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Sample records for amide hydrogen exchange

  1. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-08-18

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N-H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N-H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion.

  2. Measurement of amide hydrogen exchange rates with the use of radiation damping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing-Song; Lim, Jackwee; Yu, Binhan; Yang, Daiwen

    2011-09-01

    A simple method for measuring amide hydrogen exchange rates is presented, which is based on the selective inversion of water magnetization with the use of radiation damping. Simulations show that accurate exchange rates can be measured despite the complications of radiation damping and cross relaxation to the exchange process between amide and water protons. This method cannot eliminate the contributions of the exchange-relayed NOE and direct NOE to the measured exchange rates, but minimize the direct NOE contribution. In addition, the amides with a significant amount of such indirect contributions are possible to be identified from the shape of the exchange peak intensity profiles or/and from the apparent relaxation rates of amide protons which are extracted from fitting the intensity profiles to an equation established here for our experiment. The method was tested on ubiquitin and also applied to an acyl carrier protein. The amide exchange rates for the acyl carrier protein at two pHs indicate that the entire protein is highly dynamic on the second timescale. Low protection factors for the residues in the regular secondary structural elements also suggest the presence of invisible unfolded species. The highly dynamic nature of the acyl carrier protein may be crucial for its interactions with its substrate and enzymes.

  3. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...... degrees C, indicating that sigma 32 adopts a highly flexible structure. At 42 degrees C we observed a slow correlated exchange of 30 additional amide hydrogens and localized it to a helix-loop-helix motif within domain sigma 2 that is responsible for the recognition of the -10 region in heat shock...

  4. pH and urea dependence of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houliston, R Scott; Liu, Chengsong; Singh, Laila M R; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2002-01-29

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates were measured as a function of pH and urea for 37 slowly exchanging amides in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin. The rank order of exchange rates is generally maintained under different solution conditions, and trends in the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates are correlated with the rank order of exchange rates. The observed trends are consistent with the expected behavior for exchange of different amides via global and/or local unfolding. Analysis of the pH dependence of exchange in terms of rate constants for structural opening and closing reveals a wide range of rates in different parts of the hisactophilin structure. The slowest exchanging amides have the slowest opening and closing rates. Many of the slowest exchanging amides are located in trefoil 2, but there are also some slow exchanging amides in trefoils 1 and 3. Slow exchangers tend to be near the interface between the beta-barrel and the beta-hairpin triplet portions of this single-domain structure. The pattern of exchange behaviour in hisactophilin is similar to that observed previously in interleukin-1 beta, indicating that exchange properties may be conserved among beta-trefoil proteins. Comparisons of opening and closing rates in hisactophilin with rates obtained for other proteins reveal clear trends for opening rates; however, trends in closing rates are less apparent, perhaps due to inaccuracies in the values used for intrinsic exchange rates in the data fitting. On the basis of the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates and optical measurements of stability and folding, EX2 is the main exchange mechanism in hisactophilin, but there is also evidence for varying levels of EX1 exchange at low and high pH and high urea concentrations. Equilibrium intermediates in which subglobal portions of structure are cooperatively disrupted are not apparent from analysis of the urea dependence of exchange rates. There is, however, a strong correlation between

  5. Determination of Equine Cytochrome c Backbone Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Rates by Mass Spectrometry Using a Wider Time Window and Isotope Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-03-01

    A new strategy to analyze amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data is proposed, utilizing a wider time window and isotope envelope analysis of each peptide. While most current scientific reports present HDX-MS data as a set of time-dependent deuteration levels of peptides, the ideal HDX-MS data presentation is a complete set of backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The ideal data set can provide single amide resolution, coverage of all exchange events, and the open/close ratio of each amide hydrogen in EX2 mechanism. Toward this goal, a typical HDX-MS protocol was modified in two aspects: measurement of a wider time window in HDX-MS experiments and deconvolution of isotope envelope of each peptide. Measurement of a wider time window enabled the observation of deuterium incorporation of most backbone amide hydrogens. Analysis of the isotope envelope instead of centroid value provides the deuterium distribution instead of the sum of deuteration levels in each peptide. A one-step, global-fitting algorithm optimized exchange rate and deuterium retention during the analysis of each amide hydrogen by fitting the deuterated isotope envelopes at all time points of all peptides in a region. Application of this strategy to cytochrome c yielded 97 out of 100 amide hydrogen exchange rates. A set of exchange rates determined by this approach is more appropriate for a patent or regulatory filing of a biopharmaceutical than a set of peptide deuteration levels obtained by a typical protocol. A wider time window of this method also eliminates false negatives in protein-ligand binding site identification.

  6. Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bryan F; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Durazo, Armando; Frueh, Dominique P; Pollastri, Michael P; Lee, Andrew; Bilgicer, Basar; Gygi, Steven P; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M

    2010-12-15

    This paper combines two techniques--mass spectrometry and protein charge ladders--to examine the relationship between the surface charge and hydrophobicity of a representative globular protein (bovine carbonic anhydrase II; BCA II) and its rate of amide hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the sequential acetylation of surface lysine-ε-NH3(+) groups--a type of modification that increases the net negative charge and hydrophobicity of the surface of BCA II without affecting its secondary or tertiary structure--resulted in a linear decrease in the aggregate rate of amide H/D exchange at pD 7.4, 15 °C. According to analysis with MS, the acetylation of each additional lysine generated between 1.4 and 0.9 additional hydrogens that are protected from H/D exchange during the 2 h exchange experiment at 15 °C, pD 7.4. NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that none of the hydrogen atoms which became protected upon acetylation were located on the side chain of the acetylated lysine residues (i.e., lys-ε-NHCOCH3) but were instead located on amide NHCO moieties in the backbone. The decrease in rate of exchange associated with acetylation paralleled a decrease in thermostability: the most slowly exchanging rungs of the charge ladder were the least thermostable (as measured by differential scanning calorimetry). This observation--that faster rates of exchange are associated with slower rates of denaturation--is contrary to the usual assumptions in protein chemistry. The fact that the rates of H/D exchange were similar for perbutyrated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCO(CH2)2CH3]18) and peracetylated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCOCH3]18) suggests that the electrostatic charge is more important than the hydrophobicity of surface groups in determining the rate of H/D exchange. These electrostatic effects on the kinetics of H/D exchange could complicate (or aid) the interpretation of experiments in which H/D exchange methods are used to probe the structural

  7. Local conformational stability of HIV-1 gp120 in unliganded and CD4-bound states as defined by amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Leopold; Huang, Chih-Chin; Coales, Stephen J; Molnar, Kathleen S; Skinner, Jeff; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Kwong, Peter D

    2010-10-01

    The binding reaction of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein to the CD4 receptor involves exceptional changes in enthalpy and entropy. Crystal structures of gp120 in unliganded and various ligand-bound states, meanwhile, reveal an inner domain able to fold into diverse conformations, a structurally invariant outer domain, and, in the CD4-bound state, a bridging sheet minidomain. These studies, however, provide only hints as to the flexibility of each state. Here we use amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry to provide quantifications of local conformational stability for HIV-1 gp120 in unliganded and CD4-bound states. On average, unliganded core gp120 displayed >10,000-fold slower exchange of backbone-amide hydrogens than a theoretically unstructured protein of the same composition, with binding by CD4 reducing the rate of gp120 amide exchange a further 10-fold. For the structurally constant CD4, alterations in exchange correlated well with alterations in binding surface (P value = 0.0004). For the structurally variable gp120, however, reductions in flexibility extended outside the binding surface, and regions of expected high structural diversity (inner domain/bridging sheet) displayed roughly 20-fold more rapid exchange in the unliganded state than regions of low diversity (outer domain). Thus, despite an extraordinary reduction in entropy, neither unliganded gp120 nor free CD4 was substantially unstructured, suggesting that most of the diverse conformations that make up the gp120 unliganded state are reasonably ordered. The results provide a framework for understanding how local conformational stability influences entropic change, conformational diversity, and structural rearrangements in the gp120-CD4 binding reaction.

  8. Predicting protein aggregation during storage in lyophilized solids using solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Schultz, Steven G; Kim, Sherry G; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-06-02

    Solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS) was used to assess the conformation of myoglobin (Mb) in lyophilized formulations, and the results correlated with the extent of aggregation during storage. Mb was colyophilized with sucrose (1:1 or 1:8 w/w), mannitol (1:1 w/w), or NaCl (1:1 w/w) or in the absence of excipients. Immediately after lyophilization, samples of each formulation were analyzed by ssHDX-MS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to assess Mb conformation, and by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to determine the extent of aggregation. The remaining samples were then placed on stability at 25 °C and 60% RH or 40 °C and 75% RH for up to 1 year, withdrawn at intervals, and analyzed for aggregate content by SEC and DLS. In ssHDX-MS of samples immediately after lyophilization (t = 0), Mb was less deuterated in solids containing sucrose (1:1 and 1:8 w/w) than in those containing mannitol (1:1 w/w), NaCl (1:1 w/w), or Mb alone. Deuterium uptake kinetics and peptide mass envelopes also indicated greater Mb structural perturbation in mannitol, NaCl, or Mb-alone samples at t = 0. The extent of deuterium incorporation and kinetic parameters related to rapidly and slowly exchanging amide pools (Nfast, Nslow), measured at t = 0, were highly correlated with the extent of aggregation on storage as measured by SEC. In contrast, the extent of aggregation was weakly correlated with FTIR band intensity and peak position measured at t = 0. The results support the use of ssHDX-MS as a formulation screening tool in developing lyophilized protein drug products.

  9. Amide-Exchange-Rate-Edited NMR (AERE-NMR) Experiment:A Novel Method for Resolving Overlapping Resonances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xue-Hui; LIN Dong-Hai

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an amide-exchange-rate-edited (AERE) NMR method that can effectively alleviate the problem of resonance overlap for proteins and peptides. This method exploits the diversity of amide proton exchange rates and consists of two complementary experiments: (1) SEA (solvent exposed amide)-type NMR experiments to map exchangeable surface residues whose amides are not involved in hydrogen bonding, and (2) presat-type NMR experiments to map solvent inaccessibly buried residues or nonexchangeable residues located in hydrogen-bonded secondary structures with properly controlled saturation transfer via amide proton exchanges with the solvent. This method separates overlapping resonances in a spectrum into two complementary spectra. The AERE-NMR method was demonstrated with a sample of 15N/13C/2H(70%) labeled ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin of 247 residues.

  10. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  11. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  12. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Leland

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data.

  13. Electrochemical reduction of disulfide-containing proteins for hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Salbo, Rune; Ploug, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of disulfide bond-containing proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) requires reduction of the disulfide bonds under acidic and cold conditions, where the amide hydrogen exchange reaction is quenched (pH 2.5, 0 °C). The reduction typically ...

  14. Pyrrolic Amide: A New Hydrogen Bond Building Block for Self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Zhen-Ming; LI Jian-Feng; HE Jia-Qi; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Molecular self-assembly has emerged as a powerful technology for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. In design of various molecular assemblies, hydrogen bonding is a preferably selected intra- or inter-molecular weak interaction in recent research by virtue of the directionality and specificity. The research for novel hydrogen bond building blocks that self-assembly into well defined structures is great important not only for gaining an understanding of the concepts of self-assembly but also for the design of new molecular materials. Pyrrolic amide moiety has one hydrogen bond acceptor (C =O) and two hydrogen bond donors (pyrrole NH and amide NH). By deliberately design, pyrrolic amide compounds would be new kinds hydrogen bond building blocks. So, pyrrolic amide compounds 1 ~ 6, which bear one, two or three pyrrolic amide moieties respectively, were designed and synthesized.

  15. Electron capture dissociation proceeds with a low degree of intramolecular migration of peptide amide hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Adams, Christopher M; Zubarev, Roman A;

    2008-01-01

    scrambling) that occurs during vibrational excitation of gas-phase ions. Unlike traditional collisional ion activation, electron capture dissociation (ECD) is not associated with substantial vibrational excitation. We investigated the extent of intramolecular backbone amide hydrogen (1H/2H) migration upon...... ECD using peptides with a unique selective deuterium incorporation. Our results show that only limited amide hydrogen migration occurs upon ECD, provided that vibrational excitation prior to the electron capture event is minimized. Peptide ions that are excessively vibrationally excited...

  16. NMR analysis of native-state protein conformational flexibility by hydrogen exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M

    2009-01-01

    The rate of hydrogen exchange for the most protected amides of a protein is widely used to provide an estimate of global conformational stability by analyzing the exchange kinetics in the unfolded state in terms of model peptide exchange rates. The exchange behavior of the other amides of the protein which do not exchange via a global unfolding mechanism can provide insight into the smaller-scale conformational transitions that facilitate access to solvent as required for the exchange reaction. However, since the residual tertiary structure in the exchange-competent conformation can modulate the chemistry of the exchange reaction, equilibrium values estimated from normalization with model peptide rates are open to question. To overcome this limitation, the most robust approaches utilize differential analyses as a function of experimental variables such as denaturant concentration, temperature, pH, and mutational variation. Practical aspects of these various differential analysis techniques are considered with illustrations drawn from the literature.

  17. Peptide conformer acidity analysis of protein flexibility monitored by hydrogen exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMaster, David M; Anderson, Janet S; Hernández, Griselda

    2009-10-06

    The amide hydrogens that are exposed to solvent in the high-resolution X-ray structures of ubiquitin, FK506-binding protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, and rubredoxin span a billion-fold range in hydroxide-catalyzed exchange rates which are predictable by continuum dielectric methods. To facilitate analysis of transiently accessible amides, the hydroxide-catalyzed rate constants for every backbone amide of ubiquitin were determined under near physiological conditions. With the previously reported NMR-restrained molecular dynamics ensembles of ubiquitin (PDB codes 2NR2 and 2K39 ) used as representations of the Boltzmann-weighted conformational distribution, nearly all of the exchange rates for the highly exposed amides were more accurately predicted than by use of the high-resolution X-ray structure. More strikingly, predictions for the amide hydrogens of the NMR relaxation-restrained ensemble that become exposed to solvent in more than one but less than half of the 144 protein conformations in this ensemble were almost as accurate. In marked contrast, the exchange rates for many of the analogous amides in the residual dipolar coupling-restrained ubiquitin ensemble are substantially overestimated, as was particularly evident for the Ile 44 to Lys 48 segment which constitutes the primary interaction site for the proteasome targeting enzymes involved in polyubiquitylation. For both ensembles, "excited state" conformers in this active site region having markedly elevated peptide acidities are represented at a population level that is 10(2) to 10(3) above what can exist in the Boltzmann distribution of protein conformations. These results indicate how a chemically consistent interpretation of amide hydrogen exchange can provide insight into both the population and the detailed structure of transient protein conformations.

  18. Mapping Protein-Ligand Interactions with Proteolytic Fragmentation, Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Elyssia S; Hudgens, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    Biological processes are the result of noncovalent, protein-ligand interactions, where the ligands range from small organic and inorganic molecules to lipids, nucleic acids, peptides, and proteins. Amide groups within proteins constantly exchange protons with water. When immersed in heavy water (D2O), mass spectrometry (MS) can measure the change of mass associated with the hydrogen to deuterium exchange (HDX). Protein-ligand interactions modify the hydrogen exchange rates of amide protons, and the measurement of the amide exchange rates can provide rich information regarding the dynamical structure of the protein-ligand complex. This chapter describes a protocol for conducting bottom-up, continuous uptake, proteolytic fragmentation HDX-MS experiments that can help identify and map the interacting peptides of a protein-ligand interface. This tutorial outlines the fundamental theory governing hydrogen exchange; provides practical information regarding the preparation of protein samples and solutions; and describes the exchange reaction, reaction quenching, enzymatic digestion, chromatographic separation, and peptide analysis by MS. Tables list representative combinations of fluidic components used by HDX-MS researchers and summarize the available HDX-MS analysis software packages. Additionally, two HDX-MS case studies are used to illustrate protein-ligand interactions involving: (1) a continuous sequence of interacting residues and (2) a set of discontinuously numbered residues, residing spatially near each other.

  19. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R22(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8 kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31 + G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4 kcal/mol.

  20. The Deuterator: software for the determination of backbone amide deuterium levels from H/D exchange MS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsinoremas NF

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of mass spectrometry and solution phase amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange experiments is an effective method for characterizing protein dynamics, and protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions. Despite methodological advancements and improvements in instrumentation and automation, data analysis and display remains a tedious process. The factors that contribute to this bottleneck are the large number of data points produced in a typical experiment, each requiring manual curation and validation, and then calculation of the level of backbone amide exchange. Tools have become available that address some of these issues, but lack sufficient integration, functionality, and accessibility required to address the needs of the H/D exchange community. To date there is no software for the analysis of H/D exchange data that comprehensively addresses these issues. Results We have developed an integrated software system for the automated analysis and representation of H/D exchange data that has been titled "The Deuterator". Novel approaches have been implemented that enable high throughput analysis, automated determination of deuterium incorporation, and deconvolution of overlapping peptides. This has been achieved by using methods involving iterative theoretical envelope fitting, and consideration of peak data within expected m/z ranges. Existing common file formats have been leveraged to allow compatibility with the output from the myriad of MS instrument platforms and peptide sequence database search engines. A web-based interface is used to integrate the components of The Deuterator that are able to analyze and present mass spectral data from instruments with varying resolving powers. The results, if necessary, can then be confirmed, adjusted, re-calculated and saved. Additional tools synchronize the curated calculation parameters with replicate time points, increasing throughput. Saved results can then

  1. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow... anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine (PMN...

  2. Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Properties of Porous Solids Containing Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEUNG, LEUNGK.

    2004-08-18

    Porous solids such as activated alumina, silica and molecular sieves generally contain significant amounts of hydrogen atoms in the form of H2O or OH even at high temperature and low humidity environment. A significant amount of this hydrogen is available for reversible isotopic exchange. This exchange reaction is slow under normal conditions and does not render itself to practical applications. But if the exchange kinetics is improved this reaction has the potential to be used for tritium removal from gas streams or for hydrogen isotopic separation.The use of catalysts to improve the exchange kinetics between hydrogen isotope in the gas phase and that in the solid phase was investigated. Granules of alumina, silica and molecular sieve were coated with platinum or palladium as the catalyst. The granules were packed in a 2-cm diameter column for isotope exchange tests. Gas streams containing different concentrations of deuterium in nitrogen or argon were fed through the protium saturated column. Isotope concentration in column effluent was monitored to generate isotope break-through curves. The curves were analyzed to produce information on the kinetics and capacity of the material. The results showed that all materials tested provided some extent of isotope exchange but some were superior both in kinetics and capacity. This paper will present the test results.

  3. Protein hydrogen exchange measured at single-residue resolution by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2009-01-01

    Because of unparalleled sensitivity and tolerance to protein size, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular method for measuring the solution hydrogen (1H/2H) exchange (HX) of biologically relevant protein states. While incorporated deuterium can be localized to different regions by pepsin...... the HX of individual amide linkages in the amyloidogenic protein beta2-microglobulin. A comparison of the deuterium levels of 60 individual backbone amides of beta2-microglobulin measured by HX-ETD-MS analysis to the corresponding values measured by NMR spectroscopy shows an excellent correlation......-phase hydrogen (1H/2H) migration (i.e., hydrogen scrambling). This article demonstrates that ETD can be implemented in a mass spectrometric method to monitor the conformational dynamics of proteins in solution at single-residue resolution....

  4. Probing the role of backbone hydrogen bonds in protein-peptide interactions by amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Hultqvist, Greta; Balle, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    -protein interactions, those of the PDZ domain family involve formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: C-termini or internal linear motifs of proteins bind as β-strands to form an extended antiparallel β-sheet with the PDZ domain. Whereas extensive work has focused on the importance of the amino acid side chains...... of the protein ligand, the role of the backbone hydrogen bonds in the binding reaction is not known. Using amide-to-ester substitutions to perturb the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern, we have systematically probed putative backbone hydrogen bonds between four different PDZ domains and peptides corresponding...... to natural protein ligands. Amide-to-ester mutations of the three C-terminal amides of the peptide ligand severely affected the affinity with the PDZ domain, demonstrating that hydrogen bonds contribute significantly to ligand binding (apparent changes in binding energy, ΔΔG = 1.3 to >3.8 kcal mol(-1...

  5. Sequence-specific conformational flexibility of SNARE transmembrane helices probed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Walter; Poschner, Bernhard C; Stalz, Holger; Heck, Albert J; Langosch, Dieter

    2008-08-01

    SNARE proteins mediate fusion of intracellular eukaryotic membranes and their alpha-helical transmembrane domains are known to contribute to lipid bilayer mixing. Synthetic transmembrane domain peptides were previously shown to mimic the function of SNARE proteins in that they trigger liposome fusion in a sequence-specific fashion. Here, we performed a detailed investigation of the conformational dynamics of the transmembrane helices of the presynaptic SNAREs synaptobrevin II and syntaxin 1a. To this end, we recorded deuterium/hydrogen-exchange kinetics in isotropic solution as well as in the membrane-embedded state. In solution, the exchange kinetics of each peptide can be described by three different classes of amide deuteriums that exchange with different rate constants. These are likely to originate from exchange at different domains of the helices. Interestingly, the rate constants of each class vary with the TMD sequence. Thus, the exchange rate is position-specific and sequence-specific. Further, the rate constants correlate with the previously determined membrane fusogenicities. In membranes, exchange is retarded and a significant proportion of amide hydrogens are protected from exchange. We conclude that the conformational dynamics of SNARE TMD helices is mechanistically linked to their ability to drive lipid mixing.

  6. Ternary Amides Containing Transition Metals for Hydrogen Storage: A Case Study with Alkali Metal Amidozincates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Richter, Theresia M M; Pistidda, Claudio; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Santoru, Antonio; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The alkali metal amidozincates Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2 and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time as hydrogen storage media. Compared with the LiNH2-2 LiH system, both Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2-12 LiH and K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH systems showed improved rehydrogenation performance, especially K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH, which can be fully hydrogenated within 30 s at approximately 230 °C. The absorption properties are stable upon cycling. This work shows that ternary amides containing transition metals have great potential as hydrogen storage materials.

  7. Capsid structure and dynamics of a human rhinovirus probed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lintao; Smith, David L

    2005-06-01

    Viral capsids are dynamic protein assemblies surrounding viral genomes. Despite the high-resolution structures determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, their in-solution structure and dynamics can be probed by hydrogen exchange. We report here using hydrogen exchange combined with protein enzymatic fragmentation and mass spectrometry to determine the capsid structure and dynamics of a human rhinovirus, HRV14. Capsid proteins (VP1-4) were labeled with deuterium by incubating intact virus in D(2)O buffer at neutral pH. The labeled proteins were digested by immobilized pepsin to give peptides analyzed by capillary reverse-phase HPLC coupled with nano-electrospray mass spectrometry. Deuterium levels incorporated at amide linkages in peptic fragments were measured for different exchange times from 12 sec to 30 h to assess the amide hydrogen exchange rates along each of the four protein backbones. Exchange results generally agree with the crystal structure of VP1-4,with extended, flexible terminal and surface-loop regions in fast exchange and folded helical and sheet structures in slow exchange. In addition, three alpha-helices, one from each of VP1-3, exhibited very slow exchange, indicating high stability of the protomeric interface. The beta-strands at VP3 N terminus also had very slow exchange, suggesting stable pentamer contacts. It was noted, however, that the interface around the fivefold axis had fast and intermediate exchange, indicating relatively more flexibility. Even faster exchange rates were found in the N terminus of VP1 and most segments of VP4, suggesting high flexibilities, which may correspond to their potential roles in virus uncoating.

  8. High sensitivity of amide V bands in uracil and its derivatives to the strengths of hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandekar, Jagdeesh; Zundel, Georg

    Bands due to CO, CH and NH out-of-plane bending modes have been identified and studied as a function of temperature in the cis-amide uracil and its derivatives. Only the bands due to NH out-of-plane bending modes, the so-called amide V bands, are found to be sensitive to the strengths of hydrogen bonds. This sensitivity is found to be as great as that of NH stretching bands. It is shown that the amide V bands could be used, among other things, to detect the possibility and/or extent of hydrogen bonding in Hoogsteen-type base-pairs. This provides a very simple way to detect the presence of undesirable uncomplexed bases in the study of base-paired complexes. These results point to the need to understand better the origin of amide V bands.

  9. HDX Match Software for the Data Analysis of Top-Down ECD-FTMS Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) combined with mass spectrometry is a powerful technique for studying protein structure. The recently developed top-down ECD-FTMS HDX approach (Pan J. et al., JACS, 2008) allows determination of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of a protein's amide bonds, down to the single residue resolution. One of the existing limitations of this technology has been the laborious manual analysis of the MS/MS spectra. Here we present a software program for processing the data from these experiments. This program assigns the c- and z-fragment ion series of the protein, and calculates the number of the exchanged amide protons for each fragment by fitting the theoretically predicted isotopic envelopes of the deuterated fragments to the experimental data.

  10. An insight into the photophysical properties of amide hydrogen bonded N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl) acetamide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balijapalli, Umamahesh; Udayadasan, Sathiskumar; Panyam Muralidharan, Vivek; Sukumarapillai, Dileep Kumar; Shanmugam, Easwaramoorthi; Paduthapillai Gopal, Aravindan; S. Rathore, Ravindranath; Kulathu Iyer, Sathiyanarayanan

    2017-02-01

    Three distinct, hydrogen bond associated N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl) acetamides were synthesized by refluxing benzothiazoles with acetic acid. The nature of the assemblies was characteristic to the substituent in the benzothiazole moiety. In N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide, water acts as a bridge for forming three hydrogen bonds, as an acceptor to amide Nsbnd H, and donors to carbonyl of amide and thiazole nitrogen assembles of three different N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide molecules. The N-(6-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide formed a (amide) N-H…N (thiazole) bonded R22(8) molecular dimers by two homo-intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. N-(6-methoxybenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide formed (amide)N-H…O (acid) & (acid)O-H…N (thiazole) interactions with the acetic acid, forming a R22(8) hydrogen-bonded ring by two hetero-intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  11. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. [Poly(etherimide) and poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    During the last quarter several high performance membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The heat-resistant resin poly(etherimide) has been selected as the polymer with the most outstanding properties for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Flat sheet and hollow fiber poly(etherimide) membranes have been prepared and evaluated with pure gases and gas mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures. Multilayer composite poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes were also developed. These membranes are useful for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide hydrogen. They have very high selectivities and extremely high normalized carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide fluxes. Separation of carbon dioxide/hydrogen streams is a key problem in hydrogen production from coal. The development of the two membranes now gives us two approaches to separate these gas streams, depending on the stream's composition. If the stream contains small quantities of hydrogen, the hydrogen- permeable poly(etherimide) membrane would be used to produce a hydrogen-enriched permeate. If the stream contains small quantities of carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide, the poly(ether-ester-amide) membrane would be used to produce a carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide-free, hydrogen-enriched residue stream. 6 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Synthesis, structural investigations, hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies, and molecular modeling of conformationally stablilized aromatic oligoamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Qin, Bo; Ren, Changliang; Chen, Xiuying; Yip, Yeow Kwan; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Dawei; Su, Haibin; Zeng, Huaqiang

    2010-04-28

    Biasing the conformational preferences of aromatic oligoamides by internally placing intramolecular hydrogen bonds has led to a series of stably folded molecular strands. This article presents the results from extensive solid-state, solution, and computational studies on these folding oligomers. Depending on its backbone length, an oligoamide adopts a crescent or helical conformation. Surprisingly, despite the highly repetitive nature of the backbone, the internally placed, otherwise very similar intramolecular hydrogen bonds showed significantly different stabilities as demonstrated by hydrogen-deuterium exchange data. It was also observed that the hydrogen-bonding strength can be tuned by adjusting the substituents attached to the exterior of the aromatic backbones. Examining the amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates of trimers revealed that a six-membered hydrogen bond nearing the ester end is the weakest among all the four intramolecular hydrogen bonds of a molecule. This observation was verified by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*. Such a "weak point" creates the "battle of the bulge" where backbone twisting is centered, which is consistently observed in the solid-state structures of the four trimer molecules studied. In the solid state, the oligomers assemble into interesting one-dimensional structures. A pronounced columnar packing of short oligomers (i.e., dimers, trimers, and tetramer) and channel-like, potentially ion-conducting stacks of longer oligomers (i.e., tetramer, pentamer, and hexamer) were observed.

  13. Interaction of arginine with protein during refolding process probed by amide H/D exchange mass spectrometry and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dawei; Liu, Yongdong; Zhang, Guifeng; Zhang, Chun; Li, Xiunan; Wang, Qingqing; Shi, Hong; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Arginine has been widely used as low molecular weight additive to promote protein refolding by suppressing aggregate formation. However, methods to investigate the role of arginine in protein refolding are often limited on protein's global conformational properties. Here, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was used to study the effects of arginine on recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) refolding at the scale of peptide mapping. It was found that deuteration levels of rhG-CSF refolded with arginine was higher than that without arginine during the whole refolding process, but they became almost the same when the refolding reached equilibrium. This phenomenon indicated that arginine could protect some amide deuterium atoms from being exchanged with hydrogen, but the protection diminished gradually along with refolding proceeding. Enzymatic digestion revealed six particular peptides of 16-47, 72-84, 84-93, 114-124, 145-153 and 154-162 were mainly responsible for the deuteration, and all of them dominantly located in protein's α-helix domain. Furthermore, thermodynamics analysis by isothermal titration calorimetry provided direct evidence that arginine could only react with denatured and partially refolded rhG-CSF. Taking all of the results together, we suggest that arginine suppresses protein aggregation by a reversible combination. At the initial refolding stage, arginine could combine with the denatured protein mainly through hydrogen bonding. Subsequently, arginine is gradually excluded from protein with protein's native conformation recovering.

  14. New synthesis route for ternary transition metal amides as well as ultrafast amide-hydride hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Richter, Theresia M M; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-04-14

    K2[Mn(NH2)4] and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were successfully synthesized via a mechanochemical method. The mixture of K2[Mn(NH2)4] and LiH showed excellent rehydrogenation properties. In fact, after dehydrogenation K2[Mn(NH2)4]-8LiH fully rehydrogenates within 60 seconds at ca. 230 °C and 5 MPa of H2. This is one of the fastest rehydrogenation rates in amide-hydride systems known to date. This work also shows a strategy for the synthesis of transition metal nitrides by decomposition of the mixtures of M[M'(NH2)n] (where M is an alkali or alkaline earth metal and M' is a transition metal) and metal hydrides.

  15. Kinetic solvent effects on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with tertiary amides. Control over the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity through solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-01-16

    A laser flash photolysis study on the role of solvent effects on hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-formylpyrrolidine (FPRD), and N-acetylpyrrolidine (APRD) to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. From large to very large increases in the HAT rate constant (kH) were measured on going from MeOH and TFE to isooctane (kH(isooctane)/kH(MeOH) = 5-12; kH(isooctane)/kH(TFE) > 80). This behavior was explained in terms of the increase in the extent of charge separation in the amides determined by polar solvents through solvent-amide dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding, where the latter interactions appear to play a major role with strong HBD solvents such as TFE. These interactions increase the electron deficiency of the amide C-H bonds, deactivating these bonds toward HAT to an electrophilic radical such as CumO(•), indicating that changes in solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding can provide a convenient method for deactivation of the C-H bond of amides toward HAT. With DMF, a solvent-induced change in HAT selectivity was observed, suggesting that solvent effects can be successfully employed to control the reaction selectivity in HAT-based procedures for the functionalization of C-H bonds.

  16. Evaluation of enthalpy change due to hydrogen desorption for lithium amide/imide system by differential scanning calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Enthalpy change (ΔH) due to hydrogen desorption (H-desorption) for the lithium amide/imide system was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement. In order to obtain the accurate and precise value of ΔH, we have paid special attention to following two points for correcting raw experimental data. One is to determine a cell constant of DSC equipment, which was evaluated by using the TiO2-doped MgH2 compound as a reference because of its quite similar hydrogen desorption pro...

  17. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange in imidazole as a tool for studying histidine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebo, Małgorzata; Kielmas, Martyna; Adamczyk, Justyna; Cebrat, Marek; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Stefanowicz, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Isotope exchange at the histidine C2 atom of imidazole in D2O solution is well known to occur at a significantly slower rate than the exchange of amide protons. Analysis of the kinetics of this isotope-exchange reaction is proposed herein as a method of detecting histidine phosphorylation. This modification of His-containing peptides is challenging to pinpoint because of its instability under acidic conditions as well as during CID-MS analysis. In this work, we investigated the effect of phosphorylation of the histidine side chain in peptides on deuterium-hydrogen exchange (DHX) in the imidazole. The results demonstrate that phosphorylation dramatically slows the rate of the DHX reaction. This phenomenon can be applied to detect phosphorylation of peptides at the histidine residue (e.g., in enzymatic digests). We also found that the influence of the peptide sequence on the exchange kinetics is relatively small. A CID fragmentation experiment revealed that there was no detectable hydrogen scrambling in peptides deuterated at C2 of the imidazole ring. Therefore, MS/MS can be used to directly identify the locations of deuterium ions incorporated into peptides containing multiple histidine moieties.

  18. Trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2005-01-01

    A density functional theory database of hydrogen chemisorption energies on close packed surfaces of a number of transition and noble metals is presented. The bond energies are used to understand the trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution. A volcano curve is obtained when measured...... exchange currents are plotted as a function of the calculated hydrogen adsorption energies and a simple kinetic model is developed to understand the origin of the volcano. The volcano curve is also consistent with Pt being the most efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution. (c) 2005...

  19. Ligand assisted carbon dioxide activation and hydrogenation using molybdenum and tungsten amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Blacque, Olivier; Berke, Heinz

    2015-04-14

    The hepta-coordinated isomeric M(NO)Cl3(PN(H)P) complexes {M = Mo, ; W, , PN(H)P = (iPr2PCH2CH2)2NH, (HN atom of PN(H)P syn and anti to the NO ligand)} and the paramagnetic species M(NO)Cl2(PN(H)P) (M = Mo, ; W, ) could be prepared via a new synthetic pathway. The pseudo trigonal bipyramidal amides M(NO)(CO)(PNP) {M = Mo, ; W, ; [PNP](-) = [(iPr2PCH2CH2)2N](-)} were reacted with CO2 at room temperature with CO2 approaching the M[double bond, length as m-dash]N double bond in the equatorial (CO,NO,N) plane trans to the NO ligand and forming the pseudo-octahedral cyclic carbamates M(NO)(CO)(PNP)(OCO) (M = Mo, ; W = ). DFT calculations revealed that the approach to form the isomer is kinetically determined. The amine hydrides M(NO)H(CO)(PN(H)P) {M = Mo, ; W, }, obtained by H2 addition to , insert CO2 (2 bar) at room temperature into the M-H bond generating isomeric mixtures of the η(1)-formato complexes M(NO)(CO)(PN(H)P)(η(1)-OCHO), (M = Mo, ; M = W, ). Closing the stoichiometric cycles for sodium formate formation the isomeric mixtures were reacted with 1 equiv. of Na[N(SiMe3)2] regenerating . Attempts to turn the stoichiometric formate production into catalytic CO2 hydrogenation using in the presence of various types of sterically congested bases furnished yields of formate salts of up to 4%.

  20. Amide-mediated hydrogen bonding at organic crystal/water interfaces enables selective endotoxin binding with picomolar affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Thirumoorthi, Navanita; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-05-22

    Since the discovery of endotoxins as the primary toxic component of Gram-negative bacteria, researchers have pursued the quest for molecules that detect, neutralize, and remove endotoxins. Selective removal of endotoxins is particularly challenging for protein solutions and, to this day, no general method is available. Here, we report that crystals of the purine-derived compound allantoin selectively adsorb endotoxins with picomolar affinity through amide-mediated hydrogen bonding in aqueous solutions. Atom force microscopy and chemical inhibition experiments indicate that endotoxin adsorption is largely independent from hydrophobic and ionic interactions with allantoin crystals and is mediated by hydrogen bonding with amide groups at flat crystal surfaces. The small size (500 nm) and large specific surface area of allantoin crystals results in a very high endotoxin-binding capacity (3 × 10(7) EU/g) which compares favorably with known endotoxin-binding materials. These results provide a proof-of-concept for hydrogen bond-based molecular recognition processes in aqueous solutions and establish a practical method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions.

  1. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  2. Kinetic Study of the Reaction of the Phthalimide-N-oxyl Radical with Amides: Structural and Medium Effects on the Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactivity and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietti, Massimo; Forcina, Veronica; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Lapi, Andrea; Martin, Teo; Mazzonna, Marco; Salamone, Michela

    2016-12-02

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of secondary N-(4-X-benzyl)acetamides and tertiary amides to the phthalimide-N-oxyl radical (PINO) has been carried out. The results indicate that HAT is strongly influenced by structural and medium effects; in particular, the addition of Brønsted and Lewis acids determines a significant deactivation of C-H bonds α to the amide nitrogen of these substrates. Thus, by changing the reaction medium, it is possible to carefully control the regioselectivity of the aerobic oxidation of amides catalyzed by N-hydroxyphthalimide, widening the synthetic versatility of this process.

  3. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for investigation of backbone dynamics of oxidized and reduced cytochrome P450cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Molnar, Kathleen S; Coales, Stephen J; OuYang, Bo; Simorellis, Alana K; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-01

    Backbone dynamics of the camphor monoxygenase cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101) as a function of oxidation/ligation state of the heme iron were investigated via hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) as monitored by mass spectrometry. Main chain amide NH hydrogens can exchange readily with solvent and the rate of this exchange depends upon, among other things, dynamic fluctuations in local structural elements. A fluxional region of the polypeptide will exchange more quickly with solvent than one that is more constrained. In most regions of the enzyme, exchange rates were similar between oxidized high-spin camphor-bound and reduced camphor- and CO-bound CYP101 (CYP-S and CYP-S-CO, respectively). However, in regions of the protein that have previously been implicated in substrate access by structural and molecular dynamics investigations, the reduced enzyme shows significantly slower exchange rates than the oxidized CYP-S. This observation corresponds to increased flexibility of the oxidized enzyme relative to the reduced form. Structural features previously found to be perturbed in CYP-S-CO upon binding of the biologically relevant effector and reductant putidaredoxin (Pdx) as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are also more protected from exchange in the reduced state. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental investigation of backbone dynamics within the P450 family using this methodology.

  4. Collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry induces intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists in the literature as to the occurrence of intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens upon collisional activation of protonated peptides and proteins. This phenomenon has important implications for the application of CID as an experimental tool to obtain site......-specific information about the incorporation of deuterium into peptides and proteins in solution. Using a unique set of peptides with their carboxyl-terminal half labeled with deuterium we have shown unambiguously that hydrogen (1H/2H) scrambling is such a dominating factor during low energy collisional activation.......127, 2785-2793). Taking further advantage of this unique test system we have now investigated the influence of the charge state and collision energy on the occurrence of scrambling in protonated peptides. Our MALDI tandem time-of-flight experiments clearly demonstrate that complete positional...

  5. Allosteric activation of coagulation factor VIIa visualized by hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Jørgensen, Thomas; Olsen, Ole H;

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a serine protease that, after binding to tissue factor (TF), plays a pivotal role in the initiation of blood coagulation. We used hydrogen exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to visualize the details of FVIIa activation by comparing the exchange kinetics...... tissue factor binding, FVIIa undergoes dramatic structural stabilization as indicated by decreased exchange rates localized throughout the protease domain and in distant parts of the light chain, spanning across 50A and revealing a concerted interplay between functional sites in FVIIa. The results...... of distinct molecular states, namely zymogen FVII, endoproteolytically cleaved FVIIa, TF-bound zymogen FVII, TF-bound FVIIa, and FVIIa in complex with an active site inhibitor. The hydrogen exchange kinetics of zymogen FVII and FVIIa are identical indicating highly similar solution structures. However, upon...

  6. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Magee, E. W.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-11-01

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  7. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    Proteins are dynamic molecules that exhibit conformational flexibility to function properly. Well-known examples of this are allosteric regulation of protein activity and ligand-induced conformational changes in protein receptors. Detailed knowledge of the conformational properties of proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic resolution of the lowest-energy structure of the native ensemble. There is a growing need for sensitive analytical tools to explore all of the significant molecular structures in the conformational landscape of proteins. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently emerged as a powerful method for characterizing protein conformational dynamics. The basis of this method is the fact that backbone amides in stable hydrogen-bonded structures (e.g., α-helices and β-sheets) are protected against exchange with the aqueous solvent. All protein structures are dynamic, however, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein--according to thermodynamic principles--cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent-exposed and exchange-competent over time. Consequently, a folded protein in D2O will gradually incorporate deuterium into its backbone amides, and the kinetics of the process can be readily monitored by mass spectrometry. The deuterium uptake kinetics for the intact protein (global exchange kinetics) represents the sum of the exchange kinetics for the individual backbone amides. Local exchange kinetics is typically achieved by using pepsin digestion under quench conditions (i.e., under cold

  8. SSH2S: Hydrogen storage in complex hydrides for an auxiliary power unit based on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricco, Marcello; Bang, Mads; Fichtner, Maximilian; Hauback, Bjorn; Linder, Marc; Luetto, Carlo; Moretto, Pietro; Sgroi, Mauro

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of the SSH2S (Fuel Cell Coupled Solid State Hydrogen Storage Tank) project was to develop a solid state hydrogen storage tank based on complex hydrides and to fully integrate it with a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack. A mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was used as the main storage material for the tank, due to its high gravimetric storage capacity and relatively low hydrogen desorption temperature. The mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was coupled with a standard intermetallic compound to take advantage of its capability to release hydrogen at ambient temperature and to ensure a fast start-up of the system. The hydrogen storage tank was designed to feed a 1 kW HT-PEM stack for 2 h to be used for an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). A full thermal integration was possible thanks to the high operation temperature of the fuel cell and to the relative low temperature (170 °C) for hydrogen release from the mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system.

  9. Flexible and rigid structures in HIV-1 p17 matrix protein monitored by relaxation and amide proton exchange with NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohori, Yuka; Okazaki, Honoka; Watanabe, Satoru; Tochio, Naoya; Arai, Munehito; Kigawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Chiaki

    2014-03-01

    The HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is a multifunctional protein that interacts with other molecules including proteins and membranes. The dynamic structure between its folded and partially unfolded states can be critical for the recognition of interacting molecules. One of the most important roles of the p17 matrix protein is its localization to the plasma membrane with the Gag polyprotein. The myristyl group attached to the N-terminus on the p17 matrix protein functions as an anchor for binding to the plasma membrane. Biochemical studies revealed that two regions are important for its function: D14-L31 and V84-V88. Here, the dynamic structures of the p17 matrix protein were studied using NMR for relaxation and amide proton exchange experiments at the physiological pH of 7.0. The results revealed that the α12-loop, which includes the 14-31 region, was relatively flexible, and that helix 4, including the 84-88 region, was the most protected helix in this protein. However, the residues in the α34-loop near helix 4 had a low order parameter and high exchange rate of amide protons, indicating high flexibility. This region is probably flexible because this loop functions as a hinge for optimizing the interactions between helices 3 and 4. The C-terminal long region of K113-Y132 adopted a disordered structure. Furthermore, the C-terminal helix 5 appeared to be slightly destabilized due to the flexible C-terminal tail based on the order parameters. Thus, the dynamic structure of the p17 matrix protein may be related to its multiple functions.

  10. Hydrogen amid the change of the energy supply system; Wasserstoff im Wandel der Energieversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehlein, Bernd; Kattenstein, Thomas [EnergieAgentur.NRW, Duesseldorf (Germany). Netzwerk Brennstoffzelle und Wasserstoff NRW; Toepler, Johannes [Deutscher Wasserstoff und Brennstoffzellenverband e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Germany has set itself ambitious goals for the energy turnaround. Being a complementary energy carrier hydrogen could play an important role in their achievement. One of the great advantages of hydrogen is its excellent storability. Due to the fact that energy can be converted back and forth between hydrogen and electricity, making use of hydrogen alongside the heavily fluctuating feed-in of renewable energy could prove a wise decision. The present article analyses what opportunities are associated with the integration of hydrogen but also what challenges must be taken into consideration and ultimately mastered.

  11. Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer from tertiary amides to the cumyloxyl radical: evaluating the role of stereoelectronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Milan, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of alkanamides to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. With N,N-dialkylformamides HAT preferentially occurs from the formyl C-H bond, while in N-formylpyrrolidine HAT mostly occurs from the ring α-C-H bonds. With the acetamides and the alkanamides almost exclusive HAT from the C-H bonds that are α to nitrogen was observed. The results obtained show that alignment between the C-H bond being broken and the amide π-system can lead to significant increases in the HAT rate constant (kH). This finding points toward the important role of stereoelectronic effects on the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The highest kH values were measured for the reactions of CumO(•) with N-acylpyrrolidines. These substrates have ring α-C-H bonds that are held in a conformation that is optimally aligned with the amide π-system, thus allowing for the relatively facile HAT reaction. The lowest kH value was measured for the reaction of N,N-diisobutylacetamide, wherein the steric bulk associated with the N-isobutyl groups increases the energy barrier required to reach the most suitable conformation for HAT. The experimental results are well supported by the computed BDEs for the C-H bonds of the most representative substrates.

  12. Investigating the role of a backbone to substrate hydrogen bond in OMP decarboxylase using a site-specific amide to ester substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bijoy J; Goto, Yuki; Cembran, Alessandro; Fedorov, Alexander A; Almo, Steven C; Gao, Jiali; Suga, Hiroaki; Gerlt, John A

    2014-10-21

    Hydrogen bonds between backbone amide groups of enzymes and their substrates are often observed, but their importance in substrate binding and/or catalysis is not easy to investigate experimentally. We describe the generation and kinetic characterization of a backbone amide to ester substitution in the orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase from Methanobacter thermoautotrophicum (MtOMPDC) to determine the importance of a backbone amide-substrate hydrogen bond. The MtOMPDC-catalyzed reaction is characterized by a rate enhancement (∼10(17)) that is among the largest for enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The reaction proceeds through a vinyl anion intermediate that may be stabilized by hydrogen bonding interaction between the backbone amide of a conserved active site serine residue (Ser-127) and oxygen (O4) of the pyrimidine moiety and/or electrostatic interactions with the conserved general acidic lysine (Lys-72). In vitro translation in conjunction with amber suppression using an orthogonal amber tRNA charged with L-glycerate ((HO)S) was used to generate the ester backbone substitution (S127(HO)S). With 5-fluoro OMP (FOMP) as substrate, the amide to ester substitution increased the value of Km by ∼1.5-fold and decreased the value of kcat by ∼50-fold. We conclude that (i) the hydrogen bond between the backbone amide of Ser-127 and O4 of the pyrimidine moiety contributes a modest factor (∼10(2)) to the 10(17) rate enhancement and (ii) the stabilization of the anionic intermediate is accomplished by electrostatic interactions, including its proximity of Lys-72. These conclusions are in good agreement with predictions obtained from hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations.

  13. Understanding hydrogen sorption in a metal-organic framework with open-metal sites and amide functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony T.

    2013-05-09

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) studies of the mechanism of hydrogen sorption in an rht-MOF known as Cu-TPBTM are presented. The MOF is a decorated/substituted isostructural analogue to the unembellished rht-MOF, PCN-61, that was studied previously [ Forrest, K. A.J. Phys. Chem. C 2012, 116, 15538-15549. ]. The simulations were performed using three different hydrogen potentials of increasing complexity. Simulated hydrogen sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the reported experimental data for only a polarizable model in one of four experimentally observed crystal structure configurations. The study demonstrates the ability of modeling to distinguish the differential sorption of distinct strucures; one configuration is found to be dominant due to favorable interactions with substrates. In addition, it was discovered that the presence of polar amide groups had a significant effect on the electrostatics of the Cu2+ ions and directs the low-pressure physisorption of hydrogen in the MOF. This is in contrast to what was observed in PCN-61, where an exterior copper ion had a higher relative charge and was the favored loading site. This tunability of the electrostatics of the copper ions via chemical substitution on the MOF framework can be explained by the presence of the negatively charged oxygen atom of the amide group that causes the interior Cu2+ ion to exhibit a higher positive charge through an inductive effect. Further, control simulations, taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by theoretical modeling, include artificially modified charges for both Cu2+ ions chosen equal to or with a higher charge on the exterior Cu2+ ion. This choice resulted in distinctly different hydrogen sorption characteristics in Cu-TPBTM with no direct sorption on the open-metal sites. Thus, this study demonstrates both the tunable nature of MOF platforms and the possibility for rational design of sorption

  14. Conformational analysis of g protein-coupled receptor signaling by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Su Youn; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-01-01

    Conformational change and protein-protein interactions are two major mechanisms of membrane protein signal transduction, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon agonist binding, GPCRs change conformation, resulting in interaction with downstream signaling molecules such as G proteins. To understand the precise signaling mechanism, studies have investigated the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or electron paramagnetic resonance. In addition to these techniques, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently been used in GPCR studies. HDX-MS measures the rate at which peptide amide hydrogens exchange with deuterium in the solvent. Exposed or flexible regions have higher exchange rates and excluded or ordered regions have lower exchange rates. Therefore, HDX-MS is a useful tool for studying protein-protein interfaces and conformational changes after protein activation or protein-protein interactions. Although HDX-MS does not give high-resolution structures, it analyzes protein conformations that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography or NMR. Furthermore, conformational information from HDX-MS can help in the crystallization of X-ray crystallography by suggesting highly flexible regions. Interactions between GPCRs and downstream signaling molecules are not easily analyzed by X-ray crystallography or NMR because of the large size of the GPCR-signaling molecule complexes, hydrophobicity, and flexibility of GPCRs. HDX-MS could be useful for analyzing the conformational mechanism of GPCR signaling. In this chapter, we discuss details of HDX-MS for analyzing GPCRs using the β2AR-G protein complex as a model system.

  15. Reliable determination of amidicity in acyclic amides and lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Stephen A; Rosser, Adam A

    2012-07-06

    Two independent computational methods have been used for determination of amide resonance stabilization and amidicities relative to N,N-dimethylacetamide for a wide range of acyclic and cyclic amides. The first method utilizes carbonyl substitution nitrogen atom replacement (COSNAR). The second, new approach involves determination of the difference in amide resonance between N,N-dimethylacetamide and the target amide using an isodesmic trans-amidation process and is calibrated relative to 1-aza-2-adamantanone with zero amidicity and N,N-dimethylacetamide with 100% amidicity. Results indicate excellent coherence between the methods, which must be regarded as more reliable than a recently reported approach to amidicities based upon enthalpies of hydrogenation. Data for acyclic planar and twisted amides are predictable on the basis of the degrees of pyramidalization at nitrogen and twisting about the C-N bonds. Monocyclic lactams are predicted to have amidicities at least as high as N,N-dimethylacetamide, and the β-lactam system is planar with greater amide resonance than that of N,N-dimethylacetamide. Bicyclic penam/em and cepham/em scaffolds lose some amidicity in line with the degree of strain-induced pyramidalization at the bridgehead nitrogen and twist about the amide bond, but the most puckered penem system still retains substantial amidicity equivalent to 73% that of N,N-dimethylacetamide.

  16. Reactions of the cumyloxyl and benzyloxyl radicals with tertiary amides. Hydrogen abstraction selectivity and the role of specific substrate-radical hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Milan, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2013-06-21

    A time-resolved kinetic study in acetonitrile and a theoretical investigation of hydrogen abstraction reactions from N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. CumO(•) reacts with both substrates by direct hydrogen abstraction. With DMF, abstraction occurs from the formyl and N-methyl C-H bonds, with the formyl being the preferred abstraction site, as indicated by the measured kH/kD ratios and by theory. With DMA, abstraction preferentially occurs from the N-methyl groups, whereas abstraction from the acetyl group represents a minor pathway, in line with the computed C-H BDEs and the kH/kD ratios. The reactions of BnO(•) with both substrates were best described by the rate-limiting formation of hydrogen-bonded prereaction complexes between the BnO(•) α-C-H and the amide oxygen, followed by intramolecular hydrogen abstraction. This mechanism is consistent with the very large increases in reactivity measured on going from CumO(•) to BnO(•) and with the observation of kH/kD ratios close to unity in the reactions of BnO(•). Our modeling supports the different mechanisms proposed for the reactions of CumO(•) and BnO(•) and the importance of specific substrate/radical hydrogen bond interactions, moreover providing information on the hydrogen abstraction selectivity.

