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Sample records for amide hydrogen exchange

  1. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    degrees C, indicating that sigma 32 adopts a highly flexible structure. At 42 degrees C we observed a slow correlated exchange of 30 additional amide hydrogens and localized it to a helix-loop-helix motif within domain sigma 2 that is responsible for the recognition of the -10 region in heat shock......Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...

  2. Subzero temperature chromatography for reduced back-exchange and improved dynamic range in amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, John D; Okach, Linda; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Brock, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange is a commonly used technique for studying the dynamics of proteins and their interactions with other proteins or ligands. When coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, hydrogen/deuterium exchange provides several unique advantages over other structural characterization techniques including very high sensitivity, the ability to analyze proteins in complex environments, and a large mass range. A fundamental limitation of the technique arises from the loss of the deuterium label (back-exchange) during the course of the analysis. A method to limit loss of the label during the separation stage of the analysis using subzero temperature reversed-phase chromatography is presented. The approach is facilitated by the use of buffer modifiers that prevent freezing. We evaluated ethylene glycol, dimethyl formamide, formamide, and methanol for their freezing point suppression capabilities, effects on peptide retention, and their compatibilities with electrospray ionization. Ethylene glycol was used extensively because of its good electrospray ionization compatibility; however, formamide has potential to be a superior modifier if detrimental effects on ionization can be overcome. It is demonstrated using suitable buffer modifiers that separations can be performed at temperatures as low as -30 °C with negligible loss of the deuterium label, even during long chromatographic separations. The reduction in back-exchange is shown to increase the dynamic range of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry in terms of mixture complexity and the magnitude with which changes in deuteration level can be quantified. PMID:23025328

  3. Sub-Zero Temperature Chromatography for Reduced Back-Exchange and Improved Dynamic Range in Amide Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Venable, John D.; Okach, Linda; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Brock, Ansgar

    2012-01-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange is a commonly used technique for studying the dynamics of proteins and their interactions with other proteins or ligands. When coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, hydrogen/deuterium exchange provides several unique advantages over other structural characterization techniques including very high sensitivity, the ability to analyze proteins in complex environments, and a large mass range. A fundamental limitation of the technique arises fr...

  4. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: measurement of individual amide hydrogen-exchange rates in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein using 13C NMR hydrogen/deuterium isotope shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-exchange rates have been measured for individual assigned amide protons in M13 coat protein, a 50-residue integral membrane protein, using a 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) equilibrium isotope shift technique. The locations of the more rapidly exchanging amides have been determined. In D2O solutions, a peptide carbonyl resonance undergoes a small upfield isotope shift (0.08-0.09 ppm) from its position in H2O solutions; in 1:1 H2O/D2O mixtures, the carbonyl line shape is determined by the exchange rate at the adjacent nitrogen atom. M13 coat protein was labeled biosynthetically with 13C at the peptide carbonyls of alanine, glycine, phenylalanine, proline, and lysine, and the exchange rates of 12 assigned amide protons in the hydrophilic regions were measured as a function of pH by using the isotope shift method. This equilibrium technique is sensitive to the more rapidly exchanging protons which are difficult to measure by classical exchange-out experiments. In proteins, structural factors, notably H bonding, can decrease the exchange rate of an amide proton by many orders of magnitude from that observed in the freely exposed amides of model peptides such as poly(DL-alanine). With corrections for sequence-related inductive effects, the retardation of amide exchange in sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized coat protein has been calculated with respect to poly(DL-alanine). The most rapidly exchanging protons, which are retarded very little or not at all, are shown to occur at the N- and C-termini of the molecule. A model of the detergent-solubilized coat protein is constructed from these H-exchange data which is consistent with circular dichroism and other NMR results

  5. Hydrogen abstraction reactions by amide electron adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron reactions with a number of peptide model compounds (amides and N-acetylamino acids) in aqueous glasses at low temperature have been investigated using ESR spectroscopy. The radicals produced by electron attachment to amides, RC(OD)NDR', are found to act as hydrogen abstracting agents. For example, the propionamide electron adduct is found to abstract from its parent propionamide. Electron adducts of other amides investigated show similar behavior except for acetamide electron adduct which does not abstract from its parent compound, but does abstract from other amides. The tendency toward abstraction for amide electron adducts are compared to electron adducts of several carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes and esters. The comparison suggests the hydrogen abstraction tendency of the various deuterated electron adducts (DEAs) to be in the following order: aldehyde DEA > acid DEA = approximately ester DEA > ketone DEA > amide DEA. In basic glasses the hydrogen abstraction ability of the amide electron adducts is maintained until the concentration of base is increased sufficiently to convert the DEA to its anionic form, RC(O-)ND2. In this form the hydrogen abstracting ability of the radical is greatly diminished. Similar results were found for the ester and carboxylic acid DEA's tested. (author)

  6. Isotopic exchange between molecular hydrogen and liquid ammonia catalysed by alkali amides; Echange isotopique entre l'hydrogene moleculaire et l'ammoniac liquide catalyse par les amidures alcalins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmas, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-15

    The catalytic action of alkali amides on the isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid ammonia has been reinvestigated. It was clear before this work that the reaction is homogeneous and first order with respect to the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, but the nature of the catalytic species was still subject to discussion. On one hand new precise kinetic measurements have been made with sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium amide. On the other hand, the dissociation of these salts has been calculated with the help of the FUOSS-ONSAGER equation. If the rate of exchange is plotted as a function of the concentration of the free amide ion, a linear relationship is obtained. In our experimental conditions, primary salt effects are negligible and the concentration has to be used in the rate equations. This shows that only the free amide ion is acting as a catalytic species. Experiments on common ion effects and secondary salt effects support this conclusion. The results are in agreement with an associative mechanism. (author) [French] Une nouvelle etude de l'echange isotopique entre l'hydrogene et l'ammoniac liquide catalyse par les amidures alcalins a ete effectuee. II etait bien etabli avant le present travail que la reaction etait homogene et que sa vitesse etait du premier ordre par rapport a la concentration d'hydrogene dissous, mais la nature de l'espece catalytique etait encore controversee. De nouvelles mesures cinetiques precises ont ete faites avec les amidures de sodium, de potassium, de rubidium et de cesium. D'autre part, la dissociation de ces sels a ete calculee a l'aide de l'equation de FUOSS-ONSAGER. On constate que la vitesse d'echange est proportionnelle a la concentration de l'ion amidure libre. Dans nos conditions experimentales, les effets de sel primaires sont negligeables, l'equation de vitesse doit s'exprimer simplement en fonction des concentrations. Ceci indique que l

  7. Kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of hydrogen exchange of CH aromatic bonds of benzene, fluorobenzene, and nitrogen-containing heterocycles with alkali metal amide solution in liquid ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic isotope effects during deutero- and tritium exchange of benzene, fluorobenzene, pyridine, N-oxide of pyridine and quinoline with solution of potassium or sodium amide in liquid ammonia were determined experimentally. The character of rate constant change of tritium exchange in benzene, when passing from light-weight to deutero-substituted ammonia, was ascertained. Reasons for reduction in the secondary isotope effect of the solvent in reference to theoretic maximum equal to 2.4, as well as the change in the primary kinetic isotope effect resulting from hydrogen isotopic exchange in CH aromatic bonds, depending on substrates CH-acidity, are discussed. The conclusion on applicability of the Eigen theory for explaining the mechanism of hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions in CH aromatic binds was confirmed

  8. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  9. Rapid and accurate processing method for amide proton exchange rate measurement in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, Harri [University of Helsinki, Finnish Institute for Verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (VERIFIN) (Finland)], E-mail: Harri.T.Koskela@helsinki.fi; Heikkinen, Outi; Kilpelaeinen, Ilkka; Heikkinen, Sami [University of Helsinki, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Finland)

    2007-04-15

    Exchange between protein backbone amide hydrogen and water gives relevant information about solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure stability. NMR spectroscopy provides a convenient tool to study these dynamic processes with saturation transfer experiments. Processing of this type of NMR spectra has traditionally required peak integration followed by exponential fitting, which can be tedious with large data sets. We propose here a computer-aided method that applies inverse Laplace transform in the exchange rate measurement. With this approach, the determination of exchange rates can be automated, and reliable results can be acquired rapidly without a need for manual processing.

  10. Rapid and accurate processing method for amide proton exchange rate measurement in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exchange between protein backbone amide hydrogen and water gives relevant information about solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure stability. NMR spectroscopy provides a convenient tool to study these dynamic processes with saturation transfer experiments. Processing of this type of NMR spectra has traditionally required peak integration followed by exponential fitting, which can be tedious with large data sets. We propose here a computer-aided method that applies inverse Laplace transform in the exchange rate measurement. With this approach, the determination of exchange rates can be automated, and reliable results can be acquired rapidly without a need for manual processing

  11. Hydrogen isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two most widely used methods for following hydrogen isotope exchange reactions, namely dedeuteriation and detritiation, involve in the first place the synthesis of an appropriately labelled compound. Rates of dedeuteriation are usually followed by measuring changes in the 1H n.m.r. spectrum of the substrate (examples are given); the method not only gives the rate but also the site(s) of exchange. It is limited to rather slow reactions and is not as accurate as some of the other methods. The development of deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy means that changes in the 2H n.m.r. spectrum can also be used to measure rates of dedeuteriation. The development of liquid scintillation counting greatly eased the problem of how to detect weak β emitters; the attractions of tritium as a tracer were thereby much enhanced. Nowadays the study of rates of detritiation constitutes one of the most versatile and accurate methods of following hydrogen isotope exchange. Examples of the technique are given. (U.K.)

  12. Pyrrolic Amide: A New Hydrogen Bond Building Block for Self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Zhen-Ming; LI Jian-Feng; HE Jia-Qi; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Molecular self-assembly has emerged as a powerful technology for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. In design of various molecular assemblies, hydrogen bonding is a preferably selected intra- or inter-molecular weak interaction in recent research by virtue of the directionality and specificity. The research for novel hydrogen bond building blocks that self-assembly into well defined structures is great important not only for gaining an understanding of the concepts of self-assembly but also for the design of new molecular materials. Pyrrolic amide moiety has one hydrogen bond acceptor (C =O) and two hydrogen bond donors (pyrrole NH and amide NH). By deliberately design, pyrrolic amide compounds would be new kinds hydrogen bond building blocks. So, pyrrolic amide compounds 1 ~ 6, which bear one, two or three pyrrolic amide moieties respectively, were designed and synthesized.

  13. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd, E-mail: reif@tum.d [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s{sup -1}. Backbone amide {sup 15}N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41{epsilon}. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D{sub 2}O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long {sup 15}N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  14. Gas-phase fragmentation of peptides by MALDI in-source decay with limited amide hydrogen (1H/2H) scrambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper D; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    To achieve a fundamental understanding of the function of proteins and protein complexes at the molecular level, it is crucial to obtain a detailed knowledge about their dynamic and structural properties. The kinetics of backbone amide hydrogen exchange is intimately linked to the structural...... dynamics of the protein, and in recent years, the monitoring of the isotopic exchange of these hydrogens by mass spectrometry has become a recognized method. At present, the resolution of this method is, however, limited and single-residue resolution is typically only obtained for a few residues in a...... protein. It would therefore be desirable if gas-phase fragmentation could be used to localize incorporated deuterons as this would ultimately lead to single-residue resolution. A central obstacle for this approach is, however, the occurrence of intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens upon activation...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, from ammonium hydroxide -...

  16. Carbonyl 13C NMR spectrum of basin pancreatic trypsin inhibitor: resonance assignments by selective amide hydrogen isotope labeling and detection of isotope effects on 13C nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbonyl region of the natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor is examined, and 65 of the 66 expected signals are characterized at varying pH and temperature. Assignments are reported for over two-thirds of the signals, including those of all buried backbone amide groups with slow proton exchange and all side-chain carbonyl groups. This is the first extensively assigned carbonyl spectrum for any protein. A method for carbonyl resonance assignments utilizing amide proton exchange and isotope effects on nuclear shielding is described in detail. The assignments are made by establishing kinetic correlation between effects of amide proton exchange observed in the carbonyl 13C region with development of isotope effects and in the amide proton region with disappearance of preassigned resonances. Several aspects of protein structure and dynamics in solution may be investigated by carbonyl 13C NMR spectroscopy. Some effects of side-chain primary amide group hydrolysis are described. The main interest is on information about intramolecular hydrogen-bond energies and changes in the protein due to amino acid replacements by chemical modification or genetic engineering

  17. Study of the isotope effect in hydrogen exchange reactions in liquid hydrogen bromide and liquid ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of the investigation was the thermodynamic isotope effects in naphthalene-hydrogen bromide and benzene-ammonia systems in the presence of potassium amide acting as a catalyst. Protium, deuterium and tritium atoms were present in the system during the experiments. In the experiments on direct and ''reverse'' exchange, the kinetic isotope effects of hydrogen were measured in the liquid-phase systems hydrogen bromide-diphenvl and benzene-ammonia. The mechanisms of exchange reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons with HBr and NH3 are considered with regard to the findings of kinetic experiments. There is a brief description of the methods of preparation in which deuterized and tritiated compounds are used. For tritium counting a scintillation coincidence system was used; and spectroscopic and mass spectrometric methods were used for the isotopic analysis of deuterized substances. (author)

  18. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R2(2)(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6-31++G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4kcal/mol. PMID:27239947

  19. Spatially resolved protein hydrogen exchange measured by subzero-cooled chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amon, Sabine; Trelle, Morten B; Jensen, Ole N; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a valuable method for studying structural dynamics of proteins in solution by measuring their backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics. In a typical exchange experiment one or more proteins are incubated in deuterated buffer at physiological conditions...... optimized mass spectrometric conditions where gas-phase hydrogen scrambling is negligible. Our results show that the known dynamic behavior of ubiquitin in solution is accurately reflected in the deuterium contents of the fragment ions....

  20. Infrared spectroscopic study of photoreceptor membrane and purple membrane. Protein secondary structure and hydrogen deuterium exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared spectroscopy in the interval from 1800 to 1300 cm-1 has been used to investigate the secondary structure and the hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of bacteriorhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin in their respective native membranes. The amide I' and amide II' regions from spectra of membrane suspensions in D2O were decomposed into constituent bands by use of a curve-fitting procedure. The amide I' bands could be fit with a minimum of three theoretical components having peak positions at 1664, 1638, and 1625 cm-1 for bacteriorhodopsin and 1657, 1639, and 1625 cm-1 for rhodopsin. For both of these membrane proteins, the amide I' spectrum suggests that alpha-helix is the predominant form of peptide chain secondary structure, but that a substantial amount of beta-sheet conformation is present as well. The shape of the amide I' band was pH-sensitive for photoreceptor membranes, but not for purple membrane, indicating that membrane-bound rhodopsin undergoes a conformation change at acidic pH. Peptide hydrogen exchange of bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin was monitored by observing the change in the ratio of integrated absorbance (Aamide II'/Aamide I') during the interval from 1.5 to 25 h after membranes were introduced into buffered D2O. The fraction of peptide groups in a very slowly exchanging secondary structure was estimated to be 0.71 for bacteriorhodopsin at pD 7. The corresponding fraction in vertebrate rhodopsin was estimated to be less than or equal to 0.60. These findings are discussed in relationship to previous studies of hydrogen exchange behavior and to structural models for both proteins

  1. Electrostatic interaction of pi-acidic amides with hydrogen-bond acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Snyder, Lawrence B; Langley, David R

    2003-10-01

    Interactions between N-methylacetamide (NMA) and N-methylated derivatives of uracil, isocyanurate and barbituric acid have been studied using ab initio methods at the local MP2/6-31G** level of theory. The results were compared to similar interactions between the oxygen atom of NMA and the pi-clouds of perfluorobenzene, quinone and trimethyltriazine. The pi-acidic amides of isocyanurate and barbituric acid were found to interact with a hydrogen bond acceptor primarily through electrostatic attractions. These groups may be used as alternatives of a hydrogen bond donor to complement a hydrogen bond acceptor or an anion in molecular recognition and drug design. Examples of such interactions were identified through a search of the CSD database. PMID:12951105

  2. Isotope exchange reactions in hydrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rates of isotopic exchange for the excited states of muonic hydrogen are calculated as functions of collision energy. Ground state population q1s for different collision energies, target densities and isotope concentrations is obtained. It is shown that for principal quantum numbers n > 5 the isotopic exchange still considerably influences the value of q1s. (author)

  3. Hydrogen bonding to carbonyl oxygen of nitrogen-pyramidalized amide - detection of pyramidalization direction preference by vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Taniguchi, Tohru; Monde, Kenji; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen-pyramidalization of amide increases electron density on nitrogen and decreases that on carbonyl oxygen. We identified hydrogen-bonding to carbonyl of nitrogen-pyramidalized bicyclic β-proline derivatives by crystallography, and by NMR and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy in solution. Such hydrogen-bonding can switch the preferred nitrogen-pyramidalization direction, as detected by VCD spectroscopy. PMID:26889607

  4. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  5. Electron capture dissociation proceeds with a low degree of intramolecular migration of peptide amide hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Adams, Christopher M; Zubarev, Roman A;

    2008-01-01

    scrambling) that occurs during vibrational excitation of gas-phase ions. Unlike traditional collisional ion activation, electron capture dissociation (ECD) is not associated with substantial vibrational excitation. We investigated the extent of intramolecular backbone amide hydrogen (1H/2H) migration upon...... electrospray ion source by, e.g., high declustering potentials or during precursor ion selection (via sideband excitation) in the external linear quadrupole ion trap undergo nearly complete hydrogen (1H/2H) scrambling. Similarly, collision-induced dissociation (CID) in the external linear quadrupole ion trap...... closely mimic the known solution deuteration pattern of the selectively labeled peptides. This excellent correlation between the results obtained from gas phase and solution suggests that ECD holds great promise as a general method to obtain single residue resolution in proteins from solution 1H/2H...

  6. Calculations of Molecular Structures and Processes Important for Hydrogen Behaviour in the Li-Amide/Imide System

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanovic, N.; Radisavljevic, I.; Novakovic, N.; Manasijevic, M.; Colognesi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Lithium amide (LiNH2) and imide (Li2NH) have recently attracted much attention as part of the Li-H-N system suitable for hydrogen (H) storage applications. However, the ground-state imide structure is still unknown with at least six candidate structures, with ground state energies all very close to one another. In order to discover possible pathways for the imide-amide-imide transformations during the hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles, we have examined the molecular structures involved (a...

  7. New synthesis route for ternary transition metal amides as well as ultrafast amide-hydride hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Richter, Theresia M M; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-04-14

    K2[Mn(NH2)4] and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were successfully synthesized via a mechanochemical method. The mixture of K2[Mn(NH2)4] and LiH showed excellent rehydrogenation properties. In fact, after dehydrogenation K2[Mn(NH2)4]-8LiH fully rehydrogenates within 60 seconds at ca. 230 °C and 5 MPa of H2. This is one of the fastest rehydrogenation rates in amide-hydride systems known to date. This work also shows a strategy for the synthesis of transition metal nitrides by decomposition of the mixtures of M[M'(NH2)n] (where M is an alkali or alkaline earth metal and M' is a transition metal) and metal hydrides. PMID:26936831

  8. The pH sensitivity of −NH exchange in LnDOTA-tetraamide complexes varies with amide substituent

    OpenAIRE

    Opina, Ana Christina L.; Wu, Yunkou; Zhao, Piyu; Kiefer, Garry; Sherry, A. Dean

    2011-01-01

    The amide proton exchange rates in various lanthanide(III) DOTA-tetraamide complexes were investigated by CEST as a function of variable chemical structures and charges on the amide substituents. Comparisons were made between YbDOTA-(gly)4− (Yb-1), YbDOTA-(NHCH2PO3)45− (Yb-2), and YbDOTA-(NHCH2PO3Et2)43+ (Yb-3). The general shapes of the CEST versus pH profiles were similar for the three complexes but they showed maximum CEST intensities at different pH values, pH 8.3, 8.8 and 6.9 for Yb-1, Y...

  9. Electrochemical reduction of disulfide-containing proteins for hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Salbo, Rune; Ploug, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    some challenges in using electrochemical reduction in HDX-MS analyses and provide possible conditions to attenuate these limitations. For example, high salt concentrations hamper disulfide bond reduction, necessitating additional dilution of the sample with aqueous acidic solution at quench conditions.......Characterization of disulfide bond-containing proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) requires reduction of the disulfide bonds under acidic and cold conditions, where the amide hydrogen exchange reaction is quenched (pH 2.5, 0 °C). The reduction typically...... requires a high concentration (>200 mM) of the chemical reducing agent Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) as its reduction rate constant is decreased at low pH and temperature. Serious adverse effects on chromatographic and mass spectrometric performances have been reported when using high concentrations...

  10. Process for exchanging tritium between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method of exchanging and concentrating the radioactive isotope of hydrogen from water or hydrogen gas is described. This heavy water enrichment system involves a low pressure, dual temperature process. (U.K.)

  11. Characterization of the interface structure of enzyme-inhibitor complex by using hydrogen-deuterium exchange and electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Akashi, S.; Takio, K

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the interaction between a thiol protease inhibitor, cystatin, and its target enzyme, papain, by hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange in conjunction with successive analysis by collision-induced dissociation (CID) in an rf-only hexapole ion guide with electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR MS). The deuterium incorporation into backbone amide hydrogens of cystatin was analyzed at different time points in the presence or absenc...

  12. Deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall separation factors for the deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen have been calculated over a wide range of temperature, pressure and deuterium concentrations. These data would be useful in the design and other considerations for heavy water production, based on hydrogen-water exchange. (author)

  13. 15NH/D-SOLEXSY experiment for accurate measurement of amide solvent exchange rates: application to denatured drkN SH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amide solvent exchange rates are regarded as a valuable source of information on structure/dynamics of unfolded (disordered) proteins. Proton-based saturation transfer experiments, normally used to measure solvent exchange, are known to meet some serious difficulties. The problems mainly arise from the need to (1) manipulate water magnetization and (2) discriminate between multiple magnetization transfer pathways that occur within the proton pool. Some of these issues are specific to unfolded proteins. For example, the compensation scheme used to cancel the Overhauser effect in the popular CLEANEX experiment is not designed for use with unfolded proteins. In this report we describe an alternative experimental strategy, where amide 15N is used as a probe of solvent exchange. The experiment is performed in 50% H2O-50% D2O solvent and is based on the (HACACO)NH pulse sequence. The resulting spectral map is fully equivalent to the conventional HSQC. To fulfill its purpose, the experiment monitors the conversion of deuterated species, 15ND, into protonated species, 15NH, as effected by the solvent exchange. Conceptually, this experiment is similar to EXSY which prompted the name of 15NH/D-SOLEXSY (SOLvent EXchange SpectroscopY). Of note, our experimental scheme, which relies on nitrogen rather than proton to monitor solvent exchange, is free of the complications described above. The developed pulse sequence was used to measure solvent exchange rates in the chemically denatured state of the drkN SH3 domain. The results were found to correlate well with the CLEANEX-PM data, r = 0.97, thus providing a measure of validation for both techniques. When the experimentally measured exchange rates are converted into protection factors, most of the values fall in the range 0.5-2, consistent with random-coil behavior. However, elevated values, ca. 5, are obtained for residues R38 and A39, as well as the side-chain indole of W36. This is surprising, given that high protection

  14. Trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2005-01-01

    A density functional theory database of hydrogen chemisorption energies on close packed surfaces of a number of transition and noble metals is presented. The bond energies are used to understand the trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution. A volcano curve is obtained when measured...... exchange currents are plotted as a function of the calculated hydrogen adsorption energies and a simple kinetic model is developed to understand the origin of the volcano. The volcano curve is also consistent with Pt being the most efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution. (c) 2005 The...

  15. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  16. Operating experiences of Heavy Water Plant at Talcher using bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process (Paper No. 1.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heavy water plant employing bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process was set up at Talcher (India). The energy consumption in the process is lower as compared to monothermal process. The plant performance was affected by various problems and has resulted in low heavy water production. The problems are: (i)formation of solid deposits, (ii)inability of exchange towers to process design gas flow rates, (iii)inadequate exchange efficiency of the sieve trays provided as exchange trays, and (iv)differential amide concentration in different plant sections. These problems and their effect on the overall plant performance are discussed in detail and modifications to improve the performance are suggested. (author). 4 figs

  17. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  18. Understanding hydrogen sorption in a metal-organic framework with open-metal sites and amide functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony T.

    2013-05-09

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) studies of the mechanism of hydrogen sorption in an rht-MOF known as Cu-TPBTM are presented. The MOF is a decorated/substituted isostructural analogue to the unembellished rht-MOF, PCN-61, that was studied previously [ Forrest, K. A.J. Phys. Chem. C 2012, 116, 15538-15549. ]. The simulations were performed using three different hydrogen potentials of increasing complexity. Simulated hydrogen sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the reported experimental data for only a polarizable model in one of four experimentally observed crystal structure configurations. The study demonstrates the ability of modeling to distinguish the differential sorption of distinct strucures; one configuration is found to be dominant due to favorable interactions with substrates. In addition, it was discovered that the presence of polar amide groups had a significant effect on the electrostatics of the Cu2+ ions and directs the low-pressure physisorption of hydrogen in the MOF. This is in contrast to what was observed in PCN-61, where an exterior copper ion had a higher relative charge and was the favored loading site. This tunability of the electrostatics of the copper ions via chemical substitution on the MOF framework can be explained by the presence of the negatively charged oxygen atom of the amide group that causes the interior Cu2+ ion to exhibit a higher positive charge through an inductive effect. Further, control simulations, taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by theoretical modeling, include artificially modified charges for both Cu2+ ions chosen equal to or with a higher charge on the exterior Cu2+ ion. This choice resulted in distinctly different hydrogen sorption characteristics in Cu-TPBTM with no direct sorption on the open-metal sites. Thus, this study demonstrates both the tunable nature of MOF platforms and the possibility for rational design of sorption

  19. Allosteric activation of coagulation factor VIIa visualized by hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Jørgensen, Thomas; Olsen, Ole H; Persson, Egon; Jensen, Ole; Stennicke, Henning R; Andersen, Mette

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a serine protease that, after binding to tissue factor (TF), plays a pivotal role in the initiation of blood coagulation. We used hydrogen exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to visualize the details of FVIIa activation by comparing the exchange kinetics of ...... provide novel insights into the cofactor-induced activation of this important protease and reveal the potential for allosteric regulation in the trypsin family of proteases....

  20. Does the Surface Matter? Hydrogen-Bonded Chain Formation of an Oxalic Amide Derivative in a Two- and Three-Dimensional Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Klappenberger, F.; Canas-Ventura, M. E.; Clair, S.; Pons, S.; Schlickum, U.; Qu, Z. R.; Strunskus, T.; Comisso, A.; Woll, C.; Brune, H.; Kern, K.; De Vita, A; Ruben, M.; Bartha, J. V.

    2008-01-01

    We report on a multi-technique investigation of the supramolecular organisation of N,N-diphenyl oxalic amide under differently dimensioned environments, namely three-dimensional (3D) in the bulk crystal, and in two dimensions on the Ag(111) surface as well as on the reconstructed Au(111) surface. With the help of Xray structure analysis and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) we find that the molecules organize in hydrogen-bonded chains with the bonding motif qualitatively changed by the surf...

  1. Combination of supported bimetallic rhodium–molybdenum catalyst and cerium oxide for hydrogenation of amide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenation of cyclohexanecarboxamide to aminomethylcyclohexane was conducted with silica-supported bimetallic catalysts composed of noble metal and group 6–7 elements. The combination of rhodium and molybdenum with molar ratio of 1:1 showed the highest activity. The effect of addition of various metal oxides was investigated on the catalysis of Rh–MoOx/SiO2, and the addition of CeO2 much increased the activity and selectivity. Higher hydrogen pressure and higher reaction temperature in the tested range of 2–8 MPa and 393–433 K, respectively, were favorable in view of both activity and selectivity. The highest yield of aminomethylcyclohexane obtained over Rh–MoOx/SiO2 + CeO2 was 63%. The effect of CeO2 addition was highest when CeO2 was not calcined, and CeO2 calcined at >773 K showed a smaller effect. The use of CeO2 as a support rather decreased the activity in comparison with Rh–MoOx/SiO2. The weakly-basic nature of CeO2 additive can affect the surface structure of Rh–MoOx/SiO2, i.e. reducing the ratio of Mo–OH/Mo–O− sites. (focus issue paper)

  2. Combination of supported bimetallic rhodium-molybdenum catalyst and cerium oxide for hydrogenation of amide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tamura, Riku; Tamura, Masazumi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogenation of cyclohexanecarboxamide to aminomethylcyclohexane was conducted with silica-supported bimetallic catalysts composed of noble metal and group 6-7 elements. The combination of rhodium and molybdenum with molar ratio of 1:1 showed the highest activity. The effect of addition of various metal oxides was investigated on the catalysis of Rh-MoOx/SiO2, and the addition of CeO2 much increased the activity and selectivity. Higher hydrogen pressure and higher reaction temperature in the tested range of 2-8 MPa and 393-433 K, respectively, were favorable in view of both activity and selectivity. The highest yield of aminomethylcyclohexane obtained over Rh-MoOx/SiO2 + CeO2 was 63%. The effect of CeO2 addition was highest when CeO2 was not calcined, and CeO2 calcined at >773 K showed a smaller effect. The use of CeO2 as a support rather decreased the activity in comparison with Rh-MoOx/SiO2. The weakly-basic nature of CeO2 additive can affect the surface structure of Rh-MoOx/SiO2, i.e. reducing the ratio of Mo-OH/Mo-O- sites.

  3. Isotopic exchange between gaseous hydrogen and scandium dideuteride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a study to understand the long-term storage effects on scandium hydride thin films, an experiment has been conducted in which scandium dideuteride thin films were exposed to a hydrogen environment for various periods of time at ambient temperature. The resulting films were analysed using neutron reflectivity using the surface profile analysis reflectometer (SPEAR) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Using neutron reflectivity and taking advantage of the large difference in the neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and deuterium, the resulting changes in the film composition due to isotopic exchange and diffusion were observed as a function of the film depth. (orig.)

  4. Study on influencing factors for hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction offers an approach to hydrogen isotope separation, which can be applied in heavy water detritiation. Purpose: To optimize the operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction, we analysed the influence of different factors on the transfer coefficient. Methods: In detail, the isotope exchange experiments of H-D system were carried out in a self-designed catalytic bed loaded with hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing with certain volume ratio. The experiments showed the changes of both the transfer coefficient and the pressure drop of column with the changing of the operational temperatures (29℃, 45℃, 60℃ and 75℃), the ratios of gas to liquid (0.58, 1.17, 2.65, 3.54) and the deuterium concentrations (5.05×10-3, 1.0144×10-2, 2.01×10-2). Results: Results showed that 45℃ is the optimal temperature for operating. The transfer coefficient increases with the increasing of the ratio of gas to liquid in the ranges of 0.58 to 1.17 and 2.65 to 3.56, while decreases with the deuterium concentration increases from 5.05×10-3 to 2.01×10-2. The pressure drop of column increases with increasing of gas flow rate. Conclusions: The experiment proves that the ratio of gas to liquid, the reaction temperature and the deuterium concentration are all important factors, which influence the transfer coefficient of deuterium obviously. The optimal operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction are as follows: the temperature is 45℃, the ratio of gas to liquid is 3.56, and the deuterium concentration is 2.01×10-2. (authors)

  5. Rhodium catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalysts were prepared by depositing rhodium on porous polystyrene copolymer. The activity of the catalysts for the isotopic exchange reaction in the hydrogen-water vapor system was determined by the nearness of approach to isotopic equilibrium between the two reactants after passing through the column. A known quantity of catalyst was packed in a 1 cm diameter glass column to depth varying 2 to 5 cm. The degree of approach to isotopic equilibrium was as high as 60 to 100 %

  6. Separation of hydrogen isotopes by exchange reaction between water and hydrogen using hydrophobic platinum catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of utilizing exchange reaction and distillation has been found very frequently in practical scale in the separation process of hydrogen isotopes such as heavy water and deuterium. Distillation consumes a large quantity of energy, but it is a promising method in future because of the stability and simplicity of the process utilizing phase equilibrium. In the exchange reaction method, there are four excellent reactions involving the exchange reaction between gas and liquid, and in the practical process, counter flow gas-liquid contact towers are used. In this case, single temperature exchange method and double temperature exchange method are conceivable. In order to prevent the condensation of water molecules on active platinum surface, the catalyst has been made hydrophobic. The evaluation of catalyst activity and its basic theory, the lowering of catalyst activity and the effect of regeneration, the rate of exchange reaction and activation energy, and overall mass transfer coefficient are discussed. The performance of hydrogen isotope separation in a counter flow type exchange tower is represented by two factors in gas and liquid phase reactions, and to improve the performance, the transfer at gas-liquid interface must be accelerated, (Kako, I.)

  7. Tritium removal by hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water on hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many kinds of the hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water have been prepared. The carriers are the hydrophobic organic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), monofluorocarbon-PTFE mixture(PTFE-FC), and styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer(SDB). 0.1 to 2 wt % Pt is deposited on the carriers. The Pt/SDB catalyst has much higher activity than the Pt/PTFE catalyst and the Pt/PTFE-FC catalyst shows the intermediate value of catalytic activity. The observation of electron microscope shows that the degrees of dispersion of Pt particles on the hydrophobic carriers result in the difference of catalytic activities. A gas-liquid separated type column containing ten stages is constructed. Each stage is composed of both the hydrophobic catalyst bed for the hydrogen gas/water vapor isotopic exchange and the packed column type bed for the water vapor/liquid water isotopic exchange. In the column hydrogen gas and water flow countercurrently and hydrogen isotopes are separated

  8. Stereo-Specific Hydrogen Exchange Accompanying Catalytic Hydrogenation of Methyl β, β-Dimethylacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During platinum or palladium-catalysed hydrogenation in which, in solution, methyl β, β-dimethylacrylate is converted into the corresponding ester of isovaleric acid by the equation CH3CH3>C = CH-COOCH3 H2, cat. sol. --> CH3CH3>C = CH-CH2-COOCH3' an isotopic exchange of hydrogen between the gas and the solvent on the one hand and the substrate on the other is superposed upon the process of saturation of the double bond. This was studied by carrying out, at 20°C, hydrogenations which were interrupted after saturation of half the starting product and by employing D2 or esters deuterated either totally or at specific positions, different positions being used from experiment to experiment. The isotopic composition of the hydrogen at each of the positions of the molecules, both saturated and non-saturated, was determined, after separation of the molecules by chromatography in the gaseous phase, by combined mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. A separate study was made of behaviour in respect of exchange of substrate in the non-saturated and saturated state, in the absence of hydrogen or the catalyst or both. Among the factors examined were, in particular, the effects of the solvent and the catalyst - which were very pronounced - on all the phenomena observed. These can be summarized as follows, (a) Molecules of the substrate no longer exchange once they are saturated, (b) With non-saturated molecules, restricted exchange takes place in which only the β-methyls are involved. This exchange is symmetric in the presence of rhodium and palladium, and stereo-specific in the presence of platinum - on an average 2.2 times greater in the cis-group than in the trans-group. This fact in the latter case excludes the hypothesis of double bond migration from the α-β position to the β-γ position as an exchange mechanism; which is confirmed by the absence of exchange at the exposition, (c) All the isotopic varieties from -d0 to -d6 or -d8 are present in the

  9. Charge exchange between hydrogen atoms and fully stripped heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge exchange between multicharged ions and background atomic and molecular gases represents one of the limitations to the attainment of high charge states in heavy ion sources, particularly containment sources. An attempt is made to study systematically a particularly simple but in many respects representative class of such reactions, namely charge transfer between atomic hydrogen and fully stripped heavy ions. Approximate cross sections for these processes in the low keV range of collision energies were obtained using a multistate Landau--Zener method. The energy and Z dependences of the cross sections are discussed

  10. Action of Mercaptan and Disulfide in Hydrogen Atom Exchange Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free- radical, photochemical, and high-energy radiation-induced reactions may be catalysed or inhibited by rapid hydrogen atom exchange reactions of mercaptans and disulfides. The radical-induced, light-initiated, and benzophenone-sensitized decarbonylations of aldehydes are catalysed by mercaptans. The chain-propagating hydrogen transfer reaction, R' + RCH = O -> RH + RC = O , is made more rapid by a similar sequence of hydrogen atom transfers involving the sulfur compound: R' + C6H5CH2SH -> RH + C6H5CH2S'; C6H5CH2S + RCH = 0 -> C6H5CH2SH + RC = 0. The photoreduction of benzophenone in 2-propanol leads to benzpinacol by a non-chain reaction via the radicals (C6H5)2C-OH and (CH3)2COH. The reaction is retarded and inhibited by mercaptan and disulfide, which reconvert the radicals to the starting materials by rapid hydrogen transfer reactions and are themselves regenerated in their alternate valence states, each molecule of sulfur compound negating the chemical consequences of many quanta: (C6H5)2C-OH + AS' -> (C6H5)2C = O + ASH; (CH3)2C-OH + ASH -> (CH3)2C = 0 + AS'. Proof of the mechanism is found in: equilibration of initially present mercaptan or disulfide during inhibition; in racemization of optically active alcohol during inhibition; in deuterium exchange during inhibition. Similar inhibition is seen when only one intermediate radical is formed, as in the benzophenone- benzhydrol and acetophenone-α-methyl-benzyl alcohol systems. Inhibition by sulfur compounds, by the same mechanism, is found in the 60Co γ-ray induced conversion of benzophenone to benzpinacol; naphthalene has no protecting effect on benzophenone in the 60Co system, while quenching the photochemical reaction. The protection by sulfur compounds of solutes against radiation damage thus results from hydrogen atom transfer reactions. The photoreduction of benzophenone in an ether is also inhibited by the sulfur compounds, by hydrogen atom transfer reactions. A mechanism exists in this system

  11. Evidence for hydrogen-deuterium exchange in viral particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jiangsen; LIU Ziyang; TANG Caihua; HE Yihui; ZHU Jiahong; WANG Chengyu; CHAI Shaoai; CHEN Yueqing; QIAN Wen

    2004-01-01

    Heavy water (D2O) could enhance thermostability of some viruses. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we report the development of a matrix-aided gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry method that allows direct determination of deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in D2O-treated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and RNA from D2O-treated HAV. The D/H ratio was expressed as δDSMOW. Our experiments showed that δDSMOW values increased significantly in D2O-treated viral samples compared to normal controls, and increment in δDSMOW of D2O, treated viral samples was in a fine linear relationship with increment in amount of samples loaded in BSA matrix. Our experiments also indicated that increased δDSMOW of D2O-treated virus correlated well with its enhanced thermostability. The results suggested that hydrogen-deuterium exchange occurred in viral particles and its RNA structure as a result of D2O-treatment. Furthermore, such exchange could cause changes in viral phenotype, such as enhanced thermostability.

  12. Contribution to the study of catalytic hydrogen-deuterium exchange between hydrogen and hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen-deuterium exchange between molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons over a platinum and charcoal catalyst was studied in a static system. The change in isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen was followed by a thermal conductivity method. Cyclo-pentane and cyclohexane were chosen because of their stability. A reversible inactivation of the catalyst was observed with both hydrocarbons. The reasons for this inactivation are unknown but it was shown that reactivation led to satisfactory reproducibility. A kinetic study was done with cyclohexane in the range 30 to 160 deg. C, and 40 to 360 mm for the pressure of hydrogen, and 10 to 70 mm for the pressure of cyclohexane. The order of the reaction with respect to cyclohexane pressure is always close to zero; the order with respect to that of hydrogen is 0.5 above 100 deg. C. It decreases with increasing temperature and becomes negative (-0.5 at 30 deg. C), characterizing an inhibition by hydrogen. At the same time, the apparent activation energy goes from 6 to 13 kcal/mole. (author)

  13. The Geometric Phase Appears in the Ultracold Hydrogen Exchange Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kendrick, Brian K; Balakrishnan, Naduvalath

    2015-01-01

    Quantum reactive scattering calculations for the hydrogen exchange reaction H + H$_2$($v=4$, $j=0$) $\\to$ H + H$_2$($v'$, $j'$) and its isotopic analogues are reported for ultracold collision energies. Due to the unique properties associated with ultracold collisions, it is shown that the geometric phase effectively controls the reactivity. The rotationally resolved rate coefficients computed with and without the geometric phase are shown to differ by up to four orders of magnitude. The effect is also significant in the vibrationally resolved and total rate coefficients. The dynamical origin of the effect is discussed and the large geometric phase effect reported here might be exploited to control the reactivity through the application of external fields or by the selection of a particular nuclear spin state.

  14. Hydrogen isotope exchanges between water and methanol in interstellar ices

    CERN Document Server

    Faure, A; Theulé, P; Quirico, E; Schmitt, B

    2015-01-01

    The deuterium fractionation of gas-phase molecules in hot cores is believed to reflect the composition of interstellar ices. The deuteration of methanol is a major puzzle, however, because the isotopologue ratio [CH2DOH]/[CH3OD], which is predicted to be equal to 3 by standard grain chemistry models, is much larger (~20) in low-mass hot corinos and significantly lower (~1) in high-mass hot cores. This dichotomy in methanol deuteration between low-mass and massive protostars is currently not understood. In this study, we report a simplified rate equation model of the deuterium chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. We apply this model to the chemistry of hot corinos and hot cores, with IRAS 16293-2422 and the Orion~KL Compact Ridge as prototypes, respectively. The chemistry is based on a statistical initial deuteration at low temperature followed by a warm-up phase during which thermal hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchanges occur between water and methanol. The exchange kinetics is incorpor...

  15. Water hydrogen bonding in proton exchange and neutral polymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Sarah Black

    Understanding the dynamics of water sorbed into polymer films is critical to reveal structure-property relationships in membranes for energy and water treatment applications, where membranes must interact with water to facilitate or inhibit the transport of ions. The chemical structure of the polymer has drastic effects on the transport properties of the membrane due to the morphological structure of the polymer and how water is interacting with the functional groups on the polymer backbone. Therefore studying the dynamics of water adsorbed into a membrane will give insight into how water-polymer interactions influence transport properties of the film. With a better understanding of how to design materials to have specific properties, we can accelerate development of smarter materials for both energy and water treatment applications to increase efficiency and create high-flux materials and processes. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the water-polymer interactions in proton exchange and uncharged membranes and make correlations to their charge densities and transport properties. A linear Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method for measuring the hydrogen bonding distribution of water sorbed in proton exchange membranes is described in this thesis. The information on the distribution of the microenvironments of water in an ionic polymer is critical to understanding the effects of different acidic groups on the proton conductivity of proton exchange membranes at low relative humidity. The OD stretch of dilute HOD in H2O is a single, well-defined vibrational band. When HOD in dilute H2O is sorbed into a proton exchange membrane, the OD stretch peak shifts based on the microenvironment that water encounters within the nanophase separated structure of the material. This peak shift is a signature of different hydrogen bonding populations within the membrane, which can be deconvoluted rigorously for dilute HOD in H 2O compared to only

  16. Methylamine-hydrogen exchange. Part I - theoretical evaluation of separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium constants and the deuterium separation factors for the methylamine-hydrogen exchange when all the species of these molecules are at equilibrium, have been calculated as function of temperature and deuterium concentrations in amine and hydrogen, using recent spectroscopic data. Wide range of temperature and deuterium concentrations have been covered. It has been observed that the separation factors for this system are higher than the corresponding fractionation factors for ammonia-hydrogen exchange. From the temperature dependence of these separation factors, the heat of reaction for the isotopic exchange between amine and hydrogen has been calculated. (author)

  17. Measurement of the acidities of several cation-exchange resins using hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between ethanol (unlabeled) and one of three cation-exchange resins labeled with tritium has been observed at 40-80degC. The acidity (acidity based on kinetic logic) at each temperature has been obtained from a A'-McKay plot based on the respective data obtained. The following results have been obtained on the basis of both the acidities obtained in this work and the acidities (of several materials) obtained previously. (1) The order of the reactivity is (Amberlite IRC-76)>(Dowex A-1)>(PVA2000>(Amberlite IRC-50) at 60degC. (2) The higher the temperature, the larger is the reactivity of each material. (3) The temperature dependence of the reactivity of Dowex A-1 is the largest in the four. (4) The reactivity of the functional group (i.e., COOH group or OH group) bonded to the polymer chain can be clarified using the A'-McKay plot method. (5) It seems that method can be applied to analyze other reactions, e.g., other isotope-exchange reactions, surface reactions, catalytic reactions, etc. (author)

  18. Effect of Amide Hydrogen Bonding Interaction on Supramolecular Self‐Assembly of Naphthalene Diimide Amphiphiles with Aggregation Induced Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghule, Namdev V.; La, Duong Duc; Bhosale, Rajesh S.; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Raynor, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the present work, two new naphthalene diimide (NDI) amphiphiles, NDI‐N and NDI‐NA, were successfully synthesized and employed to investigate their self‐assembly and optical properties. For NDI‐NA, which contains an amide group, aggregation‐induced emission enhancement (AIEE) was demonstrated in the presence of various ratios of methylcyclohexane (MCH) in chloroform, which led to the visual color changes. This new amide‐containing NDI‐NA amphiphile formed nanobelt structures in chloroform/MCH (10:90, v/v) and microcup‐like morphologies in chloroform/MCH (5:95, v/v). The closure of these microcups led to the formation of vesicles and microcapsules. The structural morphologies gained from the solvophobic control of NDI‐NA were confirmed by various complementary techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, X‐ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of the amide moiety in NDI‐N, no self‐assembly was observed, indicating the fundamental role of H‐bonding in the self‐association process.

  19. Molecular Simulation of Hydrogen Storage in Ion-Exchanged X Zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoming Du

    2014-01-01

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method was employed to simulate the adsorption properties of molecular hydrogen on ion-exchanged X zeolites at 100–293 K and pressures up to 10 MPa in this paper. The effect of cation type, temperature, and pressure on hydrogen adsorption capacity, heat of adsorption, adsorption sites, and adsorption potential energy of ion-exchanged X zeolites was analyzed. The results indicate that the hydrogen adsorption capacity increases with the decrease in temperature...

  20. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Sharley, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure....

  1. Exact Exchange-Correlation Functional for the Infinitely Stretched Hydrogen Molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Matito, Eduard; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2016-01-01

    The exchange-correlation hole density of the infinitely stretched (dissociated) hydrogen molecule can be cast into a closed analytical form by using its exact wave function. This permits to obtain an explicit exchange-correlation energy functional of the electron density which allows for its functional derivation to yield the corresponding Kohh-Sham effective exchange-correlation potential. We have shown that this exchange-correlation functional is exact for the dissociated hydrogen molecule, yields its dissociation energy correctly, and its corresponding exchange-correlation potential has the correct $-1/r$ asymptotic behavior.

