day 1 to 5 and 29 to 33), 14 patients were treated without amifostine. The analyzed parameters were dermatitis, mucositis, skin temperature, white blood and platelet count, creatinine and scintigram of salivary glands. Median survival of the amifostine group was 19 months, of the control group 10 months. Results: There were no relevant differences in all analyzed parameters between both arms of the study. Conclusion: Our form of amifostine application is probably not able to obtain a relevant reduction of the toxicity of radio-chemotherapy. (orig.) [de

  6. Protective effect of amifostine on dental health after radiotherapy of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Meyer, Jens; Momm, Felix; Bendel, Martin; Henke, Michael; Strnad, Vratislav; Groetz, Knut; Schulte, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The cytoprotective agent amifostine has been shown to reduce the radiation-induced acute and chronic xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not amifostine also reduces the incidence of dental caries associated with the radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods and Materials: The dental status before and 1 year after radiotherapy was retrospectively compared in 35 unselected patients treated as part of the prospective randomized and multicenter open-label Phase III study (WR-38) at the University Hospitals of Heidelberg, Freiburg, and Erlangen. The WR-38 study compared radiotherapy in head and neck cancer with and without concomitant administration of amifostine. Results: Patient and treatment characteristics (particularly the radiation dose and percentage of parotids included in the treatment volume) were equally distributed between the patients who received (n = 17) or did not receive (n = 18) amifostine. Fifteen patients of the amifostine group showed no deterioration of the dental status 1 year after radiotherapy as compared to 7 patients who did not receive the cytoprotector (p = 0.015, two-tailed Fisher exact test). Conclusion: Our data suggest a protective effect of amifostine on the dental health after radiotherapy of the head and neck. The dental status should be used as a primary endpoint in future studies on amifostine.

  7. Amifostine is a potent radioprotector of salivary glands in radioiodine therapy. Structural and ultrastructural findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutta, H.; Kampen, U.; Sagowski, C.; Brenner, W.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Paulsen, F.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: salivary gland impairment following high-dose radioiodine treatment is well recognized. Since differentiated thyroid cancer has a good prognosis, reduction of long-term side effects is important. This study investigates the radioprotective effects of amifostine in salivary glands of rabbits receiving high-dose radioiodine therapy so as to obtain deeper insight in changes on the cellular and ultrastructural level. Material and methods: a total of 20 rabbits were investigated. High-dose radioiodine therapy applying 1 GBq 131 I was performed in 16 animals. Eight of these 16 animals received 200 mg/m 2 body surface amifostine prior to high-dose radioiodine therapy. Four additional rabbits served as controls, two receiving amifostine, the other two no treatment at all. Subsequently, salivary glands (submandibular and parotid glands, respectively) of all animals were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Results: parenchymal damage of both parotid and submandibular glands, specially acinar structures comprising cell organelles and nuclei, of animals pretreated with amifostine was much less pronounced than in animals without amifostine pretreatment. Conclusion: the results indicate that parenchymal damage in salivary glands induced by high-dose radioiodine therapy can significantly be reduced by amifostine. Therefore, amifostine therapy may increase quality of life in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  8. Radiochemotherapy With Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Amifostine for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Tsoutsou, Pelagia G.; Karpouzis, Antonios; Tsiarkatsi, Maria; Karapantzos, Ilias; Daniilidis, Vassilios; Kouskoukis, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) combined with cisplatin or cetuximab is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced head/neck cancer (LA-HNC). The feasibility of radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and cetuximab, supported with amifostine, was herein investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-three patients with LA-HNC were recruited. Conformal hypofractionated/accelerated RT with amifostine cytoprotection (2.7 Gy/fraction, 21 fractions in 4 weeks) was combined with cisplatin (30 mg/m 2 /week) and cetuximab (standard weekly regimen) therapy. The dose of amifostine was individualized according to tolerance. Results: A high daily amifostine dose (750-1,000 mg) was tolerated by 41.8% of patients, and a standard dose (500 mg) was tolerated by 34.9% of patients. A high amifostine dose was linked to reduced RT delays (p = 0.0003). Grade 3 to 4 (3-4) mucositis occurred in 7/43 (16.2%) patients, and fungal infections occurred in 18/43 (41.8%) patients. Radiation dermatitis was not aggravated. Interruption of cetuximab due to acneiform rash was necessary in 23.3% of patients, while amifostine-related fever and rash were not observed. Severe late radiation sequelae consisted of laryngeal edema (9% laryngeal cases) and cervical strictures (33% of hypopharyngeal cases). Good salivary function was preserved in 6/11 (54.5%) nasopharyngeal cancer patients. The complete response rate was 68.5%, reaching 77.2% in patients with minor radiotherapy delays. The 24-month local control and survival rates were 72.3% and 91%, respectively (median follow-up was 13 months.). Conclusions: In this feasibility study, weekly administration of cisplatin and cetuximab was safely combined with accelerated RT, supported with amifostine, at the cost of a high incidence of acneiform rash but a reduced incidence of amifostine-related fever/rash. A high daily dose of amifostine allows completion of therapy with minor delays.

  9. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anne, Pramila Rani; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m 2 reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of ≥Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of ≥Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of ≥Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients

  10. Effects of amifostine on radiation-induced apoptosis in mouse ovary

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    Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Hee; Yoon Yong Dal [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The present study was designed to assess the radioprotective effects of amifostine on ovarian follicles. Three week-old female mice with or without pretreatment of amifostine were irradiated with 6.42 Gy of {gamma} -ray. Ovaries were collected 0 and 6h after irradiation. DNA fragmentation pattern and expression of genes and activity of proteins related with apoptosis were investigated by means of RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation of granulosa cells was reduced and incidence rate of follicular atresia was increased in ovarian follicles in {gamma} -ray irradiated mice compared to those in control or amifostine-treated group. DNA fragmentation was increased in time-dependent manner in granulosa cells of all irradiated groups. However, no difference between amifostine pre-treated group and irradiated groups was found and the expression of p53 as tumor suppressor gene and Bax as one of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family was increased in irradiated mice ovaries. PARP as DNA damage sensor was cleaved and its upstream regulator, Caspase-3 was activated. Fas (CD95), one of membrane bound receptor which initiated apoptosis pathway was expressed by {gamma} -ray. Pretreatment of amifostine before irradiation, however, inhibited the expression of p53 and Bax, the cleavage of PARP and the activation of Caspase-3. In conclusion, amifostine has an inhibitory effect on gonadal cell apoptosis induced by {gamma} -ray irradiation, through lowering the expression of apoptotic signaling peptide and the activation of DNA repair enzymes.

  11. Residual chromosomal damage after radiochemotherapy with and without amifostine detected by 24-color FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuechler, A.; Wendt, T.G.; Dreidax, M.; Liehr, T.; Claussen, U.; Pigorsch, S.U.; Dunst, J.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Amifostine is a radioprotective drug applied to reduce acute radiation toxicity during a course of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. In the present study, amifostine was used in patients undergoing adjuvant radiochemotherapy for rectal cancer. It was described previously that additional application of amifostine led to less acute skin and bowel toxicity. The present study was aimed to determine whether amifostine has an influence on the amount of residual chromosomal damage. Material and Methods: Peripheral lymphocytes of twelve rectal cancer patients who had undergone postoperative radiochemotherapy 2-3 years ago were investigated for residual chromosomal damage using 24-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (24-color FISH). All twelve patients had received a total dose of 55.8 Gy in conventional fractionation of 1.8 Gy and a 120-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy (1,000 mg/m 2 per day) in the 1st and 5th week of irradiation. Seven out of twelve patients had been given additional amifostine on chemotherapy days (500 mg total dose as short i.v. infusion immediately prior to the daily radiation fraction). Cultivation of lymphocytes and 24-color FISH were performed according to standard protocols. 100 metaphases per patient were analyzed for chromosomal aberrations in a blind study. Results: Analysis of the average number of breaks per mitosis (B/M) revealed an increased amount of residual chromosomal damage in the group treated with amifostine (0.65 B/M [0.32-0.97]) as well as in those treated without amifostine (0.76 B/M [0.31-1.25]). Also the average number of cells containing aberrations per 100 analyzed metaphases was similar (with amifostine: 22.1 [13-32] vs. 24.4 [13-35] without amifostine). The aberration types, occurring as simple translocations, reciprocal translocations, breaks, dicentrics, inversions, rings and complex chromosomal rearrangements, did not show any specific accumulation in one or the other

  12. Radiotherapy alone, versus radiotherapy with amifostine 3 times weekly, versus radiotherapy with amifostine 5 times weekly: A prospective randomized study in squamous cell head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, Anke Petra; Slotman, Ben J.; Muller, Martin J.; Leemans, C. Rene; Smeele, Ludi E.; Hoekman, Klaas; Aaronson, Neil K.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main objective of this study was to investigate whether nondaily intravenous administration of amifostine was as effective as daily intravenous administration with regard to the reduction of the incidence of Grade 2 or greater xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer.

  13. Pre-Treatment with Amifostine Protects against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Disruption of Taste in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Carroll, Brittany L.; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Delay, Eugene R.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP), a commonly prescribed chemotherapy drug, has multiple adverse side effects including alteration of taste. The effects on taste are a cause of concern for patients as changes in taste are often associated with loss of appetite, malnutrition, poor recovery and reduced quality of life. Amifostine is a cytoprotective agent that was previously shown to be effective in preventing chemotherapy-induced mucositis and nephrotoxicity. Here we determined its ability to protect against chemotherapy-induced damage to taste buds using a mouse model of CYP injury. We conducted detection threshold tests to measure changes in sucrose taste sensitivity and found that administration of amifostine 30 mins prior to CYP injection protected against CYP-induced loss in taste sensitivity. Morphological studies showed that pre-treatment with amifostine prevented CYP-induced reduction in the number of fungiform taste papillae and increased the number of taste buds. Immunohistochemical assays for markers of the cell cycle showed that amifostine administration prevented CYP-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and also protected against loss of mature taste cells after CYP exposure. Our results indicate that treatment of cancer patients with amifostine prior to chemotherapy may improve their sensitivity for taste stimuli and protect the taste system from the detrimental effects of chemotherapy. PMID:23626702

  14. Pre-treatment with amifostine protects against cyclophosphamide-induced disruption of taste in mice.

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    Nabanita Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Cyclophosphamide (CYP, a commonly prescribed chemotherapy drug, has multiple adverse side effects including alteration of taste. The effects on taste are a cause of concern for patients as changes in taste are often associated with loss of appetite, malnutrition, poor recovery and reduced quality of life. Amifostine is a cytoprotective agent that was previously shown to be effective in preventing chemotherapy-induced mucositis and nephrotoxicity. Here we determined its ability to protect against chemotherapy-induced damage to taste buds using a mouse model of CYP injury. We conducted detection threshold tests to measure changes in sucrose taste sensitivity and found that administration of amifostine 30 mins prior to CYP injection protected against CYP-induced loss in taste sensitivity. Morphological studies showed that pre-treatment with amifostine prevented CYP-induced reduction in the number of fungiform taste papillae and increased the number of taste buds. Immunohistochemical assays for markers of the cell cycle showed that amifostine administration prevented CYP-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and also protected against loss of mature taste cells after CYP exposure. Our results indicate that treatment of cancer patients with amifostine prior to chemotherapy may improve their sensitivity for taste stimuli and protect the taste system from the detrimental effects of chemotherapy.

  15. Animal experimental studies on the modification of radiogenic mucositis enoralis through amifostin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, G.; Doerr, W.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to quantify the protective effect of amifostin administered intravenously and subcutaneously in conjunction with one-time irradiation and fractionated irradiation regimes. Ulceration of the mouse lingual mucous membrane equivalent to RTOG/EORTC stage III confluent mucositis served as a clinically relevant parameter. In summary it can be said that the mucoprotective effect of amifostin is clearly dependent on when it is given. It is only effective when administered at the start of fractionated irradiation. It has no effect when administered at a later time, possibly even masking the effect of earlier doses. Amifostin administered subcutaneously, a mode which has been associated with markedly fewer side-effects in clinical studies, and after a suitably adapted time interval following irradiation is just as effective as when it is injected intravenously [de

  16. Novel Formulation Strategy to Improve the Feasibility of Amifostine Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Kavitha; Simon, Eric; Lynn, Jeremy; Snider, Alicia; Zhang, Yu; Nelson, Noah; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, Jose; Buchman, Lauren; Reyna, Dawn; Lipka, Elke; Buchman, Steven R

    2018-03-19

    Amifostine (AMF), a radioprotectant, is FDA-approved for intravenous administration in cancer patients receiving radiation therapy (XRT). Unfortunately, it remains clinically underutilized due to adverse side effects. The purpose of this study is to define the pharmacokinetic profile of an oral AMF formulation potentially capable of reducing side effects and increasing clinical feasibility. Calvarial osteoblasts were radiated under three conditions: no drug, AMF, and WR-1065 (active metabolite). Osteogenic potential of cells was measured using alkaline phosphatase staining. Next, rats were given AMF intravenously or directly into the jejunum, and pharmacokinetic profiles were evaluated. Finally, rats were given AMF orally or subcutaneously, and blood samples were analyzed for pharmacokinetics. WR-1065 preserved osteogenic potential of calvarial osteoblasts after XRT to a greater degree than AMF. Direct jejunal AMF administration incurred a systemic bioavailability of 61.5%. Subcutaneously administrated AMF yielded higher systemic levels, a more rapid peak exposure (0.438 vs. 0.875 h), and greater total systemic exposure of WR-1065 (116,756 vs. 16,874 ng*hr/ml) compared to orally administered AMF. Orally administered AMF achieves a similar systemic bioavailability and decreased peak plasma level of WR-1065 compared to intravenously administered AMF, suggesting oral AMF formulations maintain radioprotective efficacy without causing onerous side effects, and are clinically feasible.

  17. Effect of amifostine on patient assessed clinical benefit in irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Todd; Mackowiak, John I.; Brizel, David M.; Oster, Wolfgang; Zhang, Jianliang; Peeples, Patricia J.; Sauer, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if head and neck (H/N) cancer patients receiving daily amifostine during radiation therapy (RT) experienced clinical benefit (improvement in their ability to carry out normal functions with reduced discomfort) compared to nonamifostine treated patients. Methods and Materials: This was an open-label, multi-institutional randomized trial in 303 H/N cancer patients treated with RT +amifostine. Clinical benefit was measured using an 8-item validated Patient Benefit Questionnaire (PBQ) during and up to 11 months after RT. Results: 301 patients completed one or more PBQ assessments. Amifostine patients had significantly better PBQ scores (p < 0.05) than controls. The improvement in PBQ scores was most significant during chronic xerostomia. Conclusions: Amifostine use results in improved Patient Benefit Questionnaire (PBQ) scores, which is indicative of improved oral toxicity related outcomes and improved clinical benefit. Less oral toxicity should lead to preservation of late dental and oral health, and improvements in activities such as diet, nutrition, and sleep

  18. Effect of amifostine on sperm DNA fragmentation and testes after radioiodine treatment

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    Sen Cigdem Cebi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radioactive iodine (RAI is commonly used for the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves’ disease or thyroid nodules. However, information available on the impact of RAI therapy on male gonadal function is scarce. This study aimed to determine any possible damage to testicular tissue and sperm quality caused by RAI therapy, and the radioprotective effect of amifostine against such damage.

  19. Radioprotective effect of amifostine on parotid gland functioning is region dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, AWT; Faber, H; Vissink, A; Coppes, RP

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigation the protective ability of amifostine during partial irradiation of the rat parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Single-dose X-ray irradiation was performed by use of collimators with conformal radiation portals for either the 100% volume (15 Gy) or the 50% cranial/caudal

  20. Prophylactic use of amifostine to prevent radiochemotherapy-induced mucositis and xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonadou, Dosia; Pepelassi, Marizenia; Synodinou, Maria; Puglisi, Maria; Throuvalas, Nicolas

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prophylactic properties of amifostine against acute and late toxicities from radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients were randomized to receive conventional radiotherapy (RT) (2-Gy fractions, 5 days weekly, to a total of 60-74 Gy, depending on the tumor localization and TNM classification) and carboplatin (90 mg/m 2 infusion once per week before RT). Amifostine (300 mg/m 2 ) was administered in the study group only 15-30 min before RT for 6-7.5 weeks. The primary study end point was the grading of acute and late nonhematologic toxicities (mucositis, dysphagia, xerostomia) induced by radiochemotherapy. Secondary end points included treatment duration, hematologic toxicity, and clinical outcome. Results: The treatment duration was significantly shorter in the amifostine-treated group (p=0.013), because treatment interruptions were more frequent in the control group. Acute toxicities (mucositis and dysphagia) were less severe in the amifostine-treated group. By Week 3, all in the control group experienced Grade 2 mucositis compared with only 9% in the amifostine-treated group (p<0.0001). By Week 5, 52.2% of the patients in the control group experienced Grade 4 mucositis compared with 4.5% in the amifostine-treated group (p=0.0006). Similar results were obtained for dysphagia. At 3 months of follow-up, only 27% of patients in the study group experienced Grade 2 xerostomia compared with 73.9% in the control group (p=0.0001). Eighteen months after cessation of therapy, the proportion of patients with Grade 2 xerostomia was 4.5% vs. 30.4% for each respective treatment group (p=0.047). Cytoprotection with amifostine did not affect treatment outcome, with 90.9% complete responses in the amifostine-treated group compared with 78.3% in the control group (p=0.414). Conclusion: Amifostine was effective in reducing mucositis and dysphagia resulting from radiochemotherapy in patients with head

  1. Amifostine reduces the seminiferous epithelium damage in doxorubicin-treated prepubertal rats without improving the fertility status