  17. Microscopic stability of cold shock protein A examined by NMR native state hydrogen exchange as a function of urea and trimethylamine N-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaravine, V. A.; Rathgeb-Szabo, K.; Alexandrescu, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Native state hydrogen exchange of cold shock protein A (CspA) has been characterized as a function of the denaturant urea and of the stabilizing agent trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The structure of CspA has five strands of beta-sheet. Strands beta1-beta4 have strongly protected amide protons that, based on experiments as a function of urea, exchange through a simple all-or-none global unfolding mechanism. By contrast, the protection of amide protons from strand beta5 is too weak to measure in water. Strand beta5 is hydrogen bonded to strands beta3 and beta4, both of which afford strong protection from solvent exchange. Gaussian network model (GNM) simulations, which assume that the degree of protection depends on tertiary contact density in the native structure, accurately predict the strong protection observed in strands beta1-beta4 but fail to account for the weak protection in strand beta5. The most conspicuous feature of strand beta5 is its low sequence hydrophobicity. In the presence of TMAO, there is an increase in the protection of strands beta1-beta4, and protection extends to amide protons in more hydrophilic segments of the protein, including strand beta5 and the loops connecting the beta-strands. TMAO stabilizes proteins by raising the free energy of the denatured state, due to highly unfavorable interactions between TMAO and the exposed peptide backbone. As such, the stabilizing effects of TMAO are expected to be relatively independent of sequence hydrophobicity. The present results suggest that the magnitude of solvent exchange protection depends more on solvent accessibility in the ensemble of exchange susceptible conformations than on the strength of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the native structure. PMID:10716181

  18. Synthesis, complexation and water exchange properties of Gd(III)-TTDA-mono and bis(amide) derivatives and their binding affinity to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Ming-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chang, Ya-Hui; Lu, Wen-Kuei; Liu, Gin-Chung; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2007-07-14

    With the objective of tuning the lipophilicity of ligands and maintaining the neutrality and stability of Gd(III) chelate, we designed and synthesized two bis(amide) derivatives of TTDA, TTDA-BMA and TTDA-BBA, and a mono(amide) derivative, TTDA-N-MOBA. The ligand protonation constants and complex stability constants for various metal ions were determined in this study. The identification of the microscopic sites of protonation of the amide ligand by 1H NMR titrations show that the first protonation site occurs on the central nitrogen atom. The values of the stability constant of TTDA-mono and bis(amide) complex are significantly lower than those of TTDA and DTPA, but the selectivity constants of these ligands for Gd(III) over Zn(II) and Cu(II) are slightly higher than those of TTDA and DTPA. On the basis of the water-exchange rate values available for [Gd(TTDA-BMA)(H2O)], [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] and [Gd(TTDA-N-MOBA)(H2O)]-, we can state that, in general, the replacement of one carboxylate group by an amide group decreases the water-exchange rate of the gadolinium(III) complexes by a factor of about three to five. The decrease in the exchange rate is explained in terms of a decreased steric crowding and charge effect around the metal ion when carboxylates are replaced by an amide group. In addition, to support the HSA protein binding studies of lipophilic [Gd(TTDA-N-MOBA)(H2O)]- and [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] complexes, further protein-complex binding was studied by ultrafiltration and relaxivity studies. The binding constants (KA) of [Gd(TTDA-N-MOBA)(H2O)]- and [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] are 8.6 x 10(2) and 1.0 x 10(4) dm3 mol(-1), respectively. The bound relaxivities (r1(b)) are 51.8 and 52 dm3 mmol(-1) s(-1), respectively. The KA value of [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] is similar to that of MS-325 and indicates a stronger interaction of [Gd(TTDA-BBA)(H2O)] with HSA.

  19. Evaluation on the Stability of the Intramolecular N—H…OMe Hydrogen Bonds of Aromatic Amide Foldamers%芳酰胺折叠体分子内N—H…OMe氢键强度评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施朱明; 宋宇; 陆方; 周天佑; 赵新; 张文科; 黎占亭

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relative stability of different intramolecular N-H…OMe hydrogen bonds of aromatic amide-based foldamers, 3-, 5-, and 7-mer aromatic amide foldamers F-3, F-5 and F-7, which possess one, two, and three different amide units, have been constructed from benzene-1,3-diamine and isophthalic acid derivatives. 'H NMR experiments in CDC12CDC12 and DMSO-d6 showed that the hydrogen bonds formed in the central area of the foldamer backbones are least stable, whereas the hydrogen bonds formed at the two ends are most stable. 1H NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments for F-3, F-5 and F-7 in CDC12CDC12-CD3OD (19 : 1, VIV) and DMSO-d6-CD3OD (19 : 1, VIV) were performed. In the former less polar solvent mixture, the half-life values of the process, corresponding to amides from the central area to the end areas, were determined to be 140 h for F-3, 71.8 and 405 h for F-5, and 36.3,216 and 314 h for F-7, respectively. In the latter more polar solvent mixture, the related values were evaluated to be 97.1 h for F-3, 69.0 and 300 h for F-5, and 13.5, 38.3 and 57.5 h for F-7, respectively. These quantitative results are consistent with the above 'H NMR observation. To further assess the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds, the three folded aromatic amide segments have also been incorporated into the main chains of dodecane-l,12-diamine-derived amide polymers to afford macromolecules P-3, P-5 and P-7. The degree of polymerization of the macromolecules was determined by GPC to be 22, 14 and 13, respectively. Force-extension curves obtained from single molecular force spectroscopy (SMFS) revealed that, in tetrachloroethane, all the three macromolecules exhibited saw-tooth force peaks, which had been attributed to the step-by-step breaking of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the foldamer segments. P-3 exhibited 4 peaks at ca. 83, 121, 181 and 236 pN, P-5 displayed 7 peaks at ca. 20, 44, 73, 101, 130, 171 and 278 pN, and P-7 generated 8 peaks at ca. 31, 43

  20. Evidence for hydrogen-deuterium exchange in viral particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jiangsen; LIU Ziyang; TANG Caihua; HE Yihui; ZHU Jiahong; WANG Chengyu; CHAI Shaoai; CHEN Yueqing; QIAN Wen

    2004-01-01

    Heavy water (D2O) could enhance thermostability of some viruses. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we report the development of a matrix-aided gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry method that allows direct determination of deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in D2O-treated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and RNA from D2O-treated HAV. The D/H ratio was expressed as δDSMOW. Our experiments showed that δDSMOW values increased significantly in D2O-treated viral samples compared to normal controls, and increment in δDSMOW of D2O, treated viral samples was in a fine linear relationship with increment in amount of samples loaded in BSA matrix. Our experiments also indicated that increased δDSMOW of D2O-treated virus correlated well with its enhanced thermostability. The results suggested that hydrogen-deuterium exchange occurred in viral particles and its RNA structure as a result of D2O-treatment. Furthermore, such exchange could cause changes in viral phenotype, such as enhanced thermostability.

  1. Water hydrogen bonding in proton exchange and neutral polymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Sarah Black

    Understanding the dynamics of water sorbed into polymer films is critical to reveal structure-property relationships in membranes for energy and water treatment applications, where membranes must interact with water to facilitate or inhibit the transport of ions. The chemical structure of the polymer has drastic effects on the transport properties of the membrane due to the morphological structure of the polymer and how water is interacting with the functional groups on the polymer backbone. Therefore studying the dynamics of water adsorbed into a membrane will give insight into how water-polymer interactions influence transport properties of the film. With a better understanding of how to design materials to have specific properties, we can accelerate development of smarter materials for both energy and water treatment applications to increase efficiency and create high-flux materials and processes. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the water-polymer interactions in proton exchange and uncharged membranes and make correlations to their charge densities and transport properties. A linear Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method for measuring the hydrogen bonding distribution of water sorbed in proton exchange membranes is described in this thesis. The information on the distribution of the microenvironments of water in an ionic polymer is critical to understanding the effects of different acidic groups on the proton conductivity of proton exchange membranes at low relative humidity. The OD stretch of dilute HOD in H2O is a single, well-defined vibrational band. When HOD in dilute H2O is sorbed into a proton exchange membrane, the OD stretch peak shifts based on the microenvironment that water encounters within the nanophase separated structure of the material. This peak shift is a signature of different hydrogen bonding populations within the membrane, which can be deconvoluted rigorously for dilute HOD in H 2O compared to only

  2. Assessment of ischemic penumbra in patients with hyperacute stroke using amide proton transfer (APT) chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Anna; Blicher, Jakob; Mikkelsen, Irene Klaerke; Østergaard, Leif; Strother, Megan K; Smith, Seth A; Donahue, Manus J

    2014-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)-derived, pH-weighted, amide proton transfer (APT) MRI has shown promise in animal studies for the prediction of infarction risk in ischemic tissue. Here, APT MRI was translated to patients with acute stroke (1-24 h post-symptom onset), and assessments of APT contrast, perfusion, diffusion, disability and final infarct volume (23-92 days post-stroke) are reported. Healthy volunteers (n = 5) and patients (n = 10) with acute onset of symptoms (0-4 h, n = 7; uncertain onset diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and CEST. Traditional asymmetry and a Lorentzian-based APT index were calculated in the infarct core, at-risk tissue (time-to-peak, TTP; lengthening) and final infarct volume. On average (mean ± standard deviation), control white matter APT values (asymmetry, 0.019 ± 0.005; Lorentzian, 0.045 ± 0.006) were not significantly different (p > 0.05) from APT values in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of patients (asymmetry, 0.022 ± 0.003; Lorentzian, 0.048 ± 0.003); however, ischemic regions in patients showed reduced (p = 0.03) APT effects compared with NAWM. Representative cases are presented, whereby the APT contrast is compared quantitatively with contrast from other imaging modalities. The findings vary between patients; in some patients, a trend for a reduction in the APT signal in the final infarct region compared with at-risk tissue was observed, consistent with tissue acidosis. However, in other patients, no relationship was observed in the infarct core and final infarct volume. Larger clinical studies, in combination with focused efforts on sequence development at clinically available field strengths (e.g. 3.0 T), are necessary to fully understand the potential of APT imaging for guiding the hyperacute management of patients.

  3. Identification of hydroxyl protons, determination of their exchange dynamics, and characterization of hydrogen bonding in a microcrystallin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vipin; Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Faelber, Katja; Reif, Bernd

    2010-03-10

    Heteronuclear correlation experiments employing perdeuterated proteins enable the observation of all hydroxyl protons in a microcrystalline protein by MAS solid-state NMR. Dipolar-based sequences allow magnetization transfers that are >50 times faster compared to scalar-coupling-based sequences, which significantly facilitates their assignment. Hydroxyl exchange rates were measured using EXSY-type experiments. We find a biexponential decay behavior for those hydroxyl groups that are involved in side chain-side chain C-O-H...O horizontal lineC hydrogen bonds. The quantification of the distances between the hydroxyl proton and the carbon atoms in the hydrogen-bonding donor as well as acceptor group is achieved via a REDOR experiment. In combination with X-ray data and isotropic proton chemical shifts, availability of (1)H,(13)C distance information can aid in the quantitative description of the geometry of these hydrogen bonds. Similarly, correlations between backbone amide proton and carbonyl atoms are observed, which will be useful in the analysis of the registry of beta-strand arrangement in amyloid fibrils.

  4. Key role of intramolecular metal chelation and hydrogen bonding in the cobalt-mediated radical polymerization of N-vinyl amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuigne, Antoine; Morin, Aurélie N; Kermagoret, Anthony; Piette, Yasmine; Detrembleur, Christophe; Jérôme, Christine; Poli, Rinaldo

    2012-10-01

    This work reveals the preponderance of an intramolecular metal chelation phenomenon in a controlled radical polymerization system involving the reversible trapping of the radical chains by a cobalt complex bis(acetylacetonato)cobalt(II). The cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) of a series of N-vinyl amides was considered with the aim of studying the effect of the cobalt chelation by the amide moiety of the last monomer unit of the chain. The latter reinforces the cobalt-polymer bond in the order N-vinylpyrrolidonepolymerizations observed for the last two monomers. Such a double linkage between the controlling agent and the polymer, through a covalent bond and a dative bond, is unique in the field of controlled radical polymerization and represents a powerful opportunity to fine tune the equilibrium between latent and free radicals. Possible hydrogen bond formation is also taken into account in the case of N-vinyl acetamide and N-vinyl formamide. These results are essential for understanding the factors influencing Co-C bond strength in general, and the CMRP mechanism in particular, but also for developing a powerful platform for the synthesis of new precision poly(N-vinyl amide) materials, which are an important class of polymers that sustain numerous applications today.

  5. Hydrogen isotope exchanges between water and methanol in interstellar ices

    CERN Document Server

    Faure, A; Theulé, P; Quirico, E; Schmitt, B

    2015-01-01

    The deuterium fractionation of gas-phase molecules in hot cores is believed to reflect the composition of interstellar ices. The deuteration of methanol is a major puzzle, however, because the isotopologue ratio [CH2DOH]/[CH3OD], which is predicted to be equal to 3 by standard grain chemistry models, is much larger (~20) in low-mass hot corinos and significantly lower (~1) in high-mass hot cores. This dichotomy in methanol deuteration between low-mass and massive protostars is currently not understood. In this study, we report a simplified rate equation model of the deuterium chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. We apply this model to the chemistry of hot corinos and hot cores, with IRAS 16293-2422 and the Orion~KL Compact Ridge as prototypes, respectively. The chemistry is based on a statistical initial deuteration at low temperature followed by a warm-up phase during which thermal hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchanges occur between water and methanol. The exchange kinetics is incorpor...

  6. Geometric phase effects in ultracold hydrogen exchange reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Jisha; Kendrick, Brian K.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2016-10-01

    The role of the geometric phase effect on chemical reaction dynamics is explored by examining the hydrogen exchange process in the fundamental H+HD reaction. Results are presented for vibrationally excited HD molecules in the v = 4 vibrational level and for collision energies ranging from 1 μK to 100 K. It is found that, for collision energies below 3 K, inclusion of the geometric phase leads to dramatic enhancement or suppression of the reaction rates depending on the final quantum state of the HD molecule. The effect was found to be the most prominent for rotationally resolved integral and differential cross sections but it persists to a lesser extent in the vibrationally resolved and total reaction rate coefficients. However, no significant GP effect is present in the reactive channel leading to the D+H2 product or in the D+H2 (v=4,j=0) \\to HD+H reaction. A simple interference mechanism involving inelastic (nonreactive) and exchange scattering amplitudes is invoked to account for the observed GP effects. The computed results also reveal a shape resonance in the H+HD reaction near 1 K and the GP effect is found to influence the magnitude of the resonant part of the cross section. Experimental detection of the resonance may allow a sensitive probe of the GP effect in the H+HD reaction.

  7. Exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms ortho to the hydroxyl group in tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R B; Morlino, V J

    1965-10-22

    The carbon-bound hydrogen atoms of tyrosine that exchange with solvent protons in strongly acid solutions at about 100 degrees C are not the methylene hydrogen atoms but a pair on the aromatic ring. Of the two pairs of protons on the aromatic ring, observed in the proton magnetic resonance spectra, the pair at higher field undergoes exchange in 2.4N DCI at 100 degrees C. Other hydrogen atoms, attached either to aliphatic or aromatic carbon atoms, exhibit no noticeable exchange under the same conditions. From a chemicalshift analysis the exchanging protons are assigned as those ortho to the hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring.

  8. Exact Exchange-Correlation Functional for the Infinitely Stretched Hydrogen Molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Matito, Eduard; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2016-01-01

    The exchange-correlation hole density of the infinitely stretched (dissociated) hydrogen molecule can be cast into a closed analytical form by using its exact wave function. This permits to obtain an explicit exchange-correlation energy functional of the electron density which allows for its functional derivation to yield the corresponding Kohh-Sham effective exchange-correlation potential. We have shown that this exchange-correlation functional is exact for the dissociated hydrogen molecule, yields its dissociation energy correctly, and its corresponding exchange-correlation potential has the correct $-1/r$ asymptotic behavior.

  9. The Solar Wind Charge-Exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntz, K D; Collier, M R; Connor, H K; Cravens, T E; Koutroumpa, D; Porter, F S; Robertson, I P; Sibeck, D G; Snowden, S L; Thomas, N E; Wash, B M

    2015-01-01

    The production factor, or broad band averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT 1/4 keV (R12) band is $3.8\\pm0.2\\times10^{-20}$ count degree$^{-2}$ cm$^4$. This value is derived from a comparison of the Long-Term (background) Enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8 to 4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of 1/4 keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the 1/4 keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the 3/4 keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally,...

  10. The Area Between Exchange Curves as a Measure of Conformational Differences in Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Sharlyn J.; Weber, Daniel P.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) provides information about protein conformational mobility under native conditions. The area between exchange curves, A bec , a functional data analysis concept, was adapted to the interpretation of HDX-MS data and provides a useful measure of exchange curve dissimilarity for tests of significance. Importantly, for most globular proteins under native conditions, A bec values provide an estimate of the log ratio of exchange-competent fractions in the two states, and thus are related to differences in the free energy of microdomain unfolding.

  11. Determination of the equilibrium micelle-inserting position of the fusion peptide of gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 at amino acid resolution by exchange broadening of amide proton resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.-K.; Cheng, S.-F. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Chemistry (China)

    1998-11-15

    The exchange broadening of backbone amide proton resonances of a 23-mer fusion peptide of the transmembrane subunit of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, gp41-FP, was investigated at pH 5 and 7 at room temperature in perdeuterated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solution. Comparison of resonance peaks for these pHs revealed an insignificant change in exchange rate between pH 5 and 7 for amide protons of residues 4 through 14, while the exchange rate increase at neutral pH was more prominent for amide protons of the remaining residues, with peaks from some protons becoming undetectable. The relative insensitivity to pH of the exchange for the amide protons of residues 4 through 14 is attributable to the drastic reduction in [OH-] in the micellar interior, leading to a decreased exchange rate. The A15-G16 segment represents a transition between these two regimes. The data are thus consistent with the notion that the peptide inserts into the hydrophobic core of a membrane-like structure and the A15-G16 dipeptide is located at the micellar-aqueous boundary.

  12. Demonstrating hydrogen production from ammonia using lithium imide - Powering a small proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Hazel M. A.; Makepeace, Joshua W.; Wood, Thomas J.; Mylius, O. Simon; Kibble, Mark G.; Nutter, Jamie B.; Jones, Martin O.; David, William I. F.

    2016-10-01

    Accessing the intrinsic hydrogen content within ammonia, NH3, has the potential to play a very significant role in the future of a CO2-free sustainable energy supply. Inexpensive light metal imides and amides are effective at decomposing ammonia to hydrogen and nitrogen (2NH3 → 3H2 + N2), at modest temperatures, and thus represent a low-cost approach to on-demand hydrogen production. Building upon this discovery, this paper describes the integration of an ammonia cracking unit with a post-reactor gas purification system and a small-scale PEM fuel cell to create a first bench-top demonstrator for the production of hydrogen using light metal imides.

  13. Sodium hydrogen exchangers contribute to arenavirus cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Ngo, Nhi; de la Torre, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Several arenaviruses, chiefly Lassa virus (LASV), cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans and pose a great public health concern in the regions in which they are endemic. Moreover, evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. The limited existing armamentarium to combat human-pathogenic arenaviruses underscores the importance of developing novel antiarenaviral drugs, a task that would be facilitated by the identification and characterization of virus-host cell factor interactions that contribute to the arenavirus life cycle. A genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen identified sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3) as required for efficient multiplication of LCMV in HeLa cells, but the mechanisms by which NHE activity contributed to the life cycle of LCMV remain unknown. Here we show that treatment with the NHE inhibitor 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) resulted in a robust inhibition of LCMV multiplication in both rodent (BHK-21) and human (A549) cells. EIPA-mediated inhibition was due not to interference with virus RNA replication, gene expression, or budding but rather to a blockade of virus cell entry. EIPA also inhibited cell entry mediated by the glycoproteins of the HF arenaviruses LASV and Junin virus (JUNV). Pharmacological and genetic studies revealed that cell entry of LCMV in A549 cells depended on actin remodeling and Pak1, suggesting a macropinocytosis-like cell entry pathway. Finally, zoniporide, an NHE inhibitor being explored as a therapeutic agent to treat myocardial infarction, inhibited LCMV propagation in culture cells. Our findings indicate that targeting NHEs could be a novel strategy to combat human-pathogenic arenaviruses.

  14. Recycling asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts by their immobilisation onto ion-exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Pierluigi; Bianchini, Claudio; Giambastiani, Giuliano; Oberhauser, Werner; Bonzi, Laura Morassi; Rossi, Filippo; Dal Santo, Vladimiro

    2004-06-21

    New systems based on cationic chiral phosphine-rhodium complexes anchored to a commercial cation-exchange gel-type resin showed high efficiency and easy recycling in the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins.

  15. Elimination of spin diffusion effects in saturation transfer experiments: application to hydrogen exchange in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Kristensen, Søren M; Led, Jens J

    2007-03-01

    The NMR saturation transfer experiment is widely used to characterize exchange processes in proteins that take place on the ms-s timescale. However, spin diffusion effects are inherently associated with the saturation transfer experiment and may overshadow the effect of the exchange processes of interest. As shown here, the effects from spin diffusion and exchange processes can be separated by varying the field strength of the saturation pulse, thereby allowing correct exchange rates to be obtained. The method is demonstrated using the hydrogen exchange process in the protein Escherichia coli thioredoxin as an example.

  16. The $\\sigma$ exchange effect in the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen by two photons and two pions exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Hai-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the simple phenomenological $\\sigma \\pi \\pi$, $\\sigma N N$ and $\\pi \\pi \\gamma$ interactions, we estimate the $\\sigma$ exchange effect in the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen. We at first calculate the effective couplings of $\\sigma\\mu\\mu$ by two photons and two pions exchange, then calculate the corresponding corrections to the energy shift of the 2S/2P states of muonic hydrogen. We find the correction to the energy shift of 2S state is about -14$\\mu$eV by the current used parameters, which is about $44\\%$ of the usual two photons exchange contribution, and is larger than the current experimental precision, and should be considered in the experimental analysis.

  17. Patterns of structural dynamics in RACK1 protein retained throughout evolution: A hydrogen-deuterium exchange study of three orthologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Fituch, Kinga; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Dadlez, Michal; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    RACK1 is a member of the WD repeat family of proteins and is involved in multiple fundamental cellular processes. An intriguing feature of RACK1 is its ability to interact with at least 80 different protein partners. Thus, the structural features enabling such interactomic flexibility are of great interest. Several previous studies of the crystal structures of RACK1 orthologs described its detailed architecture and confirmed predictions that RACK1 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold. However, this did not explain its ability to bind to multiple partners. We performed hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange mass spectrometry on three orthologs of RACK1 (human, yeast, and plant) to obtain insights into the dynamic properties of RACK1 in solution. All three variants retained similar patterns of deuterium uptake, with some pronounced differences that can be attributed to RACK1's divergent biological functions. In all cases, the most rigid structural elements were confined to B-C turns and, to some extent, strands B and C, while the remaining regions retained much flexibility. We also compared the average rate constants for H-D exchange in different regions of RACK1 and found that amide protons in some regions exchanged at least 1000-fold faster than in others. We conclude that its evolutionarily retained structural architecture might have allowed RACK1 to accommodate multiple molecular partners. This was exemplified by our additional analysis of yeast RACK1 dimer, which showed stabilization, as well as destabilization, of several interface regions upon dimer formation. PMID:24591271

  18. Patterns of structural dynamics in RACK1 protein retained throughout evolution: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study of three orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Fituch, Kinga; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Dadlez, Michal; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    RACK1 is a member of the WD repeat family of proteins and is involved in multiple fundamental cellular processes. An intriguing feature of RACK1 is its ability to interact with at least 80 different protein partners. Thus, the structural features enabling such interactomic flexibility are of great interest. Several previous studies of the crystal structures of RACK1 orthologs described its detailed architecture and confirmed predictions that RACK1 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold. However, this did not explain its ability to bind to multiple partners. We performed hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange mass spectrometry on three orthologs of RACK1 (human, yeast, and plant) to obtain insights into the dynamic properties of RACK1 in solution. All three variants retained similar patterns of deuterium uptake, with some pronounced differences that can be attributed to RACK1's divergent biological functions. In all cases, the most rigid structural elements were confined to B-C turns and, to some extent, strands B and C, while the remaining regions retained much flexibility. We also compared the average rate constants for H-D exchange in different regions of RACK1 and found that amide protons in some regions exchanged at least 1000-fold faster than in others. We conclude that its evolutionarily retained structural architecture might have allowed RACK1 to accommodate multiple molecular partners. This was exemplified by our additional analysis of yeast RACK1 dimer, which showed stabilization, as well as destabilization, of several interface regions upon dimer formation.

  19. Hydrogen adsorption over Zeolite-like MOF materials modified by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, G.; Botas, J.A.; Orcajo, M.G. [Department of Chemical and Energy Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Sanchez, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, C/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Novel porous Zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) materials with Rho and Sod topologies are promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage due to their high surface area and, more importantly, to their capacity of being ion-exchanged, potentially changing their affinity for hydrogen. In this work, we have successfully synthesized both Rho and SodZMOF materials, optimizing experimental conditions for scaling-up the procedure already published to produce grams of material. The resultant materials were alkaline-cation-exchanged, widely characterized and finally tested as hydrogen adsorbents. RhoZMOF is converted into an amorphous phase during some of the ion-exchange processes, whereas SodZMOF, whose ion-exchange capacity has not been investigated so far, always maintains its topology for any tested exchange cation and conditions. Additionally, thermogravimetric analyses and thermal treatments followed by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction analysis have evidenced a significantly higher thermal stability of both as-prepared and ion-exchanged SodZMOF materials in comparison to their Rho-structured homologues. Moreover, the thermal stability of the cation-exchanged ZMOF samples improves when methanol is the ion-exchange solvent rather than the reported ethanol-water mixture. Nitrogen and hydrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K suggested that alkali-exchanged materials have lower affinity for hydrogen than the as-prepared samples compensated by imidazolium ion; however, due to the smaller size of Na{sup +} or Li{sup +} cations, their lower affinity is easily compensated by the inherent increase in surface area and pore volume as exchange degree increases. (author)

  20. A New Amide Proton R{sub 1{rho}} Experiment Permits Accurate Characterization of Microsecond Time-scale Conformational Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichmueller, Christian; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R. [Purdue University, Department of Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: nikolai@purdue.edu

    2005-08-15

    A new off-resonance spin-lock experiment to record relaxation dispersion profiles of amide protons is presented. The sensitivity-enhanced HSQC-type sequence is designed to minimize the interference from cross-relaxation effects and ensure that the dispersion profiles in the absence of {mu}s-ms time-scale dynamics are flat. Toward this end (i) the proton background is eliminated by sample deuteration (Ishima et al., 1998), (ii) {sup 1}H spin lock is applied to two-spin modes 2(H{sub x}Sin {theta} + H{sub z}Cos {theta})N{sub z}, and (iii) the tilt angle {theta} {approx} 35 deg. is maintained throughout the series of measurements (Desvaux et al. Mol. Phys., 86 (1995) 1059). The relaxation dispersion profiles recorded in this manner sample a wide range of effective rf field strengths (up to and in excess of 20 kHz) which makes them particularly suitable for studies of motions on the time scale {<=}100 {mu}s. The new experiment has been tested on the Ca{sup 2+}-loaded regulatory domain of cardiac troponin C. Many residues show pronounced dispersions with remarkably similar correlation times of 30 {mu}s. Furthermore, these residues are localized in the regions that have been previously implicated in conformational changes (Spyracopoulos et al. Biochemistry, 36 (1997) 12138)

  1. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Sharley, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure....

  2. Study on Production of Hydrogen from Methane for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋正昶; 李传统

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen production from methane for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was studied experimentally. The conversion rate of methane under different steam-carbon ratios, the effect of the different excess air ratios on the constituents of the gas produced, the permeability of hydrogen under different pressure differences, and the effect of different system pressure on the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen were obtained. The results lay the basis for the production of hydrogen applicable to PEMFC, moreover, provide a new way for the comprehensive utilization of the coal bed methane.

  3. Enhancement of the initial hydrogenation of Mg by ball milling with alkali metal amides MNH2 (M = Li or Na).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hailiang; Qiu, Shujun; Sun, Lixian; Huot, Jacques

    2015-10-14

    The introduction of 4 wt% of MNH2 (M = Li, Na) and other additives (Li, MgH2, NaCl, and NaBr) into pure Mg by ball milling greatly enhances the first hydrogenation (activation). Under 2 MPa of H2 at 608 K, the best activation performance is achieved with the NaNH2 additive.

  4. Direct hydrogenation and one-pot reductive amidation of nitro compounds over Pd/ZnO nanoparticles as a recyclable and heterogeneous catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini-Sarvari, Mona, E-mail: hossaini@shirazu.ac.ir; Razmi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Palladium supported on zinc oxide. • Nano crystalline Pd/ZnO as highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst. • Synthesis, chracterization, and application of nano-Pd/ZnO. • Ligand-free and air atmosphere conditions. - Abstract: A novel Pd supported on ZnO nanoparticles was readily synthesized and characterized. The amount of palladium on ZnO is 9.84 wt% which was determined by ICP analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Percentage of accessible Pd as active catalyst is also estimated to 2.72% based on the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. This nano-sized Pd/ZnO with an average particle size of 20–25 nm and specific surface area 40.61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} was used as a new reusable heterogeneous catalyst for direct hydrogenation and one-pot reductive amidation of nitro compounds without the use of any ligands under atmospheric pressure. The catalyst can be recovered and recycled several times without marked loss of activity.

  5. Hydrogen Bonded Semi-Rigidified Bispyridyl-lncorporating Aryl Amide Oligomers: Efficient "C"-Styled Receptors for Aliphatic Ammoniums, a Remarkable Protonation Effect and Chiral Induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Chang-Zhia; LI, Zhan-Ting; GAO, Xianga; WANG, Quan-Rui

    2007-01-01

    The complexing behaviour of two linear compounds 1 and 2 toward the trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) salts of n-dodecylamine, di-n-octylamine, n-dodecyl D- and L-phenylalaninates (3, 4, and D- and L-5) in chloroform has been described. Compounds 1 and 2 consist of two folded amide moieties with two pyridyls at the terminals which are connected directly or with an acetylene linker. The rigidified folded moieties are stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding, while the whole molecules can adopt an "S"- or a "C"-styled conformation depending on the relative orientation of the two rigidified moieties. 1H NMR, UV-Vis, fluorescent and circular dichroism investigations revealed that 1 and 2 could bind primary and secondary ammonium cations with their "C"-styled conformation. In the presence of 1 equiv. Of TFA, the binding stability was increased significantly as a result of promoted formation of the "C"-styled conformation due to the monoprotonation of the peripheral pyridyl units in 1and 2. In contrast, the addition of 2 equiv. Of TFA substantially weakened the binding stability because the "S"-styled conformation was favored as a result of protonation of both of their pyridyl units. Moreover, remarkable induced circular dichroisms were also displayed for the complexes of 1 and 2 with chiral D- and L-5.

  6. Molecular Simulation of Hydrogen Storage in Ion-Exchanged X Zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC method was employed to simulate the adsorption properties of molecular hydrogen on ion-exchanged X zeolites at 100–293 K and pressures up to 10 MPa in this paper. The effect of cation type, temperature, and pressure on hydrogen adsorption capacity, heat of adsorption, adsorption sites, and adsorption potential energy of ion-exchanged X zeolites was analyzed. The results indicate that the hydrogen adsorption capacity increases with the decrease in temperatures and the increase in pressures and decreases in the order of KXhydrogen adsorption capacity. The hydrogen adsorption sites in the three zeolites were determined by the simulated distribution of hydrogen adsorption energy and the factors that influence their variations were discussed. Adsorption temperature has an important effect on the distribution of hydrogen molecules in zeolite pores.

  7. Small proton exchange membrane fuel cell power station by using bio-hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志祥; 毛宗强; 王诚; 任南琪

    2006-01-01

    In fermentative organic waste water treatment process, there was hydrogen as a by-product. After some purification,there was about 50% ~ 70% hydrogen in the bio-gas, which could be utilized for electricity generation with fuel cell. Half a year ago, joint experiments between biological hydrogen production in Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) and proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) power station in Tsinghua University were conducted for electricity generation with bio-hydrogen from the pilot plant in HIT. The results proved the feasibility of the bio-hydrogen as a by-product utilization with PEMFC power station and revealed some problems of fuel cell power station for this application.

  8. The folding energy landscape of apoflavodoxin is rugged. hydrogen exchange reveals non-productive misfolded intermediates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, Y.J.M.; Kamphuis, M.B.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Many native proteins occasionally form partially unfolded forms (PUFs), which can be detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and NMR spectroscopy. Knowledge about these metastable states is required to better understand the onset of folding-related diseases. So far, not much is known about where PUF

  9. Investigation of the gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of aromatic dicarboxylic acids in a quadrupole ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-11-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated aromatic dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid, isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Experimental results showed significant differences in the rate and extent of exchange when the relative position of the carboxylic acid groups varied. Spontaneous and near complete exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom occurred when the carboxylic acid groups were in the meta-position, whereas no additional exchange was observed for either the ortho- or para-isomers or for the structurally similar naphthalic acid. Computational investigations support the participation of several possible exchange mechanisms with the contribution of each relying heavily on the relative orientation of the acid moieties. A relay mechanism that bridges the deprotonation site and the labile hydrogen site appears to be responsible for the H/D exchange of not only the labile hydrogen atom of isophthalic acid, but also for the formation of a stable carbanion and corresponding subsequent exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom. The impact of hydrogen bonding on the relay mechanism is demonstrated by the reaction of phthalic acid as the extent and rate of reaction are greatly retarded by the favorable interaction of the two carboxylic acid groups. Finally, a flip-flop mechanism is likely responsible for the exchange of both terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid where the reactive sites are too remote for exchange via relay.

  10. Interplay of Charge Transfer, Dimensionality, and Amide Hydrogen Bond Network Adaptability in TCNQF 4 Complexes of EDO-TTF-CONH 2 and EDT-TTF-CONH 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudron, Stéphane A.; Mézière, Cécile; Heuzé, Karine; Fourmigué, Marc; Batail, Patrick; Molinié, Philippe; Auban-Senzier, Pascale

    2002-11-01

    [EDO-TTF-CONH 2][TCNQF 4], triclinic system, space group P-1, a=8.2479(12) Å, b=12.282(2) Å, c=12.6842(18) Å, α=113.850(17)°, β=106.420(17)°, γ=90.284(19)°, V=1116.8(4) Å 3; and [EDT-TTF-CONH 2] 2[TCNQF 4], triclinic system, space group P-1, a=6.5858(9) Å, b=11.699(2) Å, c=12.2281(18) Å, α=104.000(19)°, β=93.611(17)°, γ=98.279(19)°, V=899.9(3) Å 3, whose π-donor molecules, (ethylenedioxo)-carbamoyltetrathiafulvalene and (ethylenedithio)-carbamoyltetrathiafulvalene, respectively, differ solely by the nature of the chalcogen atoms in their outer ethylene dichalcogeno bridge, yet form very different charge-transfer complexes with the same π-acceptor. [EDO-TTF-CONH 2•+] 2 [TCNQF 4•-] 2 is a diamagnetic insulating ionic salt with a three-dimensional rock-salt-type structure based on discrete dimers while in the semi-conducting mixed-valence complex, [EDT-TTF-CONH 2] 2•+[TCNQF 4•-], the mixed-valence dimers aggregate into infinite chains interspersed within parallel rows of non-interacting radical anions. It is shown how the robust and adaptable supramolecular amide hydrogen bond tweezers-like motifs common to the two solids simply comply to the 3-to-1 dimensionality reduction upon substitution of O for S.

  11. Dual temperature dual pressure water-hydrogen chemical exchange for water detritiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Takahiko, E-mail: t-sugiyama@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Takada, Akito; Morita, Youhei [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kotoh, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Moto-oka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Munakata, Kenzo [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-machi 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Taguchi, Akira [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kawano, Takao; Tanaka, Masahiro; Akata, Naofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Experimental and analytical studies on hydrogen-tritium isotope separation by a dual temperature dual pressure catalytic exchange (DTDP-CE) with liquid phase chemical exchange columns were carried out in order to apply it to a part of the water detritiation system for DEMO fuel cycle. A prototype DTDP-CE apparatus was successfully operated and it was confirmed that tritium was separated by the apparatus as significantly distinguishable. A calculation code was developed based on the channeling stage model. The values of separation factors and the effects of some operating parameters were well predicted by the separative analyses with the code.

  12. Peptide-Column Interactions and Their Influence on Back Exchange Rates in Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheff, Joey G.; Rey, Martial; Schriemer, David C.

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods generate useful information on protein structure and dynamics, ideally at the individual residue level. Most MS-based HDX methods involve a rapid proteolytic digestion followed by LC/MS analysis, with exchange kinetics monitored at the peptide level. Localizing specific sites of HDX is usually restricted to a resolution the size of the host peptide because gas-phase processes can scramble deuterium throughout the peptide. Subtractive methods may improve resolution, where deuterium levels of overlapping and nested peptides are used in a subtractive manner to localize exchange to smaller segments. In this study, we explore the underlying assumption of the subtractive method, namely, that the measured back exchange kinetics of a given residue is independent of its host peptide. Using a series of deuterated peptides, we show that secondary structure can be partially retained under quenched conditions, and that interactions between peptides and reversed-phase LC columns may both accelerate and decelerate residue HDX, depending upon peptide sequence and length. Secondary structure is induced through column interactions in peptides with a solution-phase propensity for structure, which has the effect of slowing HDX rates relative to predicted random coil values. Conversely, column interactions can orient random-coil peptide conformers to accelerate HDX, the degree to which correlates with peptide charge in solution, and which can be reversed by using stronger ion pairing reagents. The dependency of these effects on sequence and length suggest that subtractive methods for improving structural resolution in HDX-MS will not offer a straightforward solution for increasing exchange site resolution.

  13. Amide cis-trans isomerization in aqueous solutions of methyl N-formyl-D-glucosaminides and methyl N-acetyl-D-glucosaminides: chemical equilibria and exchange kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Wenhui; Carmichael, Ian; Serianni, Anthony S

    2010-04-07

    Amide cis-trans isomerization (CTI) in methyl 2-deoxy-2-acylamido-d-glucopyranosides was investigated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Singly (13)C-labeled methyl 2-deoxy-2-formamido-d-glucopyranoside (MeGlcNFm) anomers provided standard (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H and (13)C-(13)C spin-coupling constants for cis and trans amides that are detected readily in aqueous solution. Equipped with this information, doubly (13)C-labeled methyl 2-deoxy-2-acetamido-d-glucopyranoside (MeGlcNAc) anomers were investigated, leading to the detection and quantification of cis and trans amides in this biologically important aminosugar. In comparison to MeGlcNFm anomers, the percentage of cis amide in aqueous solutions of MeGlcNAc anomers is small ( approximately 23% for MeGlcNFm versus approximately 1.8% for MeGlcNAc at 42 degrees C) but nevertheless observable with assistance from (13)C-labeling. Temperature studies gave thermodynamic parameters DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees , and DeltaS degrees for cis-trans interconversion in MeGlcNFm and MeGlcNAc anomers. Cis/trans equilibria depended on anomeric configuration, with solutions of alpha-anomers containing less cis amide than those of beta-anomers. Confirmation of the presence of cis amide in MeGlcNAc solutions derived from quantitative (13)C saturation transfer measurements of CTI rate constants as a function of solution temperature, yielding activation parameters E(act), DeltaG degrees (), DeltaH degrees (), and DeltaS degrees () for saccharide CTI. Rate constants for the conversion of trans to cis amide in MeGlcNFm and MeGlcNAc anomers ranged from 0.02 to 3.59 s(-1) over 31-85 degrees C, compared to 0.24-80 s(-1) for the conversion of cis to trans amide over the same temperature range. Energies of activation ranged from 16-19 and 19-20 kcal/mol for the cis --> trans and trans --> cis processes, respectively. Complementary DFT calculations on MeGlcNFm and MeGlcNAc model structures were conducted to evaluate

  14. Catalytic heat exchangers for small-scale production of hydrogen - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, F. [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    A feasibility study concerning heat-exchanger reactors in small-scale production of hydrogen has been performed on the request of Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB and SWEP International AB. The basic idea is to implement different catalysts into brazed plate-type heat exchangers. This can be achieved by installing catalytic cylinders in the inlet-and outlet ports of the heat exchangers or through treatment of the plates to render them catalytically active. It is also possible to sandwich catalytically active wire meshes between the plates. Experiments concerning steam reforming of methanol and methane have been performed in a micro-reactor to gather kinetic data for modelling purposes. Performance calculations concerning heat exchanger reactors have then been conducted with Catator's generic simulation code for catalytic reactors (CatalystExplorer). The simulations clearly demonstrate the technical performance of these reactors. Indeed, the production rate of hydrogen is expected to be about 10 nm{sup 3}/h per litre of heat exchanger. The corresponding value for a conventional steam-reforming unit is about 1 nm{sup 3}/h or less per litre of reactor volume. Also, the compactness and the high degree of integration together with the possibilities of mass production will give an attractive cost for such units. Depending on the demands concerning the purity of the hydrogen it is possible to add secondary catalytic steps like water-gas shifters, methanation and selective oxidation, into a one-train unit, i.e. to design an all-inclusive design. Such reactors can be used for the supply of hydrogen to fuel cells. The production cost for hydrogen can be cut by 60 - 70% through the utilisation of heat exchanger reactors instead of conventional electrolysis. This result is primarily a result of the high price for electricity compared to the feed stock prices in steam reforming. It is important to verify the performance calculations and the simulation results through

  15. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS AND CHALLENGES IN HYDROGEN/DEUTERIUM EXCHANGE MASS SPECTROMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange (HDX) has been applied, since the 1930s, as an analytical tool to study the structure and dynamics of (small) biomolecules. The popularity of using HDX to study proteins increased drastically in the last two decades due to the successful combination with mass spectrometry (MS). Together with this growth in popularity, several technological advances have been made, such as improved quenching and fragmentation. As a consequence of these experimental improvemen...

  16. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  17. Hydrogen isotope exchange between n-alkanes and water under hydrothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Eoghan P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the extent of hydrogen isotope (2H and 1H) exchange between hydrocarbons and water under hydrothermal conditions, we performed experiments heating C1-C5n-alkanes in aqueous solutions of varying initial 2H/1H ratios in the presence of a pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite redox buffer at 323 °C and 35-36 MPa. Extensive and reversible incorporation of water-derived hydrogen into C2-C5n-alkanes was observed on timescales of months. In contrast, comparatively minor exchange was observed for CH4. Isotopic exchange is facilitated by reversible equilibration of n-alkanes and their corresponding n-alkenes with H2 derived from the disproportionation of water. Rates of δ2H variation in C3+n-alkanes decreased with time, a trend that is consistent with an asymptotic approach to steady state isotopic compositions regulated by alkane-water isotopic equilibrium. Substantially slower δ2H variation was observed for ethane relative to C3-C5n-alkanes, suggesting that the greater stability of C3+ alkenes and isomerization reactions may dramatically enhance rates of 2H/1H exchange in C3+n-alkanes. Thus, in reducing aqueous environments, reversible reaction of alkanes and their corresponding alkenes facilitates rapid 2H/1H exchange between water and alkyl-bound hydrogen on relatively short geological timescales at elevated temperatures and pressures. The proximity of some thermogenic and purported abiogenic alkane δ2H values to those predicted for equilibrium 2H/1H fractionation with ambient water suggests that this process may regulate the δ2H signatures of some naturally occurring hydrocarbons.

  18. Hydrogen isotope exchange and conditioning in graphite limiters used in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; McCarthy, P.J.; Ulrickson, M.

    1986-02-01

    Isotopic exchange experiments performed in TFTR are used to examine the outgassing and diffusive properties of graphite used as the plasma limiter. Changeover from hydrogen to deuterium for different periods ranges from approx.600 to 60 plasma discharges, which appears to be correlated to the limiter temperature. We present a simple analytical model that predicts a fast transient (approx.10 plasma discharges) changeover where the deuterium fueling dilutes the adsorbed and near-surface hydrogen, and a slowly changing term where bulk hydrogen diffuses to the surface. Using this model we can extract an activation energy for diffusion of 0.15 +- 0.02 eV. We hypothesize that interpore diffusion for this porous (approx.15%) material is consistent with our observations. 19 refs.

  19. The two-photon exchange contribution to muonic hydrogen from chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara

    2014-01-01

    We compute the spin-dependent and spin-independent structure functions of the forward virtual-photon Compton tensor of the proton at one loop using heavy baryon effective theory including the Delta particle. We compare with previous results when existing. Using these results we obtain the leading hadronic contributions, associated to the pion and Delta particles, to the Wilson coefficients of the lepton-proton four fermion operators in NRQED. The spin-independent coefficient yields a pure prediction for the two-photon exchange contribution to the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift, $\\Delta E_{\\rm TPE}(\\pi\\&\\Delta)=34(13)$ $\\mu$eV. We also compute the charge, $\\langle r^n \\rangle$, and Zemach, $\\langle r^n \\rangle_{(2)}$, moments for $n \\geq 3$. Finally, we discuss the spin-dependent case, for which we compute the difference between the four-fermion Wilson coefficients relevant for hydrogen and muonic hydrogen.

  20. Identifying Zn-bound histidine residues in metalloproteins using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jia; Callahan, Katie L; Borotto, Nicholas B; Vachet, Richard W

    2014-01-07

    In this work, we have developed a method that uses hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) of C2-hydrogens of histidines coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) to identify Zn-bound histidines in metalloproteins. This method relies on differences in HDX reaction rates of Zn-bound and Zn-free His residues. Using several model peptides and proteins, we find that all Zn-bound His residues have substantially lower HDX reaction rates in the presence of the metal. The vast majority of non-Zn-binding His residues undergo no significant changes in HDX reaction rates when their reactivity is compared in the presence and absence of Zn. Using this new approach, we then determined the Zn binding site of β-2-microglobulin, a protein associated with metal-induced amyloidosis. Together, these results suggest that HDX-MS of His C2-hydrogens is a promising new method for identifying Zn-bound histidines in metalloproteins.

  1. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  2. Hydrogen bonding in cyclic imides and amide carboxylic acid derivatives from the facile reaction of cis-cyclohexane-1,2-carboxylic anhydride with o- and p-anisidine and m- and p-aminobenzoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2012-09-01

    The structures of the open-chain amide carboxylic acid rac-cis-2-[(2-methoxyphenyl)carbamoyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid, C(15)H(19)NO(4), (I), and the cyclic imides rac-cis-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3a,4,5,6,7,7a-hexahydroisoindole-1,3-dione, C(15)H(17)NO(3), (II), chiral cis-3-(1,3-dioxo-3a,4,5,6,7,7a-hexahydroisoindol-2-yl)benzoic acid, C(15)H(15)NO(4), (III), and rac-cis-4-(1,3-dioxo-3a,4,5,6,7,7a-hexahydroisoindol-2-yl)benzoic acid monohydrate, C(15)H(15)NO(4)·H(2)O, (IV), are reported. In the amide acid (I), the phenylcarbamoyl group is essentially planar [maximum deviation from the least-squares plane = 0.060 (1) Å for the amide O atom] and the molecules form discrete centrosymmetric dimers through intermolecular cyclic carboxy-carboxy O-H···O hydrogen-bonding interactions [graph-set notation R(2)(2)(8)]. The cyclic imides (II)-(IV) are conformationally similar, with comparable benzene ring rotations about the imide N-C(ar) bond [dihedral angles between the benzene and isoindole rings = 51.55 (7)° in (II), 59.22 (12)° in (III) and 51.99 (14)° in (IV)]. Unlike (II), in which only weak intermolecular C-H···O(imide) hydrogen bonding is present, the crystal packing of imides (III) and (IV) shows strong intermolecular carboxylic acid O-H···O hydrogen-bonding associations. With (III), these involve imide O-atom acceptors, giving one-dimensional zigzag chains [graph-set C(9)], while with the monohydrate (IV), the hydrogen bond involves the partially disordered water molecule which also bridges molecules through both imide and carboxy O-atom acceptors in a cyclic R(4)(4)(12) association, giving a two-dimensional sheet structure. The structures reported here expand the structural database for compounds of this series formed from the facile reaction of cis-cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic anhydride with substituted anilines, in which there is a much larger incidence of cyclic imides compared to amide carboxylic acids.

  3. 3D, 2D and 1D networks via N-H…O and N-H…N hydrogen bonding by the bis-amide analogues: Effect of chain lengths and odd-even spacers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gargi Mukherjee; Kumar Biradha

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis, crystal structures and hydrogen bonding networks of four members of the bis(pyridinecarboxamido)alkane and bis(pyridyl)alkanediamides series (1 ≤ ≤ 8), where the amide moieties are separated by alkyl chain (-(CH2)-) having even or odd number of -(CH2)-groups are explored and correlated with the previously reported structures. The odd members (n= odd) of both the series are found to adopt three-dimensional networks in contrast to the 1D or 2D structures of the even members (n= even). This odd-even effect on the dimensionality of the networks however disappears with increase in chain length.

  4. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  5. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  6. Experimental setup for the determination of exchangeable hydrogen in environmental samples using deuterium and tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, L.; Siclet, F. [EDF R et D (France); Peron, O.; Gegout, C.; Montavon, G.; Landesman, C. [Laboratoire SUBATECH, IN2P3/CNRS, EMN, Universite de Nantes (France); Fourre, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P. [LSCE, UMR 8112 CEA-CNRS-UVSQ/IPSL (France)

    2014-07-01

    Tritium ({sup 3}H or T) is a radioactive isotope of the element hydrogen with a half-life of 12.32 yrs. It is naturally produced in the upper atmosphere, but also by the nuclear industry. It is used in many fields like medical research and watch making. It is thus released in the environment on gaseous and liquid form by these facilities and is currently the major released radionuclide in liquid effluent from French nuclear power plants (in HTO form). Current studies dealing with the fate and behavior of tritium in the environment focus mainly on its organic form, i.e. the organically bound tritium (OBT). It is indeed more resilient in the environment than the tritiated water (HTO) as it is part of the organic matter cycle. There is nevertheless a distinction to be made between the exchangeable and the non-exchangeable fraction of OBT. When hydrogen is linked to nitrogen, sulfur or oxygen, it is considered to be exchangeable with the H contained in the surrounding solution or in the atmospheric water phase. Thus, its residence time within the molecule will be reduced and closely linked to the surrounding parameters. When hydrogen is linked to carbon, it is assumed that the link is more stable and thus the residence time in the molecule will be enhanced. It is thus important to know the fraction of exchangeable OBT when addressing the residence time of tritium in the environment. The present study aims at assessing this fraction in different environmental matrixes using deuterium and/or tritium. Compared to several others studies on exchangeable hydrogen where experiments were conducted at high temperature and/or high pressure, this study follows a different approach with experiments conducted at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure (natural conditions) with a controlled hygrometric value within the system. The system itself consists in a glove box modified to fulfill the requirements for an efficient control on the experimental parameters (temperature

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  8. Comparative hydrogen-deuterium exchange for a mesophilic vs thermophilic dihydrofolate reductase at 25 °C: identification of a single active site region with enhanced flexibility in the mesophilic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, Olayinka A; Sours, Kevin M; Lee, Thomas; Kohen, Amnon; Resing, Katheryn A; Ahn, Natalie G; Klinman, Judith P

    2011-09-27

    The technique of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been applied to a mesophilic (E. coli) dihydrofolate reductase under conditions that allow direct comparison to a thermophilic (B. stearothermophilus) ortholog, Ec-DHFR and Bs-DHFR, respectively. The analysis of hydrogen-deuterium exchange patterns within proteolytically derived peptides allows spatial resolution, while requiring a series of controls to compare orthologous proteins with only ca. 40% sequence identity. These controls include the determination of primary structure effects on intrinsic rate constants for HDX as well as the use of existing 3-dimensional structures to evaluate the distance of each backbone amide hydrogen to the protein surface. Only a single peptide from the Ec-DHFR is found to be substantially more flexible than the Bs-DHFR at 25 °C in a region located within the protein interior at the intersection of the cofactor and substrate-binding sites. The surrounding regions of the enzyme are either unchanged or more flexible in the thermophilic DHFR from B. stearothermophilus. The region with increased flexibility in Ec-DHFR corresponds to one of two regions previously proposed to control the enthalpic barrier for hydride transfer in Bs-DHFR [Oyeyemi et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 10074].

  9. Large Angular Jump Mechanism Observed for Hydrogen Bond Exchange in Aqueous Perchlorate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Minbiao; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Odelius3, Michael; /Stockholm U.; Gaffney1, K.J.; /aff SLAC, PULSE

    2010-06-11

    The mechanism for hydrogen bond (H-bond) switching in solution has remained subject to debate despite extensive experimental and theoretical studies. We have applied polarization-selective multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy to investigate the H-bond exchange mechanism in aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution. The results show that a water molecule shifts its donated H-bonds between water and perchlorate acceptors by means of large, prompt angular rotation. Using a jump-exchange kinetic model, we extract an average jump angle of 49 {+-} 4{sup o}, in qualitative agreement with the jump angle observed in molecular dynamics simulations of the same aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution.

  10. Phase transition and proton exchange in 1,3-diazinium hydrogen chloranilate monohydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaji, T., E-mail: asaji@chs.nihon-u.ac.jp; Hoshino, M. [Nihon University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences (Japan); Ishida, H. [Okayama University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Japan); Konnai, A. [National Maritime Research Institute, Navigation and System Engineering Department (Japan); Shinoda, Y. [Bruker AXS K. K. (Japan); Seliger, J. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Slovenia); Zagar, V. [Jozef Stefan Institute (Slovenia)

    2010-06-15

    In the hydrate crystal of 1:1 salt with 1,3-diazine and chloranilic acid (H{sub 2}ca), (1,3-diazineH){center_dot}H{sub 2}O{center_dot}Hca, an unique hydrogen-bonded molecular aggregate is formed. There exists proton disorder in the N-H...O hydrogen bond between 1,3-diazinium ion and water (H{sub 2}O) of crystallization. In order to reveal dynamic aspect of this disorder, {sup 35}Cl NQR measurements were conducted. Two resonance lines observed at 35.973 and 35.449 MHz at 321 K split into four lines below T{sub c} = 198 K clearly showing occurrence of a solid-solid phase transition; 36.565, 36.357, 36.011, 35.974 MHz at 77 K. Temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} in high-temperature phase was observed to obey an Arrhenius-type relation with the activation energy of 8.5 kJ mol{sup - 1}. This result leads to the conclusion that proton exchange in the N-H...O hydrogen bond takes place in the high-temperature phase. Specific heat measurements by DSC resulted in the transition entropy {Delta}S = 1.3 J K{sup - 1} per 1 mole [(1,3-diazineH){center_dot}H{sub 2}O{center_dot}Hca]{sub 2} which is far less than 2R ln2 = 11.5 J K{sup - 1} mol{sup - 1}. It is expected that proton exchange in the two hydrogen bonds within the aggregate does not occur independently but concertedly with strong correlation in the high-temperature phase.