  2. Recombinant Nepenthesin II for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Menglin; Hoeppner, Morgan; Rey, Martial; Kadek, Alan; Man, Petr; Schriemer, David C

    2015-07-01

    The pitcher secretions of the Nepenthes genus of carnivorous plants contain a proteolytic activity that is very useful for hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS). Our efforts to reconstitute pitcher fluid activity using recombinant nepenthesin I (one of two known aspartic proteases in the fluid) revealed a partial cleavage profile and reduced enzymatic stability in certain HX-MS applications. We produced and characterized recombinant nepenthesin II to determine if it complemented nepenthesin I in HX-MS applications. Nepenthesin II shares many properties with nepenthesin I, such as fast digestion at reduced temperature and pH, and broad cleavage specificity, but in addition, it cleaves C-terminal to tryptophan. Neither enzyme reproduces the C-terminal proline cleavage we observed in the natural extract. Nepenthesin II is considerably more resistant to chemical denaturants and reducing agents than nepenthesin I, and it possesses a stability profile that is similar to that of pepsin. Higher stability combined with the slightly broader cleavage specificity makes nepenthesin II a useful alternative to pepsin and a more complete replacement for pitcher fluid in HX-MS applications. PMID:25993527

  3. Characterization of hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domestic hydrophobic catalysts, KC-1 and KC-2, which were developed for the liquid phase catalytic exchange process separating hydrogen isotopes, were tested against Japanese catalyst, Kogel, which is being used in the Fugen's heavy water upgrader in Japan. KC-1 and KC-2 have different characteristics due to the differences of the solvent and solvent composition used. The test results of domestic hydrophobic catalysts characteristics such as pore distribution, specific surface area, platinum loading, and platinum dispersion from AECL agreed well with the results obtained by KEPRI/KAERI. The shape of KC-1 and KC-2 were 4x4 mm cylindrial pellet and that of Kogel catalyst was 4∼5.5mm sphere. The platinum loading of all catalysts were 0.8 wt%. The BET surface areas were 442, 247, 514m2 ·g-1 for KC-1, KC-2, and Kogel respectively, among which the BET surface area of KC-2 was the smallest. The platinum dispersion area was 2.47, 2.07, 1.90 m2g-1 and the platinum dispersion was 100, 100, 92% for KC-1, KC-2, and Kogel respectively, which showed domestic catalysts had higher values than Kogel catalyst. The average pore size was the largest in KC-2

  4. The Solar Wind Charge-Exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntz, K D; Collier, M R; Connor, H K; Cravens, T E; Koutroumpa, D; Porter, F S; Robertson, I P; Sibeck, D G; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Wash, B M

    2015-01-01

    The production factor, or broad band averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT 1/4 keV (R12) band is $3.8\\pm0.2\\times10^{-20}$ count degree$^{-2}$ cm$^4$. This value is derived from a comparison of the Long-Term (background) Enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8 to 4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of 1/4 keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the 1/4 keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the 3/4 keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally,...

  5. Hydrogen isotope exchange between boranes and deuterated aromatic hydrocarbons: evidence for reversible hydroboration of benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentaborane, B5H9, and diborane, B2H6, undergo hydrogen isotope exchange with deuterated aromatic hydrocarbons. Lewis acid catalyzed hydrogen isotope exchange occurs between benzene-d6 and the apical hydrogen atom of B5H9 to form 1-DB5H8 at ambient temperature. In uncatalyzed exchanges, B5H9 reacts with deuterated aromatic hydrocarbons to produce 1,2,3,4,5-D5B5H4 at +450C and B5D9 at +1200C. This thermally induced hydrogen isotope exchange apparently occurs via a reversible hydroboration of the aromatic ring. Diborane undergoes a similar isotope exchange with benzene-d6 under mild thermal conditions. 18 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  6. Solvent exchange of buried water and hydrogen exchange of peptide NH groups hydrogen bonded to buried waters in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent exchange of 18O-labeled buried water in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), trypsin, and trypsin-BPTI complex is measured by high-precision isotope ratio mass spectroscopy. Buried water is labeled by equilibrium of the protein in 18O-enriched water. Protein samples are then rapidly dialyzed against water of normal isotope composition by gel filtration and stored. The exchangeable 18O label eluting with the protein in 10-300 s is determined by an H2O-CO2 equilibration technique. Exchange of buried waters with solvent water is complete before 10-15 s in BPTI, trypsin, and BPTI-trypsin, as well as in lysozyme and carboxypeptidase measured as controls. When in-exchange dialysis and storage are carried out at pH ≥ 2.5, trypsin-BPTI and trypsin, but not free BPTI, have the equivalent of one 18O atom that exchanges slowly (after 300 s and before several days). This oxygen is probably covalently bound to a specific site in trypsin. When in-exchange dialysis and storage are carried out at pH 1.1, the equivalent of three to seven 18O atoms per molecule is associated with the trypsin-BPTI complex, apparently due to nonspecific covalent 18O labeling of carboxyl groups at low pH. In addition to 18O exchange of buried waters, the hydrogen isotope exchange of buried NH groups H bonded to buried waters was also measured. Their base-catalyzed exchange rate constants are on the order of NH groups that in the crystal are exposed to solvent and hydrogen-bonded main chain O, and their pH/sub min/ is similar to that for model compounds. The pH dependence of their exchange rate constants suggests that direct exchange with water may significantly contribute to their observed exchange rate

  7. Exchange reaction of hydrogen isotopes on proton conductor ceramic of hydrogen pump for blanket tritium recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical hydrogen pump using ceramic proton conductor has been investigated to discuss its application for the blanket tritium recovery system of the nuclear fusion reactor. As the series of those work, the transportation experiments of H2-D2 mixture via ceramic proton conductor membrane have been carried out. Then, the phenomenon that was caused by the exchange reaction between the deuterium in the ceramic and the hydrogen in the gas phase has been observed. So, the ceramic proton conductor which doped deuterium was exposed to hydrogen under the control of zero current, and the effluent gas was analyzed. It is considered that the hydrogen in the gas phase is taken as proton to the ceramic by isotope exchange reaction, and penetrates to the ceramic by diffusion with replacement of deuteron. (author)

  8. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-01-01

    proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic......, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein-according to thermodynamic principles-cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent...

  9. Development of hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and liquid water (Preprint No. CI-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exchange of deuterium between hydrogen and water is important for heavy water production. The exchange reaction is too slow and requires a catalyst for any practicability. However usual catalysts lose their catalytic activity in contact with liquid water probably because of water engulfing all the catalytic sites and preventing hydrogen from reaching them. This problem has been overcome by imparting hydrophobicity to these catalysts. A brief account of the development of a hydrophobic catalyst Pt-C-PTFE is given. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  10. On the proton exchange contribution to electron-hydrogen atom elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the exchange contribution to the electron-proton potential Born term in elastic electron-hydrogen atom scattering arises as the non relativistic limit from the exchange of a proton between the two participant electrons - calculated from quantum electrodynamics including properly bound states (as solution of Bethe - Salpeter equation). (Author)

  11. Hydrogen Bonded Semi-Rigidified Bispyridyl-lncorporating Aryl Amide Oligomers: Efficient "C"-Styled Receptors for Aliphatic Ammoniums, a Remarkable Protonation Effect and Chiral Induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Chang-Zhia; LI, Zhan-Ting; GAO, Xianga; WANG, Quan-Rui

    2007-01-01

    The complexing behaviour of two linear compounds 1 and 2 toward the trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) salts of n-dodecylamine, di-n-octylamine, n-dodecyl D- and L-phenylalaninates (3, 4, and D- and L-5) in chloroform has been described. Compounds 1 and 2 consist of two folded amide moieties with two pyridyls at the terminals which are connected directly or with an acetylene linker. The rigidified folded moieties are stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding, while the whole molecules can adopt an "S"- or a "C"-styled conformation depending on the relative orientation of the two rigidified moieties. 1H NMR, UV-Vis, fluorescent and circular dichroism investigations revealed that 1 and 2 could bind primary and secondary ammonium cations with their "C"-styled conformation. In the presence of 1 equiv. Of TFA, the binding stability was increased significantly as a result of promoted formation of the "C"-styled conformation due to the monoprotonation of the peripheral pyridyl units in 1and 2. In contrast, the addition of 2 equiv. Of TFA substantially weakened the binding stability because the "S"-styled conformation was favored as a result of protonation of both of their pyridyl units. Moreover, remarkable induced circular dichroisms were also displayed for the complexes of 1 and 2 with chiral D- and L-5.

  12. Direct hydrogenation and one-pot reductive amidation of nitro compounds over Pd/ZnO nanoparticles as a recyclable and heterogeneous catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Palladium supported on zinc oxide. • Nano crystalline Pd/ZnO as highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst. • Synthesis, chracterization, and application of nano-Pd/ZnO. • Ligand-free and air atmosphere conditions. - Abstract: A novel Pd supported on ZnO nanoparticles was readily synthesized and characterized. The amount of palladium on ZnO is 9.84 wt% which was determined by ICP analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Percentage of accessible Pd as active catalyst is also estimated to 2.72% based on the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. This nano-sized Pd/ZnO with an average particle size of 20–25 nm and specific surface area 40.61 m2 g−1 was used as a new reusable heterogeneous catalyst for direct hydrogenation and one-pot reductive amidation of nitro compounds without the use of any ligands under atmospheric pressure. The catalyst can be recovered and recycled several times without marked loss of activity

  13. Direct hydrogenation and one-pot reductive amidation of nitro compounds over Pd/ZnO nanoparticles as a recyclable and heterogeneous catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini-Sarvari, Mona, E-mail: hossaini@shirazu.ac.ir; Razmi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Palladium supported on zinc oxide. • Nano crystalline Pd/ZnO as highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst. • Synthesis, chracterization, and application of nano-Pd/ZnO. • Ligand-free and air atmosphere conditions. - Abstract: A novel Pd supported on ZnO nanoparticles was readily synthesized and characterized. The amount of palladium on ZnO is 9.84 wt% which was determined by ICP analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Percentage of accessible Pd as active catalyst is also estimated to 2.72% based on the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. This nano-sized Pd/ZnO with an average particle size of 20–25 nm and specific surface area 40.61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} was used as a new reusable heterogeneous catalyst for direct hydrogenation and one-pot reductive amidation of nitro compounds without the use of any ligands under atmospheric pressure. The catalyst can be recovered and recycled several times without marked loss of activity.

  14. The $\\sigma$ exchange effect in the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen by two photons and two pions exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Hai-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the simple phenomenological $\\sigma \\pi \\pi$, $\\sigma N N$ and $\\pi \\pi \\gamma$ interactions, we estimate the $\\sigma$ exchange effect in the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen. We at first calculate the effective couplings of $\\sigma\\mu\\mu$ by two photons and two pions exchange, then calculate the corresponding corrections to the energy shift of the 2S/2P states of muonic hydrogen. We find the correction to the energy shift of 2S state is about -14$\\mu$eV by the current used parameters, which is about $44\\%$ of the usual two photons exchange contribution, and is larger than the current experimental precision, and should be considered in the experimental analysis.

  15. Resonance charge exchange between excited states in slow proton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of resonance charge exchange in slow collisions of a proton with a hydrogen atom in the excited state is developed. It extends the Firsov-Demkov theory of resonance charge exchange to the case of degenerate initial and final states. The theory is illustrated by semiclassical and quantum calculations of charge exchange cross sections between states with n=2 in parabolic and spherical coordinates. The results are compared with existing close-coupling calculations.

  16. Study of solid-state isotopic exchange of hydrogen in L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solid-state isotopic exchange of L-Ala with the spillover tritium activated on Rh(Pd) supported catalysts and the reactivity of hydrogen at C(2) and C(3) carbon atoms of L-Ala were studied using tritium NMR. The activation energy of the catalyzed isotopic exchange was measured. Ab initio calculations of the reaction of hydrogen exchange in the alanine molecule with H3O+ ion were carried out. The mechanism and transition states of this reaction were proposed. 22 refs.; 4 figs.; 4 tabs

  17. Rhodium trichloride as a homogeneous catalyst for isotopic hydrogen exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of rhodium trichloride as a homogeneous catalyst for the exchange of aromatic compounds and alkanes is described; comparison of the results with corresponding data from heterogeneous rhodium metal and other homogeneous systems, e.g., platinum and iridium, supports the proposal that specific type of π-complex mechanisms are common to all such exchange systems. (author)

  18. Measurement of atomic-hydrogen spin-exchange parameters at 0.5 K using a cryogenic hydrogen maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a cryogenic hydrogen maser, suitably modified to have electronic control of both the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the external cavity, we have measured a number of spin-exchange parameters for an atomic-hydrogen (H) gas at a temperature of 0.5 K. These results are relevant to the ultimate achievable frequency stability for cryogenic H masers and, when coupled with accurate calculations of the spin-exchange parameters, serve as a sensitive test of the H-H interatomic potentials. We find evidence for a frequency shift not predicted by semiclassical theories of spin exchange. In the context of a fully quantum mechanical hydrogen-atom spin-exchange theory [B. J. Verhaar et al., Phys. Rev. A 35, 3825 (1987) and J. M. V. A. Koelman et al., Phys. Rev. A 38, 3535 (1988)], this frequency shift is attributed to the influence of hyperfine interactions during spin-exchange collisions. Our findings are generally in agreement with these predictions; however, the sign of the hyperfine-induced frequency shift appears to differ from theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  20. Study on Production of Hydrogen from Methane for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋正昶; 李传统

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen production from methane for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was studied experimentally. The conversion rate of methane under different steam-carbon ratios, the effect of the different excess air ratios on the constituents of the gas produced, the permeability of hydrogen under different pressure differences, and the effect of different system pressure on the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen were obtained. The results lay the basis for the production of hydrogen applicable to PEMFC, moreover, provide a new way for the comprehensive utilization of the coal bed methane.

  1. Hydrogen exchange at the β-carbon of amino acids during transamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen exchange at the β-carbon of L-alanine, L-glutamate and L-aspartate with water has been examined during transamination catalyzed by glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and by glutamic-pyruvic transaminase. A significant hydrogen exchange at the β-carbon has been demonstrated during incubation of L-[3-3H] alanine + glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, L-[3-3H] alanine + α-oxoglutarate + glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, L-[3-3H] glutamate + glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, L-[3-3H] glutamate + oxalocetate + glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, and L-[3-3H] glutamate + pyruvate + glutamic-pyruvic transaminase as shown by the appearance of 3H2O. No hydrogen exchange at the β-carbon of L-glutamate occurred during incubation of L-[3-3H] -glutamate with glutamic-pyruvic transaminase alone. The hydogen exchange at the β-carbon of L-glutamate coincides with transamination as demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 2H2O-L-glutamate exchange during transamination by glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase. No hydrogen exchange at the β-carbon occurred during transamination of L-aspartate by glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results are discussed with special reference to the different equilibria between the pyridoxal form and the pyridoxamine form of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase. (orig.)

  2. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  3. The diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge exchange induced hydrogen escape flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of ion temperature and density data at specific points and times in June 1969 provided by the OGO 6 satellite, and altitude profiles of the ion and electron temperature and concentration provided by the Arecibo radar facility over the period February 1972-April 1974, the diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was investigated. It was calculated that for low to moderate solar activity at Arecibo, the diurnal ratio of the maximum-to-minimum charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was approximately 6 with a peak around noon and a minimum somewhere between 0100 and 0300 h LT. This study of a limited amount of OGO 6 and Arecibo data seems to indicate that the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux increases as the F(10.7) flux increases for low to moderate solar activity.

  4. Charge Exchange Spectra of Hydrogenic and He-like Iron

    CERN Document Server

    Wargelin, B J; Neill, P A; Olson, R E; Scofield, J H

    2005-01-01

    We present H-like Fe XXVI and He-like Fe XXV charge-exchange spectra resulting from collisions of highly charged iron with N2 gas at an energy of 10 eV/amu in an electron beam ion trap. Although individual high-n emission lines are not resolved in our measurements, we observe that the most likely level for Fe25+ --> Fe24+ electron capture is n~9, in line with expectations, while the most likely value for Fe26+ --> Fe25+ charge exchange is significantly higher. In the Fe XXV spectrum, the K-alpha emission feature dominates, whether produced via charge exchange or collisional excitation. The K-alpha centroid is lower in energy for the former case than the latter (6666 versus 6685 eV, respectively), as expected because of the strong enhancement of emission from the forbidden and intercombination lines, relative to the resonance line, in charge-exchange spectra. In contrast, the Fe XXVI high-n Lyman lines have a summed intensity greater than that of Ly-alpha, and are substantially stronger than predicted from the...

  5. Passive hydrogen recovery schemes using a vacuum ejector in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jenn-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    The present work describes the development of a passive hydrogen-recirculating scheme for the anode of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. A vacuum ejector is fluidly connected to the stack anode outlet to entrain the unused hydrogen into the main hydrogen supply. A combination of a continuous-flow mode and a pulse-flow mode is employed to cover a wide range of power consumption. The former deals with the normal and high stack power conditions, while the latter is active only at low stack power. Transient results showed that the hydrogen anode stoichiometry has been successfully stabilized in the range of 1.4-1.6 with an entrainment ratio of 40-50% under the constant system load of 1.45 kW. In addition, the reliable operation of the PEM fuel cell system without any failure during the approximate 1-h test indicates the stability and reliability of the present hydrogen recovery scheme.

  6. Small proton exchange membrane fuel cell power station by using bio-hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志祥; 毛宗强; 王诚; 任南琪

    2006-01-01

    In fermentative organic waste water treatment process, there was hydrogen as a by-product. After some purification,there was about 50% ~ 70% hydrogen in the bio-gas, which could be utilized for electricity generation with fuel cell. Half a year ago, joint experiments between biological hydrogen production in Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) and proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) power station in Tsinghua University were conducted for electricity generation with bio-hydrogen from the pilot plant in HIT. The results proved the feasibility of the bio-hydrogen as a by-product utilization with PEMFC power station and revealed some problems of fuel cell power station for this application.

  7. Numerical analysis of hydrogen isotope separation characteristics in improved dual temperature exchange reaction system between water and hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual temperature hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction system between water and hydrogen gas is numerically analyzed. The system has two features; high efficiency of isotope exchange reaction and operation under atmospheric pressure. To achieve them, the low temperature section of the system is composed of water mist and hydrogen gas co-current reactor units. For the high temperature section, a multistage-type reactor, in which a bubble plate, superheater and catalyst bed are alternatively arranged, is applied. From a material balance between these reactors, enrichment and decontamination factors for the system are expressed as functions of seven parameters: unit number of the low temperature co-current reactor (X); stage number of the high temperature section (Y); flow ratio of tritium enriched water to decontaminated water (P/W), flow ratio of feed water to hydrogen gas (F/G); reaction temperatures of the low and high temperature sections (Tsub(c), Tsub(h)); and bubble plate temperature (Tsub(b)). Numerical calculations show that enrichment factor depends remarkably on F/G and Tsub(b) as well as X and Y. In order to understand the separation characteristics visually, the McCabe-Thiele diagrams for the present system are drawn and compared with the results calculated. (author)

  8. Comparison between water distillation process and hydrogen isotope exchange process for depletion and enrichment of tritium in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical comparison between the water distillation column process and multiunit separated-bed hydrogen isotopic exchange column process with hydrophobic Pt-catalyst shows that the column inner diameter and the column height in the hydrogen isotope exchange process are shorter than in the water distillation process for the case of the depletion and the enrichment of the tritium in light water. (author)

  9. Protein hydrogen exchange measured at single-residue resolution by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard;

    2009-01-01

    Because of unparalleled sensitivity and tolerance to protein size, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular method for measuring the solution hydrogen (1H/2H) exchange (HX) of biologically relevant protein states. While incorporated deuterium can be localized to different regions by pepsin...

  10. Trifluoroacetic acid quenching of naphthalene fluorescence: implications for the mechanism of photoelectrophilic hydrogen exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quenching of naphthalene fluorescence by trifluoroacetic acid involves the dimer of the acid. In isooctane, the activation energy for quenching is essentially zero. The previously observed decrease in quenching efficiency in more polar solvents results from their lower dimer content. Hydrogen isotope exchange in the system naphthalene-trifluoroacetic acid-alkane solvent also involves the dimer of trifluoroacetic acid. 3 tables

  11. Contribution to the study of proteins and peptides structure by hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of hydrogen exchange measurement methods to study the structure and the molecular interaction of globular protein molecules in aqueous solution (ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, coupling factors of chloroplasts), in peptide hormones in trifluoroethanol solution (angiotensin II, corticotropin) and in proteins of membranes (rhodopsin)

  12. Energetics of the lithium-magnesium imide-magnesium amide and lithium hydride reaction for hydrogen storage: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ab initio study within the density functional theory of the recently described reversible hydrogen storage reaction Mg(NH2)2 + 2LiH ↔ Li2Mg(NH)2 + 2H2 has been conducted. The electronic structure, structural parameters, vibrational spectra, and enthalpies of formation of all the reactants and products as well as the heat of the overall reaction at zero and finite temperature have been calculated in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) to the exchange correlation potential. The heat of the overall reaction is calculated to be 53.4 kJ/mol H2 in contrast to the experimentally obtained overall heat of reaction of ∼44.1 kJ/mol H2. The difference of ∼20% between the experimental and calculated values is discussed

  13. 3D, 2D and 1D networks via N-H…O and N-H…N hydrogen bonding by the bis-amide analogues: Effect of chain lengths and odd-even spacers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gargi Mukherjee; Kumar Biradha

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis, crystal structures and hydrogen bonding networks of four members of the bis(pyridinecarboxamido)alkane and bis(pyridyl)alkanediamides series (1 ≤ ≤ 8), where the amide moieties are separated by alkyl chain (-(CH2)-) having even or odd number of -(CH2)-groups are explored and correlated with the previously reported structures. The odd members (n= odd) of both the series are found to adopt three-dimensional networks in contrast to the 1D or 2D structures of the even members (n= even). This odd-even effect on the dimensionality of the networks however disappears with increase in chain length.

  14. Binary supported nickel catalysts for the deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel catalysts supported by Fe2O3, CuO, MnO and CeO were prepared from the corresponding metal nitrates. Chemical treatment of the catalysts was carried out at room temperature, while thermal treatment was made at 350 0C. The total surface area of the catalysts was measured by nitrogen adsorption at -195 0C using the BET equation. The specific metallic surface area was measured by hydrogen chemisorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. The activity of the catalysts was tested for the isotopic exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water vapour. The results obtained showed that Ni-Fe2O3, Ni-CuO and Ni-MnO catalysts exhibit catalytic activity for the deuterium exchange between hydrogen and water vapour, while the catalyst supported by CeO has no such activity. (author)

  15. Preparation of Pt-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen-water isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrophobic catalyst used in the hydrogen-water isotope exchange is prepared with Pt as the active metal, PTFE as the hydrophobic material, active carbon or silicon dioxide as the support. The isotope catalytic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water is carried out in the trickle bed and the effects of different carriers, mass fraction of Pt and PTFE on the catalytic activity are discussed. The experimental results show that the activity of Pt-C-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst with the ratio between PTFE and Pt-C from 1 to 2 is higher than other kinds of catalysts and the overall volume transfer coefficient is increased with the increasing of the hydrogen flow rate and reaction temperature

  16. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a1b2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  17. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and non-polyproline helix such as alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure. The electrostatic properties including permittivity of amino acid residue sidegroups influence the electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide. The significance of this factor relative to other factors in protein folding depends on the magnitude of electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide, and preliminary protein-scale calculations of the magnitude of these components suggest this factor warrants investigation in ...

  18. Conformation-Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of the Amino Acid Glutamine: Amide-Stacking and Hydrogen Bonding in AN Important Residue in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Dean, Jacob C.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease (HD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). An intriguing aspect of the structure of glutamine is its incorporation of an amide group in its side chain, thereby opening up the possibility of forming amide-amide H-bonds between the peptide backbone and side chain. In this study the conformational preferences of two capped gluatamines Z(carboxybenzyl)-Glutamine-X (X=OH, NHMe) are studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase in order to unlock the intrinsic structural motifs that are favored by this flexible sidechain. Conformational assignments are made by comparing the hydride stretch ( 3100-3700 cm-1) and amide I and II ( 1400-1800 cm-1) resonant ion-dip infrared spectra with predictions from harmonic frequency calculations. Assigned structures will be compared to previously published results on both natural and unnatural residues. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison between glutamine and unconstrained γ-peptides due to the similar three-carbon spacing between backbone and side chain in glutamine to the backbone spacing in γ-peptides. The ability of the glutamine side-chain to form amide stacked conformations will be a main focus, along with the prevalence of extended backbone type structures. W. H. James, III, C W. Müller, E. G. Buchanan, M. G. D. Nix, L. Guo, L. Roskop, M. S. Gordon, L. V. Slipchenko, S. H. Gellman, and T. S. Zwier, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131(40), 14243-14245.

  19. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope exchange of geopressured thermal water in the central Guanzhong basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Juan; MA Zhi-yuan; WANG Zhao-wei; LI Wei-liang; SU Yan

    2009-01-01

    Geothermal water of Xi'an and Xianyang in the central Guanzhong basin is typically geopressured thermal water in China. δ18O and δD data of geopressured thermal water in Xi'an and Xianyang, combined with data from the perimeter of the basin, are analyzed to study features of hydrogen and oxygen shifts. The results show that 18O exchange of geothermal water at the pc-rimeter of the basin and in the non-geopressured thermal water in the center of the basin is not evident, while in most of the geo-pressured thermal water in the central basin, in cities such as Xi'an and Xianyang, significant oxygen exchange had taken place as well as hydrogen exchange, suggesting that isotope exchanges would slowly move the geothermal water system towards equilib-rium. Thermal water reservoirs in the central basin have passed through significant water-rock reactions. Moreover, the geothermal reservoir of Xianyang city is relatively much more enclosed than that of Xi'an city. It has been observed that the more enclosed the geological environment of geothermal water is, the more obvious the oxygen shifts are. With the increasing of the depth, residence time, total amounts of thssolute solids and temperatures of geothermal waters, the oxygen exchange accelerates.

  20. Research on the hydrogen-water isotope exchange reaction by Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst used in the hydrogen-water exchange reaction. Platinum is as active metal and the polystyrene divinylbenzene (SDB) is as hydrophobic carrier in the Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst. The experimental results show that the efficiency of catalytic exchange reaction is higher in random bed with a packing ratio of 1:1 mixture of catalyst and hydrophilic or 1:4 in order bed. The volume transfer coefficient increases with increasing temperature, but the trend is slow down when the temperature is above 60 degree C

  1. Contribution to the study of the hydrogen-deuterium exchange in presence of a catalyst based on nickel oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis focuses on the study of the mechanism of the hydrogen-deuterium isotopic exchange reaction upon the contact with a nickel oxide which is either pure or containing other cations like lithium or gallium. The coupling of the reaction system with a chromatographic loop allows the study of the exchange reaction kinetics in a simple and straightforward way. After a presentation of the experimental techniques and materials the author reports the study of hydrogen chemisorption which allowed the identification of different adsorption mechanisms with respect to the temperature. She reports a kinetic study of hydrogen-deuterium exchange at different temperatures (-78 and -196 C)

  2. Gaseous exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water on hydrophobic catalyst supporting platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in the gas phase where the fed hydrogen gas is saturated with water vapor is studied experimentally by use of the proper hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. It is found that the activities of those catalysts for this reaction system are very high compared with the other known ones for the systems in which gas and liquid should coexist on catalyst surfaces, and that the apparent catalytic activity becomes larger as the amount of platinum supported on a catalyst particle increases. By analyses of the data the following informations are obtained. The exchange reaction can be expressed by a first order reversible reaction kinetics. The pore diffusion in the catalyst particles has significant effect on the overall reaction mechanisms. (author)

  3. Catalytic heat exchangers for small-scale production of hydrogen - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, F. [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    A feasibility study concerning heat-exchanger reactors in small-scale production of hydrogen has been performed on the request of Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB and SWEP International AB. The basic idea is to implement different catalysts into brazed plate-type heat exchangers. This can be achieved by installing catalytic cylinders in the inlet-and outlet ports of the heat exchangers or through treatment of the plates to render them catalytically active. It is also possible to sandwich catalytically active wire meshes between the plates. Experiments concerning steam reforming of methanol and methane have been performed in a micro-reactor to gather kinetic data for modelling purposes. Performance calculations concerning heat exchanger reactors have then been conducted with Catator's generic simulation code for catalytic reactors (CatalystExplorer). The simulations clearly demonstrate the technical performance of these reactors. Indeed, the production rate of hydrogen is expected to be about 10 nm{sup 3}/h per litre of heat exchanger. The corresponding value for a conventional steam-reforming unit is about 1 nm{sup 3}/h or less per litre of reactor volume. Also, the compactness and the high degree of integration together with the possibilities of mass production will give an attractive cost for such units. Depending on the demands concerning the purity of the hydrogen it is possible to add secondary catalytic steps like water-gas shifters, methanation and selective oxidation, into a one-train unit, i.e. to design an all-inclusive design. Such reactors can be used for the supply of hydrogen to fuel cells. The production cost for hydrogen can be cut by 60 - 70% through the utilisation of heat exchanger reactors instead of conventional electrolysis. This result is primarily a result of the high price for electricity compared to the feed stock prices in steam reforming. It is important to verify the performance calculations and the simulation results through

  4. Analysis of Overlapped and Noisy Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Guttman, Miklos; Weis, David D.; John R Engen; Lee, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Noisy and overlapped mass spectrometry data hinders the sequence coverage that can be obtained from Hydrogen Deuterium exchange analysis, and places a limit on the complexity of the samples that can be studied by this technique. Advances in instrumentation have addressed these limits, but as the complexity of the biological samples under investigation increases, these problems are reencountered. Here we describe the use of binomial distribution fitting with asymmetric linear squares regressio...

  5. Shape of the Hα emission line in non resonant charge exchange in hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hα line shape emitted from a maxwellian hydrogen plasma and produced by non resonant change exchange has been calculated. Its explicit shape depends on the ion temperature, on background neutral energy and on the relative shape of the collision cross section. A comparison between theoretical and experimental shapes of the Hα line is carried out to check the model and to deduce the ion plasma temperature. (author)

  6. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  7. An antibody binding site on cytochrome c defined by hydrogen exchange and two-dimensional NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a protein antigen, horse cytochrome c (cyt c), with a monoclonal antibody has been studied by hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange labeling and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) methods. The H-exchange rate of residues in three discontiguous regions of the cyt c polypeptide backbone was slowed by factors up to 340-fold in the antibody-antigen complex compared with free cyt c. The protected residues, 36 to 38, 59, 60, 64 to 67, 100, and 101, and their hydrogen-bond acceptors, are brought together in the three-dimensional structure to form a contiguous, largely exposed protein surface with an area of about 750 square angstroms. The interaction site determined in this way is consistent with prior epitope mapping studies and includes several residues that were not previously identified. The hydrogen exchange labeling approach can be used to map binding sites on small proteins in antibody-antigen complexes and may be applicable to protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions in general

  8. Tag and Capture Flow Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry with a Fluorous-Immobilized Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcsisin, Sean R; Liptak, Cary; Marineau, Jason; Bradner, James E; Engen, John R

    2015-06-16

    Analysis of complex mixtures of proteins by hydrogen exchange (HX) mass spectrometry (MS) is limited by one's ability to resolve the protein(s) of interest from the proteins that are not of interest. One strategy for overcoming this problem is to tag the target protein(s) to allow for rapid removal from the mixture for subsequent analysis. Here we illustrate a new solution involving fluorous conjugation of a retrievable probe. The appended fluorous tag allows for facile immobilization on a fluorous surface. When a target protein is passed over the immobilized probe molecule, it can be efficiently captured and then exposed to a flowing stream of deuterated buffer for hydrogen exchange. The utility of this method is illustrated for a model system of the Elongin BC protein complex bound to a peptide from HIV Vif. Efficient capture is demonstrated, and deuteration when immobilized was identical to deuteration in conventional solution-phase hydrogen exchange MS. Protein captured from a crude bacterial cell lysate could also be deuterated without the need for separate purification steps before HX MS. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed in light of miniaturization and automation. PMID:26023704

  9. The two-photon exchange contribution to muonic hydrogen from chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the spin-dependent and spin-independent structure functions of the forward virtual-photon Compton tensor of the proton at O(p3) using heavy baryon effective theory including the Delta particle. We compare with previous results when existing. Using these results we obtain the leading hadronic contributions, associated to the pion and Delta particles, to the Wilson coefficients of the lepton–proton four fermion operators in NRQED. The spin-independent coefficient yields a pure prediction for the two-photon exchange contribution to the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift, ΔETPE(π and Δ)=34(13) μeV. We also compute the charge, 〈rn〉, and Zemach, 〈rn〉(2), moments for n≥3. Finally, we discuss the spin-dependent case, for which we compute the difference between the four-fermion Wilson coefficients relevant for hydrogen and muonic hydrogen

  10. Hydrogen isotope exchange and conditioning in graphite limiters used in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic exchange experiments performed in TFTR are used to examine the outgassing and diffusive properties of graphite used as the plasma limiter. Changeover from hydrogen to deuterium for different periods ranges from approx.600 to 60 plasma discharges, which appears to be correlated to the limiter temperature. We present a simple analytical model that predicts a fast transient (approx.10 plasma discharges) changeover where the deuterium fueling dilutes the adsorbed and near-surface hydrogen, and a slowly changing term where bulk hydrogen diffuses to the surface. Using this model we can extract an activation energy for diffusion of 0.15 +- 0.02 eV. We hypothesize that interpore diffusion for this porous (approx.15%) material is consistent with our observations. 19 refs

  11. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  12. Hydrogen water deuterium exchange studies on palladium on activated charcoal hydrophobic catalyst (Preprint No. CA-20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium exchange between hydrogen gas and water is one of the most promising processes for heavy water production. In production of heavy water, separation factor and energy cost are two main parameters which govern the economic effectiveness of a process. Out of the chemical exchange process, H2-H2O exchange has higher separation factor at a given temperature. Even though the separation factor is high, major disadvantage in the process is that a catalyst is required. Group VIII metals are most suitable catalysts for hydrogenation, dehydrogenation and hydrogenolysis because of their ability to chemisorb H2 dissociatively. Even among VIII2 triad, Pt has the highest activity. A highly active Pt catalyst has a reported half life of 4 seconds. As Pd is cheaper than Pt, studies have been carried out using active Pd as catalyst for H2-H2O exchange. It is observed that: (1)at metal concentration of 0.3%, Pd shows the optimum catalytic activity, (2)a highly active Pd is found to have a half life of 5 minutes, and (3)addition of α-alumina enhances the catalytic activity. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs

  13. General Tritium labelling of gentamicin C by catalytic hydrogen exchange reaction with tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentamicin C was labelled with tritium by means of a PtO2 catalized hydrogen exchange reaction. Under the conditions of the exchange (100 mg of gentamicin, basic form, 0,3 ml H2O-3H, and 50 mg of prereduced PtO2) the radiochemical yield was 0,24, 0,38 and 0,48 % at 120oC, for 8, 16 and 24 hours respectively. Chemical yield for purified gentamicin was about 60 %. Purification was accoumplished with a cellulose column eluted with the lower phase of chloroform-methanol 17 % ammonium hydroxide (2:1:1, v/v). Chemical purity, determined by HPLC, was 96,5 % and radiochemical one was 95 % . Main exchange degradation products show biological activity. (Author). 12 refs

  14. General Tritium Labelling of Gentamicin C by catalytic hydrogen exchange Reaction with Tritiated Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentamicin C was labelled with tritium by means of a PtO2 catalyzed hydrogen exchange reaction. Under the conditions of the exchange (100 mg of gentamicin, basic form, 0,3 ml H2O-3H, and 50 mg of prereduced PtO2) the radiochemical yield was 0,24, 0,38 and 0,48 % at 120 degree celsius, for 8, 16 and 24 hours respectively. Chemical yield for purified gentamicin was about 60 %. Purification was accomplished with a cellulose column eluted with the lower phase of chloroform-methanol 17 % ammonium hydroxide (2:1:1, v/v) . Chemical purity, determined by HPLC, was 96,5 % and radiochemical one was 95. Main exchange degradation products show biological activity. (Author) 12 refs

  15. Exchange of hydrogen isotopes in oxide ceramics and water-vapor using ERD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the exchange of deuterium in a tritium breeding ceramics, Li2ZrO3, for protium by exposure to air-vapor which has been studied by means of the elastic recoil detection technique with 1.7 MeV He+ ion beam. The ceramic specimen implanted up to saturation concentration at room temperature with 5 keV D2+ ions is exposed to normal air introduced into the vacuum chamber at room temperature. It is found that the retained number of D implanted decreases, while the retain number of H increases as the exposure time to normal air increases. The exchange behavior of D for H in Li2ZrO3 is compared with that in SrCe0.95Yb0.05O3-δ studied previously and the processes for hydrogen isotope exchange observed are discussed

  16. Side-chain dynamics of a detergent-solubilized membrane protein: Measurement of tryptophan and glutamine hydrogen-exchange rates in M13 coat protein by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M13 coat protein is a small (50 amino acids) lipid-soluble protein that becomes an integral membrane protein during the infection stage of the life cycle of the M13 phage and is therefore used as a model membrane protein. To study side-chain dynamics in the protein, the authors have measured individual hydrogen-exchange rates for a primary amide in the side chain of glutamine-15 and for the indole amine of tryptophan-26. The protein was solubilized with the use of perdeuteriated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and hydrogen-exchange rates were measured by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The glutamine-15 syn proton exchanged at a rate identical with that in glutamine model peptides except that the pH corresponding to minimum exchange was elevated by about 1.5 pH units. The tryptophan-26 indole amine proton exchange was biphasic, suggesting that two populations of tryptophan-26 exist. It is suggested that the two populations may reflect protein dimerization or aggregation in the SDS micelles. The pH values of minimum exchange for tryptophan-26 in both environments were also elevated by 1.3-1.9 pH units. This phenomenon is reproduced when small tryptophan- and glutamine-containing hydrophobic peptides are dissolved in the presence of SDS micelles. The electrostatic nature of this phenomenon is proven by showing that the minimum pH for exchange can be reduced by dissolving the hydrophobic peptides in the positively charged detergent micelle dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide

  17. Modification of interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/V/Fe trilayers using hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoryna, J., E-mail: jskoryna@ifmpan.poznan.pl [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17 St., 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Marczyńska, A. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17 St., 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Lewandowski, M. [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85 St., 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Smardz, L. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17 St., 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Magnetic films and multilayers. • Thin films. • Hydrogen absorbing materials. • Magnetic measurements. • Exchange coupling. - Abstract: Fe/V/Fe trilayers with constant-thickness Fe and step-like wedged V sublayers were prepared at room temperature using UHV magnetron sputtering. The bottom Fe layer grows onto oxidised Si(1 0 0) substrate and shows relatively high coercivity. The top Fe layer grows on vanadium spacer and shows considerably lower coercivity. The planar growth of the Fe and V sublayers was confirmed in-situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that the Fe sublayers are weakly exchange coupled for d{sub V} > 1.4 nm. Results on the coercivity studies as a function of the V interlayer thickness show near d{sub V} ∼ 1.95 nm (∼2.45 nm) weak antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) coupling, respectively. The hydrogenation of the Fe/V/Fe trilayers leads to increase of the strength of the ferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling.

  18. Modification of interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/V/Fe trilayers using hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Magnetic films and multilayers. • Thin films. • Hydrogen absorbing materials. • Magnetic measurements. • Exchange coupling. - Abstract: Fe/V/Fe trilayers with constant-thickness Fe and step-like wedged V sublayers were prepared at room temperature using UHV magnetron sputtering. The bottom Fe layer grows onto oxidised Si(1 0 0) substrate and shows relatively high coercivity. The top Fe layer grows on vanadium spacer and shows considerably lower coercivity. The planar growth of the Fe and V sublayers was confirmed in-situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that the Fe sublayers are weakly exchange coupled for dV > 1.4 nm. Results on the coercivity studies as a function of the V interlayer thickness show near dV ∼ 1.95 nm (∼2.45 nm) weak antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) coupling, respectively. The hydrogenation of the Fe/V/Fe trilayers leads to increase of the strength of the ferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling

  19. H/D exchange of a 15N labelled Tau fragment as measured by a simple Relax-EXSY experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-12-01

    We present an equilibrium H/D exchange experiment to measure the exchange rates of labile amide protons in intrinsically unfolded proteins. By measuring the contribution of the H/D exchange to the apparent T1 relaxation rates in solvents of different D2O content, we can easily derive the rates of exchange for rapidly exchanging amide protons. The method does not require double isotope labelling, is sensitive, and requires limited fitting of the data. We demonstrate it on a functional fragment of Tau, and provide evidence for the hydrogen bond formation of the phosphate moiety of Ser214 with its own amide proton in the same fragment phosphorylated by the PKA kinase.

  20. Hydrogen Bonds between Acidic Protons from Alkynes (C–H···O and Amides (N–H···O and Carbonyl Oxygen Atoms as Acceptor Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baillargeon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of tert-butyl (2S-2-(prop-2-yn-1-ylcarbamoylpyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (Boc-L-Pro-NHCH2CCH have been obtained. The title compound crystallizes easily as sharp needles in orthorhombic system, space group P 21 21 21 with a = 9.2890(2, b = 9.7292(2, c = 15.7918(4 Å, V = 1427.18(6 Å3, and Z = 4. The main feature of the structure is the orientation of the carbamate and amide. Their dipoles add up and the molecule displays an electric dipole moment of 5.61 D from B3LYP/6-31G(d calculations. The antiparallel H bonding of amides and the alignment of dipoles induce columnar stacking (the dipole moment along the columnar a axis is 4.46 D for each molecule. The other components across the other axes are, therefore weaker, (3.17 D and 1.23 D along the b and c axes, resp.. The resulting anisotropic columns pack side by side, in an antiparallel fashion mostly by (alkyne CH···O=C (carbamate interactions.

  1. Conformational dynamics of human FXR-LBD ligand interactions studied by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry: insights into the antagonism of the hypolipidemic agent Z-guggulsterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Broderick, David; Jiang, Yuan; Hsu, Victor; Maier, Claudia S

    2014-09-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays a key role in the regulation of bile acids, lipid and glucose metabolisms. The regulative function of FXR is governed by conformational changes of the ligand binding domain (LBD) upon ligand binding. Although FXR is a highly researched potential therapeutic target, only a limited number of FXR-agonist complexes have been successfully crystallized and subsequently yielded high resolution structures. There is currently no structural information of any FXR-antagonist complexes publically available. We therefore explored the use of amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled with mass spectrometry for characterizing conformational changes in the FXR-LBD upon ligand binding. Ligand-specific deuterium incorporation profiles were obtained for three FXR ligand chemotypes: GW4064, a synthetic non-steroidal high affinity agonist; the bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), the endogenous low affinity agonist of FXR; and Z-guggulsterone (GG), an in vitro antagonist of the steroid chemotype. A comparison of the HDX profiles of their ligand-bound FXR-LBD complexes revealed a unique mode of interaction for GG. The conformational features of the FXR-LBD-antagonist interaction are discussed. PMID:24953769

  2. Use of conventional sieve trays in ammonia-hydrogen exchange process for production of heavy water and the operating experience (Preprints No. PD-14)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sieve trays used in Heavy Water Plant at Talcher are simple and are free from any maintenance. Absence of pumps etc resulted in trouble-free installation and operation of these trays. Performance of the trays, has, however not been satisfactory due to the constraints of high foam height, reduced gas flow rates and higher pressure drop. These constraints may be removed for new trays by suitable modification of the tray geometry in the design stage like reduction of weir height, increase in tray spacing, change in hole diameter/spacing, reduction of design/flow rate per unit tray active area (i.e. increase in tray/tower diameter for same gas load) etc. Removal of the hydrodynamic limitations will permit operation at near design conditions of temperature, potassium amide concentration and gas flow rates. This is likely to improve the efficiency of the trays. Careful study of the operating behaviour of the sieve t rays and judicious modification of the tray geometry for future design may make the s ieve trays a useful contacting device in ammonia-hydrogen exchange process for heavy water production. (author). 1 tab ., 4 figs

  3. Electrochemistry Modeling of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Water Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrochemistry model was developed to analyse the J-V characteristics of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolyzer for hydrogen production. The Butler-Volmer equation and water transport characteristics through electrolyte membrane were employed to simulate the electrode activation over-potential and membrane ohmic over-potential, respectively. The modeling results are found to agree reasonably well with experimental data published in the literature. The parametric simulations show that the ohmic over-potential is relatively small with typical water content in the membrane. Compared with the cathode over-potential, the anode over-potential is more significant and constitutes the major source of voltage loss. The high anode over-potential is due to the relatively slow oxidation kinetics, which is related to anode material property and microstructure. This model can be integrated with a photovoltaic or wind turbine model to predict the performance of sustainable hydrogen production systems and optimise their designs. (authors)

  4. Development of hydrophobic catalysts for deuterium exchange between hydrogen and water (Preprint No. CI-4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the salient features of catalyst development work carried out in Chemistry Division for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water. The catalysts with noble metals dispersed over PTFE coated supports (such as activated charcoal, zeolites etc) or over polymer supports (such as polyester, nylon) are prepared. Catalysts with Pt dispersed over PTFE coated charcoal are found to be highly active and resistant to water poisoning. These catalysts maintained their physical form and catalytic property at temperatures upto 200degC and performed better than the catalysts prepared by reported method, viz, supporting Pt on charcoal blended with teflon powder. A laboratory scale plant is set up to evaluate catalyst activity under continuous countercurrent flow of hydrogen and water under experimental conditions of elevated temperatures (∼150degC) and pressures (10 atm). (author). 5 refs., 3 figs

  5. Dynamics of the molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, L. M.; Thompson, D. L.; Sims, L. B.; Porter, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction are treated theoretically by means of extensive classical trajectories calculated on a reasonable potential energy surface on which the single adjustable parameter is the iodine-core effective charge. The analysis shows the molecular mechanism to be dynamically forbidden, but gives an over-all rate constant for the atomic mechanism that is in agreement with the experimental values. It is indicated that the formation of a weak H2I complex plays an important dynamical role if the atomic mechanism is limited to reactions with collision complexes involving no more than two hydrogen atoms and two iodine atoms. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained for the rate constant for the recombination I+I+H2 yields I2+H2 and its negative temperature coefficient.

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  7. Time-resolved pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes gaseous proteins structural kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX. PMID:25318698

  8. Aspartic protease nepenthesin-1 as a tool for digestion in hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadek, Alan; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Rey, Martial; Schriemer, David C; Man, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HXMS) utilizes enzymatic digestion of proteins to localize the information about altered exchange patterns in protein structure. The ability of the protease to produce small peptides and overlapping fragments and provide sufficient coverage of the protein sequence is essential for localizing regions of interest. Recently, it was shown that there is an interesting group of proteolytic enzymes from carnivorous pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes. In this report, we describe successful immobilization and the use of one of these enzymes, nepenthesin-1, in HXMS workflow. In contrast to pepsin, it has different cleavage specificities, and despite its high inherent susceptibility to reducing and denaturing agents, it is very stable upon immobilization and withstands even high concentration of guanidine hydrochloride and reducing agents. We show that denaturing agents can alter digestion by reducing protease activity and/or substrate solubility, and additionally, they influence the trapping of proteolytic peptides onto the reversed phase resin. PMID:24661217

  9. Hydrogen production in the K-Basin ion exchange columns, modules and cartridge filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-21

    K-Basin uses ion exchange modules and ion exchange (IX) columns for removing radionuclides from the basin water. When the columns and modules are loaded, they are removed from service, drained and stored. After a few IX columns accumulate in storage, they are moved to a burial box. One of the burial box contains 33 columns and the other, six. The radionuclides act on the liquid left within and adhering to the beads to produce hydrogen. This report describes the generation rate, accumulation rate and significance of that accumulation. This summary also highlights those major areas of concern to the external (to Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC]) reviewers. Appendix H presents the comments made by the external reviewers and, on a separate sheet, the responses to those comments. The concerns regarding the details of the analytical approach, are addressed in Appendix H and in the appropriate section.

  10. Hydrogen production in the K-Basin ion exchange columns, modules and cartridge filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K-Basin uses ion exchange modules and ion exchange (IX) columns for removing radionuclides from the basin water. When the columns and modules are loaded, they are removed from service, drained and stored. After a few IX columns accumulate in storage, they are moved to a burial box. One of the burial box contains 33 columns and the other, six. The radionuclides act on the liquid left within and adhering to the beads to produce hydrogen. This report describes the generation rate, accumulation rate and significance of that accumulation. This summary also highlights those major areas of concern to the external (to Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC]) reviewers. Appendix H presents the comments made by the external reviewers and, on a separate sheet, the responses to those comments. The concerns regarding the details of the analytical approach, are addressed in Appendix H and in the appropriate section

  11. Large Angular Jump Mechanism Observed for Hydrogen Bond Exchange in Aqueous Perchlorate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Minbiao; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Odelius3, Michael; /Stockholm U.; Gaffney1, K.J.; /aff SLAC, PULSE

    2010-06-11

    The mechanism for hydrogen bond (H-bond) switching in solution has remained subject to debate despite extensive experimental and theoretical studies. We have applied polarization-selective multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy to investigate the H-bond exchange mechanism in aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution. The results show that a water molecule shifts its donated H-bonds between water and perchlorate acceptors by means of large, prompt angular rotation. Using a jump-exchange kinetic model, we extract an average jump angle of 49 {+-} 4{sup o}, in qualitative agreement with the jump angle observed in molecular dynamics simulations of the same aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution.