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    Miraglia Sandra M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amifostine is an efficient cytoprotector against toxicity caused by some chemotherapeutic drugs. Doxorubicin, a potent anticancer anthracycline, is known to produce spermatogenic damage even in low doses. Although some studies have suggested that amifostine does not confer protection to doxorubicin-induced testicular damage, schedules and age of treatment have different approach depending on the protocol. Thus, we proposed to investigate the potential cytoprotective action of amifostine against the damage provoked by doxorubicin to prepubertal rat testes (30-day-old by assessing some macro and microscopic morphometric parameters 15, 30 and 60 days after the treatment; for fertility evaluation, quantitative analyses of sperm parameters and reproductive competence in the adult phase were also carried out. Methods Thirty-day-old male rats were distributed into four groups: Doxorubicin (5 mg/kg, Amifostine (400 mg/kg, Amifostine/Doxorubicin (amifostine 15 minutes before doxorubicin and Sham Control (0.9% saline solution. "Standard One Way Anova" parametric and "Anova on Ranks" non-parametric tests were applied according to the behavior of the obtained data; significant differences were considered when p Results The rats killed 30 and 60 days after doxorubicin treatment showed diminution of seminiferous epithelium height and reduction on the frequency of tubular sections containing at least one type of differentiated spermatogonia; reduction of sperm concentration and motility and an increase of sperm anomalous forms where observed in doxorubicin-treated animals. All these parameters were improved in the Amifostine/Doxorubicin group only when compared to Doxorubicin group. Such reduction, however, still remained below the values obtained from the Sham Control group. Nevertheless, the reproductive competence of doxorubicin-treated rats was not improved by amifostine pre-administration. Conclusions These results suggest that

  2. Cytoprotection with amifostine in the simultaneous radio-chemotherapy of recurrent head and neck cancer; Zytoprotection mit Amifostin im Rahmen der Radiochemotherapie bei vorbestrahlten Kopf-Hals-Karzinomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buentzel, J.; Weinaug, R.; Kuettner, K. [Zentralklinikum gGmbH Suedthueringen, Suhl (Germany). Klinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Plastische Operationen; Glatzel, M.; Froehlich, D. [Zentralklinikum gGmbH Suedthueringen, Suhl (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Schuth, J. [Essex Pharma, Muenchen (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: The radiotherapeutic possibilities are limited for patients with a recurrent or second head and neck cancer if the patient was already irradiated in the first therapy. In the presented study we investigated the changes of this situation due to the usage of amifostine in the case of re-irradiation (simultaneous radio-chemotherapy). Patients and methods: Between 1995 and 1997 we treated 14 patients with a recurrent or second malignancy of the head and neck region by a simultaneous radio-chemotherapy (20x1.5 Gy, Carboplatin 70 mg/m{sup 2} BSA on days 1 to 5 and 16 to 20, 500 mg amifostine prior to every carboplatin infusion). Six out of 14 patients got an additional brachytherapy (10 to 15 Gy) to increase the local dose because of a residual tomor. In 4 cases the treatment was an adjunctive one, following the surgical tumor debulking. Results: We have seen 3 complete remissions (21.4%), and 8 partial remissions (57.1%). The median time of observation in 13 months now. Three out of 14 patients died, 2 because of the tumor. Hematological toxicities: Side effects Grade 2 WHO were seen only in 1 patient. Acute non-hematological toxicities: Mucositis Grade 0/1 in 7 patients, mucositis Grade 2 in 7 patients, dysphagia Grade 0/1 in 9 patients, dysphagia Grade 2 in 5 patients, xerostomia Grade 1 in 9 patients, xerostomia Grade 2 in 3 patients. We registrated only 1 serious late toxicity due to radio-chemotherapy: 4 months after brachytherapy a patient (with laryngectomy) developed a submental fistula. Conclusion: These first results suggest that the usage of amifostine offers new potential ways for re-irradiation of patients with recurrent or second malignancies in the head neck region. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bei einem Rezidiv- oder Zweitkarzinom im Kopf-Hals-Bereich sind die radiotherapeutischen Moeglichkeiten bei bereits vorbestrahlten Patienten sehr begrenzt. Inwieweit die Integration des selektiven Zytoprotektivums Amifostin in eine nochmalige Radiochemotherapie

  3. A pilot study of topical intrarectal application of amifostine for prevention of late radiation rectal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Han, Sue; Tobi, Martin; Shaw, Leslie M.; Bonner, Heather S.; Vargas, Barbara J.; Prokop, Sharon; Stamos, Beth; Kelly, Laura; Biggar, Sandra; Kaplan, Irving

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical symptomatic late injury to the rectal wall occurs in about one-third of patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation. Reducing the physical dose to the anterior rectal wall without a similar reduction in the posterior peripheral zone is difficult because of the proximity of the prostate to the anterior rectal wall. On the basis of our previous observations in an animal model that intrarectal application of amifostine resulted in very high concentrations of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 in the rectal wall, a Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial was undertaken. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with localized prostate cancer were accrued. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, and no pelvic lymphadenopathy or distant metastases. The total dose to the prostate was 70.2 Gy in 20 patients and 73.8 Gy in 9 patients. Therapy was delivered using a 4-field technique with three-dimensional conformal planning. Amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution 30 min before irradiation on the first 15 days of therapy. Amifostine was escalated in cohorts from 500 to 2500 mg. Proctoscopy was performed before therapy and at 9 months after completion. Most patients underwent repeat proctoscopy at 18 months. On Days 1 and 10 of radiotherapy, serum samples were collected for pharmacokinetic studies. The clinical symptoms (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale) and a proctoscopy score were assessed during follow-up. Results: All patients completed therapy with no amifostine-related toxicity at any dose level. The application was feasible and well tolerated. No substantial systemic absorption occurred. With a median follow-up of 26 months, 9 patients (33%) developed rectal bleeding (8 Grade 1, 1 Grade 2). At 9 months, 16 and 3 patients developed Grade 1 and Grade 2 telangiectasia, respectively. This was mostly confined to the anterior

  4. The rat acute-phase protein {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin plays a central role in amifostine-mediated radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirjana, Mihailovic; Goran, Poznanovic; Nevena, Grdovic; Melita, Vidakovic; Svetlana, Dinic; Ilijana, Grigorov; Desanka, Bogojevic, E-mail: mista@ibiss.bg.ac.r [Department of Molecular Biology, Institute for Biological Research ' Sinisa Stankovic' , University of Belgrade, Bulevar despota Stefana 142, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-09-15

    Previously we reported that elevated circulating concentrations of the acute-phase (AP) protein {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin ({alpha}{sub 2}M), either as typically occurring in pregnant female rats or after administration to male rats, provides radioprotection, displayed as 100% survival of experimental animals exposed to total-body irradiation with 6.7 Gy (LD{sub 50/30}) x-rays, that is as effective as that afforded by the synthetic radioprotector amifostine. The finding that amifostine administration induces a 45-fold increase in {alpha}{sub 2}M in the circulation led us to hypothesise that {alpha}{sub 2}M assumes an essential role in both natural and amifostine-mediated radioprotection in the rat. In the present work we examined the activation of cytoprotective mechanisms in rat hepatocytes after the exogenous administration of {alpha}{sub 2}M and amifostine. Our results showed that the IL6/JAK/STAT3 hepatoprotective signal pathway, described in a variety of liver-injury models, upregulated the {alpha}{sub 2}M gene in amifostine-pretreated animals. In both {alpha}{sub 2}M- and amifostine-pretreated rats we observed the activation of the Akt signalling pathways that mediate cellular survival. At the cellular level this was reflected as a significant reduction of irradiation-induced DNA damage that allowed for the rapid and complete restoration of liver mass and ultimately at the level of the whole organism the complete restoration of body weight. We conclude that the selective upregulation of {alpha}{sub 2}M plays a central role in amifostine-provided radioprotection.

  5. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and amifostine in spinal cord reirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, C.; Andratschke, N.; Price, R.E.; Rivera, B.; Ang, K. Kian

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and amifostine modulate the reirradiation tolerance of rat cervical spinal cord. Initial experiments by the authors' group suggested that administration of each agent alone significantly increased the median latent time to radiation myelopathy (RM) in previously unirradiated animals but did not change the dose-response relationship. Because of different modes of action, a follow-up study was undertaken to test the combined treatment. Material and Methods: The cervical spinal cord of 51 adult Fisher F-344 rats received a single fraction of 16 Gy, which corresponds to approximately 75% of the median paresis dose (ED 50 ), followed 5 months later by a second radiation dose, which ranged from 17 to 21 Gy. The study animals received a single intrathecal injection of 0.3 mg amifostine into the cisterna magna 30-60 min before reirradiation plus three subcutaneous doses of IGF-1 (700 μg) starting from 24 h before to 24 h after reirradiation. Control animals received saline injections via the same routes. Animals were followed until RM developed or until 12 months from reirradiation. Histopathologic examinations were performed post mortem. Results: No animals showed any neurologic abnormalities before reirradiation. RM occurred in controls versus treated rats after a mean latency of 218 versus 314 days (19 Gy; p=0.11) and 104 versus 186 days (21 Gy; p=0.002) from second dose (Figure 1). ED 50 was 18.2 versus 19.4 Gy (p=0.15; Figure 2). Treatment with IGF-1 and amifostine did not significantly influence the rates of tumor induction or intercurrent death. Conclusion: IGF-1 and amifostine significantly reduced RM rates after 21 Gy. The shift of the dose-response curve suggests an increase of the ED 50 for single-dose treatment by approximately 7%. Thus, brief therapeutic intervention might slightly decrease radiation-induced neurotoxicity in a retreatment situation. (orig.)

  6. Daily amifostine given concomitantly to chemoradiation in head and neck cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trog, D.; Bank, P.; Wendt, T.G.; Koscielny, S.; Beleites, E.

    1999-01-01

    Background: In patients with loco-regionally advanced head and neck cancer conventionally fractionated radiotherapy alone results in poor loco-regional control and survival rates. Treatment intensification by simultaneous administration of cytotoxic drugs produces higher acute morbidity. Therefore chemical radioprotection of normal tissues may be of clinical benefit. Patients and Methods: In a pilot study patients with advanced nonresectable head neck cancer treated with conventionally fractionated radical radiotherapy (60 to 66 Gy total doses) and concomitantly given 5-fluorouracil as protracted venous infusion, 250 mg/sqm/24 h over the entire treatment period were given amifostine 300 mg absolutely before each fraction. Acute treatment related mobidity was scored according to CTC classification and loco-regional control and survival rates were estimated. Comparison was made with a historical control group of identical chemoradiation but without amifostine application. Results: Chemoradiation induced oral mucositis was delayed and showed significant lower degrees at all 10 Gy increments (p 0.05). No significant toxicity was recorded with respect to blood pressure, serum calcium, potassium, hematologic parameters, emesis, nausea or body weight loss. Progression free survival and overall survival probability at 2 years were not statistically different in both cohorts. Conclusion: Amifostine given before each fraction of radiotherapy over 6 weeks has no cumulative toxicity, was well tolerated and may reduce treatment induced oral mucositis. No tumor protective effect was observed. (orig.) [de

  7. The potential influence of cell protectors for dose escalation in cancer therapy: an analysis of amifostine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCumber, Linda M.

    2004-01-01

    The attempt to increase the therapeutic ratio in an effort to improve survival or quality of life is the goal of modern cancer therapy. It is commonly accepted that local and systemic tumor control would increase if the dose intensity of antineoplastic drugs, radiation therapy, or the combination were increased. Radiation dose escalation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), accelerated or hypofractionated radiation schemes, and multidrug chemotherapy regimens are being used to try to increase tumor kill while inflicting minimal injury to normal tissue. Modern chemoradiation techniques have led to improved local regional control and increased cure rates, but the potentially severe and debilitating adverse effects of the therapies prevent them from reaching the ultimate goal of curing the disease while leaving the patient with a good quality of life. Cell protectants such as amifostine function by reducing the effects of therapy on normal cells while maintaining tumor sensitivity to the therapy. In various studies, amifostine has been analyzed and appears to be a potentially powerful adjuvant to current cancer therapy. Administering amifostine may allow dose escalation with less or equal risk to surrounding normal tissues. This could improve therapeutic efficacy, survival, and quality of life for cancer patients

  8. Intrarectal amifostine suspension may protect against acute proctitis during radiation therapy for prostate cancer: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K.; Menard, Cynthia; Guion, Peter; Simone, Nicole L.; Smith, Sharon; Crouse, Nancy Sears; Godette, Denise J.; Cooley-Zgela, Theresa; Sciuto, Linda C.; Coleman, Jonathan; Pinto, Peter; Albert, Paul S.; Camphausen, Kevin; Coleman, C. Norman

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Our goal was to test the ability of intrarectal amifostine to limit symptoms of radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: The first 18 patients received 1 g of intrarectal amifostine suspension placed 30-45 min before each radiation treatment. The following 12 patients received 2 g of amifostine. Total dose prescribed ranged from 66 to 76 Gy. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. The suspension remained intrarectal during treatment and was expelled after treatment. For gastrointestinal symptoms, during treatment and follow-up, all patients had a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade recorded. Results: Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 6-24 months). With 2 g vs. 1 g amifostine, there was a nearly significant decrease in RTOG Grade 2 acute rectal toxicity. Seven weeks after the start of radiation therapy, the incidence of Grade 2 toxicity was 33% in the 1-g group (6/18) compared with 0% (0/12) in the 2-g group (p = 0.06). No Grade 3 toxicity or greater occurred in this study. Conclusion: This trial suggests greater rectal radioprotection from acute effects with 2 g vs. 1 g amifostine suspension. Further studies should be conducted in populations at higher risk for developing symptomatic acute and late proctitis

  9. The potentiation of the radioprotective efficacy of two medical countermeasures, gamma-tocotrienol and amifostine, by a combination prophylactic modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vijay K.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Newman, Victoria L.; Romaine, Patricia L.P.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the possible potentiation of survival protection afforded by relatively low-dose amifostine prophylaxis against total body irradiation in combination with a protective, less toxic agent, gamma-tocotrienol (GT3). Mice were administered amifostine and/or GT3, then exposed to 9.2 Gy 60 Co γ-irradiation and monitored for survival for 30 days. To investigate cytokine stimulation, mice were administered amifostine or GT3; serum samples were collected and analyzed for cytokines. Survival studies show single treatments of GT3 or amifostine significantly improved survival, compared to the vehicle, and combination treatments resulted in significantly higher survival compared to single treatments. In vivo studies with GT3 confirmed prior work indicating GT3 induces granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). This approach, the prophylactic combination of amifostine and GT3, which act through different mechanisms, shows promise and should be investigated further as a potential countermeasure for acute radiation syndrome. (authors)

  10. Daily amifostine given concomitantly to chemoradiation in head and neck cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trog, D.; Bank, P.; Wendt, T.G. [Friedrich-Schiller Univ., Jena (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Koscielny, S.; Beleites, E. [Friedrich-Schiller Univ., Jena (Germany). Dept. of Ear Nose Throat Diseases

    1999-09-01

    Background: In patients with loco-regionally advanced head and neck cancer conventionally fractionated radiotherapy alone results in poor loco-regional control and survival rates. Treatment intensification by simultaneous administration of cytotoxic drugs produces higher acute morbidity. Therefore chemical radioprotection of normal tissues may be of clinical benefit. Patients and Methods: In a pilot study patients with advanced nonresectable head neck cancer treated with conventionally fractionated radical radiotherapy (60 to 66 Gy total doses) and concomitantly given 5-fluorouracil as protracted venous infusion, 250 mg/sqm/24 h over the entire treatment period were given amifostine 300 mg absolutely before each fraction. Acute treatment related mobidity was scored according to CTC classification and loco-regional control and survival rates were estimated. Comparison was made with a historical control group of identical chemoradiation but without amifostine application. Results: Chemoradiation induced oral mucositis was delayed and showed significant lower degrees at all 10 Gy increments (p<0.05) except 60 Gy and over (p>0.05). No significant toxicity was recorded with respect to blood pressure, serum calcium, potassium, hematologic parameters, emesis, nausea or body weight loss. Progression free survival and overall survival probability at 2 years were not statistically different in both cohorts. Conclusion: Amifostine given before each fraction of radiotherapy over 6 weeks has no cumulative toxicity, was well tolerated and may reduce treatment induced oral mucositis. No tumor protective effect was observed. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Bei Patienten mit lokoregionaer fortgeschrittenen Karzinomen im Kopf-Hals-Bereich fuehrt die alleinige konventionell fraktionierte Radiotherapie zu unuenstigen lokoregionaeren Tumorkontrollraten und Ueberlebensraten. Die Therapieintensivierung durch simultane Radiochemotherapie fuehrt zu gesteigerter Akutmorbiditaet. Die chemische

  11. Randomized phase III trial of postoperative radiochemotherapy ± amifostine in head and neck cancer. Is there evidence for radioprotection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacha, P.; Fehlauer, F.; Mahlmann, B.; Marx, M.; Richter, E.; Hinke, A.; Sommer, K.; Feyerabend, T.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clincial data suggest a reduction of radiation-induced acute toxicity by amifostine (A). We investigated this issue in a randomized trial comparing radiochemotherapy (RT + CT) versus radiochemotherapy plus amifostine (RC + CT + A) in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: 56 patients with oro-/hypopharynx or larynx cancer (T1-2 N1-2 G3, T3-4 N0-2 G1-3) were randomized to received RC + CT alone or RC + CT + A. Patients were irradiated up to 60 Gy (R0) or 70 Gy (R1/2) and received chemotherapy (70 mg/m 2 carboplatin, day 1-5 week 1 and 5 of radiotherapy). 250 mg amifostine were applied daily before each radiotherapy session. Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC). As for acute xerostomia, patients with laryngeal cancer were excluded from evaluation. Results: 50 patients were evaluable (25 patients in the RC + CT, 25 patients in the RC + CT + A group). Clinical characteristics were well balanced in both treatment groups. Amifostine provided reduction in acute xerostomia and mucositis but had no obvious influence on Karnofsky performance status, body weight, cutaneous side effects, and alopecia. The differences between both groups were statistically significant for acute xerostomia and nonsignificant, but with a trend for mucositis. Conclusions: According to our results, there is a radioprotective effect on salivary glands and a potential effect on oral mucosa by amifostine in postoperative radiotherapy combined with carboplatin. To improve the radio- and chemoprotective effects of amifostine in clinical practice, the application of a higher dose (> 250 mg) seems to be necessary. (orig.)