  11. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange study of subtilisin Carlsberg during prolonged exposure to organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, Ezio; Ferrer, Amaris; Barletta, Gabriel L

    2009-03-01

    It has been previously reported that prolonged exposure of an enzyme to organic solvents leads to substantial decrease of activity. This effect was found to be unrelated to the catalysts' structure or their possible aggregation in organic solvents, and up to the present day the cause for activity loss remains unclear. In the present work, the structural dynamics of the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) have been investigated during prolonged exposure to two organic solvents by following hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of mobile protons. The enzyme, after lyophilization, was incubated in organic solvents at controlled deuteriated water activity for different times and the H/D exchange was allowed to take place. The amount of deuterium exchanged was evaluated by (2)H NMR, which in turn gave us a picture of the changing dynamics of our model enzyme during incubation and under different experimental conditions. Our results show that the flexibility of SC decreases during prolonged storage in 1,4-dioxane (Diox) and acetonitrile (ACN) as indicated by the observed 3- to 10-fold decrease in the apparent rate constants of exchange (k) of fast exchangeable protons (FEP) and slow exchangeable protons (SEP) in the protein. Our study also shows that SC is more flexible in ACN than in Diox (k 3-20 times higher in ACN for the FEP and SEP), suggesting that enzyme dynamics are affected by solvent physicochemical properties. Additionally, the enzyme dynamics are also affected by the method of preparation: decreased flexibility (k decreases 3- to 10-fold for FEP and SEP) is observed when the enzyme is chemically modified with poly ethylene glycol (PEGylated) or colyophilized with crown ethers. A possible relationship between activity, enantioselectivity (E), and structural dynamics is discussed, demonstrating that direct correlations, as have been attempted in the past, are hampered by the multi-variable nature and complexity of the system.

  12. Simulataneous analysis of reactivity of anilines in the hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dong-Yu; IMAIZUMI Hiroshi; LEI Qing-Quan; ZHAO Dong-Mei

    2005-01-01

    In order to reveal the reactivity of a functional group in an aromatic compound having two substituents in the aromatic ring, the hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction (T-H exchange reaction) between tritiated water vapor (HTO vapor) and 4-amino-2-methylbenzenesulfonic acid (and 5-amino-2-methylphenol) were dynamically observed at 50℃ (and 70℃) in a gas-solid system. Consequently, the fact that the specific activity of the acid increased with time was obtained, and the T-for-H exchange reaction occurred. By applying the A "-McKay plot method to the data observed, the rate constant of each functional group for the reaction was obtained. After the additive property of the Hammett's rule was applied to this work, the new substituent constants were obtained. From the above-mentioned,the following four items have been confirmed: (1) the reactivity of the functional groups can be dynamically analyzed,and the A"-McKay plot method is useful to analyze the reactivity; (2) the additive property of the Hammett's rule is applicable to quantitative comparison of the reactivity of the functional groups; (3) the reactivity of the functional groups can be simultaneously analyzed by using the A"-McKay plot method in the T-H exchange reaction; and (4) the method used in this work is also useful for analyzing the reactivity of a certain material having some kinds of functional groups.

  13. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and non-polyproline helix such as alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure. The electrostatic properties including permittivity of amino acid residue sidegroups influence the electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide. The significance of this factor relative to other factors in protein folding depends on the magnitude of electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide, and preliminary protein-scale calculations of the magnitude of these components suggest this factor warrants investigation in ...

  14. Protein internal flexibility and global stability: effect of urea on hydrogen exchange rates of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K S; Woodward, C

    1993-09-21

    The hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of buried NH protons in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) was measured in 8 M urea at 30 degrees C and pH 3.5. The data were analyzed by the two-process model in which slower exchanging protons utilize an unfolding mechanism and more rapidly exchanging protons exchange from the folded state. Urea accelerates the set of protons exchanging by the unfolding mechanism, all of which have approximately the same exchange rate constants in urea. For protons in this set, the ratio of exchange rate constants in the presence and absence of urea is used to estimate delta delta G(0-->8M urea) = 6.6 kcal/mol. For the set of protons exchanging from the folded state, 8 M urea either has no effect or slows exchange. Slowing of exchange by urea implies binding of urea to sites at or near the exchanging proton. Some buried protons exchanging from the folded state have diminished rates in 8 M urea, meaning that urea is accessible to these buried sites. Several unassigned side-chain NH's of arginine or lysine are highly protected from exchange by urea, suggesting that they are the location of urea binding sites on the surface of the molecule.

  15. Reordering hydrogen bonds using hamiltonian replica exchange enhances sampling of conformational changes in biomolecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreede, Jocelyne; Wolf, Maarten G; de Leeuw, Simon W; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2009-05-07

    Hydrogen bonds play an important role in stabilizing (meta-)stable states in protein folding. Hence, they can potentially be used as a way to bias these states in molecular simulation methods. Previously, Wolf et al. showed that applying repulsive and attractive hydrogen bond biasing potentials in an alternating way significantly accelerates the folding process (Wolf, M. G.; de Leeuw, S. W. Biophys. J. 2008, 94, 3742). As the biasing potentials are only active during a fixed time interval, this alternating scheme does not represent a thermodynamic equilibrium. In this work, we present a Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) scheme that aims to shuffle and reorder hydrogen bonds in the protein backbone. We therefore apply adapted hydrogen bond potentials in a Hamiltonian REMD scheme, which we call hydrogen bond switching (HS). To compare the performance of the HS to a standard REMD method, we performed HS and temperature REMD simulations of a beta-heptapeptide in methanol. Both methods sample the conformational space to a similar extent. As the HS simulation required only five replicas, while the REMD simulation required 20 replicas, the HS method is significantly more efficient. We tested the HS method also on a larger system, 16-residue polyalanine in water. Both of the simulations starting from a completely unfolded and a folded conformation resulted in an ensemble with, apart from the starting structure, similar conformational minima. We can conclude that the HS method provides an efficient way to sample the conformational space of a protein, without requiring knowledge of the folded states beforehand. In addition, these simulations revealed that convergence was hampered by replicas having a preference for specific biasing potentials. As this sorting effect is inherent to any Hamiltonian REMD method, finding a solution will result in an additional increase in the efficiency of Hamiltonian REMD methods in general.

  16. Novel Hydrophobic Pt/Inorganic Catalyst Used in Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIA Qing-qing1;HU Shi-lin1;FENG Xiao-yan2;LIU Ya-ming1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the performance of hydrophobic catalyst and extend its using range, this research adopted the porous columnar inorganic carriers (ø=5 mm to prepare the hydrophobic catalyst used in hydrogen isotopes exchange reaction, the hydrophilic carriers became hydrophobic with the nanostructured CeO2 coating and the catalyst were then fabricated by convenient impregnation method. The samples were characterized by XRD、SEM、EDX、XPS and CO adsorption. The catalytic activity were tested through catalytic exchange reaction between hydrogen and saturated water vapor to investigate the effect of micro structured CeO2 on the catalyst properties. It turned out that the nano-CeO2 coating could build favorable hydrophobic environment for the catalysts and had almost no influence on the pore structure properties of carriers. Although the hydrophobic coating would lead to the decrease of Pt particle dispersion and metallic Pt content, it could make the Pt particles mostly deposit on the surface layer of the catalysts, which would make more Pt particle participate in the reaction at the same time. The catalytic activity of the novel Pt/inorganic catalyst could reach to 80% of the mature Pt/organic catalyst. After being flushed by water for 12 weeks, the catalytic activity of Pt/inorganic catalyst decreased less than 5%. The novel hydrophobic catalyst with good activity and stability was practical and had great application prospects.

  17. Detecting proton exchange membrane fuel cell hydrogen leak using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Ghassan; Golnaraghi, Farid; DeVaal, Jake; Young, Alan

    2014-01-01

    When a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell runs short of hydrogen, it suffers from a reverse potential fault that, when driven by neighboring cells, can lead to anode catalyst degradation and holes in the membrane due to local heat generation. As a result, hydrogen leaks through the electrically-shorted membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) without being reacted, and a reduction in fuel cell voltage is noticed. Such voltage reduction can be detected by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). To fully understand the reverse potential fault, the effect of hydrogen crossover leakage in a commercial MEA is measured by EIS at different differential pressures between the anode and cathode. Then the signatures of these leaky cells were compared with the signatures of a no-leaky cells at different oxygen concentrations with the same current densities. The eventual intent of this early stage work is to develop an on-board diagnostics system that can be used to detect and possibly prevent cell reversal failures, and to permit understanding the status of crossover or transfer leaks versus time in operation.

  18. Hydrogen-fluorine exchange in NaBH4-NaBF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rude, L H; Filsø, U; D'Anna, V; Spyratou, A; Richter, B; Hino, S; Zavorotynska, O; Baricco, M; Sørby, M H; Hauback, B C; Hagemann, H; Besenbacher, F; Skibsted, J; Jensen, T R

    2013-11-07

    Hydrogen-fluorine exchange in the NaBH4-NaBF4 system is investigated using a range of experimental methods combined with DFT calculations and a possible mechanism for the reactions is proposed. Fluorine substitution is observed using in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) as a new Rock salt type compound with idealized composition NaBF2H2 in the temperature range T = 200 to 215 °C. Combined use of solid-state (19)F MAS NMR, FT-IR and DFT calculations supports the formation of a BF2H2(-) complex ion, reproducing the observation of a (19)F chemical shift at -144.2 ppm, which is different from that of NaBF4 at -159.2 ppm, along with the new absorption bands observed in the IR spectra. After further heating, the fluorine substituted compound becomes X-ray amorphous and decomposes to NaF at ~310 °C. This work shows that fluorine-substituted borohydrides tend to decompose to more stable compounds, e.g. NaF and BF3 or amorphous products such as closo-boranes, e.g. Na2B12H12. The NaBH4-NaBF4 composite decomposes at lower temperatures (300 °C) compared to NaBH4 (476 °C), as observed by thermogravimetric analysis. NaBH4-NaBF4 (1:0.5) preserves 30% of the hydrogen storage capacity after three hydrogen release and uptake cycles compared to 8% for NaBH4 as measured using Sievert's method under identical conditions, but more than 50% using prolonged hydrogen absorption time. The reversible hydrogen storage capacity tends to decrease possibly due to the formation of NaF and Na2B12H12. On the other hand, the additive sodium fluoride appears to facilitate hydrogen uptake, prevent foaming, phase segregation and loss of material from the sample container for samples of NaBH4-NaF.

  19. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  20. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  1. Analysis of Hydrogen Isotopic Exchange: Lava Creek Tuff Ash and Isotopically Labeled Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A. M.; Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Nolan, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nolan and Bindeman (2013) placed secondarily hydrated ash from the 7.7 ka eruption of Mt. Mazama (δD=-149‰, 2.3wt% H2Ot) in isotopically labeled water (+650 ‰ δD, +56 ‰ δ18O) and observed that the H2Ot and δ18O values remained constant, but the δD values of ash increased with the surrounding water at 20, 40 and 70 °C. We expand on this work by conducting a similar experiment with ash from the 640 ka Lava Creek Tuff (LCT, δD of -128 ‰; 2.1 wt.% H2Ot) eruption of Yellowstone to see if significantly older glass (with a hypothesized gel layer on the surface shielding the interior from alteration) produces the same results. We have experiments running at 70, 24, and 5 °C, and periodically remove ~1.5 mg of glass to measure the δD (‰) and H2Ot (wt.%) of water extracted from the glass on a TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. After 600 hours, the δD of the samples left at 5 and 24 °C remains at -128 ‰, but increased 8‰ for the 70 °C run series. However, there is no measurable change in wt.% of H2Ot, indicating that hydrogen exchange is not dictated by the addition of water. We are measuring and will report further progress of isotope exchange. We also plan to analyze the water in the LCT glass for δ18O (‰) to see if, as is the case for the Mt. Mazama glass, the δ18O (‰) remains constant. We also analyzed Mt. Mazama glass from the Nolan and Bindeman (2013) experiments that have now been sitting in isotopically labeled water at room temperature for ~5 years. The water concentration is still unchanged (2.3 wt.% H2Ot), and the δD of the water in the glass is now -111 ‰, causing an increase of 38 ‰. Our preliminary results show that exchange of hydrogen isotopes of hydrated glass is not limited by the age of the glass, and that the testing of hydrogen isotopes of secondarily hydrated glass, regardless of age, may not be a reliable paleoclimate indicator.

  2. The kinetics of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iloro, Ibon; Narváez, Daniel; Guillén, Nancy; Camacho, Carlos M; Guillén, Lalisse; Cora, Elsa; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda

    2008-05-15

    Five highly homologous epidermal growth factor receptor ligands were studied by mass spectral analysis, hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange via attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation analysis. These studies were performed to determine the order of events during the exchange process, the extent of H/D exchange, and associated kinetics of exchange for a comparative analysis of these ligands. Furthermore, the secondary structure composition of amphiregulin (AR) and heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) was determined. All ligands were found to have similar contributions of 3(10)-helix and random coil with varying contributions of beta-sheets and beta-turns. The extent of exchange was 40%, 65%, 55%, 65%, and 98% for EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), AR, HB-EGF, and epiregulin (ER), respectively. The rate constants were determined and classified as fast, intermediate, and slow: for EGF the 0.20 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.09 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.88 x 10(-3) min(-1) (beta-sheets and 3(10)-helix); and for TGF-alpha 0.91 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.27 min(-1) (Arg, beta-turns), and 1.41 x 10(-4) min(-1) (beta-sheets). The time constants for AR 0.47 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.04 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-turns, and beta-sheets); for HB-EGF 0.89 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.14 min(-1) (Arg and 3(10)-helix), and 1.00 x 10(-3) min(-1) (buried 3(10)-helix, beta-sheets, and beta-turns); and for epiregulin 0.16 min(-1) (Tyr), 0.03 min(-1) (Arg), and 1.00 x 10(-4) min(-1) (3(10)-helix and beta-sheets). These results provide essential information toward understanding secondary structure, H/D exchange kinetics, and solvation of these epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in their unbound state.

  3. Hydrogen Bonds between Acidic Protons from Alkynes (C–H···O and Amides (N–H···O and Carbonyl Oxygen Atoms as Acceptor Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baillargeon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of tert-butyl (2S-2-(prop-2-yn-1-ylcarbamoylpyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (Boc-L-Pro-NHCH2CCH have been obtained. The title compound crystallizes easily as sharp needles in orthorhombic system, space group P 21 21 21 with a = 9.2890(2, b = 9.7292(2, c = 15.7918(4 Å, V = 1427.18(6 Å3, and Z = 4. The main feature of the structure is the orientation of the carbamate and amide. Their dipoles add up and the molecule displays an electric dipole moment of 5.61 D from B3LYP/6-31G(d calculations. The antiparallel H bonding of amides and the alignment of dipoles induce columnar stacking (the dipole moment along the columnar a axis is 4.46 D for each molecule. The other components across the other axes are, therefore weaker, (3.17 D and 1.23 D along the b and c axes, resp.. The resulting anisotropic columns pack side by side, in an antiparallel fashion mostly by (alkyne CH···O=C (carbamate interactions.

  4. Iron-mediated induction of sister-chromatid exchanges by hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larramendy, M; Mello-Filho, A C; Martins, E A; Meneghini, R

    1987-05-01

    When Chinese hamster fibroblasts were exposed to hydrogen peroxide or to a system consisting of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine, which generates superoxide anion plus hydrogen peroxide, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were formed in a dose-dependent manner. When the iron-complexing agent o-phenanthroline was present in the medium, however, the production of these SCEs was completely inhibited. This fact indicates that the Fenton reaction: Fe2+ + H2O2----OH0 + OH- + Fe3+ is responsible for the production of SCEs. When O2- and H2O2 were generated inside the cell by incubation with menadione, the production of SCE was prevented by co-incubation with copper diisopropylsalicylate, a superoxide dismutase mimetic agent. The most likely role of O2- is as a reducing agent of Fe3+: O2- + Fe3+----Fe2+ + O2, so that the sum of this and the Fenton reaction, i.e., the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction, provides an explanation for the active oxygen species-induced SCE: H2O2 + O2(-)----OH- + OH0 + O2. According to this view, the OH radical thus produced is the agent which ultimately causes SCE. These results are discussed in comparison with other mechanisms previously proposed for induction of SCE by active oxygen species.

  5. Understanding the Amide-II Vibrations in β-Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2015-11-25

    In this work, the vibrational characteristics of the amide-II modes in β-peptides in five helical conformations, namely, 8-, 10-, 12-, 14-, and 10/12-helices, have been examined. Remarkable conformational dependence of the amide-II spectral profile is obtained by ab initio computations as well as modeling analysis. Intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction and its influence on backbone structure and on the amide-II local-mode transition frequencies and intensities are examined. Through-space and through-bond contributions of the amide-II vibrational couplings are analyzed, and it was found that hydrogen-bonding interaction is not a determining factor for the coupling strength. The results reported here provide useful benchmarks for understanding experimental amide-II infrared spectra of β-peptides and suggest the potential application of this mode on monitoring the structures and dynamics of β-peptides.

  6. SN-EXCHANGED HYDROTALCITES AS CATALYSTS FOR CLEAN AND SELECTIVE BAEYER-VILLIGER OXIDATION OF KETONES USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Sn-doped hydrotalcite (Sn/HT) catalyst prepared by ion-exchange is found to be an active and selective catalyst for the liquid phase Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclic ketones in acetonitrile using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant. Different reaction perameters such as...

  7. CHARGE-EXCHANGE SCATTERING OF NEGATIVE PIONS BY HYDROGEN AT 230,260, 290, 317 AND 371 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caris, John C

    1960-03-18

    The differential cross section for charge-exchange scattering of negative pions by hydrogen has been observed at 230, 260, 290, 317, and 371 Mev. The reaction was observed by detecting one gamma ray from the {pi}{sup 0} decay with a scintillation-counter telescope.

  8. sup 1 H NMR studies of a biosynthetic lacto-ganglio hybrid glycosphingolipid: Confirmation of structure, interpretation of anomalous' chemical shifts, and evidence for interresidue amide-amide hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levery, S.B.; Harris, D.D.; Hakomori, Senitiroh (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Holmes, E.H. (Pacific Northwest Research Foundation, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1992-02-04

    Glycosphinogolipids bearing GlcNAc{beta}1 {yields} 3 and GalNAc{beta}1 {yields} 4 linked to {beta}-Gal of lactosylceramide first isolated from a murine myelogenous leukemia cell line have since been found as normal components of mullet roe and English sole liver. In order to clarify the biosynthetic pathways responsible for its occurrence both as a product of normal tissues and as a possible mammalian cancer-associated antigen, the lacto-ganglio hybrid core structure LcGg{sub 4}Cer was synthesized from Lc{sub 3}Cer using a GalNAc{beta}1 {yields} 4 transferase preparation from English sole liver. A preliminary characterization of the enzyme, which may be identical to the GalNAc T-1 responsible for synthesis of GM{sub 2} ganglioside, is presented. The enzymatically synthesized product was analyzed by 1- and 2-D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, confirming its primary structure as GalNAc{beta}1 {yields} 4-(GlcNAc{beta}1 {yields} 3)Gal{beta}1 {yields} 4Glc{beta}1 {yields} 1Cer. An approximate three-dimensional structure for LcGg{sub 4}Cer is proposed, consistent with all data obtained, which should be useful in discussing the results of {sup 1}H NMR analysis of compounds containing this core tetrasaccharide. The structure is characterized by an unusual arrangement of terminal N-acetylhexosamine residues, resulting in a {pi}-H hydrogen-bonding interaction between their acetamido groups.

  9. Measurements of hydrogen peroxide and formaldehyde exchange between the atmosphere and surface snow at Summit, Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobi, H.W.; Frey, M.M.; Hutterli, M.A.; Bales, R.C. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources; Schrems, O. [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Cullen, N.J.; Steffen, K. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). CIRES; Koehler, C. [Manchester High School, Earth and Space Science, CT (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Tower-based measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and formaldehyde (HCHO) exchange were performed above the snowpack of the Greenland ice sheet. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HCHO fluxes were measured continuously between 16 June and 7 July 2000, at the Summit Environmental Observatory. The fluxes were determined using coil scrubber-aqueous phase fluorometry systems together with micrometeorological techniques. Both compounds exhibit strong diel cycles in the observed concentrations as well as in the fluxes with emission from the snow during the day and the evening and deposition during the night. The averaged diel variations of the observed fluxes were in the range of +1.3x10{sup 13} molecules m{sup -2} s{sup -1} (deposition) and -1.6x10{sup 13} molecules m{sup -2} s{sup -1} (emission) for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and +1.1x10{sup 12} and -4.2x10{sup 12} molecules m{sup -2} s{sup -1} for HCHO, while the net exchange per day for both compounds were much smaller. During the study period of 22 days on average (0.8{sub -4.3}{sup +4.6}x10{sup 17} molecules m{sup -2} of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were deposited and (7.0{sub -12.2}{sup +12.6})x10{sup 16} molecules m{sup -2} of HCHO were emitted from the snow per day. A comparison with the inventory in the gas phase demonstrates that the exchange influences the diel variations in the boundary layer above snow covered areas. Flux measurements during and after the precipitation of new snow shows that <16% of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and more than 25% of the HCHO originally present in the new snow were available for fast release to the atmospheric boundary layer within hours after precipitation. This release can effectively disturb the normally observed diel variations of the exchange between the surface snow and the atmosphere, thus perturbing also the diel variations of corresponding gas-phase concentrations. (Author)

  10. Desalination and hydrogen, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide production via electrophoretic ion exchange and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Bahga, Supreet S; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate and analyze a novel desalination method which works by electrophoretically replacing sodium and chloride in feed salt water with a pair of ions, calcium and carbonate, that react and precipitate out. The resulting calcium carbonate precipitate is benign to health, and can be filtered or settled out, yielding low ionic strength product water. The ion exchange and precipitation employs self-sharpening interfaces induced by movement of multiple ions in an electric field to prevent contamination of the product water. Simultaneously, the electrolysis associated with the electromigration produces hydrogen gas, chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. We conducted an experimental study of this method's basic efficacy to desalinate salt water from 100 to 600 mol m(-3) sodium chloride. We also present physicochemical models of the process, and analyze replacement reagents consumption, permeate recovery ratio, and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents using the well-known, commercially implemented Solvay process. We show that the method's permeate recovery ratio is 58% to 46%, which is on par with that of reverse osmosis. We show that the method's energy consumption requirement over and above that necessary to generate electrolysis is 3 to 10 W h l(-1), which is on par with the energy consumed by state-of-the-art desalination methods. Furthermore, the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure, and uses no specialized membranes. The process may be feasible as a part of a desalination-co-generation facility: generating fresh water, hydrogen and chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide.

  11. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, D.; Adams, J.A.; Kinnelly, A.A. [and others

    1997-07-01

    In partial fulfillment of the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-ACO2-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this conceptual vehicle design report addresses the design and packaging of battery augmented fuel cell powertrain vehicles. This report supplements the {open_quotes}Conceptual Vehicle Design Report - Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes} and includes a cost study of the fuel cell power system. The three classes of vehicles considered in this design and packaging exercise are the same vehicle classes that were studied in the previous report: the Aspire, representing the small vehicle class; the AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, representing the mid-size vehicle; and the E-150 Econoline, representing the van-size class. A preliminary PEM fuel cell power system manufacturing cost study is also presented. As in the case of the previous report concerning the {open_quotes}Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes}, the same assumptions are made for the fuel cell power system. These assumptions are fuel cell system power densities of 0.33 kW/ka and 0.33 kW/l, platinum catalyst loading of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total, and hydrogen tanks containing compressed gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The batteries considered for power augmentation of the fuel cell vehicle are based on the Ford Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program. These are state-of-the-art high power lead acid batteries with power densities ranging from 0.8 kW/kg to 2 kW/kg. The results reported here show that battery augmentation provides the fuel cell vehicle with a power source to meet instant high power demand for acceleration and start-up. Based on the assumptions made in this report, the packaging of the battery augmented fuel cell vehicle appears to be as feasible as the packaging of the pure fuel cell powered vehicle.

  12. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  13. Retention, isotope exchange, and thermal release of hydrogen in candidate materials for TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, W. R.; Doyle, B. L.; Brice, D. K.; Picraux, S. T.

    1980-08-01

    The materials studied included TiC, TiB/sub 2/, VB/sub 2/, B/sub 4/C, B, Si, graphite, and the metals Ti, V, and 304L stainless steel. The TiC and TiB/sub 2/ were formed by chemical vapor deposition on a graphite substrate. The C/Ti ratio of the TiC was measured to be 1.0 +- .05 by ion backscattering analysis. The Ti and V were explosively bonded to copper substrates, and the VB/sub 2/ was made by borodizing vanadium. Carbon (compression annealed pyrolytic graphite from Union Carbide and Papyex graphite ribbon from Le Carbone) and single crystal silicon samples were included in the study as reference materials. The hydrogen retention and isotope exchange behavior for these materials were studied by measuring the amount of H or D retained as a function of incident fluence using the D(/sup 3/He,P)/sup 4/He nuclear reaction analysis techniques for D and H(/sup 15/N,..cap alpha gamma..) profiling for H.

  14. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a `perfect experiment`, measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H{sub 2} reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H{sub 2} molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H{sub 2} reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10{sup 3} molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H{sub 2} reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  15. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H[sub 2] [yields] H[sub 2] + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a 'perfect experiment', measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H[sub 2] reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H[sub 2] molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H[sub 2] reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10[sup 3] molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H[sub 2] reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  16. The influence of hydrogen sulfide on proton exchange membrane fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weiyu; Yi, Baolian; Hou, Ming; Jing, Fenning; Yu, Hongmei; Ming, Pingwen

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide on proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) anodes was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), potential steps and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The severity of the effect of H 2S varies depending on the H 2S concentration, current density and the cell temperature. The anode humidification does not impact the poisoning rate much when the anode is exposed to H 2S. The adsorption of H 2S on the anode is dissociative and this dissociation can produce adsorbed sulfur. The dissociation potential of H 2S was studied by potential steps, and the values of the dissociation potential are about 0.4 V at 90 °C, 0.5 V at 60 °C and 0.6 V at 30 °C, respectively. The adsorbed sulfur can be oxidized at a higher potential. During CV scans, two oxidation peaks for the adsorbed sulfur at 1.07 and 1.2 V were observed at 90 °C, however a single oxidation peak could be observed at 1.2 V at 60 °C and at 1.27 V at 30 °C. Application of EIS to a H 2S|H 2 half-cell shows that the charge transfer resistance increases when the anode is exposed to H 2S because of H 2S adsorption.

  17. Salt forms of the pharmaceutical amide dihydrocarbamazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Amanda R; Kennedy, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is well known as a model active pharmaceutical ingredient used in the study of polymorphism and the generation and comparison of cocrystal forms. The pharmaceutical amide dihydrocarbamazepine (DCBZ) is a less well known material and is largely of interest here as a structural congener of CBZ. Reaction of DCBZ with strong acids results in protonation of the amide functionality at the O atom and gives the salt forms dihydrocarbamazepine hydrochloride {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium chloride, C15H15N2O(+)·Cl(-)}, dihydrocarbamazepine hydrochloride monohydrate {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium chloride monohydrate, C15H15N2O(+)·Cl(-)·H2O} and dihydrocarbamazepine hydrobromide monohydrate {systematic name: [(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methylidene]azanium bromide monohydrate, C15H15N2O(+)·Br(-)·H2O}. The anhydrous hydrochloride has a structure with two crystallographically independent ion pairs (Z' = 2), wherein both cations adopt syn conformations, whilst the two hydrated species are mutually isostructural and have cations with anti conformations. Compared to neutral dihydrocarbamazepine structures, protonation of the amide group is shown to cause changes to both the molecular (C=O bond lengthening and C-N bond shortening) and the supramolecular structures. The amide-to-amide and dimeric hydrogen-bonding motifs seen for neutral polymorphs and cocrystalline species are replaced here by one-dimensional polymeric constructs with no direct amide-to-amide bonds. The structures are also compared with, and shown to be closely related to, those of the salt forms of the structurally similar pharmaceutical carbamazepine.

  18. Characterizing the dynamics of alpha-synuclein oligomers using hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Betzer, Cristine; Jensen, Poul H;

    2013-01-01

    hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), we have analyzed the structural dynamics of soluble αSN oligomers. The analyzed oligomers were metastable, slowly dissociating to monomers over a period of 21 days, after excess monomer had been removed. The C-terminal region of α......-shielded structure. The protected regions were interspersed by two somewhat more dynamic regions (residues 18-38 and 55-70). In the oligomeric state, the isotopic exchange pattern of the region of residues 35-95 of αSN corresponded well with previous nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance...

  19. Numerical Analysis of a Single Microchannel Within a High-Temperature Hydrogen Heat Exchanger for Beamed Energy Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 Jul 2013 – 19 Jul 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Numerical Analysis of a Single Microchannel Within a High...propulsion spacecraft. It was found that despite the very small diameter of the microchannels , each design produced extreme temperature...2013, Minneapolis, MN, USA HT2013-17217 DRAFT NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF A SINGLE MICROCHANNEL WITHIN A HIGH- TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN HEAT EXCHANGER FOR

  20. Incorporation of different crystallizable amide blocks in segmented poly(ester amide)s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, P.A.M.; Broos, R.; Heeringen, van M.J.M.; Dijkstra, P.J.; Feijen, J.

    2005-01-01

    High molecular weight segmented poly(ester amide)s were prepared by melt polycondensation of dimethyl adipate, 1,4-butanediol and a symmetrical bisamide-diol based on ε-caprolactone and 1,2-diaminoethane or 1,4-diaminobutane. FT-IR and WAXD analysis revealed that segmented poly(ester amide)s based

  1. Catalytic dehalogenation of N-acetyl-L-4-chloro- and N-acetyl-L-4-iodophenylalanine amide in the presence of deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlke, J.; Bienert, M.; Niedrich, H.; Zoepfl, H.-J.; Franke, P.

    1986-09-01

    As a model for the tritium labeling of peptides, the catalytic dehalogenation of N-Acetyl-L-4-chloro- and N-Acetyl-L-4-iodo-phenylalanine amide was investigated in the presence of deuterium, using different reaction conditions. A catalyst-mediated transfer of the solvent-hydrogen to the substrate was found to be the most probable reason for the exchange of halogen by hydrogen instead of deuterium. This unwanted transfer was most intensive in the presence of water. An incorporation of additional deuterium besides the 4-position of phenylalanine takes place simultaneously with the dehalogenation especially of the chloro derivative.

  2. Kinetics of exchange between zero-, one-, and two-hydrogen-bonded states of methyl and ethyl acetate in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntonov, Lev; Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Gai, Feng

    2015-03-26

    It has recently been shown that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration can be used as a sensitive probe of local electrostatic field in molecular systems. To further characterize this vibrational probe and extend its potential applications, we studied the kinetics of chemical exchange between differently hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) ester carbonyl groups of methyl acetate (MA) and ethyl acetate (EA) in methanol. We found that, while both MA and EA can form zero, one, or two H-bonds with the solvent, the population of the 2hb state in MA is significantly smaller than that in EA. Using a combination of linear and nonlinear infrared measurements and numerical simulations, we further determined the rate constants for the exchange between these differently H-bonded states. We found that for MA the chemical exchange reaction between the two dominant states (i.e., 0hb and 1hb states) has a relaxation rate constant of 0.14 ps(-1), whereas for EA the three-state chemical exchange reaction occurs in a predominantly sequential manner with the following relaxation rate constants: 0.11 ps(-1) for exchange between 0hb and 1hb states and 0.12 ps(-1) for exchange between 1hb and 2hb states.

  3. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS.

  4. Effect of the geometric phase on the dynamics of the hydrogen-exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes-Marcos, Juan Carlos; Althorpe, Stuart C; Wrede, Eckart

    2007-01-28

    A recent puzzle in nonadiabatic quantum dynamics is that geometric phase (GP) effects are present in the state-to-state opacity functions of the hydrogen-exchange reaction, but cancel out in the state-to-state integral cross sections (ICSs). Here the authors explain this result by using topology to separate the scattering amplitudes into contributions from Feynman paths that loop in opposite senses around the conical intersection. The clockwise-looping paths pass over one transition state (1-TS) and scatter into positive deflection angles; the counterclockwise-looping paths pass over two transition states (2-TS) and scatter into negative deflection angles. The interference between the 1-TS and 2-TS paths thus integrates to a very small value, which cancels the GP effects in the ICS. Quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations reproduce the scattering of the 1-TS and 2-TS paths into positive and negative deflection angles and show that the 2-TS paths describe a direct insertion mechanism. The inserting atom follows a highly constrained "S-bend" path, which allows it to avoid both the other atoms and the conical intersection and forces the product diatom to scatter into high rotational states. By contrast, the quantum 2-TS paths scatter into a mainly statistical distribution of rotational states, so that the quantum 2-TS total ICS is roughly twice the QCT ICS at 2.3 eV total energy. This suggests that the S-bend constraint is relaxed by tunneling in the quantum system. These findings on H+H(2) suggest that similar cancellations or reductions in GP effects are likely in many other reactions.

  5. Reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with secondary amides. The influence of steric and stereoelectronic effects on the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Basili, Federica; Mele, Riccardo; Cianfanelli, Marco; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-12-19

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from secondary alkanamides to the cumyloxyl radical was carried out in acetonitrile. HAT predominantly occurs from the N-alkyl α-C-H bonds, and a >60-fold decrease in kH was observed by increasing the steric hindrance of the acyl and N-alkyl groups. The role of steric and stereoelectronic effects on the reactivity and selectivity is discussed in the framework of HAT reactions from peptides.

  6. Gas-phase fragmentation of peptides by MALDI in-source decay with limited amide hydrogen (1H/2H) scrambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper D; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    of the gaseous protein (i.e., hydrogen scrambling). Here we investigate the occurrence of scrambling in selectively labeled peptides upon fragmentation by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI ISD). We have utilized peptides with a unique regioselective deuterium incorporation...... that allows us to accurately determine the extent of scrambling upon fragmentation. Our results show that the level of scrambling upon MALDI ISD is so low that the solution deuteration pattern is readily apparent in the gas-phase fragment ions. These results suggest that MALDI ISD may prove useful...

  7. The use of spin desalting columns in DMSO-quenched H/D-exchange NMR experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Chandak, Mahesh S; Nakamura, Takashi; Takenaka, Toshio; Chaudhuri, Tapan K.; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Chen, Jin; Kato, Koichi; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-quenched hydrogen/deuterium (H/D)-exchange is a powerful method to characterize the H/D-exchange behaviors of proteins and protein assemblies, and it is potentially useful for investigating non-protected fast-exchanging amide protons in the unfolded state. However, the method has not been used for studies on fully unfolded proteins in a concentrated denaturant or protein solutions at high salt concentrations. In all of the current DMSO-quenched H/D-exchange studies of...

  8. Amide-based Fluorescent Macrocyclic Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG, Zhen-Ya(曾振亚); XU, Kuo-Xi(徐括喜); HE, Yong-Bing(何永炳); LIU, Shun-Ying(刘顺英); WU, Jin-Long(吴进龙); WEI, Lan-Hua(隗兰华); MENG, Ling-Zhi(孟令芝)

    2004-01-01

    Two fluorescent anion receptors (1 and 2) based on amide macrocycle were synthesized and corresponding fluorescence quenching induced by anion complexation was observed in different degree. Receptors form 1: 1 complexes with anions by hydrogen bonding interactions. Receptor 1 bound anions in the order of F->Cl->H2PO4->CH3COO->>Br-, I- and receptor 2 showed high selectivity to F- over other anions.

  9. EXCHANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltz, J.C. (ed.)

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  10. Design and optimization of anode flow field of a large proton exchange membrane fuel cell for high hydrogen utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Serhat; Rizwandi, Omid

    2016-11-01

    We developed a CFD model of the anode flow field of a large proton exchange membrane fuel cell that operates under the ultra-low stoichiometric (ULS) flow conditions which intend to improve the disadvantages of the dead-ended operation such as severe voltage transient and carbon corrosion. Very small exit velocity must be high enough to remove accumulated nitrogen, and must be low enough to retain hydrogen in the active area. Stokes equations are used to model the flow distribution in the flow field, Maxwell-Stefan equations are used to model the transport of the species, and a voltage model is developed to model the reactions kinetics. Uniformity of the distribution of hydrogen concentration is quantified as the normalized area of the region in which the hydrogen mole fraction remains above a certain level, such as 0.9. Geometry of the anode flow field is modified to obtain optimal configuration; the number of baffles at the inlet, width of the gaps between baffles, width of the side gaps, and length of the central baffle are used as design variables. In the final design, the hydrogen-depleted region is less than 0.2% and the hydrogen utilization is above 99%. This work was supported by The Scientific and Technolo-gical Research Council of Turkey, TUBITAK-213M023.

  11. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Related Proteins with Divergent Sequences: A Comparative Study of HIV-1 Nef Allelic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Thomas E.; Poe, Jerrod A.; Emert-Sedlak, Lori; Morgan, Christopher R.; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Engen, John R.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry can be used to compare the conformation and dynamics of proteins that are similar in tertiary structure. If relative deuterium levels are measured, differences in sequence, deuterium forward- and back-exchange, peptide retention time, and protease digestion patterns all complicate the data analysis. We illustrate what can be learned from such data sets by analyzing five variants (Consensus G2E, SF2, NL4-3, ELI, and LTNP4) of the HIV-1 Nef protein, both alone and when bound to the human Hck SH3 domain. Regions with similar sequence could be compared between variants. Although much of the hydrogen exchange features were preserved across the five proteins, the kinetics of Nef binding to Hck SH3 were not the same. These observations may be related to biological function, particularly for ELI Nef where we also observed an impaired ability to downregulate CD4 surface presentation. The data illustrate some of the caveats that must be considered for comparison experiments and provide a framework for investigations of other protein relatives, families, and superfamilies with HX MS.

  12. Computational Investigation and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange of the Fixed Charge Derivative Tris(2,4,6-Trimethoxyphenyl)Phosphonium: Implications for the Aspartic Acid Cleavage Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Kristin A.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Vorpagel, Erich R.

    2005-05-25

    Aspartic acid (Asp)-containing peptides with the fixed charge derivative tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl) phosphonium (tTMP-P+) were explored computationally and experimentally by H/D exchange and fragmentation studies in order to probe the phenomenon of selective cleavage C-terminal to Asp in the absence of a ''mobile'' proton. Ab initio modeling of the tTMP-P+ electrostatic potential demonstrates the positive charge is distributed on the phosphonium group and therefore is not initiating or directing fragmentation as would a ''mobile'' proton. Geometry optimizations and vibrational analyses of different aspartic acid conformations show the aspartic acid structure with a hydrogen bond between the side chain hydroxy and backbone carbonyl lies 2.8 kcal/mol above the lowest energy conformer. In reactions with D2O, the phosphonium-derived doubly charged peptide (H+)P+LDIFSDF rapidly exchanges all 12 of its exchangeable hydrogens for deuterium and also displays a non-exchanging population. With no added proton, P+LDIFSDF exchanges a maximum of four of eleven exchangeable hydrogens for deuterium. No exchange is observed when all acidic groups are converted to the corresponding methyl esters. Together, these H/D exchange results indicate that the acidic hydrogens are ''mobile locally'' because they are able to participate in exchange even in the absence of an added proton. Fragmentation of two distinct (H+)P+LDIFSDF ion populations shows the non-exchanging population displays selective cleavage, while the exchanging population fragments more evenly across the peptide backbone. This result demonstrates that H/D exchange can sometimes distinguish between and provide a means of separation of different protonation motifs, and that these protonation motifs can have an effect on the fragmentation.

  13. Reordering hydrogen bonds using Hamiltonian replica exchange enhances sampling of conformational changes in biomolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, J.; Wolf, M.G.; de Leeuw, S.W.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds play an important role in stabilizing (meta-)stable states in protein folding. Hence, they can potentially be used as a way to bias these states in molecular simulation methods. Previously, Wolf et al. showed that applying repulsive and attractive hydrogen bond biasing potentials in a

  14. Catalytic hydrogen/oxygen reaction assisted the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) startup at subzero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shucheng; Yu, Hongmei; Hou, Junbo; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian; Ming, Pingwen; Hou, Zhongjun

    Fuel cells for automobile application need to operate in a wide temperature range including freezing temperature. However, the rapid startup of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at subfreezing temperature, e.g., -20 °C, is very difficult. A cold-start procedure was developed, which made hydrogen and oxygen react to heat the fuel cell considering that the FC flow channel was the characteristic of microchannel reactor. The effect of hydrogen and oxygen reaction on fuel cell performance at ambient temperature was also investigated. The electrochemical characterizations such as I- V plot and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were performed. The heat generated rate for either the single cell or the stack was calculated. The results showed that the heat generated rate was proportional to the gas flow rate when H 2 concentration and the active area were constant. The fuel cell temperature rose rapidly and steadily by controlling gas flow rate.

  15. Using a Potassium Acetate Solution for Cooling High Pressure Hydrogen in a Prototype Heat Exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Abel, M.; Rokni, Masoud;

    2011-01-01

    is to be delivered at high pressure a heat exchanger was designed and constructed. The paper presents a detailed study of construction of the heat exchanger which has been tested and compared to theory to predict and verify its performance. The method presented by Nellis and Klein for laminar flow in annulus tubes...

  16. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG-FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found......The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest...... in understanding and modulating the IgG-FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation...

  17. Regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase: conformational changes upon phenylalanine binding detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Dangott, Lawrence J; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2010-04-20

    Phenylalanine acts as an allosteric activator of the tetrahydropterin-dependent enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry has been used to gain insight into local conformational changes accompanying activation of rat phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine. Peptides in the regulatory and catalytic domains that lie in the interface between these two domains show large increases in the extent of deuterium incorporation from solvent in the presence of phenylalanine. In contrast, the effects of phenylalanine on the exchange kinetics of a mutant enzyme lacking the regulatory domain are limited to peptides surrounding the binding site for the amino acid substrate. These results support a model in which the N-terminus of the protein acts as an inhibitory peptide, with phenylalanine binding causing a conformational change in the regulatory domain that alters the interaction between the catalytic and regulatory domains.

  18. Electron and hydrogen self-exchange of free radicals of sterically hindered tertiary aliphatic amines investigated by photo-CIDNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Goez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoreactions of diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO and triisopropylamine (TIPA with the sensitizers anthraquinone (AQ and xanthone (XA or benzophenone (BP were investigated by time-resolved photo-CIDNP (photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization experiments. By varying the radical-pair concentration, it was ensured that these measurements respond only to self-exchange reactions of the free amine-derived radicals (radical cations DH•+ or α-amino alkyl radicals D• with the parent amine DH; the acid–base equilibrium between DH•+ and D• also plays no role. Although the sensitizer does not at all participate in the observed processes, it has a pronounced influence on the CIDNP kinetics because the reaction occurs through successive radical pairs. With AQ, the polarizations stem from the initially formed radical-ion pairs, and escaping DH•+ then undergoes electron self-exchange with DH. In the reaction sensitized with XA (or BP, the polarizations arise in a secondary pair of neutral radicals that is rapidly produced by in-cage proton transfer, and the CIDNP kinetics are due to hydrogen self-exchange between escaping D• and DH. For TIPA, the activation parameters of both self-exchange reactions were determined. Outer-sphere reorganization energies obtained with the Marcus theory gave very good agreement between experimental and calculated values of ∆G‡298.

  19. Hydrogen exchange during cell-free incorporation of deuterated amino acids and an approach to its inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonelli, Marco; Singarapu, Kiran K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM), Department of Biochemistry (United States); Makino, Shin-ichi; Sahu, Sarata C.; Matsubara, Yuko [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), Department of Biochemistry (United States); Endo, Yaeta [Ehime University, Cell-Free Science and Technology Research Center (Japan); Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Center for Priority Areas (Japan); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM), Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Perdeuteration, selective deuteration, and stereo array isotope labeling (SAIL) are valuable strategies for NMR studies of larger proteins and membrane proteins. To minimize scrambling of the label, it is best to use cell-free methods to prepare selectively labeled proteins. However, when proteins are prepared from deuterated amino acids by cell-free translation in H{sub 2}O, exchange reactions can lead to contamination of {sup 2}H sites by {sup 1}H from the solvent. Examination of a sample of SAIL-chlorella ubiquitin prepared by Escherichia coli cell-free synthesis revealed that exchange had occurred at several residues (mainly at Gly, Ala, Asp, Asn, Glu, and Gln). We present results from a study aimed at identifying the exchanging sites and level of exchange and at testing a strategy for minimizing {sup 1}H contamination during wheat germ cell-free translation of proteins produced from deuterated amino acids by adding known inhibitors of transaminases (1 mM aminooxyacetic acid) and glutamate synthetase (0.1 mM l-methionine sulfoximine). By using a wheat germ cell-free expression system, we produced [U-{sup 2}H, {sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin without and with added inhibitors, and [U-{sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin as a reference to determine the extent of deuterium incorporation. We also prepared a sample of [U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N]-chlorella ubiquitin, for use in assigning the sites of exchange. The added inhibitors did not reduce the protein yield and were successful in blocking hydrogen exchange at C{sup {alpha}} sites, with the exception of Gly, and at C{sup {beta}} sites of Ala. We discovered, in addition, that partial exchange occurred with or without the inhibitors at certain side-chain methyl and methylene groups: Asn-H{sup {beta}}, Asp-H{sup {beta}}, Gln-H{sup {gamma}}, Glu-H{sup {gamma}}, and Lys-H{sup {epsilon}}. The side-chain labeling pattern, in particular the mixed chiral labeling resulting from partial exchange at certain sites, should be of

  20. Optimization and Application of APCI Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX MS) for the Speciation of Nitrogen Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acter, Thamina; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sungji; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-09-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the utility of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (APCI HDX MS) to identify the structures of nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds. First, experiments were performed to determine the optimized experimental conditions, with dichloromethane and CH(3)OD found to be good cosolvents for APCI HDX. In addition, a positive correlation between the heated capillary temperature and the observed HDX signal was observed, and it was suggested that the HDX reaction occurred when molecules were contained in the solvent cluster. Second, 20 standard nitrogen-containing compounds were analyzed to investigate whether speciation could be determined based on the different types of ions produced from nitrogen-containing compounds with various functional groups. The number of exchanges occurring within the compounds correlated well with the number of active hydrogen atoms attached to nitrogen, and it was confirmed that APCI HDX MS could be used to determine speciation. The results obtained by APCI HDX MS were combined with the subsequent investigation of the double bond equivalence distribution and indicated that resins of shale oil extract contained mostly pyridine type nitrogen compounds. This study confirmed that APCI HDX MS can be added to previously reported chemical ionization, electrospray ionization, and atmospheric pressure photo ionization-based HDX methods, which can be used for structural elucidation by mass spectrometry.

  1. Can sodium/hydrogen exchange inhibitors be repositioned for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder? An in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Stephen V; Zhang-James, Yanli

    2013-10-01

    Medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are only partially effective. Ideally, new treatment targets would derive from a known pathophysiology. Such data are not available for ADHD. We combine evidence for new etiologic pathways with bioinformatics data to assess the possibility that existing drugs might be repositioning for treating ADHD. We use this approach to determine if prior data implicating the sodium/hydrogen exchanger 9 gene (SLC9A9) in ADHD implicate sodium/hydrogen exchange (NHE) inhibitors as potential treatments. We assessed the potential for repositioning by assessing the similarity of drug-protein binding profiles between NHE inhibitors and drugs known to treat ADHD using the Drug Repositioning and Adverse Reaction via Chemical-Protein Interactome server. NHE9 shows a high degree of amino acid similarity between NHE inhibitor sensitive NHEs in the region of the NHE inhibitor recognition site defined for NHE1. We found high correlations in drug-protein binding profiles among most ADHD drugs. The drug-protein binding profiles of some NHE inhibitors were highly correlated with ADHD drugs whereas the profiles for a control set of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were not. Further experimental work should evaluate if NHE inhibitors are suitable for treating ADHD.

  2. Characterization of IgG1 Conformation and Conformational Dynamics by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houde, Damian; Arndt, Joseph; Domeier, Wayne; Berkowitz, Steven; Engen, John R.; (NEU); (Biogen)

    2009-04-22

    Protein function is dictated by protein conformation. For the protein biopharmaceutical industry, therefore, it is important to have analytical tools that can detect changes in protein conformation rapidly, accurately, and with high sensitivity. In this paper we show that hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) can play an important role in fulfilling this need within the industry. H/DX-MS was used to assess both global and local conformational behavior of a recombinant monoclonal IgG1 antibody, a major class of biopharmaceuticals. Analysis of exchange into the intact, glycosylated IgG1 (and the Fab and Fc regions thereof) showed that the molecule was folded, highly stable, and highly amenable to analysis by this method using less than a nanomole of material. With improved chromatographic methods, peptide identification algorithms and data-processing steps, the analysis of deuterium levels in peptic peptides produced after labeling was accomplished in 1--2 days. On the basis of peptic peptide data, exchange was localized to specific regions of the antibody. Changes to IgG1 conformation as a result of deglycosylation were determined by comparing exchange into the glycosylated and deglycosylated forms of the antibody. Two regions of the IgG1 (residues 236-253 and 292-308) were found to have altered exchange properties upon deglycosylation. These results are consistent with previous findings concerning the role of glycosylation in the interaction of IgG1 with Fc receptors. Moreover, the data clearly illustrate how H/DX-MS can provide important characterization information on the higher order structure of antibodies and conformational changes that these molecules may experience upon modification.

  3. A nordehydroabietyl amide-containing chiral diene for rhodium-catalysed asymmetric arylation to nitroolefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruikun; Wen, Zhongqing; Wu, Na

    2016-11-29

    A highly enantioselective rhodium catalysed asymmetric arylation (RCAA) of nitroolefins with arylboronic acids is presented using a newly developed, C1-symmetric, non-covalent interacted, phellandrene derived, nordehydroabietyl amide-containing chiral diene under mild conditions. Stereoelectronic effects were studied, suggesting an activation of the bound substrate through the secondary amide as a hydrogen-bond donor.

  4. Benchmarking exchange-correlation functionals for hydrogen at high pressures using quantum Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Raymond C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Mcminis, Jeremy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McMahon, Jeffrey M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Pierleoni, Carlo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), L' aquila (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN-LNGS); Ceperley, David M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Morales, Miguel A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The ab initio phase diagram of dense hydrogen is very sensitive to errors in the treatment of electronic correlation. Recently, it has been shown that the choice of the density functional has a large effect on the predicted location of both the liquid-liquid phase transition and the solid insulator-to-metal transition in dense hydrogen. To identify the most accurate functional for dense hydrogen applications, we systematically benchmark some of the most commonly used functionals using quantum Monte Carlo. By considering several measures of functional accuracy, we conclude that the van der Waals and hybrid functionals significantly outperform local density approximation and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof. We support these conclusions by analyzing the impact of functional choice on structural optimization in the molecular solid, and on the location of the liquid-liquid phase transition.

  5. Ion exchange in KTiOPO4 crystals irradiated by copper and hydrogen ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruifeng; Lu, Fei; Lian, Jie; Liu, Hanping; Liu, Xiangzhi; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Hongji

    2008-05-12

    Cs(+)-K+ ion exchanges were produced on KTiOPO4 crystals which is prior irradiated by Cu+ can H+ ions. The energy and dose of implanted Cu+ ions are 1.5 MeV and 0.5 x 10(14) ions/cm2, and that of H+ are 300 keV and 1 x 10(16) ions/cm2, respectively. The temperature of ions exchange is 430 degrees C, and the time range from 15 minutes to 30 minutes. The prism coupling method is used to measure the dark mode spectra of the samples. Compared with results of ion exchange on the sample without irradiations, both the number of guided mode and its corresponding effective refractive index are decreased. The experimental results indicate that the ion exchange rate closely related with the lattice damage and the damage layers formed in the depth of maximum nuclear energy deposition act as a barrier to block the ions diffuse into the sample and the concentration of defects can modify the speed of ion exchange..

  6. Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange of 5'- and 3'-mononucleotides in a quadrupole ion trap: exploring the role of conformation and system energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipuk, Joseph E; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2007-04-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions for deprotonated 2'-deoxy-5'-monophosphate and 2'-deoxy-3'-monophosphate nucleotides with D(2)O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. To augment these experiments, molecular modeling was also conducted to identify likely deprotonation sites and potential gas-phase conformations of the anions. A majority of the 5'-monophosphates exchanged extensively with several of the compounds completely incorporating deuterium in place of their labile hydrogen atoms. In contrast, most of the 3'-monophosphate isomers exchanged relatively few hydrogen atoms, even though the rate of the first two exchanges was greater than observed for the 5'-monophosphates. Mononucleotides that failed to incorporate more than two deuterium atoms under default reaction conditions were often found to exchange more extensively when reactions were performed under higher energy conditions. Integration of the experimental and theoretical results supports the use of a relay exchange mechanism and suggests that the exchange behavior depends highly on the identity and orientation of the nucleobase and the position and flexibility of the deprotonated phosphate moiety. These observations also highlight the importance of the distance between the various participating groups in addition to their gas-phase acidity and basicity.

  7. Study of H/D exchange rates to derive the strength of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in halo substituted organic building blocks: An NMR spectroscopic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Suryaprakash, N.

    2015-10-01

    Rates of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy are utilized to derive the strength of hydrogen bonds and to monitor the electronic effects in the site-specific halogen substituted benzamides and anilines. The theoretical fitting of the time dependent variation of the integral areas of 1H NMR resonances to the first order decay function permitted the determination of H/D exchange rate constants (k) and their precise half-lives (t1/2) with high degree of reproducibility. The comparative study also permitted the unambiguous determination of relative strength of hydrogen bonds and the contribution from electronic effects on the H/D exchange rate.

