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Sample records for amidases

  1. Functional characterization of Corynebacterium glutamicum mycothiol S-conjugate amidase.

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    Meiru Si

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the genetic and biochemical characterization of mycothiol S-conjugate amidase (Mca of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Recombinant C. glutamicum Mca was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. The molecular weight of native Mca protein determined by gel filtration chromatography was 35 kDa, indicating that Mca exists as monomers in the purification condition. Mca showed amidase activity with mycothiol S-conjugate of monobromobimane (MSmB in vivo while mca mutant lost the ability to cleave MSmB. In addition, Mca showed limited deacetylase activity with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc as substrate. Optimum pH for amidase activity was between 7.5 and 8.5, while the highest activity in the presence of Zn2+ confirmed Mca as a zinc metalloprotein. Amino acid residues conserved among Mca family members were located in C. glutamicum Mca and site-directed mutagenesis of these residues indicated that Asp14, Tyr137, His139 and Asp141 were important for activity. The mca deletion mutant showed decreased resistance to antibiotics, alkylating agents, oxidants and heavy metals, and these sensitive phenotypes were recovered in the complementary strain to a great extent. The physiological roles of Mca in resistance to various toxins were further supported by the induced expression of Mca in C. glutamicum under various stress conditions, directly under the control of the stress-responsive extracytoplasmic function-sigma (ECF-σ factor SigH.

  2. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  3. [Cloning and analysis of a new aliphatic amidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, K V; Karpova, I Yu; Epremyan, A S; Yanenko, A S

    2014-10-01

    A new aliphatic amidase gene (ami), having a level of similarity with the nearest homologs of no more than 77%, was identified in the Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 strain, which is able to hydrolyze a wide range of amides. The amidase gene was cloned within a 3.7 kb chromosomal locus, which also contains putative acetyl-CoA ligase and ABC-type transportergenes. The structure of this locus in the R. erythropolis TA37 strain differs from the structure of loci in other Rhodococcus strains. The amidase gene is expressed in Escherichia coli cells. It was demonstrated that amidase (generated in the recombinant strain) efficiently hydrolyzes acetamide (aliphatic anmide) and does not use 4'-nitroacetanilide (N-substituted amide) as a substrate. Insertional inactivation of the amidase gene in the R. erythropolis TA37 strain results in a considerable decrease (by at least 6-7 times) in basal amidase activity, indicating functional amidase activity in the R. erythropolis TA37 strain.

  4. Aliphatic amidase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34: Purification, characterization and application in synthesis of acrylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Neerja; Kumar, Vijay; Sharma, Nirmal Kant; Thakur, Shikha; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2016-01-01

    An intracellular aliphatic amide degrading inducible amidase produced by Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 was characterized and acrylic acid synthesis from acrylamide was carried out using whole cell amidase. A bioprocess was developed at 50 ml fed batch reaction using 400 mM acrylamide feeding at an interval of 30 min resulted in the production of 4 g acrylic acid with volumetric and catalytic productivity of 80 g/l and 19 g/g/h respectively. The amidase of this organism had molecular weight of 40 kDa and was purified to 8.5 fold with 8% yield. This enzyme was active within the temperature range of 30 to 60 °C, with optimum temperature 45 °C and pH 7.5. The Vmax, Km, and kcat of purified amidase were calculated as 250 U/mg protein, 4.5 mM, and 166 sec-1 for acrylamide. The enzyme showed tolerance to metal chelating agent (EDTA) and was strongly inhibited by heavy metal ions Hg2+, Ag2+, Cu2+ and Co2+. R. rhodochrous PA-34 amidase preferentially hydrolyzed small aliphatic toxic amide such as acrylamide. Thus, the amidase of R. rhodochrous PA-34 is promising biocatalyst for the synthesis of industrially important acids and biodegradation of toxic amides.

  5. Characterization of Ejl, the cell-wall amidase coded by the pneumococcal bacteriophage Ej-1.

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    Sáiz, José L; López-Zumel, Consuelo; Monterroso, Begoña; Varea, Julio; Arrondo, José Luis R; Iloro, Ibon; García, José L; Laynez, José; Menéndez, Margarita