  12. Site selective syntheses of [(3)H]omeprazole using hydrogen isotope exchange chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Scott R; Schenk, David J

    2015-01-01

    Omeprazole (Prilosec®) is a selective and irreversible proton pump inhibitor used to treat various medical conditions related to the production of excess stomach acids. It functions by suppressing secretion of those acids. Radiolabeled compounds are commonly employed in the drug discovery and development process to support efforts including library screening, target identification, receptor binding, assay development and validation and safety assessment. Herein, we describe synthetic approaches to the controlled and selective labeling of omeprazole with tritium via hydrogen isotope exchange chemistry. The chemistry may also be used to prepare tritium labeled esomeprazole (Nexium®), the active pure (S)-enantiomer of omeprazole. PMID:26380956

  13. Selection of the process for the heavy water production using isotopic exchange amonia-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of the Petroleos Mexicanos ammonia plants for heavy water production by the isotopic exchange NH3-H2 process is presented, in addition a description of the other heavy water production processes was presented. In the ammonia hydrogen process exist two possible alternatives for the operation of the system, one of them is to carry out the enrichment to the same temperature, the second consists in making the enrichment at two different temperatures (dual temperature process), an analysis was made to select the best alternative. The conclusion was that the best operation is the dual temperature process, which presents higher advantages according to the thermodynamics and engineering of the process. (author)

  14. Deactivation of a hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst by nitrogen compounds for hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the deactivation of a hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst used for a hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction, changes over time in the reaction rate of H2/HDO(v) isotopic exchange over the catalyst induced by the addition of nitric acid, nitrates and nitrogen oxides were studied experimentally. Deactivation was discussed in terms of the balance of the active sites. The catalyst was poisoned by HNO3 reversibly and the poisoning was well explained in terms of the competitive adsorption of HNO3 with H2 or HDO onto the catalytic active sites. The poisoning kinetics were explained by the Zeldovich rate equation. Neutral nitrates of fission products such as Sr(NO3)2 showed negligible poisoning effect on the catalyst. ZrO(NO3)2 showed very similar poisoning behavior with HNO3, and this was considered to result from hydrolysis reactions which produced HNO3. No deactivation was observed by the introduction of NO, NO2 or NH3 into the reactor. Instead of poisoning, the reaction rate was accelerated by NO or NO2 and this was considered to be due to local heating of the catalyst surface by exothermic reactions between nitrogen oxides and hydrogen. (author)

  15. Method of making hydrophobic industrial catalyst for water-hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have performed the research centering around the development of platinum catalyst carried by styrene divinylbenzene copolymer as the hydrophobic catalyst for water-hydrogen isotope exchange for the purpose of heavy water concentration and especially tritium removal. In this paper, the method of industrial production of this catalyst, the results of catalytic performance test by trickle bed and the problems are reported. It was found that only chloroplatinic acid was suitable as the practical raw material of the catalyst. The ethanol solution of chloroplatinic acid is practically most desirable. Generally, the catalytic activity increases by the aging of SDB in pure hydrogen flow. For the impregnation of chloroplatinic acid into SDB, the column method is suitable. The impregnated carriers are dried with an air drier. Then the carriers carrying chloroplatinic acid are reduced in a reaction tube with highly pure hydrogen. The catalytic performance test was performed in a packed tower, and the effects of the shape of catalysts, flow mode, oxygen, scale-up, pressure and impurities are reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Modeling the Hydrogen-Proton Charge-Exchange Process in Global Heliospheric Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, A.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2015-12-01

    The environment surrounding our Solar System has a vast and dynamic structure. As the Sun rounds the Milky Way galaxy, interstellar dust and gas interact with the Sun's outflow of solar wind. A bubble of hot plasma forms around the Sun due to this interaction, called the heliosphere. In order to understand the structure of the heliosphere, observations and simulations must work in tandem. Within the past decade or so, 3D models of the heliosphere have been developed exhibiting non- symmmetric as well as predicting structures such as the hydrogen wall and the IBEX ribbon. In this poster we explore new ways to compute charge-exchange source terms. The charge-exchange process is the coupling mechanism between the MHD and kinetic theories. The understanding of this process is crucial in order to make valuable predictions. Energy dependant cross section terms will aid in settling non-linear affects coupling the intestellar and solar particles. Through these new ways of computing source terms, resolving fine structures in the plasma in the heliopause may be possible. In addition, other non-trivial situations, such as charge-exchange mediated shocks, may be addressed.

  17. Kinetics of isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water vapor over hydrophobic catalyst in a Co-current bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water vapor over Pt- SDB as a hydrophobic catalyst was investigated in a fixed co-current bed. The influence of vari- ous factors on the rate constant of water vapor-hydrogen co-current exchange reaction were studied, including rate equation, order of reaction, temperature dependence of reaction and the species of catalysts. The results show that the overall reaction is first order. The relation of apparent rate constant with temperature accorded with Arrhenius and the apparent rate constant increases with temperature rising. The apparent activation energy of Pt-SDB is lower than Pt-C-PTFE and the rate constant of water vapor-hydrogen co-current exchange reaction increases when the apparent activation energy of the hydrophobic catalyst decreases. (authors)

  18. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  19. Cytotoxic Amides from Fruits of Kawakawa, Macropiper excelsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jeremy; Burgess, Elaine J; Richardson, Alistair T B; Hawkins, Bill C; Baird, Sarah K; Smallfield, Bruce M; van Klink, John W; Perry, Nigel B

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic amides have been isolated from the fruits of the endemic New Zealand medicinal plant kawakawa, Macropiper excelsum (Piperaceae). The main amide was piperchabamide A and this is the first report of this rare compound outside the genus Piper. Eleven other amides were purified including two new compounds with the unusual 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-pyridinyl group. The new compounds were fully characterized by 2D NMR spectroscopy, which showed a slow exchange between two rotamers about the amide bond, and they were chemically synthesized. In view of the antitumor activity of the related piperlongumine, all of these amides plus four synthetic analogs were tested for cytotoxicity. The most active was the piperine homolog piperdardine, with an IC50 of 14 µM against HT 29 colon cancer cells. PMID:26039266

  20. Influence of packing material and method on the efficiency of liquid phase water-hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of packing material in the countercurrent catalytic column on the efficiency of liquid phase water-hydrogen isotope exchange is studied. Stainless steel triangle spring packing demonstrates best performance among the tested three hydrophilic packing materials. Pretreatment of the stainless steel packing lowers the height of a mass transfer unit (HTU) by about 50%. The effectiveness of a catalytic column for water-hydrogen isotope exchange is proved to be higher when the column is packed in layers with hydrophilic packing and hydrophobic catalyst in the volume ratio 1:4

  1. Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry for Probing the Microenvironment of Histidine Residues in Dihydrofolate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Miyagi, Masaru; Wan, Qun; Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Gokulrangan, Giridharan; Tomechko, Sara E.; Bennett, Brad; Dealwis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Background Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (His-HDX-MS) determines the HDX rates at the imidazole C2-hydrogen of histidine residues. This method provides not only the HDX rates but also the pK a values of histidine imidazole rings. His-HDX-MS was used to probe the microenvironment of histidine residues of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme proposed to undergo multiple conformational changes during catalysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Using His-HDX-M...

  2. Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry for Probing the Microenvironment of Histidine Residues in Dihydrofolate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Masaru Miyagi; Qun Wan; Md. Faiz Ahmad; Giridharan Gokulrangan; Tomechko, Sara E; Brad Bennett; Chris Dealwis

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (His-HDX-MS) determines the HDX rates at the imidazole C(2)-hydrogen of histidine residues. This method provides not only the HDX rates but also the pK(a) values of histidine imidazole rings. His-HDX-MS was used to probe the microenvironment of histidine residues of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme proposed to undergo multiple conformational changes during catalysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using His-...

  3. Helix-forming self-assembly of enentiopure 2,2'-dimethylbiphenyl-6,6'-dipropiolic acid and amide organized by hydrogen bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Miloš; Holý, Petr; Závada, Jiří; Císařová, I.; Podlaha, J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 16 (2001), s. 2295-2300. ISSN 0957-4166 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0138 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : self-assembly * hydrogen bonding Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.265, year: 2001

  4. Scaling for state-selective charge exchange due to collisions of multicharged ions with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, A.; Illescas, Clara; Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we evaluate state-resolved charge exchange cross sections for Be{}4+, {{{B}}}5+, {{{C}}}6+, {{{N}}}7+, and {{{O}}}8+ projectiles colliding with atomic hydrogen employing two different methods: the classical trajectory Monte Carlo and the eikonal impulse approximations. These cross sections are used to extend previously derived scaling laws for n-, nl-, and nlm-distributions to highly excited final levels with 4≤slant n≤slant 9, covering energies in the range 50-2000 {{keV}}/ amu. Present total and partial capture cross sections are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data for these collision systems. Besides, the proposed scaling rules are also verified by other theories, becoming a useful instrument for plasma research.

  5. Backbone amide linker strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelton, Anne Pernille Tofteng; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    In the backbone amide linker (BAL) strategy, the peptide is anchored not at the C-terminus but through a backbone amide, which leaves the C-terminal available for various modifications. This is thus a very general strategy for the introduction of C-terminal modifications. The BAL strategy was...... assemble the final peptide. One useful application of this strategy is in the synthesis of C-terminal peptide aldehydes. The C-terminal aldehyde is masked as an acetal during synthesis and then conveniently demasked in the final cleavage step to generate the free aldehyde. Another application is in the...

  6. An intermediate heat exchanging-depressurizing loop for nuclear hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfur-iodine (SI) cycle should overcome many engineering challenges to commercialize and prove its feasibilities to compete other thermo-chemical cycles. Some critical issues such as structural material, harsh operating condition and high capital costs were considered obstacles to be actualized. Operating SI cycle at low-pressure is one of the solutions to actualize the cycle. The flash operation with over-azeotropic HI at low pressure does not require temperature and pressure as high as those in the existing methods as well as heating for separation. The operation in low pressure reduces corrosion problems and enables us to use flexible selection of structural material. We devised an intermediate heat exchanging-depressurizing loop to eliminate high operating pressure in the hydrogen side as well as a large pressure difference between the reactor side and the hydrogen side. Molten salts are adequate candidates as working fluids under the high-temperature condition with homogeneous phase during pressure changing process. Using molten salts, 2.20-4.65 MW of pumping work is required to change the pressure from 1 bar to 7 MPa. We selected BeF2-containing salts as the possible candidates based on preliminary economic and thermal hydraulic consideration.

  7. Analysis of Overlapped and Noisy Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklos; Weis, David D.; Engen, John R.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2013-12-01

    Noisy and overlapped mass spectrometry data hinder the sequence coverage that can be obtained from hydrogen deuterium exchange analysis, and places a limit on the complexity of the samples that can be studied by this technique. Advances in instrumentation have addressed these limits, but as the complexity of the biological samples under investigation increases, these problems are re-encountered. Here we describe the use of binomial distribution fitting with asymmetric linear squares regression for calculating the accurate deuterium content for mass envelopes of low signal or that contain significant overlap. The approach is demonstrated with a test data set of HIV Env gp140 wherein inclusion of the new analysis regime resulted in obtaining exchange data for 42 additional peptides, improving the sequence coverage by 11 %. At the same time, the precision of deuterium uptake measurements was improved for nearly every peptide examined. The improved processing algorithms also provide an efficient method for deconvolution of bimodal mass envelopes and EX1 kinetic signatures. All these functions and visualization tools have been implemented in the new version of the freely available software, HX-Express v2.

  8. The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with the thin-film hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with a hydrophobic catalyst was studied. The hydrophobic catalyst was composed of platinum as an active component and porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) as a support. The PTFE support was in two forms, i.e., (a) a pellet and (b) a thin-film with the thickness of 50 μm. The primary purpose of the thin film hydrophobic catalyst was to reduce the platinum usage in the reactor. The activity of the catalyst was measured in a trickle bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20 ∼ 70 deg C. It has been found that the employment of the thin-film catalyst reduced the platinum usage to 1/5 of the reactor in the case of using a conventional catalyst. Platinum particles on the thin-film catalyst work efficiently because the reactants were easily diffused to the active sites. It has also been found that the isotopic exchange rate with the thin-film catalyst increased with the increase in the ratio of liquid/gas and increased with the rise of the reaction temperature. It was found from an endurance test that the activity of the thin-film catalyst decreased gradually due to the condensation of water vapor in the catalyst, but was regenarated by heating the catalyst to remove the condensed water. (author)

  9. CHARGE-EXCHANGE SCATTERING OF NEGATIVE PIONS BY HYDROGEN AT 230,260, 290, 317 AND 371 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caris, John C

    1960-03-18

    The differential cross section for charge-exchange scattering of negative pions by hydrogen has been observed at 230, 260, 290, 317, and 371 Mev. The reaction was observed by detecting one gamma ray from the {pi}{sup 0} decay with a scintillation-counter telescope.

  10. Spatially resolved protein hydrogen exchange measured by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization in-source decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Bache, Nicolai; Nedertoft, Morten M;

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for measuring protein hydrogen exchange and thereby reveal the structural dynamics of proteins in solution. Here we describe the successful application of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry approach based on in...

  11. Study of Pt/SDB hydrophobic catalyst for T-H isotopic exchange between water and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methods of preparing platinum/polystyrene divinyl benzene (Pt/SDB) hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotopic exchange between water and hydrogen is presented. Specific surface of the support is more than 400 m2/g. Two approaches of reduction are used for platimum dispersion and comparison is made with each other. Platinum particles obtained by reduction of hydrazine hydrate are smaller. Particles obtained by reduction of hydrogen are larger and their shapes of boundary are unclear. Dispersion of platinum on the support decreases with increasing the amount of platinum. When the amount of platinum is increased to 4 percent, granules of platinum exist as colony. The T-H catalytic exchange at 30 deg C, 50 deg C and 70 deg C has been measured. The activity at 50 deg C is the best. Optimum amount of platinum on the SDB is between 0.5% to 1.5%

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Protein Structural Models by Comparison of H/D Exchange MS Data with Exchange Behavior Accurately Predicted by DXCOREX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Pantazatos, Dennis; Li, Sheng; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Hilser, Vincent J.; Woods, Virgil L.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) data are often used to qualitatively support models for protein structure. We have developed and validated a method (DXCOREX) by which exchange data can be used to quantitatively assess the accuracy of three-dimensional (3-D) models of protein structure. The method utilizes the COREX algorithm to predict a protein's amide hydrogen exchange rates by reference to a hypothesized structure, and these values are used to generate a virtual data set (deuteron incorporation per peptide) that can be quantitatively compared with the deuteration level of the peptide probes measured by hydrogen exchange experimentation. The accuracy of DXCOREX was established in studies performed with 13 proteins for which both high-resolution structures and experimental data were available. The DXCOREX-calculated and experimental data for each protein was highly correlated. We then employed correlation analysis of DXCOREX-calculated versus DXMS experimental data to assess the accuracy of a recently proposed structural model for the catalytic domain of a Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2. The model's calculated exchange behavior was highly correlated with the experimental exchange results available for the protein, supporting the accuracy of the proposed model. This method of analysis will substantially increase the precision with which experimental hydrogen exchange data can help decipher challenging questions regarding protein structure and dynamics.

  13. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, D.; Adams, J.A.; Kinnelly, A.A. [and others

    1997-07-01

    In partial fulfillment of the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-ACO2-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this conceptual vehicle design report addresses the design and packaging of battery augmented fuel cell powertrain vehicles. This report supplements the {open_quotes}Conceptual Vehicle Design Report - Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes} and includes a cost study of the fuel cell power system. The three classes of vehicles considered in this design and packaging exercise are the same vehicle classes that were studied in the previous report: the Aspire, representing the small vehicle class; the AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, representing the mid-size vehicle; and the E-150 Econoline, representing the van-size class. A preliminary PEM fuel cell power system manufacturing cost study is also presented. As in the case of the previous report concerning the {open_quotes}Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes}, the same assumptions are made for the fuel cell power system. These assumptions are fuel cell system power densities of 0.33 kW/ka and 0.33 kW/l, platinum catalyst loading of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total, and hydrogen tanks containing compressed gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The batteries considered for power augmentation of the fuel cell vehicle are based on the Ford Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program. These are state-of-the-art high power lead acid batteries with power densities ranging from 0.8 kW/kg to 2 kW/kg. The results reported here show that battery augmentation provides the fuel cell vehicle with a power source to meet instant high power demand for acceleration and start-up. Based on the assumptions made in this report, the packaging of the battery augmented fuel cell vehicle appears to be as feasible as the packaging of the pure fuel cell powered vehicle.

  14. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H[sub 2] [yields] H[sub 2] + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a 'perfect experiment', measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H[sub 2] reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H[sub 2] molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H[sub 2] reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10[sup 3] molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H[sub 2] reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  15. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a `perfect experiment`, measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H{sub 2} reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H{sub 2} molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H{sub 2} reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10{sup 3} molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H{sub 2} reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  16. Protein Folding-How and Why: By Hydrogen Exchange, Fragment Separation, and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, S Walter; Mayne, Leland; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Hu, Wenbing

    2016-07-01

    Advanced hydrogen exchange (HX) methodology can now determine the structure of protein folding intermediates and their progression in folding pathways. Key developments over time include the HX pulse labeling method with nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, the fragment separation method, the addition to it of mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, and recent improvements in the HX MS technique and data analysis. Also, the discovery of protein foldons and their role supplies an essential interpretive link. Recent work using HX pulse labeling with MS analysis finds that a number of proteins fold by stepping through a reproducible sequence of native-like intermediates in an ordered pathway. The stepwise nature of the pathway is dictated by the cooperative foldon unit construction of the protein. The pathway order is determined by a sequential stabilization principle; prior native-like structure guides the formation of adjacent native-like structure. This view does not match the funneled energy landscape paradigm of a very large number of folding tracks, which was framed before foldons were known and is more appropriate for the unguided residue-level search to surmount an initial kinetic barrier rather than for the overall unfolded-state to native-state folding pathway. PMID:27145881

  17. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  18. Cooperative folding near the downhill limit determined with amino acid resolution by hydrogen exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wookyung; Baxa, Michael C; Gagnon, Isabelle; Freed, Karl F; Sosnick, Tobin R

    2016-04-26

    The relationship between folding cooperativity and downhill, or barrier-free, folding of proteins under highly stabilizing conditions remains an unresolved topic, especially for proteins such as λ-repressor that fold on the microsecond timescale. Under aqueous conditions where downhill folding is most likely to occur, we measure the stability of multiple H bonds, using hydrogen exchange (HX) in a λYA variant that is suggested to be an incipient downhill folder having an extrapolated folding rate constant of 2 × 10(5) s(-1) and a stability of 7.4 kcal·mol(-1) at 298 K. At least one H bond on each of the three largest helices (α1, α3, and α4) breaks during a common unfolding event that reflects global denaturation. The use of HX enables us to both examine folding under highly stabilizing, native-like conditions and probe the pretransition state region for stable species without the need to initiate the folding reaction. The equivalence of the stability determined at zero and high denaturant indicates that any residual denatured state structure minimally affects the stability even under native conditions. Using our ψ analysis method along with mutational ϕ analysis, we find that the three aforementioned helices are all present in the folding transition state. Hence, the free energy surface has a sufficiently high barrier separating the denatured and native states that folding appears cooperative even under extremely stable and fast folding conditions. PMID:27078098

  19. The use of spin desalting columns in DMSO-quenched H/D-exchange NMR experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Chandak, Mahesh S; Nakamura, Takashi; Takenaka, Toshio; Chaudhuri, Tapan K; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Chen, Jin; Kato, Koichi; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-quenched hydrogen/deuterium (H/D)-exchange is a powerful method to characterize the H/D-exchange behaviors of proteins and protein assemblies, and it is potentially useful for investigating non-protected fast-exchanging amide protons in the unfolded state. However, the method has not been used for studies on fully unfolded proteins in a concentrated denaturant or protein solutions at high salt concentrations. In all of the current DMSO-quenched H/D-exchange studies of...

  20. Data acquisition and quantitative analysis of stable hydrogen isotope in liquid and gas in the liquid phase catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot plant for the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange process was built and has been operating to test the hydrophobic catalyst developed to remove the tritium generated at the CANDU nuclear power plants. The methods of quantitative analysis of hydrogen stable isotope were compared. Infrared spectroscopy was used for the liquid samples, and gas chromatography with hydrogen carrier gas showed the best result for gas samples. Also, a data acquisition system was developed to record the operation parameters. This record was very useful to investigate the causes of the system trip

  1. Applications of the water--gas shift reaction. II. Catalytic exchange of deuterium for hydrogen at saturated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies on the homogeneous catalysis of the water-gas shift reaction by metal complexes of groups 6 and 8 had been carried out using aqueous alcoholic solutions of group 8 metal carbonyl complexes made basic with KOH. Substitution of triethylamine (Et3N) for KOH as base and alcohol for solvent led to the discovery that Et3N in the presence of D2O, CO, and Rh6(CO)16 at 1500C undergoes an unusual catalytic exchange of deuterium for hydrogen. A suggested mechanism for this reaction is given and includes activation of hydrogen at a saturated carbon

  2. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  3. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbon and an apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of liquid water and gaseous halohydrocarbons comprising: (a) bringing into contact a water stream, a halohydrocarbon stream, and a catalytic porous anion exchange resin so that the isotope-deficient halohydrocarbon stream is enriched; (b) decomposing the halohydrocarbon stream photolytically into two gaseous streams, one enriched and the other deficient; (c) removing as a product the first, enriched stream; and (d) recycling the second stream for enrichment. An apparatus is also provided

  4. Deactivation of hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange: Application of the time-on-stream theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recycle reactor was built for the purpose of characterizing newly developed hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange. The catalytic rate constants of two types of hydrophobic catalysts were measured at a 100% relative humidity. The catalytic rate constants were measured at 60 deg C for 28 days and both the catalysts showed very high initial catalytic rate constants. The measured deactivation profile showed that the catalytic rate constants of both the catalysts were almost identical for 28 days. The deactivation of the catalysts was modelled based upon the time-on-stream theory. The deactivation profiles of the catalysts were estimated by using the model for a period of three years. The results showed that both the catalysts had a good exchange capacity for hydrogen isotopes and they could be applicable to a tritium removal facility that will be built at the Wolsong nuclear power plants in the near future

  5. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman; Kettenberger, Hubert; Hilger, Maximiliane; Rand, Kasper D

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest in...... understanding and modulating the IgG-FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation to...... wild-type glycosylated IgG. Our results provide new molecular insight into the IgG-FcRn interaction and illustrate the capability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to advance structural proteomics by providing detailed information on the conformation and dynamics of large protein...

  6. Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange in a travelling wave ion guide for the examination of protein conformations

    OpenAIRE

    Rand, Kasper D.; Pringle, Steven D.; Murphy, James P.; Fadgen, Keith E.; Brown, Jeff; Engen, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that solution-phase conformations of small globular proteins and large molecular protein assemblies can be preserved for milliseconds after electrospray ionization. Thus, the study of proteins in the gas-phase on this time-scale is highly desirable. Here we demonstrate that a travelling wave ion guide (TWIG) of a Synapt mass spectrometer offers a highly suitable environment for rapid and efficient gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX). Gaseous ND3 was intr...

  7. Influence of domain interactions on conformational mobility of the progesterone receptor detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Devrishi; Callaway, Celetta; Pascal, Bruce D; Kumar, Raj; Edwards, Dean P.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Structural and functional details of the N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1) of most nuclear receptors are poorly understood due to the highly dynamic intrinsically disordered nature of this domain. A hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry based investigation of TATA box binding protein (TBP) interaction with various domains of progesterone receptor (PR) demonstrate that agonist bound PR interaction with TBP via AF1 impacts the mobility of the C-terminal AF2. Results from HDX ...

  8. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H]4+ ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 446 Å2; the [M + 3H]3+ ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å2 and 367 Å2. Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H]3+ ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H]4+ ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H]4+ ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  9. A study on the deactivation and stability of hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrophobic catalyst has been prepared by deposition of platinum on porous styrene divinylbenzene copolymers(Pt/SDBC) and at the same time a separated type catalytic reactor has been developed for the Wolsong tritium removal facility(WTRF). Several tests carried out to obtain the experimental performance data of the Pt/SDBC with a recycle reactor system. The long-term stability was also measured with the Pt/SDBC catalyst immersed in water for a long time. The long-term deactivations of the Pt/SDBC catalyst were evaluated quantitatively by mathematical models. The simple mathematical models were presented to evaluate the uniform poisoning and shell progressive poisoning to be occurred simultaneously during the hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and liquid water in the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange(LPCE) column. The uniform poisoning was well characterized by a time on stream theory and then the deactivation parameters were determined from the experimental performance data. The impurity poisoning was derived by a shell progressive model with two-layer mass transfer. The water vapor condensation was a main cause of the reversible uniform poisoning for the Pt/SDBC catalyst. The values of the decay rate constant (Kd) and order of the decay reaction(m) were of 2 and 4, respectively, based on the experimental data. It indicated that the decay might be attributable to pore mouth poisoning. From the long-term stability of the catalyst immersed in water, there was no intrinsic decay of catalyst activity due to water logging to the catalyst. The activity decreased by only 7% over 18 months, which was equivalent to a catalyst half-life longer than 15 years. On the basis of the above deactivation parameters, the values for kc/kco with Thiele modulus=20 after 3 years and 10 years of operation were expected about 19% and 15% of the initial activity, respectively, while the values for kc/kco with Thiele modulus=100 were of about 22% and 18%, respectively. However

  10. Nepenthesin from monkey cups for hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Burns, Kyle M; Yu, Yaping; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Schriemer, David C

    2013-02-01

    Studies of protein dynamics, structure and interactions using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) have sharply increased over the past 5-10 years. The predominant technology requires fast digestion at pH 2-3 to retain deuterium label. Pepsin is used almost exclusively, but it provides relatively low efficiency under the constraints of the experiment, and a selectivity profile that renders poor coverage of intrinsically disordered regions. In this study we present nepenthesin-containing secretions of the pitcher plant Nepenthes, commonly called monkey cups, for use in HDX-MS. We show that nepenthesin is at least 1400-fold more efficient than pepsin under HDX-competent conditions, with a selectivity profile that mimics pepsin in part, but also includes efficient cleavage C-terminal to "forbidden" residues K, R, H, and P. High efficiency permits a solution-based analysis with no detectable autolysis, avoiding the complication of immobilized enzyme reactors. Relaxed selectivity promotes high coverage of disordered regions and the ability to "tune" the mass map for regions of interest. Nepenthesin-enriched secretions were applied to an analysis of protein complexes in the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway. The analysis of XRCC4 binding to the BRCT domains of Ligase IV points to secondary interactions between the disordered C-terminal tail of XRCC4 and remote regions of the BRCT domains, which could only be identified with a nepenthesin-based workflow. HDX data suggest that stalk-binding to XRCC4 primes a BRCT conformation in these remote regions to support tail interaction, an event which may be phosphoregulated. We conclude that nepenthesin is an effective alternative to pepsin for all HDX-MS applications, and especially for the analysis of structural transitions among intrinsically disordered proteins and their binding partners. PMID:23197791

  11. Effects of hydrophobic carrier and packing on the mass transfer capabilities in hydrogen-water liquid phase catalytic exchange bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-water liquid phase catalytic exchange bed was packed with 'sandwich' layers of the catalyst and the packing, and the effects of catalyst carrier, inert packing and their filled ratio on the overall mass transfer coefficient (Kya) were investigated experimentally. The results show that C-PTFE is suitable for hydrophobic catalyst. Kya of the bed with catalyst-stainless steel mini-spiral packing is better than that with stainless steel θ-packing, and the active Al2O3 is not suitable for the exchange bed. Moreover, if the stainless steel mini-spiral packing is etched in aqua regia, the operating flexibility and overall mass transfer capability of exchange bed are improved notably. The preferable packing ratio (catalyst/packing) is 1:4. (authors)

  12. Polymer amide as an early topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E M McGeoch

    Full Text Available Hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA could have been one of the first normal density materials to accrete in space. We present ab initio calculations of the energetics of amino acid polymerization via gas phase collisions. The initial hydrogen-bonded di-peptide is sufficiently stable to proceed in many cases via a transition state into a di-peptide with an associated bound water molecule of condensation. The energetics of polymerization are only favorable when the water remains bound. Further polymerization leads to a hydrophobic surface that is phase-separated from, but hydrogen bonded to, a small bulk water complex. The kinetics of the collision and subsequent polymerization are discussed for the low-density conditions of a molecular cloud. This polymer in the gas phase has the properties to make a topology, viz. hydrophobicity allowing phase separation from bulk water, capability to withstand large temperature ranges, versatility of form and charge separation. Its flexible tetrahedral carbon atoms that alternate with more rigid amide groups allow it to deform and reform in hazardous conditions and its density of hydrogen bonds provides adhesion that would support accretion to it of silicon and metal elements to form a stellar dust material.

  13. Reactions on solid supports. Part-3. Hydrogen isotope exchange reactions catalysed by montmorillonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Deuteriated clay' in which the interlammelar water has been replaced by deuterium oxide can be used for exchange of acidic protons in a variety of organic substrates. β-Keto esters and β-diketones undergo rapid exchange of the methylene protons in chloroform solutions in presence of deuterated clay; pyrrole undergoes exchange of all protons, whereas indoles preferentially undergo exchange at the 3-position as expected, although prolonged exposure to the reagent leads to exchange at other positions. (author). 8 refs. 1 tab

  14. Probabilistic multiobjective operation management of MicroGrids with hydrogen storage and polymer exchange fuel cell power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, T.; Golestaneh, F. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper models and solves the operation management problem of MicroGrids (MGs) including cost and emissions minimization under uncertain environment. The proposed model emphasizes on fuel cells (FCs) as a prime mover of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. An electro-chemical model of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is used and linked to the daily operating cost and emissions of the MGs. A reformer is considered to produce hydrogen for PEMFCs. Moreover, in high thermal load intervals, in order to make the MG more efficient, a part of produced hydrogen is stored in a hydrogen tank. The stored hydrogen can be reused by PEMFCs to generate electricity or be sold to other hydrogen consumers. A probabilistic optimization algorithm is devised which consists of 2m + 1 point estimate method to handle the uncertainty in input random variables (IRVs) and a multi-objective Self-adaptive Bee Swarm Optimization (SBSO) algorithm to minimize the cost and emissions simultaneously. Several techniques are proposed in the SBSO algorithm to make it a powerful black-box optimization tool. The efficiency of the proposed approach is verified on a typical grid-connected MG with several distributed energy sources. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Studies on Interactions between Sulfadiazine and Peptide Amides

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Yiwei; Zhang Xiaoqin; Du Jun; Hua Song; Guo Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the optimal structures and binding energies of 14 hydrogen bonded complexes, which contained the sulfadiazine, N-methylacetamide, a glycine dipeptide and an alanine dipeptide, were obtained. The sites preference of sulfadiazine hydrogen bonding to peptide amides were explored. The interaction energies of all the complexes were corrected by Basis Set Superposition Error (BSSE). By the analysis interaction energy, charge density and second-order interaction energies E(2) of the c...

  16. Phase space investigation of the lithium amide halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Rosalind A. [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Group, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hewett, David R.; Korkiakoski, Emma [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Stephen P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Anderson, Paul A., E-mail: p.a.anderson@bham.ac.uk [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide have been investigated. • The only amide iodide stoichiometry observed was Li{sub 3}(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}I. • Solid solutions were observed in both the amide chloride and amide bromide systems. • A 46% reduction in chloride content resulted in a new phase: Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Cl. • New low-chloride phase maintained improved H{sub 2} desorption properties of Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl. - Abstract: An investigation has been carried out into the lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide (LiNH{sub 2}). It was found that the lithium amide iodide Li{sub 3}(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}I was unable to accommodate any variation in stoichiometry. In contrast, some variation in stoichiometry was accommodated in Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Br, as shown by a decrease in unit cell volume when the bromide content was reduced. The amide chloride Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl was found to adopt either a rhombohedral or a cubic structure depending on the reaction conditions. Reduction in chloride content generally resulted in a mixture of phases, but a new rhombohedral phase with the stoichiometry Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Cl was observed. In comparison to LiNH{sub 2}, this new low-chloride phase exhibited similar improved hydrogen desorption properties as Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl but with a much reduced weight penalty through addition of chloride. Attempts to dope lithium amide with fluoride ions have so far proved unsuccessful.

  17. Phase space investigation of the lithium amide halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide have been investigated. • The only amide iodide stoichiometry observed was Li3(NH2)2I. • Solid solutions were observed in both the amide chloride and amide bromide systems. • A 46% reduction in chloride content resulted in a new phase: Li7(NH2)6Cl. • New low-chloride phase maintained improved H2 desorption properties of Li4(NH2)3Cl. - Abstract: An investigation has been carried out into the lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide (LiNH2). It was found that the lithium amide iodide Li3(NH2)2I was unable to accommodate any variation in stoichiometry. In contrast, some variation in stoichiometry was accommodated in Li7(NH2)6Br, as shown by a decrease in unit cell volume when the bromide content was reduced. The amide chloride Li4(NH2)3Cl was found to adopt either a rhombohedral or a cubic structure depending on the reaction conditions. Reduction in chloride content generally resulted in a mixture of phases, but a new rhombohedral phase with the stoichiometry Li7(NH2)6Cl was observed. In comparison to LiNH2, this new low-chloride phase exhibited similar improved hydrogen desorption properties as Li4(NH2)3Cl but with a much reduced weight penalty through addition of chloride. Attempts to dope lithium amide with fluoride ions have so far proved unsuccessful

  18. The origins of enhanced activity in factor VIIa analogs and the interplay between key allosteric sites revealed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Andersen, Mette D; Olsen, Ole H; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Ostergaard, Henrik; Jensen, Ole N; Stennicke, Henning R; Persson, Egon

    2008-01-01

    region rather than imitate the TF-induced effect. Hydrogen exchange analysis of the FVIIa(M306D) variant, which was unresponsive to stimulation by TF, correlated widespread reductions in exchange to the single mutation in the TF-binding region. These results reveal the delicate interplay between key...

  19. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Related Proteins with Divergent Sequences: A Comparative Study of HIV-1 Nef Allelic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Thomas E.; Poe, Jerrod A.; Emert-Sedlak, Lori; Morgan, Christopher R.; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Engen, John R.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry can be used to compare the conformation and dynamics of proteins that are similar in tertiary structure. If relative deuterium levels are measured, differences in sequence, deuterium forward- and back-exchange, peptide retention time, and protease digestion patterns all complicate the data analysis. We illustrate what can be learned from such data sets by analyzing five variants (Consensus G2E, SF2, NL4-3, ELI, and LTNP4) of the HIV-1 Nef protein, both alone and when bound to the human Hck SH3 domain. Regions with similar sequence could be compared between variants. Although much of the hydrogen exchange features were preserved across the five proteins, the kinetics of Nef binding to Hck SH3 were not the same. These observations may be related to biological function, particularly for ELI Nef where we also observed an impaired ability to downregulate CD4 surface presentation. The data illustrate some of the caveats that must be considered for comparison experiments and provide a framework for investigations of other protein relatives, families, and superfamilies with HX MS.

  20. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Related Proteins with Divergent Sequences: A Comparative Study of HIV-1 Nef Allelic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Thomas E.; Poe, Jerrod A.; Emert-Sedlak, Lori; Morgan, Christopher R.; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Engen, John R.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry can be used to compare the conformation and dynamics of proteins that are similar in tertiary structure. If relative deuterium levels are measured, differences in sequence, deuterium forward- and back-exchange, peptide retention time, and protease digestion patterns all complicate the data analysis. We illustrate what can be learned from such data sets by analyzing five variants (Consensus G2E, SF2, NL4-3, ELI, and LTNP4) of the HIV-1 Nef protein, both alone and when bound to the human Hck SH3 domain. Regions with similar sequence could be compared between variants. Although much of the hydrogen exchange features were preserved across the five proteins, the kinetics of Nef binding to Hck SH3 were not the same. These observations may be related to biological function, particularly for ELI Nef where we also observed an impaired ability to downregulate CD4 surface presentation. The data illustrate some of the caveats that must be considered for comparison experiments and provide a framework for investigations of other protein relatives, families, and superfamilies with HX MS.

  1. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Related Proteins with Divergent Sequences: A Comparative Study of HIV-1 Nef Allelic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Thomas E; Poe, Jerrod A; Emert-Sedlak, Lori; Morgan, Christopher R; Smithgall, Thomas E; Engen, John R

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry can be used to compare the conformation and dynamics of proteins that are similar in tertiary structure. If relative deuterium levels are measured, differences in sequence, deuterium forward- and back-exchange, peptide retention time, and protease digestion patterns all complicate the data analysis. We illustrate what can be learned from such data sets by analyzing five variants (Consensus G2E, SF2, NL4-3, ELI, and LTNP4) of the HIV-1 Nef protein, both alone and when bound to the human Hck SH3 domain. Regions with similar sequence could be compared between variants. Although much of the hydrogen exchange features were preserved across the five proteins, the kinetics of Nef binding to Hck SH3 were not the same. These observations may be related to biological function, particularly for ELI Nef where we also observed an impaired ability to downregulate CD4 surface presentation. The data illustrate some of the caveats that must be considered for comparison experiments and provide a framework for investigations of other protein relatives, families, and superfamilies with HX MS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27032648

  2. Simultaneous Blood–Tissue Exchange of Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, Bicarbonate, and Hydrogen Ion

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, Ranjan K.; BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, JAMES B.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed nonlinear four-region (red blood cell, plasma, interstitial fluid, and parenchymal cell) axially distributed convection-diffusion-permeation-reaction-binding computational model is developed to study the simultaneous transport and exchange of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood–tissue exchange system of the heart. Since the pH variation in blood and tissue influences the transport and exchange of O2 and CO2 (Bohr and Haldane effects), and since most ...

  3. Surface modification of a proton exchange membrane and hydrogen storage in a metal hydride for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lisa

    Interest in fuel cell technology is rising as a result of the need for more affordable and available fuel sources. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells involve the catalysis of a fuel to release protons and electrons. It requires the use of a polymer electrolyte membrane to transfer protons through the cell, while the electrons pass through an external circuit, producing electricity. The surface modification of the polymer, NafionRTM, commonly researched as a proton exchange membrane, may improve efficiency of a fuel cell. Surface modification can change the chemistry of the surface of a polymer while maintaining bulk properties. Plasma modification techniques such as microwave discharge of an argon and oxygen gas mixture as well as vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis may cause favorable chemical and physical changes on the surface of Nafion for improved fuel cell function. A possible increase in hydrophilicity as a result of microwave discharge experiments may increase proton conductivity. Grafting of acrylic acid from the surface of modified Nafion may decrease the permeation of methanol in a direct methanol fuel cell, a process which can decrease efficiency. Modification of the surface of Nafion samples were carried out using: 1) An indirect Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals with the surface, 2) A direct Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals and VUV radiation with the surface and, 3) VUV photolysis investigating exclusively the interaction of VUV radiation with the surface and any possible oxidation upon exposure to air. Acrylic acid was grafted from the VUV photolysed Nafion samples. All treated surfaces were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze the grafted Nafion samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements were used to analyze experiments 2 and 3. Using hydrogen as fuel is a

  4. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  5. Using a Potassium Acetate Solution for Cooling High Pressure Hydrogen in a Prototype Heat Exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Abel, M.; Rokni, Masoud;

    2011-01-01

    delivered at high pressure a heat exchanger was designed and constructed. The paper presents a detailed study of construction of the heat exchanger which has been tested and compared to theory to predict and verify its performance. The method presented by Nellis and Klein for laminar flow in annulus tubes...

  6. Amide proton transfer of carnosine in aqueous solution studied in vitro by WEX and CEST experiments.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodet, O.; Goerke, S; Behl, N.; Roeloffs, V.; Zaiss, M.; Bachert, P.

    2015-01-01

    Amide protons of peptide bonds induce an important chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast in vivo. As a simple in vitro model for a peptide amide proton CEST effect, we suggest herein the dipeptide carnosine. We show that the metabolite carnosine creates a CEST effect and we study the properties of the exchange of the amide proton (-NH) of the carnosine peptide bond (NHCPB) in model solutions for a pH range from 6 to 8.3 and a temperature range from T = 5 degrees C to 43 degree...

  7. Electron and hydrogen self-exchange of free radicals of sterically hindered tertiary aliphatic amines investigated by photo-CIDNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Goez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoreactions of diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO and triisopropylamine (TIPA with the sensitizers anthraquinone (AQ and xanthone (XA or benzophenone (BP were investigated by time-resolved photo-CIDNP (photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization experiments. By varying the radical-pair concentration, it was ensured that these measurements respond only to self-exchange reactions of the free amine-derived radicals (radical cations DH•+ or α-amino alkyl radicals D• with the parent amine DH; the acid–base equilibrium between DH•+ and D• also plays no role. Although the sensitizer does not at all participate in the observed processes, it has a pronounced influence on the CIDNP kinetics because the reaction occurs through successive radical pairs. With AQ, the polarizations stem from the initially formed radical-ion pairs, and escaping DH•+ then undergoes electron self-exchange with DH. In the reaction sensitized with XA (or BP, the polarizations arise in a secondary pair of neutral radicals that is rapidly produced by in-cage proton transfer, and the CIDNP kinetics are due to hydrogen self-exchange between escaping D• and DH. For TIPA, the activation parameters of both self-exchange reactions were determined. Outer-sphere reorganization energies obtained with the Marcus theory gave very good agreement between experimental and calculated values of ∆G‡298.

  8. Development of an analytical diffusion model for modeling hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We create a model for H retention depth profiles in W and subsequently model how this profile changes after isotope exchange. This is accomplished by calculating how trapping defects in W accumulate D (or H) inventory as W is being exposed to plasma. Each trapping site is characterized by a trapping rate and a release rate, where the only free parameters are the distribution of these trapping sites in the material. The filled trap concentrations for each trap type are modeled as a diffusion process because post-mortem deuterium depth profiles indicate that traps are filled well beyond the ion implantation zone (2–5 nm). Using this retention model, an isotope exchange rate is formulated. The retention model and isotope exchange rate are compared to low temperature isotope exchange experiments in tungsten with good agreement. The limitations of the current model highlight important physics and motivate future work

  9. Hydrogen exchange during cell-free incorporation of deuterated amino acids and an approach to its inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonelli, Marco; Singarapu, Kiran K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM), Department of Biochemistry (United States); Makino, Shin-ichi; Sahu, Sarata C.; Matsubara, Yuko [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), Department of Biochemistry (United States); Endo, Yaeta [Ehime University, Cell-Free Science and Technology Research Center (Japan); Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Center for Priority Areas (Japan); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM), Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Perdeuteration, selective deuteration, and stereo array isotope labeling (SAIL) are valuable strategies for NMR studies of larger proteins and membrane proteins. To minimize scrambling of the label, it is best to use cell-free methods to prepare selectively labeled proteins. However, when proteins are prepared from deuterated amino acids by cell-free translation in H{sub 2}O, exchange reactions can lead to contamination of {sup 2}H sites by {sup 1}H from the solvent. Examination of a sample of SAIL-chlorella ubiquitin prepared by Escherichia coli cell-free synthesis revealed that exchange had occurred at several residues (mainly at Gly, Ala, Asp, Asn, Glu, and Gln). We present results from a study aimed at identifying the exchanging sites and level of exchange and at testing a strategy for minimizing {sup 1}H contamination during wheat germ cell-free translation of proteins produced from deuterated amino acids by adding known inhibitors of transaminases (1 mM aminooxyacetic acid) and glutamate synthetase (0.1 mM l-methionine sulfoximine). By using a wheat germ cell-free expression system, we produced [U-{sup 2}H, {sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin without and with added inhibitors, and [U-{sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin as a reference to determine the extent of deuterium incorporation. We also prepared a sample of [U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin, for use in assigning the sites of exchange. The added inhibitors did not reduce the protein yield and were successful in blocking hydrogen exchange at C{sup {alpha}} sites, with the exception of Gly, and at C{sup {beta}} sites of Ala. We discovered, in addition, that partial exchange occurred with or without the inhibitors at certain side-chain methyl and methylene groups: Asn-H{sup {beta}}, Asp-H{sup {beta}}, Gln-H{sup {gamma}}, Glu-H{sup {gamma}}, and Lys-H{sup {epsilon}}. The side-chain labeling pattern, in particular the mixed chiral labeling resulting from partial exchange at certain sites, should be of

  10. Hydrogen exchange during cell-free incorporation of deuterated amino acids and an approach to its inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdeuteration, selective deuteration, and stereo array isotope labeling (SAIL) are valuable strategies for NMR studies of larger proteins and membrane proteins. To minimize scrambling of the label, it is best to use cell-free methods to prepare selectively labeled proteins. However, when proteins are prepared from deuterated amino acids by cell-free translation in H2O, exchange reactions can lead to contamination of 2H sites by 1H from the solvent. Examination of a sample of SAIL-chlorella ubiquitin prepared by Escherichia coli cell-free synthesis revealed that exchange had occurred at several residues (mainly at Gly, Ala, Asp, Asn, Glu, and Gln). We present results from a study aimed at identifying the exchanging sites and level of exchange and at testing a strategy for minimizing 1H contamination during wheat germ cell-free translation of proteins produced from deuterated amino acids by adding known inhibitors of transaminases (1 mM aminooxyacetic acid) and glutamate synthetase (0.1 mM l-methionine sulfoximine). By using a wheat germ cell-free expression system, we produced [U–2H, 15N]-chlorella ubiquitin without and with added inhibitors, and [U–15N]-chlorella ubiquitin as a reference to determine the extent of deuterium incorporation. We also prepared a sample of [U–13C, 15N]-chlorella ubiquitin, for use in assigning the sites of exchange. The added inhibitors did not reduce the protein yield and were successful in blocking hydrogen exchange at Cα sites, with the exception of Gly, and at Cβ sites of Ala. We discovered, in addition, that partial exchange occurred with or without the inhibitors at certain side-chain methyl and methylene groups: Asn–Hβ, Asp–Hβ, Gln–Hγ, Glu–Hγ, and Lys–Hε. The side-chain labeling pattern, in particular the mixed chiral labeling resulting from partial exchange at certain sites, should be of interest in studies of large proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins.

  11. Polymerization dependence of the reactivity of polyacrylamide observed with hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction in a liquid-solid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium (T) labeled polyacrylamide (abbreviated PAAm(T) below) was synthesized using the hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction (gas-solid reaction) between HTO vapor and PAAm. The degree of the polymerization of PAAm used was 2800 (and 80000) (abbreviated PAAm2800 (and PAAm80000) below). Using the PAAm(T) thus obtained, the hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction (liquid-solid reaction) between PAAm(T) and each liquid organic material has been observed at the temperature range of 50 to 90degC. Applying the A''-McKay plot method to the data thus obtained, the rate constant (k) for the reaction was obtained. Including k obtained previously, the value of k thus obtained were compared with each other. The following six items have consequently been confirmed. The reactivity of PAAm80000 is larger than that of PAAm2800. PAAm2800 is about 0.4 times PVA2900 in reactivity. The temperature dependence of the reactivity of PAAm2800 is about 6 times that of PVA-2900. The reactivity of these three compounds for several liquid organic materials can roughly be expressed as follows: (PVA2900):(PAAm80000):(PAAm2800)=1:1:0.3. It is possible to use PAAm as a solid material in the liquid-solid reaction (instead of PVA). The method used in this work can be useful to clarify the reactivity of a certain material, and to obtain the data for the prevention of tritium-contamination. (author)

  12. NMR investigations on residue level unfolding thermodynamics in DLC8 dimer by temperature dependent native state hydrogen exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding protein stability at residue level detail in the native state ensemble of a protein is crucial to understanding its biological function. At the same time, deriving thermodynamic parameters using conventional spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques remains a major challenge for some proteins due to protein aggregation and irreversibility of denaturation at higher temperature values. In this regard, we describe here the NMR investigations on the conformational stabilities and related thermodynamic parameters such as local unfolding enthalpies, heat capacities and transition midpoints in DLC8 dimer, by using temperature dependent native state hydrogen exchange; this protein aggregates at high (>65oC) temperatures. The stability (free energy) of the native state was found to vary substantially with temperature at every residue. Significant differences were found in the thermodynamic parameters at individual residue sites indicating that the local environments in the protein structure would respond differently to external perturbations; this reflects on plasticity differences in different regions of the protein. Further, comparison of this data with similar data obtained from GdnHCl dependent native state hydrogen exchange indicated many similarities at residue level, suggesting that local unfolding transitions may be similar in both the cases. This has implications for the folding/unfolding mechanisms of the protein

  13. NMR investigations on residue level unfolding thermodynamics in DLC8 dimer by temperature dependent native state hydrogen exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna Mohan, P. M.; Chakraborty, Swagata; Hosur, Ramakrishna V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)], E-mail: hosur@tifr.res.in

    2009-05-15

    Understanding protein stability at residue level detail in the native state ensemble of a protein is crucial to understanding its biological function. At the same time, deriving thermodynamic parameters using conventional spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques remains a major challenge for some proteins due to protein aggregation and irreversibility of denaturation at higher temperature values. In this regard, we describe here the NMR investigations on the conformational stabilities and related thermodynamic parameters such as local unfolding enthalpies, heat capacities and transition midpoints in DLC8 dimer, by using temperature dependent native state hydrogen exchange; this protein aggregates at high (>65{sup o}C) temperatures. The stability (free energy) of the native state was found to vary substantially with temperature at every residue. Significant differences were found in the thermodynamic parameters at individual residue sites indicating that the local environments in the protein structure would respond differently to external perturbations; this reflects on plasticity differences in different regions of the protein. Further, comparison of this data with similar data obtained from GdnHCl dependent native state hydrogen exchange indicated many similarities at residue level, suggesting that local unfolding transitions may be similar in both the cases. This has implications for the folding/unfolding mechanisms of the protein.