  8. A hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell using an ion-exchange membrane as an electrolyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, P.J. van; Kruissink, C.A.

    1966-01-01

    Using an acidic type of water leached ion exchange membrane, cell current outputs of the order of 100 mA▪cm-2 at 0,6 V cell voltage have been obtained; the removal of produced water largely limits the cell performance. Cells using the alkaline type of membrane exhibit much smaller current densities,

  9. Charge-exchange Coupling between Pickup Ions across the Heliopause and its Effect on Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Zank, G. P.; Pogorelov, N. V.; McComas, D. J.; Desai, M. I.

    2014-03-01

    Pickup ions (PUIs) appear to play an integral role in the multi-component nature of the plasma in the interaction between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). Three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations with a kinetic treatment for neutrals and PUIs are currently still not viable. In light of recent energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations by the Interstellar Boundary EXplorer, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the complex coupling between PUIs across the heliopause (HP) as facilitated by ENAs using estimates of PUI properties extracted from a 3D MHD simulation of the SW-LISM interaction with kinetic neutrals. First, we improve upon the multi-component treatment of the inner heliosheath (IHS) plasma from Zank et al. by including the extinction of PUIs through charge-exchange. We find a significant amount of energy is transferred away from hot, termination shock-processed PUIs into a colder, "freshly injected" PUI population. Second, we extend the multi-component approach to estimate ENA flux from the outer heliosheath (OHS), formed from charge-exchange between interstellar hydrogen atoms and energetic PUIs. These PUIs are formed from ENAs in the IHS that crossed the HP and experienced charge-exchange. Our estimates, based on plasma-neutral simulations of the SW-LISM interaction and a post-processing analysis of ENAs and PUIs, suggest the majority of flux visible at 1 AU from the front of the heliosphere, between ~0.02 and 10 keV, originates from OHS PUIs, indicating strong coupling between the IHS and OHS plasmas through charge-exchange.

  10. Modeling hydrogen starvation conditions in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohs, Jan Hendrik; Sauter, Ulrich; Maass, Sebastian [Robert Bosch GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Platz 1, 70839 Gerlingen-Schillerhoehe (Germany); Stolten, Detlef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a steady state and isothermal 2D-PEM fuel cell model is presented. By simulation of a single cell along the channel and in through-plane direction, its behaviour under hydrogen starvation due to nitrogen dilution is analysed. Under these conditions, carbon corrosion and water electrolysis are observed on the cathode side. This phenomenon, causing severe cell degradation, is known as reverse current decay mechanism in literature. Butler-Volmer equations are used to model the electrochemical reactions. In addition, we account for permeation of gases through the membrane and for the local water content within the membrane. The results show that the membrane potential locally drops in areas starved from hydrogen. This leads to potential gradients >1.2 V between electrode and membrane on the cathode side resulting in significant carbon corrosion and electrolysis reaction rates. The model enables the analysis of sub-stoichiometric states occurring during anode gas recirculation or load transients. (author)

  11. Modeling hydrogen starvation conditions in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohs, Jan Hendrik; Sauter, Ulrich; Maass, Sebastian; Stolten, Detlef

    In this study, a steady state and isothermal 2D-PEM fuel cell model is presented. By simulation of a single cell along the channel and in through-plane direction, its behaviour under hydrogen starvation due to nitrogen dilution is analysed. Under these conditions, carbon corrosion and water electrolysis are observed on the cathode side. This phenomenon, causing severe cell degradation, is known as reverse current decay mechanism in literature. Butler-Volmer equations are used to model the electrochemical reactions. In addition, we account for permeation of gases through the membrane and for the local water content within the membrane. The results show that the membrane potential locally drops in areas starved from hydrogen. This leads to potential gradients >1.2 V between electrode and membrane on the cathode side resulting in significant carbon corrosion and electrolysis reaction rates. The model enables the analysis of sub-stoichiometric states occurring during anode gas recirculation or load transients.

  12. Activity-regulating structural changes and autoantibody epitopes in transglutaminase 2 assessed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rasmus; Mysling, Simon; Hnida, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is the target of autoantibodies in the gluten-sensitive enteropathy celiac disease. In addition, the enzyme is responsible for deamidation of gluten peptides, which are subsequently targeted by T cells. To understand the regulation of TG2 activity...... and the enzyme's role as an autoantigen in celiac disease, we have addressed structural properties of TG2 in solution by using hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that Ca(2+) binding, which is necessary for TG2 activity, induces structural changes in the catalytic core...... domain of the enzyme. Cysteine oxidation was found to abolish these changes, suggesting a mechanism whereby disulfide bond formation inactivates the enzyme. Further, by using TG2-specific human monoclonal antibodies generated from intestinal plasma cells of celiac disease patients, we observed...

  13. Synthesis of amide-functionalized cellulose esters by olefin cross-metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J

    2015-11-05

    Cellulose esters with amide functionalities were synthesized by cross-metathesis (CM) reaction of terminally olefinic esters with different acrylamides, catalyzed by Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst. Chelation by amides of the catalyst ruthenium center caused low conversions using conventional solvents. The effects of both solvent and structure of acrylamide on reaction conversion were investigated. While the inherent tendency of acrylamides to chelate Ru is governed by the acrylamide N-substituents, employing acetic acid as a solvent significantly improved the conversion of certain acrylamides, from 50% to up to 99%. Homogeneous hydrogenation using p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide successfully eliminated the α,β-unsaturation of the CM products to give stable amide-functionalized cellulose esters. The amide-functionalized product showed higher Tg than its starting terminally olefinic counterpart, which may have resulted from strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the amide functional groups.

  14. Loss of Sodium/Hydrogen Exchanger NHA2 Exacerbates Obesity- and Aging-Induced Glucose Intolerance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisl, Christine; Anderegg, Manuel; Albano, Giuseppe; Lüscher, Benjamin P.; Cerny, David; Soria, Rodrigo; Bouillet, Elisa; Rimoldi, Stefano; Scherrer, Urs

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the sodium/hydrogen exchanger NHA2, also known as NHEDC2 or SLC9B2, is critical for insulin secretion by β–cells. To gain more insights into the role of NHA2 on systemic glucose homeostasis, we studied the impact of loss of NHA2 during the physiological aging process and in the setting of diet-induced obesity. While glucose tolerance was normal at 2 months of age, NHA2 KO mice displayed a significant glucose intolerance at 5 and 12 months of age, respectively. An obesogenic high fat diet further exacerbated the glucose intolerance of NHA2 KO mice. Insulin levels remained similar in NHA2 KO and WT mice during aging and high fat diet, but fasting insulin/glucose ratios were significantly lower in NHA2 KO mice. Peripheral insulin sensitivity, measured by insulin tolerance tests and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, was unaffected by loss of NHA2 during aging and high fat diet. High fat diet diminished insulin secretion capacity in both WT and NHA2 KO islets and reduced expression of NHA2 in WT islets. In contrast, aging was characterized by a gradual increase of NHA2 expression in islets, paralleled by an increasing difference in insulin secretion between WT and NHA2 KO islets. In summary, our results demonstrate that loss of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger NHA2 exacerbates obesity- and aging-induced glucose intolerance in mice. Furthermore, our data reveal a close link between NHA2 expression and insulin secretion capacity in islets. PMID:27685945

  15. Resuscitation from Prolonged Ventricular Fibrillation by Epinephrine Combined with Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger Isoform-1 Inhibitor Cariporide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易忠; Rual J GAZMURI; Iyad M AYOUB; Julieta D KOLAROVA

    2002-01-01

    Objective To test theresuscitative effects from prolonged ventricular fibrillation by epinephrine combined with sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 inhibitor Cariporide. Methods 16 rats were received a 3 mg/kg bolus of Cariporide or the same volume of 0.9 % NaCl solution (control) 15seconds before completion 12 minutes untreated VF.Chest compression (CC) was started for a total of 8minutes. Adjusted the depth of compressor so that the aortic diastolic pressure to 25~ 28 mmHg during the 2nd minute of CC. Fix the depth of the piston and this depth was used throughout the remaining 6 minutes of CC. 10 seconds before starting the 3rd minute of chest compression, injected epinephrine (30 μg/kg) .Recorded the time at which restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) occurred in Cariporide-treated rats. Electrical defibrillation was timed in control group to match the time of spontaneous defibrillation in Cariporide-treated rats. To the rats, which can't be defibrillated spontaneously, received chest compression and rescues electrical shocks. Results compared with control group, with the same CC depth, Cariporide-treated rats received the higher and longer lasting coronary perfusion pressure (P < 0.05), higher resuscitative rate ( P < 0.05), less post resuscitative ventricular ectopic activities (P < 0. 001), better hemodynamic effects and longer survival time (P <0.05) Conclusion Epinephrine combined with sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 inhibitor Cariporide may represent a novel and remarkably effective intervention for resuscitation from prolonged VF.

  16. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogtt K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80ºC and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13ºC. Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  17. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  18. Phase space investigation of the lithium amide halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Rosalind A. [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Group, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hewett, David R.; Korkiakoski, Emma [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Stephen P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Anderson, Paul A., E-mail: p.a.anderson@bham.ac.uk [Hydrogen Storage Chemistry Group, School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide have been investigated. • The only amide iodide stoichiometry observed was Li{sub 3}(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}I. • Solid solutions were observed in both the amide chloride and amide bromide systems. • A 46% reduction in chloride content resulted in a new phase: Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Cl. • New low-chloride phase maintained improved H{sub 2} desorption properties of Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl. - Abstract: An investigation has been carried out into the lower limits of halide incorporation in lithium amide (LiNH{sub 2}). It was found that the lithium amide iodide Li{sub 3}(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}I was unable to accommodate any variation in stoichiometry. In contrast, some variation in stoichiometry was accommodated in Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Br, as shown by a decrease in unit cell volume when the bromide content was reduced. The amide chloride Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl was found to adopt either a rhombohedral or a cubic structure depending on the reaction conditions. Reduction in chloride content generally resulted in a mixture of phases, but a new rhombohedral phase with the stoichiometry Li{sub 7}(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}Cl was observed. In comparison to LiNH{sub 2}, this new low-chloride phase exhibited similar improved hydrogen desorption properties as Li{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}Cl but with a much reduced weight penalty through addition of chloride. Attempts to dope lithium amide with fluoride ions have so far proved unsuccessful.

  19. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with in-source atmospheric pressure ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for compound speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunju; Choi, Man-Ho; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-04-29

    An experimental setup for the speciation of compounds by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) with atmospheric pressure ionization while performing chromatographic separation is presented. The proposed experimental setup combines the high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) system that can be readily used as an inlet for mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) HDX. This combination overcomes the limitation of an approach using conventional liquid chromatography (LC) by minimizing the amount of deuterium solvents used for separation. In the SFC separation, supercritical CO2 was used as a major component of the mobile phase, and methanol was used as a minor co-solvent. By using deuterated methanol (CH3OD), AP HDX was achieved during SFC separation. To prove the concept, thirty one nitrogen- and/or oxygen-containing standard compounds were analyzed by SFC-AP HDX MS. The compounds were successfully speciated from the obtained SFC-MS spectra. The exchange ions were observed with as low as 1% of CH3OD in the mobile phase, and separation could be performed within approximately 20min using approximately 0.24 mL of CH3OD. The results showed that SFC separation and APPI/APCI HDX could be successfully performed using the suggested method.

  20. Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange in a traveling wave ion guide for the examination of protein conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kasper D; Pringle, Steven D; Murphy, James P; Fadgen, Keith E; Brown, Jeff; Engen, John R

    2009-12-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that solution-phase conformations of small globular proteins and large molecular protein assemblies can be preserved for milliseconds after electrospray ionization. Thus, the study of proteins in the gas phase on this time scale is highly desirable. Here we demonstrate that a traveling wave ion guide (TWIG) of a Synapt mass spectrometer offers a highly suitable environment for rapid and efficient gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX). Gaseous ND(3) was introduced into either the source TWIG or the TWIG located just after the ion mobility cell, such that ions underwent HDX as they passed through the ND(3) on the way to the time-of-flight analyzer. The extent of deuterium labeling could be controlled by varying the quantity of ND(3) or the speed of the traveling wave. The gas-phase HDX of model peptides corresponded to labeling of primarily fast exchanging sites due to the short labeling times (ranging from 0.1 to 10 ms). In addition to peptides, gas-phase HDX of ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and apomyoglobin were examined. We conclude that HDX of protein ions in a TWIG is highly sensitive to protein conformation, enables the detection of conformers present on submilliseconds time scales, and can readily be combined with ion mobility spectrometry.

  1. Sites involved in intra- and interdomain allostery associated with the activation of factor VIIa pinpointed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Hongjian; Olsen, Ole H; Persson, Egon;

    2014-01-01

    enhancement remain elusive. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation to pinpoint individual residues in the heavy chain of FVIIa whose conformation and/or local interaction pattern changes when the enzyme transitions to the active form...

  2. Probing the Conformational and Functional Consequences of Disulfide Bond Engineering in Growth Hormone by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Coupled to Electron Transfer Dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Signe T; Breinholt, Jens; Faber, Johan H

    2015-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH), and its receptor interaction, is essential for cell growth. To stabilize a flexible loop between helices 3 and 4, while retaining affinity for the hGH receptor, we have engineered a new hGH variant (Q84C/Y143C). Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrom...

  3. The origins of enhanced activity in factor VIIa analogs and the interplay between key allosteric sites revealed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Andersen, Mette D; Olsen, Ole H;

    2008-01-01

    to investigate the conformational effects of site-directed mutagenesis at key positions in FVIIa and the origins of enhanced intrinsic activity of FVIIa analogs. The differences in hydrogen exchange of two highly active variants, FVIIa(DVQ) and FVIIa(VEAY), imply that enhanced catalytic efficiency was attained...

  4. Structure and Dynamics of NBD1 from CFTR Characterized Using Crystallography and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, H.A.; Wang, C.; Zhao, X.; Hamuro, Y.; Conners, K.; Kearins, M.C.; Lu, F.; Sauder, J.M.; Molnar, K.S.; Coales, S.J.; Maloney, P.C.; Guggino, W.B.; Wetmore, D.R.; Weber, P.C.; Hunt, J.F. (SGX); (ExSAR); (Cystic); (JHU-MED); (Columbia)

    2012-04-30

    The {Delta}F508 mutation in nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the predominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Previous biophysical studies on human F508 and {Delta}F508 domains showed only local structural changes restricted to residues 509-511 and only minor differences in folding rate and stability. These results were remarkable because {Delta}F508 was widely assumed to perturb domain folding based on the fact that it prevents trafficking of CFTR out of the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the previously reported crystal structures did not come from matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs, and the {Delta}F508 structure contained additional mutations that were required to obtain sufficient protein solubility. In this article, we present additional biophysical studies of NBD1 designed to address these ambiguities. Mass spectral measurements of backbone amide {sup 1}H/{sup 2}H exchange rates in matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs reveal that {Delta}F508 increases backbone dynamics at residues 509-511 and the adjacent protein segments but not elsewhere in NBD1. These measurements also confirm a high level of flexibility in the protein segments exhibiting variable conformations in the crystal structures. We additionally present crystal structures of a broader set of human NBD1 constructs, including one harboring the native F508 residue and others harboring the {Delta}F508 mutation in the presence of fewer and different solubilizing mutations. The only consistent conformational difference is observed at residues 509-511. The side chain of residue V510 in this loop is mostly buried in all non-{Delta}F508 structures but completely solvent exposed in all {Delta}F508 structures. These results reinforce the importance of the perturbation {Delta}F508 causes in the surface topography of NBD1 in a region likely to mediate contact with the transmembrane domains of CFTR. However, they also suggest that increased

  5. Structure and dynamics of NBD1 from CFTR characterized using crystallography and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H A; Wang, C; Zhao, X; Hamuro, Y; Conners, K; Kearins, M C; Lu, F; Sauder, J M; Molnar, K S; Coales, S J; Maloney, P C; Guggino, W B; Wetmore, D R; Weber, P C; Hunt, J F

    2010-02-19

    The DeltaF508 mutation in nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the predominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Previous biophysical studies on human F508 and DeltaF508 domains showed only local structural changes restricted to residues 509-511 and only minor differences in folding rate and stability. These results were remarkable because DeltaF508 was widely assumed to perturb domain folding based on the fact that it prevents trafficking of CFTR out of the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the previously reported crystal structures did not come from matched F508 and DeltaF508 constructs, and the DeltaF508 structure contained additional mutations that were required to obtain sufficient protein solubility. In this article, we present additional biophysical studies of NBD1 designed to address these ambiguities. Mass spectral measurements of backbone amide (1)H/(2)H exchange rates in matched F508 and DeltaF508 constructs reveal that DeltaF508 increases backbone dynamics at residues 509-511 and the adjacent protein segments but not elsewhere in NBD1. These measurements also confirm a high level of flexibility in the protein segments exhibiting variable conformations in the crystal structures. We additionally present crystal structures of a broader set of human NBD1 constructs, including one harboring the native F508 residue and others harboring the DeltaF508 mutation in the presence of fewer and different solubilizing mutations. The only consistent conformational difference is observed at residues 509-511. The side chain of residue V510 in this loop is mostly buried in all non-DeltaF508 structures but completely solvent exposed in all DeltaF508 structures. These results reinforce the importance of the perturbation DeltaF508 causes in the surface topography of NBD1 in a region likely to mediate contact with the transmembrane domains of CFTR. However, they also suggest that increased exposure of the 509-511 loop

  6. Effects of basic site proximity on deprotonation and hydrogen/deuterium exchange reactions for model dodecapeptide ions containing lysine and glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ewing, Nigel P.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    1998-05-01

    The effects of basic site proximity on gas-phase deprotonation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions were investigated for three model dodecapeptide ions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Each peptide contained four high basicity lysine (K) residues and eight low basicity glycine (G) residues; however, the ordering of the residues differed. In the deprotonation studies, `fully protonated' peptide ions, [M + 4H]4+, where M = (KGG)4, (K2G4)2, and K4G8, were reacted with reference compounds of known basicities. Reaction efficiencies were in the order: [K4G8 + 4H]4+ > [(K2G4)2 + 4H]4+ ~ [(KGG)4 + 4H]4+. The facile reaction of [K4G8 + 4H]4+ is consistent with this ion having the highest Coulomb energy. For gas-phase H/D exchange reactions with d4-methanol, [K4G8 + 4H]4+ has the fastest exchange rate and undergoes the largest number of exchanges; 22 of the 26 labile hydrogens exchanged within the timescale studied. In contrast, [(KGG)4 + 4H]4+ and [(K2G4)2 + 4H]4+ reacted more slowly, but at similar rates, with a maximum of 14 observed exchanges for both ions. Molecular dynamics calculations were conducted to gain insights into conformations. In the lowest energy structures for [(KGG)4 + 4H]4+ and [(K2G4)2 + 4H]4+, the lysine n-butylamino chains stretch out to minimize Coulomb energy; there is little or no intramolecular hydrogen bonding involving the protonated amino groups. In contrast, for [K4G8 + 4H]4+, the proximity of the basicity residues makes minimization of the Coulomb energy difficult; instead, the structure becomes more compact with stabilization of the protonated amino groups by extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding to heteroatoms in the peptide backbone. The calculated structures suggest that, in the H/D exchange reactions, the compact conformation of [K4G8 + 4H]4+ allows stabilization of the methanolpeptide intermediate by hydrogen bonding, thus lowering the barrier to proton transfer within the complex. The

  7. A model for hydrogen sulfide poisoning in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A. A.; Walsh, F. C.

    A polymer-electrolyte fuel cell model that incorporates the effects of hydrogen sulfide contaminant on performance is developed. The model is transient, fully two-phase and non-isothermal and includes a complex kinetic mechanism to describe the electrode reactions. Comparisons between the simulation results and data in the literature demonstrate that known trends are well captured. The effects of temperature and relative humidity variations in the anode stream are investigated, with further comparisons to experimental data and a proposed explanation for the nonlinear behaviour observed in the experiments of Mohtadi et al. [R. Mohatadi, W.-K. Lee, J. van Zee, Appl. Catal. B 56 (2005) 37-42)]. Extensions to the model and future work are discussed.

  8. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. [The role of ATPase subunits from E. coli in hydrogen-potassium exchange].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosov, S M; Trchunian, A A

    1984-01-01

    A hypothesis was developed that in membranes of glycolysing bacteria functioned supercomplexes (F1 X F0-TrkA) and (F0-TrkA) which operated as H+-K+-pump exchanging 2H+ for one K+ and as H+-K+-antiport respectively. The mutants with defects in alpha, beta and gamma subunits of ATPase F1 manifested the alteration only in the work of (F1 X F0-TrkA). Defect in epsilon subunit of F1 broke the regulation of pump operation on the part of a cell turgor. In mutants with defects in F0 the changes in both supercomplexes were observed. The only mutation in unc- cluster producing the complete blocking of both systems operation was related to a defect in h3-subunit of F0 which was the dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-sensitive and apparently "gate" component of F0.

  10. Spectroscopic, DFT, and XRD Studies of Hydrogen Bonds in N-Unsubstituted 2-Aminobenzamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malose Jack Mphahlele

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the mono- and the dihalogenated N-unsubstituted 2-aminobenzamides were characterized by means of the spectroscopic (1H-NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR, and FT-Raman and X-ray crystallographic techniques complemented with a density functional theory (DFT method. The hindered rotation of the C(O–NH2 single bond resulted in non-equivalence of the amide protons and therefore two distinct resonances of different chemical shift values in the 1H-NMR spectra of these compounds were observed. 2-Amino-5-bromobenzamide (ABB as a model confirmed the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between oxygen and the amine hydrogen. However, intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the amine protons was not observed in the solution phase due to a rapid exchange of these two protons with the solvent and fast rotation of the Ar–NH2 single bond. XRD also revealed the ability of the amide unit of these compounds to function as a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor simultaneously to form strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen of one molecule and the NH moiety of the amine or amide group of the other molecule and between the amine nitrogen and the amide hydrogen of different molecules. DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p basis set revealed that the conformer (A with oxygen and 2-amine on the same side predominates possibly due to the formation of a six-membered intramolecular ring, which is assisted by hydrogen bonding as observed in the single crystal XRD structure.

  11. Histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for probing the microenvironment of histidine residues in dihydrofolate reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Miyagi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (His-HDX-MS determines the HDX rates at the imidazole C(2-hydrogen of histidine residues. This method provides not only the HDX rates but also the pK(a values of histidine imidazole rings. His-HDX-MS was used to probe the microenvironment of histidine residues of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, an enzyme proposed to undergo multiple conformational changes during catalysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using His-HDX-MS, the pK(a values and the half-lives (t(1/2 of HDX reactions of five histidine residues of apo-DHFR, DHFR in complex with methotrexate (DHFR-MTX, DHFR in complex with MTX and NADPH (DHFR-MTX-NADPH, and DHFR in complex with folate and NADP+ (DHFR-folate-NADP+ were determined. The results showed that the two parameters (pK(a and t(1/2 are sensitive to the changes of the microenvironment around the histidine residues. Although four of the five histidine residues are located far from the active site, ligand binding affected their pK(a, t(1/2 or both. This is consistent with previous observations of ligand binding-induced distal conformational changes on DHFR. Most of the observed pK(a and t(1/2 changes could be rationalized using the X-ray structures of apo-DHFR, DHFR-MTX-NADPH, and DHFR-folate-NADP+. The availability of the neutron diffraction structure of DHFR-MTX enabled us to compare the protonation states of histidine imidazole rings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the usefulness of His-HDX-MS in probing the microenvironments of histidine residues within proteins.

  12. Triple differential cross-sections for the ionization of metastable 2P-state hydrogen atoms by electrons with exchange effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUNIL DHAR; NURUN NAHAR

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, triple differential cross-sections for the ionization of metastable 2P-state hydrogen atoms by 250 eV electron energy with exchange effects for various kinematic conditions are calculated. Multiple scattering theory proposed by Das and Seal in {\\it Phys. Rev.} A 47, 2978 (1993) is utilized here. The computational results provide significant peak features that show good qualitative agreement with the hydrogenic ground-state experimental data and theoretical results and the present first Born results. In addition, physical origin of the peaks of the cross-section curves is investigated.

  13. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  14. Applications of hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX for the characterization of conformational dynamics in light-activated photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eLindner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rational design of optogenetic tools is inherently linked to the understanding of photoreceptor function. Structural analysis of elements involved in signal integration in individual sensor domains provides an initial idea of their mode of operation, but understanding how local structural rearrangements eventually affect signal transmission to output domains requires inclusion of the effector regions in the characterization. However, the dynamic nature of these assemblies renders their structural analysis challenging and therefore a combination of high- and low-resolution techniques is required to appreciate functional aspects of photoreceptors.This review focuses on the potential of Hydrogen-Deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS for complementing the structural characterization of photoreceptors. In this respect, the ability of HDX-MS to provide information on the conformational dynamics and the possibility to address multiple functionally relevant states in solution render this methodology ideally suitable. We highlight recent examples demonstrating the potential of HDX-MS and discuss how these results can help to improve existing optogenetic systems or guide the design of novel optogenetic tools.

  15. Conformational Analysis of Proteins in Highly Concentrated Solutions by Dialysis-Coupled Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Damian; Nazari, Zeinab E.; Bou-Assaf, George M.; Weiskopf, Andrew S.; Rand, Kasper D.

    2016-04-01

    When highly concentrated, an antibody solution can exhibit unusual behaviors, which can lead to unwanted properties, such as increased levels of protein aggregation and unusually high viscosity. Molecular modeling, along with many indirect biophysical measurements, has suggested that the cause for these phenomena can be due to short range electrostatic and/or hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for investigating protein conformation, dynamics, and interactions. However, "traditional" continuous dilution labeling HDX-MS experiments have limited utility for the direct analysis of solutions with high concentrations of protein. Here, we present a dialysis-based HDX-MS (di-HDX-MS) method as an alternative HDX-MS labeling format, which takes advantage of passive dialysis rather than the classic dilution workflow. We applied this approach to a highly concentrated antibody solution without dilution or significant sample manipulation, prior to analysis. Such a method could pave the way for a deeper understanding of the unusual behavior of proteins at high concentrations, which is highly relevant for development of biopharmaceuticals in industry.

  16. Improvement of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions on Li4SiO4 ceramic pebble by catalytic metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jian Xiao; Chun Mei Kang; Xiao Jun Chen; Xiao Ling Gao; Yang Ming Luo; Sheng Hu; Xiao Lin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Li4SiO4 ceramic pebble is considered as a candidate tritium breeding material of Chinese Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Test Blanket Module (CH HCSB TBM) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER).In this paper,Li4SiO4 ceramic pebbles deposited with catalytic metals,including Pt,Pd,Ru and Ir,were prepared by wet impregnation method.The metal particles on Li4SiO4 pebble exhibit a good promotion of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions in H2-DzO gas system,with conversion equilibrium temperature reduction of 200-300 ℃.The out-of-pile tritium release experiments were performed using 1.0 wt% Pt/Li4SiO4 and Li4SiO4 pebbles irradiated in a thermal neutron reactor.The thermal desorption spectroscopy shows that Pt was effective to increase the tritium release rate at lower temperatures,and the ratio of tritium molecule (HT) to tritiated water (HTO) of 1.0 wt% Pt/Li4SiO4 was much more than that of Li4SiO4,which released mainly as HTO.Thus,catalytic metals deposited on Li4SiO4 pebble may help to accelerate the recovery of bred tritium particularly in low temperature region,and increase the tritium molecule form released from the tritium breeding materials.

  17. Do cooperative cycles of hydrogen bonding exist in proteins?

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2016-01-01

    The closure of cooperative chains of Hydrogen Bonding, HB, to form cycles can enhance cooperativity. Cycles of charge transfer can balance charge into and out of every site, eliminating the charge build-up that limits the cooperativity of open unidirectional chains of cooperativity. If cycles of cooperative HB exist in proteins, these could be expected to be significant in protein structure and function in ways described below. We investigate whether cooperative HB cycles not traversing solvent, ligand or modified residues occur in protein by means including search of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy entries of the Protein Data Bank. We find no mention of an example of this kind of cycle in the literature. For amide-amide HB, for direct inter-amide interactions, when the energy associated with Natural Bond Orbital, NBO, steric exchange is deducted from that of NBO donor-acceptor interactions, the result is close to zero, so that HB is not primarily due to the sum of direct inter-amide NBO interactions....

  18. Affinity capture of biotinylated proteins at acidic conditions to facilitate hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of multimeric protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Koefoed, Klaus;

    2013-01-01

    prior to the HDX-MS experiment. However, when studying protein complexes of more than two proteins, immobilization can possibly introduce steric limitations to the interactions. Here, we present a method based on the high affinity biotin-streptavidin interaction that allows selective capture...... of biotinylated proteins even under the extreme conditions for hydrogen/deuterium exchange quenching i.e. pH 2.5 and 0 °C. This biotin-streptavidin capture strategy allows hydrogen/deuterium exchange to occur in proteins in solution and enables characterization of specific proteins in heteromultimeric protein...... complexes without interference of peptides originating from other interaction partners in the complex. The biotin-streptavidin strategy has been successfully implemented in a model system with two recombinant monoclonal antibodies that target nonoverlapping epitopes on the human epidermal growth factor...

  19. Structure-activity studies on the C-terminal amide of substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, E; Couture, R; Poulos, C; Pinas, N; Mizrahi, J; Theodoropoulos, D; Regoli, D

    1982-11-01

    Twelve C-terminal heptapeptide analogues of substance P have been synthesized by solid phase and by the classical solution method. The modifications concerned all the C-terminal primary amide of SP and should therefore help to understand the biological significance of this carboxamide, as evaluated by in vivo and in vitro bioassays. From the results it can be seen that not the slightest change of the two amide protons is tolerated without an important loss of activity: replacement of one or two amide protons with alkyl groups, extension of the amide to the hydrazide and its alkyl analogues, and exchange of the amide with an ester or a carboxylic acid all reduce the relative activity/affinity at least by 2-fold. It is not clear for what reason all these modifications produce such a drastic activity reduction.

  20. Reduction of aldehydes and hydrogen cyanide yields in mainstream cigarette smoke using an amine functionalised ion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke Martin G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoking is a well recognized cause of diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Of the more than 5000 identified species in cigarette smoke, at least 150 have toxicological activity. For example, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde have been assigned as Group 1 and Group 2B carcinogens by IARC, and hydrogen cyanide has been identified as a respiratory and cardiovascular toxicant. Active carbon has been shown to be an effective material for the physical adsorption of many of the smoke volatile species. However, physical adsorption of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and also hydrogen cyanide from smoke is less effective using carbon. Alternative methods for the removal of these species from cigarette smoke are therefore of interest. A macroporous, polystyrene based ion-exchange resin (Diaion®CR20 with surface amine group functionality has been investigated for its ability to react with aldehydes and HCN in an aerosol stream, and thus selectively reduce the yields of these compounds (in particular formaldehyde in mainstream cigarette smoke. Results Resin surface chemistry was characterized using vapour sorption, XPS, TOF-SIMS and 15N NMR. Diaion®CR20 was found to have structural characteristics indicating weak physisorption properties, but sufficient surface functionalities to selectively remove aldehydes and HCN from cigarette smoke. Using 60 mg of Diaion®CR20 in a cigarette cavity filter gave reductions in smoke formaldehyde greater than 50% (estimated to be equivalent to >80% of the formaldehyde present in the smoke vapour phase independent of a range of flow rates. Substantial removal of HCN (>80% and acetaldehyde (>60% was also observed. The performance of Diaion®CR20 was found to be consistent over a test period of 6 months. The overall adsorption for the majority of smoke compounds measured appeared to follow a pseudo-first order approximation to second order

  1. On the temperature dependence of amide I frequencies of peptides in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amunson, Krista E; Kubelka, Jan

    2007-08-23

    The temperature dependence of the amide I vibrational frequencies of peptides in solution was investigated. In D2O, the amide I' bands of both an alpha-helical oligopeptide, the random-coil poly(L-lysine), and the simplest amide, N-methyl acetamide (NMA), exhibit linear frequency shifts of approximately 0.07 cm(-1)/degrees C with increasing temperature. Similar amide I frequency shifts are also observed for NMA in both polar (acetonitrile and DMSO) and nonpolar (1,4-dioxane) organic solvents, thus ruling out hydrogen-bonding strength as the cause of these effects. The experimental NMA amide I frequencies in the organic solvents can be accurately described by a simple theory based on the Onsager reaction field with temperature-dependent solvent dielectric properties and a solute molecular cavity. DFT-level calculations (BPW91/cc-pVDZ) for NMA with an Onsager reaction field confirm the significant contribution of the molecular cavity to the predicted amide I frequencies. Comparison of the computations to experimental data shows that the frequency-dependent response of the reaction field, taken into account by the index of refraction, is crucial for describing the amide I frequencies in polar solvents. The poor predictions of the model for the NMA amide I band in D2O might be due, in part, to the unknown temperature dependence of the refractive index of D2O in the mid-IR range, which was approximated by the available values in the visible region.

  2. Robust trans-amide helical structure of oligomers of bicyclic mimics of β-proline: impact of positional switching of bridgehead substituent on amide cis-trans equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Otani, Yuko; Liu, Xin; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2014-06-06

    Because homooligomers of 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-endo-carboxylic acid, a bridged β-proline analogue with a substituent installed at the remote C4-bridgehead position, completely biased the amide cis-trans equilibrium to the cis-amide structure, we expected that introduction of a substituent at the C1-bridgehead position adjacent to the carboxylic acid moiety, rather than the remote C4-bridgehead position, would tip the cis-trans amide equilibrium toward trans-amide structure without the aid of hydrogen bonding. Thus, in this work we established an efficient synthetic route to an optically active bicyclic analogue of 1,1-disubstituted β-proline, bearing a substituent at the C1-bridgehead position. Crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational studies showed that indeed oligomers of this analogue take a consistent helical structure involving all-trans-amide linkages, independently of the number of residues, from the dimer up to the octamer. Oligomers composed of (R)-β-amino acid units form an extended left-handed helix with about 2.7 residues per turn and an approximately 4.0 Å rise per residue, characterized by complete lack of main-chain hydrogen bonding. This unique helical structure shows some similarity in shape to the trans-amide-based polyproline II (PPII) helix. The present helix was stable in various kinds of solvents such as alcohols. The present work provided a fundamental structural basis for future applications.

  3. General Tritium Labelling of Gentamicin C by catalytic hydrogen exchange Reaction with Tritiated Water; Marcado general con tritio de la Gentamicina C por intercambio catalitico con agua triatiada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, C.; Diaz, D.; Paz, D.

    1991-07-01

    Gentamicin C was labelled with tritium by means of a PtO2 catalyzed hydrogen exchange reaction. Under the conditions of the exchange (100 mg of gentamicin, basic form, 0,3 ml H2O-3H, and 50 mg of prereduced PtO2) the radiochemical yield was 0,24, 0,38 and 0,48 % at 120 degree celsius, for 8, 16 and 24 hours respectively. Chemical yield for purified gentamicin was about 60 %. Purification was accomplished with a cellulose column eluted with the lower phase of chloroform-methanol 17 % ammonium hydroxide (2:1:1, v/v) . Chemical purity, determined by HPLC, was 96,5 % and radiochemical one was 95. Main exchange degradation products show biological activity. (Author) 12 refs.

  4. Experimental results of acetone hydrogenation on a heat exchanger type reactor for solar chemical heat pump; Solar chemical heat pump ni okeru acetone suisoka hanno netsu kaishu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashima, T.; Doi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Ando, Y. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Miyahara, R.; Kamoshida, J. [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    With the purpose of converting solar heat energy to industrial heat energy, an experiment of acetone hydrogenation was carried out using a heat exchanger type reactor that recovers heat generated by acetone hydrogenation, an exothermic reaction, and supplies it to an outside load. In the experiment, a pellet-like activated carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst was used for the acetone hydrogenation with hydrogen and acetone supplied to the catalyst layer at a space velocity of 400-1,200 or so. In the external pipe of the double-pipe type reactor, a heating medium oil was circulated in parallel with the flow of the reactant, with the heat of reaction recovered that was generated from the acetone hydrogenation. In this experiment, an 1wt%Ru/C catalyst and a 5wt%Ru/C catalyst were used so as to examine the effects of variation in the space velocity. As a result, from the viewpoint of recovering the heat of reaction, it was found desirable to increase the reaction speed by raising catalytic density and also to supply the reactant downstream inside the reaction pipe by increasing the space velocity. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Enhancing ionic conductivity in lithium amide for improved energy storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Rosalind A.; Hewett, David R.; Anderson, Paul A.

    2015-03-01

    Non-stoichiometry and bulk cation transport have been identified as key factors in the release and uptake of hydrogen in the Li-N-H system. Amide halide phases have been synthesized that have ionic conductivities several orders of magnitude greater than lithium amide, a faster rate of hydrogen release and elimination of the by-product, ammonia. Here we report the effect of both anion- and cation-doping on the hydrogen desorption properties of lithium amide, focusing in particular on how the presence of chloride anions and magnesium cations affects and controls the structure of the amide and imide compounds at the sub-nanometre level. Reducing the chloride content resulted in new low-chloride rhombohedral phases that contain around half of the chloride present in earlier amide chlorides, but maintained the enhancements seen in hydrogen desorption properties when compared to the halide-free system. These materials may also have potential in a range of other energy applications such as all solid state lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, and CO2 capture and storage membranes. Invited talk at the 7th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2014, 2-6 November 2014, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  6. 40 CFR 721.3720 - Fatty amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty amide. 721.3720 Section 721.3720... Fatty amide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a fatty amide (PMN P-91-87) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2120 - Cyclic amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cyclic amide. 721.2120 Section 721... Cyclic amide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a cyclic amide (PMN P-92-131) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. UV resonance Raman investigation of the aqueous solvation dependence of primary amide vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punihaole, David; Jakubek, Ryan S; Dahlburg, Elizabeth M; Hong, Zhenmin; Myshakina, Nataliya S; Geib, Steven; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-03-12

    We investigated the normal mode composition and the aqueous solvation dependence of the primary amide vibrations of propanamide. Infrared, normal Raman, and UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy were applied in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) to assign the vibrations of crystalline propanamide. We examined the aqueous solvation dependence of the primary amide UVRR bands by measuring spectra in different acetonitrile/water mixtures. As previously observed in the UVRR spectra of N-methylacetamide, all of the resonance enhanced primary amide bands, except for the Amide I (AmI), show increased UVRR cross sections as the solvent becomes water-rich. These spectral trends are rationalized by a model wherein the hydrogen bonding and the high dielectric constant of water stabilizes the ground state dipolar (-)O-C═NH2(+) resonance structure over the neutral O═C-NH2 resonance structure. Thus, vibrations with large C-N stretching show increased UVRR cross sections because the C-N displacement between the electronic ground and excited state increases along the C-N bond. In contrast, vibrations dominated by C═O stretching, such as the AmI, show a decreased displacement between the electronic ground and excited state, which result in a decreased UVRR cross section upon aqueous solvation. The UVRR primary amide vibrations can be used as sensitive spectroscopic markers to study the local dielectric constant and hydrogen bonding environments of the primary amide side chains of glutamine (Gln) and asparagine (Asn).

  9. Insulin-sensitizing and cardiovascular effects of the sodium-hydrogen exchange inhibitor, cariporide, in the JCR: LA-cp rat and db/db mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J C; Proctor, S D; Kelly, S E; Löhn, M; Busch, A E; Schäfer, S

    2005-12-01

    The effects of the sodium-hydrogen (Na/H) exchange inhibitor cariporide (HOE642), on insulin sensitivity and vascular function were studied in the JCR:LA-cp rat and the db/db mouse. In the insulin-resistant rat, cariporide reduced fasting insulin levels (42%, P JCR:LA-cp insulin-resistant rat, which develops advanced cardiovascular disease and ischemic myocardial lesions. It also improved vascular function in a similar mouse model of insulin resistance. These effects were markedly greater than those of ramipril.

  10. Orientation and Order of the Amide Group of Sphingomyelin in Bilayers Determined by Solid-State NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Maeta, Yoshiko; Murata, Michio

    2015-06-16

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol) are considered essential for the formation of lipid rafts; however, the types of molecular interactions involved in this process, such as intermolecular hydrogen bonding, are not well understood. Since, unlike other phospholipids, SM is characterized by the presence of an amide group, it is essential to determine the orientation of the amide and its order in the lipid bilayers to understand the nature of the hydrogen bonds in lipid rafts. For this study, 1'-(13)C-2-(15)N-labeled and 2'-(13)C-2-(15)N-labeled SMs were prepared, and the rotational-axis direction and order parameters of the SM amide in bilayers were determined based on (13)C and (15)N chemical-shift anisotropies and intramolecular (13)C-(15)N dipole coupling constants. Results revealed that the amide orientation was minimally affected by Chol, whereas the order was enhanced significantly in its presence. Thus, Chol likely promotes the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond network involving the SM amide without significantly changing its orientation, providing a higher order to the SM amide. To our knowledge, this study offers new insight into the significance of the SM amide orientation with regard to molecular recognition in lipid rafts, and therefore provides a deeper understanding of the mechanism of their formation.

  11. Interdependence of coenzyme-induced conformational work and binding potential in yeast alcohol and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenases: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Weck, Z.; Pande, J.; Kaegi, J.H.R.

    1987-07-28

    Binding of NAD coenzymes to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenase (PHLDH) was studied by hydrogen-deuterium exchange with the infrared technique. Conformational changes in the enzymes specific to the coenzymes and their fragments were observed, and the pH dependence of the exchange reaction shows that it conforms to the EX-2 scheme. In both YADH and PHLDH the magnitude of the conformational change as measured by exchange retardation is considerably larger for the NAD/sup +/ than for NADH. Studies with coenzyme fragments like ADP-ribose, ADP, and AMP also highlight the lack of rigorous correlation between structural features such as charge and size and their influence on exchange behavior. Ternary complexes such as YADH-NAD/sup +/-pyrazole, PHLDH-NAD/sup +/-oxalate, and PHLDH-NADH-oxamate, which mimic the transition state, have a significantly more pronounced effect on exchange rates than the corresponding binary complexes. The outstanding feature of this study is the demonstration that in the binary enzyme-coenzyme complexes the more loosely bound NAD/sup +/ is more effective in retarding exchange than the more firmly bound NADH. These differences are attributed to the unequal structural constraints exerted by the two coenzymes upon the enzymes, which translate to unequal expenditure of transconformational work in the formation of the two complexes. The opposing variation in the free energy of binding and the transconformational work expended can be viewed as an unequal partitioning of the net free energy gain resulting from the protein-ligand interaction into a binding term and that required for conformational change.

  12. Interdependence of coenzyme-induced conformational work and binding potential in yeast alcohol and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenases: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Weck, Z; Pande, J; Kägi, J H

    1987-07-28

    Binding of NAD coenzymes to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenase (PHLDH) was studied by hydrogen-deuterium exchange with the infrared technique. Conformational changes in the enzymes specific to the coenzymes and their fragments were observed, and the pH dependence of the exchange reaction shows that it conforms to the EX-2 scheme. In both YADH and PHLDH the magnitude of the conformational change of measured by exchange retardation is considerably larger for NAD+ than for NADH. Studies with coenzyme fragments like ADP-ribose, ADP, and AMP also highlight the lack of rigorous correlation between structural features such as charge and size and their influence on exchange behavior. Ternary complexes such as YADH-NAD+-pyrazole, PHLDH-NAD+-oxalate, and PHLDH-NADH-oxamate, which mimic the transition state, have a significantly more pronounced effect on exchange rates than the corresponding binary complexes. The outstanding feature of this study is the demonstration that in the binary enzyme-coenzyme complexes the more loosely bound NAD+ is more effective in retarding exchange than the more firmly bound NADH. These differences are attributed to the unequal structural constraints exerted by the two coenzymes upon the enzymes, which translate to unequal expenditure of transconformational work in the formation of the two complexes. The opposing variation in the free energy of binding and the transconformational work expended can be viewed as an unequal partitioning of the net free energy gain resulting from the protein-ligand interaction into a binding term and that required for conformational change.

  13. Comparison of pH-sensitive degradability of maleic acid amide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sunyoung; Kim, Youngeun; Song, Youngjun; Choi, Jin Uk; Park, Euddeum; Choi, Wonmin; Park, Jeongseon; Lee, Yan

    2014-05-15

    We synthesized five maleic acid amide derivatives (maleic, citraconic, cis-aconitic, 2-(2'-carboxyethyl) maleic, 1-methyl-2-(2'-carboxyethyl) maleic acid amide), and compared their degradability for the future development of pH-sensitive biomaterials with tailored kinetics of the release of drugs, the change of charge density, and the degradation of scaffolds. The degradation kinetics was highly dependent upon the substituents on the cis-double bond. Among the maleic acid amide derivatives, 2-(2'-carboxyethyl) maleic acid amide with one carboxyethyl and one hydrogen substituent showed appropriate degradability at weakly acidic pH, and the additional carboxyl group can be used as a pH-sensitive linker.

  14. Crystal structure of the high-energy-density material guanylurea dipicryl-amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblitz, Raik; Hrib, Cristian G; Hilfert, Liane; Edelmann, Frank T

    2014-08-01

    The title compound, 1-carbamoylguanidinium bis-(2,4,6-tri-nitro-phen-yl)amide [H2NC(=O)NHC(NH2)2](+)[N{C6H2(NO2)3-2,4,6}2](-) (= guanylurea dipicryl-amide), was prepared as dark-red block-like crystals in 70% yield by salt-metathesis reaction between guanylurea sulfate and sodium dipicryl-amide. In the solid state, the new compound builds up an array of mutually linked guanylurea cations and dipicryl-amide anions. The crystal packing is dominated by an extensive network of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a high density of 1.795 Mg m(-3), which makes the title compound a potential secondary explosive.

  15. Coumarin amide derivatives as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qianqian [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Liu, Zhiqiang [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, Shandong (China); Cao, Duxia, E-mail: duxiacao@ujn.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Guan, Ruifang, E-mail: mse_guanrf@ujn.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Wang, Kangnan; Shan, Yanyan; Xu, Yongxiao; Ma, Lin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China)

    2015-07-01

    Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group have been synthesized. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been examined. The results indicate that the compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change, at the same time, obvious color and fluorescence change can be observed by naked eye. The in situ hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and photophysical properties change confirm that Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin. - Highlights: • Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group were synthesized. • The compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change. • Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin.

  16. Determination of Histidine pKa Values in the Propeptides of Furin and Proprotein Convertase 1/3 Using Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferich, Johannes; Williamson, Danielle M; David, Larry L; Shinde, Ujwal

    2015-08-04

    Propeptides of proprotein convertases regulate activation of their protease domains by sensing the organellar pH within the secretory pathway. Earlier experimental work highlighted the importance of a conserved histidine residue within the propeptide of a widely studied member, furin. A subsequent evolutionary analysis found an increase in histidine content within propeptides of secreted eukaryotic proteases compared with their prokaryotic orthologs. However, furin activates in the trans-golgi network at a pH of 6.5 while a paralog, proprotein convertase 1/3, activates in secretory vesicles at a pH of 5.5. It is unclear how a conserved histidine can mediate activation at two different pH values. In this manuscript, we measured the pKa values of histidines within the propeptides of furin and proprotein convertase 1/3 using a histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry approach. The high density of histidine residues combined with an abundance of basic residues provided challenges for generation of peptide ions with unique histidine residues, which were overcome by employing ETD fragmentation. During this analysis, we found slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange in residues other than histidine at basic pH. Finally, we demonstrate that the pKa of the conserved histidine in proprotein convertase 1/3 is acid-shifted compared with furin and is consistent with its lower pH of activation.

  17. Amide-based inhibitors of p38alpha MAP kinase. Part 2: design, synthesis and SAR of potent N-pyrimidyl amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, Richland; Tan, Xuefei; Luedtke, Gregory R; Nashashibi, Imad; Schinzel, Kurt; Liang, Weiling; Jung, Joon; Dugar, Sundeep; Liclican, Albert; Tabora, Jocelyn; Levy, Daniel E; Do, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Optimization of a tri-substituted N-pyridyl amide led to the discovery of a new class of potent N-pyrimidyl amide based p38alpha MAP kinase inhibitors. Initial SAR studies led to the identification of 5-dihydrofuran as an optimal hydrophobic group. Additional side chain modifications resulted in the introduction of hydrogen bond interactions. Through extensive SAR studies, analogs bearing free amino groups and alternatives to the parent (S)-alpha-methyl benzyl moiety were identified. These compounds exhibited improved cellular activities and maintained balance between p38alpha and CYP3A4 inhibition.

  18. Estimation of free energy barriers in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reactions probed by hydrogen-exchange kinetics of C alpha-labeled amino acids with solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julin, D.A.; Wiesinger, H.; Toney, M.D.; Kirsch, J.F. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1989-05-02

    The existence of the postulated quinonoid intermediate in the cytoplasmic aspartate amino-transferase catalyzed transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate was probed by determining the extent of transfer of tritium from the C alpha position of tritiated L-aspartate to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate in single turnover experiments in which washout from the back-reaction was obviated by product trapping. The maximum amount of transferred tritium observed was 0.7%, consistent either with a mechanism in which a fraction of the net transamination reaction proceeds through a quinonoid intermediate or with a mechanism in which this intermediate is formed off the main reaction pathway. It is shown that transfer of labeled hydrogen from the amino acid to cofactor cannot be used to differentiate a stepwise from a concerted transamination mechanism. The amount of tritium transferred is a function of the rate constant for torsional equilibration about the epsilon-amino group of Lys-258, the presumptive abstractor of the C alpha proton; the relative rate constants for hydrogen exchange with solvent versus cofactor protonation; and the tritium isotope effect on this ratio. The free energy barriers facing the covalent intermediate between aldimine and keto acid product (i.e., ketimine and possibly quinonoid) were evaluated relatively by comparing the rates of C alpha-hydrogen exchange in starting amino acid with the rates of keto acid formation. The value of theta (= kexge/kprod) was found to be 2.6 for the reaction of cytoplasmic isozyme with aspartate and ca. 0.5 for that of the mitochondrial form with glutamate.

  19. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michling, R.; Braun, A.; Cristescu, I.; Dittrich, H.; Gramlich, N.; Lohr, N. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Glugla, M.; Shu, W.; Willms, S. [ITER Organization, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h{sup -1} and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  20. Corrigendum to “Crystal structure solution of KMg(ND)(ND2): An ordered mixed amide/imide compound” [Int J Hydrogen Energy 39 (2) 2014) 868 - 876

    OpenAIRE

    NAPOLITANO EMILIO; DOLCI Francesco; CAMPESI RENATO; Pistidda, Claudio; Hoelzel, Markus; Moretto, Pietro; Enzo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This corrigendum to orignal article [Int J Hydrogen Energy 39 (2) 2014) 868 - 876] wants to points out that there are two different way to describe the structure of KMg(ND)(ND2). This was described as an orthorhombic system with space group P212121 (n.19) in the original article. However, after the publication of the article the authors found out that the structure can also be described in higher symmetry using the space group Pnma (n.62) in the orthorhombic system. The corrigendum describes...

  1. Amide, urea and thiourea-containing triphenylene derivatives: influence of H-bonding on mesomorphic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paraschiv, I.; Tomkinson, A.; Giesbers, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.; Marcelis, A.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis and thermotropic properties are reported for a series of hexaalkoxytriphenylenes that contain an amide, urea or thiourea group in one of their alkoxy tails. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding abilities of these molecules have a disturbing influence on the formation and stability of th

  2. Mechanistic insight into benzenethiol catalyzed amide bond formations from thioesters and primary amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Bork, Nicolai; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    of thiophenol (PhSH) in a slurry of disodium hydrogen phosphate in dry DMF. Quantitative conversions into the resulting amide were observed within a few hours in the presence of equimolar amounts of thiophenol. Ab initio calculations showed that the reaction mechanism in DMF is similar to the well-known aqueous...

  3. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...

  4. Identification of nitrogen compounds and amides from spent hydroprocessing catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.H.K.; Gray, M.R. (University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-06-01

    A spent commercial naphtha hydrotreating catalyst was analyzed to identify compounds which had accumulated on the catalyst surface during its active life. The catalyst was extracted with methylene chloride, methanol and pyridine to remove adsorbed organic material, which was rich in nitrogen and oxygen. A series of quinolones were identified in the methanol extract after enrichment with HCl-modified silica gel adsorption and subsequent silica gel chromatography. Tetra- and hexahydroquinolones with alkyl substituents up to C{sub 3} were identified. Similar amides have been identified in asphaltenes, and are very resistant to hydrogenation. Tetrahydroquinolines and piperidines were detected in the pyridine extract. 36 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Computational Amide I Spectroscopy for Refinement of Disordered Peptide Ensembles: Maximum Entropy and Related Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Michael; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    The structural characterization of intrinsically disordered peptides (IDPs) presents a challenging biophysical problem. Extreme heterogeneity and rapid conformational interconversion make traditional methods difficult to interpret. Due to its ultrafast (ps) shutter speed, Amide I vibrational spectroscopy has received considerable interest as a novel technique to probe IDP structure and dynamics. Historically, Amide I spectroscopy has been limited to delivering global secondary structural information. More recently, however, the method has been adapted to study structure at the local level through incorporation of isotope labels into the protein backbone at specific amide bonds. Thanks to the acute sensitivity of Amide I frequencies to local electrostatic interactions-particularly hydrogen bonds-spectroscopic data on isotope labeled residues directly reports on local peptide conformation. Quantitative information can be extracted using electrostatic frequency maps which translate molecular dynamics trajectories into Amide I spectra for comparison with experiment. Here we present our recent efforts in the development of a rigorous approach to incorporating Amide I spectroscopic restraints into refined molecular dynamics structural ensembles using maximum entropy and related approaches. By combining force field predictions with experimental spectroscopic data, we construct refined structural ensembles for a family of short, strongly disordered, elastin-like peptides in aqueous solution.