    2002-07-01

    The Ejl amidase is coded by Ej-1, a temperate phage isolated from the atypical pneumococcus strain 101/87. Like all the pneumococcal cell-wall lysins, Ejl has a bimodular organization; the catalytic region is located in the N-terminal module, and the C-terminal module attaches the enzyme to the choline residues of the pneumococcal cell wall. The structural features of the Ejl amidase, its interaction with choline, and the structural changes accompanying the ligand binding have been characterized by CD and IR spectroscopies, differential scanning calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and FPLC. According to prediction and spectroscopic (CD and IR) results, Ejl would be composed of short beta-strands (ca. 36%) connected by long loops (ca. 17%), presenting only two well-predicted alpha-helices (ca. 12%) in the catalytic module. Its polypeptide chain folds into two cooperative domains, corresponding to the N- and C-terminal modules, and exhibits a monomer dimer self-association equilibrium. Choline binding induces small rearrangements in Ejl secondary structure but enhances the amidase self-association by preferential binding to Ejl dimers and tetramers. Comparison of LytA, the major pneumococcal amidase, with Ejl shows that the sequence differences (15% divergence) strongly influence the amidase stability, the organization of the catalytic module in cooperative domains, and the self-association state induced by choline. Moreover, the ligand affinity for the choline-binding locus involved in regulation of the amidase dimerization is reduced by a factor of 10 in Ejl. Present results evidence that sequence differences resulting from the natural variability found in the cell wall amidases coded by pneumococcus and its bacteriophages may significantly alter the protein structure and its attachment to the cell wall.

  6. Characterization of Ejl, the cell-wall amidase coded by the pneumococcal bacteriophage Ej-1

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    Sáiz, José L.; López-Zumel, Consuelo; Monterroso, Begoña; Varea, Julio; Arrondo, José Luis R.; Iloro, Ibon; García, José L.; Laynez, José; Menéndez, Margarita

    2002-01-01

    The Ejl amidase is coded by Ej-1, a temperate phage isolated from the atypical pneumococcus strain 101/87. Like all the pneumococcal cell-wall lysins, Ejl has a bimodular organization; the catalytic region is located in the N-terminal module, and the C-terminal module attaches the enzyme to the choline residues of the pneumococcal cell wall. The structural features of the Ejl amidase, its interaction with choline, and the structural changes accompanying the ligand binding have been characterized by CD and IR spectroscopies, differential scanning calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and FPLC. According to prediction and spectroscopic (CD and IR) results, Ejl would be composed of short β-strands (ca. 36%) connected by long loops (ca. 17%), presenting only two well-predicted α-helices (ca. 12%) in the catalytic module. Its polypeptide chain folds into two cooperative domains, corresponding to the N- and C-terminal modules, and exhibits a monomer ↔ dimer self-association equilibrium. Choline binding induces small rearrangements in Ejl secondary structure but enhances the amidase self-association by preferential binding to Ejl dimers and tetramers. Comparison of LytA, the major pneumococcal amidase, with Ejl shows that the sequence differences (15% divergence) strongly influence the amidase stability, the organization of the catalytic module in cooperative domains, and the self-association state induced by choline. Moreover, the ligand affinity for the choline-binding locus involved in regulation of the amidase dimerization is reduced by a factor of 10 in Ejl. Present results evidence that sequence differences resulting from the natural variability found in the cell wall amidases coded by pneumococcus and its bacteriophages may significantly alter the protein structure and its attachment to the cell wall. PMID:12070331

  7. Endogenous molecules stimulating N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Tatsuya; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Uyama, Toru; Masuda, Kim; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Houchi, Hitoshi; Ueda, Natsuo

    2012-05-16

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays the central role in the degradation of bioactive N-acylethanolamines such as the endocannabinoid arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) in brain and peripheral tissues. A lysosomal enzyme referred to as N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) catalyzes the same reaction with preference to palmitoylethanolamide, an endogenous analgesic and neuroprotective substance, and is therefore expected as a potential target of therapeutic drugs. In the in vitro assays thus far performed, the maximal activity of NAAA was achieved in the presence of both nonionic detergent (Triton X-100 or Nonidet P-40) and the SH reagent dithiothreitol. However, endogenous molecules that might substitute for these synthetic compounds remain poorly understood. Here, we examined stimulatory effects of endogenous phospholipids and thiol compounds on recombinant NAAA. Among different phospholipids tested, choline- or ethanolamine-containing phospholipids showed potent effects, and 1 mM phosphatidylcholine increased NAAA activity by 6.6-fold. Concerning endogenous thiol compounds, dihydrolipoic acid at 0.1-1 mM was the most active, causing 8.5-9.0-fold stimulation. These results suggest that endogenous phospholipids and dihydrolipoic acid may contribute in keeping NAAA active in lysosomes. Even in the presence of phosphatidylcholine and dihydrolipoic acid, however, the preferential hydrolysis of palmitoylethanolamide was unaltered. We also investigated a possible compensatory induction of NAAA mRNA in brain and other tissues of FAAH-deficient mice. However, NAAA expression levels in all the tissues examined were not significantly altered from those in wild-type mice.