  12. Radioprotection of salivary glands by S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosphorothioic (amifostine) obtained in a rabbit animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohuslavizki, Karl H.; Klutmann, Susanne; Jenicke, Lars; Brenner, Winfried; Feyerabend, Bernd; Henze, Eberhard; Clausen, Malte

    1999-01-01

    Background: Impairment of salivary gland function following high-dose radioiodine treatment (HDRIT) is a well-recognized side effect of the treatment. Because differentiated thyroid cancer has an excellent prognosis, reduction of long-term side-effects is mandatory. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of amifostine in a rabbit animal model. Methods: Salivary gland scintigraphy was performed in a total of 16 New Zealand White rabbits. Uptake of 99m Tc-pertechnetate was calculated in percentage of injected activity as a quantitative measure of both salivary gland and thyroid function. Reproducibility of salivary gland scintigraphy was evaluated in one rabbit without any intervention. Fifteen rabbits were studied prior to and up to 6 months after high-dose radioiodine treatment applying 2 GBq 131 I. Ten animals received 200 mg/kg amifostine prior to high-dose radioiodine therapy, and 5 served as controls. Salivary glands were examined histopathologically. Results: Variation coefficient of parenchymal function was less than 3.8% in salivary glands. Prior to HDRIT, thyroid uptake was 0.417 ± 0.373% and 0.421 ± 0.241% in control and amifostine-treated rabbits, respectively. Four weeks after HDRIT, complete ablation of the thyroid was achieved in both groups. Prior to HDRIT, uptake of 99m Tc-pertechnetate in salivary glands of five control rabbits was not significantly different from ten amifostine-treated rabbits. In control rabbits 6 months after HDRIT, parenchymal function was reduced significantly (p 0.05) in parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. Histopathologically, marked lipomatosis was observed in control animals but was negligible in amifostine-treated animals. Conclusion: Parenchymal damage in salivary glands induced by high-dose radioiodine treatment can be significantly reduced by amifostine in this rabbit animal model. This corresponds to data obtained in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

  13. Randomized phase III trial of postoperative radiochemotherapy {+-} amifostine in head and neck cancer. Is there evidence for radioprotection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacha, P; Fehlauer, F; Mahlmann, B; Marx, M; Richter, E [Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Hinke, A [WiSP Research Inst., Langenfeld (Germany); Sommer, K [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Feyerabend, T [Practice for Radiation Therapy Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Bonn (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clincial data suggest a reduction of radiation-induced acute toxicity by amifostine (A). We investigated this issue in a randomized trial comparing radiochemotherapy (RT + CT) versus radiochemotherapy plus amifostine (RC + CT + A) in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: 56 patients with oro-/hypopharynx or larynx cancer (T1-2 N1-2 G3, T3-4 N0-2 G1-3) were randomized to received RC + CT alone or RC + CT + A. Patients were irradiated up to 60 Gy (R0) or 70 Gy (R1/2) and received chemotherapy (70 mg/m{sup 2} carboplatin, day 1-5 week 1 and 5 of radiotherapy). 250 mg amifostine were applied daily before each radiotherapy session. Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC). As for acute xerostomia, patients with laryngeal cancer were excluded from evaluation. Results: 50 patients were evaluable (25 patients in the RC + CT, 25 patients in the RC + CT + A group). Clinical characteristics were well balanced in both treatment groups. Amifostine provided reduction in acute xerostomia and mucositis but had no obvious influence on Karnofsky performance status, body weight, cutaneous side effects, and alopecia. The differences between both groups were statistically significant for acute xerostomia and nonsignificant, but with a trend for mucositis. Conclusions: According to our results, there is a radioprotective effect on salivary glands and a potential effect on oral mucosa by amifostine in postoperative radiotherapy combined with carboplatin. To improve the radio- and chemoprotective effects of amifostine in clinical practice, the application of a higher dose (> 250 mg) seems to be necessary. (orig.)

  14. Cytoprotection with amifostine in the simultaneous radio-chemotherapy of recurrent head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buentzel, J.; Weinaug, R.; Kuettner, K.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The radiotherapeutic possibilities are limited for patients with a recurrent or second head and neck cancer if the patient was already irradiated in the first therapy. In the presented study we investigated the changes of this situation due to the usage of amifostine in the case of re-irradiation (simultaneous radio-chemotherapy). Patients and methods: Between 1995 and 1997 we treated 14 patients with a recurrent or second malignancy of the head and neck region by a simultaneous radio-chemotherapy (20x1.5 Gy, Carboplatin 70 mg/m 2 BSA on days 1 to 5 and 16 to 20, 500 mg amifostine prior to every carboplatin infusion). Six out of 14 patients got an additional brachytherapy (10 to 15 Gy) to increase the local dose because of a residual tumor. In 4 cases the treatment was an adjunctive one, following the surgical tumor debulking. Results: We have seen 3 complete remissions (21.4%), and 8 partial remissions (57.1%). The median time of observation in 13 months now. Three out of 14 patients died, 2 because of the tumor. Hematological toxicities: Side effects Grade 2 WHO were seen only in 1 patient. Acute non-hematological toxicities: Mucositis Grade 0/1 in 7 patients, mucositis Grade 2 in 7 patients, dysphagia Grade 0/1 in 9 patients, dysphagia Grade 2 in 5 patients, xerostomia Grade 1 in 9 patients, xerostomia Grade 2 in 3 patients. We registrated only 1 serious late toxicity due to radio-chemotherapy: 4 months after brachytherapy a patient (with laryngectomy) developed a submental fistula. Conclusion: These first results suggest that the usage of amifostine offers new potential ways for re-irradiation of patients with recurrent or second malignancies in the head neck region. (orig.) [de

  15. Amifostine Analog, DRDE-30, Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aastha Arora

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin (BLM is an effective curative option in the management of several malignancies including pleural effusions; but pulmonary toxicity, comprising of pneumonitis and fibrosis, poses challenge in its use as a front-line chemotherapeutic. Although Amifostine has been found to protect lungs from the toxic effects of radiation and BLM, its application is limited due to associated toxicity and unfavorable route of administration. Therefore, there is a need for selective, potent, and safe anti-fibrotic drugs. The current study was undertaken to assess the protective effects of DRDE-30, an analog of Amifostine, on BLM-induced lung injury in C57BL/6 mice. Whole body micro- computed tomography (CT was used to non-invasively observe tissue damage, while broncheo-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung tissues were assessed for oxidative damage, inflammation and fibrosis. Changes in the lung density revealed by micro-CT suggested protection against BLM-induced lung injury by DRDE-30, which correlated well with changes in lung morphology and histopathology. DRDE-30 significantly blunted BLM-induced oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs evidenced by reduced oxidative damage, endothelial barrier dysfunction, Myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and protection of tissue architecture, that could be linked to enhanced anti-oxidant defense system and suppression of redox-sensitive pro-inflammatory signaling cascades. DRDE-30 decreased the BLM-induced augmentation in BALF TGF-β and lung hydroxyproline levels, as well as reduced the expression of the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, suggesting the suppression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT as one of its anti-fibrotic effects. The results demonstrate that the Amifostine analog, DRDE-30, ameliorates the oxidative injury and lung fibrosis induced by BLM and strengthen its potential use as an adjuvant in alleviating the side effects of

  16. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and amifostine in spinal cord reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, C.; Andratschke, N. [TU Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Price, R.E.; Rivera, B. [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery; Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To test whether insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and amifostine modulate the reirradiation tolerance of rat cervical spinal cord. Initial experiments by the authors' group suggested that administration of each agent alone significantly increased the median latent time to radiation myelopathy (RM) in previously unirradiated animals but did not change the dose-response relationship. Because of different modes of action, a follow-up study was undertaken to test the combined treatment. Material and Methods: The cervical spinal cord of 51 adult Fisher F-344 rats received a single fraction of 16 Gy, which corresponds to approximately 75% of the median paresis dose (ED{sub 50}), followed 5 months later by a second radiation dose, which ranged from 17 to 21 Gy. The study animals received a single intrathecal injection of 0.3 mg amifostine into the cisterna magna 30-60 min before reirradiation plus three subcutaneous doses of IGF-1 (700 {mu}g) starting from 24 h before to 24 h after reirradiation. Control animals received saline injections via the same routes. Animals were followed until RM developed or until 12 months from reirradiation. Histopathologic examinations were performed post mortem. Results: No animals showed any neurologic abnormalities before reirradiation. RM occurred in controls versus treated rats after a mean latency of 218 versus 314 days (19 Gy; p=0.11) and 104 versus 186 days (21 Gy; p=0.002) from second dose (Figure 1). ED{sub 50} was 18.2 versus 19.4 Gy (p=0.15; Figure 2). Treatment with IGF-1 and amifostine did not significantly influence the rates of tumor induction or intercurrent death. Conclusion: IGF-1 and amifostine significantly reduced RM rates after 21 Gy. The shift of the dose-response curve suggests an increase of the ED{sub 50} for single-dose treatment by approximately 7%. Thus, brief therapeutic intervention might slightly decrease radiation-induced neurotoxicity in a retreatment situation. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of the radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human lymphocytes irradiated with gamma-rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Miocic, S.; Ramic, S.; Milic, M.; Viculin, T.

    2005-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human peripheral blood irradiated with g-rays were investigated using the micronucleus (MN) assay and the analysis of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Duplicate blood samples were pre-treated with amifostine (7.7 mM), melatonin (2 mM) and their combination for 30 minutes. Negative controls were also included. After treatment with radioprotectors, one blood sample from each experimental group was exposed to g-rays from a 6 0C o source. The radiation dose absorbed was 2 Gy. Pre-treated irradiated blood samples showed a decrease in the total number of MN and in the number of cells with more than one MN. Moreover, they also showed significantly lower mean SCE values. Our results indicate that amifostine, melatonin and their combination in vitro have radioprotective effects on g-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no significant genotoxicity. Therefore, it may be reasonable to use them in combination, adjusting the doses of amifostine to achieve the best radioprotective effect with as few side effects as possible. Before employment, this combination should be extensively tested in vitro and in vivo, using the same and other biomarkers for different radiation dose and concentration ranges of both radioprotectors.(author)

  18. Radioprotection of salivary glands by S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosphorothioic (amifostine) obtained in a rabbit animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohuslavizki, Karl H; Klutmann, Susanne; Jenicke, Lars; Brenner, Winfried; Feyerabend, Bernd; Henze, Eberhard; Clausen, Malte

    1999-08-01

    Background: Impairment of salivary gland function following high-dose radioiodine treatment (HDRIT) is a well-recognized side effect of the treatment. Because differentiated thyroid cancer has an excellent prognosis, reduction of long-term side-effects is mandatory. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of amifostine in a rabbit animal model. Methods: Salivary gland scintigraphy was performed in a total of 16 New Zealand White rabbits. Uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate was calculated in percentage of injected activity as a quantitative measure of both salivary gland and thyroid function. Reproducibility of salivary gland scintigraphy was evaluated in one rabbit without any intervention. Fifteen rabbits were studied prior to and up to 6 months after high-dose radioiodine treatment applying 2 GBq {sup 131}I. Ten animals received 200 mg/kg amifostine prior to high-dose radioiodine therapy, and 5 served as controls. Salivary glands were examined histopathologically. Results: Variation coefficient of parenchymal function was less than 3.8% in salivary glands. Prior to HDRIT, thyroid uptake was 0.417 {+-} 0.373% and 0.421 {+-} 0.241% in control and amifostine-treated rabbits, respectively. Four weeks after HDRIT, complete ablation of the thyroid was achieved in both groups. Prior to HDRIT, uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate in salivary glands of five control rabbits was not significantly different from ten amifostine-treated rabbits. In control rabbits 6 months after HDRIT, parenchymal function was reduced significantly (p < 0.0001) by 75.3 {+-} 5.3% and 53.6 {+-} 17.4% in parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. In contrast, in amifostine-treated rabbits, parenchymal function was reduced by 10.6 {+-} 3.4% and 6.5 {+-} 4.3% (p > 0.05) in parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. Histopathologically, marked lipomatosis was observed in control animals but was negligible in amifostine-treated animals. Conclusion

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy of zoledronic acid and amifostine on radiation induced bone loss in mice

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    Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sueum; Kang, Sohi; Moon, Cahng Jong; Kim, Jong Choon; Kim, Sung Ho [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung Kee [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeungeup (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [College of Ecology and Environmental Science, Kyungpook National University, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study investigated the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on radiation-induced bone loss in C3H/HeN mice. C3H/HeN mice were divided into sham control and three irradiated groups (3 Gy, gamma ray). The irradiated mice were treated for 12 weeks with vehicle, amifostine (intraperitoneal injection), or ZA (subcutaneous injection). Grip strength, uterus weight, and serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) levels were measured. Tibiae were analyzed using micro-computed tomography. Treatment of ZA (100 μg·kg{sup -1}·week{sup -1}) significantly preserved trabecular bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, trabecular separation, bone mineral density of proximal tibia metaphysic, and cortical bone volume, but did not alter the uterus weight of the mice. The administration of ZA for 12 weeks lowered serum ALP and TRAP levels in irradiated mice, suggesting that ZA can reduce the bone turnover rate in mice. No differences were apparent between the amifostine-treated group and the irradiation control group. The results indicate that ZA can prevent radiation-induced bone loss in mice.

  20. Phase II multicenter randomized study of amifostine for prevention of acute radiation rectal toxicity: Topical intrarectal versus subcutaneous application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouloulias, Vassilis E.; Kouvaris, John R.; Pissakas, George; Mallas, Elias; Antypas, Christos; Kokakis, John D.; Matsopoulos, George; Michopoulos, Spyros; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Vlahos, Lambros J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the cytoprotective effect of subcutaneous vs. intrarectal administration of amifostine against acute radiation toxicity. Methods and materials: Patients were randomized to receive amifostine either intrarectally (Group A, n = 27) or a 500-mg flat dose subcutaneously (Group B, n = 26) before irradiation. Therapy was delivered using a four-field technique with three-dimensional conformal planning. In Group A, 1,500 mg of amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution in 40 mL of enema. Two different toxicity scales were used: the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) rectal and urologic toxicity criteria and the Subjective-RectoSigmoid scale based on the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. Objective measurements with rectosigmoidoscopy were performed at baseline and 1-2 days after radiotherapy completion. The area under the curve for the time course of mucositis (RTOG criteria) during irradiation represented the mucositis index. Results: Intrarectal amifostine was feasible and well tolerated without any systemic or local side effects. According to the RTOG toxicity scale, Group A had superior results with a significantly lower incidence of Grades I-II rectal radiation morbidity (11% vs. 42%, p 0.04) but inferior results concerning urinary toxicity (48% vs. 15%, p 0.03). The mean rectal mucositis index and Subjective-RectoSigmoid score were significantly lower in Group A (0.44 vs. 2.45 [p = 0.015] and 3.9 vs. 6.0 [p = 0.01], respectively), and the mean urinary mucositis index was lower in Group B (2.39 vs. 0.34, p < 0.028). Conclusions: Intrarectal administration of amifostine (1,500 mg) seemed to have a cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation rectal mucositis but was inferior to subcutaneous administration in terms of urinary toxicity. Additional randomized studies are needed for definitive decisions concerning the

  1. Amifostine protects rat kidneys during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate

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    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Forrer, Flavio; Bernard, Bert; Bijster, Magda; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de; Vermeij, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues, the kidneys are the major dose-limiting organs, because of tubular reabsorption and retention of radioactivity. Preventing renal uptake or toxicity will allow for higher tumour radiation doses. We tested the cytoprotective drug amifostine, which selectively protects healthy tissue during chemo- and radiotherapy, for its renoprotective capacities after PRRT with high-dose [ 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate. Male Lewis rats were injected with 278 or 555 MBq [ 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate to create renal damage and were followed up for 130 days. For renoprotection, rats received either amifostine or co-injection with lysine. Kidneys, blood and urine were collected for toxicity measurements. At 130 days after PRRT, a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan was performed to quantify tubular uptake of 99m Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a measure of tubular function. Treatment with 555 MBq [ 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate resulted in body weight loss, elevated creatinine and proteinuria. Amifostine and lysine treatment significantly prevented this rise in creatinine and the level of proteinuria, but did not improve the histological damage. In contrast, after 278 MBq [ 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate, creatinine values were slightly, but not significantly, elevated compared with the control rats. Proteinuria and histological damage were different from controls and were significantly improved by amifostine treatment. Quantification of 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT scintigrams at 130 days after [ 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate therapy correlated well with 1/creatinine (r 2 = 0.772, p 177 Lu-DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 ]octreotate. Besides lysine, amifostine might be used in clinical PRRT as well as to maximise anti-tumour efficacy. (orig.)

  2. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

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    Murat Caloglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6, Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8, Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8, and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8. The rats in all groups were irradiated individually with a single dose of 20 Gy to the total abdomen, except those in CONT. LC (300 mg/kg or amifostine (200 mg/kg was used 30 min before irradiation. Histopathological analysis of small intestine was carried out after euthanasia. Results: Pretreatment with amifostine reduced the radiation-induced acute degenerative damage (P = 0.009 compared to the RT group. Pretreatment with LC did not obtain any significant difference compared to the RT group. The vascular damage significantly reduced in both of the AMI+RT (P = 0.003 and LC+RT group (P = 0.029 compared to the RT group. The overall damage score was significantly lower in the AMI+RT group than the RT group (P = 0.009. There was not any significant difference between the LC+RT and RT group. Conclusions: Amifostine has a marked radioprotective effect against all histopathological changes on small intestinal tissue while LC has limited effects which are mainly on vascular structure.