  6. Nucleoside phosphorylation in amide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoffstall, A. M.; Kokko, B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with phosphorylation in possible prebiotic nonaqueous solvents. To this end, phosphorylation of nucleosides using inorganic phosphates in amide solutions is studied at room and elevated temperatures. Reaction proceeds most readily in formamide and N-methylformamide. Products obtained at elevated temperature are nucleotides, nucleoside 2',3'-cyclic phosphates, and when the phosphate concentration is high, nucleoside diphosphates. At room temperature, adenosine afforded a mixture of nucleotides, but none of the cyclic nucleotide. Conditions leading to the highest relative percentage of cyclic nucleotide involve the use of low concentrations of phosphate and an excess of nucleoside.

  7. Biocompatibility and degradation of aliphatic segmented poly(ester amide)s : in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, PAM; van Luyn, MJA; Chiellini, F; Brouwer, LA; Velthoen, IW; Dijkstra, PJ; Feijen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aliphatic segmented poly(ester amide)s, comprising a crystallizable amide phase and a flexible amorphous ester phase, were investigated for potential use in biomedical applications. By varying the amide content and the type of crystallizable amide segments, the polymer's thermal and mechanical prope

  8. Structural elucidation of metabolites of ginkgolic acid in rat liver microsomes by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z H; Chen, J; Yu, L S; Jiang, H D; Yao, T W; Zeng, S

    2009-07-01

    Ginkgolic acids have been shown to possess allergenic as well as genotoxic and cytotoxic properties. The question arises whether the metabolism of ginkgolic acids in the liver could decrease or increase their toxicity. In this study, the in vitro metabolism of ginkgolic acid (15:1, GA), one component of ginkgo acids, was investigated as a model compound in Sprague-Dawley rat liver microsomes. The metabolites were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector/negative-ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-PDA/ESI-MS/MS) and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange. The result showed that the benzene ring remained unchanged and the oxidations occurred at the side alkyl chain in rat liver microsomes. At least eight metabolites were found. Among them, six phase I metabolites were tentatively identified. This study might be useful for the investigation of toxicological mechanism of ginkgolic acids.

  9. Rapid Conformational Analysis of Protein Drugs in Formulation by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmail Nazari, Zeinab; van de Weert, Marco; Bou-Assaf, George

    2016-01-01

    back exchange levels (Real-world applicability was demonstrated by HDX-MS analyses of interferon-β-1a...... pharmaceutically relevant formulation conditions. Of significant practical utility, the methodology allows global HDX-MS analyses to be performed without refrigeration or external cooling of the setup. In Mode 1, we used DMSO-containing solvents for SPE, allowing the HDX-MS analysis to be performed at acceptable...

  10. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon [Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, KIOST, Geoje 656-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan, E-mail: sunghwank@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Green Nano Center, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We examined source crude oil and weathered oils from M/V Hebei accident. • APPI hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh mass spectrometry was applied. • N{sub 1} class compounds with 2° and/or 3° amine decrease in larger scale than pyridines. • Preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed. • Significant increase in S{sub 1}O{sub 1} compounds was observed as the weathering proceeds. - Abstract: The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N{sup +}· and [N − H + D]{sup +} ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N + H]{sup +} and [N + D]{sup +} ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + H]{sup +} and [S{sub 1}O{sub 1} + D]{sup +} ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S{sub 1} class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  11. Application of Welding Plate and Frame Heat Exchanger in Hydrogen Peroxide Preparation Device%焊接板框式热交换器在双氧水制备装置中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常春梅; 侯霄艳; 刘一凡; 杨飞

    2016-01-01

    双氧水制备过程中的氢化及氧化工序均需采用热交换器进行加热或冷却,目前国内双氧水企业多采用可拆卸板式热交换器,但双氧水具有腐蚀性,常使可拆卸板式热交换器垫片处发生泄漏,造成停工、停产和一定的经济损失。因此,提出了以焊接板框式热交换器替代可拆卸板式热交换器的方案,并对焊接板框式热交换器的结构及工艺参数进行了设计。对双氧水制备装置中已投入使用的焊接板框式工作液/氢化液热交换器的应用验证表明,焊接板框式热交换器具有结构紧凑、占地面积小、耐腐蚀能力强、便于维修及运行成本降低等优势,在双氧水制备装置中具有广阔的应用前景。%The hydrogenation and oxidation procedures in the preparation process of hydrogen peroxide need to adopt heat exchanger for heating or cooling.Most companies in China use frame plate heat exchanger at present.Because the hydrogen peroxide is corrosive,making the gasket of the frame plate heat exchanger leak,it will cause production shutdown and certain economic loss. Therefore,welding plate and frame heat exchanger is put forward to replace the frame plate heat exchanger,and the structure and the process parameters of welding plate and frame heat exchang-er are designed.By verifying the working liquid/liquid hydrogen welding plate and frame type heat exchanger which has been put into use in hydrogen peroxide preparation device,it shows that the welding plate and frame heat exchanger,which has compact structure,less occupied area, corrosion resistant ability,easy maintenance and reducing running cost advantage,has broad ap-plication prospects in the hydrogen peroxide industry.

  12. Technology Development of an Advanced Small-scale Microchannel-type Process Heat Exchanger (PHE) for Hydrogen Production in Iodine-sulfur Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, Injin; Kim, Chan Soo; Kim, Yong Wan; Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Min-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, ongoing manufacturing processes of the components employed in an advanced small-scale microchannel-type PHE are presented. The components, such as mechanically machined microchannels and a diffusion-bonded stack are introduced. Also, preliminary studies on surface treatment techniques for improving corrosion resistance from the corrosive sulfuric environment will be covered. Ongoing manufacturing process for an advanced small-size microchannel-type PHE in KAERI is presented. Through the preliminary studies for optimizing diffusion bonding condition of Hastelloy-X, a diffusion-bonded stack, consisting of primary and secondary side layer by layer, is scheduled to be fabricated in a few months. Also, surface treatment for enhancing the corrosion resistance from the sulfuric acid environment is in progress for the plates with microchannels. A massive production of hydrogen with electricity generation is expected in a Process Heat Exchanger (PHE) in a Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) system. For the application of hydrogen production, a small-scale gas loop for feasibility testing of a laboratory-scale has constructed and operated in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) as a precursor to an experimental- and a pilot-scale gas loops.

  13. Catalytic synthesis of amides via aldoximes rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, Pascale; Cadierno, Victorio

    2015-02-14

    Amide bond formation reactions are among the most important transformations in organic chemistry because of the widespread occurrence of amides in pharmaceuticals, natural products and biologically active compounds. The Beckmann rearrangement is a well-known method to generate secondary amides from ketoximes. However, under the acidic conditions commonly employed, aldoximes RHC=NOH rarely rearrange into the corresponding primary amides RC(=O)NH2. In recent years, it was demonstrated that this atom-economical transformation can be carried out efficiently and selectively with the help of metal catalysts. Several homogeneous and heterogenous systems have been described. In addition, protocols offering the option to generate the aldoximes in situ from the corresponding aldehydes and hydroxylamine, or even from alcohols, have also been developed, as well as a series of tandem processes allowing the access to N-substituted amide products. In this Feature article a comprehensive overview of the advances achieved in this particular research area is presented.

  14. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...... QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift...

  15. Optimization and application of atmospheric pressure chemical and photoionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for speciation of oxygen-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acter, Thamina; Kim, Donghwi; Ahmed, Arif; Jin, Jang Mi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the feasibility of optimized positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) for structural assignment of diverse oxygen-containing compounds. The important parameters for optimization of HDX MS were characterized. The optimized techniques employed in the positive and negative modes showed satisfactory HDX product ions for the model compounds when dichloromethane and toluene were employed as a co-solvent in APCI- and APPI-HDX, respectively. The evaluation of the mass spectra obtained from 38 oxygen-containing compounds demonstrated that the extent of the HDX of the ions was structure-dependent. The combination of information provided by different ionization techniques could be used for better speciation of oxygen-containing compounds. For example, (+) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with alcohol, ketone, or aldehyde substituents, while (-) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with carboxylic functional groups. In addition, the compounds with alcohol can be distinguished from other compounds by the presence of exchanged peaks. The combined information was applied to study chemical compositions of degraded oils. The HDX pattern, double bond equivalent (DBE) distribution, and previously reported oxidation products were combined to predict structures of the compounds produced from oxidation of oil. Overall, this study shows that APCI- and APPI-HDX MS are useful experimental techniques that can be applied for the structural analysis of oxygen-containing compounds.

  16. Partially Fluorinated Sulfonated Poly(ether amide Fuel Cell Membranes: Influence of Chemical Structure on Membrane Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulsung Bae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of fluorinated sulfonated poly (ether amides (SPAs were synthesized for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications. A polycondensation reaction of 4,4’-oxydianiline, 2-sulfoterephthalic acid monosodium salt, and tetrafluorophenylene dicarboxylic acids (terephthalic and isophthalic or fluoroaliphatic dicarboxylic acids produced SPAs with sulfonation degrees of 80–90%. Controlling the feed ratio of the sulfonated and unsulfonated dicarboxylic acid monomers afforded random SPAs with ion exchange capacities between 1.7 and 2.2 meq/g and good solubility in polar aprotic solvents. Their structures were characterized using NMR and FT IR spectroscopies. Tough, flexible, and transparent films were obtained with dimethylsulfoxide using a solution casting method. Most SPA membranes with 90% sulfonation degree showed high proton conductivity (>100 mS/cm at 80 °C and 100% relative humidity. Among them, two outstanding ionomers (ODA-STA-TPA-90 and ODA-STA-IPA-90 showed proton conductivity comparable to that of Nafion 117 between 40 and 80 °C. The influence of chemical structure on the membrane properties was systematically investigated by comparing the fluorinated polymers to their hydrogenated counterparts. The results suggest that the incorporation of fluorinated moieties in the polymer backbone of the membrane reduces water absorption. High molecular weight and the resulting physical entanglement of the polymers chains played a more important role in improving stability in water, however.

  17. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R; Brown, Jeffery M; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Water-stable helical structure of tertiary amides of bicyclic β-amino acid bearing 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane. Full control of amide cis-trans equilibrium by bridgehead substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Masahiro; Otani, Yuko; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2010-10-27

    Helical structures of oligomers of non-natural β-amino acids are significantly stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding between main-chain amide moieties in many cases, but the structures are generally susceptible to the environment; that is, helices may unfold in protic solvents such as water. For the generation of non-hydrogen-bonded ordered structures of amides (tertiary amides in most cases), control of cis-trans isomerization is crucial, even though there is only a small sterical difference with respect to cis and trans orientations. We have established methods for synthesis of conformationally constrained β-proline mimics, that is, bridgehead-substituted 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-endo-carboxylic acids. Our crystallographic, 1D- and 2D-NMR, and CD spectroscopic studies in solution revealed that a bridgehead methoxymethyl substituent completely biased the cis-trans equilibrium to the cis-amide structure along the main chain, and helical structures based on the cis-amide linkage were generated independently of the number of residues, from the minimalist dimer through the tetramer, hexamer, and up to the octamer, and irrespective of the solvent (e.g., water, alcohol, halogenated solvents, and cyclohexane). Generality of the control of the amide equilibrium by bridgehead substitution was also examined.

  19. Microorganisms hydrolyse amide bonds; knowledge enabling read-across of biodegradability of fatty acid amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Roy; Kuijer, Patrick; van Ginkel, Cornelis G; Plugge, Caroline M

    2014-07-01

    To get insight in the biodegradation and potential read-across of fatty acid amides, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] cocoamide and N-(1-ethylpiperazine) tall oil amide were used as model compounds. Two bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PK1 and Pseudomonas putida PK2 were isolated with N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] cocoamide and its hydrolysis product N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine, respectively. In mixed culture, both strains accomplished complete mineralization of N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] cocoamide. Aeromonas hydrophila PK3 was enriched with N-(1-ethylpiperazine) tall oil amide and subsequently isolated using agar plates containing dodecanoate. N-(2-Aminoethyl)piperazine, the hydrolysis product of N-(1-ethylpiperazine) tall oil amide, was not degraded. The aerobic biodegradation pathway for primary and secondary fatty acid amides of P. aeruginosa and A. hydrophila involved initial hydrolysis of the amide bond producing ammonium, or amines, where the fatty acids formed were immediately metabolized. Complete mineralization of secondary fatty acid amides depended on the biodegradability of the released amine. Tertiary fatty acid amides were not transformed by P. aeruginosa or A. hydrophila. These strains were able to utilize all tested primary and secondary fatty acid amides independent of the amine structure and fatty acid. Read-across of previous reported ready biodegradability results of primary and secondary fatty acid amides is justified based on the broad substrate specificity and the initial hydrolytic attack of the two isolates PK1 and PK3.

  20. Hydrogen photoproduction in green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii sustainable over 2 weeks with the original cell culture without supply of fresh cells nor exchange of the whole culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Takafumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Okada, Norihide; Isono, Takumi; Momose, Daisuke; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    Unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are known to make hydrogen photoproduction under the anaerobic condition with water molecules as the hydrogen source. Since the hydrogen photoproduction occurs for a cell to circumvent crisis of its survival, it is only temporary. It is a challenge to realize persistent hydrogen production because the cells must withstand stressful conditions to survive with alternation of generations in the cell culture. In this paper, we have found a simple and cost-effective method to sustain the hydrogen production over 14 days in the original culture, without supply of fresh cells nor exchange of the culture medium. This is achieved for the cells under hydrogen production in a sulfur-deprived culture solution on the {anaerobic, intense light} condition in a desiccator, by periodically providing a short period of the recovery time (2 h) with a small amount of TAP(+S) supplied outside of the desiccator. As this operation is repeated, the response time of transition into hydrogen production (preparation time) is shortened and the rate of hydrogen production (build up time) is increased. The optimum states of these properties favorable to the hydrogen production are attained in a few days and stably sustained for more than 10 days. Since generations are alternated during this consecutive hydrogen production experiment, it is suggested that the improved hydrogen production properties are inherited to next generations without genetic mutation. The properties are reset only when the cells are placed on the {sulfur-sufficient, aerobic, moderate light} conditions for a long time (more than 1 day at least).

  1. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  2. Is there any difference in Amide and NOE CEST effects between white and gray matter at 7 T?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikov, Vitaliy; Siero, Jeroen C. W.; Wijnen, Jannie; Visser, Fredy; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, Dennis W. J.; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Measurement of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) is providing tissue physiology dependent contrast, e.g. by looking at Amide and NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement) effects. CEST is unique in providing quantitative metabolite information at high imaging resolution. However, direct comparison of Amide and NOE effects between different tissues may result in wrong conclusions on the metabolite concentration due to the additional contributors to the observed CEST contrast, such as water content (WC) and water T1 relaxation (T1w). For instance, there are multiple contradictory reports in the literature on Amide and NOE effects in white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) at 7 T. This study shows that at 7 T, tissue water T1 relaxation is a stronger contributor to CEST contrasts than WC. After water T1 correction, there was no difference in Amide effects between WM and GM, whereas WM/GM contrast was enhanced for NOE effects.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(ether amide)s Containing Bisphthalazinone and Ether Linkages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng LIU; Shou Hai ZHANG; Ming Jing WANG; Qi Zhen LIANG; Xi Gao JIAN

    2005-01-01

    A novel aromatic diacid, 4, 4'-bis[2-(4-carboxyphenyl)phthalazin-1-one-4-yl]-bisphenyl ether Ⅲ, containing bisphthalazinone and ether linkages was prepared from nucleophilic substitution of p-chlorobenzonitrile with the bisphenol-like monomer Ⅰ, followed by alkaline hydrolysis of the intermediate dinitrile Ⅱ. A series of poly(ether amide)s containing bisphthalazinone and ether linkages derived from diacid Ⅲ and aromatic diamines were synthesized by one-step solution condensation polymerization using triphenyl phosphite and pyridine as condensing agents. Moreover, the properties of poly(ether amide)s including thermal stability,solubility and crystallinity were also studied.

  4. Nonuniform isotope patterns produced by collision-induced dissociation of homogeneously labeled ubiquitin: implications for spatially resolved hydrogen/deuterium exchange ESI-MS studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Peter L; Konermann, Lars

    2008-06-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether collision-induced dissociation (CID) of electrosprayed proteins after solution-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a viable approach for determining spatially resolved deuteration patterns. This work explores the use of two methods, source-CID and hexapole tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer, for measuring the fragment deuteration levels of regioselectively labeled ubiquitin. Both methods reveal that b-ions exhibit HDX levels significantly below that of the intact protein, whereas several y'' fragments are labeled to a much greater extent. These results are consistent with earlier source-CID data (Akashi, S.; Naito, Y.; Takio, K. Anal. Chem. 1999, 71, 4974-4980). However, the measured b-ion deuteration levels are in disagreement with the known solution-phase behavior of ubiquitin. Partial agreement is observed for y''-ions. Control experiments on homogeneously labeled ubiquitin (having the same average deuteration level at every exchangeable site) result in highly nonuniform fragment HDX levels. In particular, b-ions exhibit deuteration levels significantly below that of intact ubiquitin, thereby mimicking the behavior seen for the regioselectively labeled protein. This effect is likely caused by isotope fractionation during collisional activation, facilitated by the high mobility of charge carriers (scrambling) in the gas phase. The observation that the b-ion labeling behavior is largely independent of the spatial isotope distribution within solution-phase ubiquitin invalidates these ions as reporters of the protein deuteration pattern. This work questions the common practice of interpreting any nonuniformities in fragment deuteration as being indicative of regioselective solution-phase labeling. Artifactual deuterium enrichment or depletion during collisional activation may have contributed to the current lack of consensus as to whether HDX/CID represents a potentially

  5. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-15

    The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N(+) and [N-H+D](+) ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N+H](+) and [N+D](+) ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1+H](+) and [S1O1+D](+) ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components.

  6. Correlating excipient effects on conformational and storage stability of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody with local dynamics as measured by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikwar, Prakash; Majumdar, Ranajoy; Hickey, John M; Thakkar, Santosh V; Samra, Hardeep S; Sathish, Hasige A; Bishop, Steven M; Middaugh, C Russell; Weis, David D; Volkin, David B

    2013-07-01

    The effects of sucrose and arginine on the conformational and storage stability of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), respectively. Excipient effects on protein physical stability were then compared with their effects on the local flexibility of the mAb in solution at pH 6, 25°C using hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry (H/D-MS). Compared with a 0.1 M NaCl control, sucrose (0.5 M) increased conformational stability (T(m) values), slowed the rate of monomer loss, reduced the formation of insoluble aggregates, and resulted in a global trend of small decreases in local flexibility across most regions of the mAb. In contrast, the addition of arginine (0.5 M) decreased the mAb's conformational stability, increased the rate of loss of monomer with elevated levels of soluble and insoluble aggregates, and led to significant increases in the local flexibility in specific regions of the mAb, most notably within the constant domain 2 of the heavy chain (C(H)2). These results provide new insights into the effect of sucrose and arginine on the local dynamics of IgG1 domains as well as preliminary correlations between local flexibility within specific segments of the C(H)2 domain (notably heavy chain 241-251) and the mAb's overall physical stability.

  7. Structures of Highly Twisted Amides Relevant to Amide N-C Cross-Coupling: Evidence for Ground-State Amide Destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Vittorio; Holzer, Wolfgang; Meng, Guangrong; Shi, Shicheng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Roman; Szostak, Michal

    2016-10-04

    Herein, we show that acyclic amides that have recently enabled a series of elusive transition-metal-catalyzed N-C activation/cross-coupling reactions are highly twisted around the N-C(O) axis by a new destabilization mechanism of the amide bond. A unique effect of the N-glutarimide substituent, leading to uniformly high twist (ca. 90°) irrespective of the steric effect at the carbon side of the amide bond has been found. This represents the first example of a twisted amide that does not bear significant steric hindrance at the α-carbon atom. The (15) N NMR data show linear correlations between electron density at nitrogen and amide bond twist. This study strongly supports the concept of amide bond ground-state twist as a blueprint for activation of amides toward N-C bond cleavage. The new mechanism offers considerable opportunities for organic synthesis and biological processes involving non-planar amide bonds.

  8. Stability of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, John; Kerwin, Sean M; Bowman, Phillip D; Stavchansky, Salomon

    2012-05-01

    A validated C₁₈ reverse-phase HPLC method with UV detection at 320 nm was developed and used for the stability evaluation of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in rat plasma. CAPA is the amide derivative of CAPE, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound that has been found to be active in a variety of biological pathways. CAPA has been shown to protect endothelial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress to a similar degree to CAPE. CAPE has been reported to be rapidly hydrolyzed in rat plasma via esterase enzymes. CAPA is expected to display a longer half-life than CAPE by avoiding hydrolysis via plasma esterases. The stability of CAPA and CAPE in rat plasma was investigated at three temperatures. The half-lives for CAPA were found to be 41.5, 10 and 0.82 h at 25, 37 and 60 °C, respectively. The half-lives for CAPE were found to be 1.95, 0.35 and 0.13 h at 4, 25 and 37 °C, respectively. The energy of activation was found to be 22.1 kcal/mol for CAPA and 14.1 kcal/mol for CAPE. A more stable compound could potentially extend the beneficial effects of CAPE.

  9. Amide-induced phase separation of hexafluoroisopropanol-water mixtures depending on the hydrophobicity of amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Wada, Hiroshi; Kawatoko, Chiemi; Shimomura, Takuya; Kanzaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Munetaka

    2012-06-21

    Amide-induced phase separation of hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP)-water mixtures has been investigated to elucidate solvation properties of the mixtures by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), (1)H and (13)C NMR, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The amides included N-methylformamide (NMF), N-methylacetamide (NMA), and N-methylpropionamide (NMP). The phase diagrams of amide-HFIP-water ternary systems at 298 K showed that phase separation occurs in a closed-loop area of compositions as well as an N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) system previously reported. The phase separation area becomes wider as the hydrophobicity of amides increases in the order of NMF amides due to the hydrophobic interaction gives rise to phase separation of the mixtures. In contrast, the disruption of HFIP clusters causes the recovery of the homogeneity of the ternary systems. The present results showed that HFIP clusters are evolved with increasing amide content to the lower phase separation concentration in the same mechanism among the four amide systems. However, the disruption of HFIP clusters in the NMP and DMF systems with further increasing amide content to the upper phase separation concentration occurs in a different way from those in the NMF and NMA systems.

  10. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2015-07-01

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common (13)C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  11. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-Based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common {sup 13}C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  12. Preparation and evaluation at the delta opioid receptor of a series of linear leu-enkephalin analogues obtained by systematic replacement of the amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Kristina; Proteau-Gagné, Arnaud; Bourassa, Philippe; Nadon, Jean-François; Côté, Jérome; Bournival, Véronique; Gobeil, Fernand; Guérin, Brigitte; Dory, Yves L; Gendron, Louis

    2013-08-21

    Leu-enkephalin analogues, in which the amide bonds were sequentially and systematically replaced either by ester or N-methyl amide bonds, were prepared using classical organic chemistry as well as solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The peptidomimetics were characterized using competition binding, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, receptor internalization, and contractility assays to evaluate their pharmacological profile over the delta opioid receptor (DOPr). The lipophilicity (LogD7.4) and plasma stability of the active analogues were also measured. Our results revealed that the last amide bond can be successfully replaced by either an ester or an N-methyl amide bond without significantly decreasing the biological activity of the corresponding analogues when compared to Leu-enkephalin. The peptidomimetics with an N-methyl amide function between residues Phe and Leu were found to be more lipophilic and more stable than Leu-enkephalin. Findings from the present study further revealed that the hydrogen-bond donor properties of the fourth amide of Leu-enkephalin are not important for its biological activity on DOPr. Our results show that the systematic replacement of amide bonds by isosteric functions represents an efficient way to design and synthesize novel peptide analogues with enhanced stability. Our findings further suggest that such a strategy can also be useful to study the biological roles of amide bonds.

  13. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond (h3JNC') spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to refine protein structures to this...

  14. Is there any difference in Amide and NOE CEST effects between white and gray matter at 7T?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khlebnikov, Vitaly; Siero, JCW; Wijnen, Jannie; Visser, F; Luijten, Peter R; Klomp, DWJ; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) is providing tissue physiology dependent contrast, e.g. by looking at Amide and NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement) effects. CEST is unique in providing quantitative metabolite information at high imaging resolution. However, direct compar

  15. Detection of Lipid Induced Structural Changes of the Marburg Virus Matrix Protein VP40 Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Kaveesha J; Urata, Sarah; Bhattarai, Nisha; Kooijman, Edgar E; Gerstman, Bernard S; Chapagain, Prem P; Li, Sheng; Stahelin, Robert V

    2017-02-06

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a lipid-enveloped virus from the Filoviridae family containing a negative sense RNA genome. One of the seven MARV genes encodes the matrix protein VP40, which forms a matrix layer beneath the plasma membrane inner leaflet to facilitate budding from the host cell. MARV VP40 (mVP40) has been shown to be a dimeric peripheral protein with a broad and flat basic surface that can associate with anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine. While a number of mVP40 cationic residues have been shown to facilitate binding to membranes containing anionic lipids, much less is known on how mVP40 assembles to form the matrix layer following membrane binding. Here we have used hydrogen-deuterium exchange (H/DX) mass spectrometry to determine the solvent accessibility of mVP40 residues in the absence and presence of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. H/DX analysis demonstrates two basic loops in the mVP40 C-terminal domain make important contributions to anionic membrane binding and also revealed a potential oligomerization interface in the C-terminal domain as well as a conserved oligomerization interface in the mVP40 N-terminal domain. Lipid binding assays confirm the role of the two basic patches elucidated with HD/X measurements while molecular dynamics simulations and membrane insertion measurements complement these studies to demonstrate mVP40 doesn't appreciably insert into the hydrocarbon region of anionic membranes in contrast to the matrix protein from Ebola virus. Taken together, we propose a model by which association of the mVP40 dimer with the anionic plasma membrane facilitates assembly of mVP40 oligomers.

  16. Effect of heat treatment on the activity and stability of carbon supported PtMo alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen oxidation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ayaz; Carreras, Alejo; Trincavelli, Jorge; Ticianelli, Edson Antonio

    2014-02-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the activity, stability and CO tolerance of PtMo/C catalysts was studied, due to their applicability in the anode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To this purpose, a carbon supported PtMo (60:40) alloy electrocatalyst was synthesized by the formic acid reduction method, and samples of this catalyst were heat-treated at various temperatures ranging between 400 and 700 °C. The samples were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS). Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the stability, and polarization curves were used to investigate the performance of all materials as CO tolerant anode on a PEM single cell text fixture. The catalyst treated at 600 °C, for which the average crystallite size was 16.7 nm, showed the highest hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO, giving an overpotential induced by CO contamination of 100 mV at 1 Acm-2. This catalyst also showed a better stability up to 5000 potential cycles of cyclic voltammetry, as compared to the untreated catalyst. CV, SEM and WDS results indicated that a partial dissolution of Mo and its migration/diffusion from the anode to the cathode occurs during the single cell cycling. Polarization results showed that the catalytic activity and the stability can be improved by a heat treatment, in spite of a growth of the catalyst particles.

  17. Preparation of amidated derivatives of carboxymethylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubner, Tomáš; Synytsya, Andriy; Čopíková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was selected as substrate for amidation based on previous results described for monocarboxy cellulose (MCC) with the aim to prepare highly substituted products. In comparison with MCC containing uronic carboxyl groups at C-6 position, O-carboxymethyl groups in CMC should be more accessible for reagents because they are more distant from the polysaccharide chain. Two-step way of amidation was based on the esterification of CMC carboxyls by reaction with methanol and further amino-de-alkoxylation (aminolysis) of the obtained methyl ester with amidation reagents (n-alkylamines, hydrazine and hydroxylamine). Purity and substitution degree of the products were monitored by the vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR and Raman) and organic elemental analysis. Analytical methods confirmed the preparation of highly or moderately substituted N-alkylamides, hydrazide and hydroxamic acid of CMC.

  18. Synthesis of Calix[4]resorcinarene Amide Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Guo YAN; Yun GE

    2004-01-01

    Three different synthetic routes were developed to introduce carbamoyloxy functional groups at the upper periphery of two calix[4]resorcinarenes. By treating activated esters 2a-b with excess corresponding amine such as 3-(dimethylamino)propylamine 3, α-phenethylamine 4 and triethylenetetramine 5, six amide derivatives 6a~8b were obtained in high yield (Route 1). The pyridine-linked amide derivatives 9a-b were prepared by using acid chloride intermediate (Route 2). The amide derivatives 10a-b were obtained in moderate yields by direct alkylation of phenolic hydroxyl groups of 1a-b with N,N-dipropylchloroacetoamide in the presence of K2CO3/KI in acetone (Route 3).

  19. Polyimides Containing Amide And Perfluoroisopropyl Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezem, James F.

    1993-01-01

    New polyimides synthesized from reactions of aromatic hexafluoroisopropyl dianhydrides with asymmetric amide diamines. Soluble to extent of at least 10 percent by weight at temperature of about 25 degrees C in common amide solvents such as N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Polyimides form tough, flexible films, coatings, and moldings. Glass-transition temperatures ranged from 300 to 365 degrees C, and crystalline melting temperatures observed between 543 and 603 degrees C. Display excellent physical, chemical, and electrical properties. Useful as adhesives, laminating resins, fibers, coatings for electrical and decorative purposes, films, wire enamels, and molding compounds.

  20. Enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy amides via Umpolung amide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighty, Matthew W; Shen, Bo; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2012-09-19

    α-Oxy amides are prepared through enantioselective synthesis using a sequence beginning with a Henry addition of bromonitromethane to aldehydes and finishing with Umpolung Amide Synthesis (UmAS). Key to high enantioselection is the finding that ortho-iodo benzoic acid salts of the chiral copper(II) bis(oxazoline) catalyst deliver both diastereomers of the Henry adduct with high enantiomeric excess, homochiral at the oxygen-bearing carbon. Overall, this approach to α-oxy amides provides an innovative complement to alternatives that focus almost entirely on the enantioselective synthesis of α-oxy carboxylic acids.

  1. Amide-transforming activity of Streptomyces: possible application to the formation of hydroxy amides and aminoalcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinya; Miyagawa, Taka-Aki; Yamada, Ren; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Sayo, Noboru; Saito, Takao; Takano, Hideaki; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    To develop an efficient bioconversion process for amides, we screened our collection of Streptomyces strains, mostly obtained from soil, for effective transformers. Five strains, including the SY007 (NBRC 109343) and SY435 (NBRC 109344) of Streptomyces sp., exhibited marked conversion activities from the approximately 700 strains analyzed. These strains transformed diverse amide compounds such as N-acetyltetrahydroquinoline, N-benzoylpyrrolidine, and N-benzoylpiperidine into alcohols or N,O-acetals with high activity and regioselectivity. N,O-acetal was transformed into alcohol by serial tautomerization and reduction reactions. As such, Streptomyces spp. can potentially be used for the efficient preparation of hydroxy amides and aminoalcohols.

  2. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications.

  3. Aminolysis reaction of calix [ 4 ] arene esters and crystal structures and conformational behaviors of calix[4]arene amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU, Yong; LIU, Hui-Biao; HU, Jun; DUAN, Chun-Ying; XU, Zheng

    2000-01-01

    We first make use of aminolysis of calix[4]arene esters to synthesize calix[4]arene amides. When the two ethyl esters of the calix[4]arene esters are aminolysized, the 1, 3-amide derivative is formed selectively. The crystal structures of the calix[4]arene with two butyl amide (3b) and four butyl amide moieties (4b) were determined. The intermolecular hydrogen bonds make 4b form two-dimensional net work insolid state.The 1H NMR spectra prove that 3b is of a pinched cone conformation, while 4b and tetraheptylamide-calix[4]arene (6b)take fast interconversion between two C2v isomers in solution and appear an apparent cone conformation at room temperature. As decreasing temperature, the interconversion rate decreases gradually and, finally, the interconversion process is frozen at Tc= - 10℃, which makes both conformations of 4b and 6b the pinched cone structures. The hydrogen bond improves the interconversion barrier, and the large different values of the potential barrier between 6b and 4b (or 6b) may be of forming different hydrogen bonds.

  4. Clean SEA-TROSY Experiments to Map Solvent Exposed Amides in Large Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林东海

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the SEA-TROSY experiment could alleviate some of the problems of resonance overlap in 15N/2H labeled proteins as it was designed to selectively map solvent exposed amide protons. However, SEATROSY spectra may be contaminated with exchange-relayed NOE contributions from fast exchanged hydroxyl or amine protons and contributions from longitudinal relaxation. Also, perdeuteration of the protein sample is a prerequisite for this experiment. In this communication, a modified version, clean SEA-TROSY, was proposed to eliminate these artifacts and to allow the experiment to be applied to protonated or partially deuterated proteins and protein complexes.

  5. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed c

  6. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  7. ACRYLATE-AMIDE FOAM CARDIOVASCULAR PROSTHESES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    thoracic and abdominal aorta. The use of a composite construction utilizing acrylate-amide foam is being evaluated in prostheses for mitral valve ...bleeding. The success of the initial experimental work has led to a clinical trial in which 99 replacement , bypass, or patch-angioplasty procedures... replacement , superior vena cava patch venoplasty, and esophageal replacement . (Author)

  8. Platinum catalysed hydrolytic amidation of unactivated nitriles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobley, Christopher J.; Heuvel, Marco van den; Abbadi, Abdelilah; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2000-01-01

    The platinum(II) complex, [(Me2PO··H··OPMe2)PtH(PMe2OH)], efficiently catalyses the direct conversion of unactivated nitriles to N-substituted amides with both primary and secondary amines. Possible mechanisms for this reaction are discussed and evidence for initial amidine formation is reported. Is

  9. Design of a trial evaluating myocardial cell protection with cariporide, an inhibitor of the transmembrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger: the Guard During Ischemia Against Necrosis (GUARDIAN trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder John S

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Synopsis Background Direct myocardial cell protection in patients with unstable angina or evolving myocardial infarction (MI could prevent cell necrosis or reduce its extent, and minimize the risk of MI and death associated with percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs and coronary artery bypass surgery. The myocardial NHE plays a critical role in mediating the progression of ischemia to necrosis by promoting intracellular accumulation of sodium and calcium in exchange for hydrogen. Blockage of the system in various experimental models of ischemia and reperfusion had a strong antinecrotic effect. The present paper describes a trial that was intended to investigate the potential clinical benefit of cariporide, a potent and selective inhibitor of the NHE, in a large spectrum of at-risk patients. Trial design The GUARDIAN trial was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, four-arm trial that compared three cariporide dosages with placebo in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI and in patients undergoing a high-risk PCI or coronary artery bypass surgery. A total of 11 590 patients with one of the three possible entry diagnoses were enroled in 23 countries. The trial was designed as a combined phase 2/phase 3 study. The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of cariporide in reducing all-cause mortality and/or MI across the various entry populations 36 days after randomization. Three different doses of cariporide were compared with placebo. Secondary end-points were death or non-fatal MI at 10 days and 6 months, and cardiac events related to left ventricular dysfunction. The extent of MI was also assessed by peak elevation in creatinine kinase (CK-MB and a ratio of peak elevation to normal values. The sample size was driven by a total event rate of 1200 patients experiencing a primary end-point, powered to detect a 25% risk reduction in any of the three treatment groups compared with

  10. Role of an amide bond for self-assembly of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Romain; Tropsch, Juergen; Holmberg, Krister

    2010-03-01

    Self-assembly in solution and adsorption at the air-water interface and at solid surfaces were investigated for two amino-acid-based surfactants with conductimetry, NMR, tensiometry, quartz crystal microbalance with monitoring of the dissipation (QCM-D), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The surfactants studied were sodium N-lauroylglycinate and sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate, differing only in a methyl group on the amide nitrogen for the sarcosinate. Thus, the glycinate but not the sarcosinate surfactant is capable of forming intermolecular hydrogen bonds via the amide group. It was found that the amide bond, N-methylated or not, gave a substantial contribution to the hydrophilicity of the amphiphile. The ability to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds led to tighter packing at the air-water interface and at a hydrophobic surface. It also increased the tendency for precipitation as an acid-soap pair on addition of acid. Adsorption of the surfactants at a gold surface was also investigated and gave unexpected results. The sarcosine-based surfactant seemed to give bilayer adsorption, while the glycine derivative adsorbed as a monolayer.

  11. NMR study of hydroxy and amide protons in hyaluronan polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Gustav; Sandström, Corine

    2017-02-10

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an important and well characterized glycosaminoglycan with high viscosity and water-retaining capacity. Nonetheless, it is not fully understood whether conformational properties of the easily characterized HA oligomers can be transferred to HA polymers. To investigate possible differences in hydration, hydrogen bonding and flexibility between HA polymers and oligomers, hydroxy and amide protons of HA polymers were studied by solution-state and high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Measurements of chemical shifts, temperature coefficients and NOEs in HA polymers revealed that the NMR data are very similar compared to the interior of a HA octasaccharide, supporting transient hydrogen bond interactions across the β(1→3) and β(1→4) glycosidic linkages. However, differences in NOEs suggested a cis-like orientation between NH and H2 in the HA polymer. The lack of concentration dependence of the hydroxy proton chemical shifts suggests that there are no direct inter-chain interactions involving hydroxy protons at the concentrations investigated.

  12. DFT-based simulations of IR amide I' spectra for a small protein in solution. Comparison of explicit and empirical solvent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahnen, Johan A; Amunson, Krista E; Kubelka, Jan

    2010-10-14

    Infrared (IR) amide I' spectra are widely used for investigations of the structural properties of proteins in aqueous solution. For analysis of the experimental data, it is necessary to separate the spectral features due to the backbone conformation from those arising from other factors, in particular the interaction with solvent. We investigate the effects of solvation on amide I' spectra for a small 40-residue helix-turn-helix protein by theoretical simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). The vibrational force fields and intensity parameters for the protein amide backbone are constructed by transfer from smaller heptaamide fragments; the side chains are neglected in the DFT calculations. Solvent is modeled at two different levels: first as explicit water hydrogen bonded to the surface amide groups, treated at the same DFT level, and, second, using the electrostatic map approach combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Motional narrowing of the spectral band shapes due to averaging over the fast solvent fluctuation is introduced by use of the time-averaging approximation (TAA). The simulations are compared with the experimental amide I', including two (13)C isotopically edited spectra, corrected for the side-chain signals. Both solvent models are consistent with the asymmetric experimental band shape, which arises from the differential solvation of the amide backbone. However, the effects of (13)C isotopic labeling are best captured by the gas-phase calculations. The limitations of the solvent models and implications for the theoretical simulations of protein amide vibrational spectra are discussed.

  13. Sulfur-Tolerant Pt-Supported Catalysts for Benzene Hydrogenation: II. Influence of Cation Exchange Level for Pt/MOR-Based Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, L.J.; Ommen, van J.G.; Jentys, A.; Lercher, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Two reaction pathways are described for the hydrogenation of benzene over Pt/MOR, i.e., (i) on the metal particles and (ii) on Brønsted acid sites of MOR at the boundary to the metal, with atomic hydrogen being dissociated on the metal. The ratio between the two pathways depends on the zeolite acid

  14. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  15. Gas-phase Acidities of Aspartic Acid, Glutamic Acid, and their Amino Acid Amides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H; Velazquez, Hector A; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2007-02-14

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or ΔGacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage’s importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3–4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  16. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function.

  17. Uncovering the Sensitivity of Amide-II Vibration to Peptide-Ion Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2016-09-15

    In this work, linear infrared spectroscopy was used to examine the effect of salt on the amide-II mode in a model β-peptide (N-ethylpropionamide, NEPA) in its deuterated form, to reveal the sensitivity of this mode in reporting peptide-ion interactions. In comparison to the case of NEPA in water, the amide-II spectra mainly showed a red-shifted component in four typical saline solutions (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and AlCl3) examined in this work. Our results suggest that highly populated hydrated ion complexes under high salt concentration conditions destroy the hydration layer of the model peptide and result in mostly a salting-out state of the peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the hydrated cation mainly interacts with the peptide backbone on the amide C═O side, whereas the hydrated anion interacts on the amide N-H side. As the amide-II mode is mainly a combination of the C-N stretching and N-H in-plane-bending vibrations, this mode is advantageous in being responsive to ionic interaction from both the C═O and N-H sides. Such a dual sensitivity should be very useful in probing the breaking and/or formation of the interamide hydrogen bond between the C═O and N-H groups, which is a very important interaction involved in the solvation and stabilization, as well as folding/unfolding of proteins.

  18. Amide Synthesis from Alcohols and Amines Catalyzed by Ruthenium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Johan Hygum; Osztrovszky, Gyorgyi; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik Rubæk

    2010-01-01

    The direct synthesis of amides from alcohols and amines is described with the simultaneous liberation of dihydrogen. The reaction does not require any stoichiometric additives or hydrogen acceptors and is catalyzed by ruthenium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes. Three different catalyst systems...... chloride and base. A range of different primary alcohols and amines have been coupled in the presence of the three catalyst systems to afford the corresponding amides in moderate to excellent yields. The best results are obtained with sterically unhindered alcohols and amines. The three catalyst systems do...... not show any significant differences in reactivity, which indicates that the same catalytically active species is operating. The reaction is believed to proceed by initial dehydrogenation of the primary alcohol to the aldehyde that stays coordinated to ruthenium and is not released into the reaction...

  19. Design and optimization of selective azaindole amide M1 positive allosteric modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoren, Jennifer E; O'Neil, Steven V; Anderson, Dennis P; Brodney, Michael A; Chenard, Lois; Dlugolenski, Keith; Edgerton, Jeremy R; Green, Michael; Garnsey, Michelle; Grimwood, Sarah; Harris, Anthony R; Kauffman, Gregory W; LaChapelle, Erik; Lazzaro, John T; Lee, Che-Wah; Lotarski, Susan M; Nason, Deane M; Obach, R Scott; Reinhart, Veronica; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Steyn, Stefanus J; Webb, Damien; Yan, Jiangli; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-15

    Selective activation of the M1 receptor via a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) is a new approach for the treatment of the cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. A novel series of azaindole amides and their key pharmacophore elements are described. The nitrogen of the azaindole core is a key design element as it forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with the amide N-H thus reinforcing the bioactive conformation predicted by published SAR and our homology model. Representative compound 25 is a potent and selective M1 PAM that has well aligned physicochemical properties, adequate brain penetration and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, and is active in vivo. These favorable properties indicate that this series possesses suitable qualities for further development and studies.

  20. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  1. 氢腐蚀分层对换热器筒体承载能力的影响%Influence of bearing capacity of heat exchanger shell caused by hydrogen corrosion delaminating crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何家胜; 李超; 朱晓明; 陈伟; 路远明; 杨峰

    2013-01-01

    To explore the influence of hydrogen corrosion delaminating crack on the mechanical properties and bearing capacity in operation of the layered heat exchanger shell, the material capability of layered heat exchanger shell was analyzed by using chemical constituents analysis, hardness test, tensile tests, Charpy V-notch pendulum impact test. The finite element method was used to calculate the stress distribution of heat exchanger shell and to discuss the stress intensity factors of crack tip. The results show that the Mn element is lower in the chemical constituents, other elements accord with the National Standards; the material hardness meets the requirements, but the toughness declines obviously. The material of heat layered exchanger shell is deteriorated by the hydrogen corrosion, which destroys the continuity and uniformity of the material, decreases the ultimate strength, but increases the yield-strength ratio. The film stress state is destroyed, and material resistance to crack growth decreases. The hydrogen corrosion delaminating crack causes biggish partial stress and makes bearing capacity of the heat exchanger shell decrease.%为了解换热器筒体发生氢腐蚀分层后,其简体局部材料的性能发生的变化及对换热器运行中的承载能力带来的影响,采用化学成分分析、硬度测试、拉伸试验、夏比V口冲击韧性试验等方法对换热器筒体材料的性能进行了分析;运用有限元分析方法计算了简体分层处的应力分布,并探讨了裂纹尖端应力强度因子的变化情况.研究结果表明:材料化学成分中除Mn元素的含量偏低外,其它元素含量符合国家标准;材料的硬度符合要求,材料的强度极限降低,屈强比上升,韧性明显降低.氢腐蚀分层使换热器筒体材料局部劣化,破坏了材料的均匀性和连续性,破坏了简体的薄膜应力状态,产生了较大的局部应力,使换热器筒体承载能力下降.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Amide Anions Based Ionic Liquids Containing Nitrile Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Ting; LU Liang; LIU Xiuli; ZHANG Zhan; XUE Yunrong; YANG Yu; Li Caimeng; FU Xianlei; GAO Guohua

    2009-01-01

    A series of novel amide anion based ionic liquids containing nitrile groups have been synthesized using the method of ion-exchange between potassium amide and various quaternary halide salts such as trimethylamine,triethylamine,tributylamine,N-methylpyrrolidine,and N-methylimidazole.All of the functionalised ionic liquids were characterized by IR,1H and 13C NMR,and MS.The synthesized ionic liquids exhibited advantageously high thermal stability.The decomposition temperature of ionic liquids measured via TGA ranged from 224 to 289 ℃.The functionalised ionic liquid,l-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium propionyl cyanamide ([EMIm][N(CN)COC2H5]),was used as a ligand in the palladium catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction.The yields of the coupling reaction increased by 10%-20% by the addition of [EMIm]IN(CN)COC2H5].

  3. Tertiary fatty amides as diesel fuel substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serdari, Aikaterini; Lois, Euripides; Stournas, Stamoulis [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Athens (Greece)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents experimental results regarding the impact of adding different tertiary amides of fatty acids to mineral diesel fuel; an assessment of the behaviour of these compounds as possible diesel fuel extenders is also included. Measurements of cetane number, cold flow properties (cloud point, pour point and CFPP), density, kinematic viscosity, flash point and distillation temperatures are reported, while initial experiments concerning the effects on particulate emissions are also described. Most of the examined tertiary fatty amides esters have very good performance and they can be easily prepared from fatty acids (biomass). Such compounds or their blends could be used as mineral diesel fuel or even fatty acid methylesters (FAME, biodiesel) substitutes or extenders. (Author)

  4. An amidated carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Gemma; Fini, Milena; Torricelli, Paola; Giardino, Roberto; Barbucci, Rolando

    2008-08-01

    An amidic derivative of carboxymethylcellulose was synthesized (CMCA). The new polysaccharide was obtained by converting a large percentage of carboxylic groups ( approximately 50%) of carboxymethylcellulose into amidic groups rendering the macromolecule quite similar to hyaluronan. Then, the polysaccharide (CMCA) was crosslinked. The behavior of CMCA hydrogel towards normal human articular chondrocytes (NHAC) was in vitro studied monitoring the cell proliferation and synthesis of extra cellular matrix (ECM) components and compared with a hyaluronan based hydrogel (Hyal). An extracellular matrix rich in cartilage-specific collagen and proteoglycans was secreted in the presence of hydrogels. The injectability of the new hydrogels was also analysed. An experimental in vivo model was realized to study the effect of CMCA and Hyal hydrogels in the treatment of surgically created partial thickness chondral defects in the rabbit knee. The preliminary results pointed out that CMCA hydrogel could be considered as a potential compound for cartilage regeneration.

  5. Polyimides containing amide and perfluoroisopropylidene connecting groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezern, James F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    New, thermooxidatively stable polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides containing isopropylidene bridging groups with aromatic diamines containing amide connecting groups between the rings. Several of these polyimides were shown to be semi-crystalline as evidenced by wide angle x ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. Most of the polyimides form tough, flexible films with high tensile properties. These polyimide films exhibit enhanced solubility in organic solvents.

  6. Enhanced incorporation of nonhydrolyzable tritium in GnRH and TRF by catalytic exchange labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlke, J.; Bienert, M.; Niedrich, H.; Mittag, E.; Toth, G.

    1987-12-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), D-Phe/sub 6/-GnRH and thyro-tropin releasing factor (TRF) were tritiated by direct catalytic exchange using RhA1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ + HT under conditions which lead in model deuterations of N..cap alpha..-acetylhistidine amide to a high incorporation of deuterium into position 5 of the histidine ring. Specific activities up to a range of 400 GBqmmol in form of nonhydrolyzable tritium are attainable after removal of the label incorporated into position 2 of the histidine ring. A crucial reason for diminished specific activities was found to be a catalyst mediated hydrogen transfer between the peptides and traces of water, contained in the reaction mixture, competing with the tritiation.

  7. Environmentally benign synthesis of amides and ureas via catalytic dehydrogenation coupling of volatile alcohols and amines in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2016-05-31

    In this study, we report the direct synthesis of amides and ureas via the catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines using the Milstein catalyst in a Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor. A series of amides and ureas, which could not be synthesized in an open system by catalytic dehydrogenation coupling, were obtained in moderate to high yields via catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines. This process could be monitored by the hydrogen produced. Compared to the traditional method of condensation, this catalytic system avoids the stoichiometric pre-activation or in situ activation of reagents, and is a much cleaner process with high atom economy. This methodology, only possible by employing the Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor, not only provides a new environmentally benign synthetic approach of amides and ureas, but is also a potential method for hydrogen storage.

  8. Luciferin Amides Enable in Vivo Bioluminescence Detection of Endogenous Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofford, David M; Adams, Spencer T; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Reddy, Gadarla Randheer; Miller, Stephen C

    2015-07-15

    Firefly luciferase is homologous to fatty acyl-CoA synthetases. We hypothesized that the firefly luciferase substrate d-luciferin and its analogs are fatty acid mimics that are ideally suited to probe the chemistry of enzymes that release fatty acid products. Here, we synthesized luciferin amides and found that these molecules are hydrolyzed to substrates for firefly luciferase by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In the presence of luciferase, these molecules enable highly sensitive and selective bioluminescent detection of FAAH activity in vitro, in live cells, and in vivo. The potency and tissue distribution of FAAH inhibitors can be imaged in live mice, and luciferin amides serve as exemplary reagents for greatly improved bioluminescence imaging in FAAH-expressing tissues such as the brain.

  9. An Efficient Amide-Aldehyde-Alkene Condensation: Synthesis for the N-Allyl Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Zheng-Jun; Wang, Xi-Cun

    2016-02-01

    The allylamine skeleton represents a significant class of biologically active nitrogen compounds that are found in various natural products and drugs with well-recognized pharmacological properties. In this personal account, we will briefly discuss the synthesis of allylamine skeletons. We will focus on showing a general protocol for Lewis acid-catalyzed N-allylation of electron-poor N-heterocyclic amides and sulfonamide via an amide-aldehyde-alkene condensation reaction. The substrate scope with respect to N-heterocyclic amides, aldehydes, and alkenes will be discussed. This method is also capable of preparing the Naftifine motif from N-methyl-1-naphthamide or methyl (naphthalene-1-ylmethyl)carbamate, with paraformaldehyde and styrene in a one-pot manner.

  10. Storing Renewable Energy in the Hydrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas; Callini, Elsa; Kato, Shunsuke; Atakli, Züleyha Özlem Kocabas

    2015-01-01

    An energy economy based on renewable energy requires massive energy storage, approx. half of the annual energy consumption. Therefore, the production of a synthetic energy carrier, e.g. hydrogen, is necessary. The hydrogen cycle, i.e. production of hydrogen from water by renewable energy, storage and use of hydrogen in fuel cells, combustion engines or turbines is a closed cycle. Electrolysis splits water into hydrogen and oxygen and represents a mature technology in the power range up to 100 kW. However, the major technological challenge is to build electrolyzers in the power range of several MW producing high purity hydrogen with a high efficiency. After the production of hydrogen, large scale and safe hydrogen storage is required. Hydrogen is stored either as a molecule or as an atom in the case of hydrides. The maximum volumetric hydrogen density of a molecular hydrogen storage is limited to the density of liquid hydrogen. In a complex hydride the hydrogen density is limited to 20 mass% and 150 kg/m(3) which corresponds to twice the density of liquid hydrogen. Current research focuses on the investigation of new storage materials based on combinations of complex hydrides with amides and the understanding of the hydrogen sorption mechanism in order to better control the reaction for the hydrogen storage applications.

  11. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F; Shah, Tejas K; Baker, Emma L; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Garg, Neil K

    2015-08-06

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis.

  12. New Umami Amides: Structure-Taste Relationship Studies of Cinnamic Acid Derived Amides and the Natural Occurrence of an Intense Umami Amide in Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerot, Eric; Neirynck, Nathalie; Cayeux, Isabelle; Yuan, Yoyo Hui-Juan; Yuan, Yong-Ming

    2015-08-19

    A series of aromatic amides were synthesized from various acids and amines selected from naturally occurring structural frameworks. These synthetic amides were evaluated for umami taste in comparison with monosodium glutamate. The effect of the substitution pattern of both the acid and the amine parts on umami taste was investigated. The only intensely umami-tasting amides were those made from 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid. The amine part was more tolerant to structural changes. Amides bearing an alkyl- or alkoxy-substituted phenylethylamine residue displayed a clean umami taste as 20 ppm solutions in water. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with a high quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC/MS) was subsequently used to show the natural occurrence of these amides. (E)-3-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(4-methoxyphenethyl)acrylamide was shown to occur in the roots and stems of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant of the family Rutaceae growing in Korea, Japan, and China.