  14. Benchmarking exchange-correlation functionals for hydrogen at high pressures using quantum Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Raymond C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Mcminis, Jeremy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McMahon, Jeffrey M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Pierleoni, Carlo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), L' aquila (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN-LNGS); Ceperley, David M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Morales, Miguel A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The ab initio phase diagram of dense hydrogen is very sensitive to errors in the treatment of electronic correlation. Recently, it has been shown that the choice of the density functional has a large effect on the predicted location of both the liquid-liquid phase transition and the solid insulator-to-metal transition in dense hydrogen. To identify the most accurate functional for dense hydrogen applications, we systematically benchmark some of the most commonly used functionals using quantum Monte Carlo. By considering several measures of functional accuracy, we conclude that the van der Waals and hybrid functionals significantly outperform local density approximation and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof. We support these conclusions by analyzing the impact of functional choice on structural optimization in the molecular solid, and on the location of the liquid-liquid phase transition.

  15. Information exchange on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation activities on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2007. (author)

  16. Some notes on hydrogen-related point defects and their role in the isotope exchange and electrical conductivity in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2015-11-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine dissolve hydrogen in a variety of forms including free (or interstitial) proton (Hrad) and two protons trapped at the M-site ((2 H)M×). The strength of chemical bonding between protons and the surrounding atoms are different among different species, and consequently protons belonging to different species likely have different mobility (diffusion coefficients). I discuss the role of diffusion of protons in different species in the isotope exchange and hydrogen-assisted electrical conductivity adding a few notes to the previous work by Karato (2013) including a new way to test the model. I conclude that in the case of isotope exchange, the interaction among these species is strong because diffusion is heterogeneous, whereas there is no strong interaction among different species in electrical conduction where diffusion is homogeneous (in an infinite crystal). Consequently, the slowest diffusing species controls the rate of isotope exchange, whereas the fastest diffusing species controls electrical conductivity leading to a different temperature dependence of activation energy and anisotropy. This model explains the differences in the activation energy and anisotropy between isotope diffusion and electrical conductivity, and predicts that the mechanism of electrical conductivity changes with temperature providing an explanation for most of the discrepancies among different experimental observations at different temperatures except for those by Poe et al. (2010) who reported anomalously high water content dependence and highly anisotropic activation energy. When the results obtained at high temperatures are used, most of the geophysically observed high and highly anisotropic electrical conductivity in the asthenosphere can be explained without invoking partial melting.

  17. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the black-eyed pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitar and its complex with β-trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H-D exchange of the black-eyed pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) in D2O was studied by an ultraviolet spectroscopic method recently proposed (J.J. Englander, D.B. Calhoun, and S.W. Englander (1979) Analytical Biochemistry, 92, 517-524). Isotopic exchange data are presented as plots of X (The fraction of unex-changed peptide hydrogen atoms at time t) versus log(k0t), where K0 is the pH dependent rate constant for peptide groups exposed to the solvent. In the range of pD2.25-6.9, at 200C, BTCI shows a continuous exchange curve which indicates that the exchange mechanism is of the EX2 type and no detectable conformational changes occur in the protein. Deviations from this exchange curve are found at pD 7.3 and 8.0. About 60% of the peptide hydrogens of BTCI are exchanged for ΔG00 < 6 kcal/mole. For reduced and carboxymethylated BTCI, exchange data suggest a much more open conformation in comparison with the unmodified protein. However, some residual structure appears to be maintained, after scission of the disulfide bonds. The exchange data indicate that, as a consequence of the formation of the β-trypsin-BTCI complex, part of the peptide groups of the enzyme and/or inhibitor become less accessible to the isotopic exchange. (Author)

  18. Evaluation of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Methodology on Adsorbents for Tritium Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H2 (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D2O, leaving H2O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T2O, HTO, and DTO) using D2 (or H2)

  19. Evaluation of hydrogen isotope exchange methodology on adsorbents for tritium removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H2 (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D2O, leaving H2O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T2O, HTO, and DTO) using D2 (or H2). (authors)

  20. Hydrogen exchange: A sensitive analytical window into protein conformation and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  1. Amides complexing with BSA in presence of GuHCl; Kompleksowanie amidow z BSA w obecnosci GuHCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michnik, A.; Sulkowska, A. [Wydzial Farmaceutyczny, Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Sosnowiec (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Mechanism of amides complexing with albumin has been studied by means of {sup 1}H NMR. The assessment of hydrogen bonds contribution in interaction of amides with albumin has been done through analysis of denaturation agent (GuHCl) influence results. 1 ref., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Preparation by ion exchange and structural simulation of a new hydrogen phosphate of sodium zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is described the method of synthesis of the τ-Zr P and the obtaining of its sodium form by ion exchange, the simulation of crystalline model and their patterns of X-ray diffraction and comparison of these with other compounds reported in the literature. (Author)

  3. A new experimental facility for the investigation of hydrogen isotopes permeation through heat exchanger tubes with sweep gas intermediate circuit under nuclear conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a new experimental facility is presented to study the permeation of hydrogen isotopes (tritium and protium) through heat exchanger tubes with sweep gas intermediate circuit under process gas conditions. Beside temperature and pressure dependant measurements to determine the permeation data of Incoloy 800 H double wall tubes further parameter investigations have been made to study the action of a sweep gas circuit against hydrogen permeation. The experimental results show that the obtained impending factor could be destinctly increased. (orig.)

  4. Development of a coupling process heat exchanger between a VHTR and a sulfur-iodine hydrogen production system - HTR2008-58071

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat exchanger to transfer the heat generated from a nuclear reactor to a sulfur-iodine hydrogen production system has been developed. This heat exchanger operates in the extreme environments of a high corrosion, a high temperature, and a high differential pressure. A coating and ion beam mixing surface modification technology are applied to the process heat exchanger in order to enhance its corrosion resistance without loosing the manufacturability of the metal. A Ni-based super alloy is coated with a silicon carbide to enhance its corrosion resistance. The development of heat exchanger including shape design, thermal sizing, ion beam mixing process, stress analysis, and the manufacturing of small scale mock-up heat exchanger are discussed in this paper. The heat exchanger is a hybrid type to meet the design pressure requirements between a nuclear system and a hydrogen production system. A thermal sizing procedure for the process heat exchanger by considering the heat of sulfuric acid gas decomposition is developed. A finite element stress analysis is carried out by using the temperature profile obtained from the thermal sizing calculation. The finite element models were studied to simulate the stress state of the heat exchanger. Two-dimensional analysis was performed at the entrance region of the heat exchanger. A three-dimensional analysis for a single effective heat transfer channel was performed to investigate three-dimensional stress state. Stress analysis results have shown that the developed heat exchanger can withstand the required pressure difference at the elevated temperature condition. A small size heat exchanger was fabricated in order to test it in a high temperature nitrogen-gas loop. The fabrication of the heat exchanger includes a machining of the flow path, a coating and ion beam mixing, and a diffusion bonding of the heat transfer plate. (authors)

  5. Quantum-mechanical interference in charge exchange between hydrogen and graphene-like surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral to negative charge fluctuation of a hydrogen atom in front of a graphene surface is calculated by using the Anderson model within an infinite intra atomic Coulomb repulsion approximation. We perform an ab initio calculation of the Anderson hybridization function that allows investigation of the effect of quantum-mechanical interference related to the Berry phase inherent to the graphene band structure. We find that consideration of the interaction of hydrogen on top of many C atoms leads to a marked asymmetry of the imaginary part of the hybridization function with respect to the Fermi level. Consequently, Fano factors larger than one and strongly dependent on the energy around the Fermi level are predicted. Moreover, the suppression of the hybridization for energies above the Fermi level can explain the unexpected large negative ion formation measured in the scattering of protons by graphite-like surfaces. (paper)

  6. Photochemical hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction of tryptophan: the role in nonradiative decay of singlet tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of nonradiative decay of singlet excited tryptophan (Trp) in aqueous solution was investigated by a highly selective photosubstitution of the C-4 hydrogen of Trp with deuterium of solvent D2O. It was concluded that intramolecular proton transfer from the α-ammonia group giving rise to formation of a protonated species plays an important role in the nonradiative decay of singlet Trp at neutral pH. 11 references, 1 figure

  7. Solubility, diffusivity, and isotopic exchange rate of hydrogen isotopes in Li-Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion, solution and permeation coefficients of hydrogen isotopes in liquid Li-Pb which is a candidate liquid blanket material for fusion reactors were determined in the temperature range 573-973 K using an unsteady permeation method. Each coefficients was correlated to temperature as follows: DLi-Pb = 1.8 x 10-8 exp(-11590/RT) [m2/s] (1) KLi-Pb = 2.1x10-6 exp(-18700/RT) [1/Pa0.5] (2) PLi-Pb = 1.8x10-9 exp(-30290/RT) [mol/msPa0.5] (3) The hydrogen permeation flux depends on the square root of pressure at 773-973 K. Although the power of pressure declined below 0.4 when temperature was below 673 K, the effects of surface resistance were neglected above 673 K. The hydrogen solubility in liquid Li-Pb was found to correlate with a Sievert's constant. We calculated a height-equivalent to theoretical-plate of a gas-liquid countercurrent extraction tower for tritium recovery rates in liquid Li-Pb to be HL= 7.0x10-2 [m] (4). (authors)

  8. Solubility, diffusivity, and isotopic exchange rate of hydrogen isotopes in Li-Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Y.; Edao, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Fukada, S. [Dept. of Advanced Energy Engineering Science Interdisciplinary, Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    The diffusion, solution and permeation coefficients of hydrogen isotopes in liquid Li-Pb which is a candidate liquid blanket material for fusion reactors were determined in the temperature range 573-973 K using an unsteady permeation method. Each coefficients was correlated to temperature as follows: D{sub Li-Pb} = 1.8 x 10{sup -8} exp(-11590/RT) [m{sup 2}/s] (1) K{sub Li-Pb} = 2.1x10{sup -6} exp(-18700/RT) [1/Pa{sup 0.5}] (2) P{sub Li-Pb} = 1.8x10{sup -9} exp(-30290/RT) [mol/msPa{sup 0.5}] (3) The hydrogen permeation flux depends on the square root of pressure at 773-973 K. Although the power of pressure declined below 0.4 when temperature was below 673 K, the effects of surface resistance were neglected above 673 K. The hydrogen solubility in liquid Li-Pb was found to correlate with a Sievert's constant. We calculated a height-equivalent to theoretical-plate of a gas-liquid countercurrent extraction tower for tritium recovery rates in liquid Li-Pb to be H{sub L}= 7.0x10{sup -2} [m] (4). (authors)

  9. Solar wind/local interstellar medium interaction including charge exchange with neural hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, H. Louis; Zank, Gary P.

    1995-01-01

    We present results from a hydrodynamic model of the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium (LISM), self-consistently taking into account the effects of charge exchange between the plasma component and the interstellar neutrals. The simulation is fully time dependent, and is carried out in two or three dimensions, depending on whether the helio-latitudinal dependence of the solar wind speed and number density (both giving rise to three dimensional effects) are included. As a first approximation it is assumed that the neutral component of the flow can be described by a single, isotropic fluid. Clearly, this is not the actual situation, since charge exchange with the supersonic solar wind plasma in the region of the nose results in a 'second' neutral fluid propagating in the opposite direction as that of the LISM neutrals.

  10. Simultaneous blood-tissue exchange of oxygen, carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and hydrogen ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Ranjan K; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2006-07-01

    A detailed nonlinear four-region (red blood cell, plasma, interstitial fluid, and parenchymal cell) axially distributed convection-diffusion-permeation-reaction-binding computational model is developed to study the simultaneous transport and exchange of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood-tissue exchange system of the heart. Since the pH variation in blood and tissue influences the transport and exchange of O2 and CO2 (Bohr and Haldane effects), and since most CO2 is transported as HCO3(-) (bicarbonate) via the CO2 hydration (buffering) reaction, the transport and exchange of HCO3(-) and H+ are also simulated along with that of O2 and CO2. Furthermore, the model accounts for the competitive nonlinear binding of O2 and CO2 with the hemoglobin inside the red blood cells (nonlinear O2-CO2 interactions, Bohr and Haldane effects), and myoglobin-facilitated transport of O2 inside the parenchymal cells. The consumption of O2 through cytochrome-c oxidase reaction inside the parenchymal cells is based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The corresponding production of CO2 is determined by respiratory quotient (RQ), depending on the relative consumption of carbohydrate, protein, and fat. The model gives a physiologically realistic description of O2 transport and metabolism in the microcirculation of the heart. Furthermore, because model solutions for tracer transients and steady states can be computed highly efficiently, this model may be the preferred vehicle for routine data analysis where repetitive solutions and parameter optimization are required, as is the case in PET imaging for estimating myocardial O2 consumption. PMID:16775761

  11. Probing the dynamic regulation of peripheral membrane proteins using hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadas, Oscar; Burke, John E

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular signalling events are controlled by the selective recruitment of protein complexes to membranes. Determining the molecular basis for how lipid signalling complexes are recruited, assembled and regulated on specific membrane compartments has remained challenging due to the difficulty of working in conditions mimicking native biological membrane environments. Enzyme recruitment to membranes is controlled by a variety of regulatory mechanisms, including binding to specific lipid species, protein-protein interactions, membrane curvature, as well as post-translational modifications. A powerful tool to study the regulation of membrane signalling enzymes and complexes is hydrogen deuterium exchange-MS (HDX-MS), a technique that allows for the interrogation of protein dynamics upon membrane binding and recruitment. This review will highlight the theory and development of HDX-MS and its application to examine the molecular basis of lipid signalling enzymes, specifically the regulation and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks). PMID:26517882

  12. Influence of helium on hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten at sequential exposures to deuterium and helium–protium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobyr, N.P., E-mail: NPBobyr@gmail.com [NRC “Kurcharov Institute”, Ac. Kurcharov sq., 1/1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Alimov, V.Kh. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Khripunov, B.I.; Spitsyn, A.V. [NRC “Kurcharov Institute”, Ac. Kurcharov sq., 1/1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hatano, Y. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Golubeva, A.V.; Petrov, V.B. [NRC “Kurcharov Institute”, Ac. Kurcharov sq., 1/1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen isotopes exchange in tungsten was investigated after sequential exposures to low energy deuterium (D) and helium–seeded protium (He–seeded H) plasmas at sample temperatures of 403 and 533 K. Deuterium depth profiles were measured by the D({sup 3}He, p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction with {sup 3}He{sup +} energies between 0.69 and 4.5 MeV allowing determination of the D concentration up to a depth of 8 μm. It was found that a significant part of the deuterium initially retained in tungsten after D plasma exposure was released during sequential exposure to a protium plasma. However, exposure of the D-plasma-exposed W samples to the He–seeded H plasma reduces the amount of released deuterium as compared to pure H plasma exposure.

  13. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J. Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J. C. Yves; Wilson, Derek J.

    2016-03-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)—the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development.

  14. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J. Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J. C. Yves; Wilson, Derek J.

    2016-06-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)—the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development.

  15. Influence of helium on hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten at sequential exposures to deuterium and helium–protium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen isotopes exchange in tungsten was investigated after sequential exposures to low energy deuterium (D) and helium–seeded protium (He–seeded H) plasmas at sample temperatures of 403 and 533 K. Deuterium depth profiles were measured by the D(3He, p)4He nuclear reaction with 3He+ energies between 0.69 and 4.5 MeV allowing determination of the D concentration up to a depth of 8 μm. It was found that a significant part of the deuterium initially retained in tungsten after D plasma exposure was released during sequential exposure to a protium plasma. However, exposure of the D-plasma-exposed W samples to the He–seeded H plasma reduces the amount of released deuterium as compared to pure H plasma exposure

  16. Analysis of distinct molecular assembly complexes of keratin K8 and K18 by hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premchandar, Aiswarya; Kupniewska, Anna; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Mücke, Norbert; Mauermann, Monika; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Edelman, Aleksander; Herrmann, Harald; Dadlez, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Keratins are intermediate filament (IF) proteins that form complex filament systems in epithelial cells, thus serving as scaffolding elements and mechanical stress absorbers. The building blocks of keratin IFs are parallel coiled-coil dimers of two distinct sequence-related proteins distinguished as type I and type II keratins. To gain more insight into their structural dynamics, we resorted to hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of keratins K8 and K18, which are characteristic for simple epithelial cells. Using this powerful technique not employed with IFs before, we mapped patterns of protected versus unprotected regions in keratin complexes at various assembly levels. In particular, we localized protein segments exhibiting different hydrogen exchange patterns in tetramers versus filaments. We observed a general pattern of precisely positioned regions of stability intertwining with flexible regions, mostly represented by the non-α-helical segments. Notably, some regions within the coiled-coil domains are significantly more dynamic than others, while the IF-consensus motifs at the end domains of the central α-helical "rod" segment, which mediate the "head-to-tail" dimer-dimer interaction in the filament elongation process, become distinctly more protected upon formation of filaments. Moreover, to gain more insight into the dynamics of the individual keratins, we investigated the properties of homomeric preparations of K8 and K18. The physiological importance of keratins without a partner is encountered in both pathological and experimental situations when one of the two species is present in robust excess or completely absent, such as in gene-targeted mice. PMID:26434626

  17. Resuscitation from Prolonged Ventricular Fibrillation by Epinephrine Combined with Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger Isoform-1 Inhibitor Cariporide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易忠; Rual J GAZMURI; Iyad M AYOUB; Julieta D KOLAROVA

    2002-01-01

    Objective To test theresuscitative effects from prolonged ventricular fibrillation by epinephrine combined with sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 inhibitor Cariporide. Methods 16 rats were received a 3 mg/kg bolus of Cariporide or the same volume of 0.9 % NaCl solution (control) 15seconds before completion 12 minutes untreated VF.Chest compression (CC) was started for a total of 8minutes. Adjusted the depth of compressor so that the aortic diastolic pressure to 25~ 28 mmHg during the 2nd minute of CC. Fix the depth of the piston and this depth was used throughout the remaining 6 minutes of CC. 10 seconds before starting the 3rd minute of chest compression, injected epinephrine (30 μg/kg) .Recorded the time at which restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) occurred in Cariporide-treated rats. Electrical defibrillation was timed in control group to match the time of spontaneous defibrillation in Cariporide-treated rats. To the rats, which can't be defibrillated spontaneously, received chest compression and rescues electrical shocks. Results compared with control group, with the same CC depth, Cariporide-treated rats received the higher and longer lasting coronary perfusion pressure (P < 0.05), higher resuscitative rate ( P < 0.05), less post resuscitative ventricular ectopic activities (P < 0. 001), better hemodynamic effects and longer survival time (P <0.05) Conclusion Epinephrine combined with sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 inhibitor Cariporide may represent a novel and remarkably effective intervention for resuscitation from prolonged VF.

  18. Hydrogen-exchange labeling study of the allosteric R-state to T-state equilibrium in methemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnie, R. E.; Englander, J. J.; Englander, S. W.

    1991-12-01

    Hydrogen-exchange labeling methods can be used to identify functionally important changes at positions all through a protein structure, can monitor the effect at these positions of structure changes anywhere in the protein, and can quantify these effects in terms of change in structural-stabilization free energy. These methods were used to study effects at two widely separated positions in human methemoglobin (metHb). The results show that the observed changes in hydrogen-exchange behavior reflect changes in the global R-state to T-state equilibrium, and specifically that stabilizing salt links at the α-chain N-terminus and the β-chain C-terminus are reformed in the R-T transition. The strong allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), switches R-state methemoglobin to the T-state, but achieves a T/R equilibrium constant of only ≈ 3 (at pH=6.5, 0°C). Addition of the weaker effector, bezafibrate (Bzf), promotes this transition by an additional 0.7 kcal (T/R shifts to ≈ 12). Bzf alone is insufficient to cause the transition, indicating that R/T is 10 or more in stripped metHb under these conditions. However, R/T is small enough, not more than 103, to be reversed by the differential (T versus R) binding energy of IHP. The R-T transition caused by IHP and Bzf acting together can be reversed by some covalent modifications that sever the stabilizing salt links at the chain termini and thus favor transition back to the R-state.

  19. Bifunctional Brønsted Base Catalyzes Direct Asymmetric Aldol Reaction of α-Keto Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echave, Haizea; López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    The first enantioselective direct cross-aldol reaction of α-keto amides with aldehydes, mediated by a bifunctional ureidopeptide-based Brønsted base catalyst, is described. The appropriate combination of a tertiary amine base and an aminal, and urea hydrogen-bond donor groups in the catalyst structure promoted the exclusive generation of the α-keto amide enolate which reacted with either non-enolizable or enolizable aldehydes to produce highly enantioenriched polyoxygenated aldol adducts without side-products resulting from dehydration, α-keto amide self-condensation, aldehyde enolization, and isotetronic acid formation. PMID:26835655

  20. A heat exchanger between forced flow helium gas at 14 to 18 K and liquid hydrogen at 20 K circulated by natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has three 350-mm long liquid hydrogen absorbers to reduce the momentum of 200 MeV muons in all directions. The muons are then re-accelerated in the longitudinal direction by 200 MHz RF cavities. The result is cooled muons with a reduced emittance. The energy from the muons is taken up by the liquid hydrogen in the absorber. The hydrogen in the MICE absorbers is cooled by natural convection to the walls of the absorber that are in turn cooled by helium gas that enters at 14 K. This report describes the MICE liquid hydrogen absorber and the heat exchanger between the liquid hydrogen and the helium gas that flows through passages in the absorber wall

  1. Structure and Dynamics of NBD1 from CFTR Characterized Using Crystallography and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, H.A.; Wang, C.; Zhao, X.; Hamuro, Y.; Conners, K.; Kearins, M.C.; Lu, F.; Sauder, J.M.; Molnar, K.S.; Coales, S.J.; Maloney, P.C.; Guggino, W.B.; Wetmore, D.R.; Weber, P.C.; Hunt, J.F. (SGX); (ExSAR); (Cystic); (JHU-MED); (Columbia)

    2012-04-30

    The {Delta}F508 mutation in nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the predominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Previous biophysical studies on human F508 and {Delta}F508 domains showed only local structural changes restricted to residues 509-511 and only minor differences in folding rate and stability. These results were remarkable because {Delta}F508 was widely assumed to perturb domain folding based on the fact that it prevents trafficking of CFTR out of the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the previously reported crystal structures did not come from matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs, and the {Delta}F508 structure contained additional mutations that were required to obtain sufficient protein solubility. In this article, we present additional biophysical studies of NBD1 designed to address these ambiguities. Mass spectral measurements of backbone amide {sup 1}H/{sup 2}H exchange rates in matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs reveal that {Delta}F508 increases backbone dynamics at residues 509-511 and the adjacent protein segments but not elsewhere in NBD1. These measurements also confirm a high level of flexibility in the protein segments exhibiting variable conformations in the crystal structures. We additionally present crystal structures of a broader set of human NBD1 constructs, including one harboring the native F508 residue and others harboring the {Delta}F508 mutation in the presence of fewer and different solubilizing mutations. The only consistent conformational difference is observed at residues 509-511. The side chain of residue V510 in this loop is mostly buried in all non-{Delta}F508 structures but completely solvent exposed in all {Delta}F508 structures. These results reinforce the importance of the perturbation {Delta}F508 causes in the surface topography of NBD1 in a region likely to mediate contact with the transmembrane domains of CFTR. However, they also suggest that increased

  2. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H](3-) and [M - 5H](5-) insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å(2) and 808 ± 2 Å(2). [M - 4H](4-) ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å(2)) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å(2)) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H](4-) and [M - 5H](5-) ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis. PMID:26620531

  3. Dynamic Structural Changes During Complement C3 Activation Analyzed by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Schuster, Michael C.; Ricklin, Daniel; Papp, Krisztián; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Coales, Stephen J.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Sfyroera, Georgia; Chen, Hui; Winters, Michael S; Lambris, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of component C3 to C3b is a central step in the activation of complement. Whereas C3 is largely biologically inactive, C3b is directly involved in various complement activities. While the recently described crystal structures of C3 and C3b provide a molecular basis of complement activation, they do not reflect the dynamic changes that occur in solution. In addition, the available C3b structures diverge in some important aspects. Here we have utilized hydrogen/deuterium ex...

  4. Gas exchange between hydrogen plasma with oxygen impurity and stainless steel surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy the hydrogen isotopes and oxygen trapping in stainless steel 12Kh18N10T during its exposure in the D2+O2 mixture in the presence of atom source or at irradiation by ions and electrons of deuterium plasma with oxygen impurity is studied. The dependences of oxygen trapping in steel on dose rate, irradiating ions energy, oxygen concentration in working gas are obtained. The regularities are determined and the technique for trapped oxygen removal by irradiation in helium or deuterium plasma is suggested

  5. Recombinant immobilized rhizopuspepsin as a new tool for protein digestion in hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Martial; Man, Petr; Brandolin, Gérard; Forest, Eric; Pelosi, Ludovic

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange coupled to mass spectrometry is nowadays routinely used to probe protein interactions or conformational changes. The method has many advantages, e.g. very low sample consumption, but offers limited spatial resolution. One way to higher resolution leads through the use of different proteases or their combinations. In the present work we describe recombinant production, purification and use of aspartic protease zymogen from Rhizopus chimensis, protease type XVIII (EC 3.4.23.6), commonly referred to as rhizopuspepsinogen (Rpg). The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified to homogeneity. A typical yield was approximately 100 mg of pure enzyme per 1 L of original bacterial culture. The kinetics of protease activation, i.e. removal of the propeptide achieved by autolysis in an acidic environment, was followed by mass spectrometry. The digestion efficiency was tested for the protease in solution as well as for the immobilized enzyme. Apomyoglobin was successfully digested under all conditions tested and the protease displayed very low or no autodigestion. The results outperformed those obtained with commercial protease where the digestion of apomyoglobin was incomplete and accompanied by many contaminating peptides. Taken together, the recombinant protease type XVIII can be considered as a new and highly efficient tool for H/D exchange followed by mass spectrometry. PMID:19827048

  6. Performance analysis of an integrated biomass gasification and PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) system: Hydrogen and power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is expected to play a significant role in next-generation energy systems. Because most hydrogen that is used as a fuel for PEMFCs is derived from the reforming of natural gas, the use of renewable energy sources such as biomass to produce this hydrogen offers a promising alternative. This study is focused on the performance analysis of an integrated biomass gasification and PEMFC system. The combined heat and power generation output of this integrated system is designed for residential applications, taking into account thermal and electrical demands. A flowsheet model of the integrated PEMFC system is developed and employed to analyze its performance with respect to various key operating parameters. A purification process consisting of a water–gas shift reactor and a preferential oxidation reactor is also necessary in order to reduce the concentration of CO in the synthesis gas to below 10 ppm for subsequent use in the PEMFC. The effect of load level on the performance of the PEMFC system is investigated. Based on an electrical load of 5 kW, it is found that the electrical efficiency of the PEMFC integrated system is 22%, and, when waste heat recovery is considered, the total efficiency of the PEMFC system is 51%. - Highlights: • Performance of a biomass gasification and PEMFC integrated system is analyzed. • A flowsheet model of the PEMFC integrated system is developed. • Effect of biomass sources and key parameters on hydrogen and power generation is presented. • The PEMFC integrated system is designed for small-scale power demand. • Effect of load changes on the performance of PEMFC is investigated

  7. NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator with a volume-exchange fuel tank for small unmanned aerial vehicles powered by a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system integrated with a NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator was developed for small UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles). The hydrogen generator was composed of a catalytic reactor, liquid pump and volume-exchange fuel tank, where the fuel and spent fuel exchange the volume within a single fuel tank. Co–B catalyst supported on a porous ceramic material was used to generate hydrogen from the NaBH4 solution. Considering the power consumption according to the mission profile of a UAV, the power output of the fuel cell and auxiliary battery was distributed passively as an electrical load. A blended wing-body was selected considering the fuel efficiency and carrying capability of fuel cell components. First, the fuel cell stack and hydrogen generator were evaluated under the operating conditions, and integrated into the airframe. The ground test of the complete fuel cell UAV was performed under a range of load conditions. Finally, the fuel cell powered flight test was made for 1 h. The volume-exchange fuel tank minimized the fuel sloshing and the change in center of gravity due to fuel consumption during the flight, so that much stable operation of the fuel cell system was validated at different flight modes. - Highlights: • PEMFC system with a NaBH4 hydrogen source was developed for small UAVs. • Volume-exchange fuel tank was used to reduce the size of the fuel cell system. • Passive power management was used for a stable power output during the flight. • BWB UAV was selected by taking the fuel cell integration into consideration. • Stable operation of the fuel cell system was verified from the flight test

  8. Lithium polymer batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells as energy sources in hydrogen electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, P.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    This paper deals with the application of lithium ion polymer batteries as electric energy storage systems for hydrogen fuel cell power trains. The experimental study was firstly effected in steady state conditions, to evidence the basic features of these systems in view of their application in the automotive field, in particular charge-discharge experiments were carried at different rates (varying the current between 8 and 100 A). A comparison with conventional lead acid batteries evidenced the superior features of lithium systems in terms of both higher discharge rate capability and minor resistance in charge mode. Dynamic experiments were carried out on the overall power train equipped with PEM fuel cell stack (2 kW) and lithium batteries (47.5 V, 40 Ah) on the European R47 driving cycle. The usage of lithium ion polymer batteries permitted to follow the high dynamic requirement of this cycle in hard hybrid configuration, with a hydrogen consumption reduction of about 6% with respect to the same power train equipped with lead acid batteries.

  9. Lithium polymer batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells as energy sources in hydrogen electric vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbo, P.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O. [Istituto Motori - National Research Council (CNR), Via Marconi, 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2010-12-01

    This paper deals with the application of lithium ion polymer batteries as electric energy storage systems for hydrogen fuel cell power trains. The experimental study was firstly effected in steady state conditions, to evidence the basic features of these systems in view of their application in the automotive field, in particular charge-discharge experiments were carried at different rates (varying the current between 8 and 100 A). A comparison with conventional lead acid batteries evidenced the superior features of lithium systems in terms of both higher discharge rate capability and minor resistance in charge mode. Dynamic experiments were carried out on the overall power train equipped with PEM fuel cell stack (2 kW) and lithium batteries (47.5 V, 40 Ah) on the European R47 driving cycle. The usage of lithium ion polymer batteries permitted to follow the high dynamic requirement of this cycle in hard hybrid configuration, with a hydrogen consumption reduction of about 6% with respect to the same power train equipped with lead acid batteries. (author)

  10. Isotopic exchange in mineral-fluid systems. II. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic investigation of the experimental basalt-seawater system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David R.; Mottl, Michael J.; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1987-06-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions between basalt and seawater at T = 300° to 500°C were investigated, using oceanic tholeiitic basalt ( δ 18O = ˜5.7%.; δD = ˜-70%. ), natural seawater ( δ 18O = 1.2%.; δD = + 5%. ) and artificial seawater ( δ 18O = -5.3%. ) as starting materials. The starting basalts varied in the crystallinity (from holocrystalline to glass) but were ground to approximately the same grain size (-100 mesh). The water/rock mass ratios ranged from 1 to 3 and the duration of the experiments ranged from 167 to 576 days. In general, depletion of 18O and enrichment of D in basalts occur at all temperatures, with the magnitudes of change being greater as temperature, time and to a lesser degree, glass content increases. The trends in isotopic shifts are directly related to changes in the style and intensity of mineralogic alterations in the basalt ( e.g., smectite at 300°C, talc-actinoiite at 400°-500°C). The changes in the δ 18O values of basalts and seawater in the experimental systems were observed to follow closely with those expected from a first-order rate law. Rate constants for the oxygen isotopic exchange between rock and water range from 10 -9.5 to 10 -8.0 moles oxygen/m 2 of solid surface/sec for temperatures of 300° to 500°C. The activation energy for the isotopic exchange reaction was calculated to be 11.5 Kcal/ mol. An application of our experimental rate data to natural systems suggests that the oxygen isotope equilibrium between basalt and seawater in the mid-oceanic ridge may take place within approximately 1000 years at 350°C. Our experimental data also suggest the equilibrium oxygen isotopic fractionation factors between the altered basalt and seawater to be 3.5 ± 0.5%. at 300°C, 2.0 ± 0.4%. at 400°C and 0.5 ± 0.25%. at 500°C. The observed hydrogen isotopic fractionation factors between the altered basalts and seawater in our experimental systems were about -74%. at 300°C. about -62%. at 400°C and

  11. Accessibility changes within diphtheria toxin T domain when in the functional molten globule state, as determined using hydrogen/deuterium exchange measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Petr; Montagner, C.; Vitrac, H.; Kavan, Daniel; Pichard, S.; Gillet, D.; Forest, E.; Forge, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 277, č. 3 (2010), s. 653-662. ISSN 1742-464X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : diphtheria toxin * hydrogen/deuterium exchanges * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.129, year: 2010

  12. Absence of significant sodium-hydrogen exchange by rabbit erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red blood cells of several mammalian species (e.g., human, rabbit, bovine) possess a countertransport system for Li and Na. The authors have used rabbit red blood cells to determine the extent of sodium-proton exchange by this countertransporter. Ouabain-insensitive 22Na efflux into phosphate-buffered K-acetate media of varying Na concentrations was determined at extracellular pH 7.5 and 6.9. To maintain the intracellular pH at approximately 7.2, most of the acetate in the pH 6.9 medium was replaced by gluconate, a nonpenetrating anion. Extracellular Na strongly (greater than 10-fold) stimulated the 22Na efflux in both high- and low-pH media, but the K1/2 for this stimulation was higher at pH 6.9. This is consistent with a competitive binding of H to the outward-facing transport site. However, the lower pH itself, in a Na-free medium, stimulated the 22Na efflux only very slightly. The 22Na efflux stimulated by lowering the extracellular pH to 6.9 was less than 1% of the stimulation produced by 100 mM extracellular Na. It is concluded that, although H appears to bind to the substrate site of the Na-Li exchanger, there is no significant H transport in the physiological pH range

  13. A comparative account of the wet oxidation of cation exchange resin with hydrogen peroxide using titanium, vanadium, and molybdenum doped MCM-41 as catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins are widely used in the nuclear industry for treatment of radioactive waste as well as for the upgrading of heavy water used in the primary heat transport system and moderator system. Repeated usage of the resins calls for replacement and treatment before disposal. The present work involves the application of metal-doped MCM-41 material as a catalyst for the wet oxidation of cation exchange resins using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent. The sulfate produced from the exchangeable group of the resin reflects the extent of decomposition and the carbonate produced reflects the extent of oxidation of the ion exchange resin. Results indicate that the percentage decomposition and oxidation increase with the weight of the catalyst and the volume of the oxidant, i.e., hydrogen peroxide. As much as 0.5 g of the resin could be decomposed by 12 mL of 30% hydrogen peroxide to 98.7% and oxidized to 99.25% using molybdenum doped MCM-41. Vanadium doped and titanium doped MCM-41 required 14 to 16 mL for complete decomposition and 18 to 20 mL for complete oxidation of the ion exchange resin. (orig.)

  14. Investigation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction rate in mixed gas (H2 and D2) at pressure up to 200 MPa using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectroscopy is a relevant method for obtaining objective data on isotopic exchange rate in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes, since it allows one to determine a gaseous mix composition in real time without sampling. We have developed a high-pressure fiber-optic probe to be used for obtaining protium Raman spectra under pressures up to 400 MPa and we have recorded spectral line broadening induced by molecule collisions starting from ∼ 40 MPa. Using this fiber-optic probe we have performed experiments to study isotopic exchange kinetics in a gaseous mix of hydrogen isotopes (protium-deuterium) at pressures up to 200 MPa. Preliminary results show that the dependence of the average isotopic exchange rate related to pressure take unexpected values at the very beginning of the time evolution. More work is required to understand this inconsistency

  15. A study on wet catalysis oxidation of spent radioactive ion-exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent radioactive ion-exchange resin (IER) is one of the main kinds of wastes produced by nuclear installations. The authors describe the study on decomposition behaviors of cationic, anionic and mixed IER in H2O2-Ni2+/Cu2+, H2O2-Mn2+/Cu2+, H2O2-Fe2+/Cu2+ and H2O2-Cu2+ systems, analyzes the effects on reaction process and consequence of many factors such as amount of H2O2, catalyst, temperature, pH-value, NaOH and so on. The relation between cementation process and the amount of decomposition residuals was studied. It provided the possible maximum COD-value under which the solidification process would not be affected. The reaction mechanism of the wet chemical oxidation of IER was discussed preliminarily

  16. Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the...

  17. Do cooperative cycles of hydrogen bonding exist in proteins?

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2016-01-01

    The closure of cooperative chains of Hydrogen Bonding, HB, to form cycles can enhance cooperativity. Cycles of charge transfer can balance charge into and out of every site, eliminating the charge build-up that limits the cooperativity of open unidirectional chains of cooperativity. If cycles of cooperative HB exist in proteins, these could be expected to be significant in protein structure and function in ways described below. We investigate whether cooperative HB cycles not traversing solvent, ligand or modified residues occur in protein by means including search of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy entries of the Protein Data Bank. We find no mention of an example of this kind of cycle in the literature. For amide-amide HB, for direct inter-amide interactions, when the energy associated with Natural Bond Orbital, NBO, steric exchange is deducted from that of NBO donor-acceptor interactions, the result is close to zero, so that HB is not primarily due to the sum of direct inter-amide NBO interactions....

  18. Materials development for process heat exchanger (PHE) in nuclear hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decomposed sulfuric acid gas (SO2/SO3/H2O) channels made of super alloys (Alloy HX in this work) in process heat exchanger (PHE) are subjected to an extremely severe corrosion environment because its operation temperature is more than 900 °C. For the corrosion protection, Alloy HX was coated with SiC film in this work. The bonding between two dissimilar materials is often problematic, particularly in coating metals with ceramics protective layer. A strong bonding between SiC/Alloy HX was achieved by mixing the atoms at the interface by ion-beam: The film was not peeled-off at ≥900 °C, confirming excellent adhesion, although the thermal expansion coefficient of Alloy HX is about three times higher than that of SiC. Instead, the SiC film was cracked along the grain boundary of the substrate above 700 °C. At ≥900 °C, the film was crystallized forming islands on the substrate so that a considerable part of the substrate surface could be exposed to the corrosive environment. In order to cover the exposed areas and cracks multiple coating/IBM process has been developed. The immersion corrosion test in 80% sulfuric acid at 300 °C for 100 h showed the weight retain rate was gradually increased as increasing the number of the process time

  19. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Conformational Analysis of Proteins in Highly Concentrated Solutions by Dialysis-Coupled Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Damian; Nazari, Zeinab E.; Bou-Assaf, George M.; Weiskopf, Andrew S.; Rand, Kasper D.

    2016-04-01

    When highly concentrated, an antibody solution can exhibit unusual behaviors, which can lead to unwanted properties, such as increased levels of protein aggregation and unusually high viscosity. Molecular modeling, along with many indirect biophysical measurements, has suggested that the cause for these phenomena can be due to short range electrostatic and/or hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for investigating protein conformation, dynamics, and interactions. However, "traditional" continuous dilution labeling HDX-MS experiments have limited utility for the direct analysis of solutions with high concentrations of protein. Here, we present a dialysis-based HDX-MS (di-HDX-MS) method as an alternative HDX-MS labeling format, which takes advantage of passive dialysis rather than the classic dilution workflow. We applied this approach to a highly concentrated antibody solution without dilution or significant sample manipulation, prior to analysis. Such a method could pave the way for a deeper understanding of the unusual behavior of proteins at high concentrations, which is highly relevant for development of biopharmaceuticals in industry.

  1. Applications of hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX for the characterization of conformational dynamics in light-activated photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eLindner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rational design of optogenetic tools is inherently linked to the understanding of photoreceptor function. Structural analysis of elements involved in signal integration in individual sensor domains provides an initial idea of their mode of operation, but understanding how local structural rearrangements eventually affect signal transmission to output domains requires inclusion of the effector regions in the characterization. However, the dynamic nature of these assemblies renders their structural analysis challenging and therefore a combination of high- and low-resolution techniques is required to appreciate functional aspects of photoreceptors.This review focuses on the potential of Hydrogen-Deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS for complementing the structural characterization of photoreceptors. In this respect, the ability of HDX-MS to provide information on the conformational dynamics and the possibility to address multiple functionally relevant states in solution render this methodology ideally suitable. We highlight recent examples demonstrating the potential of HDX-MS and discuss how these results can help to improve existing optogenetic systems or guide the design of novel optogenetic tools.

  2. Coumarin amide derivatives as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group have been synthesized. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been examined. The results indicate that the compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change, at the same time, obvious color and fluorescence change can be observed by naked eye. The in situ hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and photophysical properties change confirm that Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin. - Highlights: • Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group were synthesized. • The compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change. • Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin

  3. Affinity capture of biotinylated proteins at acidic conditions to facilitate hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of multimeric protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Koefoed, Klaus; Nygaard, Frank; Sen, Jette Wagtberg

    2013-01-01

    prior to the HDX-MS experiment. However, when studying protein complexes of more than two proteins, immobilization can possibly introduce steric limitations to the interactions. Here, we present a method based on the high affinity biotin-streptavidin interaction that allows selective capture of...... biotinylated proteins even under the extreme conditions for hydrogen/deuterium exchange quenching i.e. pH 2.5 and 0 °C. This biotin-streptavidin capture strategy allows hydrogen/deuterium exchange to occur in proteins in solution and enables characterization of specific proteins in heteromultimeric protein...... complexes without interference of peptides originating from other interaction partners in the complex. The biotin-streptavidin strategy has been successfully implemented in a model system with two recombinant monoclonal antibodies that target nonoverlapping epitopes on the human epidermal growth factor...

  4. Effect of pH on tritium exchange and hydrogen production and uptake in free-living cells and in bacteroids of Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soybean nodule bacteroids and Bradyrhizobium japonicum free-living cells induced for H2-uptake hydrogenase, actively catalyze the evolution of H2 in a reaction highly dependent on the pH. The optimal pHs for the evolution and uptake reactions were 4.0 and 7.5-8.0, respectively. No differences were found between free-living cells and bacteroids with respect to hydrogen acceptor specificity, although absolute rates of H2 uptake were higher for free-living cells. Both types of cells were able to evolve hydrogen from reduced methyl viologen at low pH. These intact cells also catalyzed the exchange reaction between tritium and water in the absence of oxygen. The pH profile of the exchange activity showed two peaks at values near the optimal pHs for the evolution and uptake reactions

  5. Approach to Characterization of the Higher Order Structure of Disulfide-Containing Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guanbo; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2014-01-01

    Top-down hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection has recently matured to become a potent biophysical tool capable of providing valuable information on higher order structure and conformational dynamics of proteins at an unprecedented level of structural detail. However, the scope of the proteins amenable to the analysis by top-down HDX MS still remains limited, with the protein size and the presence of disulfide bonds being the two most important limiting fact...

  6. Borate esters as convenient reagents for direct amidation of carboxylic acids and transamidation of primary amides

    OpenAIRE

    Starkov, P.; Sheppard, T. D.

    2011-01-01

    Simple borates serve as effective promoters for amide bond formation with a variety of carboxylic acids and amines. With trimethyl or tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) borate, amides are obtained in good to excellent yield and high purity after a simple work-up procedure. Tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) borate can also be used for the straightforward conversion of primary amides to secondary amides via transamidation.

  7. Analysis of Local Dynamics of Human Insulin and a Rapid-acting Insulin Analog by Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Shiori; Hashii, Noritaka; Hirose, Kenji; Kawasaki, Nana; Ahn, Joomi

    2013-01-01

    Human insulin, used by diabetics to regulate blood sugar, was first introduced as a recombinant therapeutic drug nearly 30 years ago. Human insulin and insulin lispro have identical primary structure, except for the transposition of two amino acids. Lispro is one of the rapid-acting insulin analogs, which has higher tendency to dissociate than human insulin. In this study, we present an analytical workflow to allow us to detect the difference in the oligomeric dynamics using Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS). The HDX analysis on Insulin and Lispro peptides was conducted to identify the location where different deuterium uptakes were observed between human insulin and lispro. The detected areas were illustrated in various formats to help understand their flexibility associated with rapid dissociation of insulin oligomers. Drug products, human insulin (Humulin R) and lispro (Humalog), were reduced and digested online by pepsin. Deuterium labeling, quenching, and injection to on-line pepsin digestion were prepared using a robotic sample manager. Labeling experiments in 0, 0.5, 5, 10, 60, and 180 min interval were duplicated for both samples. The peptic digests were separated on a UPLC system at 0 °C. Q-TOF MS was used to measure the deuterium incorporation of identified peptides. The amount of deuterium was determined by automated HDX data processing software, DynamX 2.0. We obtained 98% of sequence coverage for both human insulin and lispro. From peptide HDX determination, two regions were revealed distinctive different values in deuterium uptakes between human insulin and lispro; the N terminus of chain A, and a region adjacent to the C terminus of chain B. We attributed this localized behavior to the relation of hexamerization and dimerization, respectively. Furthermore, characteristic profiles that showed different deuteration margins between two insulins were determined, which was also consistent with their involvement in hexamer and dimer

  8. Conformational difference in human IgG2 disulfide isoforms revealed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aming; Fang, Jing; Chou, Robert Y-T; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Zhang, Zhongqi

    2015-03-17

    Both recombinant and natural human IgG2 antibodies have several different disulfide bond isoforms, which possess different global structures, thermal stabilities, and biological activities. A detailed mapping of the structural difference among IgG2 disulfide isoforms, however, has not been established. In this work, we employed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to study the conformation of three major IgG2 disulfide isoforms known as IgG2-B, IgG2-A1, and IgG2-A2 in two recombinant human IgG2 monoclonal antibodies. By comparing the protection factors between amino acid residues in isoforms B and A1 (the classical form), we successfully identified several local regions in which the IgG2-B isoform showed more solvent protection than the IgG2-A1 isoform. On the basis of three-dimensional structural models of IgG2, these identified regions were located on the Fab domains, close to the hinge, centered on the side where the two Fab arms faced each other in spatial proximity. We speculated that in the more solvent-protected B isoform, the two Fab arms were brought into contact by the nonclassical disulfide bonds, resulting in a more compact global structure. Loss of Fab domain flexibility in IgG2-B could limit its ability to access cell-surface epitopes, leading to reduced antigen binding potency. The A2 isoform was previously found to have disulfide linkages similar to those of the classical A1 isoform, but with different biophysical behaviors. Our data indicated that, compared to IgG2-A1, IgG2-A2 had less solvent protection in some heavy-chain Fab regions close the hinge, suggesting that the A2 isoform had more flexible Fab domains. PMID:25730439

  9. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  10. Amide, urea and thiourea-containing triphenylene derivatives: influence of H-bonding on mesomorphic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paraschiv, I.; Tomkinson, A.; Giesbers, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.; Marcelis, A.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis and thermotropic properties are reported for a series of hexaalkoxytriphenylenes that contain an amide, urea or thiourea group in one of their alkoxy tails. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding abilities of these molecules have a disturbing influence on the formation and stability of th

  11. Visible-Light-Mediated Synthesis of Amides from Aldehydes and Amines via in Situ Acid Chloride Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naeem; Cho, Eun Jin

    2016-03-01

    An efficient visible-light photocatalysis-based one-pot amide synthesis method was developed; visible-light irradiation of a mixture of an aldehyde, tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide, and N-chlorosuccinimide using a Ru(bpy)3Cl2 photocatalyst afforded an acid chloride, which subsequently reacted with amine to yield the corresponding amide. The reaction was used to synthesize moclobemide and a D3 receptor intermediate. PMID:26836367

  12. Regiospecific tritium labeling of aromatic acids, amides, amines and heterocyclics using homogeneous rhodium trichloride and ruthenium acetylacetonate catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneous rhodium trichloride has been found to promote ortho-tritiation with high regioselectivity in a wide range of aromatic carboxylic acids, amides and aralkylamines. Less successful results were obtained using o-chlorobenzoic and o-anisic acids where some decomposition was seen, and in acids and amides of the phenolic type, where a degree of electrophilic exchange accompanies the ortho-exchange. The same catalyst has also been used to regiospecifically label a number of heterocyclics. In the course of investigations with other metal complexes ruthenium acetylacetonate has been identified as an excellent promoter of ortho-exchange in benzoic acids. (author)

  13. Hydrogen-bond lifetime measured by time-resolved 2D-IR spectroscopy: N-methylacetamide in methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, S.; Mu, Y.; Stock, G.; Hamm, P.