  3. Cytoprotection with amifostine in radiotherapy or combined radio-chemotherapy of head and neck cancer; Zytoprotektion mit Amifostin in der Strahlentherapie bzw. Strahlen-/Chemotherapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren

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    Altmann, S.; Hoffmanns, H. [Krankenhaus Maria-Hilf, Moenchengladbach (Germany). Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie

    1999-11-01

    Background: A considerable amount of experimental and clinical data prove the cytoprotective effect of amifostine on normal tissue exposed to different types of antineoplastic treatments. The present study examines its influence on the short-term toxicity of either radiotherapy alone or combined radio-chemotherapy in patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: Twenty-three patients with advanced head and neck cancer, mainly Stage III and IV, were treated with preoperative radiation (n=1), pre- as well as postoperative radiotherapy (n=5), postoperative radiation (n=9) or combined postoperative radio-chemotherapy (n=6). Before each radiation application a total dose of 500 mg amifostine was administered intravenously over 15 minutes. The documentation of this unselected patient group was compared retrospectively to a historical control group comprising 17 patients. Results: In 15 patients (65%) of the amifostine group, therapy induced side effects such as mucositis and dermatitis of WHO Grade {<=}2 were detected, requiring interruptions of the radiotherapy (mean: 6.5, maximum 17 days). No mucosa or dermatologic toxicity of WHO Grade 3 or 4 was observed in this group. Significantly more acute toxicity was detected in the historical control group. Stomatitis or epitheliolysis of WHO Grade 3 occurred in 7 patients (41%). The side effects induced by the antineoplastic therapy caused an interruption of treatment in 15 patients (88%) (mean: 16, maximum 40 days; p=0.0016). Conclusion: The application of amifostine before each radiation treatment seems to result in a distinct reduction of short-term toxicity of radiotherapy or combined radio-chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer, allowing for a better adherence to the planned radiation time schedule. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Zahlreiche experimentelle und klinische Daten belegen die zytoprotektive Wirkung von Amifostin auf gesundes Gewebe bei Anwendung verschiedener antineoplastischer

  4. Effects of an Amifostine analogue on radiation induced lung inflammation and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Aastha; Bhuria, Vikas; Soni, Ravi; Singh, Saurabh; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Pathak, Uma; Mathur, Shweta; Sandhir, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients irradiated for thoracic malignancies as well as in victims of accidental radiation exposure. We have recently established the efficacy of an analogue of Amifostine (DRDE-30) in reducing the mortality of whole body irradiated mice. The widely used radioprotector Amifostine has been found to reduce the incidence of radiation induced pneumonitis during radiation therapy for non small cell lung carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated the potential of DRDE-30 in ameliorating the radiation induced lung damage. Intra-peritoneal administration of DRDE-30 at 220 mg/kg b.wt 30 min. prior to 13.5 Gy thoracic radiation enhanced the 24-month survival of C57BL/6 mice to 80% compared to 0% with radiation alone. Reduced protein content and cell number in the broncheo-alveolar lavage fluid suggested reduction in radiation induced vascular permeability in DRDE-30 treated mice. Higher levels of MnSOD and Catalase observed under these conditions indicated that strengthening of the anti-oxidant defense system by DRDE-30 could also contribute to the protection against radiation induced lung damage. Reduced levels of p-p38 observed under these conditions suggested down-regulation of the p38/MAP kinase pathway as one of the plausible mechanisms underlying anti-inflammatory effects of DRDE-30, while lower levels of Vimentin seen, indicated inhibition of epithelial to mesenchymal transition revealing its anti-fibrotic effect as well. Structural analysis with X-ray CT indicated comparable lung architecture in control and drug treated mice in terms of reduced opacity, which correlated well with the lung morphology (H and E staining) and reduced collagen deposition (trichrome staining). These results demonstrate the potential of DRDE-30 in reducing radiation induced pulmonary toxicity by attenuating the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. (author)

  5. Amifostine (WR-2721, a cytoprotective agent during high-dose cyclophosphamide treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: a phase II study

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    C.A. De Souza

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials indicate that amifostine may confer protection on various normal tissues without attenuating anti-tumor response. When administered prior to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it may provide a broad spectrum of cytoprotection including against alkylating drugs. The mechanism of protection resides in the metabolism at normal tissue site by membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase. Toxicity of this drug is moderate with hypotension, nausea and vomiting, and hypocalcemia being observed. We report a phase II study using amifostine as a protective drug against high-dose cyclophosphamide (HDCY (7 g/m2, used to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC and to reduce tumor burden. We enrolled 29 patients, 22 (75.9% affected by aggressive and 7 (24.1% by indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, who were submitted to 58 infusions of amifostine and compared them with a historical group (33 patients affected by aggressive NHL and treated with VACOP-B followed by HDCY. The most important results in favor of amifostine were the reduction of intensity of cardiac, pulmonary and hepatic toxicity, and a significant reduction of frequency and severity of mucositis (P = 0.04. None of the 29 patients died in the protected group, while in the historical group 2/33 patients died because of cardiac or pulmonary toxicity and 2 patients stopped therapy due to toxicity. Amifostine did not prevent the aplastic phase following HDCY. PBPC collection and hematological recovery were adequate in both groups. The number of CFU-GM (colony-forming units-granulocyte/macrophage colonies and mononuclear cells in the apheresis products was significantly higher in the amifostine group (P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively. Side effects were mild and easily controlled. We conclude that amifostine protection should be useful in HDCY to protect normal tissues, with acceptable side effects.

  6. Comparison of the protective roles of L-carnitine and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage by histopathological and biochemical methods

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    Vuslat Yurut-Caloglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the radioprotective efficacies of L-carnitine (LC and amifostine against radiation-induced acute ovarian damage. Materials and Methods: Forty-five, 3-month-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to six groups. Control (CONT, n = 7; irradiation alone RT: radiation therapy (RT, n = 8; amifostine plus irradiation (AMI + RT, n = 8; LC plus irradiation (LC + RT, n = 8; LC and sham irradiation (LC, n = 7; and amifostine and sham irradiation (AMI, n = 7. The rats in the AMI + RT, LC + RT and RT groups were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy to the whole abdomen. LC (300 mg/kg and amifostine (200 mg/kg was given intraperitoneally 30 min before irradiation. Five days after irradiation, both antral follicles and corpus luteum in the right ovaries were counted, and tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP were measured. Results: Irradiation significantly decreased antral follicles and corpus luteum (P: 0.005 and P 0.05. The level of MDA and AOPP significantly increased after irradiation (P = 0.001 and P 0.005. The levels of both MDA and AOPP were also similar when LC + RT is compared with AMI + RT group (P > 0.005. Conclusions: L-carnitine and amifostine have a noteworthy and similar radioprotective effect against radiation-induced acute ovarian toxicity.

  7. Effect of Amifostine on Response Rates in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated on Randomized Controlled Trials: A Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mell, Loren K.; Malik, Renuka; Komaki, Ritsuko; Movsas, Benjamin; Swann, R. Suzanne; Langer, Corey; Antonadou, Dosia; Koukourakis, Michael; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Amifostine can reduce the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, but concerns remain regarding its possible tumor-protective effects. Studies with sufficient statistical power to address this question are lacking. Methods and Materials: We performed a meta-analysis of all published clinical trials involving locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, who had been randomized to treatment with amifostine vs. no amifostine or placebo. Random effects estimates of the relative risk of overall, partial, and complete response were obtained. Results: Seven randomized trials involving 601 patients were identified. Response rate data were available for six studies (552 patients). The pooled relative risk (RR) estimate was 1.07 (95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.18; p = 0.18), 1.21 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.78; p = 0.33), and 0.99 (95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.26; p = 0.95) for overall, complete, and partial response, respectively (a RR >1 indicates improvement in response with amifostine compared with the control arm). The results were similar after sensitivity analyses. No evidence was found of treatment effect heterogeneity across the studies. Conclusions: Amifostine has no effect on tumor response in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy

  8. Lung autophagic response following exposure of mice to whole body irradiation, with and without amifostine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zois, Christos E.; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Kainulainen, Heikki; Botaitis, Sotirios; Torvinen, Sira; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Sivridis, Efthimios; Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated the effect 6 Gy of WBI on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. → Irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. → The membrane bound LC3A-II protein levels increased in the cytosolic fraction (not in the pellet), contrasting the patterns noted after starvation-induced autophagy. → Administration of amifostine, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings, suggesting protection of the normal autophagic function. -- Abstract: Purpose: The effect of ionizing irradiation on the autophagic response of normal tissues is largely unexplored. Abnormal autophagic function may interfere the protein quality control leading to cell degeneration and dysfunction. This study investigates its effect on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. Methods and materials: Mice were exposed to 6 Gy of whole body γ-radiation and sacrificed at various time points. The expression of MAP1LC3A/LC3A/Atg8, beclin-1, p62/sequestosome-1 and of the Bnip3 proteins was analyzed. Results: Following irradiation, the LC3A-I and LC3A-II protein levels increased significantly at 72 h and 7 days. Strikingly, LC3A-II protein was increased (5.6-fold at 7 days; p < 0.001) only in the cytosolic fraction, but remained unchanged in the membrane fraction. The p62 protein, was significantly increased in both supernatant and pellet fraction (p < 0.001), suggesting an autophagosome turnover deregulation. These findings contrast the patterns of starvation-induced autophagy up-regulation. Beclin-1 levels remained unchanged. The Bnip3 protein was significantly increased at 8 h, but it sharply decreased at 72 h (p < 0.05). Administration of amifostine (200 mg/kg), 30 min before irradiation, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings on blots, suggesting restoration of the normal autophagic function. The LC3A and Beclin1 m

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous Amifostine in Minimizing Radiation-Induced Toxicities in Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Treatment for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Amy; Kennedy, Thomas; Pellitteri, Phillip; Wood, Craig; Christie, Douglas; Yumen, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report long-term data from a prospective trial of subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in patients who received chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: Patients ≥18 years of age with previously untreated Stage III/IV SCCHN received fractionated radiotherapy, 1.8-2.0 Gy/day, 5 days per week, to a total dose of 70-72 Gy, plus weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (100 mg/m 2 ) administered intravenously (i.v.) for 6 weeks. All patients received 500 mg s.c. amifostine 30-60 min before radiotherapy with antihistamine and antiemetic prophylaxis. Results: Twenty patients were evaluable (median age, 55 years). The incidence of Grade 2 xerostomia was 42% and 29% at 12 and 18 months, respectively; there were no reports of Grade ≥3 xerostomia. Grade ≥3 mucositis occurred in 30% of patients, with median time to resolution of 12.5 weeks (range, 5-17 weeks). Survival estimates at 1 and 2 years were 95% and 71%, respectively. All patients experienced Grade 2 weight loss; 7 patients (35%) experienced Grade ≤2 nausea/vomiting. There were no reports of Grade ≥3 amifostine-related adverse events. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine was well tolerated by patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for SCCHN, with lower rates of nausea/vomiting than reported in trials with i.v. amifostine. Xerostomia and mucositis rates were similar to those reported in trials with i.v. amifostine

  10. Acute toxicity of postoperative radiochemotherapy with amifostine vs radiochemotherapy alone in head and neck cancer patients. Preliminary results of a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacha, P.; Marx, M.; Engel, A.; Richter, E.; Feyerabend, T.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clinical data suggest a reduction of radiation-induced acute toxicity by amifostine. We investigated this issue in a randomized trial comparing radiochemotherapy (RCT) versus radiochemotherapy and amifostine (RCT+A) in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: Forty-seven patients with pharyngeal or laryngeal cancer (T 1-2 N 1-2 G 3 ,T 3-4 N 0-2 G 1-3 ) were randomized to receive RCT alone (21 patients) or RCT+A (21 patients). Patients were irradiated up to 60 Gy (R 0 ) or 70 Gy (R 1/2 ). Chemotherapy consisted of 70 mg/m 2 carboplatin and was administered over 5 days in the 1st and 5th week of the radiotherapy course. 250 mg amifostine were applied daily just before each radiotherapy session. Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). As for xerostomia no patients with laryngeal cancer were assessed because in these cases only small volumes of the salivary glands were within the treatment volume. To evaluate the overall toxicity a summarized CTC score of all observed side effects was calculated. Results: Forty-two patients were evaluable. Clinical characteristics (age, sex, Karnofsky index, tumor-staging) were well balanced in both treatment groups. Amifostine provided reduction in xerostomia and mucositis. Conclusions: According to our preliminary results amifostine has a radioprotective effect on salivary glands. Mucositis can be reduced during radiochemotherapy. At this point of patient accrual the difference between both groups are statistically not significant. To improve the radioprotective effects of amifostine in clinical practice the application of a higher dose (>250 mg) seems to be necessary. (orig.) [de

  11. Amifostine Protection Against Mitomycin-induced Chromosomal Breakage in Fanconi Anaemia Lymphocytes

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    Miriam T. P. Lopes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anaemia (FA is a rare genetic chromosomal instability syndrome caused by impairment of DNA repair and reactive oxygen species (ROS imbalance. This disease is also related to bone marrow failure and cancer. Treatment of these complications with radiation and alkylating agents may enhance chromosomal breakage. We have evaluated the effect of amifostine (AMF on basal and mitomycin C (MMC-induced chromosomal breakage in FA blood cells using the micronucleus assay. The basal micronuclei count was higher among FA patients than healthy subjects. Pre-treatment with AMF significantly inhibited micronucleation induced by MMC in healthy subjects (23.4 ± 4.0 – MMC vs 12.3 ± 2.9 – AMF →MMC MN/1000CB, p < 0.01, one way ANOVA as well as in FA patients (80.0 ± 5.8 – MMC vs 40.1 ± 5.8 – AMF →MMC MN/1000CB, p < 0.01, ANOVA. Release of ROS by peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with AMF →MMC and measured by chemoluminometry showed that AMF-protection was statistically higher among FA patients than in healthy individuals. Based on these results we suggest that AMF prevents chromosomal breakage induced by MMC, probably by its antioxidant effect.

  12. A phase II randomized study of topical intrarectal administration of amifostine for the prevention of acute radiation-induced rectal toxicity

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    Kouloulias, V.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece); Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical Univ. of Athens, Athens (Greece); Center of Radiation Oncology, YGEIA Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kouvaris, J.R.; Kokakis, J.D.; Antypas, C.; Mallas, E.; Vosdoganis, S.P.; Vlahos, L.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece); Pissakas, G. [Radiotherapy Dept., Agios Savvas Anticancer Hospital, Athens (Greece); Matsopoulos, G. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical Univ. of Athens, Athens (Greece); Michopoulos, S. [Gastroenterology Unit, Alexandra General Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kostakopoulos, A. [Urology Dept., Sismanoglio Hospital, Univ. of Athens Medical School, Athens (Greece)

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: to investigate the cytoprotective effect of intrarectal amifostine administration on acute radiation-induced rectal toxicity. Patients and methods: 67 patients with T1b-2 NO MO prostate cancer were randomized to receive amifostine intrarectally (group A, n - 33) or not (group B, n = 34) before irradiation. Therapy was delivered using a four-field technique with three-dimensional conformal planning. In group A, 1,500 mg amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution in a 40-ml enema. Two different toxicity scales were used: EORTC/RTOG rectal and urologic toxicity criteria along with a Subjective-RectoSigmoid (S-RS) scale based on the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. Objective measurements with rectosigmoidoscopy were performed at baseline and 1-2 days after the completion of radiotherapy. The area under curve for the time course of mucositis (RTOG criteria) during irradiation represented the mucositis index (MI). Results: intrarectal amifostine was feasible and well tolerated without any systemic or local side effects. According to the RTOG toxicity scale, five out of 33 patients showed grade 1 mucositis in group A versus 15 out of 34 patients with grade 1/2 in group B (p = 0.026). Mean rectal MI was 0.3 {+-} 0.1 in group A versus 2.2 {+-} 0.4 in group B (p < 0.001), while S-RS score was 3.9 {+-} 0.5 in group A versus 6.3 {+-} 0.7 in group B (p < 0.001). The incidence of urinary toxicity was the same in both groups. Conclusion: intrarectal administration of amifostine seems to have a cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation-induced rectal mucositis. Further randomized studies are needed for definitive therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  13. Influence of intravenous amifostine on xerostomia, tumor control, and survival after radiotherapy for head-and- neck cancer: 2-year follow-up of a prospective, randomized, phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Todd H.; Brizel, David M.; Henke, Michael; Monnier, Alain; Eschwege, Francois; Sauer, Rolf; Strnad, Vratislav

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate chronic xerostomia and tumor control 18 and 24 months after initial treatment with amifostine in a randomized controlled trial of patients with head-and-neck cancer; at 12 months after radiotherapy (RT), amifostine had been shown to reduce xerostomia without changing tumor control. Methods and Materials: Adults with head-and-neck cancer who underwent once-daily RT for 5-7 weeks (total dose, 50-70 Gy) received either open-label amifostine (200 mg/m 2 i.v.) 15-30 min before each fraction of radiation (n = 150) or RT alone (control; n = 153). Results: Amifostine administration was associated with a reduced incidence of Grade ≥2 xerostomia over 2 years of follow-up (p = 0.002), an increase in the proportion of patients with meaningful (>0.1 g) unstimulated saliva production at 24 months (p = 0.011), and reduced mouth dryness scores on a patient benefit questionnaire at 24 months (p < 0.001). Locoregional control rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were not significantly different between the amifostine group and the control group. Conclusions: Amifostine administration during head-and-neck RT reduces the severity and duration of xerostomia 2 years after treatment and does not seem to compromise locoregional control rates, progression-free survival, or overall survival

  14. Acute toxicity of postoperative radiochemotherapy with amifostine vs radiochemotherapy alone in head and neck cancer patients. Preliminary results of a randomized trial; Nebenwirkungen einer postoperativen Radiochemotherapie mit Amifostin versus alleiniger Radiochemotherapie bei Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Vorlaeufige Ergebnisse einer prospektiv randomisierten Untersuchung

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    Vacha, P; Marx, M; Engel, A; Richter, E; Feyerabend, T [Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clinical data suggest a reduction of radiation-induced acute toxicity by amifostine. We investigated this issue in a randomized trial comparing radiochemotherapy (RCT) versus radiochemotherapy and amifostine (RCT+A) in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: Forty-seven patients with pharyngeal or laryngeal cancer (T{sub 1-2}N{sub 1-2}G{sub 3},T{sub 3-4}N{sub 0-2}G{sub 1-3}) were randomized to receive RCT alone (21 patients) or RCT+A (21 patients). Patients were irradiated up to 60 Gy (R{sub 0}) or 70 Gy (R{sub 1/2}). Chemotherapy consisted of 70 mg/m{sup 2} carboplatin and was administered over 5 days in the 1st and 5th week of the radiotherapy course. 250 mg amifostine were applied daily just before each radiotherapy session. Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). As for xerostomia no patients with laryngeal cancer were assessed because in these cases only small volumes of the salivary glands were within the treatment volume. To evaluate the overall toxicity a summarized CTC score of all observed side effects was calculated. Results: Forty-two patients were evaluable. Clinical characteristics (age, sex, Karnofsky index, tumor-staging) were well balanced in both treatment groups. Amifostine provided reduction in xerostomia and mucositis. Conclusions: According to our preliminary results amifostine has a radioprotective effect on salivary glands. Mucositis can be reduced during radiochemotherapy. At this point of patient accrual the difference between both groups are statistically not significant. To improve the radioprotective effects of amifostine in clinical practice the application of a higher dose (>250 mg) seems to be necessary. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Diese Untersuchung soll die Frage beantworten, ob bei der postoperativen Radiochemotherapie von Patienten mit HNO-Tumoren eine zusaetzliche Amifostin-Medikation Ausmass und Haeufigkeit akuter Strahlenreaktionen vermindert