  13. Synthesis of Novel Poly(aryl ether amide)s Containing the Phthalazinone Moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two novel heterocyclic diamine monomers: 1,2-dihydro-2-(4-aminophenyl)-4-[4-(4-amin- ophenoxy)phenyl](2H)phthalazin-1-one and 1,2-dihydro-2-(4-aminophenyl)-4-[4-(4-aminophenoxy)-3,5-dimethylphenyl](2H)phthalazin-1-one were successfully synthesized from readily available heterocyclic bisphenol-like monomers in two steps in high yield. A series of novel poly(aryl ether amide)s containing the phthalazinone moiety were successfully prepared by the direct polymerization of the novel diamines and aromatic dicarboxylic acids using triphenyl phosphite and pyridine as condensing agents.

  14. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION OF CHIRAL POLY(ESTER AMIDE)S DERIVED FROM L-ISOLEUCINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-He Fan; Jing-Lun Zhou; Xiao-Fang Chen; Xin-Hua Wan; Qi-Feng Zhou

    2004-01-01

    A series of new optically active aromatic poly(ester amide)s containing a chiral group in the side chain prepared from the p-toluenesulfonic acid salt of o,o'-bis(leucyl)-hexanediol (TS-+LHD+TS-) and p-phthaloyl chloride and styrene-2,5-dicarbonyl chloride styrene have been synthesized by interfacial polymerization. The structure of the monomer is elucidated by FT-IR and elemental analysis. The thermal properties of the polymers were studied by DSC and TGA. The chiroptical properties of the above polymer have also been studied by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Results indicated that these polymers form helical structures.

  15. Photophysical studies on the interaction of amides with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution: Fluorescence quenching and protein unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, R., E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600106 (India); Ramamurthy, P. [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Sekhizar Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Addition. of amides containing a H-CO(NH{sub 2}) or CH{sub 3}-CO(NH{sub 2}) framework to BSA results in a fluorescence quenching. On the contrary, fluorescence enhancement with a shift in the emission maximum towards the blue region is observed on the addition of dimethylformamide (DMF) (H-CON(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}). Fluorescence quenching accompanied initially with a shift towards the blue region and a subsequent red shift in the emission maximum of BSA is observed on the addition of formamide (H-CO(NH{sub 2})), whereas a shift in the emission maximum only towards the red region results on the addition of acetamide (CH{sub 3}-CONH{sub 2}). Steady state emission spectral studies reveal that amides that possess a free NH{sub 2} and N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} moiety result in fluorescence quenching and enhancement of BSA respectively. The 3D contour spectral studies of BSA with formamide exhibit a shift in the emission towards the red region accompanied with fluorescence quenching, which indicates that the tryptophan residues of the BSA are exposed to a more polar environment. Circular Dichroism (CD) studies of BSA with amides resulted in a gradual decrease in the α-helical content of BSA at 208 nm, which confirms that there is a conformational change in the native structure of BSA. Time-resolved fluorescence studies illustrate that the extent of buried trytophan moieties exposed to the aqueous phase on the addition of amides follows the order DMFhydrogen-bonding sites in alkyl substituted amides. Amides act as a hydrogen-bonding donor and acceptor resulting in a hydrogen-bonding interaction with amino and carboxy moieties (amino acids) present in BSA. The fact that the –NH{sub 2} hydrogen and the carbonyl oxygen of amide form a concerted hydrogen-bonding network with the carbonyl oxygen and the amino moieties of amino acids respectively is established from fluorescence methods. -- Highlights:

  16. New Neutral Receptors for Fluoride Based on Calix[4]arene Bearing Thiourea and Amide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘顺英; 徐括喜; 何永炳; 秦海娟; 孟令芝

    2005-01-01

    Two-armed neutral anion receptors (4,5), calix[4]arenes beating thiourea and amide binding sites, were prepared and examined their anion-binding ability by the UV-vis spectra. The results of non-linear curve fitting and Job plot indicate that 4 or 5 forms 1:1 stoichiometry complex with fluoride by hydrogen bonding interactions. Receptors 4 and 5 have an excellent selectivity for fluoride but have no binding ability with acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and the halogen anions (Cl-,Br-,I-).

  17. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  18. Structure and property of self-assemble valinyl bolaform amides having different chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, M; Asano, A; Yoshida, H; Inouguchi, M; Iwanaga, K; Sasaki, M; Katsuya, Y; Taniguchi, T; Yamamoto, D

    2005-10-01

    Bolaform amides were designed from N,N'-bis(carboethoxy-L-valinyl)-diaminoethane (1) by linking t-butyloxycarbonyl-valine through ethylenediamine (EDA) to enable spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction analyses. N,N'-Bis(Boc-L-valinyl)-diaminoethane (2) and N,N'-bis(Boc-D-valinyl)-diaminoethane (3) were composed of L-Val and D-Val, respectively. N-(Boc-L-valinyl)-N'-(Boc-D-valinyl)-diaminoethane (4) was composed of both L-Val and D-Val, and was achiral (meso-peptide). Peptide 5 was a 1:1 mixture of 2 and 3, and was also achiral (racemate). These peptides mediated gelation of corn oil at a concentration of approximately 1%. Within crystals, the peptides formed beta-sheet ribbons, but differences were observed in hydrogen-bonding patterns and side-chain arrangements. These differences were also deduced from temperature dependence of amide protons. Force-field calculations based on the crystal structures indicated that association of beta-sheet ribbons had energy benefits, and it was assumed that molecular aggregation progressed spontaneously. These structural studies indicated the chirality of amino acids affected for the properties of bolaform amides.

  19. AMID: autonomous modeler of intragenic duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Weiss, Anthony S; Fekete, Alan; Jermiin, Lars S

    2003-01-01

    Intragenic duplication is an evolutionary process where segments of a gene become duplicated. While there has been much research into whole-gene or domain duplication, there have been very few studies of non-tandem intragenic duplication. The identification of intragenically replicated sequences may provide insight into the evolution of proteins, helping to link sequence data with structure and function. This paper describes a tool for autonomously modelling intragenic duplication. AMID provides: identification of modularly repetitive genes; an algorithm for identifying repeated modules; and a scoring system for evaluating the modules' similarity. An evaluation of the algorithms and use cases are presented.

  20. Reaction mechanism of the acidic hydrolysis of highly twisted amides: Rate acceleration caused by the twist of the amide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Lopez, Xabier

    2006-08-03

    We present an ab initio study of the acid hydrolysis of a highly twisted amide and a planar amide analogue. The aim of these studies is to investigate the effect that the twist of the amide bond has on the reaction barriers and mechanism of acid hydrolysis. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms were investigated using density functional theory and polarizable continuum model calculations. Remarkable differences were observed between the mechanism of twisted and planar amide, due mainly to the preference for N-protonation of the former and O-protonation of the latter. In addition, we were also able to determine that the hydrolytic mechanism of the twisted amide will be pH dependent. Thus, there is a preference for a stepwise mechanism with formation of an intermediate in the acid hydrolysis, whereas the neutral hydrolysis undergoes a concerted-type mechanism. There is a nice agreement between the characterized intermediate and available X-ray data and a good agreement with the kinetically estimated rate acceleration of hydrolysis with respect to analogous undistorted amide compounds. This work, along with previous ab initio calculations, describes a complex and rich chemistry for the hydrolysis of highly twisted amides as a function of pH. The theoretical data provided will allow for a better understanding of the available kinetic data of the rate acceleration of amides upon twisting and the relation of the observed rate acceleration with intrinsic differential reactivity upon loss of amide bond resonance.

  1. Room-temperature heterogeneous hydroxylation of phenol with hydrogen peroxide over Fe2+, Co2+ ion-exchanged Na beta zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Park, Jung-Nam; Wei, Xian-Yong; Lee, Chul Wee

    2003-03-07

    Ion-exchanged Na beta zeolite with Fe2+ and Co2+ cations shows high catalytic activity at room temperature in phenol hydroxylation with H2O2, where the conversion of phenol is ca. 21% and the selectivity of benzoquinone is below 3% at a molar ratio of phenol to H2O2 of 3 in the starting aqueous reaction medium.

  2. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell for a pre-humidified hydrogen stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Shakhshir, Saher Al

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication it has been shown how the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be determined employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor has to be placed into the anode outlet pipe of the operating fuel cell, and the voltage signal E that is read from the senso...

  3. Synthesis and characterisation of uniform bisester tetra-amide segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsman, J.; Husken, D.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of a new type of high melting and fast crystallising amide units that can be used for copolymerisation have been studied. These bisester tetra-amide or TxTxT-dimethyl segments (T is a terephthalic unit and x=(CH2)n (n=2–8)) can be synthesised in a two-step reaction

  4. Synthesis of Novel Extractants——Amide Podands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGHong-bin; ZHUWen-bin; YEGuo-an; ZHUZhi-xuan; CHENWen-jun

    2003-01-01

    Amide podands which are used as a novel extractants are widely concerned recently. In the early stage, the studies were focused on the amide potands substituted with short-chain alky group, and for avoiding the formation of the second organic phase, aromatic, halogenated or higher alcohol compound must be used as diluents.

  5. Picosecond thermometer in the amide I band of myoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, R.H.; Xie, A.; Meer, L. van der;

    2005-01-01

    The amide I and II bands in myoglobin show a heterogeneous temperature dependence, with bands at 6.17 and 6.43 mu m which are more intense at low temperatures. The amide I band temperature dependence is on the long wavelength edge of the band, while the short wavelength side has almost no tempera...

  6. Performance of electric forklift with low-temperature polymer exchange membrane fuel cell power module and metal hydride hydrogen storage extension tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Tolj, Ivan; Parsons, Adrian; Smith, Fahmida; Sita, Cordellia; Linkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    We present test results of a commercial 3-tonne electric forklift (STILL) equipped with a commercial fuel cell power module (Plug Power) and a MH hydrogen storage tank (HySA Systems and TF Design). The tests included: (i) performance evaluation of "hybrid" hydrogen storage system during refuelling at low (pressures; (ii) comparison of the forklift performances during heavy-duty operation when changing the powering in the series: standard battery - fuel cell power module (alone) - power module with integrated MH tank; and (iii) performance tests of the forklift during its operation under working conditions. It was found that (a) the forklift with power module and MH tank can achieve 83% of maximum hydrogen storage capacity during 6 min refuelling (for full capacity 12-15 min); (b) heavy-duty operation of the forklift is characterised by 25% increase in energy consumption, and during system operation more uniform power distribution occurs when operating in the fuel cell powering mode with MH, in comparison to the battery powering mode; (c) use of the fully refuelled fuel cell power module with the MH extension tank allows for uninterrupted operation for 3 h 6 min and 7 h 15 min, for heavy- and light-duty operation, respectively.

  7. Influence of Silica/Sulfonated Polyether-Ether Ketone as Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Handayani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The operation of non-humidified condition of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC using composite sPEEK-silica membrane is reported. Sulfonated membrane of PEEK is known as hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membrane for PEMFC and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The state of the art of fuel cells is based on the perluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion. Nafion has been the most used in both PEMFC and DMFC due to good performance although in low humidified condition showed poor current density. Here we reported the effect of silica in hydrocarbon sPEEK membrane that contributes for a better water management system inside the cell, and showed 0.16 W/cm2 of power density which is 78% higher than that of non-silica modified [Keywords: composite membrane, polyether-ether ketone, silica, proton exchange membrane fuel cell].

  8. Excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in deuteron charge exchange on hydrogen at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.3 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mchedlishvili, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, GE-0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barsov, S. [High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RU-188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Carbonell, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Chiladze, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, GE-0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dymov, S. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Physikalisches Institut II, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Dzyuba, A. [High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RU-188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Engels, R.; Gebel, R. [Institut für Kernphysik and Jülich Centre for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Glagolev, V. [Laboratory of High Energies, JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-10-07

    The charge-exchange break-up of polarised deuterons d{sup →}p→{pp}{sub s}n, where the final {pp}{sub s} diproton system has a very low excitation energy and hence is mainly in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state, is a powerful tool to probe the spin-flip terms in the proton–neutron charge-exchange scattering. Recent measurements with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27 GeV have extended these studies into the pion-production regime in order to investigate the mechanism for the excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in the d{sup →}p→{pp}{sub s}X reaction. Values of the differential cross section and two deuteron tensor analysing powers, A{sub xx} and A{sub yy}, have been extracted as functions of the momentum transfer to the diproton or the invariant mass M{sub X} of the unobserved system X. The unpolarised cross section in the high M{sub X} region is well described in a model that includes only direct excitation of the Δ isobar through undistorted one pion exchange. However, the cross section is grossly underestimated for low M{sub X}, even when Δ excitation in the projectile deuteron is included in the calculation. Furthermore, direct Δ production through one pion exchange only reproduces the angular dependence of the difference between the two tensor analysing powers.

  9. Excitation of the Delta(1232) isobar in deuteron charge exchange on hydrogen at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Mchedlishvili, D; Carbonell, J; Chiladze, D; Dymov, S; Dzyuba, A; Engels, R; Gebel, R; Glagolev, V; Grigoryev, K; Goslawski, P; Hartmann, M; Imambekov, O; Kacharava, A; Kamerdzhiev, V; Keshelashvili, I; Khoukaz, A; Komarov, V; Kulessa, P; Kulikov, A; Lehrach, A; Lomidze, N; Lorentz, B; Macharashvili, G; Maier, R; Merzliakov, S; Mielke, M; Mikirtychyants, M; Mikirtychyants, S; Nioradze, M; Ohm, H; Papenbrock, M; Prasuhn, D; Rathmann, F; Serdyuk, V; Seyfarth, H; Stein, H J; Steffens, E; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Tabidze, M; Trusov, S; Uzikov, Yu; Valdau, Yu; Wilkin, C

    2013-01-01

    The charge-exchange break-up of polarised deuterons pol{d}p -> {pp}n, where the final {pp} diproton system has a very low excitation energy and hence is mainly in the 1S0 state, is a powerful tool to probe the spin-flip terms in the proton-neutron charge-exchange scattering. Recent measurements with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27 GeV have extended these studies into the pion-production regime in order to investigate the mechanism for the excitation of the Delta(1232) isobar in the pol{d}p -> {pp}X reaction. Values of the differential cross section and two deuteron tensor analysing powers, A_{xx} and A_{yy}, have been extracted in terms of the momentum transfer to the diproton or the invariant mass Mx of the unobserved system X. The unpolarised cross section in the high Mx region is well described in a model that includes only direct excitation of the Delta isobar through undistorted one pion exchange. However, the cross section is grossly underestimated for low Mx, even w...

  10. Retinobenzoic acids. 4. Conformation of aromatic amides with retinoidal activity. Importance of trans-amide structure for the activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagechika, H; Himi, T; Kawachi, E; Shudo, K

    1989-10-01

    N-Methylation of two retinoidal amide compounds, 4-[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)carbamoyl]benz oic acid (3, Am80) and 4-[[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2- naphthalenyl)carbonyl]amino]benzoic acid (5, Am580), resulted in the disappearance of their potent differentiation-inducing activity on human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60. Studies with 1H NMR and UV spectroscopy indicated that large conformational differences exist between the active secondary amides and the inactive N-methyl amides. From a comparison of the spectroscopic results of these amides with those of stilbene derivatives, the conformations of the active amides are expected to resemble that of (E)-stilbene, whereas the inactive amides resemble the Z isomer: 3 (Am80) and 5 (Am580) have a trans-amide bond and their whole structures are elongated, while the N-methylated compounds [4 (Am90) and 6 (Am590)] have a cis-amide bond, resulting in the folding of the two benzene rings. These structures in the crystals were related to those in solution by 13C NMR spectroscopic comparison between the two phases (solid and solution).

  11. Anion complexation with cyanobenzoyl substituted first and second generation tripodal amide receptors: crystal structure and solution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Md Najbul; Gogoi, Abhijit; Das, Gopal

    2015-09-14

    Anion complexation properties of two new tripodal amide receptors have been extensively studied here. Two tripodal receptors have been synthesized from the reaction of cyanobenzoyl acid chloride with two tri-amine building blocks such as (i) tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and (ii) tris(2-(4-aminophenoxy)ethyl)amine, which resulted in the first (L1) and second (L2) generation tripodal amides respectively. A detailed comparison of their coordination behavior with anions is also described by crystallographic and solution state experiments. The crystal structure demonstrates various types of spatial orientations of tripodal arms in two receptors and concomitantly interacts with anions distinctively. Intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO prevents opening of the receptor cavity in the crystal, which leads to a locked conformation of L1 having C(3v) symmetry and makes amide hydrogen unavailable for the anion which results in side cleft anion binding. However, in L2 we conveniently shift the anion binding sites to a distant position which increases cavity size as well as rules out any intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO. The crystal structure shows a different orientation of the arms in L2; it adopts a quasi-planar arrangement with C(2v) symmetry. In the crystal structure two arms are pointed in the same direction and while extending the contact the third arm is H-bonded with the apical N-atom through a –CN group, making a pseudo capsular cavity where the anion interacts. Most importantly spatial reorientation of the receptor L2 from a C(2v) symmetry to a folded conformation with a C(3v) symmetry was observed only in the presence of an octahedral SiF6(2-) anion and forms a sandwich type complex. Receptors L1 and L2 are explored for their solution state anion binding abilities. The substantial changes in chemical shifts were observed for the amide (-NH) and aromatic hydrogen (-CH) (especially for F(-)), indicating the role of these hydrogens in

  12. Synthesis of novel poly(aryl ether amide)s containing the phthalazinone moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG, Lin(程琳); JIAN, Xi- Gao(蹇锡高)

    2000-01-01

    Two novel heterocyclic diamine monomers: 1,2-dihydro-2-(4-aminophenyl)-4- [ 4-( 4-aminophenoxy ) phenyl ]-( 2H )-phtha-lazin-1-one and 1, 2-dihydro-2-( 4-aminophenyl)-4-[ 4-( 4-aminophenoxy)-3, 5-dimethylphenyl]-(2H)-phthalazin-1-one were successfully synthesized using readily available heterocyclic bisphenol-like monomers through two steps in high yield. A series of novel poly(aryl ether amide)s containing the phthalazinone moiety with inherent viscosities of 1.16-1.67 dL/g were prepared by the direct polymerization of the novel diamines and aromatic dicarboxylic acids using triphenyl phosphite and pyridine as condensing agents. The polymers were readily soluble in a variety of solvents such as N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc),dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), and pyridine. The polymers had high glass transition tenperatured(Tg) in the 291-329℃ range.

  13. Cytotoxic cassaine diterpenoid-diterpenoid amide dimers and diterpenoid amides from the leaves of Erythrophleum fordii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qu, Jing; Wang, Jia-Ming; Yu, Shi-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Xu, Song; Ma, Shuang-Gang; Li, Yong; Ding, Guang-Zhi; Fang, Lei

    2010-10-01

    Detailed phytochemical investigation from the leaves of Erythrophleum fordii resulted in the isolation of 13 compounds, including three cassaine diterpenoid-diterpenoid amide dimers (1, 3 and 5), and seven cassaine diterpenoid amides (6 and 8-13), together with three previously reported ones, erythrophlesins D (2), C (4) and 3beta-hydroxynorerythrosuamide (7). Compounds 1, 3 and 5 are further additions to the small group of cassaine diterpenoid dimers represented by erythrophlesins A-D. Their structures were determined by analysis of extensive one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments and ESIMS methods. Cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds were tested against HCT-8, Bel-7402, BGC-823, A549 and A2780 human cancer cell lines in the MTT test. Results showed that compounds 1 and 3-5 exhibited significantly selective cytotoxic activities (IC(50)<10 microM) against these cells, respectively.

  14. Structural Characterization of N-Alkylated Twisted Amides: Consequences for Amide Bond Resonance and N-C Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feng; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Michal

    2016-04-11

    Herein, we describe the first structural characterization of N-alkylated twisted amides prepared directly by N-alkylation of the corresponding non-planar lactams. This study provides the first experimental evidence that N-alkylation results in a dramatic increase of non-planarity around the amide N-C(O) bond. Moreover, we report a rare example of a molecular wire supported by the same amide C=O-Ag bonds. Reactivity studies demonstrate rapid nucleophilic addition to the N-C(O) moiety of N-alkylated amides, indicating the lack of n(N) to π*(C=O) conjugation. Most crucially, we demonstrate that N-alkylation activates the otherwise unreactive amide bond towards σ N-C cleavage by switchable coordination.

  15. Hepatoprotective amide constituents from the fruit of Piper chaba: Structural requirements, mode of action, and new amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hisashi; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Morikawa, Toshio; Yasuda, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Itadaki; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2009-10-15

    The 80% aqueous acetone extract from the fruit of Piper chaba (Piperaceae) was found to have hepatoprotective effects on D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice. From the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction, three new amides, piperchabamides E, G, and H, 33 amides, and four aromatic constituents were isolated. Among the isolates, several amide constituents inhibited D-GalN/tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced death of hepatocytes, and the following structural requirements were suggested: (i) the amide moiety is essential for potent activity; and (ii) the 1,9-decadiene structure between the benzene ring and the amide moiety tended to enhance the activity. Moreover, a principal constituent, piperine, exhibited strong in vivo hepatoprotective effects at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg, po and its mode of action was suggested to depend on the reduced sensitivity of hepatocytes to TNF-alpha.

  16. Hydrogen atom scrambling in selectively labeled anionic peptides upon collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    have now measured the level of hydrogen scrambling in a deprotonated, selectively labeled peptide using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results conclusively show that hydrogen scrambling is prevalent in the deprotonated peptide upon collisional activation. The amide hydrogens ((1)H...

  17. Benzoylureas as removable cis amide inducers: synthesis of cyclic amides via ring closing metathesis (RCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ryan M; Khakham, Yelena; Lessene, Guillaume; Baell, Jonathan B

    2011-02-07

    Rapid and high yielding synthesis of medium ring lactams was made possible through the use of a benzoylurea auxiliary that serves to stabilize a cisoid amide conformation, facilitating cyclization. The auxiliary is released after activation under the mild conditions required to deprotect a primary amine, such as acidolysis of a Boc group in the examples given here. This methodology is a promising tool for the synthesis of medium ring lactams, macrocyclic natural products and peptides.

  18. Single crystal electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Cu(II) ions in Cu(tyrosine)(2): a study of weak exchange interactions mediated by resonance assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-García, Verónica; Santana, Ricardo C; Madrid, Rosa; Baldo, Bianca; Vega, Andrés; Spodine, Evgenia

    2012-09-01

    EPR measurements have been performed on single crystals of [Cu(L-tyrosine)(2)](∞) at 33.8 GHz and at room temperature. The EPR spectra display partially resolved EPR lines for most orientations of the magnetic field in the ab plane, and only one resonance for orientations close to the crystal axes, while only a single line is observed along any direction in the ca and cb crystal planes. This behavior is a result of the selective collapse of the resonances corresponding to the four copper sites in the unit cell produced by the exchange interactions between the copper ions. The magnitudes of the exchange interactions between the copper ions were evaluated from the angular variation of the line width and the collapse of the EPR lines. The value |J(AD)/k(B)|=0.8 K between neighboring copper atoms at 4.942 Å is assigned to a syn-anti equatorial-apical carboxylate bridge with a total bond length of 6.822 Å, while the small value |J(AB)/k(B)|=0.004 K is assigned to a long bridge of 11 atoms with a total bond length of 19.186 Å, that includes one resonance assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB). This finding is discussed in terms of values obtained for similar paths in other model compounds and in proteins.

  19. Poly(amide-graft-acrylate) interfacial compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Michael Perez

    Graft copolymers with segments of dissimilar chemistries have been shown to be useful in a variety of applications as surfactants, compatibilizers, impact modifiers, and surface modifiers. The most common route to well defined graft copolymers is through the use of macromonomers, polymers containing a reactive functionality and thus capable of further polymerization. However, the majority of the studies thus far have focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of reacting with vinyl monomers to form graft copolymers. This study focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of participating in condensation polymerizations. A chain transfer functionalization method was utilized. Cysteine was evaluated as a chain transfer agent for the synthesis of amino acid functionalized poly(acrylate) and poly(methacrylate) macromonomers. Low molar mass, functionalized macromonomers were produced. These macromonomers were proven to be capable of reacting with amide precursors to form poly(amide-g-acrylate) graft copolymers. Macromonomers and graft copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The second part of this research involved poly(dimethacrylate) dental restorative materials. Volumetric shrinkage during the cure of these resins results in a poor interface between the resin and the remaining tooth structure, limiting the lifetime of these materials. Cyclic anhydrides were incorporated into common monomer compositions used in dental applications. Volume expansion from the ring opening hydrolysis of these anhydrides was shown to be feasible. The modified dental resins were characterized by swelling, extraction and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and density measurements. Linear poLymers designed to model the crosslinked dental resins were

  20. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  1. Iron(II) cage complexes of N-heterocyclic amide and bis(trimethylsilyl)amide ligands: synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulway, Scott A; Collison, David; McDouall, Joseph J W; Tuna, Floriana; Layfield, Richard A

    2011-03-21

    Metallation of hexahydropyrimidopyrimidine (hppH) by [Fe{N(SiMe(3))(2)}(2)] (1) produces the trimetallic iron(II) amide cage complex [{(Me(3)Si)(2)NFe}(2)(hpp)(4)Fe] (2), which contains three iron(II) centers, each of which resides in a distorted tetrahedral environment. An alternative, one-pot route that avoids use of the highly air-sensitive complex 1 is described for the synthesis of the iron(II)-lithium complex [{(Me(3)Si)(2)N}(2)Fe{Li(bta)}](2) (3) (where btaH = benzotriazole), in which both iron(II) centers reside in 3-coordinated pyramidal environments. The structure of 3 is also interpreted in terms of the ring laddering principle developed for alkali metal amides. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that both compounds display very weak antiferromagnetic exchange between the iron(II) centers, and that the iron(II) centers in 2 and 3 possess large negative axial zero-field splittings.

  2. Direct modification of hydrogen/deuterium-terminated diamond particles with polymers to form reversed and strong cation exchange solid phase extraction sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Jensen, David S; Vail, Michael A; Dadson, Andrew; Linford, Matthew R

    2010-12-03

    We describe direct polymer attachment to hydrogen and deuterium-terminated diamond (HTD and DTD) surfaces using a radical initiator (di-tert-amyl peroxide, DTAP), a reactive monomer (styrene) and a crosslinking agent (divinylbenzene, DVB) to create polystyrene encapsulated diamond. Chemisorbed polystyrene is sulfonated with sulfuric acid in acetic acid. Surface changes were followed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT). Finally, both polystyrene-modified DTD and sulfonated styrene-modified DTD were used in solid phase extraction (SPE). Percent recovery and column capacity were investigated for both phenyl (polystyrene) and sulfonic acid treated polystyrene SPE columns. These diamond-based SPE supports are stable under basic conditions, which is not the case for silica-based SPE supports.

  3. A reduced-amide inhibitor of Pin1 binds in a conformation resembling a twisted-amide transition state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G; Zhang, Yan; Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2011-11-08

    The mechanism of the cell cycle regulatory peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase), Pin1, was investigated using reduced-amide inhibitors designed to mimic the twisted-amide transition state. Inhibitors, R-pSer-Ψ[CH(2)N]-Pro-2-(indol-3-yl)ethylamine, 1 [R = fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)] and 2 (R = Ac), of Pin1 were synthesized and bioassayed. Inhibitor 1 had an IC(50) value of 6.3 μM, which is 4.5-fold better for Pin1 than our comparable ground-state analogue, a cis-amide alkene isostere-containing inhibitor. The change of Fmoc to Ac in 2 improved aqueous solubility for structural determination and resulted in an IC(50) value of 12 μM. The X-ray structure of the complex of 2 bound to Pin1 was determined to 1.76 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the reduced amide adopted a conformation similar to the proposed twisted-amide transition state of Pin1, with a trans-pyrrolidine conformation of the prolyl ring. A similar conformation of substrate would be destabilized relative to the planar amide conformation. Three additional reduced amides, with Thr replacing Ser and l- or d-pipecolate (Pip) replacing Pro, were slightly weaker inhibitors of Pin1.

  4. The influence of hydrogen- and cation-underpotential deposition on oxide-mediated Pt dissolution in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seokkoo [Texas Materials Institute and Center for Electrochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, University Station, C2200 Austin, TX 78712-0292 (United States); Meyers, Jeremy P., E-mail: jeremypmeyers@austin.utexas.edu [Texas Materials Institute and Center for Electrochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, University Station, C2200 Austin, TX 78712-0292 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > Pt dissolution has a maximum value around E{sub L} = 0.5-0.6 V vs. RHE at CV, SW experiments. > The addition of Zn cation (5 mM) in acid solution increase Pt dissolution rate on the region E{sub L} < 0.2 V at E{sub H} = 1.6 V. > Pt dissolution is accelerated by convection flow at over 1.2 V vs. RHE. > The amount of Pt dissolution during Pt oxide reduction reaction is measured by RRDE experiment. - Abstract: In order to fully understand the influence of a lower potential limit on platinum dissolution and the likely mechanism for mass and surface-area loss under potential cycling conditions, the dissolution of a Pt catalyst in a N{sub 2}-saturated 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution was examined using an electrochemical quartz nanobalance (EQCN) flow cell, a rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Due to the observation that cycling to a lower potential limit, which coincides with the hydrogen under-potential (H{sub UPD}) region, results in a decrease in the dissolution rate, cations capable of interfering with the hydrogen UPD process (Zn{sup 2+}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cd{sup 2+}) were introduced to the solution. Larger rates of mass loss were observed in the presence of these cations during the cycling process in the UPD region, despite apparently negligible effects on the behavior with more positive lower potential limits or on oxide formation and stripping. It was found that the quantity of soluble Pt species produced during the electrochemical reduction of PtO{sub 2} was proportional to the charge associated with oxide stripping at the disk electrode during the RRDE experiment.

  5. Palladium-Catalyzed N-Alkylation of Amides and Amines with Alcohols Employing the Aerobic Relay Race Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余小春; 姜澜; 李强; 谢嫒媛; 徐清

    2012-01-01

    Possibly because homogeneous palladium catalysts are not typical borrowing hydrogen catalysts and ligands are thus ineffective in catalyst activation under conventional anaerobic conditions, they had not been used in the N-alkylation reactions of amines/amides with alcohols in the past. By employing the aerobic relay race methodol- ogy with Pd-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation being a more effective protocol for alcohol activation, ligand-free homogeneous palladiums are successfully used as active catalysts in the dehydrative N-alkylation reactions, giving high yields and selectivities of the alkylated amides and amines. Mechanistic studies implied that the reaction most probably proceeds via the novel relay race mechanism we recently discovered and proposed.

  6. Oxidation resistant organic hydrogen getters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2008-09-09

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably Pt. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently removing hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  7. Copper/N,N-Dimethylglycine Catalyzed Goldberg Reactions Between Aryl Bromides and Amides, Aryl Iodides and Secondary Acyclic Amides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and general copper-catalyzed Goldberg reaction at 90–110 °C between aryl bromides and amides providing the desired products in good to excellent yields has been developed using N,N-dimethylglycine as the ligand. The reaction is tolerant toward a wide range of amides and a variety of functional group substituted aryl bromides. In addition, hindered, unreactive aromatic and aliphatic secondary acyclic amides, known to be poor nucleophiles, are efficiently coupled with aryl iodides through this simple and cheap copper/N,N-dimethylglycine catalytic system.

  8. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SEVEN AMIDES BY SUSPENDED BACTERIAL POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial transformation rate constants were determined for seven amides in natural pond water. A second-order mathematical rate expression served as the model for describing the microbial transformation. Also investigated was the relationship between the infrared spectra and the...

  9. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  10. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF AMIDE DERIVATIVES OF GINKGOLIDE A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI-HONG HU; ZHONG-LIANG CHEN; YU-YUAN XIE

    2001-01-01

    Amide derivatives of ginkgolide A were prepared and evaluated for their in vitro ability to inhibit the PAF-induced aggregation of rabbit platelets. They showed less activities than their parent compound ginkgolide A.

  11. Amid the Economic Rubble,Shangkong will Rise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Two years ago, bankers and policymakers were arguing heatedly over whether New York or London was the world's premier financial centre. Amid the post-crisis rubble that covers both cities, those arguments now look terribly passé.

  12. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage.

  13. Limiting steps of hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Synechocystis PCC 6803 as analysed by light-induced gas exchange transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournac, L.; Mus, F.; Bernard, L.; Guedeney, G.; Peltier, G. [CEA Cadarache, Lab. d' Ecophysiologie de la Photosynthese, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Vignais, P. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. de Biochimie er Biophysique des Systemes Integres (France)

    2002-12-01

    In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, transient hydrogen photo-production is observed when cells are exposed to light in anoxia. We measured changes in H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} concentrations using time-resolved mass spectrometry in wild-type and mutant strains of Chlamydomonas and Synechocystis. In both organisms, non-photochemical reduction of the plastoquinone pool is shown to contribute to the initial H{sub 2} photo-production. This pathway, which does not produce O{sub 2}, exhibits a low rate in normal conditions. From the effect of the uncoupler FCCP, we conclude that PS II-independent H{sub 2} production in Chlamydomonas is limited by the trans-thylakoidal proton gradient. In Synechocystis, from the study of a mutant deficient in the NDH-1 complex (M55), we conclude that PS II-independent H{sub 2} production is limited by recycling of NAD(P)H through the NDH-1 complex. Based on these conclusions, we propose strategies for optimising H{sub 2} photo-production in these organisms. (Author)

  14. Artists with Arthritis Create Beauty amid Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan; Mozes; 蔡峥伟

    2000-01-01

    得此来稿,我们曾犹豫再三,是否刊用此文。因为,其内容给人的第一印象颇有点离奇。Artists with Arthritis Create Beauty amid Pain,怎么可能呢?细读之下,你也许会觉得,此文虽是一家之言,但也并非荒唐。尤其是本文的收尾句,笔锋一转,抖出了妙言: ...in addition to the emotional support such stories can give RA patients,there are now new drug options that far surpass the treatment choices Renoir faced. 此句是否可译:除了此类故事能够给患风湿病者一种情感上的支持之外,现在可选的新药要比Renoir(雷诺阿,法国印象派画家。主要作品有《包厢》、《游船上的午餐》、《浴女》等。)时代强得多。

  15. Quantification of in vivo pH-weighted amide proton transfer (APT) MRI in acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Iris Y.; Igarashi, Takahiro; Guo, Yingkun; Sun, Phillip Z.

    2015-03-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is a specific form of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI that probes the pH-dependent amide proton exchange.The endogenous APT MRI is sensitive to tissue acidosis, which may complement the commonly used perfusion and diffusion scans for characterizing heterogeneous ischemic tissue damage. Whereas the saturation transfer asymmetry analysis (MTRasym) may reasonably compensate for direct RF saturation, in vivo MTRasym is however, susceptible to an intrinsically asymmetric shift (MTR'asym). Specifically, the reference scan for the endogenous APT MRI is 7 ppm upfield from that of the label scan, and subjects to concomitant RF irradiation effects, including nuclear overhauser effect (NOE)-mediated saturation transfer and semisolid macromolecular magnetization transfer. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis could not fully compensate for such slightly asymmetric concomitant RF irradiation effects, and MTRasym has to be delineated in order to properly characterize the pH-weighted APT MRI contrast. Given that there is very little change in relaxation time immediately after ischemia and the concomitant RF irradiation effects only minimally depends on pH, the APT contrast can be obtained as the difference of MTRasym between the normal and ischemic regions. Thereby, the endogenous amide proton concentration and exchange rate can be solved using a dual 2-pool model, and the in vivo MTR'asym can be calculated by subtracting the solved APT contrast from asymmetry analysis (i.e., MTR'asym =MTRasym-APTR). In addition, MTR'asym can be quantified using the classical 2-pool exchange model. In sum, our study delineated the conventional in vivo pH-sensitive MTRasym contrast so that pHspecific contrast can be obtained for imaging ischemic tissue acidosis.

  16. 强酸阳树脂在过氧化氢中的氧化分解特性研究%Characteristics of oxidation and decomposition of strong acidic cation exchange resin in hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱志平; 周瑜; 赵永福; 郭小翠

    2012-01-01

    在核电站,SO42-会引起镍基金属的晶间应力腐蚀破裂,对核电站的安全经济运行造成严重危害.为探索核电站SO42-的来源,研究了几种进口阳树脂在H2O2溶液中的动态溶出特性,采用离子色谱仪和TOC仪对溶出液的SO42-、TOC进行测定.研究结果表明,过氧化氢对大孔型和凝胶型树脂的影响不同,且氧化剂浓度越高,对树脂的影响越大,溶出的SO42-也越多;脱磺化速率随着时间推移而降低,而有机物溶出速率变化相对较小.%SO42- may cause intergranular stress corrosion cracking of nickel-based metal in nuclear power stations, resulting in serious hazards to the economically running of the nuclear power stations. To explore the source of SO42-of nuclear power stations, dynamic dissolving characteristics of several kinds of imported cation exchange resins in hydrogen peroxide solution have been researched. The dissolved liquid of S042- ,TOC are determined by ion chro-matography and TOC meter. The results show that the effects of hydrogen peroxide on macro-porous resin and gel-type resin are different. The higher the oxidant concentration is,the higher the influence on resin is,and the more SO42- is dissolved. And it is very likely that the desulfonation rate decreases with time, and the change of dissolving rate of organisms is relatively small.

  17. Far-infrared amide IV-VI spectroscopy of isolated 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J.; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    Delocalized molecular vibrations in the far-infrared and THz ranges are highly sensitive to the molecular structure, as well as to intra- and inter-molecular interactions. Thus, spectroscopic studies of biomolecular structures can greatly benefit from an extension of the conventional mid-infrared to the far-infrared wavelength range. In this work, the conformer-specific gas-phase far-infrared spectra of two aromatic molecules containing the peptide -CO-NH- link, namely, 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide, are investigated. The planar conformations with trans configuration of the peptide link have only been observed in the supersonic-jet expansion. The corresponding far-infrared signatures associated with the vibrations of the peptide -CO-NH- moiety, the so-called amide IV-VI bands, have been assigned and compared with the results of density functional theory frequency calculations based on the anharmonic vibrational second-order perturbation theory approach. The analysis of the experimental and theoretical data shows that the amide IV-VI bands are highly diagnostic for the geometry of the peptide moiety and the molecular backbone. They are also strongly blue-shifted upon formation of the NH⋯O-C hydrogen bonding, which is, for example, responsible for the formation of secondary protein structures. Furthermore, the amide IV-VI bands are also diagnostic for the cis configuration of the peptide link, which can be present in cyclic peptides. The experimental gas-phase data presented in this work can assist the vibrational assignment of similar biologically important systems, either isolated or in natural environments.

  18. Far-infrared amide IV-VI spectroscopy of isolated 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-14

    Delocalized molecular vibrations in the far-infrared and THz ranges are highly sensitive to the molecular structure, as well as to intra- and inter-molecular interactions. Thus, spectroscopic studies of biomolecular structures can greatly benefit from an extension of the conventional mid-infrared to the far-infrared wavelength range. In this work, the conformer-specific gas-phase far-infrared spectra of two aromatic molecules containing the peptide -CO-NH- link, namely, 2- and 4-Methylacetanilide, are investigated. The planar conformations with trans configuration of the peptide link have only been observed in the supersonic-jet expansion. The corresponding far-infrared signatures associated with the vibrations of the peptide -CO-NH- moiety, the so-called amide IV-VI bands, have been assigned and compared with the results of density functional theory frequency calculations based on the anharmonic vibrational second-order perturbation theory approach. The analysis of the experimental and theoretical data shows that the amide IV-VI bands are highly diagnostic for the geometry of the peptide moiety and the molecular backbone. They are also strongly blue-shifted upon formation of the NH⋯O-C hydrogen bonding, which is, for example, responsible for the formation of secondary protein structures. Furthermore, the amide IV-VI bands are also diagnostic for the cis configuration of the peptide link, which can be present in cyclic peptides. The experimental gas-phase data presented in this work can assist the vibrational assignment of similar biologically important systems, either isolated or in natural environments.

  19. Nonplanar tertiary amides in rigid chiral tricyclic dilactams. Peptide group distortions and vibrational optical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderková, Markéta; Profant, Václav; Hodačová, Jana; Sebestík, Jaroslav; Pazderka, Tomáš; Novotná, Pavlína; Urbanová, Marie; Safařík, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Tichý, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Baumruk, Vladimír; Maloň, Petr

    2013-08-22

    We investigate amide nonplanarity in vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra of tricyclic spirodilactams 5,8-diazatricyclo[6,3,0,0(1,5)]undecan-4,9-dione (I) and its 6,6',7,7'-tetradeuterio derivative (II). These rigid molecules constrain amide groups to nonplanar geometries with twisted pyramidal arrangements of bonds to amide nitrogen atoms. We have collected a full range vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra including signals of C-H and C-D stretching vibrations. We report normal-mode analysis and a comparison of calculated to experimental VCD and ROA. The data provide band-to-band assignment and offer a possibility to evaluate roles of constrained nonplanar tertiary amide groups and rigid chiral skeletons. Nonplanarity shows as single-signed VCD and ROA amide I signals, prevailing the couplets expected to arise from the amide-amide interaction. Amide-amide coupling dominates amide II (mainly C'-N stretching, modified in tertiary amides by the absence of a N-H bond) transitions (strong couplet in VCD, no significant ROA) probably due to the close proximity of amide nitrogen atoms. At lower wavenumbers, ROA spectra exhibit another likely manifestation of amide nonplanarity, showing signals of amide V (δ(oop)(N-C) at ~570 cm(-1)) and amide VI (δ(oop)(C'═O) at ~700 cm(-1) and ~650 cm(-1)) vibrations.

  20. Analysis of proton exchange kinetics with time-dependent exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2010-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is used to probe the kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in lysozyme in pH 5, 6 and 7.4. An analysis based on a Verhulst growth model is proposed and effectively applied to the kinetics of the hydrogen exchange. The data are described by a power-like function which is based on a time-dependence of the exchange rate. Experimental data ranging over many time scales is considered and accurate fits of a power-like function are obtained. Results of fittings show correlation between faster hydrogen-deuterium exchange and increase of pH. Furthermore a model is presented that discriminates between easily exchangeable hydrogens (located in close proximity to the protein surface) and those protected from the exchange (located in the protein interior). A possible interpretation of the model and its biological significance are discussed.

  1. Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC/ESI-MS/MS Study for the Identification and Characterization of In Vivo Metabolites of Cisplatin in Rat Kidney Cancer Tissues: Online Hydrogen/Deuterium (H/D Exchange Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Bandu

    Full Text Available In vivo rat kidney tissue metabolites of an anticancer drug, cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [II] (CP which is used for the treatment of testicular, ovarian, bladder, cervical, esophageal, small cell lung, head and neck cancers, have been identified and characterized by using liquid chromatography positive ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS in combination with on line hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX experiments. To identify in vivo metabolites, kidney tissues were collected after intravenous administration of CP to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 3 per group. The tissue samples were homogenized and extracted using newly optimized metabolite extraction procedure which involves liquid extraction with phosphate buffer containing ethyl acetate and protein precipitation with mixed solvents of methanol-water-chloroform followed by solid-phase clean-up procedure on Oasis HLB 3cc cartridges and then subjected to LC/ESI-HRMS analysis. A total of thirty one unknown in vivo metabolites have been identified and the structures of metabolites were elucidated using LC-MS/MS experiments combined with accurate mass measurements. Online HDX experiments have been used to further support the structural characterization of metabolites. The results showed that CP undergoes a series of ligand exchange biotransformation reactions with water and other nucleophiles like thio groups of methionine, cysteine, acetylcysteine, glutathione and thioether. This is the first research approach focused on the structure elucidation of biotransformation products of CP in rats, and the identification of metabolites provides essential information for further pharmacological and clinical studies of CP, and may also be useful to develop various effective new anticancer agents.

  2. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  3. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  4. Assembling one-dimensional coordination polymers into threedimensional architectures via hydrogen bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit Rajput; Madhushree Sarkar; Kumar Biradha

    2010-09-01

    The reactions of bis(pyridylcarboxamido)alkanes (amides) and bis(3-pyridyl)alkanediamides (reverse amides) with copper(II) and zinc(II) in the presence of various anions resulted in onedimensional polymeric crystalline complexes with or without guest inclusion. The crystal structure analyses of these complexes reveal that the one-dimensional networks observed here are of three types: simple linear chain, chains with wavy nature and chains containing cavities. The self-complementary amide groups of the ligands assembled these coordination networks into higher dimensional architectures via N-H$\\cdots$O hydrogen bonds.

  5. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-12-31

    During the last quarter several high performance membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The heat-resistant resin poly(etherimide) has been selected as the polymer with the most outstanding properties for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Flat sheet and hollow fiber poly(etherimide) membranes have been prepared and evaluated with pure gases and gas mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures. Multilayer composite poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes were also developed. These membranes are useful for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide hydrogen. They have very high selectivities and extremely high normalized carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide fluxes. Separation of carbon dioxide/hydrogen streams is a key problem in hydrogen production from coal. The development of the two membranes now gives us two approaches to separate these gas streams, depending on the stream`s composition. If the stream contains small quantities of hydrogen, the hydrogen- permeable poly(etherimide) membrane would be used to produce a hydrogen-enriched permeate. If the stream contains small quantities of carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide, the poly(ether-ester-amide) membrane would be used to produce a carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide-free, hydrogen-enriched residue stream. 6 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Cinnamic acid amides from Tribulus terrestris displaying uncompetitive α-glucosidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeong Hun; Kim, Dae Wook; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Park, Chanin; Son, Minky; Kim, Jeong Yoon; Yuk, Heung Joo; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Ki Hun

    2016-05-23

    The α-glucosidase inhibitory potential of Tribulus terrestris extracts has been reported but as yet the active ingredients are unknown. This study attempted to isolate the responsible metabolites and elucidate their inhibition mechanism of α-glucosidase. By fractionating T. terristris extracts, three cinnamic acid amide derivatives (1-3) were ascertained to be active components against α-glucosidase. The lead structure, N-trans-coumaroyltyramine 1, showed significant inhibition of α-glucosidase (IC50 = 0.42 μM). Moreover, all active compounds displayed uncompetitive inhibition mechanisms that have rarely been reported for α-glucosidase inhibitors. This kinetic behavior was fully demonstrated by showing a decrease of both Km and Vmax, and Kik/Kiv ratio ranging between 1.029 and 1.053. We progressed to study how chemical modifications to the lead structure 1 may impact inhibition. An α, β-unsaturation carbonyl group and hydroxyl group in A-ring of cinnamic acid amide emerged to be critical functionalities for α-glucosidase inhibition. The molecular modeling study revealed that the inhibitory activities are tightly related to π-π interaction as well as hydrogen bond interaction between enzyme and inhibitors.

  7. Is the pre-Tg DSC endotherm observed with solid state proteins associated with the protein internal dynamics? Investigation of bovine serum albumin by solid state hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masayasu; Pikal, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    DSC thermograms of solid state pure proteins often show a distinct endotherm at a temperature far below the glass transition temperature of the system (Tg). We hypothesized this endotherm represents enthalpy recovery associated with an internal mobility transition of the protein molecule. Although the existence of an internal transition has been postulated, whether this endotherm is associated with such a transition has not previously been discussed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of the pre-Tg endotherm in lyophilized bovine serum albumin (BSA). Due to strong glass behavior, the system Tg was determined by extrapolating Tg data of disaccharide/BSA formulations to zero saccharide. A small pre-Tg endotherm around 40-60 °C was observed in amorphous BSA equilibrated at 11%RH. The apparent activation energy suggested the endotherm was "α-mobility"-related. A solid state hydrogen/deuterium exchange study using FTIR was conducted over a temperature range spanning the endotherm. We found a fast phase, followed by essentially a plateau level which is highly temperature dependent in the 40-60 °C range, suggesting enhanced internal protein motion as the system passes through the temperature range of the endotherm. These results suggest the pre-Tg endotherm is associated with a protein internal mobility transition.

  8. Exchange interaction between TCNQ and transition metal ion mediated by hydrogen bonds in [Mn(phen)3](TCNQ)2·H2O and [Co(phen)3](TCNQ)2·H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šoltésová, D.; Vasylets, G.; Čižmár, E.; Botko, M.; Cheranovskii, V.; Starodub, V.; Feher, A.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic properties, specific heat and EPR spectra of anion-radical salts [Mn(phen)3](TCNQ)2·H2O and [Co(phen)3](TCNQ)2·H2O, in which TCNQ molecules and transition metal ions are not connected by covalent bonds and magnetic interactions are mediated via hydrogen bonds, were investigated. Measurements of the magnetic response were performed down to 1.8 K in magnetic fields up to 7 T. The heat capacity of investigated compounds was measured in temperature range from 0.38 K to 35 K in magnetic fields up to 9 T for [Mn(phen)3](TCNQ)2·H2O and up to 3 T for [Co(phen)3](TCNQ)2·H2O. The EPR spectra of studied samples were investigated for both samples in the temperature range from 2 K to 300 K. Theoretical model of weakly-coupled magnetic units composed of four TCNQ anion radicals and of two transition metal ions was proposed for interpretation of obtained data. The energy of exchange interactions between TCNQ molecules and transition metal ion is important for the description of low-temperature behavior of studied anion-radical salts and was estimated to be in the range of 1.3-1.5 K.

  9. RhoA Kinase (Rock) and p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase (p90Rsk) phosphorylation of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE1) is required for lysophosphatidic acid-induced transport, cytoskeletal organization and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallert, Mark A; Hammes, Daniel; Nguyen, Tony; Kiefer, Lea; Berthelsen, Nick; Kern, Andrew; Anderson-Tiege, Kristina; Shabb, John B; Muhonen, Wallace W; Grove, Bryon D; Provost, Joseph J

    2015-03-01

    The sodium hydrogen exchanger isoform one (NHE1) plays a critical role coordinating asymmetric events at the leading edge of migrating cells and is regulated by a number of phosphorylation events influencing both the ion transport and cytoskeletal anchoring required for directed migration. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) activation of RhoA kinase (Rock) and the Ras-ERK growth factor pathway induces cytoskeletal reorganization, activates NHE1 and induces an increase in cell motility. We report that both Rock I and II stoichiometrically phosphorylate NHE1 at threonine 653 in vitro using mass spectrometry and reconstituted kinase assays. In fibroblasts expressing NHE1 alanine mutants for either Rock (T653A) or ribosomal S6 kinase (Rsk; S703A) we show that each site is partially responsible for the LPA-induced increase in transport activity while NHE1 phosphorylation by either Rock or Rsk at their respective site is sufficient for LPA stimulated stress fiber formation and migration. Furthermore, mutation of either T653 or S703 leads to a higher basal pH level and a significantly higher proliferation rate. Our results identify the direct phosphorylation of NHE1 by Rock and suggest that both RhoA and Ras pathways mediate NHE1-dependent ion transport and migration in fibroblasts.

  10. Cations bind only weakly to amides in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Halil I; Kherb, Jaibir; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated salt interactions with butyramide as a simple mimic of cation interactions with protein backbones. The experiments were performed in aqueous metal chloride solutions using two spectroscopic techniques. In the first, which provided information about contact pair formation, the response of the amide I band to the nature and concentration of salt was monitored in bulk aqueous solutions via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that molar concentrations of well-hydrated metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Li(+)) led to the rise of a peak assigned to metal cation-bound amides (1645 cm(-1)) and a decrease in the peak associated with purely water-bound amides (1620 cm(-1)). In a complementary set of experiments, the effect of cation identity and concentration was investigated at the air/butyramide/water interface via vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. In these studies, metal ion-amide binding led to the ordering of the adjacent water layer. Such experiments were sensitive to the interfacial partitioning of cations in either a contact pair with the amide or as a solvent separated pair. In both experiments, the ordering of the interactions of the cations was: Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Li(+) > Na(+) ≈ K(+). This is a direct cationic Hofmeister series. Even for Ca(2+), however, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the cation with the amide carbonyl oxygen was no tighter than ∼8.5 M. For Na(+) and K(+), no evidence was found for any binding. As such, the interactions of metal cations with amides are far weaker than the analogous binding of weakly hydrated anions.

  11. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  12. An efficient and convenient synthesis of N-substituted amides under heterogeneous condition using Al(HSO4)3 via Ritter reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elnaz Karimian; Batool Akhlaghinia; Sara S E Ghodsinia

    2016-03-01

    An efficient and inexpensive synthesis of N-substituted amides from the reaction of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles with various benzylic alcohols (secondary and tertiary) and tert-butyl alcohol by refluxing nitromethane via the Ritter reaction catalyzed by aluminum hydrogen sulfate [Al(HSO4)3] is described. Thecatalyst which is an air-stable, cost-effective solid acid could be readily recycled by filtration and reused four times without any significant loss of its activity.

  13. Mechanistic Investigation of the Ruthenium–N-Heterocyclic-Carbene-Catalyzed Amidation of Alcohols and Amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarov, Ilya; Fristrup, Peter; Madsen, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the ruthenium–N-heterocyclic-carbene-catalyzed formation of amides from alcohols and amines was investigated by experimental techniques (Hammett studies, kinetic isotope effects) and by a computational study by using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT/ M06......, but that it is one of several slow steps in the catalytic cycle. Rapid scrambling of hydrogen and deuterium at the a position of the alcohol was observed with deuterium-labeled substrates, which implies that the catalytically active species is a ruthenium dihydride. The experimental results were supported...... by the characterization of a plausible catalytic cycle by using DFT/M06. Both cisdihydride and trans-dihydride intermediates were considered, but when the theoretical turnover frequencies (TOFs) were derived directly from the calculated DFT/M06 energies, we found that only the trans-dihydride pathway was in agreement...