    2001-05-01

    2D vibrational spectroscopy is applied to investigate the equilibrium dynamics of hydrogen bonding of N-methylacetamide (NMA) dissolved in methanol- d4. For this particular solute-solvent system, roughly equal populations are found for two conformers of the solute-solvent complex, one of which forms a hydrogen bond from the CO group of NMA to the surrounding solvent, and one of which does not. Using time-resolved 2D-IR spectroscopy on the amide I band of NMA, the exchange between both conformers is resolved. Equilibration of each conformer is completed after 4.5 ps, while the formation and breaking of the hydrogen bond occurs on a slower, 10-15 ps time scale. This interpretation is supported by classical molecular-dynamics simulations of NMA in methanol. The calculations predict a 64% population of the hydrogen-bonded conformer and an average hydrogen-bond lifetime of ≈12 ps.

  14. Measurement of charge exchange cross sections for highly charged xenon and thorium ions with molecular hydrogen in a Penning Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    Highly charged xenon (35+ to 46+) and thorium (72+ to 79+) ions were produced in an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). The ions were extracted from EBIT in a short pulse. Ions of one charge state were selected using an electromagnet. The ions were recaptured at low energy in a cryogenic Penning trap (RETRAP). As the ions captured electrons from molecular hydrogen, populations of the various charge states were obtained by measuring the image currents induced by the ions on the electrodes of the trap. Data on the number of ions in each charge state vs. time were compared to theoretical rate equations in order to determine the average charge exchange rates. These rates were compared to charge exchange rates of an ion with a known charge exchange cross section (Ar{sup 11+}) measured in a similar manner in order to determine the average charge exchange cross sections for the highly charged ions. The energy of interaction between the highly charged ions and hydrogen was estimated to be 4 eV in the center of mass frame. The mean charge exchange cross sections were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 2} for Xe{sup 43+} to Xe{sup 46+} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 2} for Th{sup 73+} to Th{sup 79+}. Double capture was approximately 20--25% of the total for both xenon and thorium. A fit indicated that the cross sections were approximately proportional to q. This is consistent with a linear dependence of cross section on q within the measurement uncertainties.

  15. Heat transfer characteristics evaluation of heat exchangers of mock-up test facility with full-scale reaction tube for HTTR hydrogen production system (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connection of hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane to the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been surveyed until now. Mock-up test facility of this steam reforming system with full-scale reaction tube was constructed in FY 2001 and hydrogen of 120 Nm3/h was successfully produced in overall performance test. Totally 7 times operational tests were performed from March 2002 to December 2004. A lot of operational test data on heat exchanges were obtained in these tests. In this report specifications and structures of steam reformer, steam superheater, steam generator, condenser, helium gas cooler, feed gas heater and feed gas superheater were described. Heat transfer correlation equations for inside and outside tube were chosen from references. Spreadsheet programs were newly made to evaluate heat transfer characteristics from measured test data such as inlet and outlet temperature pressure and flow-rate. Overall heat-transfer coefficients obtained from the experimental data were compared and evaluated with the calculated values with heat transfer correlation equation. As a result, actual measurement values of all heat exchangers gave close agreement with the calculated values with correlation equations. Thermal efficiencies of the heat exchangers were adequate as they were well accorded with design value. (author)

  16. A study on the isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water on a catalyst in the liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that catalytic exchange in the liquid phase offers many advantages over exchange in the gaseous phase; however the rate of reaction is much smaller in the former case. The object of the following work is to study the influence of the various parameters on which the reaction rate depends (pressure, temperature, concentration, agitation), to classify catalysts according to their activity and to determine the economic possibility of liquid phase exchange. (author)

  17. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...... QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift...

  18. Investigation of the hydrogen and tritium impediment of protective coatings on high-alloyed materials of heat exchangers for process heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In High Temperature Reactors, hydrogen permeates at 9000C through the walls of the heat exchanger. A research and developing program has been founded in order to reduce the hydrogen permeation by covering the surfaces with oxidic protective layers. This work describes the development, set up and use of a permeation device, which allows by means of permeation technique the direct determination of the quality of the oxidic protection layer deposited on sample plats. The calibration of the device was made with measurements at uncovered samples of nickel and checked by a comparison with literature data. Measurements on uncovered and covered Hastelloy-X-samples are described and discussed theoretically in terms of a two-zone model of the permeation through oxide-substrate layers. (orig.)

  19. Application of mixed-mode, solid-phase extraction in environmental and clinical chemistry. Combining hydrogen-bonding, cation-exchange and Van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pedersen, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Silica- and styrene-divinylbenzene-based mixed-mode resins that contain C8, C18 and sulphonated cation-exchange groups were compared for their efficiency in isolation of neutral triazine compounds from water and of the basic drug, benzoylecgonine, from urine. The triazine compounds were isolated by a combination of Van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and benzoylecgonine was isolated by Van der Waals interactions and cation exchange. All analytes were eluted with a polar organic solvent contaning 2% ammonium hydroxide. Larger recoveries (95%) were achieved on copolymerized mixed-mode resins where C18 and sulfonic acid are in closer proximity than on 'blended' mixed-mode resins (60-70% recovery).

  20. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  1. Dissecting the effect of RNA aptamer binding on the dynamics of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trelle, Morten B; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Madsen, Jeppe Buur;

    2014-01-01

    , about their effects on protein conformation and dynamics. We have employed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry to study the effect of RNA aptamers on the structural flexibility of the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The aptamers have characteristic effects...... on the biochemical properties of PAI-1. In particular, they are potent inhibitors of the structural transition of PAI-1 from the active state to the inactive, so-called latent state. This transition is one of the largest conformational changes of a folded protein domain without covalent modification. Binding...

  2. Iodide titanium - perspective material for shape memory alloys and hydrogen-resistant alloys for heat-exchange equipment of nuclear power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents the results of investigations aimed at assessment of furnace charge materials impact on stoichiometry of shape memory alloy (TH1 grade) on the basis of nickelide titanium. It is shown that highly pure iodide titanium of TI grade and electrolytic nickel of H-0 grade are the most appropriate precursors for generation of nickelide titanium with fixed temperature of shape recovery. Iodide titanium, if used as furnace charge component in the process of melting of hydrogen-resistant α-alloys for heat-exchange equipment of nuclear power installations, will contribute to the increase of major devices service life.

  3. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  4. Metal extraction by amides of carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction ability of various amides was studied. Data on extraction of rare earths, vanadium, molybdenum, rhenium, uranium, niobium, tantalum by N,N-dibutyl-amides of acetic, nonanic acids and fatly synthetic acids of C7-C9 fractions are presented. Effect of salting-out agents, inorganic acid concentrations on extraction process was studied. Potential ability of using amides of carboxylic acids for extractional concentration of rare earths as well as for recovery and separation of iron, rhenium, vanadium, molybdenum, uranium, niobium, and tantalum was shown

  5. Recent developments in amide synthesis: direct amidation of carboxylic acids and transamidation reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lanigan, R. M.; Sheppard, T. D.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of amides is of huge importance in a wide variety of industrial and academic fields and is of particular significance in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals. Many of the well established methods for amide synthesis involve reagents that are difficult to handle and lead to the generation of large quantities of waste products. As a consequence, there has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of new approaches to amide synthesis. Over the past few years a wide rang...

  6. Structure-property relationship of aliphatic segmented poly(ester amide)s

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Priya

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the synthesis, characterization and applications of aliphatic segmented poly(ester amide)s (PEA)s for use as potential biomaterials. Three different series of PEAs with different microstructures containing isolated, two and three adjacent amide groups within a polybutylene adipate (PBA) chain have been synthesized. Analytical techniques such as NMR (liquid and solid-state), SEC, DSC, FT-IR, WAXD and microscopy (AFM, SEM, optical) have been extensively used to characteri...

  7. Mechanistic insight into benzenethiol catalyzed amide bond formations from thioesters and primary amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Bork, Nicolai; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The influence of arylthiols on cysteine-free ligation, i.e. the reaction between an alkyl thioester and a primary amine forming an amide bond, was studied in a polar aprotic solvent. We reacted the ethylthioester of hippuric acid with cyclohexylamine in the absence or presence of various quantities...... state in the aromatic thioester amidation reaction. Under similar conditions, cysteine-free ligation was achieved by coupling a fully side-chain protected 15 amino acid phosphopeptide thioester to the free N-terminal of a side-chain protected 9 amino acid peptide producing the corresponding 24 amino...... of thiophenol (PhSH) in a slurry of disodium hydrogen phosphate in dry DMF. Quantitative conversions into the resulting amide were observed within a few hours in the presence of equimolar amounts of thiophenol. Ab initio calculations showed that the reaction mechanism in DMF is similar to the well...

  8. Partially Fluorinated Sulfonated Poly(ether amide Fuel Cell Membranes: Influence of Chemical Structure on Membrane Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulsung Bae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of fluorinated sulfonated poly (ether amides (SPAs were synthesized for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications. A polycondensation reaction of 4,4’-oxydianiline, 2-sulfoterephthalic acid monosodium salt, and tetrafluorophenylene dicarboxylic acids (terephthalic and isophthalic or fluoroaliphatic dicarboxylic acids produced SPAs with sulfonation degrees of 80–90%. Controlling the feed ratio of the sulfonated and unsulfonated dicarboxylic acid monomers afforded random SPAs with ion exchange capacities between 1.7 and 2.2 meq/g and good solubility in polar aprotic solvents. Their structures were characterized using NMR and FT IR spectroscopies. Tough, flexible, and transparent films were obtained with dimethylsulfoxide using a solution casting method. Most SPA membranes with 90% sulfonation degree showed high proton conductivity (>100 mS/cm at 80 °C and 100% relative humidity. Among them, two outstanding ionomers (ODA-STA-TPA-90 and ODA-STA-IPA-90 showed proton conductivity comparable to that of Nafion 117 between 40 and 80 °C. The influence of chemical structure on the membrane properties was systematically investigated by comparing the fluorinated polymers to their hydrogenated counterparts. The results suggest that the incorporation of fluorinated moieties in the polymer backbone of the membrane reduces water absorption. High molecular weight and the resulting physical entanglement of the polymers chains played a more important role in improving stability in water, however.

  9. Study of the lithium-nitrogen-hydrogen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated lithium-nitrogen-hydrogen compounds as potential hydrogen storage materials and report consistent results for the amount of hydrogen gas sorbed, weight change, and phase content for our various samples. We observed a sluggish and incomplete reaction between hydrogen and lithium nitride of > 7-bar wt.% hydrogen uptake at 160 deg. C with no observable hydrogen release into vacuum, and a ∼ 5.2-bar wt.% cyclable hydrogen sorption at 240 deg. C consistent with a reversible lithium amide/lithium imide reaction. The plateau pressure for the amide/imide reaction is quite low, ∼ 10-bar kPa at 240 deg. C

  10. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

    1997-02-01

    In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

  11. Orthogonal dipolar interactions between amide carbonyl groups

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Felix R.; Wood, Peter A.; Allen, Frank H; Diederich, François

    2008-01-01

    Orthogonal dipolar interactions between amide C=O bond dipoles are commonly found in crystal structures of small molecules, proteins, and protein–ligand complexes. We herein present the experimental quantification of such interactions by employing a model system based on a molecular torsion balance. Application of a thermodynamic double-mutant cycle allows for the determination of the incremental energetic contributions attributed to the dipolar contact between 2 amide C=O groups. The stabili...

  12. Degradation of 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Using Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron Supported on Ion Exchange Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chao; She, Jiaping; Yin, Yongguang; Zhao, Tongqian; Wu, Li

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) supported on ion exchange resin was prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy, with a simple model developed for describing the catalyst. The degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) by hydrogen peroxide using NZVI supported on ion exchange resin as the catalyst, was studied. The results showed that 2,4,6-TCP with a concentration of 1 mmol L(-1) could be well degraded into low molecule weight organic acids in two hours. The optimized condition was as follows: pH, 3.0; temperature, 35 degrees C; catalyst dosage, 1.5 g; and hydrogen peroxide, 0.16 mmol L(-1). The catalyst has good reusability, with no catalytic efficiency decreasing even after ten times recycles. A possible mechanism of 2,4,6-TCP degradation was proposed, based on the products indentified by GC-MS after derived using trimethylsulfonium hydroxide. PMID:27427643

  13. Microwave-irradiated polyol method synthesis of Pt/C catalysts and its catalytic activities for hydrogen-water liquid exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pt/C catalysts with isopropanol as both dispersant and reducing agent were synthesized by microwave-irradiated polyol method. The microstructures of the catalysts were characterized by XRD and TEM. The effects of capping agents, pH and heating rate on Pt particle size were studied. Then Pt/C catalysts were loaded on foam nickel with polytetrafluoroethylene latex to obtain hydrophobic catalysts, and their catalytic activities for hydrogen-water liquid phase exchange reaction were investigated. The results show that compared to the non-capped Pt/C catalysts, the average size of Pt particles in sodium acetate, sodium glycollate and disodium hydrogen citrate capped Pt/C catalysts decreases from 4.4 nm to 2.3, 2.5, and 2.3 nm respectively, and the agglomeration of Pt particles becomes obscure. The mean size of Pt particles in Pt/C catalysts decreases evidently with the increasing of the heating rate. However, the mean sizes of Pt particles in the Pt/C catalysts prepared with different pH of the synthesis solution are similar. The activity of the hydrophobic catalysts with capping agents is high for hydro- gen-water liquid exchange reaction, and is enhanced by decreasing the average particle size, in the range of 2.3-4.4 nm. (authors)

  14. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, D.

    1995-08-03

    This is the fourth Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) Develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls). This propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) Select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; and (3) Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) Identify any future R&D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

  15. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H2/D2O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h-1 and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  16. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders S Christensen

    Full Text Available We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts--sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94. ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond ((h3J(NC' spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to obtain this agreement. The ProCS method thus offers a powerful new tool for refining the structures of hydrogen bonding networks to high accuracy with many potential applications such as protein flexibility in ligand binding.

  17. Convergent synthesis of digitally-encoded poly(alkoxyamine amide)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Raj Kumar; Laure, Chloé; Fischer-Krauser, Diane; Charles, Laurence; Lutz, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    Binary-encoded poly(alkoxyamine amide)s were prepared by oligomer ligation. These polymers contain digital sequences based on two monomers defined as 0 and 1 bits. A library of oligomers containing all possible dyads 00, 01, 10 and 11 was prepared and used to construct long coded sequences. PMID:26359908

  18. Ion exchange sodium-hydrogen in sodium titanate Na4Ti9O20xxH2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layered titanates are effective ion-exchangers for extraction of radiostrontium and other toxic metals from water solutions. Sodium titanate samples are synthesized from titanium dioxide, isopropylate and propylate. The samples are specified through the method of roentgenophase analysis. Only preparation, synthesized from titanium isopropylate proved to be homogeneous

  19. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  20. Effect of isotopic hydrogen exchange on thermochemistry of solution of ammonium halides and deuteroammonium in water, heavy water and their mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard dissolution enthalpies of ammonium and deuteroammonium bromides and iodides in water, heavy water and their mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) at 298.15 K and compositions up to X=0.4 (X-mole part of DMSO) are presented. The influence of isotopic hydrogen exchange on the values of the standard dissolution enthalpies of NH4Cl, ND4Cl, NH4Br, ND4BR and NH4I in H2O, D2O and H2O (D2O)-DMSO mixture at 298.15 K, as well as of NH4Cl and ND4Cl in the same solvents at 323.15 K has been discussed. The values of NH4Cl and ND4Cl crystal lattice enthalpies have been compared. 15 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N1 class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S1O1 compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N+· and [N − H + D]+ ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]+ and [N + D]+ ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1 + H]+ and [S1O1 + D]+ ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components

  2. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon [Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, KIOST, Geoje 656-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan, E-mail: sunghwank@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Green Nano Center, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N{sub 1} class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S{sub 1}O{sub 1} compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N{sup +}· and [N − H + D]{sup +} ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]{sup +} and [N + D]{sup +} ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + H]{sup +} and [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + D]{sup +} ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S{sub 1} class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  3. Monitoring Backbone Hydrogen-Bond Formation in β-Barrel Membrane Protein Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschle, Thomas; Rios Flores, Perla; Opitz, Christian; Müller, Daniel J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-05-10

    β-barrel membrane proteins are key components of the outer membrane of bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Their three-dimensional structure is defined by a network of backbone hydrogen bonds between adjacent β-strands. Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange in combination with NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to monitor backbone hydrogen bond formation during folding of the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from E. coli in detergent micelles. Residue-specific kinetics of interstrand hydrogen-bond formation were found to be uniform in the entire β-barrel and synchronized to formation of the tertiary structure. OmpX folding thus propagates via a long-lived conformational ensemble state in which all backbone amide protons exchange with the solvent and engage in hydrogen bonds only transiently. Stable formation of the entire OmpX hydrogen bond network occurs downhill of the rate-limiting transition state and thus appears cooperative on the overall folding time scale. PMID:27062600

  4. Tuning the thermoresponsive properties of Hyperbranched Poly(ester amide)s based on diisopropanolamine and cyclic dicarboxylic anhydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Kelland, Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    A range of water-soluble hyperbranched poly(ester amide)s has been synthesized with a view to studying their thermoresponsive behavior in water. Poly(ester amide)s with lower critical solution temperature (LCST) values around physiological temperatures are of interest for biological and medical applications, whereas poly(ester amide)s with high LCST values may be useful as kinetic hydrate inhibitors for high salinity produced fluids in the oil and gas industry. The LCST of these p...

  5. Kinetic estimation of hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between tritiated-water (HTO) vapor and each amino acid in a heterogeneous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between HTO vapor and each amino acid has been observed in order to establish a method of estimation of the internal exposure of organically bound tritium in a heterogeneous system at 25-70degC. Rate constants (k) for the amino acids have been obtained by applying the A''-McKay plot method. Using these k values, Arrhenius plots for both the COOH and NH2 groups are drawn, and linearity was obtained over the range of 25-70degC. Comparing the rate constants, the following four statements can be made regarding the T-for-H exchange reaction. (1) The reactivity of the functional groups in amino acids increases with increasing temperature. (2) Applying Taft's equation, the ratio of polar effect to steric effect is 2:8 in the COOH group and 9:1 in the NH2 group at 25degC. (3) The A''-McKay plot method is useful for studying the reactivity of materials, not only with one (or the same kind of) functional group(s) but also with two different kinds of functional groups. (4) The method used in this work may be useful to investigate the behavior of organically bound tritium, quantitatively. (author)

  6. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond (h3JNC') spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to refine protein structures to this...

  7. Steroids linked with amide bond - extended cholesterol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Ivan; Buděšínský, Miloš; Pouzar, Vladimír; Drašar, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2009), s. 88-94. ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : synthesis * oligomers * amides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2009

  8. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  9. A method of calorimetric detection of two-dimensional atomic hydrogen using an induced two-body exchange recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel method to detect hydrogen atoms in the pure hyperfine state b at the small dense spot of the sample cell surface by injecting in pulses small controlled amounts of atoms in the reactive mixed state a into the cell volume. The total recombination rate inferred from a carbon bolometer overheating will display pronounced peaks due to two-body ab recombination. The relaxation rate of these peaks to the original value of the bolometer signal will be proportional to b-atoms' density at the spot. This method can be applied to measure the surface density of polarized H in the experiments with the field compression and with the cold spot as well. 14 refs., 4 figs

  10. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed c

  11. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications.

  12. Clean SEA-TROSY Experiments to Map Solvent Exposed Amides in Large Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林东海

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the SEA-TROSY experiment could alleviate some of the problems of resonance overlap in 15N/2H labeled proteins as it was designed to selectively map solvent exposed amide protons. However, SEATROSY spectra may be contaminated with exchange-relayed NOE contributions from fast exchanged hydroxyl or amine protons and contributions from longitudinal relaxation. Also, perdeuteration of the protein sample is a prerequisite for this experiment. In this communication, a modified version, clean SEA-TROSY, was proposed to eliminate these artifacts and to allow the experiment to be applied to protonated or partially deuterated proteins and protein complexes.

  13. Hydrogen photoproduction in green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii sustainable over 2 weeks with the original cell culture without supply of fresh cells nor exchange of the whole culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Takafumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Okada, Norihide; Isono, Takumi; Momose, Daisuke; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    Unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are known to make hydrogen photoproduction under the anaerobic condition with water molecules as the hydrogen source. Since the hydrogen photoproduction occurs for a cell to circumvent crisis of its survival, it is only temporary. It is a challenge to realize persistent hydrogen production because the cells must withstand stressful conditions to survive with alternation of generations in the cell culture. In this paper, we have found a simple and cost-effective method to sustain the hydrogen production over 14 days in the original culture, without supply of fresh cells nor exchange of the culture medium. This is achieved for the cells under hydrogen production in a sulfur-deprived culture solution on the {anaerobic, intense light} condition in a desiccator, by periodically providing a short period of the recovery time (2 h) with a small amount of TAP(+S) supplied outside of the desiccator. As this operation is repeated, the response time of transition into hydrogen production (preparation time) is shortened and the rate of hydrogen production (build up time) is increased. The optimum states of these properties favorable to the hydrogen production are attained in a few days and stably sustained for more than 10 days. Since generations are alternated during this consecutive hydrogen production experiment, it is suggested that the improved hydrogen production properties are inherited to next generations without genetic mutation. The properties are reset only when the cells are placed on the {sulfur-sufficient, aerobic, moderate light} conditions for a long time (more than 1 day at least). PMID:27083446

  14. Absolute measurement of excitation cross sections for the 2P-states of atomic hydrogen in charge exchange collisions of protons in argon and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections for the excitation of the 2P-states of atomic hydrogen in charge exchange collisions of protons in argon and nitrogen were measured by observing the Lyman-α radiation emitted in transitions from this state. For the measurement of the target gas pressure, a modified ionization gauge was developed, which eliminated distortions of pressure measurements due to charging effects on the glass envelope. Because of the lack of light standards in the vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum, the major problem of the measurements was the absolute calibration of the L/sub alpha/-photometer. This calibration was obtained from coincidence measurements of H/sub alpha/- and L/sub alpha/-photons in the presence of an electric field. The measurements were corrected for the effect of Doppler shift on photometer sensitivity. For the evaluation of the coincidence measurements, the branching ratio of H/sub alpha/-transitions to the 2S-state and the polarization of Lyman-α radiation, emitted in cascade processes, were needed. These quantities were obtained from quantum mechanical calculations of a hydrogen atom in a weak electric field. Cross sections for the 2P-states were obtained in the energy range from 0.5 to 30 keV. The 2P-cross sections in argon had maxima of 2.23 x 10-17 and 2.68 x 10-17 cm2 at 3.35 and 11.86 keV, respectively, and in N2 maxima of 2.17 x 10-17 and 2.10 x 10-17 cm2 were observed at 3.39 and 11.3 keV, respectively. The energy dependence of the measured cross sections is in agreement with that of published measurements. Differences in the absolute values are discussed

  15. Structures of Plutonium(IV) and Uranium(VI) with N,N-Dialkyl Amides from Crystallography, X-ray Absorption Spectra, and Theoretical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acher, Eléonor; Hacene Cherkaski, Yanis; Dumas, Thomas; Tamain, Christelle; Guillaumont, Dominique; Boubals, Nathalie; Javierre, Guilhem; Hennig, Christoph; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Charbonnel, Marie-Christine

    2016-06-01

    The structures of plutonium(IV) and uranium(VI) ions with a series of N,N-dialkyl amides ligands with linear and branched alkyl chains were elucidated from single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and theoretical calculations. In the field of nuclear fuel reprocessing, N,N-dialkyl amides are alternative organic ligands to achieve the separation of uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV) from highly concentrated nitric acid solution. EXAFS analysis combined with XRD shows that the coordination structure of U(VI) is identical in the solution and in the solid state and is independent of the alkyl chain: two amide ligands and four bidentate nitrate ions coordinate the uranyl ion. With linear alkyl chain amides, Pu(IV) also adopt identical structures in the solid state and in solution with two amides and four bidentate nitrate ions. With branched alkyl chain amides, the coordination structure of Pu(IV) was more difficult to establish unambiguously from EXAFS. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were consequently performed on a series of structures with different coordination modes. Structural parameters and Debye-Waller factors derived from the DFT calculations were used to compute EXAFS spectra without using fitting parameters. By using this methodology, it was possible to show that the branched alkyl chain amides form partly outer-sphere complexes with protonated ligands hydrogen bonded to nitrate ions. PMID:27171842

  16. Uranium extraction with phosphoric acid amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of uranium by phosphorus acid monobuthylamide (MBA), dibuthylamid (DBA) and hexabuthyltriamide (HBTA) has meen investigated. The concentration constants of the process are reported. The extraction behaviour of the amides was found to be analogous to that of neutral organophosphorus extragents and to depend on the donor properties of the phosphoryl oxygen, i.e. on the number and nature of substituents by the phosphorus atom. The extraction capacity of the amides is higher than that of the phosphorus acid esters. In nitric acid solutions the highest resistance to hydrolysis was shown by HBTA. The extraction capacity of HBTA is almost insensitive to the nature of the diluting agent, be it a fatty or an aromatic hydrocarbon. With hexane used for dilution, a crystalline complex UO2(NO3)2x2HBTA was isolated

  17. Tertiary fatty amides as diesel fuel substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serdari, Aikaterini; Lois, Euripides; Stournas, Stamoulis [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Athens (Greece)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents experimental results regarding the impact of adding different tertiary amides of fatty acids to mineral diesel fuel; an assessment of the behaviour of these compounds as possible diesel fuel extenders is also included. Measurements of cetane number, cold flow properties (cloud point, pour point and CFPP), density, kinematic viscosity, flash point and distillation temperatures are reported, while initial experiments concerning the effects on particulate emissions are also described. Most of the examined tertiary fatty amides esters have very good performance and they can be easily prepared from fatty acids (biomass). Such compounds or their blends could be used as mineral diesel fuel or even fatty acid methylesters (FAME, biodiesel) substitutes or extenders. (Author)

  18. [Amides of creatine: perspectives of neuroprotection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, T D; Chefu, S G; Baĭsa, A E; Leko, M V; Burov, S V; Veselkina, O S

    2011-07-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of derivatives of creatine and amino acids (CrAA) for decreasing cerebral injury in rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuroprotective effects of amides of creatine and glycine (CrGlyOEt), phenylalanine (CrPheNH2), thyrosine (CrTyrNH2), and GABA (CrGABAOEt) were investigated. Brain injury was evaluated on day 2 after transient MCAO using a TTC staining of brain slices. Compared with the MCAO control group, all the CrAms showed decreased cerebral injury (p < 0.05). However CrPheNH2, CrTyrNH2, and CrGABAOEt were toxic after intravenous administration and investigated only after intraperitoneal injection. CrGlyOEt did not show any toxicity at dose of 1 mmol/kg. These data evidenced that creatinyl amides can represent promising candidates for the development of new drugs useful in brain ischemia treatment. PMID:21961295

  19. Conformational analysis of amide extractants by NMR in organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with nuclear fuel reprocessing. We have essentially used NMR spectroscopy. We want to understand which kind of conformational parameters control selectivity and efficiency of amide extractant. The symmetric monoamides used are DOBA (C3H7 CON (CH2 CH(C2H5) C4H9)2), DOiBA ((CH3)2 CCHON (CH2CH(C2H5)C4H9)2) and DOTA ((CH3)3 CCH2CON(CH2CH(C2H5)C4H9)2). Each gives two quasi equivalent conformers (cis and trans) in organic phases. The selected malonamide DMDBTDMA ((C4H9 (CH3)NCO)2 CHC14H29) has four conformers because of its twice disymmetric amide functions. Weak interactions between monoamides which yield to dimer formation. The malonamide also gives dimers but forms aggregates too. Nitric acid extraction is due to the competitive formation of six species L, L2, L2(HNO3), L(HNO3), L(HNO3)2, L(HNO3)3 (L: monoamide). Complexation between lanthanides (III) and monoamides yields to the stoichiometries L3Ln(NO3)3 and L2Ln(NO3)3. Their ratio depend of steric hindrance on the carbonyl and the metal ionic radius. The same thing is observed of Pu4+ and Th4+ extraction in non acidic media. L2An(NO3)4 is the main stoichiometric except for the Th4+ - DOBA system where the species (DOBA)3 Th(NO3)4 appear. Exchange rates between the ligand and the complex are pointed out. The monoamide conformations obtained with lanthanide and plutonium nitrate can explain the difference in extracting power of this molecule between An4+ and Ln3+. (author). 162 refs., 87 figs., 44 tabs., 7 annexes

  20. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  1. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell for a pre-humidified hydrogen stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Shakhshir, Saher Al

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication it has been shown how the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be determined employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor has to be placed into the anode outlet pipe of the operating fuel cell, and the voltage signal E that is read from the sensor...... has to be divided by a pre-determined voltage signal E0 that has been obtained for a stream of dry hydrogen where the molar flow rate corresponds to a total current I of the fuel cell stack and a stoichiometric flow ratio, ξ. Because the last two properties are usually continuously known in fuel cell...... experiments, E0 is also continuously known. There is a one-to-one correlation between the relative voltage signal E/E0 and the fuel cell water balance, and therefore the fuel cell water balance can be a continuous output signal similar to the fuel cell voltage and the high frequency resistance. This method...

  2. Load-dependent destabilization of the γ-rotor shaft in FOF1 ATP synthase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi, Siavash; Bi, Yumin; Dunn, Stanley D; Konermann, Lars

    2016-03-01

    FoF1 is a membrane-bound molecular motor that uses proton-motive force (PMF) to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Reverse operation generates PMF via ATP hydrolysis. Catalysis in either direction involves rotation of the γε shaft that connects the α3β3 head and the membrane-anchored cn ring. X-ray crystallography and other techniques have provided insights into the structure and function of FoF1 subcomplexes. However, interrogating the conformational dynamics of intact membrane-bound FoF1 during rotational catalysis has proven to be difficult. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the inner workings of FoF1 in its natural membrane-bound state. A pronounced destabilization of the γ C-terminal helix during hydrolysis-driven rotation was observed. This behavior is attributed to torsional stress in γ, arising from γ⋅⋅⋅α3β3 interactions that cause resistance during γ rotation within the apical bearing. Intriguingly, we find that destabilization of γ occurs only when FoF1 operates against a PMF-induced torque; the effect disappears when PMF is eliminated by an uncoupler. This behavior resembles the properties of automotive engines, where bearings inflict greater forces on the crankshaft when operated under load than during idling. PMID:26884184

  3. Probing the Conformational and Functional Consequences of Disulfide Bond Engineering in Growth Hormone by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Coupled to Electron Transfer Dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Signe T; Breinholt, Jens; Faber, Johan H; Andersen, Mette D; Wiberg, Charlotte; Schjødt, Christine B; Rand, Kasper D

    2015-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH), and its receptor interaction, is essential for cell growth. To stabilize a flexible loop between helices 3 and 4, while retaining affinity for the hGH receptor, we have engineered a new hGH variant (Q84C/Y143C). Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass...... spectrometry (HDX-MS) to map the impact of the new disulfide bond on the conformational dynamics of this new hGH variant. Compared to wild type hGH, the variant exhibits reduced loop dynamics, indicating a stabilizing effect of the introduced disulfide bond. Furthermore, the disulfide bond exhibits longer...... ranging effects, stabilizing a short α-helix quite distant from the mutation sites, but also rendering a part of the α-helical hGH core slightly more dynamic. In the regions where the hGH variant exhibits a different deuterium uptake than the wild type protein, electron transfer dissociation (ETD...

  4. Passive Membrane Permeability of Macrocycles Can Be Controlled by Exocyclic Amide Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Jennifer L; Zaretsky, Serge; St Denis, Megan A; Kumar Chakka, Sai; Morshed, M Monzur; Scully, Conor C G; Roughton, Andrew L; Yudin, Andrei K

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a strategy for synthesizing passively permeable peptidomimetic macrocycles. The cyclization chemistry centers on using aziridine aldehydes in a multicomponent reaction with peptides and isocyanides. The linker region in the resulting product contains an exocyclic amide positioned α to the peptide backbone, an arrangement that is not found among natural amino acids. This amide provides structural rigidity within the cyclic peptidomimetic and promotes the creation of a stabilizing intramolecular hydrogen bonding network. This exocyclic control element also contributes to the increased membrane permeability exhibited by multicomponent-derived macrocycles with respect to their homodetic counterparts. The exocyclic control element is employed along with a strategic placement of N-methyl and d-amino acids to produce passively permeable peptides, which contain multiple polar residues. This strategy should be applicable in the pursuit of synthesizing therapeutically relevant macrocycles. PMID:27120576

  5. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Amide Anions Based Ionic Liquids Containing Nitrile Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Ting; LU Liang; LIU Xiuli; ZHANG Zhan; XUE Yunrong; YANG Yu; Li Caimeng; FU Xianlei; GAO Guohua

    2009-01-01

    A series of novel amide anion based ionic liquids containing nitrile groups have been synthesized using the method of ion-exchange between potassium amide and various quaternary halide salts such as trimethylamine,triethylamine,tributylamine,N-methylpyrrolidine,and N-methylimidazole.All of the functionalised ionic liquids were characterized by IR,1H and 13C NMR,and MS.The synthesized ionic liquids exhibited advantageously high thermal stability.The decomposition temperature of ionic liquids measured via TGA ranged from 224 to 289 ℃.The functionalised ionic liquid,l-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium propionyl cyanamide ([EMIm][N(CN)COC2H5]),was used as a ligand in the palladium catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction.The yields of the coupling reaction increased by 10%-20% by the addition of [EMIm]IN(CN)COC2H5].

  6. Heterogeneous catalytic processes on cobalt, molybdenum and cobalt-molybdenum catalysts studied by temperature-programmed desorption and temperature-programmed reaction. 27 H-D exchange between adsorbed hydrogen and various coadsorbed molecules on the surface of Co-Mo catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H-D-exchange between hydrogen adsorbed on the surface of reduced catalyst Co-Mo/Al2O3 and molecules of coadsorbates: D2O, benzene C6D6, cyclohexane C6D12 and propanethiol C3H7SH, has been studied under conditions of temperature-programmed reaction. It has been discovered that al the forms of hydrogen adsorbed on the catalyst take part in H-D-exchange. Spillover hydrogen adsorbed on a substrate features a high degree of Y-D-exchange with the coadsorbates mentioned. 2 refs., 6 figs

  7. Poly(ester-amide)s derived from PET containing uniform bisester amide segments

    OpenAIRE

    Ascanio Nuñez, Yanireth

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) has experienced a growth in its demand as a bottle container and food packaging material. However, in order to expand its uses, its barrier properties to gases like carbon dioxide and oxygen, have to be improved. In this way, bisester amide units have been introduced as a third component in the main chain of PET, with the aim to reduce both CO2 and O2 permeability. In this project, poly(ester-amide)s based on PET (PETxMXy) have been synthesized, according to th...

  8. New Umami Amides: Structure-Taste Relationship Studies of Cinnamic Acid Derived Amides and the Natural Occurrence of an Intense Umami Amide in Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerot, Eric; Neirynck, Nathalie; Cayeux, Isabelle; Yuan, Yoyo Hui-Juan; Yuan, Yong-Ming

    2015-08-19

    A series of aromatic amides were synthesized from various acids and amines selected from naturally occurring structural frameworks. These synthetic amides were evaluated for umami taste in comparison with monosodium glutamate. The effect of the substitution pattern of both the acid and the amine parts on umami taste was investigated. The only intensely umami-tasting amides were those made from 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid. The amine part was more tolerant to structural changes. Amides bearing an alkyl- or alkoxy-substituted phenylethylamine residue displayed a clean umami taste as 20 ppm solutions in water. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with a high quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC/MS) was subsequently used to show the natural occurrence of these amides. (E)-3-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(4-methoxyphenethyl)acrylamide was shown to occur in the roots and stems of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant of the family Rutaceae growing in Korea, Japan, and China. PMID:26230212

  9. DNA-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Esters and Aromatic Amides

    OpenAIRE

    Brandsen, Benjamin M.; Hesser, Anthony R.; Castner, Marissa A.; Chandra, Madhavaiah; Silverman, Scott K.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that DNA catalysts (deoxyribozymes) can hydrolyze DNA phosphodiester linkages, but DNA-catalyzed amide bond hydrolysis has been elusive. Here we used in vitro selection to identify DNA catalysts that hydrolyze ester linkages as well as DNA catalysts that hydrolyze aromatic amides, for which the leaving group is an aniline moiety. The aromatic amide-hydrolyzing deoxyribozymes were examined using linear free energy relationship analysis. The hydrolysis reaction is unaffec...

  10. Analytical applications of resins containing amide and polyamine functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orf, G. M.

    1977-12-01

    A dibutyl amide resin is used for the separation of uranium(VI), thorium(IV), and zirconium(IV) from each other and several other metal ions. Uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) are determined in the presence of large excesses of foreign metal ions and anions. A practical application of the amide resin is studied by determining uranium in low grade uranium ores. The amide resin is also used for the selective concentration of gold(III) from sea water.

  11. The C terminus of apocytochrome b562 undergoes fast motions and slow exchange among ordered conformations resembling the folded state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Nicola; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Czisch, Michael; Barker, Paul; Kaptein, Rob

    2002-04-30

    The present work describes the dynamics of the apo form of cytochrome b(562), a small soluble protein consisting of 106 amino acid residues [Itagaki, E., and Hager, L. P. (1966) J. Biol. Chem. 241, 3687-3695]. The presence of exchange in the millisecond time scale is demonstrated for the last part of helix IV (residues 95-105 in the holo form). The chemical shift index analysis [Wishart, D. S., and Sykes, B. D. (1994) J. Biomol. NMR 4, 171-180] based on H(alpha), C(alpha), C(beta), and C' chemical shifts suggests a larger helical content than shown in the NMR structure based on NOEs. These results indicate the presence of helical-like conformations participating in the exchange process. This hypothesis is consistent with amide deuterium exchange rates and the presence of some hydrogen bonds identified from amide chemical shift temperature coefficients [Baxter, N. J., and Williamson, M. P. (1997) J. Biomol. NMR 9, 359-369]. (15)N relaxation indicates limited mobility for the amide protons of this part of the helix in the picosecond time scale. A 30 ns stochastic dynamics simulation shows small fluctuations around the helical conformation on this time scale. These fluctuations, however, do not result in a significant decrease of the calculated order parameters which are consistent with the experimental (15)N relaxation data. These results resolve an apparent discrepancy in the NMR structures between the disorder observed in helix IV due to a lack of NOEs and the secondary structure predictions based on H(alpha) chemical shifts [Feng, Y., Wand, A. J., and Sligar, S. G. (1994) Struct. Biol. 1, 30-35]. PMID:11969411

  12. Copper-catalyzed oxidative amidation of aldehydes with amine salts: synthesis of primary, secondary, and tertiary amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhash Chandra; Ngiam, Joyce S Y; Seayad, Abdul M; Tuan, Dang Thanh; Chai, Christina L L; Chen, Anqi

    2012-09-21

    A practical method for the amidation of aldehydes with economic ammonium chloride or amine hydrochloride salts has been developed for the synthesis of a wide variety of amides by using inexpensive copper sulfate or copper(I) oxide as a catalyst and aqueous tert-butyl hydroperoxide as an oxidant. This amidation reaction is operationally straightforward and provides primary, secondary, and tertiary amides in good to excellent yields for most cases utilizing inexpensive and readily available reagents under mild conditions. In situ formation of amine salts from free amines extends the substrate scope of the reaction. Chiral amides are also synthesized from their corresponding chiral amines without detectable racemization. The practicality of this amide formation reaction has been demonstrated in an efficient synthesis of the antiarrhythmic drug N-acetylprocainamide. PMID:22894712

  13. Environmentally benign synthesis of amides and ureas via catalytic dehydrogenation coupling of volatile alcohols and amines in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2016-05-31

    In this study, we report the direct synthesis of amides and ureas via the catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines using the Milstein catalyst in a Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor. A series of amides and ureas, which could not be synthesized in an open system by catalytic dehydrogenation coupling, were obtained in moderate to high yields via catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines. This process could be monitored by the hydrogen produced. Compared to the traditional method of condensation, this catalytic system avoids the stoichiometric pre-activation or in situ activation of reagents, and is a much cleaner process with high atom economy. This methodology, only possible by employing the Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor, not only provides a new environmentally benign synthetic approach of amides and ureas, but is also a potential method for hydrogen storage.

  14. Role of Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger-1 (NHE-1) in the Effect of Exercise on Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen M, Yu-Chih; Yang, Kun-Ta; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Tu, Wei-Chia; Chen, Tsung-I

    2015-08-31

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and can cause ventricular dysfunction. However, whether myocardial inflammation and sodium-hydrogen exchanger-1 (NHE-1) expression play an important role in IH-induced ventricular dysfunction remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether short-term exercise provides a protective effect on IH-induced left ventricular (LV) function impairment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control (CON), IH, exercise (EXE) or IH interspersed with EXE (IHEXE). IH rats were exposed to repetitive hypoxia/reoxygenation cycles (2%-6% O₂ for 2-5 s per 75 s, followed by 21% O₂ for 6 h/day) during the light phase for 12 consecutive days. EXE rats were habituated to treadmill running for 5 days, permitted 2 days of rest, and followed by 5 exercise bouts (30 m/min for 60 min on a 2% grade) on consecutive days during the dark phase. IHEXE rats were exposed to IH during the light phase interspersed with exercise programs during the dark phase on the same day. Cardiac function was quantified by echocardiographic evaluation. Myocardial levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and NHE-1 were determined. IH rats showed LV dysfunction characterized by lower LV fractional shortening (LVFS%) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF%). LV dysfunction was associated with higher myocardial levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and NHE-1 mRNA and protein. These changes were not observed in IHEXE rats (P > 0.05 for all). EXE rats showed lower levels of NHE-1 protein than CON rats (P 0.05 for all). These data indicated that exercise may provide a protective effect on IH-induced LV dysfunction by attenuating IH-induced myocardial NHE-1 hyperactivity. PMID:26211649

  15. Photophysical studies on the interaction of amides with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution: Fluorescence quenching and protein unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, R., E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600106 (India); Ramamurthy, P. [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Sekhizar Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Addition. of amides containing a H-CO(NH{sub 2}) or CH{sub 3}-CO(NH{sub 2}) framework to BSA results in a fluorescence quenching. On the contrary, fluorescence enhancement with a shift in the emission maximum towards the blue region is observed on the addition of dimethylformamide (DMF) (H-CON(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}). Fluorescence quenching accompanied initially with a shift towards the blue region and a subsequent red shift in the emission maximum of BSA is observed on the addition of formamide (H-CO(NH{sub 2})), whereas a shift in the emission maximum only towards the red region results on the addition of acetamide (CH{sub 3}-CONH{sub 2}). Steady state emission spectral studies reveal that amides that possess a free NH{sub 2} and N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} moiety result in fluorescence quenching and enhancement of BSA respectively. The 3D contour spectral studies of BSA with formamide exhibit a shift in the emission towards the red region accompanied with fluorescence quenching, which indicates that the tryptophan residues of the BSA are exposed to a more polar environment. Circular Dichroism (CD) studies of BSA with amides resulted in a gradual decrease in the α-helical content of BSA at 208 nm, which confirms that there is a conformational change in the native structure of BSA. Time-resolved fluorescence studies illustrate that the extent of buried trytophan moieties exposed to the aqueous phase on the addition of amides follows the order DMFhydrogen-bonding sites in alkyl substituted amides. Amides act as a hydrogen-bonding donor and acceptor resulting in a hydrogen-bonding interaction with amino and carboxy moieties (amino acids) present in BSA. The fact that the –NH{sub 2} hydrogen and the carbonyl oxygen of amide form a concerted hydrogen-bonding network with the carbonyl oxygen and the amino moieties of amino acids respectively is established from fluorescence methods. -- Highlights:

  16. Mechanistic Investigation of the Ruthenium–N-Heterocyclic-Carbene-Catalyzed Amidation of Alcohols and Amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarov, Ilya; Fristrup, Peter; Madsen, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the ruthenium–N-heterocyclic-carbene-catalyzed formation of amides from alcohols and amines was investigated by experimental techniques (Hammett studies, kinetic isotope effects) and by a computational study by using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT/ M06). The...... it is one of several slow steps in the catalytic cycle. Rapid scrambling of hydrogen and deuterium at the a position of the alcohol was observed with deuterium-labeled substrates, which implies that the catalytically active species is a ruthenium dihydride. The experimental results were supported by...

  17. Oxidative activation of dihydropyridine amides to reactive acyl donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Erik Daa; Trads, Julie Brender; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2015-01-01

    Amides of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) are activated by oxidation for acyl transfer to amines, alcohols and thiols. In the reduced form the DHP amide is stable towards reaction with amines at room temperature. However, upon oxidation with DDQ the acyl donor is activated via a proposed pyridinium...

  18. Bayesian Extraction of Deep UV Resonance Raman Signature of Fibrillar Cross-β Sheet Core based on H-D Exchange Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashilov, V. A.; Lednev, I. K.

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. The application of conventional biophysical techniques including solution NMR and X-ray crystallography for structural characterization of fibrils is limited because they are neither crystalline nor soluble. The Bayesian approach was utilized for extracting the deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectrum of the lysozyme fibrillar β-sheet based on the hydrogen-deuterium exchange spectral data. The problem was shown to be unsolvable when using blind source separation or conventional chemometrics methods because of the 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of the species under study. Information about the mixing process was incorporated by forcing the columns of the concentration matrix to be proportional to the expected concentration profiles. The ill-conditioning of the matrix was removed by concatenating it to the diagonal matrix with entries corresponding to the known pure spectra (sources). Prior information about the spectral features and characteristic bands of the spectra was taken into account using the Bayesian signal dictionary approach. The extracted DUVRR spectrum of the cross-β sheet core exhibited sharp bands indicating the highly ordered structure. Well resolved sub-bands in Amide I and Amide III regions enabled us to assign the fibril core structure to anti-parallel β-sheet and estimate the amide group facial angle Ψ in the cross-β structure. The elaborated Bayesian approach was demonstrated to be applicable for studying correlated biochemical processes.