  15. Amifostine protects rat kidneys during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Forrer, Flavio; Bernard, Bert; Bijster, Magda; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Vermeij, Marcel [Erasmus MC, Department of Pathology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues, the kidneys are the major dose-limiting organs, because of tubular reabsorption and retention of radioactivity. Preventing renal uptake or toxicity will allow for higher tumour radiation doses. We tested the cytoprotective drug amifostine, which selectively protects healthy tissue during chemo- and radiotherapy, for its renoprotective capacities after PRRT with high-dose [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate. Male Lewis rats were injected with 278 or 555 MBq [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate to create renal damage and were followed up for 130 days. For renoprotection, rats received either amifostine or co-injection with lysine. Kidneys, blood and urine were collected for toxicity measurements. At 130 days after PRRT, a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan was performed to quantify tubular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a measure of tubular function. Treatment with 555 MBq [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate resulted in body weight loss, elevated creatinine and proteinuria. Amifostine and lysine treatment significantly prevented this rise in creatinine and the level of proteinuria, but did not improve the histological damage. In contrast, after 278 MBq [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate, creatinine values were slightly, but not significantly, elevated compared with the control rats. Proteinuria and histological damage were different from controls and were significantly improved by amifostine treatment. Quantification of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA SPECT scintigrams at 130 days after [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate therapy correlated well with 1/creatinine (r {sup 2} = 0.772, p < 0.001). Amifostine and lysine effectively decreased functional renal damage caused by high-dose [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate. Besides lysine, amifostine might be used in clinical PRRT as well

  16. Amifostine as radioprotective agent for the rectal mucosa during irradiation of pelvic tumors. A phase II randomized study using various toxicity scales and rectosigmoidoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouvaris, J.; Antypas, C.; Kokakis, J.; Vlahos, L. [Radiology-Radiotherapy Dept., National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Kouloulias, V. [Radiology-Radiotherapy Dept., National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Inst. of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Malas, E. [Endoscopy-Gastroenterology Unit, Dept. of Surgical Oncology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Athens (Greece); Michopoulos, S. [Dept. of Gastroenterology, Alexandra General Hospital of Athens (Greece); Matsopoulos, G. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Inst. of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

    2003-03-01

    Aim: To evaluate the cytoprotective effect of amifostine against radiation-induced acute toxicity to the rectal mucosa. Patients and Methods: 36 patients irradiated for prostate or gynecologic cancer were randomized to receive amifostine (n = 18, group A) or not (n = 18, group B). The radiation-induced acute rectal toxicity was evaluated by using three different toxicity scales: WHO scale, EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria, and a modified toxicity scale based on the LENT-SOMA grading scale and the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. The objective measurements were coming from flexible rectosigmoidoscopy performed at baseline and 1-2 days after completion of the radiotherapy schedule. Anterior-posterior fields were used in the gynecologic patients while 3-D conformal 4-field technique was applied in the prostate cancer patients. The area under the curve (AUC) for dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum was also assessed during a 3-D treatment planning schedule, and no significant differences were assessed between the two groups, indicating a homogeneous dose-volume effect. Results: Amifostine was well tolerated. No grade 2 or higher WHO and EORTC/RTOG acute toxicity was noted in group A, while acute rectal toxicity ({>=} grade 1) was observed in 16/18 patients of group B versus 2/18 of group A (p < 0.001). The onset as well as the duration of acute rectal toxicity were significantly improved in group A (p = 0.002). Rectosigmoidoscopy revealed more severe rectal mucositis in noncytoprotected patients (group B), and modified LENT-SOMA overall mucositis grading score was significantly lower in group A (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Amifostine seems to have a significant cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation-induced rectal mucositis in terms of symptomatic and objective endpoints. (orig.)

  17. Amifostine as radioprotective agent for the rectal mucosa during irradiation of pelvic tumors. A phase II randomized study using various toxicity scales and rectosigmoidoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouvaris, J.; Antypas, C.; Kokakis, J.; Vlahos, L.; Kouloulias, V.; Malas, E.; Michopoulos, S.; Matsopoulos, G.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the cytoprotective effect of amifostine against radiation-induced acute toxicity to the rectal mucosa. Patients and Methods: 36 patients irradiated for prostate or gynecologic cancer were randomized to receive amifostine (n = 18, group A) or not (n = 18, group B). The radiation-induced acute rectal toxicity was evaluated by using three different toxicity scales: WHO scale, EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria, and a modified toxicity scale based on the LENT-SOMA grading scale and the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. The objective measurements were coming from flexible rectosigmoidoscopy performed at baseline and 1-2 days after completion of the radiotherapy schedule. Anterior-posterior fields were used in the gynecologic patients while 3-D conformal 4-field technique was applied in the prostate cancer patients. The area under the curve (AUC) for dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum was also assessed during a 3-D treatment planning schedule, and no significant differences were assessed between the two groups, indicating a homogeneous dose-volume effect. Results: Amifostine was well tolerated. No grade 2 or higher WHO and EORTC/RTOG acute toxicity was noted in group A, while acute rectal toxicity (≥ grade 1) was observed in 16/18 patients of group B versus 2/18 of group A (p < 0.001). The onset as well as the duration of acute rectal toxicity were significantly improved in group A (p = 0.002). Rectosigmoidoscopy revealed more severe rectal mucositis in noncytoprotected patients (group B), and modified LENT-SOMA overall mucositis grading score was significantly lower in group A (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Amifostine seems to have a significant cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation-induced rectal mucositis in terms of symptomatic and objective endpoints. (orig.)

  18. Prevention of radiochemotherapy-induced toxicity with amifostine in patients with malignant orbital tumors involving the lacrimal gland: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldblum, David; Ghadjar, Pirus; Curschmann, Juergen; Greiner, Richard; Aebersold, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    To use amifostine concurrently with radiochemotherapy (CT-RT) or radiotherapy (RT) alone in order to prevent dry eye syndrome in patients with malignancies located in the fronto-orbital region. Five patients (2 males, 3 females) with diagnosed malignancies (Non-Hodgkin B-cell Lymphoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma) involving the lacrimal gland, in which either combined CT-RT or local RT were indicated, were prophylactically treated with amifostine (500 mg sc). Single RT fraction dose, total dose and treatment duration were individually adjusted to the patient's need. Acute and late adverse effects were recorded using the RTOG score. Subjective and objective dry eye assessment was performed for the post-treatment control of lacrimal gland function. All patients have completed CT-RT or RT as indicated. The median total duration of RT was 29 days (range, 23 – 39 days) and the median total RT dose was 40 Gy (range, 36 – 60 Gy). Median lacrimal gland exposure was 35.9 Gy (range, 16.8 – 42.6 Gy). Very good partial or complete tumor remission was achieved in all patients. The treatment was well tolerated without major toxic reactions. Post-treatment control did not reveal in any patient either subjective or objective signs of a dry eye syndrome. The addition of amifostine to RT/CT-RT of patients with tumors localized in orbital region was found to be associated with absence of dry eye syndrome

  19. Examination of the effect of ovarian radiation injury induced by hysterosalpingography on ovarian proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the radioprotective effect of amifostine: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can B

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Behzat Can,1 Remzi Atilgan,1 Sehmus Pala,1 Tuncay Kuloğlu,2 Sule Kiray,3 Nevin Ilhan4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Firat University School of Medicine, Elazig, Turkey; 2Department of Histology and Embryology, Firat University School of Medicine, Elazig, Turkey; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maltepe University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; 4Department of Biochemistry, Firat University School of Medicine, Elazig, Turkey Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of amifostine on cellular injury in the ovarian tissue induced by hysterosalpingography (HSG.Methods: In total, forty 4-month old female Wistar Albino rats were assigned into 8 groups. Each group contained 5 rats. Group 1 (G1: rats were decapitated without any procedure. Group 2 (G2: rats were decapitated after 3 hours of total body irradiation. Group 3 (G3: rats were decapitated 3 hours after HSG procedure. Group 4 (G4: rats were decapitated 3 hours after HSG procedure performed 30 min after receiving amifostine 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally. Group 5 (G5: rats were decapitated after 1 month without any procedure. Group 6 (G6: rats were decapitated after 1 month of total body irradiation. Group 7 (G7: rats were decapitated 1 month after HSG procedure. Group 8 (G8: rats were decapitated 1 month after HSG procedure performed 30 min after receiving amifostine 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally. After rats were decapitated under general anesthesia in all groups, blood samples were obtained and bilateral ovaries were removed. One of the ovaries was placed in 10% formaldehyde solution for histological germinal epithelial degeneration, apoptosis and proliferating cell nuclear antigen scoring. The other ovary and blood sera were stored at –80°C. TNF-α, total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, and malondialdehyde levels were studied in tissue samples and anti-mullerian hormone levels in blood samples.Results: At the end of the first month, there was

  20. Zytoprotektion mit Amifostin (Ethyol®) in der Chemotherapie: Meta-Analyse zum pharmakokinetischen Interaktionspotential mit Zytostatika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czejka, Martin; Schüller, Johannes; Kletzl, Heidemarie

    2017-08-25

    The cytoprotective agent amifostine (AMI) is capable to protect healthy cells (contrary to tumor cells) due to higher activity of alkaline phosphatase at the membrane site of normal cells. In seven clinical trials the influence of AMI on the pharmacokinetics of different cytostatics was investigated. Preadministration of AMI increased Cmax of doxorubicin (+ 44 %, p < 0.06), epirubicin (+ 31 %, P < 0.08), mitomycin C (+ 41 %, p < 0.01) and docetaxel (+ 31 % and + 17 %, not significant). In contrary, the peak concentration of pirarubicin , the tetrahydropyranyl-prodrug of doxorubicin was decreased (- 50 %, P < 0.03), leading to an equal higher concentrationof doxorubicin in the blood . In accordance to the peak concentrations, the AUC'ast was increased by chemoprotection: doxorubicin + 53 % (p < 0.01) and epirubicin + 23 % (not significant), docetaxel + 25 % and + 31 % (not significant). AUC'ast of mitomycin C and paclitaxel seemed to be unaffected by preadministered AMI. A particular inhibition of the protein binding by AMI has been identified as one reason for higher serum concentrations of anthracycline drugs. After cytoprotection, a possible increase of the cytostatic's Serum concentrations should be taken into account for optimal dosage schedules.

  1. Radiation therapy and concurrent fixed dose amifostine with escalating doses of twice-weekly gemcitabine in advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, A. Aydin; Aydin, Fazil; Yavuz, Melek N.; Ilis, Esra; Ozdemir, Feyyaz

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of twice-weekly gemcitabine (TW-G) when administered in conjunction with fixed dose amifostine (A) during external radiotherapy (RT) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with previously untreated, locally advanced, or asymptomatic-metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled in this study. RT was delivered by using the standard four-field technique (1.8 Gy daily fractions, 45 Gy followed by a boost of 5.4 Gy, in 5-1/2 weeks). The starting dose of TW-G was 60 mg/m 2 (i.v., 30-min infusion), which is equal to the upper limit of previously reported MTD of TW-G when given without A during RT. A was given just before the TW-G, at a fixed dose of 340 mg/m 2 (i.v., rapid infusion). TW-G doses were escalated by 30-mg/m 2 increments in successive cohorts of 3 to 6 additional patients until DLT was observed. Toxicities were graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Results: In general, therapy was well tolerated in patients treated at the first two dose levels of 60 mg/m 2 and 90 mg/m 2 . The DLT of TW-G given in conjunction with A during RT were neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and nausea/vomiting at the dose level of 120 mg/m 2 . Of the 10 patients eligible for a median follow-up of 10 months, 5 remain alive; 1 complete responder, 3 partial responders, and 1 with stable disease. Conclusion: A dose of TW-G at a level of 90 mg/m 2 produced tolerable toxicity and it may possess significant activity when delivered in conjunction with 340 mg/m 2 dose of A during RT of the upper abdomen. Due to the higher MTD of TW-G seen in our study, we consider that the A supplementation may optimize the therapeutic index of TW-G-based chemoradiotherapy protocols in patients with pancreatic carcinoma

  2. Phase I North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial-N9923 of escalating doses of twice-daily thoracic radiation therapy with amifostine and with alternating chemotherapy in limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, Yolanda I.; Okuno, Scott H.; Schild, Steven E.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Bot, Brian M.; Martens, John M.; Wender, Donald B.; Soori, Gamini S.; Moore, Dennis F.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Jett, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary goal was to identify the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) that can be given with chemotherapy and amifostine for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods and Materials: Treatment began with two cycles of topotecan (1 mg/m 2 ) Days 1 to 5 and paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 ) Day 5 (every 3 weeks) given before and after TRT. The TRT began at 6 weeks. The TRT was given in 120 cGy fractions b.i.d. and the dose escalation (from 4,800 cGy, dose level 1, to 6,600 cGy, dose level 4) followed the standard 'cohorts of 3' design. The etoposide (E) (50 mg/day) and cisplatin (C) (3 mg/m 2 ) were given i.v. before the morning TRT and amifostine (500 mg/day) was given before the afternoon RT. This was followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were defined as Grade ≥4 hematologic, febrile neutropenia, esophagitis, or other nonhematologic toxicity, Grade ≥3 dyspnea, or Grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable for the Phase I portion of the trial. No DLTs were seen at dose levels 1 and 2. Two patients on dose level 4 experienced DLTs: 1 patient had a Grade 4 pneumonitis, dyspnea, fatigue, hypokalemia, and anorexia, and 1 patient had a Grade 5 hypoxia attributable to TRT. One of 6 patients on dose level 3 had a DLT, Grade 3 esophagitis. The Grade ≥3 toxicities seen in at least 10% of patients during TRT were esophagitis (53%), leukopenia (33%), dehydration (20%), neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (13%). The median survival was 14.5 months. Conclusion: The MTD of b.i.d. TRT was 6000 cGy (120 cGy b.i.d.) with EP and amifostine

  3. Two New Faces of Amifostine: Protector from DNA Damage in Normal Cells and Inhibitor of DNA Repair in Cancer Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Falk, Martin; Komůrková, Denisa; Falková, Iva; Bačíková, Alena; Klejdus, B.; Pagáčová, Eva; Štefančíková, Lenka; Weiterová, Lenka; Angelis, Karel; Kozubek, Stanislav; Dušek, L.; Galbavy, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 7 (2016), s. 3003-3017 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12454S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : alternative splicing variant * order chromatin -structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  4. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies: management strategies and economic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    , amifostine, muscarinic agonist stimulation, oral mucosal lubricants, acupuncture, and submandibular gland transfer. There is evidence that salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies can be prevented or symptoms be minimized to some degree, depending on the type of cancer treatment....... Management guideline recommendations are provided for IMRT, amifostine, muscarinic agonist stimulation, oral mucosal lubricants, acupuncture, and submandibular gland transfer. Fields of sparse literature identified included effects of gustatory and masticatory stimulation, specific oral mucosal lubricant...... formulas, submandibular gland transfer, acupuncture, hyperbaric oxygen treatment, management strategies in pediatric cancer populations, and the economic consequences of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia...

  5. A New Orally Active, Aminothiol Radioprotector-Free of Nausea and Hypotension Side Effects at Its Highest Radioprotective Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soref, Cheryl M. [ProCertus BioPharm, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Hacker, Timothy A. [Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Physiology Core, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Fahl, William E., E-mail: fahl@oncology.wisc.edu [ProCertus BioPharm, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: A new aminothiol, PrC-210, was tested for orally conferred radioprotection (rats, mice; 9.0 Gy whole-body, which was otherwise lethal to 100% of the animals) and presence of the debilitating side effects (nausea/vomiting, hypotension/fainting) that restrict use of the current aminothiol, amifostine (Ethyol, WR-2721). Methods and Materials: PrC-210 in water was administered to rats and mice at times before irradiation, and percent-survival was recorded for 60 days. Subcutaneous (SC) amifostine (positive control) or SC PrC-210 was administered to ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) and retching/emesis responses were recorded. Intraperitoneal amifostine (positive control) or PrC-210 was administered to arterial cannulated rats to score drug-induced hypotension. Results: Oral PrC-210 conferred 100% survival in rat and mouse models against an otherwise 100% lethal whole-body radiation dose (9.0 Gy). Oral PrC-210, administered by gavage 30-90 min before irradiation, conferred a broad window of radioprotection. The comparison of PrC-210 and amifostine side effects was striking because there was no retching or emesis in 10 ferrets treated with PrC-210 and no induced hypotension in arterial cannulated rats treated with PrC-210. The tested PrC-210 doses were the ferret and rat equivalent doses of the 0.5 maximum tolerated dose (MTD) PrC-210 dose in mice. The human equivalent of this mouse 0.5 MTD PrC-210 dose would likely be the highest PrC-210 dose used in humans. By comparison, the mouse 0.5 MTD amifostine dose, 400 {mu}g/g body weight (equivalent to the human amifostine dose of 910 mg/m{sup 2}), when tested at equivalent ferret and rat doses in the above models produced 100% retching/vomiting in ferrets and 100% incidence of significant, progressive hypotension in rats. Conclusions: The PrC-210 aminothiol, with no detectable nausea/vomiting or hypotension side effects in these preclinical models, is a logical candidate for human drug development to use in healthy

  6. Study on radiation modifiers with zebrafish as a vertebrate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Jixiao; Ni Jin; Cai Jianming; Shen Jianliang

    2010-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a vertebrate model system has been used in a series of biomedical experiments by scientists. It offers distinctive benefits as a laboratory model system, especially for embryonic development, gene expression, drug screening and human disease model. In this paper, the typical radiation modifiers, such as Amifostine, DF-1, AG1478, Flavopiridol and DNA repair proteins involved in biomedical process by use of zebrafish have been reviewed. (authors)

  7. Nicaraven reduces cancer metastasis to irradiated lungs by decreasing CCL8 and macrophage recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Luo, Lan; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy for cancer patients damages normal tissues, thereby inducing an inflammatory response and promoting cancer metastasis. We investigated whether nicaraven, a compound with radioprotective and anti-inflammatory properties, could attenuate radiation-induced cancer metastasis to the lungs of mice. Nicaraven and amifostine, another commercial radioprotective agent, had limited effects on both the radiosensitivity of Lewis lung carcinoma cells in vitro and radiation-induced tumor growth inhibition in vivo. Using experimental and spontaneous metastasis models, we confirmed that thorax irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays dramatically increased the number of tumors in the lungs. Interestingly, the number of tumors in the lungs was significantly reduced by administering nicaraven but not by administering amifostine daily after radiation exposure. Furthermore, nicaraven administration effectively inhibited CCL8 expression and macrophage recruitment in the lungs 1 day after thorax irradiation. Our data suggest that nicaraven attenuates radiation-induced lung metastasis, likely by regulating the inflammatory response after radiation exposure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Contribution of radiotherapy to the treatment of malignant tumors, 3. Combined drugs and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niibe, Hideo; Takahashi, Iku; Tamaki, Yoshio (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of cytotoxic agent, hormone, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protector combined with radiation therapy in cancer management were analysed. The results were as follows: 1) An increase in response was seen in 25% or more of tumor nodules given radiotherapy combined with misonidazole, anoxic cell sensitizer, compared with radiotherpy alone. But the drug was also found to be neurotoxic and peripheral neuropathy. 2) Evidence has been given that Amifostine may protect the mucosal damage from radiation when Amifostine prior to irradiation was administrated to patients with tumor in the head and neck or in the pelvis. 3) There were no difference between five year survival of radiotherapy alone and with chemotherapy for patients with stage I Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy following radiotherapy for patients with stage II was more effective treatment method than radiotherapy alone. 4) Radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer was performed to control only primary site. The success rates of local control were over 80%. The near future holds extensive promise for a combination of radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormone therapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protectors. All of these when used in the appropriate circumstances may yield significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio and in the long-tern control of tumors.