  14. Kinetic resolution and chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of functionalized gamma-hydroxy amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Ann-Britt L; Borén, Linnéa; Pàmies, Oscar; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2005-04-01

    [reaction: see text] An efficient kinetic resolution of racemic gamma-hydroxy amides 1 was performed via Pseudomas cepacia lipase (PS-C)-catalyzed transesterification. The enzyme PS-C tolerates both variation in the chain length and different functionalities giving good to high enantioselectivity (E values of up to >250). The combination of enzymatic kinetic resolution with a ruthenium-catalyzed racemization led to a dynamic kinetic resolution. The use of 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanol as a hydrogen source to suppress ketone formation in the dynamic kinetic resolution yields the corresponding acetates in good yield and good to high enantioselectivity (ee's up to 98%). The synthetic utility of this procedure was illustrated by the practical synthesis of the versatile intermediate gamma-lactone (R)-5-methyltetrahydrofuran-2-one.

  15. Open-shell pair interaction energy decomposition analysis (PIEDA): formulation and application to the hydrogen abstraction in tripeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Mandy C; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Francisco, Joseph S; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2013-02-21

    An open-shell extension of the pair interaction energy decomposition analysis (PIEDA) within the framework of the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method is developed. The open-shell PIEDA method allows the analysis of inter- and intramolecular interactions in terms of electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, charge-transfer, dispersion, and optional polarization energies for molecular systems with a radical or high-spin fragment. Taking into account the low computational cost and scalability of the FMO and PIEDA methods, the new scheme provides a means to characterize the stabilization of radical and open-shell sites in biologically relevant species. The open-shell PIEDA is applied to the characterization of intramolecular interactions in capped trialanine upon hydrogen abstraction (HA) at various sites on the peptide. Hydrogen abstraction reaction is the first step in the oxidative pathway initiated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, associated with oxidative stress. It is found that HA results in significant geometrical reorganization of the trialanine peptide. Depending on the HA site, terminal interactions in the radical fold conformers may become weaker or stronger compared to the parent molecule, and often change the character of the non-covalent bonding from amide stacking to hydrogen bonding.

  16. 酰胺类阴离子受体的研究进展%Research on the amide anion receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉玲; 刘克成; 孙红先; 李闯

    2012-01-01

    阴离子识别是现代化学重要的研究内容之一,其关键环节是构筑可识别阴离子的结合受体,以非共价键力如静电作用、疏水作用、氢键等与阴离子结合.本文主要评述了芳香酰胺类受体分子和杂环酰胺类受体分子两种酰胺类受体的合成及其在阴离子识别中的应用.%The recognition and sensing of anion have been developed into an important research subject in modern chemistry.Its key link is the combination of constructing identifiable anions in a covalent bond,the receptor electrostatic interactions,such as force of hydrophobic functions,hydrogen anion binding.The paper mainly reviews the following two amide class receptors in their synthesis and application of anionic recognition:(1) the balmy amide receptor molecules,(2) heterocyclic amide receptor molecules.

  17. Synthesis and structural studies of amino amide salts derived from 2-(aminomethyl)benzimidazole and α-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Montiel, Concepción; Tapia-Benavides, Antonio R.; Falcón-León, Martha; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Tlahuext, Hugo; Tlahuextl, Margarita

    2015-11-01

    2-{[(Ammoniumacetyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 4, 2-{[(2-ammoniumpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 5, and 2-{[(2-ammonium-3-phenylpropanoyl)amino]methyl}-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium dichloride 6 amino amides were synthesized via condensation of 2AMBZ dihydrochloride with the corresponding amino acid. Compounds 7-12 were obtained by replacing chloride ions (in salts 4-6) with nitrate or tetrachlorozincate ions. The results of X-ray diffraction crystallographic studies indicated that the geometries, charges and sizes of the anions are essential for the formation of the strong hydrogen bond interactions of compounds 4, 5, 9-12. Moreover, in most cases, the presence of water and solvent molecules stabilizes the supramolecular structures of these compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy indicated that the presence of chloride or tetrachlorozincate anions increases the acidity of the benzimidazolic and amide groups more significantly than the presence of nitrate anions. However, Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) computations of the crystal structures demonstrate that amino amides interact more strongly with NO3- than with Cl- and ZnCl42- anions; this difference explains the spectroscopic results.

  18. Lanthanide(III) complexation with an amide derived pyridinophane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Goretti; Bastida, Rufina; Macías, Alejandro; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Valencia, Laura

    2015-02-16

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the solid state and solution structures of lanthanide(III) complexes with the 18-membered pyridinophane ligand containing acetamide pendant arms TPPTAM (TPPTAM = 2,2',2″-(3,7,11-triaza-1,5,9(2,6)-tripyridinacyclododecaphane-3,7,11-triyl)triacetamide). The ligand crystallizes in the form of a clathrated hydrate, where the clathrated water molecule establishes hydrogen-bonding interactions with the amide NH groups and two N atoms of the macrocycle. The X-ray structures of 13 different Ln(3+) complexes obtained as the nitrate salts (Ln(3+) = La(3+)-Yb(3+), except Pm(3+)) have been determined. Additionally, the X-ray structure of the La(3+) complex obtained as the triflate salt was also obtained. In all cases the ligand provides 9-fold coordination to the Ln(3+) ion, ten coordination being completed by an oxygen atom of a coordinated water molecule or a nitrate or triflate anion. The bond distances of the metal coordination environment show a quadratic change along the lanthanide series, as expected for isostructural series of Ln(3+) complexes. Luminescence lifetime measurements obtained from solutions of the Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) complexes in H2O and D2O point to the presence of a water molecule coordinated to the metal ion in aqueous solutions. The analysis of the Ln(3+)-induced paramagnetic shifts indicates that the complexes are ten-coordinated throughout the lanthanide series from Ce(3+) to Yb(3+), and that the solution structure is very similar to the structures observed in the solid state. The complexes of the light Ln(3+) ions are fluxional due to a fast Δ(λλλλλλ) ↔ Λ(δδδδδδ) interconversion that involves the inversion of the macrocyclic ligand and the rotation of the acetamide pendant arms. The complexes of the small Ln(3+) ions are considerably more rigid, the activation free energy determined from VT (1)H NMR for the Lu(3+) complex being ΔG(⧧)298 = 72.4 ± 5.1 kJ mol(-1).

  19. Crystal structure of glycidamide: the mutagenic and genotoxic metabolite of acryl-amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemgesberg, Melanie N; Bonck, Thorsten; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Sun, Yu; Schrenk, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    The title compound, glycidamide (systematic name: oxirane-2-carboxamide), C3H5NO2, is the mutagenic and genotoxic metabolite of acryl-amide, a food contaminant and industrial chemical that has been classified as being probably carcinogenic to humans. Synthesized via the reaction of acrylo-nitrile and hydrogen peroxide, it crystallizes with both enanti-omers occurring as two crystallographically independent mol-ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. They have similar conformations with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0809 Å for mol-ecule B inverted on mol-ecule A. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which lead to the formation of β-sheet structures enclosing R 2 (2)(8) and R 4 (2)(8) loops. The β-sheets are linked by weaker C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a supra-molecular three-dimensional structure.

  20. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigation on the binding of a synthesized steroidal amide to protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua-xin, E-mail: h.x.zhang@yeah.net; Liu, E.

    2014-09-15

    Owing to the various valuable biological activities, steroidal amides have become a hot topic in steroidal pharmaceutical chemistry. In this paper, an anti-tumor steroid derivate (DAAO) was synthesized and identified. The interaction between DAAO and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular modeling and molecular probe techniques. The results suggested that DAAO had reacted with HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The formation of DAAO–HSA complex at ground state led to static quenching of HSA's fluorescence. The number of binding sites, binding constants, enthalpy change (ΔH{sup θ}), Gibbs free energy change (ΔG{sup θ}) and entropy change (ΔS{sup θ}) were calculated at different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching theory and classic equation. Molecular modeling investigation indicated that DAAO was more inclined to absorb on Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule on grounds of the lowest energy principle and steric hindrance effect. The binding location was further confirmed by fluorescence probe experiment using warfarin (site I probe) for displacement. Furthermore, the conformational changes of HSA in presence of DAAO were investigated by CD spectra. The results could provide new evidence explaining the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity and may be useful for understanding the anti-cancer mechanism of steroidal drug. - Highlights: • A designed steroidal amide compound (DAAO) was synthesized by introducing amido bonds into a steroid nucleus. • DAAO binds to Sudlow's site I in HSA through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. • The interaction was a spontaneous and exothermic process with modest degree of reversibility. • The secondary structure of HSA and the microenvironment of TRP214 altered. • Amido bond in steroid nucleus (–NH–CO–) plays important role in stabling the structure of

  1. Iron(III) Chloride mediated reduction of Bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl)amide to an Amide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rojalin Sahu; Papuli Chaliha; Vadivelu Manivannan

    2016-01-01

    In methanol, FeCl3 reacted readily with L1H (L1H = bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl)amide) and afforded a complex having the formula [Fe(L2)Cl2] (1) {L2− = -((1-isoquinolyl)(methoxy)methyl)isoquinoline-1-carboxamide ion}. This reaction involves reduction of one of the two carbonyl groups present in L1H to (methoxy)methyl group. A plausible mechanism for the conversion of L1H to L2− has been proposed. Determination of molecular structure of 1 confirmed this conversion. Fe(III) ion is surrounded by three nitrogen atoms of the ligand and two chloride ions, imparting a rare distorted trigonal bipyramidal N3Cl2 coordination environment.

  2. Mechanism of fluorescence quenching of tyrosine derivatives by amide group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiczk, Wiesław; Rzeska, Alicja; Łukomska, Joanna; Stachowiak, Krystyna; Karolczak, Jerzy; Malicka, Joanna; Łankiewicz, Leszek

    2001-06-01

    The difference between fluorescence lifetimes of the following amino acids: phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), ( O-methyl)tyrosine (Tyr(Me)), (3-hydroxy)tyrosine (Dopa), (3,4-dimethoxy)phenylalanine (Dopa(Me) 2) and their amides was used to testify the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of aromatic amino acids by the amide group. On the basis of the Marcus theory of photoinduced electron transfer parabolic relationships between ln kET and ionization potentials reduced by energy of excitation ( IP-E ∗0,0) for the above-mentioned amino acids were obtained. This finding indicates the occurrence of photoinduced electron transfer from the excited chromophore group to the amide group.

  3. VCD Robustness of the Amide-I and Amide-II Vibrational Modes of Small Peptide Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Tarczay, György

    2015-09-01

    The rotational strengths and the robustness values of amide-I and amide-II vibrational modes of For(AA)n NHMe (where AA is Val, Asn, Asp, or Cys, n = 1-5 for Val and Asn; n = 1 for Asp and Cys) model peptides with α-helix and β-sheet backbone conformations were computed by density functional methods. The robustness results verify empirical rules drawn from experiments and from computed rotational strengths linking amide-I and amide-II patterns in the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of peptides with their backbone structures. For peptides with at least three residues (n ≥ 3) these characteristic patterns from coupled amide vibrational modes have robust signatures. For shorter peptide models many vibrational modes are nonrobust, and the robust modes can be dependent on the residues or on their side chain conformations in addition to backbone conformations. These robust VCD bands, however, provide information for the detailed structural analysis of these smaller systems.

  4. GTI's hydrogen programs: hydrogen production, storage, and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范钦柏

    2006-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier could help address our concerns about energy security, global climate change,and air quality. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Future and have the potential to revolutionize theway we power our nation, offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels.For over 45 years, GTI has been active in hydrogen energy research, development and demonstration. The Institute has extensive experience and on-going work in all aspects of the hydrogen energy economy including production, delivery, infrastructure,use, safety and public policy. This paper discusses the recent GTI programs in hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC).

  5. Chiral separation of amides using supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yanqiao; Dunetz, Joshua R; Lovdahl, Michael

    2013-06-07

    Nine amide derivatives bearing α-stereocenters as well as different substitutions on the amide nitrogen were synthesized via an n-propanephosphonic acid cyclic anhydride (T3P)-mediated coupling, and their enantiomeric pairs were separated using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Five polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases (CSPs), Chiralcel OD-H, and OJ-H, and Chiralpak AD-H, AS-H and IC columns were explored for the chiral separation of these compounds. None of the compounds could be resolved on all five columns, and no single column could separate all nine pairs of enantiomers. Comparatively, the IC and OD-H columns showed the best results for this group of amides, yielding baseline separations for eight of nine pairs. The type of polar functional group and aromatic substitution in the CSPs and the substitutions on the amide nitrogen had a significant impact on the enantiomeric resolution of the compounds in the interaction between the analyte and the stationary phases. The potential separation mechanism and the effect of substitutions in the CSPs and amide solutes on the separation are discussed. The effects of the organic modifiers, modifier composition, mobile phase additives, and temperature were investigated for the separation of these amides on the IC or the OD-H column. Baseline resolution was achieved under optimized chromatographic conditions using an IC or an OD-H column. Linearity, reproducibility, and limit of quantitation were also demonstrated for the compound 9. Approximately three-fold improvement in signal-to-noise was observed using a SFC system with better instrument design.

  6. Excited states of muonium in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Kulhar

    2006-06-01

    Muonium formation in excited states in muon-hydrogen charge-exchange collision is investigated using a method developed in a previous paper. Differential cross-section results are found to resemble positronium formation cross-section results of positron-hydrogen charge-exchange problem. Forward differential and integrated cross-sections are computed for muon energy of 2 keV and higher. Total muonium formation cross-sections are computed using Jackson and Schiff scaling rules. Muonium formation cross-section results obtained from proton-hydrogen charge-exchange cross-section results, using velocity scaling are compared with the results of the present calculation.

  7. Studies on the amide compounds ofMirabilis. Jalapa. L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN; XuWei

    2001-01-01

    Mirabilis himalaica(Edgew.)Heinerl Var. Chinensis Heimerl belonging to the genus Mirabilis are used in chinese medicine as a remedy for various diseases[1].Its chemical constituents,however, have not been reported so far. we have carried out a detailed chemical investigatigation of the seeds and have isolated two new amides along with three known compounds.  The known compounds were identified by comparing their spectral data with those of authentic samples or with those reported in literature as daucosterol[2], bsitoserol[2], boeravinone E[3], in the present note, the structural elucidation of two new amides is reported.  ……

  8. Study on Alternating Copolymerization of Polyester-amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Wen-liang; LI Jian-mei; ZHU Fang-liang

    2002-01-01

    The preparing methods, choice of catalysts and reaction kinetics of one of the monomers, diesteramide(DEA), of polyester-amides were investigated in details. The chemical structure of DEA was analyzed. And the Polyester-amides (PEA) were obtained by melt copolymerization with DEA. It is shown that DEA can be synthesized by DMT and hexamethylene diamine with the catalyst EX - 1 or EX - 2. The relationship between reaction rate of synthesizing monomer and concentration of hexamethylene diamine is first order kinetic relation.

  9. Studies on the amide compounds ofMirabilis. Jalapa. L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Mirabilis himalaica(Edgew.)Heinerl Var. Chinensis Heimerl belonging to the genus Mirabilis are used in chinese medicine as a remedy for various diseases[1].Its chemical constituents,however, have not been reported so far. we have carried out a detailed chemical investigatigation of the seeds and have isolated two new amides along with three known compounds. The known compounds were identified by comparing their spectral data with those of authentic samples or with those reported in literature as daucosterol[2], bsitoserol[2], boeravinone E[3], in the present note, the structural elucidation of two new amides is reported.

  10. Determination of wine authenticity and geographical origin by measuring non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes in wine ethanol with EIM-IRMS® methodology in combination with δ18O values obtained from wine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajlovic, Ivan; Glavanovic, Mirko; Sparks, Kimberlee L.; Sparks, Jed P.; Jovic, Slobodan

    2014-05-01

    Wine consumption has grown significantly in the last two decades, with the United States being the leading consumer of wine in the world. It is also the second largest wine producer and importer after the European Union, which consists of 27 European countries. The world has seen a significant increase in production from new world countries, especially the United States, Australia and Chile, and wine imports have grown significantly with this globalization. The quality and authenticity of products have become critical concerns. With the amount of wine being imported the need for verifying wine authenticity and understanding procedures used in wine making has become more important than ever. Understanding the origin of consumed wine in rapidly expanding global economy has become fundamental in order to control quality and protect consumers. In our previous scientific work we have shown that EIM-IRMS®, Ethanol Isotope Measurement - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (EIM-IRMS®), is capable of providing unique molecular fingerprint that cannot be reproduced or counterfeited. Today we know that δ18O value from the wine water is one of the most important parameters which can give information about wine geographical origin. Earlier we have suggested that grape juice or grape pulp is a closed biochemical system in which all chemical compounds stand in dynamic equilibrium and are in direct connection with each other. Taking that into consideration we have concluded that if system is genuine and if no water, or no sugar has been added to the grape must or grape juice prior to alcoholic fermentation, then ethanol which is made in process of alcoholic fermentation will have specific δD value of non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes which will be in range from -205 to -215 ‰ vs. V-SMOW. In this work we will show that this value, which we named δDn (non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes in ethanol), is very important because it can support or refute conclusions

  11. Si-H bond activation at {(NHC)₂Ni⁰} leading to hydrido silyl and bis(silyl) complexes: a versatile tool for catalytic Si-H/D exchange, acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of hydrosilanes, and hydrogenation of disilanes to hydrosilanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, David; Zell, Thomas; Schaub, Thomas; Radius, Udo

    2014-07-28

    The unique reactivity of the nickel(0) complex [Ni2(iPr2Im)4(COD)] (1) (iPr2Im = 1,3-di-isopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene) towards hydrosilanes in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions is reported. A series of nickel hydrido silyl complexes cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(H)(SiH(n-1)R(4-n))] (n = 1, 2) and nickel bis(silyl) complexes cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(SiH(n-1)R(4-n))2] (n = 1, 2, 3) were synthesized by stoichiometric reactions of 1 with hydrosilanes H(n)SiR(4-n), and fully characterized by X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods. These hydrido silyl complexes are examples where the full oxidative addition step is hindered. They have, as a result of the remaining Si-H interactions, remarkably short Si-H distances and feature a unique dynamic behavior in solution. Cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(H)(SiMePh2)] (cis-5) shows in solution at room temperature a dynamic site exchange of the NHC ligands, H-D exchange with C6D6 to give the deuteride complex cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(D)(SiMePh2)] (cis-5-D), and at elevated temperatures an irreversible isomerization to trans-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(D)(SiMePh2)] (trans-5-D). Reactions with sterically less demanding silanes give cis-configured bis(silyl) complexes accompanied by the release of dihydrogen. These complexes display, similarly to the hydrido silyl complexes, interestingly short Si-Si distances. Complex 1 reacts with 4 eq. HSi(OEt)3, in contrast to all the other silanes used in this study, to give the trans-configured bis(silyl) complex trans-[Ni(iPr2Im)2Ni(Si(OEt)3)2] (trans-12). The addition of two equivalents of Ph2SiH2 to 1 results, at elevated temperatures, in the formation of the dinuclear complex [{(iPr2Im)Ni-μ(2)-(HSiPh2)}2] (6). This diamagnetic, formal Ni(I) complex exhibits a long Ni-Ni bond in the solid state, as established by X-ray diffraction. The capability of the electron rich {Ni(iPr2Im)2} complex fragment to activate Si-H bonds was applied catalytically in the deuteration of Et3Si-H to Et3Si-D employing C6D6 as a convenient deuterium source

  12. Unraveling the degradation of artificial amide bonds in nylon oligomer hydrolase: from induced-fit to acylation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Takeshi; Boero, Mauro; Kamiya, Katsumasa; Ando, Hiroyuki; Negoro, Seiji; Nakano, Masayoshi; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-02-14

    To elucidate how the nylon oligomer hydrolase (NylB) acquires its peculiar degradation activity towards non-biological amide bonds, we inspected the underlying enzymatic processes going from the induced-fit upon substrate binding to acylation. Specifically we investigated the mutational effects of two mutants, Y170F and D181G, indicated in former experiments as crucial systems because of their specific amino acid residues. Therefore, by adopting first-principles molecular dynamics complemented with metadynamics we provide a detailed insight into the underlying acylation mechanism. Our results show that while in the wild type (WT) the Tyr170 residue points the NH group towards the proton-acceptor site of an artificial amide bond, hence ready to react, in the Y170F this does not occur. The reason is ascribed to the absence of Tyr170 in the mutant, which is replaced by phenylalanine, which is unable to form hydrogen bond with the amide bond; thus, resulting in an increase in the activation barrier of more than 10 kcal mol(-1). Nonetheless, despite the lack of hydrogen bonding between the Y170F and the substrate, the highest free energy barrier for the induced-fit is similar to that of WT. This seems to suggest that in the induced-fit process, kinetics is little affected by the mutation. On the basis of additional structural homology analyses on the enzymes of the same family, we suggest that natural selection is responsible for the development of the peculiar hydrolytic activity of Arthrobacter sp. KI72.

  13. Organic Ion Exchangers. Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. S. Dragan

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Organic ion exchangers in beads form are the most widely utilized materials in the purification, concentration and separation processes of inorganic and organic ions in many fields of science and industry[1,2]. Some original contributions in the preparation and characterization of porous organic ion exchangers will be summarized first. The main types of synthetic ion exchangers were obtained by polymer-analogous reactions performed on porous styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers (S-DVB)[3,4] and porous acrylonitrile-DVB copolymers (AN-DVB) [5,6]. Porous S-DVB copolymers were used as substrate for the synthesis of weak and strong base anion exchangers by chloromethylation reaction followed by the reaction with secondary or tertiary amines.Different chloromethylation agents were employed. Weak base anion exchangers with tertiary or primary amine groups were prepared starting from AN-DVB copolymers by aminolyse-hydrolyse reaction with asymmetrical diamines or ethylenediamine (EDA), respectively. Strong base anion exchangers were obtained by quaternization reaction with alkyl halides of the tertiary amine groups. Chelating ion exchangers with iminodiacetic groups were prepared by the carboxymethylation reaction of the primary amine groups above mentioned and of those contained in a vinylamine-ethylacrylate-DVB copolymer, vinylamine units being generated by a Hofmann degradation reaction of the primary amide groups contained in the acrylamide-ethylacrylate-DVB copolymerp[7]. An amphoteric ion exchanger was prepared by the hydrolysis of the ester groups after the Hofmann degradation.

  14. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity in brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri (Cyclostomata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jirikowski, G; Erhart, G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1984-01-01

    the hypothalamus to the olfactory system and caudally to the medulla oblongata. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity was also found in cells of the adenohypophysis. These observations suggest that the hagfish possesses a brain FMRF-amide-like transmitter system and pituitary cells containing FMRF-amide-like material...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10176 - Amides, peanut-oil, N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, peanut-oil, N- . 721.10176... Substances § 721.10176 Amides, peanut-oil, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, peanut-oil, N- (PMN P-04-144; CAS No....

  16. 40 CFR 721.720 - Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkoxylated fatty acid amide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.720 Alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt. (a) Chemical... as an alkoxylated fatty acid amide, alkylsulfate salt (PMN P-97-136) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9075 - Quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fluorinated alkylaryl amide. 721.9075 Section 721.9075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... amide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as quaternary ammonium salt of fluorinated alkylaryl amide (PMN No. P-92-688)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10063 - Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... amide (generic). 721.10063 Section 721.10063 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10063 Halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (generic). (a) Chemical... as halo substituted hydroxy nitrophenyl amide (PMN P-04-792) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10191 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- . 721.10191 Section... Substances § 721.10191 Amides, coco, N- . (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- (PMN P-06-262; CAS No. 851544-20-2)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  1. Two-dimensional supramolecular networks via C-H$\\cdots$Cl and N-H$\\cdots$Cl interactions utilizing bidentate neutral pyridine amide coordinated MnIICl2 tectons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wilson Jacob; Rabindranath Mukherjee

    2008-09-01

    Reaction of -(phenyl)-2-pyridinecarboxamide (HL1) and -(-tolyl)-2-pyridinecarboxamide (HL2) ligands with MnCl2.4H2O affords complexes [(HL1)2MnCl2] 1 and [(HL2)2MnCl2] 2. The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by three-dimensional X-ray crystallography revealing that the MnII ions assume distorted octahedral geometry with coordination by two HL1/HL2 ligands providing two pyridine N and two amide O and two chloride ions. Notably, secondary interactions [C-H$\\cdots$Cl (pyridine 3-H hydrogen) and N-H$\\cdots$Cl (amide NH hydrogen)] triggered by MnII-coordinated chloride ions acting as hydrogen bonding acceptors generate self-complementary dimeric tectons, which lead to 2D supramolecular architectures.

  2. Polyurethane elastomers with amide chain extenders of uniform length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, van der Martijn; Noordover, Bart; Gaymans, Reinoud J.

    2006-01-01

    Toluene diisocyanate based polyurethanes with amide extenders were synthesized poly(propylene oxide) with a number average molecular weight of 2000 and endcapped with toluene diisocyanate was used as the polyether segment. The chain extenders were based on poly(hexamethylene terephthalamide): hexame

  3. Intramolecular Amide Hydrolysis in N-Methylmaleamic Acid Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intramolecular amide hydrolysis of N-methylmaleamic acid have been revisited by use of density functional theory and inclusion of solvent effects. The results indicate that concerted reaction mechanism is favored over stepwise reaction mechanism. This is in agreement with the previous theoretical study. Sovlent effects have significant influence on the reaction barrier.

  4. Modeling the amide I bands of small peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas la Cour; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Watson, Tim M.; Hirst, Jonathan D.; Knoester, Jasper

    2006-01-01

    In this paper different floating oscillator models for describing the amide I band of peptides and proteins are compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Models for the variation of the frequency shifts of the oscillators and the nearest-neighbor coupling between them with respect

  5. Method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, George; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chapman, Kent; Faure, Lionel; Koulen, Peter

    2016-10-25

    A method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) is disclosed. The method comprising administering a phenoxyacylethanolamide that causes the enhanced activity. The enhanced activity can have numerous effects on biological organisms including, for example, enhancing the growth of certain seedlings. The subject matter disclosed herein relates to enhancers of amidohydrolase activity.

  6. KNH2-KH: a metal amide-hydride solid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Sørby, Magnus H; Chierotti, Michele R; Garroni, Sebastiano; Pinatel, Eugenio; Karimi, Fahim; Cao, Hujun; Bergemann, Nils; Le, Thi T; Puszkiel, Julián; Gobetto, Roberto; Baricco, Marcello; Hauback, Bjørn C; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-09-27

    We report for the first time the formation of a metal amide-hydride solid solution. The dissolution of KH into KNH2 leads to an anionic substitution, which decreases the interaction among NH2(-) ions. The rotational properties of the high temperature polymorphs of KNH2 are thereby retained down to room temperature.

  7. Protein Structure-Function Correlation in Living Human Red Blood Cells Probed by Isotope Exchange-based Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sreekala; Mitra, Gopa; Muralidharan, Monita; Mathew, Boby; Mandal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of various biological events, it is important to study the structure-function correlation of proteins within cells. Structural probes used in spectroscopic tools to investigate protein conformation are similar across all proteins. Therefore, structural studies are restricted to purified proteins in vitro and these findings are extrapolated in cells to correlate their functions in vivo. However, due to cellular complexity, in vivo and in vitro environments are radically different. Here, we show a novel way to monitor the structural transition of human hemoglobin upon oxygen binding in living red blood cells (RBCs), using hydrogen/deuterium exchange-based mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS). Exploiting permeability of D2O across cell membrane, the isotope exchange of polypeptide backbone amide hydrogens of hemoglobin was carried out inside RBCs and monitored using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). To explore the conformational transition associated with oxygenation of hemoglobin in vivo, the isotope exchange kinetics was simplified using the method of initial rates. RBC might be considered as an in vivo system of pure hemoglobin. Thus, as a proof-of-concept, the observed results were correlated with structural transition of hemoglobin associated with its function established in vitro. This is the first report on structural changes of a protein upon ligand binding in its endogenous environment. The proposed method might be applicable to proteins in their native state, irrespective of location, concentration, and size. The present in-cell approach opens a new avenue to unravel a plethora of biological processes like ligand binding, folding, and post-translational modification of proteins in living cells.

  8. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  9. Etude du comportement chimique des additifs dispersants sur les surfaces métalliques. Réaction des fonctions amide sur l'alumine Study of the Chemical Behavior of Dispersant Additives on Metal Surfaces. Reaction of Amide Functions on Aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechtschein J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail a pour objet la mise en évidence des réactions chimiques qui apparaissent entre les fonctions amides qui entrent dans la constitution de nombreuses formules de dispersants pour carburants et lubrifiants et la surface de l'aluminium. On montre que la réaction des amides sur la surface de l'alumine s'opère en deux étapes: La première étape, ou étape de chimisorption, fait intervenir les sites de Lewis et les groupements OH voisins de l'alumine pour fixer la fonction amide par le groupement carbonyle (liaison acide-base de Lewis et par l'azote (liaison hydrogène. La deuxième étape, ou étape d'hydrolyse, conduit à la formation d'un carboxylate de surface et d'une amine. The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical reactions that appear between the amide functions entering into the composition of numerous dispersant formulas for fuels and lubricants and the surface of aluminum. The reactions of amides on an aluminum surface is shown to take place in two stages. The first stage, or chemisorption stage, involves Lewis sites and the OH groups next to the aluminum oxide sa as to fix the amide function by the carbonyl group (Lewis acid-basic bonds and by nitrogen (hydrogen bond. The second stage, or hydrolysis stage, leads to the formation of a surface carboxylate and an amine.

  10. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  11. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of tris(amidate) mono(amido) and tetrakis(amidate) complexes of group 4 transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philippa R; Thomson, Robert K; Medeiros, Diane M; Wan, Geoff; Schafer, Laurel L

    2013-11-28

    The syntheses of a series of tris(amidate) mono(amido) titanium and zirconium complexes are reported. The binding motif of the amidate ligand has been determined to depend on the size of the metal centre for these sterically demanding N,O-chelating ligands; the larger zirconium metal centre supports three κ(2)-(N,O) bound amidate ligands while the titanium analogue has one ligand bound in a κ(1)-(O) fashion to alleviate steric strain. Reactivity studies indicate that, despite high steric crowding about the tris(amidate) mono(amido) zirconium metal centre, transamination of the reactive dimethylamido ligand can be achieved using aniline. This complex is also an active precatalyst for intramolecular alkene hydroamination, in which protonolysis of one amidate ligand in the presence of excess amine is observed as an initiation step prior to catalytic turnover. Eight-coordinate homoleptic κ(2)-amidate complexes of zirconium and hafnium have also been prepared.

  12. Discovery of competing anaerobic and aerobic pathways in umpolung amide synthesis allows for site-selective amide 18O-labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackleford, Jessica P; Shen, Bo; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2012-01-03

    The mechanism of umpolung amide synthesis was probed by interrogating potential sources for the oxygen of the product amide carbonyl that emanates from the α-bromo nitroalkane substrate. Using a series of (18)O-labeled substrates and reagents, evidence is gathered to advance two pathways from the putative tetrahedral intermediate. Under anaerobic conditions, a nitro-nitrite isomerization delivers the amide oxygen from nitro oxygen. The same homolytic nitro-carbon fragmentation can be diverted by capture of the carbon radical intermediate with oxygen gas (O(2)) to deliver the amide oxygen from O(2). This understanding was used to develop a straightforward protocol for the preparation of (18)O-labeled amides in peptides by simply performing the umpolung amide synthesis reaction under an atmosphere of 18O2.

  13. Porphyrin amino acids-amide coupling, redox and photophysical properties of bis(porphyrin) amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melomedov, Jascha; Wünsche von Leupoldt, Anica; Meister, Michael; Laquai, Frédéric; Heinze, Katja

    2013-07-14

    New trans-AB2C meso-substituted porphyrin amino acid esters with meso-substituents of tunable electron withdrawing power (B = mesityl, 4-C6H4F, 4-C6H4CF3, C6F5) were prepared as free amines 3a-3d, as N-acetylated derivatives Ac-3a-Ac-3d and corresponding zinc(II) complexes Zn-Ac-3a-Zn-Ac-3d. Several amide-linked bis(porphyrins) with a tunable electron density at each porphyrin site were obtained from the amino porphyrin precursors by condensation reactions (4a-4d) and mono- and bis(zinc(II)) complexes Zn(2)-4d and Zn(1)Zn(2)-4d were prepared. The electronic interaction between individual porphyrin units in bis(porphyrins) 4 is probed by electrochemical experiments (CV, EPR), electronic absorption spectroscopy, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with DFT/PCM calculations on diamagnetic neutral bis(porphyrins) 4 and on respective charged mixed-valent radicals 4(+/-). The interaction via the -C6H4-NHCO-C6H4- bridge, the site of oxidation and reduction and the lowest excited singlet state S1, is tuned by the substituents on the individual porphyrins and the metalation state.

  14. Calorimetric Investigation of Hydrogen Bonding of Formamide and Its Methyl Derivatives in Organic Solvents and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2013-04-01

    Formamide and its derivatives have a large number of practical applications; also they are structural fragments of many biomolecules. Hydrogen bonds strongly affect their physicochemical properties. In the present work a calorimetric study of formamide and its methyl derivatives was carried out. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide in organic solvents at 298.15 K were measured. The relationships between the obtained enthalpies of solvation and the structure of the studied compounds were observed. Hydrogen-bond enthalpies of amides with chlorinated alkanes, ethers, ketones, esters, nitriles, amines, alcohols, and water were determined. The strength of hydrogen bonds of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide with proton donor solvents is practically equal. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonds of formamide with the proton acceptor solvents are two times larger in magnitude than the enthalpies of N-methylformamide. The process of hydrogen bonding of amides in aliphatic alcohols and water is complicated. The obtained enthalpies of hydrogen bonding in aliphatic alcohols vary considerably from the amide structure due to the competition between solute-solvent and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonds. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out to explain the calorimetric data. Hydration enthalpies of methyl derivatives of formamides contain a contribution of the hydrophobic effect. New thermochemical data on the hydrogen bonding of formamides may be useful for predicting the properties of biomacromolecules.

  15. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  16. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  17. The Role of Backbone Hydrogen Bonds in the Transition State for Protein Folding of a PDZ Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren W. Pedersen

    Full Text Available Backbone hydrogen bonds are important for the structure and stability of proteins. However, since conventional site-directed mutagenesis cannot be applied to perturb the backbone, the contribution of these hydrogen bonds in protein folding and stability has been assessed only for a very limited set of small proteins. We have here investigated effects of five amide-to-ester mutations in the backbone of a PDZ domain, a 90-residue globular protein domain, to probe the influence of hydrogen bonds in a β-sheet for folding and stability. The amide-to-ester mutation removes NH-mediated hydrogen bonds and destabilizes hydrogen bonds formed by the carbonyl oxygen. The overall stability of the PDZ domain generally decreased for all amide-to-ester mutants due to an increase in the unfolding rate constant. For this particular region of the PDZ domain, it is therefore clear that native hydrogen bonds are formed after crossing of the rate-limiting barrier for folding. Moreover, three of the five amide-to-ester mutants displayed an increase in the folding rate constant suggesting that the hydrogen bonds are involved in non-native interactions in the transition state for folding.

  18. Hydrogen absorption and lithium ion conductivity in Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, M.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Clemens, O. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Technical University of Darmstadt, Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials, Jovanka-Bontschits-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Slater, P.R. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Anderson, P.A., E-mail: p.a.anderson@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} was synthesized via solid state methods and hydrogenation attempted. • Hydrogenation of a lithium nitride halide was demonstrated for the first time. • Powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy showed that hydrogenation had gone to completion. • The ionic conductivities of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} and Li{sub 3}N were compared through A.C. impedance spectroscopy. • The lower conductivity of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} is consistent with its higher hydrogenation temperature. - Abstract: The reaction of lithium amide and imide with lithium halides to form new amide halide or imide halide phases has led to improved hydrogen desorption and absorption properties and, for the amides, lithium ion conductivities. Here we investigate the effect of bromide incorporation on the ionic conductivity and hydrogen absorption properties of lithium nitride. For the first time we show that it is possible for a lithium halide nitride, the cubic bromide nitride Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3}, to take up hydrogen—a necessary condition for potential use as a reversible solid-state hydrogen storage material. Powder X-ray diffraction showed the formation of Li{sub 2}Br(NH{sub 2}) and LiBr, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that only amide anions were present and that the hydrogen uptake reaction had gone to completion. The lithium ion conductivity of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} at the hydrogenation temperature was found to be less than that of Li{sub 3}N, which may be a significant factor in the kinetics of the hydrogenation process.

  19. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  20. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  1. Effect of polyamine reagents on exchange capacity in ion exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, T. I.; Dyachenko, F. V.; Bogatyreva, Yu. V.; Borodastov, A. K.; Ershova, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of compounds involved in complex reagents is described using Helamin 906H reagent as an example. The working exchange capacity of KU-2-8chs cation exchanger in hydrogen form and Amberlite IRA 900Cl anion exchanger in OH form remained almost unchanged when they were used repeatedly to purify water that contained Helamin 906H reagent; in addition, this capacity was the same upon filtration of water that did not contain this reagent. Leakage of total organic carbon was observed earlier than that of calcium ions upon filtration of the solution through the cation exchanger layer. The test results obtained in industrial conditions indicated that using H-OH filters to purify turbine condensate enables the decrease of the concentration of organic and other impurities therein.

  2. Novel hydroxyamides and amides containing D-glucopyranose or D-fructose units: Biological assays in MCF-7 and MDST8 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro, Elisabete P; Costa, Ana R; Cordeiro, Maria M; Martins, Rute; Pires, Tiago O; Saraiva, Mafalda; Antunes, Célia M; Burke, Anthony J

    2016-02-01

    A novel library of 15 compounds, hydroxyamides and amides containing a β-D-glucopyranose (D-Gluc) or a β-D-fructose (D-Fruc) units was designed and synthesized for antiproliferative assays in breast (MCF-7) and colon (MDST8) cancer cell lines. Twelve of them were hydroxyamides and were successfully synthesized from β-D-glucuronic acid (D-GluA). Six of these hydroxyamides which were acetylated hydroxy-β-D-glucopyranuronamide 2a-2f (1st Family) and the other six were their respective isomers, that is, hydroxy-β-D-fructuronamide 3a-3f (2nd Family), obtained by acid-base catalyzed isomerization. These compounds have the general structure, D-Gluc-C=ONH-CHR-(CH2)n-OH and D-Fruc-C=ONH-CHR-(CH2)n-OH, where R=an aromatic, alkyl or a hydrogen substituent, with n=0 or 1. Eight of these contained a chiral aminoalcohol group. Three compounds were amides containing a D-glucopyranose unit (3rd Family). SAR studies were conducted with these compounds. Antiproliferative studies showed that compound 4a, the bromo-amide containing the β-D-glucopyranose ring, potently inhibits the proliferation of the MDST8 cells. Five compounds (2e, 2f, 3d, 3e, and 3f) were shown to potently selectively inhibit the proliferation of the MCF-7 cells. Compound 4b was the only one showing inhibition in both cell lines. In general, the more active compounds were the amides and hydroxyamides containing the β-D-fructose moiety, and containing an alkyl group or hydrogen. Half-inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of between 0.01 and 10 μM, were observed.

  3. Boron-Based Hydrogen Storage: Ternary Borides and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    DOE continues to seek reversible solid-state hydrogen materials with hydrogen densities of ≥11 wt% and ≥80 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at moderate temperatures (≤100 °C) and pressures (≤100 bar) enabling incorporation into hydrogen storage systems suitable for transportation applications. Boron-based hydrogen storage materials have the potential to meet the density requirements given boron’s low atomic weight, high chemical valance, and versatile chemistry. However, the rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based compounds are thus far much too slow for practical applications. Although contributing to the high hydrogen densities, the high valance of boron also leads to slow rates of hydrogen exchange due to extensive boron-boron atom rearrangements during hydrogen cycling. This rearrangement often leads to multiple solid phases occurring over hydrogen release and recharge cycles. These phases must nucleate and react with each other across solid-solid phase boundaries leading to energy barriers that slow the rates of hydrogen exchange. This project sought to overcome the slow rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based hydrogen storage materials by minimizing the number of solid phases and the boron atom rearrangement over a hydrogen release and recharge cycle. Two novel approaches were explored: 1) developing matched pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides that could exchange hydrogen with only one hydrogenated phase (the mixed-metal borohydride) and only one dehydrogenated phase (the ternary boride); and 2) developing boranes that could release hydrogen by being lithiated using lithium hydride with no boron-boron atom rearrangement.

  4. Enzymatic synthesis of fatty amides from palm olein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mulla, Emad A Jaffar; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa Bt; Rahman, Mohd Zaki A

    2010-01-01

    Fatty amides have been successfully synthesized from palm olein and urea by a one-step lipase catalyzed reaction. The use of immobilized lipase as the catalyst for the preparation reaction provides an easy isolation of the enzyme from the products and other components in the reaction mixture. The fatty amides were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) technique and elemental analysis. The highest conversion percentage (96%) was obtained when the process was carried out for 36 hours using urea to palm oil ratio of 5.2: 1.0 at 40 degrees C. The method employed offers several advantages such as renewable and abundant of the raw material, simple reaction procedure, environmentally friendly process and high yield of the product.

  5. In vivo behavior of hydrogel beads based on amidated pectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjeri, O; Collett, J H; Fell, J T; Sharma, H L; Smith, A M

    1998-01-01

    Radio-labeled hydrogel beads, based on amidated pectin, have been produced by adding droplets of an amidated pectin solution to calcium chloride. Incorporation of model drugs into the beads and measurement of the dissolution rate showed that the properties of the beads were unaffected by the incorporation of the radiolabel. The labeled beads were used to carry out an in vivo study of their behavior in the gastrointestinal tract using human volunteers. The volunteers were given the beads after an overnight fast and images were obtained at frequent intervals during transit through the upper gastrointestinal tract and the colon. The beads exhibited rapid gastric emptying and proceeded to pass through the small intestine individually before regrouping at the ileo-caecal junction. Once in the colon, the beads again proceeded as individuals and evidence of the degradation of the beads was observed.

  6. Halo substituent effects on intramolecular cycloadditions involving furanyl amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padwa, Albert; Crawford, Kenneth R; Straub, Christopher S; Pieniazek, Susan N; Houk, K N

    2006-07-21

    Intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions involving a series of N-alkenyl-substituted furanyl amides were investigated. Stable functionalized oxanorbornenes were formed in high yield upon heating at 80-110 degrees C. The cycloaddition reactions include several bromo-substituted furanyl amides, and these systems were found to proceed at a much faster rate and in higher yield than without substitution. This effect was observed by incorporating a halogen in the 3- or 5-position of the furan ring and appears to be general. The origin of increased cycloaddition rates for halo-substituted furans has been investigated with quantum mechanical calculations. The success of these reactions is attributed to increases in reaction exothermicities; this both decreases activation enthalpies and increases barriers to retrocycloadditions. Halogen substitution on furan increases reactant energy and stabilizes the product, which is attributed to the preference of electronegative halogens to be attached to a more highly alkylated and therefore more electropositive framework.

  7. Simulations of the temperature dependence of amide I vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminský, Jakub; Bouř, Petr; Kubelka, Jan

    2011-01-13

    For spectroscopic studies of peptide and protein thermal denaturation it is important to single out the contribution of the solvent to the spectral changes from those originated in the molecular structure. To obtain insights into the origin and size of the temperature solvent effects on the amide I spectra, combined molecular dynamics and density functional simulations were performed with the model N-methylacetamide molecule (NMA). The computations well reproduced frequency and intensity changes previously observed in aqueous NMA solutions. An empirical correction of vacuum frequencies in single NMA molecule based on the electrostatic potential of the water molecules provided superior results to a direct density functional average obtained for a limited number of solute-solvent clusters. The results thus confirm that the all-atom quantum and molecular mechanics approach captures the overall influence of the temperature dependent solvent properties on the amide I spectra and can improve the accuracy and reliability of molecular structural studies.

  8. Cleavage of an amide bond by a ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, X.; De Mesmaeker, A.; Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A variant form of a group I ribozyme, optimized by in vitro evolution for its ability to catalyze magnesium-dependent phosphoester transfer reactions involving DNA substrates, also catalyzes the cleavage of an unactivated alkyl amide when that linkage is presented in the context of an oligodeoxynucleotide analog. Substrates containing an amide bond that joins either two DNA oligos, or a DNA oligo and a short peptide, are cleaved in a magnesium-dependent fashion to generate the expected products. The first-order rate constant, kcat, is 0.1 x 10(-5) min-1 to 1 x 10(-5) min-1 for the DNA-flanked substrates, which corresponds to a rate acceleration of more than 10(3) as compared with the uncatalyzed reaction.

  9. Heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, L.B.; Farma, A.J.

    1987-01-06

    This invention concerns a heat exchanger as used in a space heater, of the type in which hot exhaust gases transfer heat to water or the like flowing through a helical heat exchange coil. A significant improvement to the efficiency of the heat exchange occurring between the air and water is achieved by using a conduit for the water having external helical fluting such that the hot gases circulate along two paths, rather than only one. A preferred embodiment of such a heat exchanger includes a porous combustion element for producing radiant heat from a combustible gas, surrounded by a helical coil for effectively transferring the heat in the exhaust gas, flowing radially from the combustion element, to the water flowing through the coil. 4 figs.

  10. Potent and orally efficacious benzothiazole amides as TRPV1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besidski, Yevgeni; Brown, William; Bylund, Johan; Dabrowski, Michael; Dautrey, Sophie; Harter, Magali; Horoszok, Lucy; Hu, Yin; Johnson, Dean; Johnstone, Shawn; Jones, Paul; Leclerc, Sandrine; Kolmodin, Karin; Kers, Inger; Labarre, Maryse; Labrecque, Denis; Laird, Jennifer; Lundström, Therese; Martino, John; Maudet, Mickaël; Munro, Alexander; Nylöf, Martin; Penwell, Andrea; Rotticci, Didier; Slaitas, Andis; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Villanueva, Huascar; Walpole, Christopher; Zemribo, Ronald; Griffin, Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    Benzothiazole amides were identified as TRPV1 antagonists from high throughput screening using recombinant human TRPV1 receptor and structure-activity relationships were explored to pinpoint key pharmacophore interactions. By increasing aqueous solubility, through the attachment of polar groups to the benzothiazole core, and enhancing metabolic stability, by blocking metabolic sites, the drug-like properties and pharmokinetic profiles of benzothiazole compounds were sufficiently optimized such that their therapeutic potential could be verified in rat pharmacological models of pain.

  11. Accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acid amides in winter wheat under snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shigeki; Yoshida, Midori; Nakajima, Takashi; Murai, Akio

    2003-06-01

    It was found that the content of antifungal compounds p-coumaroylagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-4-guanidinobutane] and p-coumaroyl-3-hydroxyagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-3-hydroxy-4-guanidinobutane] in the crown of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Chihokukomugi) significantly increased under snow cover. This finding suggests that the accumulation of these hydroxycinnamic acid amides was caused by winter stress and related to protecting the plant against snow mold under snow cover.

  12. Guidelines for Middle Managers for Thriving amid Continuous Change

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This thesis suggests the much needed guidelines for middle managers for thriving amid continuous change. Middle managers, being an integral part of their organizations, needed a set of consolidated guidelines for thriving in the times of continuous change. Thriving requires high engagement, learning and growth as a response in stressful situations. The proposed guidelines include elements from literature and recommendations of the middle managers which came from co-creation sessions with midd...

  13. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  14. An efficient computational model to predict protonation at the amide nitrogen and reactivity along the C-N rotational pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Roman; Aubé, Jeffrey; Szostak, Michal

    2015-04-14

    N-Protonation of amides is critical in numerous biological processes, including amide bonds proteolysis and protein folding as well as in organic synthesis as a method to activate amide bonds towards unconventional reactivity. A computational model enabling prediction of protonation at the amide bond nitrogen atom along the C-N rotational pathway is reported. Notably, this study provides a blueprint for the rational design and application of amides with a controlled degree of rotation in synthetic chemistry and biology.

  15. Synthesis, morphology and properties of segmented poly(ether ester amide)s comprising uniform glycine or β-alanine extended bisoxalamide hard segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandi, N.J.; Kimenai, A.J.; Mes, E.P.C.; Broos, R.; Bar, G.; Rosenthal, M.; Odarchenko, Y.; Ivanov, D.A.; Feijen, J.; Dijkstra, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Segmented poly(ether ester amide)s comprising glycine or β-alanine extended bisoxalamide hard segments are highly phase separated thermoplastic elastomers with a broad temperature independent rubber plateau. These materials with molecular weights, Mn, exceeding 30 × 103 g mol−1 are conveniently prep

  16. Amide proton signals as pH indicator for in vivo MRS and MRI of the brain-Responses to hypercapnia and hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Frahm, Jens; Michaelis, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Using proton MRS and MRI of mouse brain at 9.4T, this work provides the first in vivo evidence of pH-dependent concurrent changes of three amide signals and related metabolic responses to hypercapnia and hypothermia. During hypercapnia, amide proton MRS signals of glutamine at 6.8-6.9ppm and 7.6ppm as well as of unspecific compounds at 8.1-8.3ppm increase by at least 50% both at 37°C and 22°C. These changes reflect a reduced proton exchange with water. They are strongly correlated with intracellular pH which ranges from 6.75±0.10 to 7.13±0.06 as determined from a shift in creatine phosphokinase equilibrium. In MRI, saturation transfer from aliphatic as well as aromatic and/or amide protons alters slightly during hypercapnia and significantly during hypothermia. The asymmetry in magnetization transfer ratios decreased slightly during hypercapnia and hypothermia. Regardless of pH or temperature, saturation transfer from aliphatic protons between -2 and -4ppm frequency offset to water protons is significantly greater than that from aromatic/amide protons at corresponding offsets between +2 and +4ppm. Irradiation of aliphatic compounds at -3.5ppm frequency offset from water predominantly saturates lipids and water associated with myelin. Taken together, the results indicate that, for the B1 power used in this study, dipolar coupling between aliphatic and water protons rather than proton exchange is the dominant factor in Z-spectra and magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry of the brain in vivo.

  17. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  18. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  19. The Hydrogen Technology Center at Wyle Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, H.; Smith, D.; Frazier, J.

    1990-10-01

    A deactivated storable propellant test area with numerous test cells, large open concrete pads of up to 65-ft length, and two enclosed metal storage buildings, has been converted into a Hydrogen Technology Center. The conversion strategy involved extensive use of modified surplus equipment, well established testing technologies, and innovative engineering to obviate long-delivery time items. Simple, high heat flux water-to-cryogen heat exchangers are used to generate ambient temperature H2 and N gas. Hydrogen-fueled combustors were designed and fabricated to power the specialized heat exchangers required to support high-temperature hydrogen experiments. The facility has operated productively and safely since October, 1988.

  20. Polymerisation of Beta-alanine through catalytic ester-amide exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunenberg, P.; Könst, P.M.; Scott, E.L.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Zuilhof, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Herein we present the use of group (IV) metal alkoxides as catalysts for the polymerisation of esters of p-alanine and its derivatives. The influence of different group (IV) metal alkoxides, different esters, temperature and solvents on the polymerisation are investigated. The order in which the gro

  1. Pain and beyond: fatty acid amides and fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, Sivaram; Alexander, Christopher W; Khanna, Ish

    2009-12-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is responsible for the hydrolysis of several important endogenous fatty acid amides (FAAs), including anandamide, oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide. Because specific FAAs interact with cannabinoid and vanilloid receptors, they are often referred to as 'endocannabinoids' or 'endovanilloids'. Initial interest in this area, therefore, has focused on developing FAAH inhibitors to augment the actions of FAAs and reduce pain. However, recent literature has shown that these FAAs - through interactions with unique receptors (extracellular and intracellular) - can induce a diverse array of effects that include appetite suppression, modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, vasodilation, cardiac function and inflammation. This review gives an overview of FAAs and diverse FAAH inhibitors and their potential therapeutic utility in pain and non-pain indications.

  2. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Evan G; James, William H; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H; Müller, Christian W; Zwier, Timothy S

    2012-09-07

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding (13)C = (18)O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  3. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  4. Hydrogen release from Mg(NH2)2-MgH2 through mechanochemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjiang; Wu, Guotao; Liu, Yongfeng; Xiong, Zhitao; Chen, Ping; Murata, Kenji; Sakata, Ko; Wolf, Gerd

    2006-08-03

    A total of 7.4 wt % of hydrogen was released from the mixture of magnesium amide and magnesium hydride at a molar ratio of 1:2 by mechanical ball milling. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterizations along with the amount of hydrogen released at different stages of ball milling reveal that magnesium imide was first formed in the reaction. The imide then reacted continuously with magnesium hydride and was converted to magnesium nitride and hydrogen. Thermodynamic calculation shows that the hydrogen desorption is a mild endothermic reaction with the standard enthalpy change of about 3.5 kJ/mol of H2.

  5. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  6. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  7. Novel Synthesis of N-Substituted p-Hydroxybenzoic Amides on Soluble Polymer-Support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡春玲; 陈祖兴; 杨桂春

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis of N-substituted p-hydroxybenzoic amides using a liquid phase approach is described. Poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG) and p-hydroxybenzoic acid were linked by oxalyl chloride to give compound 1, which was chlorinated by thionyl chloride, followed by amidation with NHR1R2 to yield compound 3. Hydrolysis of compound 3 gave the title amide 4.These crude library members were obtained in good yields with high purities.