  19. Different conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2 were analyzed by HDX-MS. • β-Strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • The middle loop was less dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • Upon pre-activation by the R169E mutation, β-arrestins became more dynamic. • Pre-activation affected a wider region of β-arrestin1 compared to β-arrestin2. - Abstract: Arrestins have important roles in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling including desensitization of GPCRs and G protein-independent signaling. There have been four arrestins identified: arrestin1, arrestin2 (e.g. β-arrestin1), arrestin3 (e.g. β-arrestin2), and arrestin4. β-Arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 are ubiquitously expressed and regulate a broad range of GPCRs, while arrestin1 and arrestin4 are expressed in the visual system. Although the functions of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 widely overlap, β-arrestin2 has broader receptor selectivity, and a few studies have suggested that β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 have distinct cellular functions. Here, we compared the conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We also used the R169E mutant as a pre-activation model system. HDX-MS data revealed that β-strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 in the basal state, while the middle loop was more dynamic in β-arrestin1. With pre-activation, both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 became more flexible, but broader regions of β-arrestin1 became flexible compared to β-arrestin2. The conformational differences between β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 in both the basal and pre-activated states might determine their different receptor selectivities and different cellular functions

  20. Different conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Youngjoo; Kim, Dong Kyun [School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Min-Duk [College of Pharmacy & Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong-Man [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwang-Ju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ka Young, E-mail: kychung2@skku.edu [School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • The conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2 were analyzed by HDX-MS. • β-Strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • The middle loop was less dynamic in β-arrestin2 than in β-arrestin1. • Upon pre-activation by the R169E mutation, β-arrestins became more dynamic. • Pre-activation affected a wider region of β-arrestin1 compared to β-arrestin2. - Abstract: Arrestins have important roles in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling including desensitization of GPCRs and G protein-independent signaling. There have been four arrestins identified: arrestin1, arrestin2 (e.g. β-arrestin1), arrestin3 (e.g. β-arrestin2), and arrestin4. β-Arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 are ubiquitously expressed and regulate a broad range of GPCRs, while arrestin1 and arrestin4 are expressed in the visual system. Although the functions of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 widely overlap, β-arrestin2 has broader receptor selectivity, and a few studies have suggested that β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 have distinct cellular functions. Here, we compared the conformational dynamics of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We also used the R169E mutant as a pre-activation model system. HDX-MS data revealed that β-strands II through IV were more dynamic in β-arrestin2 in the basal state, while the middle loop was more dynamic in β-arrestin1. With pre-activation, both β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 became more flexible, but broader regions of β-arrestin1 became flexible compared to β-arrestin2. The conformational differences between β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 in both the basal and pre-activated states might determine their different receptor selectivities and different cellular functions.

  1. Design of a trial evaluating myocardial cell protection with cariporide, an inhibitor of the transmembrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger: the Guard During Ischemia Against Necrosis (GUARDIAN trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder John S

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Synopsis Background Direct myocardial cell protection in patients with unstable angina or evolving myocardial infarction (MI could prevent cell necrosis or reduce its extent, and minimize the risk of MI and death associated with percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs and coronary artery bypass surgery. The myocardial NHE plays a critical role in mediating the progression of ischemia to necrosis by promoting intracellular accumulation of sodium and calcium in exchange for hydrogen. Blockage of the system in various experimental models of ischemia and reperfusion had a strong antinecrotic effect. The present paper describes a trial that was intended to investigate the potential clinical benefit of cariporide, a potent and selective inhibitor of the NHE, in a large spectrum of at-risk patients. Trial design The GUARDIAN trial was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, four-arm trial that compared three cariporide dosages with placebo in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI and in patients undergoing a high-risk PCI or coronary artery bypass surgery. A total of 11 590 patients with one of the three possible entry diagnoses were enroled in 23 countries. The trial was designed as a combined phase 2/phase 3 study. The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of cariporide in reducing all-cause mortality and/or MI across the various entry populations 36 days after randomization. Three different doses of cariporide were compared with placebo. Secondary end-points were death or non-fatal MI at 10 days and 6 months, and cardiac events related to left ventricular dysfunction. The extent of MI was also assessed by peak elevation in creatinine kinase (CK-MB and a ratio of peak elevation to normal values. The sample size was driven by a total event rate of 1200 patients experiencing a primary end-point, powered to detect a 25% risk reduction in any of the three treatment groups compared with

  2. CNN pincer ruthenium catalysts for hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of ketones: experimental and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratta, Walter; Baldino, Salvatore; Calhorda, Maria José; Costa, Paulo J; Esposito, Gennaro; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Magnolia, Santo; Mealli, Carlo; Messaoudi, Abdelatif; Mason, Sax A; Veiros, Luis F

    2014-10-13

    Reaction of [RuCl(CNN)(dppb)] (1-Cl) (HCNN=2-aminomethyl-6-(4-methylphenyl)pyridine; dppb=Ph2 P(CH2 )4 PPh2 ) with NaOCH2 CF3 leads to the amine-alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OCH2 CF3 )(dppb)] (1-OCH2 CF3 ), whose neutron diffraction study reveals a short RuO⋅⋅⋅HN bond length. Treatment of 1-Cl with NaOEt and EtOH affords the alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OEt)(dppb)]⋅(EtOH)n (1-OEt⋅n EtOH), which equilibrates with the hydride [RuH(CNN)(dppb)] (1-H) and acetaldehyde. Compound 1-OEt⋅n EtOH reacts reversibly with H2 leading to 1-H and EtOH through dihydrogen splitting. NMR spectroscopic studies on 1-OEt⋅n EtOH and 1-H reveal hydrogen bond interactions and exchange processes. The chloride 1-Cl catalyzes the hydrogenation (5 atm of H2 ) of ketones to alcohols (turnover frequency (TOF) up to 6.5×10(4) h(-1) , 40 °C). DFT calculations were performed on the reaction of [RuH(CNN')(dmpb)] (2-H) (HCNN'=2-aminomethyl-6-(phenyl)pyridine; dmpb=Me2 P(CH2 )4 PMe2 ) with acetone and with one molecule of 2-propanol, in alcohol, with the alkoxide complex being the most stable species. In the first step, the Ru-hydride transfers one hydrogen atom to the carbon of the ketone, whereas the second hydrogen transfer from NH2 is mediated by the alcohol and leads to the key "amide" intermediate. Regeneration of the hydride complex may occur by reaction with 2-propanol or with H2 ; both pathways have low barriers and are alcohol assisted. PMID:25195979

  3. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  4. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  5. Computing H/D-Exchange rates of single residues from data of proteolytic fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althaus Ernst

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein conformation and protein/protein interaction can be elucidated by solution-phase Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange (sHDX coupled to high-resolution mass analysis of the digested protein or protein complex. In sHDX experiments mutant proteins are compared to wild-type proteins or a ligand is added to the protein and compared to the wild-type protein (or mutant. The number of deuteriums incorporated into the polypeptides generated from the protease digest of the protein is related to the solvent accessibility of amide protons within the original protein construct. Results In this work, sHDX data was collected on a 14.5 T FT-ICR MS. An algorithm was developed based on combinatorial optimization that predicts deuterium exchange with high spatial resolution based on the sHDX data of overlapping proteolytic fragments. Often the algorithm assigns deuterium exchange with single residue resolution. Conclusions With our new method it is possible to automatically determine deuterium exchange with higher spatial resolution than the level of digested fragments.

  6. Kinetic isotope effects support the twisted amide mechanism of Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y; Mullins, Ashley B; Mason, Matthew D; Xu, Guoyan G; Mahoney, Brendan J; Wang, Xingsheng; Peng, Jeffrey W; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2013-11-01

    The Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase catalyzes isomerization of pSer/pThr-Pro motifs in regulating the cell cycle. Peptide substrates, Ac-Phe-Phe-phosphoSer-Pro-Arg-p-nitroaniline, were synthesized in unlabeled form, and with deuterium-labeled Ser-d3 and Pro-d7 amino acids. Kinetic data were collected as a function of Pin1 concentration to measure kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The normal secondary (2°) KIE value measured for the Ser-d3 substrate (kH/kD = 1.6 ± 0.2) indicates that the serine carbonyl does not rehybridize from sp(2) to sp(3) in the rate-determining step, ruling out a nucleophilic addition mechanism. The normal 2° KIE can be explained by hyperconjugation between Ser α-C-H/D and C═O and release of steric strain upon rotation of the amide bond from cis to syn-exo. The inverse 2° KIE value (kH/kD = 0.86 ± 0.08) measured for the Pro-d7 substrate indicates rehybridization of the prolyl nitrogen from sp(2) to sp(3) during the rate-limiting step of isomerization. No solvent kinetic isotope was measured by NMR exchange spectroscopy (kH2O/kD2O = 0.92 ± 0.12), indicating little or no involvement of exchangeable protons in the mechanism. These results support the formation of a simple twisted amide transition state as the mechanism for peptidyl prolyl isomerization catalyzed by Pin1. A model of the reaction mechanism is presented using crystal structures of Pin1 with ground state analogues and an inhibitor that resembles a twisted amide transition state. PMID:24116866

  7. Characterization of water exchange and two-phase flow in porous gas diffusion materials by hydrogen-deuterium contrast neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manke, Ingo; Hartnig, Christoph; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Messerschmidt, Matthias; Hilger, André; Strobl, Markus; Lehnert, Werner; Banhart, John

    2008-06-01

    Liquid water exchange in two-phase flows within hydrophobic porous gas diffusion materials of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells was investigated spatially resolved with H-D contrast neutron radiography. A commonly used one-phase model is sufficient to describe water exchange characteristics at low water production rates. At higher rates, however, a significantly higher exchange velocity is found than predicted by a simple model. A new model for the water transport is derived based on an eruptive mechanism guided by Haines jumps, which is supported by recent experimental findings and leads to a very good agreement with the experiments.

  8. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF AMIDE DERIVATIVES OF GINKGOLIDE A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI-HONG HU; ZHONG-LIANG CHEN; YU-YUAN XIE

    2001-01-01

    Amide derivatives of ginkgolide A were prepared and evaluated for their in vitro ability to inhibit the PAF-induced aggregation of rabbit platelets. They showed less activities than their parent compound ginkgolide A.

  9. Artists with Arthritis Create Beauty amid Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan; Mozes; 蔡峥伟

    2000-01-01

    得此来稿,我们曾犹豫再三,是否刊用此文。因为,其内容给人的第一印象颇有点离奇。Artists with Arthritis Create Beauty amid Pain,怎么可能呢?细读之下,你也许会觉得,此文虽是一家之言,但也并非荒唐。尤其是本文的收尾句,笔锋一转,抖出了妙言: ...in addition to the emotional support such stories can give RA patients,there are now new drug options that far surpass the treatment choices Renoir faced. 此句是否可译:除了此类故事能够给患风湿病者一种情感上的支持之外,现在可选的新药要比Renoir(雷诺阿,法国印象派画家。主要作品有《包厢》、《游船上的午餐》、《浴女》等。)时代强得多。

  10. Synthesis of Glycosyl Amides Using Selenocarboxylates as Traceless Reagents for Amide Bond Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luana; Affeldt, Ricardo F; Lüdtke, Diogo S

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate-derived amides were successfully prepared in good yields from a broad range of substrates, including furanosyl and pyranosyl derivatives. The methodology successfully relied on the in situ generation of lithium selenocarboxylates from Se/LiEt3BH and acyl chlorides or carboxylic acids and their reaction with sugar azides. A key aspect of the present protocol is that we start from elemental selenium; isolation and handling of all reactive and sensitive selenium-containing intermediates is avoided, therefore providing the selenocarboxylate the status of a traceless reagent. PMID:27275515

  11. Performance of electric forklift with low-temperature polymer exchange membrane fuel cell power module and metal hydride hydrogen storage extension tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Tolj, Ivan; Parsons, Adrian; Smith, Fahmida; Sita, Cordellia; Linkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    We present test results of a commercial 3-tonne electric forklift (STILL) equipped with a commercial fuel cell power module (Plug Power) and a MH hydrogen storage tank (HySA Systems and TF Design). The tests included: (i) performance evaluation of "hybrid" hydrogen storage system during refuelling at low (distribution occurs when operating in the fuel cell powering mode with MH, in comparison to the battery powering mode; (c) use of the fully refuelled fuel cell power module with the MH extension tank allows for uninterrupted operation for 3 h 6 min and 7 h 15 min, for heavy- and light-duty operation, respectively.

  12. NMR stratagems for the study of multiple kinetic hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects of proton exchange. Example: Di-p-fluorophenylformamidine/THF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratagems are presented for the determination of kinetic isotope effects of proton exchange reactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy. In such experiments, lineshape analyses and/or polarization transfer experiments are performed on the exchanging protons or deuterons as well as on remote spins, as a function of the deuterium fraction in the mobile proton sites. These methods are NMR analogs of previous proton inventory techniques involving classical kinetic methods. A theory is developed in order to derive the kinetic isotope effects as well as the number of transferred protons from the experimental NMR spectra. The technique is then applied to the problem of proton exchange in the system 15N, 15N'-di-p-fluorophenylformamidine, a nitrogen analog of formic acid, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran-d8 (THF). DFFA forms two conformers in THF to which s-trans and s-cis structures have been assigned. Only the s-trans conformer is able to dimerize and exchange protons. Lineshape simulations and magnetization transfer experiments were carried out at 189,2 K, at a concentration of 0.02 mol l-1, as a function of the deuterium fraction D in the 1H-15N sites. Using 1H NMR spectroscopy, a linear dependence of the inverse proton lifetimes on D was observed. From this it was concluded that two protons are transported in the rate limiting step of the proton exchange. This result is expected for a double proton transfer in an s-trans dimer with a cyclic structure. The full kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects of 233:11:1 at 189 K were determined through 19F NMR experiments on the same samples. The deviation from the rule of geometric mean, although substantial, is much smaller than found in previous studies of intramolecular HH transfer reactions. Possible causes of this effect are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Cinnamic acid amides from Tribulus terrestris displaying uncompetitive α-glucosidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeong Hun; Kim, Dae Wook; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Park, Chanin; Son, Minky; Kim, Jeong Yoon; Yuk, Heung Joo; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Ki Hun

    2016-05-23

    The α-glucosidase inhibitory potential of Tribulus terrestris extracts has been reported but as yet the active ingredients are unknown. This study attempted to isolate the responsible metabolites and elucidate their inhibition mechanism of α-glucosidase. By fractionating T. terristris extracts, three cinnamic acid amide derivatives (1-3) were ascertained to be active components against α-glucosidase. The lead structure, N-trans-coumaroyltyramine 1, showed significant inhibition of α-glucosidase (IC50 = 0.42 μM). Moreover, all active compounds displayed uncompetitive inhibition mechanisms that have rarely been reported for α-glucosidase inhibitors. This kinetic behavior was fully demonstrated by showing a decrease of both Km and Vmax, and Kik/Kiv ratio ranging between 1.029 and 1.053. We progressed to study how chemical modifications to the lead structure 1 may impact inhibition. An α, β-unsaturation carbonyl group and hydroxyl group in A-ring of cinnamic acid amide emerged to be critical functionalities for α-glucosidase inhibition. The molecular modeling study revealed that the inhibitory activities are tightly related to π-π interaction as well as hydrogen bond interaction between enzyme and inhibitors. PMID:26974386

  14. Biodegradable poly(ester amide)s – A remarkable opportunity for the biomedical area: Review on the synthesis, characterization and

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Ana C.; Gil, Maria H.; Simões, Pedro N.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ester amide)s have emerged in the last years as an important family of biodegradable synthetic polymers. These polymers present both ester and amide linkages in their structure and they gather in the same entity the good degradability of polyesters with the good thermo-mechanical properties of polyamides. Particularly, poly(ester amide)s containing α-amino acids have risen as important materials in the biomedical field. The presence of the α-amino acid contributes to better cell–polymer ...

  15. Iron(III) Chloride mediated reduction of Bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl)amide to an Amide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rojalin Sahu; Papuli Chaliha; Vadivelu Manivannan

    2016-01-01

    In methanol, FeCl3 reacted readily with L1H (L1H = bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl)amide) and afforded a complex having the formula [Fe(L2)Cl2] (1) {L2− = -((1-isoquinolyl)(methoxy)methyl)isoquinoline-1-carboxamide ion}. This reaction involves reduction of one of the two carbonyl groups present in L1H to (methoxy)methyl group. A plausible mechanism for the conversion of L1H to L2− has been proposed. Determination of molecular structure of 1 confirmed this conversion. Fe(III) ion is surrounded by three nitrogen atoms of the ligand and two chloride ions, imparting a rare distorted trigonal bipyramidal N3Cl2 coordination environment.

  16. Influence of Silica/Sulfonated Polyether-Ether Ketone as Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Handayani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The operation of non-humidified condition of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC using composite sPEEK-silica membrane is reported. Sulfonated membrane of PEEK is known as hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membrane for PEMFC and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The state of the art of fuel cells is based on the perluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion. Nafion has been the most used in both PEMFC and DMFC due to good performance although in low humidified condition showed poor current density. Here we reported the effect of silica in hydrocarbon sPEEK membrane that contributes for a better water management system inside the cell, and showed 0.16 W/cm2 of power density which is 78% higher than that of non-silica modified [Keywords: composite membrane, polyether-ether ketone, silica, proton exchange membrane fuel cell].

  17. Excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in deuteron charge exchange on hydrogen at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.3 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mchedlishvili, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, GE-0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barsov, S. [High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RU-188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Carbonell, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Chiladze, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, GE-0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dymov, S. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Physikalisches Institut II, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Dzyuba, A. [High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RU-188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Engels, R.; Gebel, R. [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Glagolev, V. [Laboratory of High Energies, JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-10-07

    The charge-exchange break-up of polarised deuterons d{sup →}p→{pp}{sub s}n, where the final {pp}{sub s} diproton system has a very low excitation energy and hence is mainly in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state, is a powerful tool to probe the spin-flip terms in the proton–neutron charge-exchange scattering. Recent measurements with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27 GeV have extended these studies into the pion-production regime in order to investigate the mechanism for the excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in the d{sup →}p→{pp}{sub s}X reaction. Values of the differential cross section and two deuteron tensor analysing powers, A{sub xx} and A{sub yy}, have been extracted as functions of the momentum transfer to the diproton or the invariant mass M{sub X} of the unobserved system X. The unpolarised cross section in the high M{sub X} region is well described in a model that includes only direct excitation of the Δ isobar through undistorted one pion exchange. However, the cross section is grossly underestimated for low M{sub X}, even when Δ excitation in the projectile deuteron is included in the calculation. Furthermore, direct Δ production through one pion exchange only reproduces the angular dependence of the difference between the two tensor analysing powers.

  18. Dimerization of the type IV pilin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 results in increased helix stability as measured by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lento

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Truncated pilin monomers from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 (ΔK122 have been shown to enter a monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution prior to oligomerization into protein nanotubes. Here, we examine the structural changes occurring between the monomeric and dimeric states of ΔK122 using time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Based on levels of deuterium uptake, the N-terminal α-helix and the loop connecting the second and third strands of the anti-parallel β-sheet contribute significantly to pilin dimerization. Conversely, the antiparallel β-sheet and αβ loop region exhibit increased flexibility, while the receptor binding domain retains a rigid conformation in the equilibrium state.

  19. Dimerization of the type IV pilin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 results in increased helix stability as measured by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lento, Cristina; Wilson, Derek J; Audette, Gerald F

    2016-01-01

    Truncated pilin monomers from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 (ΔK122) have been shown to enter a monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution prior to oligomerization into protein nanotubes. Here, we examine the structural changes occurring between the monomeric and dimeric states of ΔK122 using time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Based on levels of deuterium uptake, the N-terminal α-helix and the loop connecting the second and third strands of the anti-parallel β-sheet contribute significantly to pilin dimerization. Conversely, the antiparallel β-sheet and αβ loop region exhibit increased flexibility, while the receptor binding domain retains a rigid conformation in the equilibrium state. PMID:26798830

  20. Excitation of the Delta(1232) isobar in deuteron charge exchange on hydrogen at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Mchedlishvili, D; Carbonell, J; Chiladze, D; Dymov, S; Dzyuba, A; Engels, R; Gebel, R; Glagolev, V; Grigoryev, K; Goslawski, P; Hartmann, M; Imambekov, O; Kacharava, A; Kamerdzhiev, V; Keshelashvili, I; Khoukaz, A; Komarov, V; Kulessa, P; Kulikov, A; Lehrach, A; Lomidze, N; Lorentz, B; Macharashvili, G; Maier, R; Merzliakov, S; Mielke, M; Mikirtychyants, M; Mikirtychyants, S; Nioradze, M; Ohm, H; Papenbrock, M; Prasuhn, D; Rathmann, F; Serdyuk, V; Seyfarth, H; Stein, H J; Steffens, E; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Tabidze, M; Trusov, S; Uzikov, Yu; Valdau, Yu; Wilkin, C

    2013-01-01

    The charge-exchange break-up of polarised deuterons pol{d}p -> {pp}n, where the final {pp} diproton system has a very low excitation energy and hence is mainly in the 1S0 state, is a powerful tool to probe the spin-flip terms in the proton-neutron charge-exchange scattering. Recent measurements with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27 GeV have extended these studies into the pion-production regime in order to investigate the mechanism for the excitation of the Delta(1232) isobar in the pol{d}p -> {pp}X reaction. Values of the differential cross section and two deuteron tensor analysing powers, A_{xx} and A_{yy}, have been extracted in terms of the momentum transfer to the diproton or the invariant mass Mx of the unobserved system X. The unpolarised cross section in the high Mx region is well described in a model that includes only direct excitation of the Delta isobar through undistorted one pion exchange. However, the cross section is grossly underestimated for low Mx, even w...

  1. Nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weires, Nicholas A.; Baker, Emma L.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    The Suzuki-Miyaura coupling has become one of the most important and prevalent methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Although palladium catalysis has historically dominated the field, the use of nickel catalysis has become increasingly widespread because of its unique ability to cleave carbon-heteroatom bonds that are unreactive towards other transition metals. We report the first nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides, which proceeds by an uncommon cleavage of the amide C-N bond after N-tert-butoxycarbonyl activation. The methodology is mild, functional-group tolerant and can be strategically employed in sequential transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling sequences to unite heterocyclic fragments. These studies demonstrate that amides, despite classically considered inert substrates, can be harnessed as synthons for use in reactions that form C-C bonds through cleavage of the C-N bond using non-precious metal catalysis.

  2. VCD Robustness of the Amide-I and Amide-II Vibrational Modes of Small Peptide Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Tarczay, György

    2015-09-01

    The rotational strengths and the robustness values of amide-I and amide-II vibrational modes of For(AA)n NHMe (where AA is Val, Asn, Asp, or Cys, n = 1-5 for Val and Asn; n = 1 for Asp and Cys) model peptides with α-helix and β-sheet backbone conformations were computed by density functional methods. The robustness results verify empirical rules drawn from experiments and from computed rotational strengths linking amide-I and amide-II patterns in the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of peptides with their backbone structures. For peptides with at least three residues (n ≥ 3) these characteristic patterns from coupled amide vibrational modes have robust signatures. For shorter peptide models many vibrational modes are nonrobust, and the robust modes can be dependent on the residues or on their side chain conformations in addition to backbone conformations. These robust VCD bands, however, provide information for the detailed structural analysis of these smaller systems. PMID:26087405

  3. Synthesis and structural studies of amino amide salts derived from 2-(aminomethyl)benzimidazole and α-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Montiel, Concepción; Tapia-Benavides, Antonio R.; Falcón-León, Martha; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Tlahuext, Hugo; Tlahuextl, Margarita

    2015-11-01

    2-{[(Ammoniumacetyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 4, 2-{[(2-ammoniumpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 5, and 2-{[(2-ammonium-3-phenylpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 6 amino amides were synthesized via condensation of 2AMBZ dihydrochloride with the corresponding amino acid. Compounds 7-12 were obtained by replacing chloride ions (in salts 4-6) with nitrate or tetrachlorozincate ions. The results of X-ray diffraction crystallographic studies indicated that the geometries, charges and sizes of the anions are essential for the formation of the strong hydrogen bond interactions of compounds 4, 5, 9-12. Moreover, in most cases, the presence of water and solvent molecules stabilizes the supramolecular structures of these compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy indicated that the presence of chloride or tetrachlorozincate anions increases the acidity of the benzimidazolic and amide groups more significantly than the presence of nitrate anions. However, Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) computations of the crystal structures demonstrate that amino amides interact more strongly with NO3- than with Cl- and ZnCl42- anions; this difference explains the spectroscopic results.

  4. An efficient and convenient synthesis of N-substituted amides under heterogeneous condition using Al(HSO4)3 via Ritter reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elnaz Karimian; Batool Akhlaghinia; Sara S E Ghodsinia

    2016-03-01

    An efficient and inexpensive synthesis of N-substituted amides from the reaction of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles with various benzylic alcohols (secondary and tertiary) and tert-butyl alcohol by refluxing nitromethane via the Ritter reaction catalyzed by aluminum hydrogen sulfate [Al(HSO4)3] is described. Thecatalyst which is an air-stable, cost-effective solid acid could be readily recycled by filtration and reused four times without any significant loss of its activity.

  5. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigation on the binding of a synthesized steroidal amide to protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the various valuable biological activities, steroidal amides have become a hot topic in steroidal pharmaceutical chemistry. In this paper, an anti-tumor steroid derivate (DAAO) was synthesized and identified. The interaction between DAAO and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular modeling and molecular probe techniques. The results suggested that DAAO had reacted with HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The formation of DAAO–HSA complex at ground state led to static quenching of HSA's fluorescence. The number of binding sites, binding constants, enthalpy change (ΔHθ), Gibbs free energy change (ΔGθ) and entropy change (ΔSθ) were calculated at different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching theory and classic equation. Molecular modeling investigation indicated that DAAO was more inclined to absorb on Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule on grounds of the lowest energy principle and steric hindrance effect. The binding location was further confirmed by fluorescence probe experiment using warfarin (site I probe) for displacement. Furthermore, the conformational changes of HSA in presence of DAAO were investigated by CD spectra. The results could provide new evidence explaining the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity and may be useful for understanding the anti-cancer mechanism of steroidal drug. - Highlights: • A designed steroidal amide compound (DAAO) was synthesized by introducing amido bonds into a steroid nucleus. • DAAO binds to Sudlow's site I in HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. • The interaction was a spontaneous and exothermic process with modest degree of reversibility. • The secondary structure of HSA and the microenvironment of TRP214 altered. • Amido bond in steroid nucleus (–NH–CO–) plays important role in stabling the structure of macromolecules

  6. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigation on the binding of a synthesized steroidal amide to protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua-xin, E-mail: h.x.zhang@yeah.net; Liu, E.

    2014-09-15

    Owing to the various valuable biological activities, steroidal amides have become a hot topic in steroidal pharmaceutical chemistry. In this paper, an anti-tumor steroid derivate (DAAO) was synthesized and identified. The interaction between DAAO and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular modeling and molecular probe techniques. The results suggested that DAAO had reacted with HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The formation of DAAO–HSA complex at ground state led to static quenching of HSA's fluorescence. The number of binding sites, binding constants, enthalpy change (ΔH{sup θ}), Gibbs free energy change (ΔG{sup θ}) and entropy change (ΔS{sup θ}) were calculated at different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching theory and classic equation. Molecular modeling investigation indicated that DAAO was more inclined to absorb on Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule on grounds of the lowest energy principle and steric hindrance effect. The binding location was further confirmed by fluorescence probe experiment using warfarin (site I probe) for displacement. Furthermore, the conformational changes of HSA in presence of DAAO were investigated by CD spectra. The results could provide new evidence explaining the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity and may be useful for understanding the anti-cancer mechanism of steroidal drug. - Highlights: • A designed steroidal amide compound (DAAO) was synthesized by introducing amido bonds into a steroid nucleus. • DAAO binds to Sudlow's site I in HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. • The interaction was a spontaneous and exothermic process with modest degree of reversibility. • The secondary structure of HSA and the microenvironment of TRP214 altered. • Amido bond in steroid nucleus (–NH–CO–) plays important role in stabling the structure of

  7. New GABA amides activating GABA A-receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Raster; Andreas Späth; Svetlana Bultakova; Pau Gorostiza; Burkhard König; Piotr Bregestovski

    2013-01-01

    We have prepared a series of new and some literature-reported GABA-amides and determined their effect on the activation of GABAA-receptors expressed in CHO cells. Special attention was paid to the purification of the target compounds to remove even traces of GABA contaminations, which may arise from deprotection steps in the synthesis. GABA-amides were previously reported to be partial, full or superagonists. In our hands these compounds were not able to activate GABAA-receptor channels in wh...

  8. Determining in situ protein conformation and orientation from the amide-I sum-frequency generation spectrum: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeters, S J; van Dijk, C N; Torres-Knoop, A; Backus, E H G; Campen, R K; Bonn, M; Woutersen, S

    2013-07-25

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectra of the amide-I band of proteins can give detailed insight into biomolecular processes near membranes. However, interpreting these spectra in terms of the conformation and orientation of a protein can be difficult, especially in the case of complex proteins. Here we present a formalism to calculate the amide-I infrared (IR), Raman, and VSFG spectra based on the protein conformation and orientation distribution. Based on the protein conformation, we set up the amide-I exciton Hamiltonian for the backbone amide modes that generate the linear and nonlinear spectroscopic responses. In this Hamiltonian, we distinguish between nearest-neighbor and non-nearest-neighbor vibrational couplings. To determine nearest-neighbor couplings we use an ab initio 6-31G+(d) B3LYP-calculated map of the coupling as a function of the dihedral angles. The other couplings are estimated using the transition-dipole coupling model. The local-mode frequencies of hydrogen-bonded peptide bonds and of peptide bonds to proline residues are red-shifted. To obtain realistic hydrogen-bond shifts we perform a molecular dynamics simulation in which the protein is solvated by water. As a first application, we measure and calculate the amide-I IR, Raman, and VSFG spectra of cholera toxin B subunit docked to a model cell membrane. To deduce the orientation of the protein with respect to the membrane from the VSFG spectra, we compare the experimental and calculated spectral shapes of single-polarization results, rather than comparing the relative amplitudes of VSFG spectra recorded for different polarization conditions for infrared, visible, and sum-frequency light. We find that the intrinsic uncertainty in the interfacial refractive index--essential to determine the overall amplitude of the VSFG spectra--prohibits a meaningful comparison of the intensities of the different polarization combinations. In contrast, the spectral shape of most of the VSFG

  9. Iodine-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Amidation of β,γ-Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids with Chloramine Salts Leading to Allylic Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Kojima, Takumi; Hishikawa, Yusuke; Minakata, Satoshi

    2015-10-26

    The iodine-catalyzed decarboxylative amidation of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids with chloramine salts is described. This method enables the regioselective synthesis of allylic amides from various types of β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids containing substituents at the α- and β-positions. In the reaction, N-iodo-N-chloroamides, generated by the reaction of a chloramine salt with I2 , function as a key active species. The reaction provides an attractive alternative to existing methods for the synthesis of useful secondary allylic amine derivatives. PMID:26493878

  10. A Gas-Phase Investigation of Oxygen-Hydrogen Exchange Reaction of O(3P) + C2H5 → H(2S) + C2H4O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction O(3P) + C2H5 (ethyl) → H(2S) + CH3CHO (acetaldehyde) was investigated by applying a combination of vacuum-ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a crossed beam configuration and ab initio calculations. The two radical reactants O(3P) and C2H5 were respectively produced by photolysis of NO2 and supersonic flash pyrolysis of the synthesized precursor azoethane. Doppler profile analysis of the nascent H-atom products in the Lyman-α region revealed that the average translational energy of the products and the average fraction of the total available energy released as translational energy were 5.01 ± 0.72 kcal mol-1 and 6.1%, respectively. The empirical data combined with CBS-QB3 level ab initio theory and statistical calculations demonstrated that the title exchange reaction is a major channel and proceeds via an addition-elimination mechanism through the formation of a short-lived, dynamical addition complex on the doublet potential energy surface. On the basis of systematic comparison with several exchange reactions of hydrocarbon radicals, the observed small kinetic energy release can be explained in terms of the loose transition state with a product-like geometry and a small reverse activation barrier along the reaction coordinate

  11. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  12. Assembling one-dimensional coordination polymers into threedimensional architectures via hydrogen bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit Rajput; Madhushree Sarkar; Kumar Biradha

    2010-09-01

    The reactions of bis(pyridylcarboxamido)alkanes (amides) and bis(3-pyridyl)alkanediamides (reverse amides) with copper(II) and zinc(II) in the presence of various anions resulted in onedimensional polymeric crystalline complexes with or without guest inclusion. The crystal structure analyses of these complexes reveal that the one-dimensional networks observed here are of three types: simple linear chain, chains with wavy nature and chains containing cavities. The self-complementary amide groups of the ligands assembled these coordination networks into higher dimensional architectures via N-H$\\cdots$O hydrogen bonds.

  13. Intramolecular Amide Hydrolysis in N-Methylmaleamic Acid Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intramolecular amide hydrolysis of N-methylmaleamic acid have been revisited by use of density functional theory and inclusion of solvent effects. The results indicate that concerted reaction mechanism is favored over stepwise reaction mechanism. This is in agreement with the previous theoretical study. Sovlent effects have significant influence on the reaction barrier.

  14. Chiral amides via copper-catalysed enantioselective conjugate addition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, Anne K.; Fernández-Ibáñez, M. Ángeles; Fañanás-Mastral, Martín; Teichert, Johannes F.; Feringa, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    A highly enantioselective one pot procedure for the synthesis of β-substituted amides was developed starting from the corresponding α,β-unsaturated esters. This new methodology is based on the copper-catalysed enantioselective conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to α,β-unsaturated esters and sub

  15. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-...

  16. Bovine intermediate pituitary alpha-amidation enzyme: preliminary characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A secretory granule-associated enzymatic activity that converts mono-[125I]-D-Tyr-Val-Gly into mono-[125I]-D-Tyr-Val-NH2 has been studied. The activity is primarily soluble and shows optimal activity at pH 7 to pH 8. Amidation activity was stimulated 9-fold by addition of optimal amounts of copper (3 microM). In the presence of optimal copper, ascorbate stimulated the reaction 7-fold; none of the other reduced or oxidized cofactors tested was as effective. Taking into account the dependence of the reaction on ascorbate and molecular oxygen and the production of glyoxylate [2], it is suggested that the alpha-amidation enzyme is a monooxygenase. Lineweaver Burk plots with D-Tyr-Val-Gly as the varied substrate demonstrated Michelis-Menten type kinetics with the values of K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ increasing with the addition of ascorbate to the assay. A variety of peptides ending with a COOH-terminal Gly residue act as inhibitors of the reaction. Two synthetic peptides, gamma 2MSH and ACTH(1-14), with carboxyl termini similar to the presumed physiological substrates for the enzyme, act as competitive inhibitors with similar K1 values. It is likely that this secretory granule alpha-amidation activity is involved in the physiological biosynthetic alpha-amidation of a wide range of bioactive peptides

  17. The effect of amidation on the behaviour of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Manuela; Wang, Jianping; Zhou, Yuhua; Pinna, Marco; Zvelindovsky, Andrei V; Dennison, Sarah R; Phoenix, David A

    2016-04-01

    Aurein 2.6-COOH and aurein 3.1-COOH were studied along with their naturally occurring C-terminally amidated analogues. Circular dichroism (CD) and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were used to study the effects of amidation on the interaction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with lipid bilayers. CD measurements and MD analysis suggested that both peptide analogues were predominantly random coil and adopted low levels of [Formula: see text]-helical structure in solution (peptides formed a stable [Formula: see text]-helical structure. In general, amidated analogues have a greater propensity than the non-amidated peptides to form a [Formula: see text]-helical structure. MD simulations predicted that aurein 2.6-COOH and aurein 3.1-CHOOH destabilised lipid bilayers from 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine via angled bilayer penetration. They also showed that aurein 2.6-CONH[Formula: see text] and aurein 3.1-CONH[Formula: see text] formed a helix horizontal to the plane of an asymmetric interface. PMID:26745958

  18. Amide-modified poly(butylene terephthalate): polycondensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennekom, van A.C.M.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The synthesis of poly(ester amide) copolymers (PBTA) based on poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) and nylon-4,T with the diamide of butanediamine and dimethyl terephthelate (N,N′-bis(p-carbomethoxybenzoyl)butanediamine) has been carried out. Different melt and solid state condensation reactors were u

  19. Barter exchanges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    Although barter is often perceived as something that proceeded money, barter is still used. The focus of the paper is on barter exchanges. Barter exchanges are used both in developing countries as well as in developed countries (including the U.S.). They are used by both organizations and...... individuals. They usually allow to exchange good but some include also services. Some exchanges allow only for bi-directional barter, i.e. when only two parties are involved in the exchange. But probably most of the barter exchanges use barter money; this makes it easier to exchange goods and services as the...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10191 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- . 721.10191 Section... Substances § 721.10191 Amides, coco, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- (PMN P-06-262; CAS No. 851544-20-2)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  2. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity in brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri (Cyclostomata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jirikowski, G; Erhart, G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J;

    1984-01-01

    the hypothalamus to the olfactory system and caudally to the medulla oblongata. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity was also found in cells of the adenohypophysis. These observations suggest that the hagfish possesses a brain FMRF-amide-like transmitter system and pituitary cells containing FMRF-amide-like material...

  3. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. PMID:26638824

  4. Surface plasmon spectroscopy study of electron exchange between single gold nanorods and metal oxide matrix during hydrogen gas sensing (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cittadini, Michela; Collins, Sean; Mulvaney, Paul; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The direct optical monitoring of electron exchange on single plasmonic nanoparticles, involved in chemical reactions with gas molecules, is one of the main challenges in the heterogeneous catalysis and gas sensing fields. Catalysts are substances that speed up reactions by providing an alternative pathway with lower activation energy than that required for the uncatalysed reaction. A lot of research, both fundamental and applied, has been carried out to investigate how catalysts work and to increase their efficiency. The present work shows how the use of Dark Field Microscopy (DFM) coupled with surface plasmon spectroscopy, enables the direct observation of the kinetics of H2 gas interaction with single gold nanorods (NR) coupled with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and/or with metal oxide matrices. The plasmonic particles, gold NRs, act as optical probes, and enable the monitoring of the electron exchange through the measurement of their surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band shift. To improve the redox reaction kinetics, the Au NRs have been coupled with Pt NPs and embedded also into a TiO2 or ZnO low scattering matrix. The Au NRs, the Pt, TiO2 and ZnO NPs have been synthetized by colloid chemistry. Several samples made of bare Au NRs, or Au NRs coupled with only Pt NPs or with Pt and TiO2 NPs or with Pt and TiO2 have been deposited by spin coating on silica substrates. The longitudinal Au SPR band shift has been monitored by DFM looking at the variation of the scattering spectrum of a single Au NRs in the presence of H2. Time-resolved measurements have been also conducted at fixed wavelength in order to monitor the kinetics of the H2 reaction. With such measurements it was possible to elucidate the importance of the adsorbed oxygen and the TiO2 matrix on the H2 reaction with the Pt NPs.

  5. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of Hydrogenated Ferulic Acid Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Can Cui; Zhi-Peng Wang; Xiu-jiang Du; Li-Zhong Wang; Shu-Jing Yu; Xing-Hai Liu; Zheng-Ming Li; Wei-Guang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    A series of hydrogenated ferulic acid amide derivatives 4 were synthesized. The molecular structures of the synthesized compounds were analyzed by H1 NMR and HRMS. The biological activity study showed that some of them displayed excellent protection activity and curative activity against TMV at 500 μg/mL.

  6. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  7. Hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  8. Oxidation resistant organic hydrogen getters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2008-09-09

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably Pt. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently removing hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  9. Adsorption equilibrium of uranium from seawater on chelating resin containing amide oxime group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelating resins containing amide oxime group were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization. The amount of the amide oxime groups was controlled below about 0.1 mol per kg of base polymer. The adsorption equilibrium of uranium from seawater on this resin was investigated. It was suggested that two neighboring amide oxime groups on the grafted chain captured one uranyl ion, and that single amide oxime ligand had little capacity for the adsorption of uranium. The adsorption equilibrium was correlated by a Langmuir-type equation. The content of neighboring amide oxime groups was 0.406 x 10-3 mol per kg of base polymer, which corresponded to 0.39 % of the total amount of amide oxime groups. The apparent stoichiometric stability constant for the complex of uranyl ion with the neighboring amide oxime groups in seawater was calculated to be 10-21.7. (author)

  10. Two-dimensional supramolecular networks via C-H$\\cdots$Cl and N-H$\\cdots$Cl interactions utilizing bidentate neutral pyridine amide coordinated MnIICl2 tectons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wilson Jacob; Rabindranath Mukherjee

    2008-09-01

    Reaction of -(phenyl)-2-pyridinecarboxamide (HL1) and -(-tolyl)-2-pyridinecarboxamide (HL2) ligands with MnCl2.4H2O affords complexes [(HL1)2MnCl2] 1 and [(HL2)2MnCl2] 2. The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by three-dimensional X-ray crystallography revealing that the MnII ions assume distorted octahedral geometry with coordination by two HL1/HL2 ligands providing two pyridine N and two amide O and two chloride ions. Notably, secondary interactions [C-H$\\cdots$Cl (pyridine 3-H hydrogen) and N-H$\\cdots$Cl (amide NH hydrogen)] triggered by MnII-coordinated chloride ions acting as hydrogen bonding acceptors generate self-complementary dimeric tectons, which lead to 2D supramolecular architectures.

  11. Crystal structure determination and reaction pathway of amide-hydride mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined synchrotron in situ X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction studies were performed on 2:1 mixtures of lithium amide and magnesium hydride, which have shown promise as solid-state hydrogen storage materials. The dehydrogenated product is a mixed lithium and magnesium imide, Li2Mg(NH)2, whose crystal structure has not heretofore been determined. Furthermore, at elevated temperatures, Li2Mg(NH)2 undergoes two structural transitions from an orthorhombic structure to a primitive cubic structure at intermediate temperature (350 deg. C) followed by a face-centered cubic crystal structure at high temperature (500 deg. C). Disordering of the Li, Mg and cation vacancies as a function of temperature drives the structural transitions. We report the reaction pathway from in situ X-ray diffraction studies and the crystal structures of the three structural variants of Li2Mg(NH)2 as determined by high-resolution X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. We also report the hydrogen storage reaction pathways for mixtures with other cation ratios

  12. Particle-size dependence of the activation energy for decomposition of lithium amide

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Walle, Chris; Hoang, Khang; Janotti, Anderson

    2012-02-01

    Lithium amide (LiNH2) is a promising material for reversible hydrogen storage, yet atomistic mechanisms behind the dehydrogenation process are unknown. The activation energy for LiNH2 decomposition has been observed to strongly vary with ball milling, suggesting a dependence of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the decomposition on the particle size. We have examined these mechanisms based on first-principles calculations for native point defects and defect complexes in LiNH2. We propose that the decomposition of LiNH2 into lithium imide (Li2NH) and ammonia (NH3) occurs through two competing mechanisms, one involving the formation of native defects in the interior of the material and the other at the surface. As a result, the prevailing mechanism and hence the activation energy depend on the surface-to-volume ratio, or the specific surface area, which changes with the particle size. We explain the observed variations of activation energy, and address the role played by LiH in the dehydrogenation of (LiNH2+LiH) mixtures. The relationship between the structure of hydrogen-related defects and the end products in the decomposition reaction can be extended to other complex hydrides.

  13. Synthesis, Antifungal Activity and QSAR of Some Novel Carboxylic Acid Amides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Du

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel aromatic carboxylic acid amides were synthesized and tested for their activities against six phytopathogenic fungi by an in vitro mycelia growth inhibition assay. Most of them displayed moderate to good activity. Among them N-(2-(1H-indazol-1-ylphenyl-2-(trifluoromethylbenzamide (3c exhibited the highest antifungal activity against Pythium aphanidermatum (EC50 = 16.75 µg/mL and Rhizoctonia solani (EC50 = 19.19 µg/mL, compared to the reference compound boscalid with EC50 values of 10.68 and 14.47 µg/mL, respectively. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA were employed to develop a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship model for the activity of the compounds. In the molecular docking, a fluorine atom and the carbonyl oxygen atom of 3c formed hydrogen bonds toward the hydroxyl hydrogens of TYR58 and TRP173.

  14. Non-Gaussian statistics of amide I mode frequency fluctuation of N-methylacetamide in methanol solution: Linear and nonlinear vibrational spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwac, Kijeong; Lee, Hochan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2004-01-01

    By carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of an N-methylacetamide (NMA) in methanol solution, the amide I mode frequency fluctuation and hydrogen bonding dynamics were theoretically investigated. Combining an extrapolation formula developed from systematic ab initio calculation studies of NMA-(CH3OH)n clusters with a classical molecular dynamics simulation method, we were able to quantitatively describe the solvatochromic vibrational frequency shift induced by the hydrogen-bonding interaction between NMA and solvent methanol. It was found that the fluctuating amide I mode frequency distribution is notably non-Gaussian and it can be decomposed into two Gaussian peaks that are associated with two distinctively different solvation structures. The ensemble-average-calculated linear response function associated with the IR absorption is found to be oscillating, which is in turn related to the doublet amide I band shape. Numerically calculated infrared absorption spectra are directly compared with experiment and the agreement was found to be excellent. By using the Onsager's regression hypothesis, the rate constants of the interconversion process between the two solvation structures were obtained. Then, the nonlinear response functions associated with two-dimensional infrared pump-probe spectroscopy were simulated. The physics behind the two-dimensional line shape and origin of the cross peaks in the time-resolved pump-probe spectra is explained and the result is compared with 2D spectra experimentally measured recently by Woutersen et al. [S. Woutersen, Y. Mu, G. Stock, and P. Hamm, Chem. Phys. 266, 137 (2001)].

  15. Cleavage of an amide bond by a ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, X.; De Mesmaeker, A.; Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A variant form of a group I ribozyme, optimized by in vitro evolution for its ability to catalyze magnesium-dependent phosphoester transfer reactions involving DNA substrates, also catalyzes the cleavage of an unactivated alkyl amide when that linkage is presented in the context of an oligodeoxynucleotide analog. Substrates containing an amide bond that joins either two DNA oligos, or a DNA oligo and a short peptide, are cleaved in a magnesium-dependent fashion to generate the expected products. The first-order rate constant, kcat, is 0.1 x 10(-5) min-1 to 1 x 10(-5) min-1 for the DNA-flanked substrates, which corresponds to a rate acceleration of more than 10(3) as compared with the uncatalyzed reaction.

  16. Toxocara canis: Larvicidal activity of fatty acid amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Santos, Taís; D'Oca, Caroline da Ros Montes; Mata-Santos, Hílton Antônio; Fenalti, Juliana; Pinto, Nitza; Coelho, Tatiane; Berne, Maria Elisabeth; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-02-01

    Considering the therapeutic potential of fatty acid amides, the present study aimed to evaluate their in vitro activity against Toxocara canis larvae and their cytotoxicity for the first time. Linoleylpyrrolidilamide was the most potent, with a minimal larvicidal concentration (MLC) of 0.05 mg/mL and 27% cytotoxicity against murine peritoneal macrophages C57BL/6 mice, as assessed by the MTT assay. PMID:26783180

  17. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Styrene

    OpenAIRE

    Hasmukh S. Patel; Panchal, Kumar K.

    2004-01-01

    Novel unsaturated poly (ester-amide) resins (UPEAs) were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA) and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Styrene (STY.) to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-STY. resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a catalyst and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter ...

  18. Optimization of amide-based EP3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther C Y; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Arcari, Joel T; Bahnck, Kevin; Coffey, Steven B; Derksen, David R; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Loria, Paula M; Sharma, Raman

    2016-06-01

    Prostaglandin E receptor subtype 3 (EP3) antagonism may treat a variety of symptoms from inflammation to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Previously, most EP3 antagonists were large acidic ligands that mimic the substrate, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). This manuscript describes the optimization of a neutral small molecule amide series with improved lipophilic efficiency (LipE) also known as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) ((a) Nat. Rev. Drug Disc.2007, 6, 881; (b) Annu. Rep. Med. Chem.2010, 45, 380). PMID:27107947

  19. On DABAL-Me₃ promoted formation of amides

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Nathalie; Glynn, Daniel; McInally, Thomas; Rhodes, Barrie; Woodward, Simon; Irvine, Derek; Dodds, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The range and utility of DABAL-Me3 couplings of methyl esters and free carboxylic acids with primary and secondary amines under a variety of conditions (reflux, sealed tube, microwave) has been compared for a significant range of coupling partners of relevance to the preparation of amides of interest in pharmaceutical chemistry. Commercial microwave reactors promote the fastest couplings and allow the use of significantly sterically hindered amines (primary and secondary) and carboxylic acids...