  9. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  10. DEGRO'98. 4th German congress on radiation oncology, biology, physics. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The special issue contains all abstracts of the congress papers and compact information on the subjects of poster sessions and refresher courses. The themes of the technical and poster sessions are: Radiation physics of brachytherapy, CT-simulation and dosimetry, positioning and verification, 3D planning, quality assurance, irradiation planning and imaging, portal imaging; radiobiology in the context of interactions in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, cytokine and fibrosis, radiosensitivity and repair, apoptosis, oxygen and radiation effects; CNS; Amifostine as a protective agent in radiotherapy and chemotherapy: breast cancer; upper gastro-intestinal tract; anti-inflammation and proliferation irradiation; stereotaxy; palliative treatments; head and neck cancer, irradiation techniques; hyperthermia; rectal carcinoma; urogenital tract; malignant lymphoma; eyes and orbita; cervical and corpus carcinoma; non-cat-cell bronchial carcinoma. (MG/CB) [de

  11. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies: management strategies and economic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S.B.; Pedersen, A.M.L.; Vissink, A.

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to assess the literature for management strategies and economic impact of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies and to determine the quality of evidence-based management recommendations. The electronic databases of MEDLINE/PubMed and E......This systematic review aimed to assess the literature for management strategies and economic impact of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies and to determine the quality of evidence-based management recommendations. The electronic databases of MEDLINE......, amifostine, muscarinic agonist stimulation, oral mucosal lubricants, acupuncture, and submandibular gland transfer. There is evidence that salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies can be prevented or symptoms be minimized to some degree, depending on the type of cancer treatment...... formulas, submandibular gland transfer, acupuncture, hyperbaric oxygen treatment, management strategies in pediatric cancer populations, and the economic consequences of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia...

  12. Bioprinting cell-laden matrigel for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, J E; Hamid, Q; Wang, C; Chang, R; Sun, W; Emami, K; Wu, H

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel cell printing and microfluidic system to serve as a portable ground model for the study of drug conversion and radiation protection of living liver tissue analogs. The system is applied to study behavior in ground models of space stress, particularly radiation. A microfluidic environment is engineered by two cell types to prepare an improved higher fidelity in vitro micro-liver tissue analog. Cell-laden Matrigel printing and microfluidic chips were used to test radiation shielding to liver cells by the pro-drug amifostine. In this work, the sealed microfluidic chip regulates three variables of interest: radiation exposure, anti-radiation drug treatment and single- or dual-tissue culture environments. This application is intended to obtain a scientific understanding of the response of the multi-cellular biological system for long-term manned space exploration, disease models and biosensors.

  13. Bioprinting cell-laden matrigel for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, J E; Hamid, Q; Wang, C; Chang, R; Sun, W [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Emami, K; Wu, H, E-mail: sunwei@drexel.edu, E-mail: weisun@tsinghua.edu.cn [Radiation Biophysics Lab, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77586 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel cell printing and microfluidic system to serve as a portable ground model for the study of drug conversion and radiation protection of living liver tissue analogs. The system is applied to study behavior in ground models of space stress, particularly radiation. A microfluidic environment is engineered by two cell types to prepare an improved higher fidelity in vitro micro-liver tissue analog. Cell-laden Matrigel printing and microfluidic chips were used to test radiation shielding to liver cells by the pro-drug amifostine. In this work, the sealed microfluidic chip regulates three variables of interest: radiation exposure, anti-radiation drug treatment and single- or dual-tissue culture environments. This application is intended to obtain a scientific understanding of the response of the multi-cellular biological system for long-term manned space exploration, disease models and biosensors.

  14. A Phase II Study of Submandibular Gland Transfer Prior to Radiation for Prevention of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia in Head and Neck Cancer (Rtog 0244)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Naresh; Harris, Jonathan; Seikaly, Hadi; Jacobs, John R.; McEwan, AJB.; Thomas Robbins, K.; Grecula, John; Sharma, Anand K.; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We report the results of a phase II study to determine reproducibility of surgical technique of submandibular salivary gland transfer (SGT) for prevention of radiation (XRT) induced xerostomia in a multi-institutional setting and to assess severity of xerostomia. Methods and Materials Eligible patients had surgery for primary, neck dissection, and SGT followed by XRT during which the transferred salivary gland was shielded. IMRT, amifostine, and pilocarpine were not allowed, but postoperative chemotherapy was allowed. Each operation was reviewed by two and radiation by one reviewer. If 13 or more (out of 43) were “not per protocol”, then technique would be considered not reproducible as per study design. The secondary endpoint was the rate of acute xerostomia, Grade 2 or higher and a rate of ≤ 51% was acceptable. Results 44 of the total 49 patients were analyzable: male (81.8%), oropharynx (63.6%), stage IV (61.4%), median age 56.5 years. SGT was “per protocol” or with acceptable variation in 34 patients (77.3%) and XRT in 79.5%. 9 patients (20.9%) developed grade II acute xerostomia; 2 had grade 0 -1 xerostomia (4.7%) but started on amifostine/pilocarpine. These 11 patients (25.6%) were considered failures for the xerostomia endpoint. 13 patients have died; median follow-up for 31 surviving patients is 2.9 years. Two-year overall and disease-free survival rates are 76.4% and 71.7%, respectively. Conclusions the technique of submandibular salivary gland transfer procedure is reproducible in a multicenter setting. Seventy-four percent of patients had prevention of XRT induced acute xerostomia. PMID:22541957

  15. A Phase II Study of Submandibular Gland Transfer Prior to Radiation for Prevention of Radiation-induced Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer (RTOG 0244)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Naresh; Harris, Jonathan; Seikaly, Hadi; Jacobs, John R.; McEwan, A.J.B.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Grecula, John; Sharma, Anand K.; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a phase II study to determine the reproducibility of a submandibular salivary gland transfer (SGT) surgical technique for prevention of radiation (XRT)-induced xerostomia in a multi-institutional setting and to assess severity of xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had surgery for primary, neck dissection, and SGT, followed by XRT, during which the transferred salivary gland was shielded. Intensity modulated radiation therapy, amifostine, and pilocarpine were not allowed, but postoperative chemotherapy was allowed. Each operation was reviewed by 2 reviewers and radiation by 1 reviewer. If 13 or more (of 43) were “not per protocol,” then the technique would be considered not reproducible as per study design. The secondary endpoint was the rate of acute xerostomia, grade 2 or higher, and a rate of ≤51% was acceptable. Results: Forty-four of the total 49 patients were analyzable: male (81.8%), oropharynx (63.6%), stage IV (61.4%), median age 56.5 years. SGT was “per protocol” or within acceptable variation in 34 patients (77.3%) and XRT in 79.5%. Nine patients (20.9%) developed grade 2 acute xerostomia; 2 had grade 0-1 xerostomia (4.7%) but started on amifostine/pilocarpine. Treatment for these 11 patients (25.6%) was considered a failure for the xerostomia endpoint. Thirteen patients died; median follow-up for 31 surviving patients was 2.9 years. Two-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 76.4% and 71.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The technique of submandibular SGT is reproducible in a multicenter setting. Seventy-four percent of patients were prevented from XRT-induced acute xerostomia.

  16. A Phase II Study of Submandibular Gland Transfer Prior to Radiation for Prevention of Radiation-induced Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer (RTOG 0244)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Naresh, E-mail: naresh.jha@albertahealthservices.ca [University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seikaly, Hadi [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jacobs, John R. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); McEwan, A.J.B. [University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Robbins, K. Thomas [St. John' s Hospital Cancer Institute, Springfield, Illinois (United States); Grecula, John [Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Sharma, Anand K. [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a phase II study to determine the reproducibility of a submandibular salivary gland transfer (SGT) surgical technique for prevention of radiation (XRT)-induced xerostomia in a multi-institutional setting and to assess severity of xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had surgery for primary, neck dissection, and SGT, followed by XRT, during which the transferred salivary gland was shielded. Intensity modulated radiation therapy, amifostine, and pilocarpine were not allowed, but postoperative chemotherapy was allowed. Each operation was reviewed by 2 reviewers and radiation by 1 reviewer. If 13 or more (of 43) were 'not per protocol,' then the technique would be considered not reproducible as per study design. The secondary endpoint was the rate of acute xerostomia, grade 2 or higher, and a rate of {<=}51% was acceptable. Results: Forty-four of the total 49 patients were analyzable: male (81.8%), oropharynx (63.6%), stage IV (61.4%), median age 56.5 years. SGT was 'per protocol' or within acceptable variation in 34 patients (77.3%) and XRT in 79.5%. Nine patients (20.9%) developed grade 2 acute xerostomia; 2 had grade 0-1 xerostomia (4.7%) but started on amifostine/pilocarpine. Treatment for these 11 patients (25.6%) was considered a failure for the xerostomia endpoint. Thirteen patients died; median follow-up for 31 surviving patients was 2.9 years. Two-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 76.4% and 71.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The technique of submandibular SGT is reproducible in a multicenter setting. Seventy-four percent of patients were prevented from XRT-induced acute xerostomia.

  17. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R. F.; Smith, A.; Lobachevsky, P.; Karagiannis, T; Leung, B.; Andrau, L.; White, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Methylproamine is the current lead compound of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotectors being developed in the Research Laboratories at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. The salient features of methylproamine are its radioprotective potency and the generic nature of the apparent radioprotective mechanism. Like the 'classic' aminothiol radioprotectors exemplified by amifostine, methylproamine suppresses the initial radiochemical damage induced in DNA by ionising radiation. However, survival curve studies with cultured cells have demonstrated that methylproamine is 100-fold more potent than WR1065, the active metabolite of amifostine. The radioprotective mechanism seems to involve reduction by the DNA-bound drug of transient radiation-induced oxidising species on DNA. This mechanism implies some electron transfer along DNA, from the DNA-bound drug to the oxidising species. In vivo radioprotection of mouse lung, GI tract and bone marrow has been demonstrated following systemic administration of methylproamine to mice. The commercial potential of radioprotectors resides in two distinct arenas. Until recently, most of our efforts have focused on the use of methylproamine to protect normal tissues in cancer radiotherapy patients, but a quite different opportunity arises from the imperative to develop countermeasures to the threat of radiation terrorism. Our prospects in both arenas have been lifted by the results of synthesis and screening of a pilot library of ∼50 methylproamine analogues, promising the emergence of new lead drugs. In particular, although methylproamine is a potent radioprotector, at higher concentrations it becomes cytotoxic, but one member of the pilot library shows a wider efficacy 'window'. We plan to continue this lead optimisation process by synthesis and screening of a much larger library of analogues, and we are seeking the support of a commercial partner

  18. Neonatal irradiation: neurotoxicity and modulation of pharmacological response; Irradiacion prenatal: neurotoxicidad y modulacion farmacologica de la respuesta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieher, Luis M; Guelman, Laura R [Bueno Aires Univ. (Argentina). Facultad de Medicina

    2001-07-01

    Neuronal loss may be responsible of many acute and chronic diseases. For this reason, is very important to understand the mechanisms that contribute to neuronal cell death in order to develop pharmacological strategies for the treatment of these disorders. Developing CNS is very sensitive to ionizing radiations. In particular, irradiation of immature cerebellum induce motor (impaired gait), morphological (disarrangement of cytoarchitecture) and biochemical (increase in noradrenaline levels) alterations, mainly related to cerebellar granule cell death induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated after radiation exposure. Cellular changes triggered by ROS include increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels, activation of NMDA glutamatergic receptors and apoptosis. With an excitatory neurotransmitter as glutamate and a multifacetic ion as calcium, their regulation in synapses and cytoplasm, respectively, is very vulnerable. Moreover, the highly aerobic condition of neuronal metabolism determines that an oxidative injury lead to ROS accumulation. The neuro protection therapy attempts to interfere with these few processes by using antioxidants, metal chelators, calcium antagonists or glutamatergic antagonists. In the protocol used in our laboratory, neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy gamma radiations in their cephalic ends, and pre or post-treated with selected putative neuro protective agents. After 30-90 days, motor, morphological and biochemical parameters were measured and compared with irradiated and sham-irradiated (control) animals. Drugs as GM1 ganglioside or amifostine were able to restore abnormal parameters. Cerebellar granule cell irradiated 'in vitro' were treated with neuro protective agents prior or after irradiation. Cell viability and several biochemical parameters were analysed after 48 hours. GM1 ganglioside and amifostine were effective in preventing cell death and increase in ROS induced by ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  19. Quality of life with well-differentiated thyroid cancer: treatment toxicities and their reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, April; Shaffer, Brian; Karakla, Daniel; Mason, M Elizabeth; Elkins, David; Goffman, Thomas E

    2004-02-01

    Patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer have a good prognosis but a significant chance for local recurrence. In the past, limited surgery with postoperative 131I only for extremely high-risk cases or recurrence was not uncommon. As more aggressive surgical and postoperative treatments appear to gain wider acceptance, toxicity and long-term morbidity become more important issues. Our goal is to present the experience of a single institution with emphasis on oral side effects related to 131I as well as acute and chronic symptoms related to this diagnosis and their impact on quality of life. Fifty-seven patients were followed for a median time of 19.3 months. All patients received therapeutic 131I (mean dose, 154.7 mCi) between January 1, 1996 and August 30, 2002. Fifty-four patients (94.7%) were alive at the time of analysis. Sixteen (28.1%) required a second treatment: any sign of persistence resulted in retreatment. Complaints with 131I treatment included altered taste, 26.3%; acute xerostomia, 21.1%; and acute sialoadenitis, 15.8%. Chronic xerostomia occurred in 6 (35.3%) of all patients who received multiple treatments. The incidence of chronic xerostomia was reduced to 1 of 11 (9.1%) with amifostine pretreatment. Other chronic side effects associated with this disease included fatigue 54.4%, weight gain of more than 6 months duration 24.6%, with 12 (27.9%) of those under 60 experiencing an average gain of 2.3 kg from initial diagnosis. Review of treatment-related symptoms prompted policies to reduce toxicity including amifostine pretreatment for 131I therapy and thyrotropin (synthetic TSH) use in place of iatrogenic hypothyroidism for thyroglobulin testing and scanning.

  20. Neonatal irradiation: neurotoxicity and modulation of pharmacological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieher, Luis M.; Guelman, Laura R.

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal loss may be responsible of many acute and chronic diseases. For this reason, is very important to understand the mechanisms that contribute to neuronal cell death in order to develop pharmacological strategies for the treatment of these disorders. Developing CNS is very sensitive to ionizing radiations. In particular, irradiation of immature cerebellum induce motor (impaired gait), morphological (disarrangement of cytoarchitecture) and biochemical (increase in noradrenaline levels) alterations, mainly related to cerebellar granule cell death induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated after radiation exposure. Cellular changes triggered by ROS include increased intracellular Ca 2+ levels, activation of NMDA glutamatergic receptors and apoptosis. With an excitatory neurotransmitter as glutamate and a multifacetic ion as calcium, their regulation in synapses and cytoplasm, respectively, is very vulnerable. Moreover, the highly aerobic condition of neuronal metabolism determines that an oxidative injury lead to ROS accumulation. The neuro protection therapy attempts to interfere with these few processes by using antioxidants, metal chelators, calcium antagonists or glutamatergic antagonists. In the protocol used in our laboratory, neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy gamma radiations in their cephalic ends, and pre or post-treated with selected putative neuro protective agents. After 30-90 days, motor, morphological and biochemical parameters were measured and compared with irradiated and sham-irradiated (control) animals. Drugs as GM1 ganglioside or amifostine were able to restore abnormal parameters. Cerebellar granule cell irradiated 'in vitro' were treated with neuro protective agents prior or after irradiation. Cell viability and several biochemical parameters were analysed after 48 hours. GM1 ganglioside and amifostine were effective in preventing cell death and increase in ROS induced by ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  1. Protective effect of allium sativum ethanol extract on cultured human lymphocytes against electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Shama; Shetty, Sukanya; Suchetha Kumari; Madhu, L.N.