  8. Method for absorbing hydrogen using an oxidation resisant organic hydrogen getter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2009-02-03

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably platinum, is disclosed. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently remove hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  9. The synthesis of a pyridine-N-oxide isophthalamide rotaxane utilizing supplementary amide hydrogen bond interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas H; Gell, Charles E; Peach, Michael J G

    2016-08-16

    The synthesis of a pyridine-N-oxide containing rotaxane, not requiring an additional ionic template, has been achieved in 32% yield. Successful rotaxane formation is dependent upon the structure of the isophthalamide macrocycle used, an observation which has been rationalised by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and computational modelling.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of poly(amide-imides)/TiO₂ nanocomposite gas separation membranes

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Nanosized Ti02 rich domains were generated in-situ within poly(amide-imide) (PAl) and 6F-poly(amide-imide) (6FPAl) by a sol-gel process. The composite films showed a high optical transparency. The morphology of the Ti02 rich domains was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Ti02 rich domains were well dispersed within the poly(amide-imide) and 6F-poly(amide-imide) matrices and were 5 nm to 50 nm in size. Limited study was also carried out for the fabrication o...

  11. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of 1-H-Pyrrole-2-carboxylic Acid [2-(Naphthalen-1-ylamino)-ethyl]-amide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Zhen-Ming; WANG Jian-Ying

    2006-01-01

    1-H-Pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [2-(naphthalen-1-ylamino)-ethyl]-amide has been synthesized and characterized. Its crystal is of monoclinic, space group P21/n with a = 5.930(6), b =12.144(13), c = 20.10(2) (A),β = 95.709(17)°, V= 1441(3) (A), Z= 4, C17H17N3O, Mr= 279.34, Dc=1.288 g/cm3, F(000) = 592, μ(MoKα) = 0.083 mm-1, S = 1.019, R = 0.0473 and wR = 0.1181 for 1713 observed reflections with 1 > 2σ(Ⅰ). X-ray diffraction reveals that two molecules of the title compound form a dimer through a pair of N-H…O hydrogen bonds.

  12. International Exchanges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On April 1st,2014,CPAPD Deputy Secretary General Ms.Chen Huaifan met with Mr.Djudjuk Juyoto Suntani,President of the World Peace Committee,Indonesia,who headed the delegation,in the CPAPD office.The two sides exchanged views on issues of common concern including cooperation between the two organizations and the inheritance of Chinese culture.

  13. Exchange Options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidian, Farshid

    2007-01-01

    The contract is described and market examples given. Essential theoretical developments are introduced and cited chronologically. The principles and techniques of hedging and unique pricing are illustrated for the two simplest nontrivial examples: the classical Black-Scholes/Merton/Margrabe exchange

  14. Spin-locking versus chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2011-05-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of nonequivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolite phantoms with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: (i) on-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate-exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. (ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer (J Magn Reson 2002;154:157-160). (iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. (iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR(asym)) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate-exchange regime, MTR(asym) becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care.

  15. Theoretical investigation of isotope exchange reaction in tritium-contaminated mineral oil in vacuum pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Xie, Yun; Du, Liang; Li, Weiyi; Tan, Zhaoyi

    2015-04-28

    The mechanism of the isotope exchange reaction between molecular tritium and several typical organic molecules in vacuum pump mineral oil has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT), and the reaction rates are determined by conventional transition state theory (TST). The tritium-hydrogen isotope exchange reaction can proceed with two different mechanisms, the direct T-H exchange mechanism and the hyrogenation-dehydrogenation exchange mechanism. In the direct exchange mechanism, the titrated product is obtained through one-step via a four-membered ring hydrogen migration transition state. In the hyrogenation-dehydrogenation exchange mechanism, the T-H exchange could be accomplished by the hydrogenation of the unsaturated bond with tritium followed by the dehydrogenation of HT. Isotope exchange between hydrogen and tritium is selective, and oil containing molecules with OH and COOH groups can more easily exchange hydrogen for tritium. For aldehydes and ketones, the ability of T-H isotope exchange can be determined by the hydrogenation of T2 or the dehydrogenation of HT. The molecules containing one type of hydrogen provide a single product, while the molecules containing different types of hydrogens provide competitive products. The rate constants are presented to quantitatively estimate the selectivity of the products.

  16. An efficient phase-selective gelator for aromatic solvents recovery based on a cyanostilbene amide derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuping; Ma, Yao; Deng, Mengyu; Shang, Hongxing; Liang, Chunshuang; Jiang, Shimei

    2015-07-07

    Two novel low molecular weight organogelators (LMOGs) 1 and 2 composed of a cholesteryl group, an amide group and various terminal cyanostilbene moieties were synthesized. They could form stable gels in p-xylene. In particular, 2 with more extended π-conjugation length showed remarkable gelation ability in many aromatic solvents, chloroform and chloroform-containing mixed solvents at a relatively low concentration. FT-IR and XRD spectra indicated that the difference between 1 and 2 in the gelation properties may result from the deviation of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding and π–π stacking as driving forces for the formation of the gels. Significantly, 2 can function as an efficient room-temperature phase-selective gelator (PSG) for potential application in the separation and recovery of various aromatic solvents from its mixture with water. Meanwhile, the gelator can be easily recovered and reused several times. Furthermore, the phase-selective gelation properties of 2 can provide a simple and feasible approach for the removal of the rhodamine B (RhB) dye from water.

  17. Three new amides from Streptomyces sp. H7372

    OpenAIRE

    Cheenpracha, Sarot; Borris,Robert P; Tran,Tammy T.; Jee,Jap Meng; Seow, Heng Fong; Cheah,Hwen-Yee; Ho,Coy Choke; Chang, Leng Chee

    2011-01-01

    Three new amides, methyl phenatate A (1), actiphenamide (2) and actiphenol 1-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), along with thirteen known compounds, were isolated from the organic extract of a fermentation culture of Streptomyces sp. H7372. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques, and MS analyses. Cycloheximide (6) and cyclo(ΔAla-L-Val) (8) gave a clear zone of inhibition of Ras-Raf-1 interaction in the yeast two-hybrid assay which showed hi...

  18. N-Hydroxyimide Ugi Reaction toward α-Hydrazino Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Ugi four-component reaction (U-4CR) with N-hydroxyimides as a novel carboxylic acid isostere has been reported. This reaction provides straightforward access to α-hydrazino amides. A broad range of aldehydes, amines, isocyanides and N-hydroxyimides were employed to give products in moderate to high yields. This reaction displays N–N bond formation by cyclic imide migration in the Ugi reaction. Thus, N-hydroxyimide is added as a new acid component in the Ugi reaction and broadens the scaffold diversity. PMID:28220702

  19. Antifungal activity of natural and synthetic amides from Piper species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Joaquim V.; Oliveira, Alberto de; Kato, Massuo J., E-mail: majokato@iq.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQ/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Raggi, Ludmila; Young, Maria C. [Instituto de Botanica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Plantas

    2010-07-01

    The antifungal leaves extract from Piper scutifolium was submitted to bioactivity-guided chromatographic separation against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum yielding piperine, piperlonguminine and corcovadine as the active principles which displayed a detection limit of 1 {mu}g. Structure-activity relationships were investigated with the preparation of twelve analogs having differences in the number of unsaturations, aromatic ring substituents and in the amide moiety. Analogs having a single double-bond and no substituent in the aromatic ring displayed higher activity, while N,N,-diethyl analogs displayed higher dose-dependent activity. (author)

  20. Synthesis and structures of new helical,nanoscale ferrocenylphenyl amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; RAN Chunling; WANG Haixian; SONG Maoping

    2007-01-01

    Two novel ferrocenylphenyl-containing amides have been synthesized by reaction of ferrocenylbencarboxylchloride and 1,2-di-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane.A single crystal X-ray analysis shows that compound 3 crystallizes in the triclinic system,space group P-1,and compound 4 crystallizes in orthorhombic system,space group Pca21.There areintramolecular H-bonds in both the compounds,two H-bonds in compound 3 and one in compound 4.The dihedral angels of Cp-ring and phenyl ring range from 3.8° to 20.8°.

  1. Amide-directed photoredox-catalysed C-C bond formation at unactivated sp3 C-H bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, John C. K.; Rovis, Tomislav

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is paramount in the synthesis of biologically relevant molecules, modern synthetic materials and commodity chemicals such as fuels and lubricants. Traditionally, the presence of a functional group is required at the site of C-C bond formation. Strategies that allow C-C bond formation at inert carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds enable access to molecules that would otherwise be inaccessible and the development of more efficient syntheses of complex molecules. Here we report a method for the formation of C-C bonds by directed cleavage of traditionally non-reactive C-H bonds and their subsequent coupling with readily available alkenes. Our methodology allows for amide-directed selective C-C bond formation at unactivated sp3 C-H bonds in molecules that contain many such bonds that are seemingly indistinguishable. Selectivity arises through a relayed photoredox-catalysed oxidation of a nitrogen-hydrogen bond. We anticipate that our findings will serve as a starting point for functionalization at inert C-H bonds through a strategy involving hydrogen-atom transfer.

  2. A Hydrogen Containment Process For Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. The hydrogen exhaust from the engine is contained in two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. The burner burns off the majority of the hydrogen, and the remaining hydrogen is removed in the tubular heat exchanger through the species recombination mechanism. A multi-dimensional, pressure-based multiphase computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to conceptually sizing the oxygen-rich burner, while a one-dimensional thermal analysis methodology was used to conceptually sizing the heat exchanger. Subsequently, a steady-state operation of the entire hydrogen containment process, from pressure vessel, through nozzle, diffuser, burner and heat exchanger, was simulated numerically, with the afore-mentioned computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational results show that 99% of hydrogen reduction is achieved at the end of the burner, and the rest of the hydrogen is removed to a trivial level in the heat exchanger. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger is less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  3. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  4. Preparation and evaluation of some amide ether carboxylate surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.A. El-Sukkary

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A homologous series of new mild surfactants, namely: Alkyl amide ether carboxylates surfactants (AEC RCO–NHCH2CH2O (CH2CH2O6CH2COONa, were synthesized by esterification, amidation, ethoxylation and carboxymethylation reaction steps of fatty acids (Lauric, Myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic or linoleic. The chemical structures of the prepared compounds were confirmed using different spectroscopic techniques, FTIR spectroscopy, mass spectra and HNMR. The surface properties including surface and interfacial tensions, foaming height, emulsification power, calcium ion stability, stability to hydrolysis and critical micelle concentration (cmc were determined. The study of their surface properties showed their stability in hard water and in acidic and alkaline media. These compounds have high calcium ion stability. The low foaming power could have an application in the dyeing auxiliary industry. The lower values of the interfacial tension values indicate the ability of using these surfactants in several applications as corrosion inhibitors and biocides. The data revealed various advantages and potentials as a main surfactant as well as co- surfactants.

  5. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AMIDATED PECTIN BASED POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.K.Mishra; A.Anis; S.Mondal; M.Dutt; A.K.Banthia

    2009-01-01

    The work presents the synthesis and characterization of ami dated pectin(AP)based polymer electrolyte membranes(PEM)crosslinked with glutaraldehyde(GA).The prepared membranes are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR),organic elemental analysis,X-ray diffraction studies(XRD),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)and impedance spectroscopy.Mechanical properties of the membranes are evaluated by tensile tests.The degree of amidation(DA),molar and mass reaction yields(YM and YN)are calculated based on the results of organic elemental analysis.FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of primary and secondary amide absorption bands.XRD pattern of membranes clearly indicates that there is a considerable increase in crystallinity as compared to parent pectin.TGA studies indicate that AP is less thermally stable than reference pectin.A maximum room temperature conductivity of 1.098×10-3 Scm-1 is obtained in the membrane,which is designated as AP-3.These properties make them good candidates for low cost biopolymer electrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications.

  6. Amidated pectin based hydrogels: synthesis, characterization and cytocompatibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, R K; Singhal, J P; Datt, M; Banthia, A K

    2007-01-01

    The design and development of pectin-based hydrogels were attempted through the chemical modification of pectin with diethanolamine (DA). Diethanolamine modified pectin (DAMP) was synthesized by the chemical modification of pectin with varying concentrations of DA (1:1,1:2,1:3 and 1:4) at 5 oC in methanol. The modified product was used for the preparation of the hydrogel with glutaraldehyde (GA) reagent. The prepared hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy; organic elemental analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and swelling, hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility studies of the prepared hydrogels were also done. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of primary and secondary amide absorption bands. The XRD pattern of the DAMP hydrogel clearly indicated that there was a considerable increase in crystallinity as compared to parent pectin. The degree of amidation (DA) and molar and mass reaction yields (Ym and Yn) was calculated based on the results of organic elemental analysis. Drug release studies from the hydrogel membranes were also evaluated in a Franz's diffusion cell. The hydrogels demonstrated good water holding properties and were found to be compatible with B-16 melanoma cells and human blood.

  7. Collagen and component polypeptides: Low frequency and amide vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine-Vive, F.; Merzel, F.; Johnson, M. R.; Kearley, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is a fibrous protein, which exists widely in the human body. The biomechanical properties of collagen depend on its triple helix structure and the corresponding low frequency vibrations. We use first-principles, density functional theory methods and analytical force fields to investigate the molecular vibrations of a model collagen compound, the results being validated by comparison with published, inelastic neutron scattering data. The results from these atomistic simulations are used at higher frequency to study the Amide I and V vibrations and therefore the vibrational signature of secondary and tertiary structure formation. In addition to collagen, its component homopolymers, poly-glycine and poly-proline are also studied. The Amide V vibration of glycine is strongly modified in going from the single helix of poly-glycine II to the triple helix of collagen. The collagen models are hydrated and this work allows us to discuss the relative merits of density functional theory and force field methods when tackling complex, partially crystalline systems.

  8. Poly(ester amide)s based on (L)-lactic acid oligomers and α-amino acids: influence of the α-amino acid side chain in the poly(ester amide)s properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana C; Coelho, Jorge F J; Valente, Joana F A; Correia, Tiago R; Correia, Ilídio J; Gil, Maria H; Simões, Pedro N

    2013-01-01

    Novel biodegradable and low cytotoxic poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) based on α-amino acids and (L)-lactic acid (L-LA) oligomers were successfully synthesized by interfacial polymerization. The chemical structure of the new polymers was confirmed by spectroscopic analyses. Further characterization suggests that the α-amino acid plays a critical role on the final properties of the PEA. L-phenylalanine provides PEAs with higher glass transition temperature, whereas glycine enhances the crystallinity. The hydrolytic degradation in PBS (pH = 7.4) at 37 °C also depends on the α-amino acid, being faster for glycine-based PEAs. The cytotoxic profiles using fibroblast human cells indicate that the PEAs did not elicit an acute cytotoxic effect. The strategy presented in this work opens the possibility of synthesizing biodegradable PEAs with low citotoxicity by an easy and fast method. It is worth to mention also that the properties of these materials can be fine-tuned only by changing the α-amino acid.

  9. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a New Adamantane Amide Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying-Hua; LV Qi-Chun; ZHANG Qian; CHENG Yong; SHENG En-Hong

    2012-01-01

    A novel adamantane acyl amide derivative containing two phthalimido pendant groups(C31H31N3O5) has been synthesized,and its structure was characterized by elemental analysis,IR,1 H NMR spectra,and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.The crystal belongs to triclinic,space group P1 with a=7.3158(10),b=13.2405(18),c=14.378(2),α=72.419(2),β=84.496(2),γ=81.799(2)o,V=1312.0(3)3,Z=2,Dc=1.330 g/cm 3,μ=0.09 mm-1,Mr=525.59,F(000)=556,S=1.001,R=0.0523 and wR=0.0707 for 5901 unique reflections with 2363 observed ones(I〉2σ(I)).π-π stacking interactions(offset face-to-face) exist between the two rings of phthalimides from the neighboring molecules in the title crystal structure.The intermolecular dihedral angle between the two rings of neighboring phthalic amides is 6.26° and the distance is 4.008.

  10. Two enzymes which catalyze the amidation of peptide C-terminals are synthesized by a single mRNA. Peptide C mattan amid ka hanno wo shokubaisuru futatsu no koso wa ippon no mRNA yori goseisareru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, I.; Yonekura, H.; Okamoto, H. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan))

    1991-10-25

    Recent findings by the authors are reviewed on the amidation that forms amid structure essential to physiological activities in C-terminals of peptide hormones such as oxytocin,VIP,PP. It is noted that the amidation had been considered to be catalyzed by peptidylglycine{alpha} -amidating monooxyganase ( PAM ) and that the authors investigated the PAM function by expression of PAM cDNA isolated from rat pituitary and its deletion mutant into COS-7 cells, reaching to the important findings of a singl PMA mRNA encoding two enzymes, namely one at 5 {prime} side, peptidylglicine {alpha} hydroxylase which catalyses the conversion of C-termianl glycine on peptide to the hydroxylated form ( the first step of amidation ),and another at 3{prime} side, {alpha}- hydroxylglycine amidating dealkylase which catalyzes the conversion of hydroxylated glycine to the amidated form ( the second step of amidation). 19 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in normal human pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Normal human pituitaries were extracted in boiling water and acetic acid, and the alpha-amidated peptide products of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha MSH), gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma 1MSH), and amidated hinge peptide (HP-N), as well...

  12. A General and Efficient CuBr2-Catalyzed N-Arylation of Secondary Acyclic Amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王满刚; 于华; 尤心稳; 吴军; 商志才

    2012-01-01

    A general and efficient Cu(II)-catalyzed cross-coupling method is reported for the preparation of acyclic tertiary amides. Generally moderate to excellent yields and functional group tolerance were obtained with secondary acyclic amides and aryl halides as substrates in toluene.

  13. An azole, an amide and a limonoid from Vepris uguenensis (Rutaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheplogoi, Peter K; Mulholland, Dulcie A; Coombes, Philip H; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona

    2008-04-01

    The limonoid derivative, methyl uguenenoate, the azole, uguenenazole, and the amide, uguenenonamide, together with the known furoquinoline alkaloids flindersiamine and maculosidine, and syringaldehyde have been isolated from the root of the East African Rutaceae Vepris uguenensis. While methyl uguenenoate and the furoquinoline alkaloids displayed mild antimalarial activity, the azole and amide were completely inactive.

  14. Palladium-catalyzed Substitution of Ketone or Aldehyde Bearing Aryl Triflates by Amines or Amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Xiaochun; DAI Chunya; CAO Xiongjie; CAI Lisheng; PIKE Victor W

    2009-01-01

    Various aryl triflates, bearing ketone or aldehyde groups, were evaluated for palladium-mediated introduction of an amino group at the triflate position in the presence of various phosphine ligands. BINAP was best for secondary amines, MOP-type ligand for primary or small secondary amines and Xantphos for primary or cyclic secondary amides. No ligand was found effective for acyclic secondary amides.

  15. A case study on the myth of emission from aliphatic amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avinash Kumar; Das, Sreyashi; Datta, Anindya

    2016-12-01

    For several decades, aliphatic amidic compounds have been believed to be emissive. We report that this contention is incorrect and that the anomalous emission from amides originates in fluorescent impurities generated during their synthesis. In order to make this point, we have synthesized fluorescent compounds and have compared the absorption spectra with excitation spectra.

  16. 1H NMR spectra. Part 30(+): 1H chemical shifts in amides and the magnetic anisotropy, electric field and steric effects of the amide group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The (1)H spectra of 37 amides in CDCl(3) solvent were analysed and the chemical shifts obtained. The molecular geometries and conformational analysis of these amides were considered in detail. The NMR spectral assignments are of interest, e.g. the assignments of the formamide NH(2) protons reverse in going from CDCl(3) to more polar solvents. The substituent chemical shifts of the amide group in both aliphatic and aromatic amides were analysed using an approach based on neural network data for near (≤3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy, steric and for aromatic systems π effects of the amide group for more distant protons. The electric field is calculated from the partial atomic charges on the N.C═O atoms of the amide group. The magnetic anisotropy of the carbonyl group was reproduced with the asymmetric magnetic anisotropy acting at the midpoint of the carbonyl bond. The values of the anisotropies Δχ(parl) and Δχ(perp) were for the aliphatic amides 10.53 and -23.67 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule) and for the aromatic amides 2.12 and -10.43 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). The nitrogen anisotropy was 7.62 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). These values are compared with previous literature values. The (1)H chemical shifts were calculated from the semi-empirical approach and also by gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations with the density functional theory method and B3LYP/6-31G(++) (d,p) basis set. The semi-empirical approach gave good agreement with root mean square error of 0.081 ppm for the data set of 280 entries. The gauge-independent atomic orbital approach was generally acceptable, but significant errors (ca. 1 ppm) were found for the NH and CHO protons and also for some other protons.

  17. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  18. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  19. Preparation by ion exchange and structural simulation of a new hydrogen phosphate of sodium zirconium; Preparacion por intercambio ionico y simulacion estructural de un nuevo hidrogenofosfato de circonio sodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras R, A.; Fernandez V, S. M.; Ordonez R, E.; Perez A, M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    It is described the method of synthesis of the {tau}-Zr P and the obtaining of its sodium form by ion exchange, the simulation of crystalline model and their patterns of X-ray diffraction and comparison of these with other compounds reported in the literature. (Author)

  20. Fast acquisition of high resolution 4-D amide-amide NOESY with diagonal suppression, sparse sampling and FFT-CLEAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Allen, Jon W; Coggins, Brian E; Zhou, Pei

    2010-05-01

    Amide-amide NOESY provides important distance constraints for calculating global folds of large proteins, especially integral membrane proteins with beta-barrel folds. Here, we describe a diagonal-suppressed 4-D NH-NH TROSY-NOESY-TROSY (ds-TNT) experiment for NMR studies of large proteins. The ds-TNT experiment employs a spin state selective transfer scheme that suppresses diagonal signals while providing TROSY optimization in all four dimensions. Active suppression of the strong diagonal peaks greatly reduces the dynamic range of observable signals, making this experiment particularly suitable for use with sparse sampling techniques. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we collected a high resolution 4-D ds-TNT spectrum of a 23kDa protein using randomized concentric shell sampling (RCSS), and we used FFT-CLEAN processing for further reduction of aliasing artifacts - the first application of these techniques to a NOESY experiment. A comparison of peak parameters in the high resolution 4-D dataset with those from a conventionally-sampled 3-D control spectrum shows an accurate reproduction of NOE crosspeaks in addition to a significant reduction in resonance overlap, which largely eliminates assignment ambiguity. Likewise, a comparison of 4-D peak intensities and volumes before and after application of the CLEAN procedure demonstrates that the reduction of aliasing artifacts by CLEAN does not systematically distort NMR signals.

  1. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of amide derivatives of polyether antibiotic-salinomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huczyński, Adam; Janczak, Jan; Stefańska, Joanna; Antoszczak, Michał; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2012-07-15

    For the first time a direct and practical approach to the synthesis of eight amide derivatives of polyether antibiotic-salinomycin is described. The structure of allyl amide (3a) has been determined using X-ray diffraction. Salinomycin and its amide derivatives have been screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against the typical gram-positive cocci, gram-negative rods and yeast-like organisms, as well as against a series of clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. Amides of salinomycin have been found to show a wide range of activities, from inactive at 256 μg/mL to active with MIC of 2 μg/mL, comparable with salinomycin. As a result, phenyl amide (3b) was found to be the most active salinomycin derivative against gram-positive bacteria, MRSA and MSSA.

  2. Separation of hydrogen from hydrogen/ethylene mixtures using PEM fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucet, R.; Gardner, C.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Ternan, M. [EnPross Inc., 147 Banning Road, Ottawa, Ontario K2L 1C5 (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    This article is a study of the feasibility of electrochemically separating hydrogen from hydrogen/ethylene mixtures. Experimental results are presented for the performance of the anode of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell that is used to separate hydrogen/ethylene mixtures. Experiments were performed using a single cell PEM fuel cell. The experimental results show that, to a large extent, the ethylene reacts with the hydrogen in the anode chamber to form ethane. In spite of this reaction, it is still possible to separate a significant portion of the hydrogen and options for improving the separation efficiency are discussed. A zero-dimensional mathematical model of the hydrogen separation and hydrogenation process has been developed and it has been shown that this model gives generally good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  3. Cu-catalyzed arylation of phosphinic amide facilitated by (±)-trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Li; Song Lin Zhang; Chuan Zhou Tao; Yao Fu; Qing Xiang Guo

    2007-01-01

    Cu-catalyzed cross coupling between phosphinic amides and aryl halides was accomplished for the first time by using (±)-transcyclohexane-1,2-diamine as the ligand. This reaction provided a novel approach for synthesizing arylated phosphinic amides. Both kinetic measurement and theoretical calculation indicated that phosphinic amides were much less reactive than amides by about 10times in Cu-catalyzed cross coupling.

  4. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  5. Synthesis and structural study of a series of amides derived from 4α- and 4β-amino-1-azaadamantanes as potential 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriepa, I.; Villasante, F. J.; Gálvez, E.; Bellanato, J.

    1999-10-01

    A series of amides derived from 4α-( 2b- 5b) and 4β-amino-1-azaadamantane ( 2a- 5a) were synthesized and studied by IR, 1H, 13C, 2D NMR spectroscopy and NOE 1D experiments. The combined use of COSY, 1H- 13C correlation spectra and double resonance experiments helped in the unambiguous and complete assignment of the bicyclic carbon and proton resonances. IR, 1H and 13C NMR data show the presence of an intramolecular N-H⋯O-CH 3 hydrogen bond in compounds 3a and 3b. Moreover, the IR spectra of compounds 4a and 4b show a strong intermolecular hydrogen bond N-H (indole)⋯N.

  6. International Exchanges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    On October 12,2015,Mr.Zhu Rui,CPAPD Secretary General,chaired informal discussions with U.S.young experts and scholars on arms control and non-proliferation.The two sides exchanged views on international arms control,disarmament,non-proliferation and nuclear security,etc.During October 12 to 16,2015,at the invitation of the CPAPD,a four-member delegation from the Vietnam Peace Committee headed by its Vice-President Ms.Nguyen Thi Hoang Van

  7. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  8. Testing and plugging power plant heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutor, F. [Expando Seal Tools, Inc., Montgomeryville, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Heat Exchanger tubes fail for any number of reasons including but certainly not limited to the cumulative effects of corrosion, erosion, thermal stress and fatigue. This presentation will attempt to identify the most common techniques for determining which tubes are leaking and then introduce the products in use to plug the leaking tubes. For the sake of time I will limit the scope of this presentation to include feedwater heaters and secondary system heat exchangers such as Hydrogen Coolers, Lube Oil Coolers, and nuclear Component Cooling Water, Emergency Cooling Water, Regenerative Heat Recovery heat exchangers.

  9. A combined experimental, theoretical, and Van't Hoff model study for identity methyl, proton, hydrogen atom, and hydride exchange reactions. Correlation with three-center four-, three-, and two-electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Henk M.

    We have studied carbon transfer reactions following an SN2 reaction profile. With ab initio calculations and experimental geometries concerning the nature of the various complexes indicated as stable, intermediate, and transition state we were able to show the additional value of van't Hoff's tetrahedral configuration by changing its geometry via a trigonal pyramid into a trigonal bipyramid. The ratio of the apical bond and corresponding tetrahedral bond distances is then nearly 1.333. The relevance of this approach has also been shown for identity proton-(hydrogen atom-, and hydride-) in-line reactions. The use of this geometrical transmission will be demonstrated for the hydrogen bonding distances in e.g., DNA duplexes and other biological (supra) molecular systems.

  10. Design of the cryogenic hydrogen release laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ethan S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Zimmerman, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ciotti, Michael [H< sub> 2< /sub> Fueling Engineering Linde, LLC, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A cooperative research and development agreement was made between Linde, LLC and Sandia to develop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. A three-stage heat exchanger will be used to cool gaseous hydrogen using liquid nitrogen, gaseous helium, and liquid helium. A cryogenic line from the heat exchanger into the lab will allow high-fidelity diagnostics already in place in the lab to be applied to cold hydrogen jets. Data from these experiments will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  11. Theoretical investigation of isotope exchange reaction in tritium-contaminated mineral oil in vacuum pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Xie, Yun [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Du, Liang [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection (SRMP), School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Suzhou 215000 (China); Li, Weiyi [School of Physics and Chemistry, Xihua University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Tan, Zhaoyi, E-mail: zhyitan@126.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • This is the first theoretical investigation about T–H exchange in vacuum oil. • T–H isotope exchange is accomplished through two different change mechanisms. • Isotope exchange is selective, molecules with −OH and −COOH exchange more easily. • The methyl and methylene radicals in waste oil were observed by {sup 1}HNMR. - Abstract: The mechanism of the isotope exchange reaction between molecular tritium and several typical organic molecules in vacuum pump mineral oil has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT), and the reaction rates are determined by conventional transition state theory (TST). The tritium–hydrogen isotope exchange reaction can proceed with two different mechanisms, the direct T–H exchange mechanism and the hyrogenation–dehydrogenation exchange mechanism. In the direct exchange mechanism, the titrated product is obtained through one-step via a four-membered ring hydrogen migration transition state. In the hyrogenation–dehydrogenation exchange mechanism, the T–H exchange could be accomplished by the hydrogenation of the unsaturated bond with tritium followed by the dehydrogenation of HT. Isotope exchange between hydrogen and tritium is selective, and oil containing molecules with −OH and −COOH groups can more easily exchange hydrogen for tritium. For aldehydes and ketones, the ability of T–H isotope exchange can be determined by the hydrogenation of T{sub 2} or the dehydrogenation of HT. The molecules containing one type of hydrogen provide a single product, while the molecules containing different types of hydrogens provide competitive products. The rate constants are presented to quantitatively estimate the selectivity of the products.

  12. Catalysis of a Flavoenzyme-Mediated Amide Hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P. (Cornell); (TAM)

    2010-09-13

    A new pyrimidine catabolic pathway (the Rut pathway) was recently discovered in Escherichia coli K12. In this pathway, uracil is converted to 3-hydroxypropionate, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. The seven-gene Rut operon is required for this conversion. Here we demonstrate that the flavoenzyme RutA catalyzes the initial uracil ring-opening reaction to give 3-ureidoacrylate. This reaction, while formally a hydrolysis reaction, proceeds by an oxidative mechanism initiated by the addition of a flavin hydroperoxide to the C4 carbonyl. While peroxide-catalyzed amide hydrolysis has chemical precedent, we are not aware of a prior example of analogous chemistry catalyzed by flavin hydroperoxides. This study further illustrates the extraordinary catalytic versatility of the flavin cofactor.

  13. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role.

  14. SYNTHESIS AND MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF POLY(PHENYLENE SULFIDE AMIDE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qixian; CHEN Yongrong; ZHOU Zuowan

    1995-01-01

    Poly(phenylene sulfide amide) (PPSA) has been synthesized by using sulfur as Ssource which reacts with dichlorobenzamide (DCBA) and alkali in polar organic solvent atthe atmospheric pressure. The polymer structures were determined by elemental analysis,FT-IR and 1H-NMR. It is shown that the yielded polymer has linear structure and itsstructure unit is -p-C6H4-CONH -p-C6H4-S-. The polymer morphology was studied byX-ray diffraction and polarized microscopy. The results show that PPSA is a crystallinepolymer and its spherulites are the aggregation of nontwisting lamella or micro-threadstructure. Under shearing force, these crystals are dispersed to form micro-fibrillarstructure. The decomposition kinetics of PPSA was also studied at different heating rates.The decomposition energy of PPSA is higher than that of PPS.

  15. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide-Amide: Indolicidin on Biological Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gergely Végh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolicidin, a cationic antimicrobial tridecapeptide amide, is rich in proline and tryptophan residues. Its biological activity is intensively studied, but the details how indolicidin interacts with membranes are not fully understood yet. We report here an in situ atomic force microscopic study describing the effect of indolicidin on an artificial supported planar bilayer membrane of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC and on purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. Concentration dependent interaction of the peptide and membranes was found in case of DPPC resulting the destruction of the membrane. Purple membrane was much more resistant against indolicidin, probably due to its high protein content. Indolicidin preferred the border of membrane disks, where the lipids are more accessible. These data suggest that the atomic force microscope is a powerful tool in the study of indolicidin-membrane interaction.

  16. Polymer amide in the Allende and Murchison meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2015-11-01

    It has been proposed that exothermic gas phase polymerization of amino acids can occur in the conditions of a warm dense molecular cloud to form hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) (McGeoch and McGeoch 2014). In a search for evidence of this presolar chemistry Allende and Murchison meteorites and a volcano control were diamond burr-etched and Folch extracted for potential HPA yielding 85 unique peaks in the meteorite samples via matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/MS). The amino acids after acid hydrolysis in Allende were below the level of detection but many of the Allende peaks via the more sensitive MALDI/TOF analysis could be fitted to a polymer combination of glycine, alanine, and alpha-hydroxyglycine with high statistical significance. A similar significant fit using these three amino acids could not be applied to the Murchison data indicating more complex polymer chemistry.

  17. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Styrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmukh S. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel unsaturated poly (ester-amide resins (UPEAs were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Styrene (STY. to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-STY. resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO as a catalyst and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The glass fibre reinforced composites (i.e. laminates of these UPEA-STY. resin blends were fabricated using the DSC data. The chemical, mechanical and electrical properties of the glass fibre composites have also been evaluated. The unreinforced cured samples of the UPEA-STY. resin blends were also analyzed by thermogravimetry (TGA.

  18. Interaction of Thioamides, Selenoamides, and Amides With Diiodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Hadjiliadis

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the results of our work on the iodine interaction with thioamides, selenoamides, and amides. Complexes with (i “spoke” or “extended spoke” structures, D⋅I2 and D⋅I2⋅I2, respectively, (D is the ligand donor (ii iodonium salts of {[D2−I]+[In]−} (n=3, 7 and {[D2−I]+[FeCl4]−} formulae and (iii disulfides of the categories (a [D-D], (b {[D-DH]+[I3]−} have been isolated and characterized. A compound of formula {[D2−I]+[I3]−[D⋅I2]} containing both types of complexes (i and (ii was also isolated. The interaction of diiodine with selenium analogs of the antithyroid drug 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU, of formulae RSeU (6-alkyl-2-Selenouracil results in the formation of complexes with formulae [(RSeUI2]. All these results are correlated with the mechanism of action of antithyroid drugs. Finally, we review here our work on the diiodine interaction with the amides (LO.

  19. Fine Control over Site and Substrate Selectivity in Hydrogen Atom Transfer-Based Functionalization of Aliphatic C-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Bietti, Massimo

    2016-10-07

    The selective functionalization of unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds over intrinsically more reactive ones represents an ongoing challenge of synthetic chemistry. Here we show that in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the aliphatic C-H bonds of alkane, ether, alcohol, amide, and amine substrates to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) fine control over site and substrate selectivity is achieved by means of acid-base interactions. Protonation of the amines and metal ion binding to amines and amides strongly deactivates the C-H bonds of these substrates toward HAT to CumO(•), providing a powerful method for selective functionalization of unactivated or intrinsically less reactive C-H bonds. With 5-amino-1-pentanol, site-selectivity has been drastically changed through protonation of the strongly activating NH2 group, with HAT that shifts to the C-H bonds that are adjacent to the OH group. In the intermolecular selectivity studies, trifluoroacetic acid, Mg(ClO4)2, and LiClO4 have been employed in a orthogonal fashion for selective functionalization of alkane, ether, alcohol, and amide (or amine) substrates in the presence of an amine (or amide) one. Ca(ClO4)2, that promotes deactivation of amines and amides by Ca(2+) binding, offers, moreover, the opportunity to selectively functionalize the C-H bonds of alkane, ether, and alcohol substrates in the presence of both amines and amides.

  20. Ground-State Distortion in N-Acyl-tert-butyl-carbamates (Boc) and N-Acyl-tosylamides (Ts): Twisted Amides of Relevance to Amide N-C Cross-Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Roman; Shi, Shicheng; Meng, Guangrong; Lalancette, Roger; Szostak, Michal

    2016-09-02

    Amide N-C(O) bonds are generally unreactive in cross-coupling reactions employing low-valent transition metals due to nN → π*C═O resonance. Herein we demonstrate that N-acyl-tert-butyl-carbamates (Boc) and N-acyl-tosylamides (Ts), two classes of acyclic amides that have recently enabled the development of elusive amide bond N-C cross-coupling reactions with organometallic reagents, are intrinsically twisted around the N-C(O) axis. The data have important implications for the design of new amide cross-coupling reactions with the N-C(O) amide bond cleavage as a key step.

  1. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-02-28

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storage applications, but later on it was found to be unable to store enough amounts of hydrogen under ambient conditions. New arrangements of carbon nanotubes were constructed and hydrogen sorption properties were investigated using state-of-the-art simulation methods. The simulations indicate outstanding total hydrogen uptake (up to 19.0 wt.% at 77 K and 5.52wt.% at 300 K), which makes these materials excellent candidates for storage applications. This reopens the carbon route to superior materials for a hydrogen-based economy. Zeolite imidazolate frameworks are subclass of MOFs with an exceptional chemical and thermal stability. The hydrogen adsorption in ZIFs was investigated as a function of network geometry and organic linker exchange. Ab initio calculations performed at the MP2 level to obtain correct interaction energies between hydrogen molecules and the ZIF framework. Subsequently, GCMC simulations are carried out to obtain the hydrogen uptake of ZIFs at different thermodynamic conditions. The best of these materials (ZIF-8) is found to be able to store up to 5 wt.% at 77 K and high pressure. We expected possible improvement of hydrogen capacity of ZIFs by substituting the metal atom (Zn{sup 2+}) in the structure by lighter elements such as B or Li. Therefore, we investigated the energy landscape of LiB(IM)4 polymorphs in detail and analyzed their hydrogen storage capacities. The structure with the fau topology was shown to be one of the best materials for hydrogen storage. Its

  2. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  3. Li{sub 3-x}M{sub x}N (M = Co, Ni) synthesized by Spark Plasma Sintering for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Junxian, E-mail: junxian@icmpe.cnrs.fr [Chimie Metallurgie des Terres Rares, ICMPE-UMR 7182, CNRS, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Cerny, Radovan [Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, Geneva (Switzerland); Villeroy, Benjamin; Godart, Claude [Chimie Metallurgie des Terres Rares, ICMPE-UMR 7182, CNRS, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Chandra, Dhanesh [University of Nevada, Reno (United States); Latroche, Michel [Chimie Metallurgie des Terres Rares, ICMPE-UMR 7182, CNRS, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France)

    2011-09-15

    Research highlights: > Anion substitution in light hydrides (amides) is realized experimentally. > The compounds have been synthesized by in-situ Spark plasma Sintering. > The structural characterization has been done by synchrotron powder diffraction. - Abstract: Lithium nitride has recently emerged as a promising material for hydrogen storage. The hydrogen storage capacity reaches 10.2 wt% H by the formation of compounds, such as imides, amides, and others. Hydrogenation of lithium nitride is highly exothermic, and thus desorbing hydrogen from these compounds requires high temperature and cannot be used for reversible hydrogen storage. Ab initio calculations predict that partial substitution of Li by transition metals like Cu or Ni can reduce the reaction enthalpy between amide and imide. In this work, we present the synthesis of the ternary system Li{sub 3-x}M{sub x}N (M = Co or Ni) by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The samples are hydrogenated at 255 deg. C by solid gas reaction. The sample crystal structures have been analyzed by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction using a high resolution powder diffractometer. The structural models for Co and Ni-substituted Li{sub 3}N have been confirmed. The effect of the substitution on the phase formation upon hydrogenation has been investigated at various metal and hydrogen concentration. Different behaviors are observed depending on the nature of M.

  4. Characteristic Conformation of Mosher’s Amide Elucidated Using the Cambridge Structural Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Ichikawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83% of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from –30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of −13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1 one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2 the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3 in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide, the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4 the phenyl plane was inclined from the O–Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5 the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group.

  5. Synergistic effects of amides from two piper species on generalist and specialist herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lora A; Dyer, Lee A; Smilanich, Angela M; Dodson, Craig D

    2010-10-01

    Plants use a diverse mix of defenses against herbivores, including multiple secondary metabolites, which often affect herbivores synergistically. Chemical defenses also can affect natural enemies of herbivores via limiting herbivore populations or by affecting herbivore resistance to parasitoids. In this study, we performed feeding experiments to examine the synergistic effects of imides and amides (hereafter "amides") from Piper cenocladum and P. imperiale on specialist (Eois nympha, Geometridae) and generalist (Spodoptera frugiperda, Noctuidae) lepidopteran larvae. Each Piper species has three unique amides, and in each experiment, larvae were fed diets containing different concentrations of single amides or combinations of the three. The amides from P. imperiale had negative synergistic effects on generalist survival and specialist pupal mass, but had no effect on specialist survival. Piper cenocladum amides also acted synergistically to increase mortality caused by parasitoids, and the direct negative effects of mixtures on parasitoid resistance and pupal mass were stronger than indirect effects via changes in growth rate and approximate digestibility. Our results are consistent with plant defense theory that predicts different effects of plant chemistry on generalist versus adapted specialist herbivores. The toxicity of Piper amide mixtures to generalist herbivores are standard bottom-up effects, while specialists experienced the top-down mediated effect of mixtures causing reduced parasitoid resistance and associated decreases in pupal mass.

  6. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-07-16

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group.

  7. Amides are excellent mimics of phosphate internucleoside linkages and are well tolerated in short interfering RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutisya, Daniel; Selvam, Chelliah; Lunstad, Benjamin D; Pallan, Pradeep S; Haas, Amanda; Leake, Devin; Egli, Martin; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an important tool in functional genomics and has an intriguing therapeutic potential. However, the current design of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is not optimal for in vivo applications. Non-ionic phosphate backbone modifications may have the potential to improve the properties of siRNAs, but are little explored in RNAi technologies. Using X-ray crystallography and RNAi activity assays, the present study demonstrates that 3'-CH2-CO-NH-5' amides are excellent replacements for phosphodiester internucleoside linkages in RNA. The crystal structure shows that amide-modified RNA forms a typical A-form duplex. The amide carbonyl group points into the major groove and assumes an orientation that is similar to the P-OP2 bond in the phosphate linkage. Amide linkages are well hydrated by tandem waters linking the carbonyl group and adjacent phosphate oxygens. Amides are tolerated at internal positions of both the guide and passenger strand of siRNAs and may increase the silencing activity when placed near the 5'-end of the passenger strand. As a result, an siRNA containing eight amide linkages is more active than the unmodified control. The results suggest that RNAi may tolerate even more extensive amide modification, which may be useful for optimization of siRNAs for in vivo applications.

  8. 单空位缺陷对载能氢原子与石墨层间碰撞的能量交换的影响的分子动力学研究%Molecular dynamics simulation of energy exchange during hydrogen collision with graphite sheet containing a vacancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李守阳; 孙继忠; 张治海; 刘升光; 王德真

    2011-01-01

    本文采用分子动力学方法研究空位缺陷对石墨层中碳氢粒子碰撞的影响.将氢原子以不同能量分别向单空位缺陷边缘的两个碳原子轰击,分析了入射氢原子的能量损失、发生吸附反应的能量范围和靶原子的能量传递过程.研究发现,单空位缺陷边缘的碳氢粒子更易发生吸附反应;在碳氢粒子正碰过程中,氢原子随入射能量变化出现了双反射区域;碳氢粒子在空位缺陷边缘吸附后,形成了高结合能的sp2结构,并出现悬挂键,其临近的碳碳键能未降低;单空位缺陷边缘的碳原子吸附氢原子能量的能力强而传递能量的能力弱.这些结果对理解聚变反应中,碳基材料的化学腐蚀及氚滞留有重要意义.%Molecular dynamics simulation is applied to investigation of energy exchanges during hydrogen collision with graphite sheet containing a vacancy. The effects of the monovancancy defect on the energy exchanges are discussed in detail. This paper analyzes the energy loss of the incident hydrogen atom, the energy range for the adsorption process, and the energy transfer process for target atom, in the course of a hydrogen atom bombarding the carbon atom at the edge of monovacancy defect in the graphite sheet. The simulation results show that the adsorption process proceeds more easily when the graphite sheet contains a vacancy than when the graphite sheet has perfect crystalline structure. In certain areas of the graphite sheet, adsorption of an incident hydrogen atom can occur in two energy ranges. The sp2 structure as well as overhang configuration occurs when a hydrogen atom is adsorbed. This adsorption process does not reduce the C-C bond energy. It is found that the carbon atom at the edge of monovacancy defect can adsorb an incident hydrogen atom more easily but can not diffuse the gained energy as efficiently as in a perfect graphite sheet. These results are helpful for understanding the chemical erosion of carbon

  9. Segmented heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  10. Acceleration of Amide Bond Rotation by Encapsulation in the Hydrophobic Interior of a Water-Soluble Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-04-08

    The hydrophobic interior cavity of a self-assembled supramolecular assembly exploits the hydrophobic effect for the encapsulation of tertiary amides. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments reveal that the free energy barrier for rotation around the C-N amide bond is lowered by up to 3.6 kcal/mol upon encapsulation. The hydrophobic cavity of the assembly is able to stabilize the less polar transition state of the amide rotation process. Carbon-13 labeling studies showed that the {sup 13}C NMR carbonyl resonance increases with temperature for the encapsulated amides which suggests that the assembly is able to favor a twisted for of the amide.

  11. Probing the production of amidated peptides following genetic and dietary copper manipulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yin

    Full Text Available Amidated neuropeptides play essential roles throughout the nervous and endocrine systems. Mice lacking peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM, the only enzyme capable of producing amidated peptides, are not viable. In the amidation reaction, the reactant (glycine-extended peptide is converted into a reaction intermediate (hydroxyglycine-extended peptide by the copper-dependent peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM domain of PAM. The hydroxyglycine-extended peptide is then converted into amidated product by the peptidyl-α-hydroxyglycine α-amidating lyase (PAL domain of PAM. PHM and PAL are stitched together in vertebrates, but separated in some invertebrates such as Drosophila and Hydra. In addition to its luminal catalytic domains, PAM includes a cytosolic domain that can enter the nucleus following release from the membrane by γ-secretase. In this work, several glycine- and hydroxyglycine-extended peptides as well as amidated peptides were qualitatively and quantitatively assessed from pituitaries of wild-type mice and mice with a single copy of the Pam gene (PAM(+/- via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based methods. We provide the first evidence for the presence of a peptidyl-α-hydroxyglycine in vivo, indicating that the reaction intermediate becomes free and is not handed directly from PHM to PAL in vertebrates. Wild-type mice fed a copper deficient diet and PAM(+/- mice exhibit similar behavioral deficits. While glycine-extended reaction intermediates accumulated in the PAM(+/- mice and reflected dietary copper availability, amidated products were far more prevalent under the conditions examined, suggesting that the behavioral deficits observed do not simply reflect a lack of amidated peptides.

  12. Probing the production of amidated peptides following genetic and dietary copper manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Bousquet-Moore, Danielle; Annangudi, Suresh P; Southey, Bruce R; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-01-01

    Amidated neuropeptides play essential roles throughout the nervous and endocrine systems. Mice lacking peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), the only enzyme capable of producing amidated peptides, are not viable. In the amidation reaction, the reactant (glycine-extended peptide) is converted into a reaction intermediate (hydroxyglycine-extended peptide) by the copper-dependent peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) domain of PAM. The hydroxyglycine-extended peptide is then converted into amidated product by the peptidyl-α-hydroxyglycine α-amidating lyase (PAL) domain of PAM. PHM and PAL are stitched together in vertebrates, but separated in some invertebrates such as Drosophila and Hydra. In addition to its luminal catalytic domains, PAM includes a cytosolic domain that can enter the nucleus following release from the membrane by γ-secretase. In this work, several glycine- and hydroxyglycine-extended peptides as well as amidated peptides were qualitatively and quantitatively assessed from pituitaries of wild-type mice and mice with a single copy of the Pam gene (PAM(+/-)) via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based methods. We provide the first evidence for the presence of a peptidyl-α-hydroxyglycine in vivo, indicating that the reaction intermediate becomes free and is not handed directly from PHM to PAL in vertebrates. Wild-type mice fed a copper deficient diet and PAM(+/-) mice exhibit similar behavioral deficits. While glycine-extended reaction intermediates accumulated in the PAM(+/-) mice and reflected dietary copper availability, amidated products were far more prevalent under the conditions examined, suggesting that the behavioral deficits observed do not simply reflect a lack of amidated peptides.

  13. The labeling of unsaturated γ-hydroxybutyric acid by heavy isotopes of hydrogen: iridium complex-mediated H/D exchange by C─H bond activation vs reduction by boro-deuterides/tritides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Ales; Pedersen, Martin Holst Friborg; Vogensen, Stine B.

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-ene-1-carboxylic acid (HOCPCA ( 1 )) is a potent ligand for high-affinity γ-hydroxybutyric acid binding sites in the central nervous system. Various approaches to the introduction of a hydrogen label onto the HOCPCA skeleton are reported. The outcomes of the feasible C...... period of time. The highest deuterium enrichment (>99%) was achieved through the reduction of ketone precursor 2 by lithium trimethoxyborodeuteride. Hence, analogical conditions were used for the tritiation experiment. [3H]-HOCPCA selectively labeled on the position C-3 was synthetized with radiochemical...

  14. The Catalysis of NAD+, NADP+ and Nicotinic Amide for Methanol Electrooxidation at Platinum Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ping; SHI Yufang; ZHANG Qiaolian; TANG Zhiyong; ZHENG Hongtao; YUAN Runzhang

    2006-01-01

    A group of liquid catalysts composed of nicotinic amide functioning on the anode of DMFC were investigated at a Pt electrode, which were nicotinic amide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and its phosphate (NAD(P)+). The kinetics of methanol anode oxidation in the three reaction systems was compared by measuring potentiodynamic current-potential curves and AC impedances. The experimental results show that the dynamic behavior of methanol oxidation at a Pt electrode has been changed with adding the three substances. The influence of temperature on the catalysis of these coenzymes and nicotinic amide was discussed by comparing the AC impedances spectra of methanol oxidation at different temperatures.

  15. Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed Regioselective Ortho Amidation of Imidazo Heterocycles with Isocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, S M Abdul; Kumari, Santosh; Khullar, Sadhika; Mandal, Sanjay K; Kumar, Anil; Sakhuja, Rajeev

    2016-12-16

    Direct ortho amidation at the phenyl ring of 2-phenylimidazo heterocycles with aryl isocyanates has been achieved via a chelation-assisted cationic ruthenium(II) complex catalyzed mechanism. The methodology provides a straightforward, high-yielding regioselective approach toward the synthesis of an array of ortho-amidated phenylimidazo heterocycles without prior activation of C(sp(2))-H. This also reports the first method for coupling of aryl isocyanates with the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine system via a pentacyclometalated intermediate. The methodology is found to be easily scalable and could be applied toward the selective ortho amidation of 2-heteroarylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine frameworks.

  16. Amide Synthesis from Alcohols and Amines by the Extrusion of Dihydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik Rubæk; Vogt, Henning; Madsen, R.

    2008-01-01

    An environmentally friendly method for synthesis of amides is presented where a simple ruthenium catalyst mediates the direct coupling between an alcohol and an amine with the liberation of two molecules of dihydrogen. The active catalyst is generated in situ from an easily available ruthenium...... complex, an N-heterocyclic carbene and a phosphine. The reaction allows primary alcohols to be coupled with primary alkyamines to afford the corresponding secondary amides in good yields. The amide formation presumably proceeds through a catalytic cycle where the intermediate aldehyde and hemiaminal...

  17. Studies and Applications of Metals for the Synthesis of Carbinols, Amides and Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osztrovszky, Gyorgyi

    the carbonyl addition was found to be faster or comparable to the protonation by the reagent. Project 2: Ruthenium catalyzed synthesis of amides from primary alcohols and amines The direct synthesis of amides from alcohols and amines with the simultaneous liberation of dihydrogen was previously discovered...... for the amidation. These two systems do not show any significant differences in reactivity indicating that the same catalytically active species is operating. Project 3: Synthesis of a trisaccharide probe as a putative dengue virus receptor At the Institute for Glycomics major research has been devoted to identify...

  18. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  19. Mesoporous Niobium Oxide Spheres as an Effective Catalyst for the Transamidation of Primary Amides with Amines

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Subhash Chandra

    2014-02-06

    Mesoporous niobium oxide spheres (MNOS), conveniently prepared by a novel antisolvent precipitation approach, have been shown to be an effective catalyst for the transamidation of primary amides with amines. This novel transamidation can be efficiently carried out under solvent-free conditions and is applicable to a wide range of primary amides and amines to provide N-alkyl amides in good to excellent yields. The catalyst is highly stable and reusable. The application of this transamidation reaction has been demonstrated in the synthesis of antidepressant drug moclobemide and other druglike compounds. © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH&Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Synthesis and comprehensive structural studies of a novel amide based carboxylic acid derivative: Non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahkandi, Mohammad; Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Yunus, Uzma; Shaheen, Shahida; Nadeem, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2017-04-01

    The presented work studies the geometric and electronic structures of the crystalline network of a novel amide based carboxylic acid derivative, N-[(4-chlorophenyl)]-4-oxo-4-[oxy] butane amide, C10H10NO3Cl (1), constructed via hydrogen bonds (HBs) and stacking non-covalent interactions. Compound 1 was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, 1H, and 13C NMR, and UV-Vis spectra, X-ray structural, DTA-TG, and EI-MS, analyses. DFT calculations about molecular and related network of 1 were performed at hybrid B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) level of theory to support the experimental data. The neutral monomeric structures join together via inter-molecular conventional O/Nsbnd H⋯O and non-conventional Csbnd H⋯O HBs and Osbnd H···π and Csbnd O···π stacking interactions to create 2-D architecture of the network. The results of dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations within the binding energy of the constructive non-covalent interactions demonstrate that HBs, especially conventional Osbnd H⋯O and Nsbnd H⋯O, govern the network formation. The calculated electronic spectrum show six major bands in the range of 180-270 nm which confirm the experimental one within an intense band around 250 nm. These charge transfer bands result from shift of lone pair electron density of phenyl to chlorine or hydroxyl or phenyl functional groups that possess π → π* and π → n characters.