  20. Total chemical synthesis of lassomycin and lassomycin-amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, S; Munshi, T; Hudson, A S; Hatton, C; Clardy, J; Mosely, J A; Bull, T J; Sit, C S; Cobb, S L

    2016-05-11

    Herein we report a practical synthetic route to the lasso peptide lassomycin () and C-terminal variant lassomycin-amide (). The biological evaluation of peptides and against Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that neither had any activity against this bacterium. This lack of biological activity has led us to propose that naturally occurring lassomycin may actually exhibit a standard lasso peptide threaded conformation rather than the previously reported unthreaded structure. PMID:27101411

  1. Spectroscopic properties of the nonplanar amide group: A computational study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Maloň, Petr; Bouř, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 10 (2007), s. 775-786. ISSN 0899-0042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0420; GA ČR GA202/07/0732; GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nonplanar amide bond * peptide geometry * proteins * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.436, year: 2007

  2. Uses of extraction and ion exchange chromatography in the thorium and rare earths separation from industrial residue generated in thorium purification unity at IPEN. Application of rare earths as catalysts for generation of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 70's a pilot plant for studies of different concentrates processing obtained from the chemical processing of monazite was operated at IPEN / CNEN-SP, with a view to obtaining thorium of nuclear purity. This unity was operated on an industrial scale since 1985, generating around 25 metric tons of residue and was closed in 2002. This waste containing thorium and rare earths was named Retoter (Rejeito de Torio e Terras Raras, in portuguese) and stored in the IPEN Safeguards shed. This paper studies the treatment of the waste, aimed at environmental, radiological and technology. Were studied two cases for the chromatographic separation of thorium from rare earths. One of them was the chromatographic extraction, where the extracting agent tributyl phosphate was supported on polymeric resins Amberlite XAD16. The other method is studied for comparison purposes, since the material used in chromatographic extraction is unprecedented with regard to the separation of thorium, was the ion-exchange chromatography using DOWEX 1-X8 strong cationic resin. Was studied also the chromatographic process of extraction with the extracting agent DEHPA supported on Amberlite XAD16 for the fractionation in groups of rare earths elements. Thorium was separated with high purity for strategic purposes and rare earths recovered free from thorium, were tested as a catalyst for ethanol reforming to hydrogen obtaining which is used in fuel cells for power generation. (author)

  3. 水与三甲基硅烷醇羟基的%Ab Initio Study on the Mechanism of Hydrogen Exchange Reaction Between H_2O and Hydroxyl of (CH_3)_3SiOH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋树斌; 王和义; 钟志京; 杨勇; 杜阳; 罗顺忠

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction mechanism between H_2O and -OH of surface of Li_4SiO_4 ceramic has been investigated using hydroxyl of (CH_3)_3SiOH as a simple model of hydroxyl of surface of Li_4SiO_4 ceramic. The structures of (CH_3)_3SiOH, H_2O, (CH_3)_3SiOH-H_2O complexes and transition states of hydrogen exchange reaction have been optimized at HF/3-21G, HF/6-311G++~(**), and MP2/6-311G++~(**) levels. The association energies of (CH_3)_3SiOH-H_2O and the path of hydrogen exchange reaction have also been explored. The results show that two of associate complexes can be formed, the O of H_2O interact with the H of hydroxyl of (CH_3)_3SiOH to form one complex and the another complex is formed by the interaction between the H of H_2O and the O of hydroxyl of (CH_3)_3SiOH. At HF/6-311G++~(**) and MP2/6-311G++~(**) levels, the association energies after basis set superposition error correction of two complexes above are 18.016 1, 18.816 6, 20.046 5, 21.630 7 kJ/mol, respectively. The favorable path of hydrogen exchange reaction is as follow: first, the H of H_2O interactes with the O of hydroxyl of (CH_3)_3SiOH to form associate complex, second, 4-membered ring transition state consisted of O, from H_2O, H, from H_2O, O, from (CH_3)_3SiOH, Si, from (CH_3)_3SiOH is formed, third, the formation of new O-Si bond and the break old O-H bond lead the new (CH_3)_3SiOH to be formed, at the same time, the new H_2O is formed resulting in the rupture of old O-Si bond and the formation of new H-O bond. At HF/6-311G++_(**) and MP2/6-311G++~(**) level, the activation energies of this path are 232.905 3 kJ/mol and 186.898 4 kJ/mol with counterpoise correction.%以(CH_3)_3SiOH羟基模拟Li_4SiO_4陶瓷表面羟基,研究了H_2O与(CH_3)_3SiOH羟基H的氢交换反应机理.采用HF, MP2方法,在3-21G和6-311G++H~(**)水平上优化了(CH_3)_3SiOH, H_2O, (CH_3)_3SiOH-H_2O复合物及氢交换反应过渡态的结构.计算了生成(CH_3)_3SiOH-H_2O复合物的反应热,探讨了

  4. Identification of a potent sodium hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) inhibitor with a suitable profile for chronic dosing and demonstrated cardioprotective effects in a preclinical model of myocardial infarction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, John D; Bentzien, Jörg; Boyer, Stephen J; Burke, Jennifer; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Eickmeier, Christian; Guo, Xin; Haist, James V; Hickey, Eugene R; Kaplita, Paul; Karmazyn, Morris; Kemper, Raymond; Kennedy, Charles A; Kirrane, Thomas; Madwed, Jeffrey B; Mainolfi, Elizabeth; Nagaraja, Nelamangara; Soleymanzadeh, Fariba; Swinamer, Alan; Eldrup, Anne B

    2012-08-23

    Sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane ion channel responsible for intracellular pH regulation. During myocardial ischemia, low pH activates NHE1 and causes increased intracellular calcium levels and aberrant cellular processes, leading to myocardial stunning, arrhythmias, and ultimately cell damage and death. The role of NHE1 in cardiac injury has prompted interest in the development of NHE1 inhibitors for the treatment of heart failure. This report outlines our efforts to identify a compound suitable for once daily, oral administration with low drug-drug interaction potential starting from NHE1 inhibitor sabiporide. Substitution of a piperidine for the piperazine of sabiporide followed by replacement of the pyrrole moiety and subsequent optimization to improve potency and eliminate off-target activities resulted in the identification of N-[4-(1-acetyl-piperidin-4-yl)-3-trifluoromethyl-benzoyl]-guanidine (60). Pharmacological evaluation of 60 revealed a remarkable ability to prevent ischemic damage in an ex vivo model of ischemia reperfusion injury in isolated rat hearts. PMID:22803959

  5. Mild Metal-Free Hydrosilylation of Secondary Amides to Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pei-Qiang; Lang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Yan-Rong

    2016-05-20

    The combination of amide activation by Tf2O with B(C6F5)3-catalyzed hydrosilylation with TMDS constitutes a method for the one-pot reduction of secondary amides to amines under mild conditions. The method displays a broad applicability for the reduction of many types of substrates, and shows good compatibility and excellent chemoselectivity for many sensitive functional groups. Reductions of a multifunctionalized α,β-unsaturated amide obtained from another synthetic methodology, and a C-H functionalization product produced the corresponding amines in good to excellent yield. Chemoselective reduction of enantiomeric pure (ee >99%) tetrahydro-5-oxo-2-furaneamides yielded 5-(aminomethyl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-ones in a racemization-free manner. The latter were converted in one pot to N-protected 5-hydroxypiperidin-2-ones, which are building blocks for the synthesis of many natural products. Further elaboration of an intermediate led to a concise four-step synthesis of (-)-epi-pseudoconhydrine. PMID:27100232

  6. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium employing dialkyl amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction and purification of actinides from different matrices is of utmost importance to the nuclear industry. In recent decades, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has emerged as a promising alternative to solvent extraction owing to its inherent potential of minimization of liquid waste generation. N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have been proposed to be an alternative to TBP in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel due to several attractive features like innocuous nature of degradation products (mainly carboxylic acids/ amines), possibility of complete incineration of the used extractant leading to reduction in volume of secondary waste. Also, physico-chemical properties of this class of extractants can be tuned by the judicious choice of alkyl groups. In the present work, N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides with varying alkyl groups viz. N,N-dibutyl-2-ethylhexanamide (DBEHA), N,N-dibutyl-3,3-dimethylbutanamide (DBDMBA), N,N-dihexyloctanamide (DHOA), N,N-disecbutylpentamide (DBPA), N,N-dibutyloctanamide (DBOA), have been evaluated for supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of uranium and thorium from nitric acid medium as well as tissue paper matrix. Amides were obtained from Department of Chemistry, Delhi University and were used as such. This fact could be exploited for separation of thorium and uranium

  7. First synthesis and anticancer activity of novel naphthoquinone amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradidphol, Narathip; Kongkathip, Ngampong; Sittikul, Pichamon; Boonyalai, Nonlawat; Kongkathip, Boonsong

    2012-03-01

    Sixteen novel naphthoquinone aromatic amides were synthesized by a new route starting from 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid in nine or ten steps with good to excellent yield. Amide formation reaction was carried out by using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMTMM) as an efficient condensing agent leading to carboxamides in high yield. The key step for converting naphthol to 3-hydroxynaphthoquinone was the Fremy's salt oxidation followed by hydroxylation with tert-butyl hydroperoxide and triton B. Anticancer activity of these new naphthoquinone amides were evaluated and benzamide 22 showed potent inhibition against NCI-H187 cell lines while naphthamides 23 and 43 were the most potent inhibition against KB cells. The decatenation assay revealed that compounds 24 and 43 at 20 μM can inhibit hTopoIIα activity while three other compounds, namely compounds 22, 23, and 45, exhibited hTopoIIα inhibitory activity at final concentration of 50 μM. Docking experiment revealed the same trend as the cytotoxicity and decatenation assay. Therefore, naphthamides 24 and 43 can be promising target molecules for anticancer drug development. PMID:22280818

  8. Herringbone array of hydrogen-bonded ribbons in 2-ethoxybenzamide from high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagola, Silvina; Stephens, Peter W

    2009-11-01

    In 2-ethoxybenzamide, C(9)H(11)NO(2), the amide substituents are linked into centrosymmetric head-to-head hydrogen-bonded dimers. Additional hydrogen bonds between adjacent dimers give rise to ribbon-like packing motifs, which extend along the c axis and possess a third dimension caused by twisting of the 2-ethoxyphenyl substituent with respect to the hydrogen-bonded amide groups. The ribbons are arranged in a T-shaped herringbone pattern and cohesion between them is achieved by van der Waals forces. PMID:19893241

  9. Herringbone Array of Hydrogen-bonded Ribbons in 2-ethoxybenzamide from High-resolution X-ray Powder Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagola, S.; Stephens, P

    2009-01-01

    In 2-ethoxybenzamide, C{sub 9}H{sub 11}NO{sub 2}, the amide substituents are linked into centrosymmetric head-to-head hydrogen-bonded dimers. Additional hydrogen bonds between adjacent dimers give rise to ribbon-like packing motifs, which extend along the c axis and possess a third dimension caused by twisting of the 2-ethoxyphenyl substituent with respect to the hydrogen-bonded amide groups. The ribbons are arranged in a T-shaped herringbone pattern and cohesion between them is achieved by van der Waals forces.

  10. Synergistic effects of three Piper amides on generalist and specialist herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, L A; Dodson, C D; Stireman, J O; Tobler, M A; Smilanich, A M; Fincher, R M; Letourneau, D K

    2003-11-01

    The tropical rainforest shrub Piper cenocladum, which is normally defended against herbivores by a mutualistic ant, contains three amides that have various defensive functions. While the ants are effective primarily against specialist herbivores, we hypothesized that these secondary compounds would be effective against a wider range of insects, thus providing a broad array of defenses against herbivores. We also tested whether a mixture of amides would be more effective against herbivores than individual amides. Diets spiked with amides were offered to five herbivores: a naïve generalist caterpillar (Spodoptera frugiperda), two caterpillar species that are monophagous on P. cenocladum (Eois spp.), leaf-cutting ants (Atta cephalotes), and an omnivorous ant (Paraponera clavata). Amides had negative effects on all insects, whether they were naïve, experienced, generalized, or specialized feeders. For Spodoptera, amide mixtures caused decreased pupal weights and survivorship and increased development times. Eois pupal weights, larval mass gain, and development times were affected by additions of individual amides, but increased parasitism and lower survivorship were caused only by the amide mixture. Amide mixtures also deterred feeding by the two ant species, and crude plant extracts were strongly deterrent to P. clavata. The mixture of all three amides had the most dramatic deterrent and toxic effects across experiments, with the effects usually surpassing expected additive responses, indicating that these compounds can act synergistically against a wide array of herbivores. PMID:14682530

  11. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  12. Proceedings of the 10. Canadian hydrogen conference : hydrogen millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P. [eds.

    2000-05-01

    The development of hydrogen as the ideal non-polluting fuel of the future is receiving worldwide attention. This conference provided a forum for exchanging the latest information on technical developments, commercialization efforts and government-sponsored activities. The conference was attended by participants from around the world. The following topics were addressed: (1) international perspectives on hydrogen for the new millennium, (2) climate change and the current set of policy drivers and programs in Canada, United States, Europe and Japan, (3) advances in hydrogen production using renewable energy sources such as wind and solar, (4) bio-hydrogen and hydrogen production, (5) the latest developments in hydrogen storage, compression and liquefaction, (6) hydrides, (7) carbon nanotubes and nanofibres, (8) electricity applications for distributed power for commercial and residential applications, and (9) hydrogen fuels for fuel cell vehicles. More than 100 papers were presented at this conference of which 68 have been processed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs.

  13. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  14. Amide proton signals as pH indicator for in vivo MRS and MRI of the brain-Responses to hypercapnia and hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Frahm, Jens; Michaelis, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Using proton MRS and MRI of mouse brain at 9.4T, this work provides the first in vivo evidence of pH-dependent concurrent changes of three amide signals and related metabolic responses to hypercapnia and hypothermia. During hypercapnia, amide proton MRS signals of glutamine at 6.8-6.9ppm and 7.6ppm as well as of unspecific compounds at 8.1-8.3ppm increase by at least 50% both at 37°C and 22°C. These changes reflect a reduced proton exchange with water. They are strongly correlated with intracellular pH which ranges from 6.75±0.10 to 7.13±0.06 as determined from a shift in creatine phosphokinase equilibrium. In MRI, saturation transfer from aliphatic as well as aromatic and/or amide protons alters slightly during hypercapnia and significantly during hypothermia. The asymmetry in magnetization transfer ratios decreased slightly during hypercapnia and hypothermia. Regardless of pH or temperature, saturation transfer from aliphatic protons between -2 and -4ppm frequency offset to water protons is significantly greater than that from aromatic/amide protons at corresponding offsets between +2 and +4ppm. Irradiation of aliphatic compounds at -3.5ppm frequency offset from water predominantly saturates lipids and water associated with myelin. Taken together, the results indicate that, for the B1 power used in this study, dipolar coupling between aliphatic and water protons rather than proton exchange is the dominant factor in Z-spectra and magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry of the brain in vivo. PMID:26975553

  15. Synthesis of chiral lactams via asymmetric hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Duanyang; Li, Meina; Zi, Guofu; Hou, Guohua

    2016-04-26

    A highly efficient Rh-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated nitriles containing ester/amide groups has been developed. Under mild conditions, with a complex of rhodium and (S,S)-f-spiroPhos as the catalyst, a variety of α,β-unsaturated nitriles bearing an ester or amide group were successfully hydrogenated to the corresponding chiral nitriles with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99.7% ee) and high turnover numbers (TON = 10 000). Furthermore, this catalyst system was also successfully applied to the synthesis of important chiral pharmacophore fragments, lactams, Paroxetine and amino acids. PMID:27056402

  16. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  17. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label 'amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  18. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  19. Lithium Alkyl Exchange Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic analyses of two types of exchange reactions of organo- lithium reagents, both alkyl and aryl types, RLi, have been made: (1) halogen-metal interchange with alkyl and aryl halides, R'X, and (2) hydrogen-metal interchange (commonly called metallation) with aromatic hydrocarbons, R'H. Rates of these RLi + R'X ⇄ RX + R'Li; (1) . RLi + R'H ⇄ RH+ R'Li (2) reactions have been determined, conditions under which the systems attain equilibrium have been established, and the positions of equilibrium measured, all as functions of the reactants, solvents and catalysts employed. Concerning halogen-lithium interchange between alkyl groups (1), the conclusion is reached that equilibration proceeds to yield the less sterically demanding alkyl group attached to lithium. The data show, for example, that isobutyllithium is much less stable than n-butyllithium, and again, that 2,6-dimethyl- phenyllithium is much less stable than phenyllithium. The exchange is general with iodides, occurs with some bromides and does not occur with chlorides. The exchange is quite slow in hydrocarbon media and is catalysed by relatively small amounts of ethers. In the presence of the optically active methyl ether of menthol, methyl iodide exchanges with racemic s-butyllithium to give optically active s-butyl iodide. In work with the second reaction, hydrogen-lithium interchange (2), nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry has been used for rate studies. Catalysts (Lewis bases) have been evolved for establishing equilibria in rather unreactive systems, e.g. phenyllithium can be demonstrated to exchange with benzene by labelling the latter radioactivity. From the correlations of structure and reactivity found in this study, the conclusion is reached that the basic alkyllithium structure is dimeric, R2Li2 The arrangement of the groups within this dimer satisfactorily explain the special steric effects noted in organolithium reagent stability. (author)

  20. Synthesis of Imidates: TFA-Mediated Regioselective Amide Alkylation Using Meerwein's Reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Kirill; Somfai, Peter

    2016-04-15

    Regioselective O-alkylation of an amide to form the corresponding imidate is a common synthetic problem, often resulting in varying amounts of N-alkylation. Screening existing methods for converting amides to imidates gave inconsistent or irreproducible results, sometimes affording N-alkylamide as the major product. A simple and reliable protocol for amide O-alkylation with complete regioselectivity has been designed, and its scope and efficiency demonstrated on a number of substrates. PMID:27019206

  1. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jie-Ping; Jing, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Copper catalysis has been known as a powerful tool for its ubiquitous application in organic synthesis. One of the fundamental utilities of copper catalysis is in the C-N bond formation by using carbon sources and nitrogen functional groups such as amides. In this review, the recent progress in the amidation reactions employing copper-catalyzed C-H amidation is summarized. PMID:26664644

  2. Determination of wine authenticity and geographical origin by measuring non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes in wine ethanol with EIM-IRMS® methodology in combination with δ18O values obtained from wine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajlovic, Ivan; Glavanovic, Mirko; Sparks, Kimberlee L.; Sparks, Jed P.; Jovic, Slobodan

    2014-05-01

    Wine consumption has grown significantly in the last two decades, with the United States being the leading consumer of wine in the world. It is also the second largest wine producer and importer after the European Union, which consists of 27 European countries. The world has seen a significant increase in production from new world countries, especially the United States, Australia and Chile, and wine imports have grown significantly with this globalization. The quality and authenticity of products have become critical concerns. With the amount of wine being imported the need for verifying wine authenticity and understanding procedures used in wine making has become more important than ever. Understanding the origin of consumed wine in rapidly expanding global economy has become fundamental in order to control quality and protect consumers. In our previous scientific work we have shown that EIM-IRMS®, Ethanol Isotope Measurement - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (EIM-IRMS®), is capable of providing unique molecular fingerprint that cannot be reproduced or counterfeited. Today we know that δ18O value from the wine water is one of the most important parameters which can give information about wine geographical origin. Earlier we have suggested that grape juice or grape pulp is a closed biochemical system in which all chemical compounds stand in dynamic equilibrium and are in direct connection with each other. Taking that into consideration we have concluded that if system is genuine and if no water, or no sugar has been added to the grape must or grape juice prior to alcoholic fermentation, then ethanol which is made in process of alcoholic fermentation will have specific δD value of non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes which will be in range from -205 to -215 ‰ vs. V-SMOW. In this work we will show that this value, which we named δDn (non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes in ethanol), is very important because it can support or refute conclusions

  3. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  4. Synthesis of new fatty acids amides from aminolysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent biochemical and pharmacological studies have led to the characterization of different fatty acid amides as a new family of biologically active lipids. Here, we describe the synthesis of new amides from C16:0, 18:0, 18:1 and 18:1, OH fatty acids (FFA) families with cyclic and acyclic amines and demonstrate for the first time that these compounds produce cytotoxic effects. Application of this method to the synthesis of fatty acid amides was performed using the esters aminolysis as a key step and various carboxylic amides were prepared in good yield from fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). (author)

  5. Evaluation of the Ser-His Dipeptide, a Putative Catalyst of Amide and Ester Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Melissa J; Lavis, Luke D; Hilvert, Donald; Gellman, Samuel H

    2016-08-01

    Efficient hydrolysis of amide bonds has long been a reaction of interest for organic chemists. The rate constants of proteases are unmatched by those of any synthetic catalyst. It has been proposed that a dipeptide containing serine and histidine is an effective catalyst of amide hydrolysis, based on an apparent ability to degrade a protein. The capacity of the Ser-His dipeptide to catalyze the hydrolysis of several discrete ester and amide substrates is investigated using previously described conditions. This dipeptide does not catalyze the hydrolysis of amide or unactivated ester groups in any of the substrates under the conditions evaluated. PMID:27400366

  6. Cloning of a Novel Arylamidase Gene from Paracoccus sp. Strain FLN-7 That Hydrolyzes Amide Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Jin-Gang; Hang, Bao-Jian; Cai, Shu; He, Jian; Zhou, Shun-Gui; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial isolate Paracoccus sp. strain FLN-7 hydrolyzes amide pesticides such as diflubenzuron, propanil, chlorpropham, and dimethoate through amide bond cleavage. A gene, ampA, encoding a novel arylamidase that catalyzes the amide bond cleavage in the amide pesticides was cloned from the strain. ampA contains a 1,395-bp open reading frame that encodes a 465-amino-acid protein. AmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity c...

  7. Ion exchange resin for immobilizing radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.S.; Burgman, H.A.; Nahemow, M.D.

    1988-10-25

    A method of making an ion exchange material comprising: (1) implanting a ceramic material with an element selected from the group consisting of sulfur, carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen mixtures thereof; (2) oxidizing the sulfur to sulfate, the carbon to carboxylate or carbonate, the phosphorus to phosphate, the nitrogen to nitrate, or reducing the nitrogen to amine or amide, wherein the element is implanted at an energy of at least about 50 KeV and at a concentration of at least about 10/sup 12/ moieties per cm/sup 2/.

  8. Ion exchange resin for immobilizing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of making an ion exchange material comprising: (1) implanting a ceramic material with an element selected from the group consisting of sulfur, carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen mixtures thereof; (2) oxidizing the sulfur to sulfate, the carbon to carboxylate or carbonate, the phosphorus to phosphate, the nitrogen to nitrate, or reducing the nitrogen to amine or amide, wherein the element is implanted at an energy of at least about 50 KeV and at a concentration of at least about 10/sup 12/ moieties per cm/sup 2/

  9. Three new amides from streptomyces sp. H7372

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three new amides, methyl phenatate A (1), actiphenamide (2) and actiphenol 1-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), along with thirteen known compounds, were isolated from the organic extract of a fermentation culture of Streptomyces sp. H7372. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques, and MS analyses. Cycloheximide (6) and cyclo(ΔAla-L-Val) (8) gave a clear zone of inhibition of Ras-Raf-1 interaction in the yeast two hybrid assay which showed high potency with 10 and 25 mm clear ZOIs on SD His- and inactive on SD His+ at 2.5 mug per disk, respectively. (author)

  10. Two new chlorinated amides from Nicotiana glauca R. Graham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backheet, E Y; Sayed, H M

    2002-03-01

    Two new chlorinated amides, N-(2',6'-diethyl phenyl)-2-chloroacetamide (1) and N-(butyloxymethyl)-N-(2',6'-diethyl phenyl)-2-chloroacetamide (2) were isolated for the first time from the ethanolic extract of the leaves of Nicotiana glauca R. Graham in addition to triacontanol (3), scopoletin (4) and stigmasterol-3-beta-O-D-gluco-pyranoside (5). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis (1D, 2D NMR, EIMS, HR-EIMS, IR and UV). PMID:11933854

  11. Chemical Modifications of Hyaluronan using DMTMM-Activated Amidation

    OpenAIRE

    Rydergren, Sara

    2013-01-01

    An alternative approach to chemically modifying hyaluronan (HA) has been investigated. The triazine derivative 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium (DMTMM) has been used to activate carboxylic groups on HA, which react further to form stable amide bonds with primary and secondary amines. The reaction can either be used to couple monoamines to HA or to produce hydrogels by using diamines that form crosslinks between the HA chains. The reaction between HA and DMTMM has been...

  12. Antifungal activity of natural and synthetic amides from Piper species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antifungal leaves extract from Piper scutifolium was submitted to bioactivity-guided chromatographic separation against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum yielding piperine, piperlonguminine and corcovadine as the active principles which displayed a detection limit of 1 μg. Structure-activity relationships were investigated with the preparation of twelve analogs having differences in the number of unsaturations, aromatic ring substituents and in the amide moiety. Analogs having a single double-bond and no substituent in the aromatic ring displayed higher activity, while N,N,-diethyl analogs displayed higher dose-dependent activity. (author)

  13. Antifungal activity of natural and synthetic amides from Piper species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Joaquim V.; Oliveira, Alberto de; Kato, Massuo J., E-mail: majokato@iq.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQ/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Raggi, Ludmila; Young, Maria C. [Instituto de Botanica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Plantas

    2010-07-01

    The antifungal leaves extract from Piper scutifolium was submitted to bioactivity-guided chromatographic separation against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum yielding piperine, piperlonguminine and corcovadine as the active principles which displayed a detection limit of 1 {mu}g. Structure-activity relationships were investigated with the preparation of twelve analogs having differences in the number of unsaturations, aromatic ring substituents and in the amide moiety. Analogs having a single double-bond and no substituent in the aromatic ring displayed higher activity, while N,N,-diethyl analogs displayed higher dose-dependent activity. (author)

  14. The Role of Backbone Hydrogen Bonds in the Transition State for Protein Folding of a PDZ Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren W. Pedersen

    Full Text Available Backbone hydrogen bonds are important for the structure and stability of proteins. However, since conventional site-directed mutagenesis cannot be applied to perturb the backbone, the contribution of these hydrogen bonds in protein folding and stability has been assessed only for a very limited set of small proteins. We have here investigated effects of five amide-to-ester mutations in the backbone of a PDZ domain, a 90-residue globular protein domain, to probe the influence of hydrogen bonds in a β-sheet for folding and stability. The amide-to-ester mutation removes NH-mediated hydrogen bonds and destabilizes hydrogen bonds formed by the carbonyl oxygen. The overall stability of the PDZ domain generally decreased for all amide-to-ester mutants due to an increase in the unfolding rate constant. For this particular region of the PDZ domain, it is therefore clear that native hydrogen bonds are formed after crossing of the rate-limiting barrier for folding. Moreover, three of the five amide-to-ester mutants displayed an increase in the folding rate constant suggesting that the hydrogen bonds are involved in non-native interactions in the transition state for folding.

  15. GTI's hydrogen programs: hydrogen production, storage, and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范钦柏

    2006-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier could help address our concerns about energy security, global climate change,and air quality. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Future and have the potential to revolutionize theway we power our nation, offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels.For over 45 years, GTI has been active in hydrogen energy research, development and demonstration. The Institute has extensive experience and on-going work in all aspects of the hydrogen energy economy including production, delivery, infrastructure,use, safety and public policy. This paper discusses the recent GTI programs in hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC).

  16. Excited states of muonium in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Kulhar

    2006-06-01

    Muonium formation in excited states in muon-hydrogen charge-exchange collision is investigated using a method developed in a previous paper. Differential cross-section results are found to resemble positronium formation cross-section results of positron-hydrogen charge-exchange problem. Forward differential and integrated cross-sections are computed for muon energy of 2 keV and higher. Total muonium formation cross-sections are computed using Jackson and Schiff scaling rules. Muonium formation cross-section results obtained from proton-hydrogen charge-exchange cross-section results, using velocity scaling are compared with the results of the present calculation.

  17. Hydrogen absorption and lithium ion conductivity in Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, M.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Clemens, O. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Technical University of Darmstadt, Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials, Jovanka-Bontschits-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Slater, P.R. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Anderson, P.A., E-mail: p.a.anderson@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} was synthesized via solid state methods and hydrogenation attempted. • Hydrogenation of a lithium nitride halide was demonstrated for the first time. • Powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy showed that hydrogenation had gone to completion. • The ionic conductivities of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} and Li{sub 3}N were compared through A.C. impedance spectroscopy. • The lower conductivity of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} is consistent with its higher hydrogenation temperature. - Abstract: The reaction of lithium amide and imide with lithium halides to form new amide halide or imide halide phases has led to improved hydrogen desorption and absorption properties and, for the amides, lithium ion conductivities. Here we investigate the effect of bromide incorporation on the ionic conductivity and hydrogen absorption properties of lithium nitride. For the first time we show that it is possible for a lithium halide nitride, the cubic bromide nitride Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3}, to take up hydrogen—a necessary condition for potential use as a reversible solid-state hydrogen storage material. Powder X-ray diffraction showed the formation of Li{sub 2}Br(NH{sub 2}) and LiBr, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that only amide anions were present and that the hydrogen uptake reaction had gone to completion. The lithium ion conductivity of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} at the hydrogenation temperature was found to be less than that of Li{sub 3}N, which may be a significant factor in the kinetics of the hydrogenation process.

  18. Hydrogen physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop on hydrogen bond was restarted changing its name to 'Hydrogen Physics' for grasping hydrogen bond from wider viewpoint and expecting the new development in this field hereafter. As the basic attitude, the phenomena related to hydrogen bond are reviewed from two different systems: hydrogen-lattice system and hydrogen-electron system. The Hydrogen Physics meeting was held on September 29 and 30, 1992, at National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, and 19 lectures were given. The themes were proton dynamics of hydrogen bond, water science and water with good taste, collective movement and fluctuation of water, neutron diffraction of water, hydrogen bond in water as seen from Raman scattering, electron and proton movements in organic crystals, new deuterium substitution effect of proton transfer in hydrogen bond in solids, infrared spectroscopy for one-dimensional hydrogen bond crystals, MSR in solid hydrogen, hydrogen in alkali metal-graphite intercalation compounds, lattice anomalies and Grueneisen parameters in high Tc superconducting salts, bio-substances and hydrogen, hydrogen bond net in nucleotide and control of crystalline structure change by hydrogen vapor pressure, ATP and structural change and crystal water of guanosine, spread of protons and electrons in hydrogen bond, anisotropy of loose scattering according to ice rule, high pressure effect and isotope mixed crystal effect of KHS crystals without hydrogen crystal network, state of motion and phase transformation of hydrogen in KDP, and development of hydrogen bond research by neutron scattering. This publication contains the papers and the transparencies presented at the meeting. (J.P.N.)

  19. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AMIDATED PECTIN BASED POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.K.Mishra; A.Anis; S.Mondal; M.Dutt; A.K.Banthia

    2009-01-01

    The work presents the synthesis and characterization of ami dated pectin(AP)based polymer electrolyte membranes(PEM)crosslinked with glutaraldehyde(GA).The prepared membranes are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR),organic elemental analysis,X-ray diffraction studies(XRD),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)and impedance spectroscopy.Mechanical properties of the membranes are evaluated by tensile tests.The degree of amidation(DA),molar and mass reaction yields(YM and YN)are calculated based on the results of organic elemental analysis.FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of primary and secondary amide absorption bands.XRD pattern of membranes clearly indicates that there is a considerable increase in crystallinity as compared to parent pectin.TGA studies indicate that AP is less thermally stable than reference pectin.A maximum room temperature conductivity of 1.098×10-3 Scm-1 is obtained in the membrane,which is designated as AP-3.These properties make them good candidates for low cost biopolymer electrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications.

  20. Kinetics of excited muonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deexcitation and charge exchange of excited muonic hydrogen are considered. The inverse quasiresonant charge exchange process is taken into account. During cascade the inverse charge exchange balances the direct process down to the level with the principal quantum number n for which the resonance defect is larger than the collision energy. The density of the muonic atom for n≤n is then determined by deexcitation and muon transfer to nuclei of heavier hydrogen isotopes. Energy dependence of the ground-state population of the initial muonic hydrogen, q1s, is considered. Comparing our results for the q1s parameter with the available experimental data, we conclude that the collision energy of the excited muonic atoms is ∼3 eV for D-T and ∼5 eV for an H-D mixture

  1. Two enzymes which catalyze the amidation of peptide C-terminals are synthesized by a single mRNA. Peptide C mattan amid ka hanno wo shokubaisuru futatsu no koso wa ippon no mRNA yori goseisareru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, I.; Yonekura, H.; Okamoto, H. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan))

    1991-10-25

    Recent findings by the authors are reviewed on the amidation that forms amid structure essential to physiological activities in C-terminals of peptide hormones such as oxytocin,VIP,PP. It is noted that the amidation had been considered to be catalyzed by peptidylglycine{alpha} -amidating monooxyganase ( PAM ) and that the authors investigated the PAM function by expression of PAM cDNA isolated from rat pituitary and its deletion mutant into COS-7 cells, reaching to the important findings of a singl PMA mRNA encoding two enzymes, namely one at 5 {prime} side, peptidylglicine {alpha} hydroxylase which catalyses the conversion of C-termianl glycine on peptide to the hydroxylated form ( the first step of amidation ),and another at 3{prime} side, {alpha}- hydroxylglycine amidating dealkylase which catalyzes the conversion of hydroxylated glycine to the amidated form ( the second step of amidation). 19 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Langmuir films of an amide extracted from Piperaceae and its interaction with phospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, P. A.; Oliveira, O. N.; Aroca, R. F.; Chierice, G. O.; Constantino, C. J. L.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we investigate Langmuir monolayers from an amide extracted from dried roots of Ottonia propinqua, a native Brazilian plant believed to exhibit anesthetic and hallucinogen activities. In addition to producing monolayers from the amide itself, we probe the molecular-level action of the amide on phospholipids employed as simple membrane models. The surface pressure-molecular area ( π- A) isotherms for the amide were little affected by a number of subphase conditions. Almost no changes were observed upon varying the compression speed, spreading volume onto the surface, ions in the subphase, ionic strength and the solution solvent. However, stronger effects occurred when the subphase temperature and pH were altered, as the isotherms were shifted to larger areas with increasing temperatures and decreasing pHs. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular packing adopted by the amide at the air-water interface. In the mixed films with arachidic acid, the area per molecule varied linearly with the concentration of amide, probably due to phase separation. On the other hand, in the mixed films with dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), small amounts of the amide were sufficient to change the π- A isotherms significantly. This points to a strong molecular-level interaction, probably between the phosphate group in the zwitterion of DPPC and the nitrogen from the amidic group.

  3. A 2:1 co-crystal of p-nitro-benzoic acid and N,N'-bis-(pyridin-3-ylmeth-yl)ethanedi-amide: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sabrina; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Jotani, Mukesh M; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-01-01

    The title 2:1 co-crystal, 2C7H5NO4·C14H14N4O2, in which the complete di-amide mol-ecule is generated by crystallographic inversion symmetry, features a three-mol-ecule aggregate sustained by hydroxyl-O-H⋯N(pyrid-yl) hydrogen bonds. The p-nitro-benzoic acid mol-ecule is non-planar, exhibiting twists of both the carb-oxy-lic acid and nitro groups, which form dihedral angles of 10.16 (9) and 4.24 (4)°, respectively, with the benzene ring. The di-amide mol-ecule has a conformation approximating to a Z shape, with the pyridyl rings lying to either side of the central, almost planar di-amide residue (r.m.s. deviation of the eight atoms being 0.025 Å), and forming dihedral angles of 77.22 (6)° with it. In the crystal, three-mol-ecule aggregates are linked into a linear supra-molecular ladder sustained by amide-N-H⋯O(nitro) hydrogen bonds and orientated along [10-4]. The ladders are connected into a double layer via pyridyl- and benzene-C-H⋯O(amide) inter-actions, which, in turn, are connected into a three-dimensional architecture via π-π stacking inter-actions between pyridyl and benzene rings [inter-centroid distance = 3.6947 (8) Å]. An evaluation of the Hirshfeld surfaces confirm the importance of inter-molecular inter-actions involving oxygen atoms as well as the π-π inter-actions. PMID:26870591

  4. Removal of Cr(VI) onto functionalized pyridine copolymer with amide groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neagu, Violeta, E-mail: vneagu@icmpp.ro [' Petru Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2009-11-15

    New pyridine strong base anion exchange resin has been prepared by the nucleophilic substitution reaction of 4-vinylpyridine:divinylbenzene copolymer of gel structure with 2-chloroacetamide as halogenated compound. The resulting resin was used to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies have been carried out to determine the effect of the initial concentration of Cr(VI), adsorbent dose, pH, temperature and the presence of sulfate anions as counter ions. The process was found to be pH, solid/liquid ratio and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacities increase with the increase of the initial concentration of Cr(VI) and therefore, the resin exhibited the degree of usage of the strong base exchange capacities higher than 90% and the good efficiency in the chromium removal. At acidic pH and low concentration of the hexavalent chromium the synthesized pyridine resin offer much greater chromate removal capacities compared to alkaline pH. Equilibrium modeling of the process of Cr(VI) removal was carried out by using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data obeyed these isotherm models. Thermodynamic studies were performed and the parameters namely, {Delta}G{sup o}, {Delta}H{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o} showed the spontaneous and endothermic process of the adsorption of Cr(VI) on the pyridine resin. In the competitive adsorption studies, chromate/sulfate revealed the selectivity of the pyridine adsorbents towards chromium ions. This selectivity is explained by the adsorption of the transition metal anion on the {pi} bonds of the pyridine ring and the formation a sandwich arrangement with chromium anion and amide functional groups attached to the quaternary nitrogen atoms.

  5. Removal of Cr(VI) onto functionalized pyridine copolymer with amide groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New pyridine strong base anion exchange resin has been prepared by the nucleophilic substitution reaction of 4-vinylpyridine:divinylbenzene copolymer of gel structure with 2-chloroacetamide as halogenated compound. The resulting resin was used to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies have been carried out to determine the effect of the initial concentration of Cr(VI), adsorbent dose, pH, temperature and the presence of sulfate anions as counter ions. The process was found to be pH, solid/liquid ratio and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacities increase with the increase of the initial concentration of Cr(VI) and therefore, the resin exhibited the degree of usage of the strong base exchange capacities higher than 90% and the good efficiency in the chromium removal. At acidic pH and low concentration of the hexavalent chromium the synthesized pyridine resin offer much greater chromate removal capacities compared to alkaline pH. Equilibrium modeling of the process of Cr(VI) removal was carried out by using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data obeyed these isotherm models. Thermodynamic studies were performed and the parameters namely, ΔGo, ΔHo and ΔSo showed the spontaneous and endothermic process of the adsorption of Cr(VI) on the pyridine resin. In the competitive adsorption studies, chromate/sulfate revealed the selectivity of the pyridine adsorbents towards chromium ions. This selectivity is explained by the adsorption of the transition metal anion on the π bonds of the pyridine ring and the formation a sandwich arrangement with chromium anion and amide functional groups attached to the quaternary nitrogen atoms.

  6. Removal of Cr(VI) onto functionalized pyridine copolymer with amide groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Violeta

    2009-11-15

    New pyridine strong base anion exchange resin has been prepared by the nucleophilic substitution reaction of 4-vinylpyridine:divinylbenzene copolymer of gel structure with 2-chloroacetamide as halogenated compound. The resulting resin was used to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies have been carried out to determine the effect of the initial concentration of Cr(VI), adsorbent dose, pH, temperature and the presence of sulfate anions as counter ions. The process was found to be pH, solid/liquid ratio and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacities increase with the increase of the initial concentration of Cr(VI) and therefore, the resin exhibited the degree of usage of the strong base exchange capacities higher than 90% and the good efficiency in the chromium removal. At acidic pH and low concentration of the hexavalent chromium the synthesized pyridine resin offer much greater chromate removal capacities compared to alkaline pH. Equilibrium modeling of the process of Cr(VI) removal was carried out by using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data obeyed these isotherm models. Thermodynamic studies were performed and the parameters namely, DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees showed the spontaneous and endothermic process of the adsorption of Cr(VI) on the pyridine resin. In the competitive adsorption studies, chromate/sulfate revealed the selectivity of the pyridine adsorbents towards chromium ions. This selectivity is explained by the adsorption of the transition metal anion on the pi bonds of the pyridine ring and the formation a sandwich arrangement with chromium anion and amide functional groups attached to the quaternary nitrogen atoms. PMID:19647364

  7. Effect of polyamine reagents on exchange capacity in ion exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, T. I.; Dyachenko, F. V.; Bogatyreva, Yu. V.; Borodastov, A. K.; Ershova, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of compounds involved in complex reagents is described using Helamin 906H reagent as an example. The working exchange capacity of KU-2-8chs cation exchanger in hydrogen form and Amberlite IRA 900Cl anion exchanger in OH form remained almost unchanged when they were used repeatedly to purify water that contained Helamin 906H reagent; in addition, this capacity was the same upon filtration of water that did not contain this reagent. Leakage of total organic carbon was observed earlier than that of calcium ions upon filtration of the solution through the cation exchanger layer. The test results obtained in industrial conditions indicated that using H-OH filters to purify turbine condensate enables the decrease of the concentration of organic and other impurities therein.

  8. Method for Preparation of Amides from Alcohols and Amines by Extrusion of Hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparation of carboxamides using alcohols and amines as starting materials in a dehydrogenative coupling reaction catalyzed by a ruthenium N-heterocyciic carbene (NHC) complex, which may be prepared in situ.......The present invention relates to a method for preparation of carboxamides using alcohols and amines as starting materials in a dehydrogenative coupling reaction catalyzed by a ruthenium N-heterocyciic carbene (NHC) complex, which may be prepared in situ....

  9. Catalyst-free synthesis of sodium amide nanoparticles encapsulated in silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Alexander D., E-mail: alexander.ogilvie@chem.oxon.org [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Makepeace, Joshua W., E-mail: josh.makepeace@chem.ox.ac.uk [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Hore, Katie, E-mail: katie.hore@chem.ox.ac.uk [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J., E-mail: timmy.ramirez-cuesta@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Apperley, David C., E-mail: d.c.apperley@dur.ac.uk [EPSRC UK National Solid-State NMR Service, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Mitchels, John M., E-mail: J.M.Mitchels@bath.ac.uk [Microscopy and Analysis Suite, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Edwards, Peter P., E-mail: peter.edwards@chem.ox.ac.uk [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Sartbaeva, Asel, E-mail: a.sartbaeva@bath.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Catalyst-free formation of nanoparticulate sodium amide encased in silica gel. • In situ ammoniation using Inelastic Neutron Spectroscopy. • Reduced air- and moisture-sensitivity and no pyrophoricity. • An alternative method for nanoparticle synthesis under mild conditions. - Abstract: Crystalline sodium amide nanoparticles encapsulated in an amorphous silica framework were formed by ammoniation of a precursor material, silica gel loaded with metallic sodium, under mild conditions and without catalysis. This ammoniation was performed in situ on TOSCA beamline at ISIS, RAL, using anhydrous gaseous ammonia. The resulting material exhibits no pyrophoricity and much reduced air- and moisture-sensitivity compared to the bulk amide. The nanoparticles formed will offer a greatly increased surface area for chemical reactions where amide is currently used as an important ingredient for industrial applications. We anticipate that this method of sodium amide production will have a diversity of applications.

  10. Synthesis, Structure and Catalytic Activity Comparison of Tris- and Tetracoordinated Lanthanide Amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE,Mei-Hua(谢美华); LIU,Xin-Yuan(刘心元); WANG,Shao-Wu(王绍武); LIU,Li(刘莉); WU,Yong-Yong(吴勇勇); YANG,Gao-Sheng(杨高升); ZHOU,Shuang-Liu(周双六); SHENG,En-Hong(盛恩宏); HUANG,Zi-Xiang(黄子祥)

    2004-01-01

    Tetracoordinated lanthanide amides [(Me3Si)2N]3Ln (μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 (Ln=La (1), Pr (2)) were synthesized by the reaction of anhydrous lanthanide(Ⅲ) chlorides LnCl3 (Ln=La, Pr) with 3 equiv. of lithium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide (Me3Si)2NLi in THF, followed by recrystallization from toluene. Sublimation of 1 and 2 afforded the triscoordinate lanthanide amides [(Me3Si)2N]3Ln (Ln =La, Pr). The crystal structure of 2 was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The catalytic activity studies show that the tetracoordinate amides can be used as single-component MMA (methyl methacrylate) polymerization catalysts, while the triscoordinate amides showed poor activity on MMA polymerization under the same conditions.

  11. Catalyst-free synthesis of sodium amide nanoparticles encapsulated in silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Catalyst-free formation of nanoparticulate sodium amide encased in silica gel. • In situ ammoniation using Inelastic Neutron Spectroscopy. • Reduced air- and moisture-sensitivity and no pyrophoricity. • An alternative method for nanoparticle synthesis under mild conditions. - Abstract: Crystalline sodium amide nanoparticles encapsulated in an amorphous silica framework were formed by ammoniation of a precursor material, silica gel loaded with metallic sodium, under mild conditions and without catalysis. This ammoniation was performed in situ on TOSCA beamline at ISIS, RAL, using anhydrous gaseous ammonia. The resulting material exhibits no pyrophoricity and much reduced air- and moisture-sensitivity compared to the bulk amide. The nanoparticles formed will offer a greatly increased surface area for chemical reactions where amide is currently used as an important ingredient for industrial applications. We anticipate that this method of sodium amide production will have a diversity of applications

  12. The effect of heating rate on the reversible hydrogen storage based on reactions of Li3AlH6 with LiNH2

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Choi, Young Joon; Sohn, Hong Yong; Kim, Chul; Bowman, Robert C., Jr.; Hwang, Son-Jong

    2008-01-01

    Reversible dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions have been reported for a number of reactions based on lithium alanate and lithium amide materials. The dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions involving these materials are, however, usually very complex. Significant discrepancies exist among different studies published in literature. Understanding the reaction mechanism and the dependence of the reaction pathway on material preparation processes and processing parameters is critical....

  13. Changes in the hydrogen-bonding strength of internal water molecules and cysteine residues in the conductive state of channelrhodopsin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Muders, Vera; Schlesinger, Ramona; Heberle, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, particularly in the less understood class of membrane proteins. As the first of its kind, channelrhodopsin is a light-gated cation channel and paved the way for the new and vibrant field of optogenetics, where nerve cells are activated by light. Still, the molecular mechanism of channelrhodopsin is not understood. Here, we applied time-resolved FT-IR difference spectroscopy to channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae. It is shown that the (conductive) P2380 intermediate decays with τ ≈ 40 ms and 200 ms after pulsed excitation. The vibrational changes between the closed and the conductive states were analyzed in the X-H stretching region (X = O, S, N), comprising vibrational changes of water molecules, sulfhydryl groups of cysteine side chains and changes of the amide A of the protein backbone. The O-H stretching vibrations of "dangling" water molecules were detected in two different states of the protein using H218O exchange. Uncoupling experiments with a 1:1 mixture of H2O:D2O provided the natural uncoupled frequencies of the four O-H (and O-D) stretches of these water molecules, each with a very weakly hydrogen-bonded O-H group (3639 and 3628 cm-1) and with the other O-H group medium (3440 cm-1) to moderately strongly (3300 cm-1) hydrogen-bonded. Changes in amide A and thiol vibrations report on global and local changes, respectively, associated with the formation of the conductive state. Future studies will aim at assigning the respective cysteine group(s) and at localizing the "dangling" water molecules within the protein, providing a better understanding of their functional relevance in CaChR1.