    2013-01-01

    The development of radioprotective agent has been the subject of intense research because exposure to ionizing radiation causes DNA damage which may cause mutation and ultimately leads to cancer, on the other hand radiotherapy has become an integral part in treatment of cancer which uses ionizing radiations like X rays, gamma rays to kill the cancer cells. Amifostine is a well-known radioprotector which is clinically approved. There are many other radioprotectors like cysteine, cystamine, serotine but they are not used because of its normal tissue toxicity. Allium sativum is commonly known as garlic which has already been reported for its medicinal properties. In this study we evaluated radioprotection property of Allium sativum on DNA damage caused by electron beam radiation in cultured human lymphocytes. Allium sativum ethanol extract was used for this study. Cell viability was performed by MTT assay. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay parameters. The cultured lymphocytes were incubated with different concentrations 10, 50 and 100 μg/mL of Allium sativum extracts for 2, 4, 6 and 24 hour time intervals. Treatment of lymphocytes with various concentration of Allium sativum extract resulted in significant decrease in the level of DNA damage (Percentage tail DNA 6%) and increase in cell viability 93% (p>0.05) compare to the radiation control group. Results of this study revealed that Allium sativum protects cultured lymphocytes when exposed to electron beam radiation at its sub lethal dose. (author)

  2. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury. Possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.; Kumar, S.; Whitnall, M.

    2002-01-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting and rostene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1β, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions. (author)

  3. Nutraceuticals and chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Janet M; Colosimo, Maree; Airey, Caroline; Masci, Paul P; Linnane, Anthony W; Vitetta, Luis

    2013-12-01

    Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy [CIPN] is a common significant and debilitating side effect resulting from the administration of neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. These pharmaco-chemotherapeutics can include taxanes, vinca alkaloids and others. Moderate to severe CIPN significantly decreases the quality of life and physical abilities of cancer patients and current pharmacotherapy for CIPN e.g. Amifostine and antidepressants have had limited efficacy and may themselves induce adverse side effects. To determine the potential use of nutraceuticals i.e. vitamin E, acetyl-L-carnitine, glutamine, glutathione, vitamin B6, omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium, calcium, alpha lipoic acid and n-acetyl cysteine as adjuvants in cancer treatments a systematic literature review was conducted. Revised clinical studies comprised of randomized clinical trials that investigated the anti-CIPN effect of nutraceuticals as the adjuvant intervention in patients administered chemotherapy. Twenty-four studies were assessed on methodological quality and limitations identified. Studies were mixed in their recommendations for nutraceuticals. Currently no agent has shown solid beneficial evidence to be recommended for the treatment or prophylaxis of CIPN. The standard of care for CIPN includes dose reduction and/or discontinuation of chemotherapy treatment. The management of CIPN remains an important challenge and future studies are warranted before recommendations for the use of supplements can be made. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity in children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ghane Sharbaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with cancer treated with cytotoxic drugs are frequently at risk of developing renal dysfunction. The cytotoxic drugs that are widely used for cancer treatment in children are cisplatin (CPL, ifosfamide (IFO, carboplatin, and methotrexate (MTX. Mechanisms of anticancer drug-induced renal disorders are different and include acute kidney injury (AKI, tubulointerstitial disease, vascular damage, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, and intrarenal obstruction. CPL nephrotoxicity is dose-related and is often demonstrated with hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, and impaired renal function with rising serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels. CPL, mitomycin C, and gemcitabine treatment cause vascular injury and HUS. High-dose IFO, streptozocin, and azacitidine cause renal tubular dysfunction manifested by Fanconi syndrome, rickets, and osteomalacia. AKI is a common adverse effect of MTX, interferon-alpha, and nitrosourea compound treatment. These strategies to reduce the cytotoxic drug-induced nephrotoxicity should include adequate hydration, forced diuresis, and urinary alkalization. Amifostine, sodium thiosulfate, and diethyldithiocarbamate provide protection against CPL-induced renal toxicity.

  5. Radio-induced neuropathology: from early effects to late sequelae. Rat behavioural and metabolic studies after sublethal total body irradiation; Neuropathologie radio-induite: des effets precoces aux sequelles tardives. Etudes comportementales et metaboliques chez le rat apres irradiation globale subletale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martigne, A.P.

    2010-05-15

    The radioresistance dogma of Central Nervous System (CNS) is now obsolete. Recent progress in neuroscience allow us to reconsider the radiation-induced cognitive dysfunctions observed after radiation therapy or after a nuclear accident, and to devise appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic means. We have developed a Rat model to study the effects of total body irradiation at a sublethal dose (4.5 Gy). This leads to impaired learning and memory of a task being acquired during the first month - which is prevented by administration of a radioprotector (amifostine) - while it does not appear to affect retrograde memory. Early, an apoptotic wave occurs in the sub-ventricular zone, 5 to 9 hours after exposure, while neuro-genesis is suppressed. Two days after irradiation, the metabolic study conducted by NMR HRMAS (High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning) suggests the presence of cerebral oedema and the study of brain lipids in liquid NMR confirms the membrane damages (elevated cholesterol and phospholipids). The lipid profile is then normalized while a gliosis appears. Finally, 1 month post-irradiation, the elevation of GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter, in 2 separate brain structures, occurs simultaneously with a taurine decrease in the hippocampus that lasts 6 months. Our integrated model allows validating bio-markers measurable in vivo NMR spectroscopy - the next experimental stage - and testing new radiation-protective agents. (author)

  6. A Review of Clinical Radioprotection and Chemoprotection for Oral Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Oronsky

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The first tenet of medicine, “primum non nocere” or “first, do no harm”, is not always compatible with oncological interventions e.g., chemotherapy, targeted therapy and radiation, since they commonly result in significant toxicities. One of the more frequent and serious treatment-induced toxicities is mucositis and particularly oral mucositis (OM described as inflammation, atrophy and breakdown of the mucosa or lining of the oral cavity. The sequelae of oral mucositis (OM, which include pain, odynodysphagia, dysgeusia, decreased oral intake and systemic infection, frequently require treatment delays, interruptions and discontinuations that not only negatively impact quality of life but also tumor control and survivorship. One potential strategy to reduce or prevent the development of mucositis, for which no effective therapies exist only best supportive empirical care measures, is the administration of agents referred to as radioprotectors and/or chemoprotectors, which are intended to differentially protect normal but not malignant tissue from cytotoxicity. This limited-scope review briefly summarizes the incidence, pathogenesis, symptoms and impact on patients of OM as well as the background and mechanisms of four clinical stage radioprotectors/chemoprotectors, amifostine, palifermin, GC4419 and RRx-001, with the proven or theoretical potential to minimize the development of mucositis particularly in the treatment of head and neck cancers.

  7. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ahlstedt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies.

  8. Radioprotectors in radiotherapy – advances in the potential application of phytochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Szejk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy, in addition to chemotherapy, is currently the primary method of cancer treatment based on destruction of malignant cells by ionizing radiation. Unfortunately, it also affects normal cells, which is associated with negative consequences for a patient. Radioprotectors are compounds used to prevent/protect the non-tumor cells from the harmful effects of radiation. To play their role these compounds should meet several criteria; among others, they should significantly protect normal cells from radiation without changing the tumor cell radiosensitivity. In general, agents used to alter normal tissue toxicity from radiation can be broadly divided into three categories based on timing of delivery in relation to radiation: chemical radioprotectors, mitigators, and treatment. These groups include a diverse range of synthetic compounds in terms of their structure and protective mechanisms. The aminoradiothiol amifostine is the only radioprotectant approved in clinical application. However, its use is limited due to toxicity concerns (it may cause hypotension. Natural compounds, derived from plants, meet all criteria of the ideal radioprotector. They exert their protective actions against adverse effects of ionizing radiation by several mechanisms. Plant compounds that show radioprotective activity include flavonoids and phenolic acids, stilbenes, lycopene, alkaloids, peptides, polysaccharides, and phytohormones. Garlic, green tea, apples, citrus, and ginger are examples of constituents of the human diet that contain radioprotective substances.

  9. Radio-induced neuropathology: from early effects to late sequelae. Rat behavioural and metabolic studies after sublethal total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martigne, A.P.

    2010-05-01

    The radioresistance dogma of Central Nervous System (CNS) is now obsolete. Recent progress in neuroscience allow us to reconsider the radiation-induced cognitive dysfunctions observed after radiation therapy or after a nuclear accident, and to devise appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic means. We have developed a Rat model to study the effects of total body irradiation at a sublethal dose (4.5 Gy). This leads to impaired learning and memory of a task being acquired during the first month - which is prevented by administration of a radioprotector (amifostine) - while it does not appear to affect retrograde memory. Early, an apoptotic wave occurs in the sub-ventricular zone, 5 to 9 hours after exposure, while neuro-genesis is suppressed. Two days after irradiation, the metabolic study conducted by NMR HRMAS (High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning) suggests the presence of cerebral oedema and the study of brain lipids in liquid NMR confirms the membrane damages (elevated cholesterol and phospholipids). The lipid profile is then normalized while a gliosis appears. Finally, 1 month post-irradiation, the elevation of GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter, in 2 separate brain structures, occurs simultaneously with a taurine decrease in the hippocampus that lasts 6 months. Our integrated model allows validating bio-markers measurable in vivo NMR spectroscopy - the next experimental stage - and testing new radiation-protective agents. (author)

  10. Radioprotective effects of hawthorn fruit extract against gamma irradiation in mouse bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinimehr, S.J.; Azadbakht, M.; Mousavi, S.M.; Mahmoudzadeh, A.; Akhlaghpoor, S.

    2007-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation has been investigated in mouse bone marrow cells. A single intraperitoneal (ip) administration of hawthorn extract at doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg 1 h prior to gamma irradiation (2 Gy) reduced the frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs). All four doses of hawthorn extract significantly reduced the frequencies of MnPCEs and increased the PCE/PCE+NCE ratio (polychromatic erythrocyte/polychromatic erythrocyte+normochromatic erythrocyte) in mice bone marrow compared with the non drug-treated irradiated control (p<0.02-0.00001). The maximum reduction in MnPCEs was observed in mice treated with extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Administration of amifostine at dose 100 mg/kg and hawthorn at dose 200 mg/kg reduced the frequency of MnPCE almost 4.8 and 5.7 fold; respectively, after being exposed to 2 Gy of gamma rays, compare with the irradiated control group. Crataegus extract exhibited concentration-dependent activity on 1, 1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl free radical showing that Crataegus contained high amounts of phenolic compounds and the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis determined that it contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It appeared that hawthorn extract with antioxidant activity reduced the genotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation in bone marrow cells. (author)

  11. Risks and management of radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Loren G

    2013-09-01

    High-energy ionizing radiation is harmful. Low-level exposure sources include background, occupational, and medical diagnostics. Radiation disaster incidents include radioactive substance accidents and nuclear power plant accidents. Terrorism and international conflict could trigger intentional radiation disasters that include radiation dispersion devices (RDD) (a radioactive dirty bomb), deliberate exposure to industrial radioactive substances, nuclear power plant sabotage, and nuclear weapon detonation. Nuclear fissioning events such as nuclear power plant incidents and nuclear weapon detonation release radioactive fallout that include radioactive iodine 131, cesium 137, strontium 90, uranium, plutonium, and many other radioactive isotopes. An RDD dirty bomb is likely to spread only one radioactive substance, with the most likely substance being cesium 137. Cobalt 60 and strontium 90 are other RDD dirty bomb possibilities. In a radiation disaster, stable patients should be decontaminated to minimize further radiation exposure. Potassium iodide (KI) is useful for iodine 131 exposure. Prussian blue (ferric hexacyanoferrate) enhances the fecal excretion of cesium via ion exchange. Ca-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) and Zn-DTPA form stable ionic complexes with plutonium, americium, and curium, which are excreted in the urine. Amifostine enhances chemical and enzymatic repair of damaged DNA. Acute radiation sickness ranges in severity from mild to lethal, which can be assessed by the nausea/vomiting onset/duration, complete blood cell count findings, and neurologic symptoms.

  12. Prospective of clinical drugs for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alok, Amit; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Arun; Chaudhury, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    We are living in an era of nuclear power where power derived from nuclear reaction is used for power generation as well as for nuclear weapons. The terrorism and the threat of dirty bombs looms around the civilized population. Therefore, there is a need to develop radioprotector which could prevent against the harmful effect of radiation. The research on radioprotector started more than fifty years ago but still there is no approved radioprotector in the drug market. Hundreds of lead molecule have been screened and have shown varying amount of radioprotection either in vitro or in vivo or in both. Only one drug amifostine was approved by FDA but due to its toxicity in head and neck cancer, this drug is no more in use. Antioxidants too have proven to be a potential radioprotector but the dose required for radioprotection is too high for maintenance of homeostasis in physiological system. We have taken an alternative approach of using clinical drugs like diclofenac and tetracycline for development of approach for radioprotection and reported the radioprotective role of diclofenac. The advantage of using clinical drug is its wide availability in the market and the ease with which it could be channelized for radioprotection. Antiradical assays have demonstrated possible use of tetracycline for radioprotection. Tetracycline has also ability to reduce oxidative damages ex vivo. Studies related to comet assay as well as antioxidant assays in different organs are in progress for designing further work for efficacy and elucidation of mechanisms. (author)

  13. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury. Possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.; Kumar, S.; Whitnall, M. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States). Radiation Casualty Management] [and others

    2002-12-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting and rostene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1{beta}, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions. (author)

  14. Strategies for protection against exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Radiations are known to be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cyto-lethal depending on the total dose, dose rate, quality of radiation and many other factors related to the person exposed. Therefore strategies for protection against exposure to ionizing radiations have to be accordingly planned. Radioprotection, though remains prophylactic in principle, includes mitigating and therapeutic modalities also. Initially, the central theme of biological radioprotection has been to protect against radiation-induced lethality and to optimize radiotherapy of tumours; the emphasis has now extended to cover many more situations of planned and unplanned nature. The central dogma of radioprotection work has been antioxidant action, which is relevant indeed against low LET radiation. The increasing understanding of the mechanism of radiation damage, however, permitted the advent of newer agents of both synthetic and natural origin. Sulfhydryl compounds like cysteamine, AET, Amifostine and endogenous molecules like GSH, SOD etc have been very important agents. Molecules like cytokines, immunomodulators, anti-inflammatory agents, angiotensin converting enzymes, metallo-elements and metallothionins, DNA ligands and Calcium antagonists have also been investigated recently. Unfortunately, no single agent could yield desired results especially due to toxicity at their radioprotective concentration. This led to the emergence of combinational modality where two or more agents working with different mechanisms could synergistically complement radioprotective action.. Recently, herbal extracts and dietary agents, which are the natural combinations of a large number of compounds that have important attributes to counter the damaging effects of ionizing radiations, have gained world-wide interest.. These agents have been found to be less toxic. Decorporation of radionuclei and protection against low dose chronic exposures like space flights and long haul inter-continental flights need to be

  15. Radioprotectors and Tumors: Molecular Studies in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayle Woloschak, David Grdina

    2010-03-10

    This proposal investigated effects of radiation using a set of archival tissues. Main interests of this proposal were to investigate effects of irradiation alone or in the presence or radioprotectors; to investigate these effects on different tissues; and to use/develop molecular biology techniques that would be suitable for work with archived tissues. This work resulted in several manuscripts published or in preparation. Approach for evaluation of gene copy numbers by quantitative real time PCR has been developed and we are striving to establish methods to utilize Q-RT-PCR data to evaluate genomic instability caused by irradiation(s) and accompanying treatments. References: 1. Paunesku D, Paunesku T, Wahl A, Kataoka Y, Murley J, Grdina DJ, Woloschak GE. Incidence of tissue toxicities in gamma ray and fission neutron-exposed mice treated with Amifostine. Int J Radiat Biol. 2008, 84(8):623-34. PMID: 18661379, http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.1080/09553000802241762?cookieSet=1 2. Wang Q, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Tissue and data archives from irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory over a period of four decades, in press in Radiation and Environmental Biophysics. 3. Alcantara M, Paunesku D, Rademaker A, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF TISSUE TOXICITIES IN B6CF1 MICE IRRADIATED WITH FISSION NEUTRONS OR COBALT 60 GAMMA RAYS: Gender modulates accumulation of tissue toxicities caused by low dose rate fractionated irradiation; in preparation; this document has been uploaded as STI product 4. Wang Q, Paunesku T Wanzer B and Woloschak GE. Mitochondrial gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice with lymphoid cancers; in preparation 5. Wang Q, Raha, S, Paunesku T and Woloschak GE. Evaluation of gene copy number differences in different tissues of irradiated and control mice; in preparation

  16. Management of Dysgeusia related to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DURGESHWORI MUNANKARMI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Taste change due to cancer is a notorious side effect, adversely affecting appetite and weight. Even though taste change or dysgeusia is one of the major causes of poor nutritional status in cancer survivors, it is not addressed as a significant problem and is often left untreated. The main purpose of this review is to explore current knowledge of pharmacological and behavioral interventions for the treatment of cancer related taste change. Methods: This systematic review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to identify original articles on taste change. Multiple databases including; Scopus, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and all databases via Pro quest were searched for original articles or studies related to taste change caused by cancer or its treatment. Relevant articles were subjected to a full text evaluation and assessed by Critical appraisal skills program (CASP guidelines and the Effective public health practice project (EPHPP instrument. Results: The search revealed 12 eligible studies, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Most of the studies used a standardized validated tool to measure taste change. Dysgeusia is common in cancer, 14 to 100% cancer patient report it. Pharmacological management with zinc remains inconclusive as one study reports it as beneficial and two other studies reported null effect. Few studies suggested dietary modifications such as use of sugary, salty foods that are helpful to reduce the effect of dysgeusia. Conclusion: Dietary counseling and informing the patient well about self-care strategies before treatment has consistently shown positive results on taste change, with strong statistical power. Other potential treatments for dysgeusia such as zinc, amifostine, and megestrol acetate gave inconsistent results.