  14. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  15. Hydrogen vacancies facilitate hydrogen transport kinetics in sodium hydride nanocrystallites

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.(Panjab University, Chandigarh, India); Eijt, S.W.H.

    2008-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory, of the vacancy-mediated hydrogen migration energy in bulk NaH and near the NaH(001) surface. The estimated rate of the vacancy mediated hydrogen transport, obtained within a hopping diffusion model, is consistent with the reaction rates of H-D exchange in nano-NaH at the relatively low temperatures observed in recent neutron studies on TiCl3-doped NaAlH4. We further obtained the formation energy for hydrogen vacancies and in...

  16. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of antiinflammatory mutual amide prodrugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D T Makhija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs have been widely used for the management of inflammation, pain and nociception. Gastric intolerance caused by most of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs used today restricts their use. Several approaches have been proposed to modify the parent nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs molecule in order to reduce their gastric toxicity. Oral prodrug approach is one of such approaches. In the present work three nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs viz. ibuprofen, diclofenac, and flurbiprofen were conjugated with sulfonamides like sulphamethoxazole and sulphanilamide via amide bond using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide coupling reaction. The synthesized prodrugs were screened for their analgesic and antiinflammatory activity using Eddy′s hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing and carrageenan-induced rat paw edema method, respectively. These prodrugs were also evaluated for their ulcerogenic potential. All synthesized prodrugs were found to be less ulcerogenic than their parent nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and showed better activity profile in terms of analgesic and antiinflammatory activity as compared to their respective parent drugs.

  17. Small Antimicrobial Agents Based on Acylated Reduced Amide Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Peng; Huo, Da; Nimmagadda, Alekhya; Wu, Jianfeng; She, Fengyu; Su, Ma; Lin, Xiaoyang; Yan, Jiyu; Cao, Annie; Xi, Chuanwu; Hu, Yong; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria has emerged to be one of the greatest threats in the 21st century. Herein, we report the development of a series of small molecular antibacterial agents that are based on the acylated reduced amide scaffold. These molecules display good potency against a panel of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Meanwhile, they also effectively inhibit the biofilm formation. Mechanistic studies suggest that these compounds kill bacteria by compromising bacterial membranes, a mechanism analogous to that of host-defense peptides (HDPs). The mechanism is further supported by the fact that the lead compounds do not induce resistance in MRSA bacteria even after 14 passages. Lastly, we also demonstrate that these molecules have therapeutic potential by preventing inflammation caused by MRSA induced pneumonia in a rat model. This class of compounds could lead to an appealing class of antibiotic agents combating drug-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27526720

  18. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616

  19. Catalysis of a Flavoenzyme-Mediated Amide Hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P. (Cornell); (TAM)

    2010-09-13

    A new pyrimidine catabolic pathway (the Rut pathway) was recently discovered in Escherichia coli K12. In this pathway, uracil is converted to 3-hydroxypropionate, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. The seven-gene Rut operon is required for this conversion. Here we demonstrate that the flavoenzyme RutA catalyzes the initial uracil ring-opening reaction to give 3-ureidoacrylate. This reaction, while formally a hydrolysis reaction, proceeds by an oxidative mechanism initiated by the addition of a flavin hydroperoxide to the C4 carbonyl. While peroxide-catalyzed amide hydrolysis has chemical precedent, we are not aware of a prior example of analogous chemistry catalyzed by flavin hydroperoxides. This study further illustrates the extraordinary catalytic versatility of the flavin cofactor.

  20. Three new amides from streptomyces sp. H7372

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheenpracha, Sarot; Borris, Robert P.; Tran, Tammy T.; Chang, Leng Chee, E-mail: lengchee@hawaii.ed [University of Hawaii Hilo, HI (United States). College of Pharmacy. Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Jee, Jap Meng; Seow, Heng Fong; Cheah, Hwen-Yee [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Pathology. bImmunology Unit; Hoc, Coy Choke [University Malaysia Sabah (Malaysia). School of Science and Technology. Biotechnology Program

    2011-07-01

    Three new amides, methyl phenatate A (1), actiphenamide (2) and actiphenol 1-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), along with thirteen known compounds, were isolated from the organic extract of a fermentation culture of Streptomyces sp. H7372. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques, and MS analyses. Cycloheximide (6) and cyclo({Delta}Ala-L-Val) (8) gave a clear zone of inhibition of Ras-Raf-1 interaction in the yeast two hybrid assay which showed high potency with 10 and 25 mm clear ZOIs on SD His{sup -} and inactive on SD His{sup +} at 2.5 mug per disk, respectively. (author)

  1. Proposed Chevron Tengiz venture stalls amid Soviet political squabble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the status of foreign investment in Soviet oil and gas joint ventures which has reached a critical juncture. Just as the U.S. is considering granting most favored nation trade status to the U.S.S.R., the joint venture petroleum deal seen as the litmus test for such deals-Chevron Corp.'s proposed addition of supergiant Tengiz oil field to its Caspian Sea joint venture-has stalled amid controversy. Unconfirmed reports from Soviet officials and other foreign joint venture participants in the U.S.S.R. have Chevron pulling out of the long negotiated, multibillion dollar project after the Soviets rejected the company's terms. Chevron, however, insists the project is still alive

  2. Sulfonyl fluoride inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapafuja, Shakiru O; Nikas, Spyros P; Bharathan, Indu T; Shukla, Vidyanand G; Nasr, Mahmoud L; Bowman, Anna L; Zvonok, Nikolai; Li, Jing; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-11-26

    Sulfonyl fluorides are known to inhibit esterases. Early work from our laboratory has identified hexadecyl sulfonylfluoride (AM374) as a potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). We now report on later generation sulfonyl fluoride analogs that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of FAAH. Using recombinant rat and human FAAH, we show that 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pentanesulfonyl fluoride (AM3506) has similar inhibitory activity for both the rat and the human enzyme, while rapid dilution assays and mass spectrometry analysis suggest that the compound is a covalent modifier for FAAH and inhibits its action in an irreversible manner. Our SAR results are highlighted by molecular docking of key analogs. PMID:23083016

  3. Interaction of Thioamides, Selenoamides, and Amides With Diiodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Hadjiliadis

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the results of our work on the iodine interaction with thioamides, selenoamides, and amides. Complexes with (i “spoke” or “extended spoke” structures, D⋅I2 and D⋅I2⋅I2, respectively, (D is the ligand donor (ii iodonium salts of {[D2−I]+[In]−} (n=3, 7 and {[D2−I]+[FeCl4]−} formulae and (iii disulfides of the categories (a [D-D], (b {[D-DH]+[I3]−} have been isolated and characterized. A compound of formula {[D2−I]+[I3]−[D⋅I2]} containing both types of complexes (i and (ii was also isolated. The interaction of diiodine with selenium analogs of the antithyroid drug 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU, of formulae RSeU (6-alkyl-2-Selenouracil results in the formation of complexes with formulae [(RSeUI2]. All these results are correlated with the mechanism of action of antithyroid drugs. Finally, we review here our work on the diiodine interaction with the amides (LO.

  4. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  5. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  6. I. Charge exchange collisions of highly stripped ions with atomic hydrogen. II. Development of a three-stage double tandem accelerator-decelerator system for low energy, highly stripped ions. Final report, March 1, 1977-May 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first measurements of charge exchange (electron transfer) in kiloelectron-volt-energy highly stripped boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ion collisions with atoms have been extended to additional collision energies and charge values for the ions. A first accelerator-decelerator source of very highly stripped ions has been developed, and its usefulness in charge exchange studies established

  7. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections

  8. Recent developments in the electronic spectroscopy of amides and alpha-helical polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert W; Koslowski, Axel

    2002-12-10

    Recent experimental and theoretical advances in understanding the electronic excited states of simple amides are reviewed. Polarized reflection spectroscopy of single crystals of N-acetylglycine shows that the direction of the first pipi* (NV(1)) transition dipole moment of a secondary amide differs by approximately 15 degrees from that of a primary amide. Ab initio calculations on simple amides support this conclusion. Ab initio studies of di- and tri-amides demonstrate that several inter-amide charge-transfer (CT) transitions occur in the 150-175-nm region, between the NV(1) and NV(2) transitions. When the correct dipole transition moment direction for peptides is used in calculations of the circular dichroism of the alpha-helix, the results are much improved over those from earlier calculations that used the direction for primary amides. Studies that consider the mixing of the NV(1) transition with CT transitions are reviewed. These indicate that such mixing is likely to have a significant effect on the absorption and CD spectra of the alpha-helix and other types of peptide conformation. Nevertheless, the independent systems model gives a reasonable first approximation to the absorption and CD spectra of the alpha-helix. PMID:12488025

  9. Characteristic Conformation of Mosher’s Amide Elucidated Using the Cambridge Structural Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Ichikawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83% of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from –30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of −13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1 one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2 the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3 in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide, the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4 the phenyl plane was inclined from the O–Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5 the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group.

  10. Synthesis of novel naphthoquinone aliphatic amides and esters and their anticancer evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkathip, Boonsong; Akkarasamiyo, Sunisa; Hasitapan, Komkrit; Sittikul, Pichamon; Boonyalai, Nonlawat; Kongkathip, Ngampong

    2013-02-01

    Fourteen new naphthoquinone aliphatic amides and seventeen naphthoquinone aliphatic esters were synthesized in nine to ten steps from 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid with 9-25% overall yield for the amides, and 16-21% overall yield for the esters. The key step of the amide synthesis is a coupling reaction between amine and various aliphatic acids using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMTMM) as a coupling agent while for the ester synthesis, DCC/DMAP or CDI was used as the coupling reagent between aliphatic acids and naphthoquinone alcohol. Both naphthoquinone amides and esters were evaluated for their anticancer activity against KB cells. It was found that naphthoquinone aliphatic amides showed stronger anticancer activity than those of the esters when the chains are longer than 7-carbon atoms. The optimum chain of amides is expected to be 16-carbon atoms. In addition, naphthoquinone aliphatic esters with α-methyl on the ester moiety possessed much stronger anticancer activity than the straight chains. Decatenation assay revealed that naphthoquinone amide with 16-carbon atoms chain at 15 μM and 20 μM can completely inhibit hTopoIIα activity while at 10 μM the enzyme activity was moderately inhibited. Molecular docking result also showed the same trend as the cytotoxicity and decatenation assay. PMID:23313636

  11. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  12. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  13. Hydrogen production unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgornyy, A.N.; Droshenkin, B.A.; Khmelnitskaya, I.A.; Varshavskiy, I.L.

    1981-01-01

    The unit for hydrogen production consists of a reactor, tank for fuel, tank for water, connected to the injector, and motor. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to reduce energy outlays by purifying the hydrogen and separating it from the gas mixture, it is equipped with a hydrogen separator arranged between the reactor and the motor. The separator is made in the form of a cylindrical shell separated by semipermeable partition into a chamber for pure hydrogen connected to the motor, and a chamber of ballast gas whose outlet is connected to the pressure nozzle of the injector. The use of the semipermeable partition for water vapor and permeable for hydrogen in combination with the injector makes it possible to exclude from the equipment a water pump and outlets of electricity associated with it. In addition, it is not necessary to install a current generator to power the electric motor of this pump. The heat exchanger for heating the water is also excluded.

  14. International Exchanges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On April 1st,2014,CPAPD Deputy Secretary General Ms.Chen Huaifan met with Mr.Djudjuk Juyoto Suntani,President of the World Peace Committee,Indonesia,who headed the delegation,in the CPAPD office.The two sides exchanged views on issues of common concern including cooperation between the two organizations and the inheritance of Chinese culture.

  15. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type is described in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration

  16. Mesoporous Niobium Oxide Spheres as an Effective Catalyst for the Transamidation of Primary Amides with Amines

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Subhash Chandra

    2014-02-06

    Mesoporous niobium oxide spheres (MNOS), conveniently prepared by a novel antisolvent precipitation approach, have been shown to be an effective catalyst for the transamidation of primary amides with amines. This novel transamidation can be efficiently carried out under solvent-free conditions and is applicable to a wide range of primary amides and amines to provide N-alkyl amides in good to excellent yields. The catalyst is highly stable and reusable. The application of this transamidation reaction has been demonstrated in the synthesis of antidepressant drug moclobemide and other druglike compounds. © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH&Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Stereoselective Arene-Forming Aldol Condensation: Synthesis of Axially Chiral Aromatic Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäseke, Vincent C; Sparr, Christof

    2016-06-13

    The increasing awareness of the importance of amide atropisomers prompts the development of novel strategies for their selective preparation. Described herein is a method for the enantioselective synthesis of atropisomeric aromatic amides by an amine-catalyzed arene-forming aldol condensation. The high reactivity of the glyoxylic amide substrates enables a remarkably efficient construction of a new aromatic ring, which proceeds within minutes at ambient temperature to afford products with excellent stereoselectivity. The high rotational barriers of the reduced products highlight the utility of this stable, spatially organized chiral scaffold. PMID:27166995

  18. Stability of hydrogenation states of graphene and conditions for hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Hyun; Jung, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Park, Noejung

    2012-04-01

    The hydrogen spillover mechanism has been discussed in the field of hydrogen storage and is believed to have particular advantage over the storage as metal or chemical hydrides. We investigate conditions for practicality realizing the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto carbon surfaces, using first-principles methods. Our results show that contrary to common belief, types of hydrogenation configurations of graphene (the aggregated all-paired configurations) can satisfy the thermodynamic requirement for room-temperature hydrogen storage. However, the peculiarity of the paired adsorption modes gives rise to a large kinetic barrier against hydrogen migration and desorption. It means that an extremely high pressure is required to induce the migration-derived hydrogenation. However, if mobile catalytic particles are present inside the graphitic interstitials, hydrogen migration channels can open and the spillover phenomena can be realized. We suggest a molecular model for such a mobile catalyst which can exchange hydrogen atoms with the wall of graphene.

  19. Amides as phase modifiers for N,N'-tetraalkylmalonamide extraction of actinides and lanthanides from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The N,N'-tetraalkylmalonamides are a class of compounds under development for transuranic (TRU) separations under high nitric acid conditions. There are several issues that challenge the further development of these ligands. One is the development of improved synthetic procedures that lend themselves to commercial scale-up. Another major issue is the third-phase formation that occurs when the N,N'-tetraalkylmalonamides are contacted with medium-to-high nitric acid concentrations in hydrocarbon solvents. To address the synthesis issue, the authors have developed a new synthetic approach for preparing these materials. Third-phase formation can be eliminated by addition of diluent modifiers such as tributylphosphate (TBP). TBP is inappropriate if a nonphosphate-containing process stream is required. Amides have been proposed as alternatives for TBP in a variety of applications because of their ease of synthesis and the variety of substituents that can be generated. The authors have been able to develop an amide phase-modified system that extends the working process range of alkylinalonamides (0.5 M) in dodecane: from 3.5 M to 7.5 M nitric acid and in Isopar H (branched hydrocarbon) from 4.0 M to 10.0 M nitric acid using 1.0 M di-2-ethylhexylacetamide/0.5 M alkylmalonamide. The Kd values were comparable to extraction with alkylinalonamide in Isopar H or hydrogenated tetrapropylene (TPH) solvents. The overall extraction system was more robust than the phase-uninodified system allowing for greater temperature and acid concentration fluctuations without third-phase formation

  20. Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A liquid metal heated tube and shell heat exchanger where straight tubes extend between upper and lower tube sheets. In order to prevent thermal stress problems, one tube sheet is fixed to the shell, and the other tube sheet is sealed to the shell by means of a flexible bellows. In the event of a catastrophic bellows failure, a housing that utilizes a packing gland sliding seal is used to enclose and back-up the bellows. Also, a key and slot arrangement is provided for preventing relative rotation between the shell and tube sheet which could damage the bellows and cause failure thereof. This exchanger is seen to be of use in sodium cooled reactors between the liquid sodium circuit on the steam generator

  1. Why hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  2. Kynurenic acid amides as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, István; Kolok, Sándor; Galgóczy, Kornél; Gere, Anikó; Horváth, Csilla; Farkas, Sándor; Greiner, István; Domány, György

    2007-01-15

    A novel series of kynurenic acid amides, ring-enlarged derivatives of indole-2-carboxamides, was prepared and identified as in vivo active NR2B subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The synthesis and SAR studies are discussed. PMID:17074483

  3. A two-step approach to achieve secondary amide transamidation enabled by nickel catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Emma L.; Yamano, Michael M.; Zhou, Yujing; Anthony, Sarah M.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing challenge in synthetic chemistry is the development of the transamidation reaction. This process, which involves the conversion of one amide to another, is typically plagued by unfavourable kinetic and thermodynamic factors. Although some advances have been made with regard to the transamidation of primary amide substrates, secondary amide transamidation has remained elusive. Here we present a simple two-step approach that allows for the elusive overall transformation to take place using non-precious metal catalysis. The methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions and is tolerant of amino-acid-derived nucleophiles. In addition to overcoming the classic problem of secondary amide transamidation, our studies expand the growing repertoire of new transformations mediated by base metal catalysis. PMID:27199089

  4. Capture and transfer of pions in hydrogenous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pionic hydrogen is a short-lived exotic hydrogen isotope in which a negative pion replaces the atomic electron. The formation and subsequent interactions of pionic hydrogen are discussed, with emphasis on the process of pion transfer. Recent results using the pion charge-exchange reaction (π-, π0) obtained at TRIUMF are reviewed. (Author) (35 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.)

  5. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  6. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  7. Syntheses of environmentally friendly amide derivatives for the selective separation of actinides based on oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seung; Choi, Jung Kyu; Lee, Yeon Ok; Yoon, Jun Hee [Dankook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Syntheses of environmentally friendly amide derivatives for the selective separation of actinides were studied. As for the ligand, we have synthesized TODGA (N,N-Tetraoctyl diglycolamide), DHOA (N,N-Dihexyloctaneamide), and D2EHBA (N,N-Di(2-ethyl)hexylbutanamide) in high yield. The amide derivative was successfully prepared by chlorination followed by amination method in a good synthetic yield. The structures of all synthetic precursors and final products were confirmed by NMR, IR, and Mass spectrophotometer.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of alternating poly(amide urethane)s

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Bhaskar

    2004-01-01

    This thesis deals with the preparation of alternating poly(amide urethane)s which might be of interest for the manufacture of powder coatings. The synthesis of poly(amide urethane)s was performed in environmentally friendly way without using isocyanates or phosgene. The starting materials for the synthesis were e-caprolactam, e-caprolactone, amino alcohols, diamines and carbonic acid derivatives, i.e. diphenyl carbonate and ethylene carbonate as substitutes for phosgene. A new synthesis was d...

  9. Chemical constituents from red algae Bostrychia radicans (Rhodomelaceae): new amides and phenolic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Lígia Leandrini de Oliveira; Denise B. da Silva; Norberto P. Lopes; Debonsi, Hosana M.; Yokoya, Nair S

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and structural determination of two amides, isolated for the first time: N,4-dihydroxy-N-(2'-hydroxyethyl)-benzamide (0.019%) and N,4-dihydroxy-N-(2'-hydroxyethyl)-benzeneacetamide (0.023%). These amides, produced by the red macroalgae Bostrychia radicans, had their structures assigned by NMR spectral data and MS analyses. In addition, this chemical study led to the isolation of cholesterol, heptadecane, squalene, trans-phytol, neophytadiene, tetradecanoic a...

  10. Zirconyl chloride promoted highly efficient solid phase synthesis of amide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An efficient solid phase route for the synthesis of amide derivatives by the reaction of carboxylic acids with urea in the presence of catalytic amount of zirconyl chloride under microwave irradiation conditions was described. In this way, a range of interesting amide derivatives was obtained in good to excellent yields. The catalyst was recycled with fresh reactants and it gave almost similar results without significant loss of activity up to the third run.

  11. Studies on supercritical fluid extraction behaviour of uranium and thorium nitrates using amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical fluid extraction studies of uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate in mixture were carried out using various amides such as N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl) isobutyramide (D2EHIBA),N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) and Diisooctyl Butanamide (DiOBA). These studies established a preferential extraction of uranium over thorium. Among the various amides studied, D2EHIBA offered the best rate of preferential extraction of uranium over thorium. (author)

  12. Substituted Amides of Pyrazine-2-carboxylic acids: Synthesis and Biological Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Katarina Kralova; Jiri Kunes; Miroslav Miletin; Martin Dolezal

    2002-01-01

    Condensation of 6-chloro-, 5-tert-butyl- or 6-chloro-5-tert-butylpyrazine-2-carboxylic acid chloride with ring substituted anilines yielded a series of amides, which were tested for their in vitro antimycobacterial, antifungal and photosynthesis-inhibiting activities. The highest antituberculotic activity (72% inhibition) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the highest lipophilicity (log P = 6.85) were shown by the 3,5-bistrifluoromethylphenyl amide of 5-tert-butyl-6-chloropyrazine-2-carbo...

  13. Syntheses of Macrocyclic Amides from L-Amino Acid Esters by RCM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A series of succinate-derived macrocyclic amides( 1 ) was synthesized via ring-closing metathesis (RCM) as the key step. The substrate included 12 to 15 members. The metathesis precursors were obtained from the amide coupling of tert-butyl 3-carboxyhex-5-enoate(2) with numerous side-chain alkenylated amino acid esters of general type(3)derived from L-lysine and L-ornithine.

  14. Antimicrobial and allelopathic potential of the amides isolated from the roots of Ottonia martiana miq., piperaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two amides, piperovatine and isopiperlonguminine, were isolated from the roots of Ottonia martiana Miq., a herbaceous shrub commonly used in folk medicine in the treatment of toothache. The crude extract (CE) and isolated compounds were submitted to bioautography and allelopathic assay. The bioautograms allowed the detection of compounds with antibacterial activity and the identification of the bioactive substance piperovatine. The CE and amides exhibited an allelopathic effect on Lactuca sativa (lettuce) seedling growth but did not affect the seeds' germinability. (author)

  15. A protocol for amide bond formation with electron deficient amines and sterically hindered substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Maria E; Pandey, Sunil K; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Andersen, Rikke; Hansen, Steffen V F; Ulven, Trond

    2016-01-01

    A protocol for amide coupling by in situ formation of acyl fluorides and reaction with amines at elevated temperature has been developed and found to be efficient for coupling of sterically hindered substrates and electron deficient amines where standard methods failed.......A protocol for amide coupling by in situ formation of acyl fluorides and reaction with amines at elevated temperature has been developed and found to be efficient for coupling of sterically hindered substrates and electron deficient amines where standard methods failed....

  16. Synthesis and quantitation of six phenolic amides in Amaranthus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Hans A; Steffensen, Stine K; Christophersen, Carsten; Mortensen, Anne G; Jørgensen, Lise N; Niveyro, Selene; de Troiani, Rosa M; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Ricardo José; Barba-de la Rosa, Ana Paulina; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2010-05-26

    Cinnamoylphenethylamines are phenolic amides in which cinnamic acid provides the acid moiety and phenethylamine the amine moiety. Single ion monitoring (SIM) in LC-MS was performed on amaranth leaf extracts. Masses corresponding to sets of regioisomers, including previously reported compounds, were examined. Six peaks were detected and their corresponding standards synthesized for a quantitative LC-MS/MS investigation of cinnamoylphenethylamines in amaranth. Four cinnamoylphenethylamines (caffeoyltyramine, feruloyldopamine, sinapoyltyramine, and p-coumaroyltyramine) are reported in the Amaranthaceae for the first time; also, one rare compound, feruloyl-4-O-methyldopamine, appeared to be quite common in the genus Amaranthus. Feruloyldopamine showed moderate antifungal activity toward an isolate of Fusarium culmorum. Our LC-MS approach, in conjunction with the straightforward synthesis, provides a simple, reliable way of quantitatively investigating cinnamoylphenethylamines in plants. Concentrations of cinnamoylphenethylamines vary widely: feruloyltyramine was present in quantities of 5.26 to 114.31 microg/g and feruloyldopamine in quantities of 0.16 to 10.27 microg/g, depending on the plant sample. PMID:20438062

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopic and structural perspective of new ferrocenyl amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Martin; Nigar, Asifa; Ali, Naveed Zafar; Akhter, Zareen; Dinnebier, Robert E.

    2016-05-01

    Two new ferrocene derivatives with amide linkages were synthesized by the condensation of 4-ferrocenylaniline with n-alkyl acid chloride derivatives as pristine orange solids in good yields. FTIR and 1H/13C NMR studies have confirmed the basic structure of the molecules with the involvement of intermolecular H-bonding, which together with the ferrocene-like packing ensures the stability of the crystal structure. Crystal structures for both compounds were solved by Rietveld refinements of high resolution X-ray powder diffraction data. The XRD results show that both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/c. The primary feature of the crystal structure is a double layer of ferrocenyl groups stretched out in the b-c -plane perpendicular to the a-axis, with packing of the ferrocenyl groups occurring in a manner similar to that of pure ferrocene. Despite the close structural similarity, both compounds differ in the optimized geometry of respective Ferrocene conformers. The Cp rings are eclipsed for one Ferrocene conformer and close to staggered for the other, owing to the low energy barrier for the rotation of a cyclopentadienyl ring relative to the rest of the molecule.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and pharmacological evaluation of amide prodrugs of Flurbiprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flurbiprofen (FB) suffers from the general side effects of NSAIDs, owing to presence of free carboxylic acid group. The study was aimed to retard the adverse effects of gastrointestinal origin. Ten prodrugs of FB were synthesized by amidation with ethyl esters of amino acids, namely, glycine, L-phenylalanine, L-tryptophan, L-valine, L-isoleucine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-glutamic acid, L-aspartic acid and β alanine. Purified synthesized prodrugs were characterized by m.p., TLC, solubility, partition coefficients, elemental analyses, UV, FTIR, NMR and MS. Synthesized prodrugs were subjected for bioavailability studies, analgesic, anti-inflammatory activities and ulcerogenic index. Marked reduction of ulcerogenic index and comparable analgesic, antiinflammatory activities were obtained in all cases as compared to FB. Among synthesized prodrugs AR-9, AR-10 and AR-2 showing excellent pharmacological response and encouraging hydrolysis rate both in (Simulated Intestinal Fluid) SIF and in 80% human plasma. Prodrugs with increased aliphatic side chain length or introduction of aromatic substituent resulted in enhanced partition coefficient but diminished dissolution and hydrolysis rate. Such prodrugs can be considered for sustained release purpose. (author)

  19. Theoretical study of corrosion inhibition of amides and thiosemicarbazones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination of quantum chemical and corrosion inhibition studies were carried out to investigate whether any clear links exist between the results of quantum chemical calculations and the experimental efficiencies of urea (U), thiourea (TU), acetamide (A), thioacetamide (TA), semicarbazide (SC), thiosemicarbazide (TSC), methoxybenzaldehydethiosemicarbazone (MBTSC), 2-acetylpyridine-(4phenyl) thiosemicarbazone (2AP4PTSC), 2-acetylpyridine-(4-methyl) thiosemicarbazone (2AP4MTSC), benzointhiosemicarbazone (BZOTSC) and benzilthiosemicarbazone (BZITSC) being corrosion inhibitors. The quantum chemical calculations have been performed by using DFT, ab-initio molecular orbital and semi-empirical methods for some amides and thiosemicarbozone derivatives being corrosion inhibitors. The highest occupied molecular orbital energy (E HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (E LUMO), the energy gap between E HOMO and E LUMO (ΔE HOMO-LUMO), dipole moments (μ), charges on the C, O, N, S atoms, the total energies of the molecules and the polarizabilities , the coefficients of the development of the MO over the atomic orbital (AO) corresponding to the between atoms which a new bond is established have been calculated. The results of quantum chemical calculations and experimental efficiencies of inhibitors were subjected to correlation analysis. We have reached the conclusion that the synthesis of better corrosion inhibitors can be achieved by controlling all electronic properties and parameters of a selected group of molecules

  20. Synthesis, characterization and pharmacological evaluation of amide prodrugs of Flurbiprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Veerasamy, Ravichandran; Jain, Prateek Kumar; Dixit, Vinod Kumar; Agrawal, Ram Kishor [Dr. H. S. Gour Vishwavidyalaya, Sagar (India). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Research Lab.]. E-mail: dragrawal2001@yahoo.co.in

    2008-07-01

    Flurbiprofen (FB) suffers from the general side effects of NSAIDs, owing to presence of free carboxylic acid group. The study was aimed to retard the adverse effects of gastrointestinal origin. Ten prodrugs of FB were synthesized by amidation with ethyl esters of amino acids, namely, glycine, L-phenylalanine, L-tryptophan, L-valine, L-isoleucine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-glutamic acid, L-aspartic acid and {beta} alanine. Purified synthesized prodrugs were characterized by m.p., TLC, solubility, partition coefficients, elemental analyses, UV, FTIR, NMR and MS. Synthesized prodrugs were subjected for bioavailability studies, analgesic, anti-inflammatory activities and ulcerogenic index. Marked reduction of ulcerogenic index and comparable analgesic, antiinflammatory activities were obtained in all cases as compared to FB. Among synthesized prodrugs AR-9, AR-10 and AR-2 showing excellent pharmacological response and encouraging hydrolysis rate both in (Simulated Intestinal Fluid) SIF and in 80% human plasma. Prodrugs with increased aliphatic side chain length or introduction of aromatic substituent resulted in enhanced partition coefficient but diminished dissolution and hydrolysis rate. Such prodrugs can be considered for sustained release purpose. (author)

  1. N-{N-[2-(3,5-Difluoro­phenyl)acetyl]-(S)-alanyl}-(S)-phenyl­glycine tert-butyl ester (DAPT): an inhibitor of γ-secretase, revealing fine electronic and hydrogen-bonding features

    OpenAIRE

    Czerwinski, Andrzej; Valenzuela, Francisco; Afonine, Pavel; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, C23H26F2N2O4, is a dipeptidic inhibitor of γ-secretase, one of the enzymes involved in Alzheimer’s dis­ease. The mol­ecule adopts a compact conformation, without intra­molecular hydrogen bonds. In the crystal structure, one of the amide N atoms forms the only inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond; the second amide N atom does not form hydrogen bonds. High-resolution synchrotron diffraction data permitted the unequivocal location and refinement without restraints of all H ato...

  2. Bimodal dynamics of mechanically constrained hydrogen bonds revealed by vibrational photon echoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Yeremenko, Sergiy; Berná, José; Buma, Wybren J; Leigh, David A; Woutersen, Sander

    2011-04-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the hydrogen bonds that connect the components of a [2]rotaxane in solution. In this rotaxane, the amide groups in the benzylic-amide macrocycle and the succinamide thread are connected by four equivalent N-H⋅⋅⋅O=C hydrogen bonds. The fluctuations of these hydrogen bonds are mirrored by the frequency fluctuations of the NH-stretch modes, which are probed by means of three-pulse photon-echo peak shift spectroscopy. The hydrogen-bond fluctuations occur on three different time scales, with time constants of 0.1, 0.6, and ≥200 ps. Comparing these three time scales to the ones found in liquid formamide, which contains the same hydrogen-bonded amide motif but without mechanical constraints, we find that the faster two components, which are associated with small-amplitude fluctuations in the strength of the N-H⋅⋅⋅O=C hydrogen bonds, are very similar in the liquid and the rotaxane. However, the third component, which is associated with the breaking and subsequent reformation of hydrogen bonds, is found to be much slower in the rotaxane than in the liquid. It can be concluded that the mechanical bonding in a rotaxane does not influence the amplitude and time scale of the small-amplitude fluctuations of the hydrogen bonds, but strongly slows down the complete dissociation of these hydrogen bonds. This is probably because in a rotaxane breaking of the macrocycle-axle contacts is severely hindered by the mechanical constraints. The hydrogen-bond dynamics in rotaxane-based molecular machines can therefore be regarded as liquidlike on a time scale 1 ps and less, but structurally frozen on longer (up to at least 200 ps) time scales. PMID:21476761

  3. Bimodal dynamics of mechanically constrained hydrogen bonds revealed by vibrational photon echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Yeremenko, Sergiy; Berná, José; Buma, Wybren J.; Leigh, David A.; Woutersen, Sander

    2011-04-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the hydrogen bonds that connect the components of a [2]rotaxane in solution. In this rotaxane, the amide groups in the benzylic-amide macrocycle and the succinamide thread are connected by four equivalent N-HṡṡṡO=C hydrogen bonds. The fluctuations of these hydrogen bonds are mirrored by the frequency fluctuations of the NH-stretch modes, which are probed by means of three-pulse photon-echo peak shift spectroscopy. The hydrogen-bond fluctuations occur on three different time scales, with time constants of 0.1, 0.6, and ⩾200 ps. Comparing these three time scales to the ones found in liquid formamide, which contains the same hydrogen-bonded amide motif but without mechanical constraints, we find that the faster two components, which are associated with small-amplitude fluctuations in the strength of the N-HṡṡṡO=C hydrogen bonds, are very similar in the liquid and the rotaxane. However, the third component, which is associated with the breaking and subsequent reformation of hydrogen bonds, is found to be much slower in the rotaxane than in the liquid. It can be concluded that the mechanical bonding in a rotaxane does not influence the amplitude and time scale of the small-amplitude fluctuations of the hydrogen bonds, but strongly slows down the complete dissociation of these hydrogen bonds. This is probably because in a rotaxane breaking of the macrocycle-axle contacts is severely hindered by the mechanical constraints. The hydrogen-bond dynamics in rotaxane-based molecular machines can therefore be regarded as liquidlike on a time scale 1 ps and less, but structurally frozen on longer (up to at least 200 ps) time scales.

  4. Alterations in chemical shifts and exchange broadening upon peptide boronic acid inhibitor binding to α-lytic protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    α-Lytic protease, a bacterial serine protease of 198 aminoacids (19800 Da), has been used as a model system for studies of catalytic mechanism, structure-function relationships, and more recently for studies of pro region-assisted protein folding. We have assigned the backbones of the enzyme alone, and of its complex with the tetrahedral transition state mimic N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Ala-Pro-boroVal, using double- and triple-resonance 3D NMR spectroscopy on uniformly15N- and 13C/15N-labeled protein.Changes in backbone chemical shifts between the uncomplexed and inhibited form of the protein are correlated with distance from the inhibitor, the displacement of backbone nitrogens, and change in hydrogen bond strength upon inhibitor binding (derived from previously solved crystal structures).A comparison of the solution secondary structure of the uninhibited enzyme with that of the X-ray structure reveals no significant differences.Significant line broadening, indicating intermediate chemical exchange, was observed in many of the active site amides (including three broadened to invisibility), and in a majority of cases the broadening was reversed upon addition of the inhibitor. Implications and possible mechanisms of this line broadening are discussed

  5. N-Methyl­pyrrolidine-1-carbothio­amide

    OpenAIRE

    Umar, M. Naveed; Tahir, M. Nawaz; Shoaib, Mohammad; Ali, Akbar; Khan, Imran

    2012-01-01

    There are two independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C6H12N2S, in which the N-methyl­thio­formamide unit and the pyrrolidine ring mean plane are oriented at dihedral angles of 5.9 (5) and 5.9 (4)°. In the crystal, zigzag C(4) chains extending along the a axis are formed due to N—H⋯S hydrogen bonds between alternate arrangements of mol­ecules. The chains are inter­linked by C—H⋯S hydrogen bonds.

  6. A 2:1 co-crystal of 2-methyl-benzoic acid and N,N'-bis-(pyridin-4-ylmeth-yl)ethanedi-amide: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sabrina; Jotani, Mukesh M; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-03-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title 2:1 co-crystal, 2C8H8O2·C14H14N4O2, comprises an acid mol-ecule in a general position and half a di-amide mol-ecule, the latter being located about a centre of inversion. In the acid, the carb-oxy-lic acid group is twisted out of the plane of the benzene ring to which it is attached [dihedral angle = 28.51 (8)°] and the carbonyl O atom and methyl group lie approximately to the same side of the mol-ecule [hy-droxy-O-C-C-C(H) torsion angle = -27.92 (17)°]. In the di-amide, the central C4N2O2 core is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.031 Å), and the pyridyl rings are perpendicular, lying to either side of the central plane [central residue/pyridyl dihedral angle = 88.60 (5)°]. In the mol-ecular packing, three-mol-ecule aggregates are formed via hy-droxy-O-H⋯N(pyrid-yl) hydrogen bonds. These are connected into a supra-molecular layer parallel to (12[Formula: see text]) via amide-N-H⋯O(carbon-yl) hydrogen bonds, as well as methyl-ene-C-H⋯O(amide) inter-actions. Significant π-π inter-actions occur between benzene/benzene, pyrid-yl/benzene and pyrid-yl/pyridyl rings within and between layers to consolidate the three-dimensional packing. PMID:27006815

  7. Mechanistic Aspects of the Holmium-Mediated, Reciprocal Hydrogen/Sulfur Exchange in the Gas Phase: C6 H5 CH3 +CH2 S→C6 H5 CHS+CH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-03-18

    The thermal reaction of [Ho(CH2 S)](+) with toluene giving rise to [C6 H5 CHSHo](+) and CH4 has been investigated using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry complemented by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The high reactivity of [Ho(CH2 S)](+) which is in distinct contrast with the non-reactivity of "bare" Ho(+) has its origin in the presence of a carbon-centered radical; the latter initiates hydrogen-atom abstraction from the methyl group of toluene as the first step of a sequence of hydrogen and sulfur transfer mediated by cationic holmium. PMID:26789533

  8. Tritium Exchange in Biological Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whenever tritium-labelled water is employed as a test solute or tracer in biological systems, an appreciable exchange between tritium and labile hydrogen atoms occurs that frequently affects the nature and interpretation of experimental results. The studies reported here are concerned with the magnitude of the effect that tritium exchange introduces into measurements of total body water and water metabolism in animals and humans. Direct measurements of exchange were made in rats, guinea pigs, pigeons, and rabbits. Tritium-labelled water was administered intravenously or by mouth, and tritium space and turnover determined from the concentration of tritium in blood. The animals were then desiccated to constant weight in vacuo. The specific activity of water collected periodically during desiccation increased by 50% as a result of isotope effects. Water from combustion of dried rabbit tissues contained about 2% of the tritium originally given to the animal. Adipose tissue alone contained little or no exchange tritium. The dried tissues of the other animals were rehydrated with inactive water and the appearance of tritium in the water observed. The specific activity of the water increased in exponential fashion, i.e., 1-exp. (kt), with about 90% of exchange occurring with a half-time of 1 h, and the remaining 10% with a half-time of 10 h. The total tritium extracted accounted for 1.5 to 3.5% of the dose given to the animal, which agrees with the difference between the tritium space and total body water determined by desiccation. An indirect estimate of exchange in humans was derived from concurrent measurements of tritium and antipyrene spaces. The average difference of about 2% in water volume agrees with the direct estimates of exchanges in animals. It is evident that tritium space should be reduced by about 2% to identify it with total body water. The magnitude and relatively slow rate of exchange may also influence the interpretation of metabolic studies with

  9. Method for absorbing hydrogen using an oxidation resisant organic hydrogen getter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2009-02-03

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably platinum, is disclosed. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently remove hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  10. Pb(II)-promoted amide cleavage: mechanistic comparison to a Zn(II) analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Eric S; Zhang, Tingting; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2013-10-01

    Two new Pb(II) complexes of the amide-appended nitrogen/sulfur epppa (N-((2-ethylthio)ethyl)-N-((6-pivaloylamido-2-pyridyl)methyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amine) chelate ligand, [(epppa)Pb(NO3)2] (4-NO3) and [(epppa)Pb(ClO4)2] (4-ClO4), were prepared and characterized. In the solid state, 4-NO3 exhibits κ(5)-epppa chelate ligand coordination as well as the coordination of two bidentate nitrate ions. In acetonitrile, 4-NO3 is a 1:1 electrolyte with a coordinated NO3(-), whereas 4-ClO4 is a 1:2 electrolyte. Treatment of 4-ClO4 with 1 equiv Me4NOH·5H2O in CH3CN:CH3OH (3:5) results in amide methanolysis in a reaction that is akin to that previously reported for the Zn(II) analogue [(epppa)Zn](ClO4)2 (3-ClO4). (1)H NMR kinetic studies of the amide methanolysis reactions of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4 as a function of temperature revealed free energies of activation of 21.3 and 24.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The amide methanolysis reactions of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4 differ in terms of the effect of the concentration of methanol (saturation kinetics for 4-ClO4; second-order behavior for 3-ClO4), the observation of a small solvent kinetic isotope effect (SKIE) only for the reaction of the Zn(II)-containing 3-ClO4, and the properties of an initial intermediate isolated from each reaction upon treatment with Me4NOH·5H2O. These experimental results, combined with computational studies of the amide methanolysis reaction pathways of 4-ClO4 and 3-ClO4, indicate that the Zn(II)-containing 3-ClO4 initially undergoes amide deprotonation upon treatment with Me4NOH·5H2O. Subsequent amide protonation from coordinated methanol yields a structure containing a coordinated neutral amide and methoxide anion from which amide cleavage can then proceed. The rate-determining step in this pathway is either amide protonation or protonation of the leaving group. The Pb(II)-containing 4-ClO4 instead directly forms a neutral amide-containing, epppa-ligated Pb(II)-OH/Pb(II)-OCH3 equilibrium mixture upon treatment

  11. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Protein Helices Reconciled with Three-Centered Hydrogen Bonds and Multipole Electrostatics

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Liu, Chengyu; Fang, Zheng; Ponder, Jay W.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution) position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These tor...

  12. A Hydrogen Containment Process For Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. The hydrogen exhaust from the engine is contained in two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. The burner burns off the majority of the hydrogen, and the remaining hydrogen is removed in the tubular heat exchanger through the species recombination mechanism. A multi-dimensional, pressure-based multiphase computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to conceptually sizing the oxygen-rich burner, while a one-dimensional thermal analysis methodology was used to conceptually sizing the heat exchanger. Subsequently, a steady-state operation of the entire hydrogen containment process, from pressure vessel, through nozzle, diffuser, burner and heat exchanger, was simulated numerically, with the afore-mentioned computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational results show that 99% of hydrogen reduction is achieved at the end of the burner, and the rest of the hydrogen is removed to a trivial level in the heat exchanger. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger is less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  13. Testing and plugging power plant heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutor, F. [Expando Seal Tools, Inc., Montgomeryville, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Heat Exchanger tubes fail for any number of reasons including but certainly not limited to the cumulative effects of corrosion, erosion, thermal stress and fatigue. This presentation will attempt to identify the most common techniques for determining which tubes are leaking and then introduce the products in use to plug the leaking tubes. For the sake of time I will limit the scope of this presentation to include feedwater heaters and secondary system heat exchangers such as Hydrogen Coolers, Lube Oil Coolers, and nuclear Component Cooling Water, Emergency Cooling Water, Regenerative Heat Recovery heat exchangers.

  14. Synthesis of Biaryls through Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling of Amides by Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shicheng; Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-01

    The first Ni-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides for the synthesis of widely occurring biaryl compounds through N-C amide bond activation is reported. The reaction tolerates a wide range of electron-withdrawing, electron-neutral, and electron-donating substituents on both coupling partners. The reaction constitutes the first example of the Ni-catalyzed generation of aryl electrophiles from bench-stable amides with potential applications for a broad range of organometallic reactions. PMID:27101428

  15. Expression of peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating mono-oxygenase (PAM) enzymes in morphological abnormalities adjacent to pulmonary tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, A.; Treston, A M; Saldise, L. (Laura); Montuenga, L.M. (Luis M.); Linnoila, R I

    1996-01-01

    Carboxyl-terminal amidated peptide hormones are known to be autocrine growth factors for lung tumors and tumor cell lines. Expression of the enzymes necessary for the biosynthesis of active amidated peptide hormones is therefore necessary for autocrine growth stimulation in lung tumors and possibly in the early proliferative stages of lung carcinogenesis. The peptidyl amidating enzymes have previously been identified in cell lines of all histological types of lung cancer and in lung tumors by...

  16. Generation of a novel monoclonal antibody that recognizes the alpha (α)-amidated isoform of a valine residue

    OpenAIRE

    Antón Palma, Benito; Leff Gelman, Philippe; Medecigo Ríos, Mayra; Calva Nieves, Juan Carlos; Acevedo Ortuño, Rodolfo; Matus Ortega, Maura Epifanía; Hernández Calderón, Jorge Alberto; Hernández Miramontes, Ricardo; Flores Zamora, Anabel; Salazar Juárez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha (α)-amidation of peptides is a mechanism required for the conversion of prohormones into functional peptide sequences that display biological activities, receptor recognition and signal transduction on target cells. Alpha (α)-amidation occurs in almost all species and amino acids identified in nature. C-terminal valine amide neuropeptides constitute the smallest group of functional peptide compounds identified in neurosecretory structures in vertebrate and invertebrate specie...

  17. Decomposing method for ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a method of decomposing ion exchange resins generated in a nuclear power plant to carbon dioxide reliably in a short period of time. (1) The ion exchange resins are mixed with water, and then they are kept for a predetermined period of time in the presence of an inert gas at high temperature and high pressure exceeding the critical point of water to decompose the ion exchange resins. (2) The ion exchange resins is mixed with water, an oxidant is added and they are kept for a predetermined time in the presence of an inert gas at a high temperature and a high pressure exceeding a critical point of water of an inert gas at a high temperature to decompose the ion exchange resins. (3) An alkali or acid is added to ion exchange resins and water to control the hydrogen ion concentration in the solution and the ion exchange resins are decomposed in above-mentioned (1) or (2). Sodium hydroxide is used as the alkali and hydrochloric acid is used as the acid. In addition, oxygen, hydrogen peroxide or ozone is used as an oxidant. (I.S.)

  18. Hydrogen Effect against Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Kanezaki, Toshihiko; Mine, Yoji

    2010-10-01

    The well-known term “hydrogen embrittlement” (HE) expresses undesirable effects due to hydrogen such as loss of ductility, decreased fracture toughness, and degradation of fatigue properties of metals. However, this article shows, surprisingly, that hydrogen can have an effect against HE. A dramatic phenomenon was found in which charging a supersaturated level of hydrogen into specimens of austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316L drastically improved the fatigue crack growth resistance, rather than accelerating fatigue crack growth rates. Although this mysterious phenomenon has not previously been observed in the history of HE research, its mechanism can be understood as an interaction between hydrogen and dislocations. Hydrogen can play two roles in terms of dislocation mobility: pinning (or dragging) and enhancement of mobility. Competition between these two roles determines whether the resulting phenomenon is damaging or, unexpectedly, desirable. This finding will, not only be the crucial key factor to elucidate the mechanism of HE, but also be a trigger to review all existing theories on HE in which hydrogen is regarded as a dangerous culprit.

  19. Segmented heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  20. Theoretical investigation of isotope exchange reaction in tritium-contaminated mineral oil in vacuum pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Xie, Yun [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Du, Liang [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection (SRMP), School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Suzhou 215000 (China); Li, Weiyi [School of Physics and Chemistry, Xihua University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Tan, Zhaoyi, E-mail: zhyitan@126.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • This is the first theoretical investigation about T–H exchange in vacuum oil. • T–H isotope exchange is accomplished through two different change mechanisms. • Isotope exchange is selective, molecules with −OH and −COOH exchange more easily. • The methyl and methylene radicals in waste oil were observed by {sup 1}HNMR. - Abstract: The mechanism of the isotope exchange reaction between molecular tritium and several typical organic molecules in vacuum pump mineral oil has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT), and the reaction rates are determined by conventional transition state theory (TST). The tritium–hydrogen isotope exchange reaction can proceed with two different mechanisms, the direct T–H exchange mechanism and the hyrogenation–dehydrogenation exchange mechanism. In the direct exchange mechanism, the titrated product is obtained through one-step via a four-membered ring hydrogen migration transition state. In the hyrogenation–dehydrogenation exchange mechanism, the T–H exchange could be accomplished by the hydrogenation of the unsaturated bond with tritium followed by the dehydrogenation of HT. Isotope exchange between hydrogen and tritium is selective, and oil containing molecules with −OH and −COOH groups can more easily exchange hydrogen for tritium. For aldehydes and ketones, the ability of T–H isotope exchange can be determined by the hydrogenation of T{sub 2} or the dehydrogenation of HT. The molecules containing one type of hydrogen provide a single product, while the molecules containing different types of hydrogens provide competitive products. The rate constants are presented to quantitatively estimate the selectivity of the products.