  17. Radioprotective Effect of Moderate Wine Consumption in Patients With Breast Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Digesu, Cinzia; Panunzi, Simona; De Gaetano, Andrea; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cece, M. Grazia; Cirocco, Massimo; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Iacoviello, Licia; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Gaetano, Giovanni de

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Given the high cost and side effects of radioprotective agents such as amifostine, attention has been focused on potentially equally effective but less expensive and toxic natural substances. We evaluated the potential radioprotective effects of wine in preventing skin toxicity in patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Before treatment, the medical history and habits of patients were assessed and the information recorded in their clinical folders. Patients were divided into three groups based on the dose/fractionation scheme used: control group, 60.4 Gy (standard technique); Modulated Accelerated Radiotherapy in Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer (MARA)-1 protocol group, 44 Gy (concomitant boost to tumoral bed); and MARA-2 protocol group, 60 Gy (concomitant boost to tumoral bed). The impact of the following variables on acute skin toxicity was evaluated by chart review: radiotherapy protocol, planning target volume (PTV), comorbidity (e.g., hypertension and diabetes), hemoglobin level before therapy, adjuvant hormone therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and drinking habits. Results: The study population consisted of 348 patients. More severe skin toxicity was significantly associated with the radiotherapy protocol (p < 0.001) and median PTV (p = 0.005). In addition, the incidence of acute toxicity of Grade 2 or greater was higher in patients without alcohol intake (38.4% vs. 22.3%, p = 0.021). The daily amount of alcohol intake also influenced the incidence of skin toxicity, with an incidence of 38.4% in patients with no wine intake, 31.8% in patients drinking half a glass per day, 13.6% in patients drinking one glass per day, and 35.0% in patients drinking two glasses per day. Multivariate analysis showed that wine intake, PTV, and radiotherapy protocol were all significantly correlated with acute toxicity. Conclusions: Our results indicate that wine may have a radioprotective effect; however, prospective studies are needed to

  18. Why herbals as radioprotectors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruka, Kavita

    2012-01-01

    Increasing use of ionizing radiations for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes has drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards the side effects of such exposures. Therefore, it is desirable that the response of the various tissues to radiation exposure be modified to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiations. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Work on the development of chemicals to protect biological system from radiation damage was initiated nearly six decades ago with cysteine. Thereafter, several chemical compounds have been screened for their radioprotective efficacy. Among the chemical radioprotectors, S-2(3- amino-propylamino) ethyl phosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) or amifostine is the most thoroughly investigated radioprotective drug. It is a derivative of cysteamine, which produces more radioprotection to normal tissues than tumor tissues. It offers more than twice the protection observed with other members of the same phosphorothioate series. Therefore, it has been recommended for cancer patients to reduce the side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. But the drug has many drawbacks that it is toxic at maximum effective dose, ineffective by oral administration, unable to provide post irradiation protection and costly. No ideal, safe, synthetic radioprotector are available to date. So the search for alternative radioprotectors has been going on, which are nontoxic, orally effective and cheap. A number of medicinal plants evaluated for their radioprotective ability, which have shown protective effects against the deleterious effects of ionizing radiations. The plants and natural products are usually non-toxic, can be orally administered, inexpensive and act through multiple mechanisms due to presence of many chemicals. Therefore, development of radioprotectors from natural sources

  19. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Melis, Marleen; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, V 220, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides resulting in dose-limiting high kidney radiation doses. Radiation nephropathy has been described in several patients. Studies on the mechanism and localization demonstrate that renal uptake of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues largely depends on the megalin/cubulin system in the proximal tubule cells. Thus methods are needed that interfere with this reabsorption pathway to achieve kidney protection. Such methods include coadministration of basic amino acids, the bovine gelatin-containing solution Gelofusine or albumin fragments. Amino acids are already commonly used in the clinical setting during PRRT. Other compounds that interfere with renal reabsorption capacity (maleic acid and colchicine) are not suitable for clinical use because of potential toxicity. The safe limit for the renal radiation dose during PRRT is not exactly known. Dosimetry studies applying the principle of the biological equivalent dose (correcting for the effect of dose fractionation) suggest that a dose of about 37 Gy is the threshold for development of kidney toxicity. This threshold is lower when risk factors for development of renal damage exist: age over 60 years, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and previous chemotherapy. A still experimental pathway for kidney protection is mitigation of radiation effects, possibly achievable by cotreatment with amifostine (Ethylol), a radiation protector, or with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Future perspectives on improving kidney protection during PRRT include combinations of agents to reduce renal retention of radiolabelled peptides, eventually together with mitigating medicines. Moreover, new somatostatin analogues with lower

  20. Kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolleman, Edgar J.; Melis, Marleen; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P.; Jong, Marion de; Boerman, Otto C.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the present status of kidney protection during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. This treatment modality for somatostatin receptor-positive tumours is limited by renal reabsorption and retention of radiolabelled peptides resulting in dose-limiting high kidney radiation doses. Radiation nephropathy has been described in several patients. Studies on the mechanism and localization demonstrate that renal uptake of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues largely depends on the megalin/cubulin system in the proximal tubule cells. Thus methods are needed that interfere with this reabsorption pathway to achieve kidney protection. Such methods include coadministration of basic amino acids, the bovine gelatin-containing solution Gelofusine or albumin fragments. Amino acids are already commonly used in the clinical setting during PRRT. Other compounds that interfere with renal reabsorption capacity (maleic acid and colchicine) are not suitable for clinical use because of potential toxicity. The safe limit for the renal radiation dose during PRRT is not exactly known. Dosimetry studies applying the principle of the biological equivalent dose (correcting for the effect of dose fractionation) suggest that a dose of about 37 Gy is the threshold for development of kidney toxicity. This threshold is lower when risk factors for development of renal damage exist: age over 60 years, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and previous chemotherapy. A still experimental pathway for kidney protection is mitigation of radiation effects, possibly achievable by cotreatment with amifostine (Ethylol), a radiation protector, or with blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Future perspectives on improving kidney protection during PRRT include combinations of agents to reduce renal retention of radiolabelled peptides, eventually together with mitigating medicines. Moreover, new somatostatin analogues with lower

  1. Biological activities of Umbilicaria crustulosa (Ach. frey acetone extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatanović Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports for the first time the effect of an acetone extract of Umbilicaria crustulosa on the micronucleus distribution of human lymphocytes, and on the cholinesterase activity and antioxidant activity by the cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC method. Additionally, the total phenolic compounds (TPC and the antioxidant properties were estimated via DPPH, ABTS and TRP assays. Moreover, the antibacterial activity against two Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria were determined. Acetone extract of U. crustulosa at concentration of 1 and 2 μg mL-1 decreased a frequency of micronuclei (MN by 10.8 and 16.8 %, respectively, acting more or slightly less than the synthetic protector amifostine (AMF, WR-2721, 11.4 %, at concentration of 1 μg mL-1. The tested extract did not inhibit cholinesterase activity nor did it exhibit activity toward the examined bacteria. The extract reduced the concentration of DPPH and ABTS radicals by 88.7 and 96.2 %, respectively. Values for total reducing power (TRP and cupric reducing capacity (CUPRAC were 0.6197±0.0166 μg ascorbic acid equivalents (AAE per mg of dry extract, and 19.7641±1.6546 μg trolox equivalents (TE per mg of dry extract, respectively. The total phenol content was 350.4188 ±14.587 μg gallic acid equivalents (GAE per mg of dry extract. The results of the present study showed that U. crustulosa acetone extract is a promising candidate for in vivo experiments considering its antioxidant activity and protective effect on human lymphocytes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172047

  2. An Odyssey of cytoprotective bisbenzimidazole as therapeutic agent for human well being

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is utilized by 80% patients as a part of their treatment to most prevalent disease like cancer. Ionizing radiation causes radiolysis of water, generation of ROS and has deleterious effect penetrating the living tissues resulting in the-transfer of radiation energy to the biological materials. Radioprotectors protect the normal cells from the unwanted radiation damage. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, despite extensive research on the development of radioprotectors from natural and synthetic compounds, success has been limited. The only clinically acceptable radioprotector, amifostine, has inherent dose-limiting toxicities and has therefore stimulated extensive search for nontoxic, effective, and alternative radioprotectors. We have developed a cytoprotective radioprotector DMA, having a bisbenzimidazole nucleus. Relative quantitation of gene expression of the identified proteins and their interacting partners led to the identification of NFkB inducing kinase (NIK) as one of the plausible target. Subsequently, over expression and knock down of NIK suggested that DMA affects NFkB inducing kinase mediated phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ both alone and in the presence of ionizing radiation. We observed 51% radioprotection in untreated cells that attenuated to 17% in siRNA NIK treated U87 cells at 24h. Further studies concluded that the Coactivation of AKT/NFkB triggered by DMA, is a reason behind protection against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis of normal cells, and this was consistent with the alteration of DNA-PKcs. Pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluations and bioavailability measurements proved superior in vivo efficacy, higher AUCs, greater residence time of DMA. (author)

  3. DF-1, A Nontoxic Carbon Fullerene Based Antioxidant, is Effective as a Biomedical Countermeasure Against Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Casey, Rachael; Conyers, Jodie; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    A long-term goal of radiation research is the mitigation of inherent risks of radiation exposure. Thus the study and development of safe agents, whether biomedical or dietary, that act as effective radioprotectors is an important step in accomplishing this long-term goal. Some of the most effective agents to date have been aminothiols and their derivatives. Unfortunately, most of these agents have side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hypotension, weakness, and fatigability. For example, nausea and emesis occur in most patients treated with WR-2721 (Amifostine), requiring the use of effective antiemetics, with hypotension being the dose-limiting side effect in patients treated. Clearly, the need for a radioprotector that is both effective and safe still exists. Development of biocompatible nano-materials for radioprotection is a promising emerging technology that could be exploited to address the need to minimize biological effects when exposure is unavoidable. Testing free radical scavenging nanoparticles for potential use in radioprotection is exciting and highly relevant. Initial investigations presented here demonstrate the ability of a particular functionalized carbon fullerene nanoparticle, (DF-1), to act as an effective radioprotector. DF-1 was first identified as the most promising candidate in a screen of several functionalized carbon fullerenes based on lack of toxicity and antioxidant therapeutic potential against oxidative injuries (i.e. organ reperfusion and ionizing radiation). Subsequently, DF-1 has been shown to reduce chromosome aberration yield and cell death, as well as overall ROS levels in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts after exposure to gamma radiation and energetic protons while demonstrating no associated toxicity. The dose-reducing factor of DF-1 at LD50 is nearly 2.0 for gamma radiation. In addition, DF-1 treatment also significantly prevented cell cycle arrest after exposure. Finally, DF-1 markedly attenuated COX2 upregulation in cell

  4. Amelioration of radiation stress by antioxidants and prooxidants: role of redox transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandur, Santosh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation countermeasures has emerged as a major area of research in radiation biology as ionizing radiation is finding wide applications in power generation, agriculture, food processing, disease diagnosis and therapy. Chemical agents used to alter tissue toxicity of radiation can be broadly divided into three categories based on the time of intervention in relation to radiation. These are: radioprotectors, mitigators, and therapeutic agents. Radiation causes injury to normal tissue by a dynamic process involving generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their interactions with bio-molecules, intracellular signaling, cell-to-cell communication, inflammatory responses, tissue repair and cell death. Most of the radiation-induced damage to bio-molecules is caused by the formation of free radicals resulting from the radiolysis of water. However, antioxidants that neutralize free radicals failed to reach clinic. At present, no agent, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is available for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), although amifostine is approved for prophylaxis of dry mouth (xerostomia) from radiotherapy of head and neck cancers. Therefore, researchers are employing new approaches to ameliorate radiation induced injury. Some of these include use of cytokines, NF-κB (Nuclear factor κB) activators, agents that induce G1 arrest, antibiotics and inhibitors of P53. We have used pro-oxidants to upregulate cytoprotective pathways as a novel strategy to protect against radiation induced hematopoietic syndrome. Different prooxidants including hydrogen peroxide, diethylmaleate, t-butylhydroperoxide and naphthoquinone and its derivatives protected lymphocytes against radiation induced cell death. Further studies were carried out with 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) to explore the molecular mechanism of the observed protection. Thiol containing antioxidants abrogated NQ mediated radioprotection in lymphocytes. Addition of NQ to

  5. Radioprotectors in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, C.K.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Parida, D.K.; Nomura, Taisei

    2001-03-01

    This review article focuses on clinically relevant radioprotectors and their mechanisms of radioprotection. Radiotherapy is the most common modality of human cancer therapy. Obtaining optimal results requires a judicious balance between the total dose of radiotherapy delivered and the threshold limit of critical surrounding normal tissues, and the normal tissues need to be protected against radiation injury to obtain better tumor control by using a higher dose. For this reason, radiation-protective agents play an important role in clinical radiotherapy. Radiation-protective agents can be classified into three groups: radioprotectors, adaptogens, and absorbents. The first group generally consists of sulfhydryl compounds and other antioxidants. They include several myelo-, entero-, and cerebro-protectors. Adaptogens act as promotors of radioresistance. They are natural protectors that offer chemical protection against low levels of ionizing radiation. Absorbents protect organs from internal radiation and chemicals. They include drugs that prevent incorporation of radioiodine by the thyroid gland and absorption of radionuclides. This article thoroughly describes the properties, mechanisms of action, and perspectives on clinical application of the following categories of radioprotectors: sulfhydryl compounds (e.g., cysteine, cysteamine, glutathione, AET, WR 2127, and other WR-compounds), antioxidants (e.g., tempace, Hoechst 33342, vitamin A, E, and C, TMG, melatonin), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., captopril, elanopril, penicillamine, pentoxifylline, L-158, 809), cytoprotective agents (mesna, dexrazoxane, and amifostin), metalloelements (e.g., manganese chloride, cadmium salts, bismuth subnitrate), immunomodulators (gamma-interferon, polysaccharides AM5, AM218, heat-killed lactobacillus cells, broncho-vaxom, trehalose dicorynomycolate, and AS101), lipopolysaccharides and prostaglandins, plant extracts and compounds isolated from plants (curcmin

  6. A survey of techniques to reduce and manage external beam radiation-induced xerostomia in British oncology and radiotherapy departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macknelly, Andrew; Day, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Xerostomia is the most common side effect of external beam radiotherapy to the head and neck [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et-al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia? - A feasibility study for locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical Oncology 2006;18(6):497-504.]. A survey was carried out in British oncology departments to determine what treatment regimes, to minimise xerostomia, are used for patients with head-and-neck cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy. A semi-structured questionnaire consisting of both quantitative and qualitative questions was designed that asked departments which of the identified methods they used, why a method might not be currently employed, and whether its use had ever been considered. The study found that there are wide disparities between the techniques employed by oncology departments to avoid and reduce xerostomia in patients with cancers of the head and neck. The National Institute of Clinical Health and Excellence, [National Institute for Clinical Health and Excellence (NICE). Improving outcomes in head and neck cancers: the manual. London: Office of Public Sector Information; 2004.] for example, recommends that patients are given dental care and dietary advice but some departments did not appear to be doing this. Less than half of departments stated that they offer complementary therapies and less than 40% prescribed pilocarpine, a saliva-stimulant. Only two respondents stated that they use amifostine, a radioprotector, during radiotherapy treatment to the head and neck. The results also suggested a move toward using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for treating head-and-neck cancers which offers better normal tissue sparing than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia

  7. The optimal choice of medication administration route regarding intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin JF

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jing-fen Jin,1 Ling-ling Zhu,2 Meng Chen,3 Hui-min Xu,3 Hua-fen Wang,1 Xiu-qin Feng,1 Xiu-ping Zhu,3 Quan Zhou31Division of Nursing, 2VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, 3Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Intravenous (IV, intramuscular (IM, and subcutaneous (SC are the three most frequently used injection routes in medication administration. Comparative studies of SC versus IV, IM versus IV, or IM versus SC have been sporadically conducted, and some new findings are completely different from the dosage recommendation as described in prescribing information. However, clinicians may still be ignorant of such new evidence-based findings when choosing treatment methods.Methods: A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Sciences™ Core Collection to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of SC, IV, and IM administration in head-to-head comparative studies.Results: “SC better than IV” involves trastuzumab, rituximab, antitumor necrosis factor medications, bortezomib, amifostine, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant interleukin-2, immunoglobulin, epoetin alfa, heparin, and opioids. “IV better than SC” involves ketamine, vitamin K1, and abatacept. With respect to insulin and ketamine, whether IV has advantages over SC is determined by specific clinical circumstances. “IM better than IV” involves epinephrine, hepatitis B immunoglobulin, pegaspargase, and some antibiotics. “IV better than IM” involves ketamine, morphine, and antivenom. “IM better than SC” involves epinephrine. “SC better than IM” involves interferon-beta-1a, methotrexate, human chorionic gonadotropin, hepatitis B immunoglobulin, hydrocortisone, and morphine. Safety, efficacy, patient preference, and pharmacoeconomics are four principles

  8. Antiradiation Vaccine: Technology Development- Radiation Tolerance,Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Clinical Presentation After Heavy Ion Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    irradiation was generated in heavy ion (Fe56) accelerator - UTI. Heavy Ion linear transfer energy - 2000- 2600 KeV -mkm, 600 MeV -92U. Absorbed Dose - 3820 Rad. Experimental Design: Rabbits from all groups were irradiated by heavy ion accelerator. Group A: control-10 rabbits; Group B: placebo-5 rabbits; Group C: Radioprotectant Cystamine (50 mg-kg)-5 rabbits, 15 minutes before irradiation - 5 rabbits; Group D: Radioprotectant Gammafos (Amifostine 400mg -kg ) - 5 rabbits; Group E: Antiradiation Vaccine: subcutaneus administration or IM - 2 ml of active substance, 14 days before irradiation Results: Group A 100% mortality within two hours after heavy ion irradiation with clinical symptoms of Acute Cerebro- and Cardio-Vascular Radiation syndromes. Group B 100% mortality within 15 hours following irradiation. Group C 100% mortality within 14-15 hours after irradiation. Group D 100% mortality within 15-16 hours after irradiation. In groups A- D registered the development of acute radiation cerebrovascular and cardiovascular syndromes and also extensive burns. of skin produced rapid death. Group E -100% mortality in 280-290 hours (12 days) following heavy ion irradiation with animals exhibiting a combination or individual forms of Acute Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, and Gastrointestinal forms and focal skin burns. Discussion Antiradiation vaccine and immune-prophylaxis is an effective method of neutralization of Radiation Toxins. Vaccination before irradiation extended survival time after irradiation with heavy ions from two hours up to 300 hours. Clinical signs, clinical features, symptoms were somewhat attenuated. Degree of clinical forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes were diminished in their clinical manifestation and severity. Groups A-D demonstrated extremely severe level of Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes and lethality 100% was registered in short time after irradiation. Radiation induced burns in this groups (with Cutaneous sub