  8. Purification and characterization of a novel thermo-active amidase from Geobacillus subterraneus RL-2a.

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    Mehta, Praveen Kumar; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Bhatia, Ravi Kant; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2013-07-01

    A thermostable amidase produced by Geobacillus subterraneus RL-2a was purified to homogeneity, with a yield of 9.54 % and a specific activity of 48.66 U mg(-1). The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 111 kDa. The amidase of G. subterraneus RL-2a is constitutive in nature, active at a broad range of pH (4.5-11.5) and temperature (40-90 °C) and has a half-life of 5 h and 54 min at 70 °C. Inhibition of enzyme activity was observed in the presence of metal ions, such as Co(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and thiol reagents. The presence of mid-chain aliphatic and amino acid amides enhances the enzymatic activity. The acyl transferase activity was detected with propionamide, butyramide and nicotinamide. The enzyme showed moderate stability toward toluene, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, ethylene glycol except acetone, ethanol, butanol, propanol and dimethyl sulfoxide. The K m and V max of the purified amidase with nicotinamide were 6.02 ± 0.56 mM and 132.6 ± 4.4 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein by analyzing Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The results of MALDI-TOF analysis indicated that this amidase has homology with the amidase of Geobacillus sp. C56-T3 (gi|297530427). It is the first reported wide-spectrum thermostable amidase from a thermophilic G. subterraneus.

  9. Purification and Characterization of an L-Amino Amidase from Mycobacterium neoaurum ATCC 25795

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Tandler, R.F.; Sonke, T.; Dijkhuizen, L.; Meijer, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    An L-amino amidase from Mycobacterium neoaurum ATCC 25795 responsible for the enantioselective resolution of DL-α-methyl valine amide was purified and characterized. The purification procedure included ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion-exchange chromatography, which resulted

  10. The autolytic activity of the recombinant amidase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is inhibited by its own recombinant GW repeats.

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    Hell, Wolfgang; Reichl, Sylvia; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören

    2003-10-10

    The Aas (autolysin/adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus) is a multifunctional surface protein containing two enzymatic domains an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, and two different regions of repetitive sequences, an N-terminal and a C-terminal repetitive domain. The C-terminal repetitive domain is built up by the repeats R1, R2 and R3, which interconnect the putative active centers of the amidase and glucosaminidase. To investigate the influence of the C-terminal repeats and the N-terminal repeats on the amidase activity, the repetitive domains and fragments of them were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The influence of the different fragments on the activity of the recombinant amidase of the Aas, consisting of the active center of the enzyme and repeat R1, was investigated in a turbidimetric microassay. The different fragments derived from the C-terminal repeats inhibited the amidase activity, while the N-terminal repeats did not influence the activity of the enzyme. The inhibiting activity increased with the number of GW repeats the recombinant fragment contained. Thus we conclude, that the C-terminal GW repeats and not the N-terminal repeats are necessary for the cell wall targeting and the autolytic function of the amidase.

  11. Increasing plant growth by modulating omega-amidase expression in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2015-06-30

    The present disclosure relates to compositions and methods for increasing the leaf-to-root ratio of the signal metabolite 2-oxoglutaramate and related proline molecules in plants by modulating levels of .omega.-amidase to increase nitrogen use efficiency, resulting in enhanced growth, faster growth rates, greater seed and fruit/pod yields, earlier and more productive flowering, increased tolerance to high salt conditions, and increased biomass yields.

  12. Enhanced production of amidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis MTCC 1526 by medium optimisation using a statistical experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Bhalchandra K; Mutalik, Snehal R; Joshi, Renuka M; Nene, Sanjay N; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2009-05-01

    In the present work, statistical experimental methodology was used to enhance the production of amidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis MTCC 1526. R. erythropolis MTCC 1526 was selected through screening of seven strains of Rhodococcus species. The Placket-Burman screening experiments suggested that sorbitol as carbon source, yeast extract and meat peptone as nitrogen sources, and acetamide as amidase inducer are the most influential media components. The concentrations of these four media components were optimised using a face-centred design of response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum medium composition for amidase production was found to contain sorbitol (5 g/L), yeast extract (4 g/L), meat peptone (2.5 g/L), and acetamide (12.25 mM). Amidase activities before and after optimisation were 157.85 units/g dry cells and 1,086.57 units/g dry cells, respectively. Thus, use of RSM increased production of amidase from R. erythropolis MTCC 1526 by 6.88-fold.

  13. Structure-function analysis of Staphylococcus aureus amidase reveals the determinants of peptidoglycan recognition and cleavage.

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    Büttner, Felix Michael; Zoll, Sebastian; Nega, Mulugeta; Götz, Friedrich; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-04-18

    The bifunctional major autolysin AtlA of Staphylococcus aureus cleaves the bacterium's peptidoglycan network (PGN) at two distinct sites during cell division. Deletion of the enzyme results in large cell clusters with disordered division patterns, indicating that AtlA could be a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. One of the two functions of AtlA is performed by the N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase AmiA, which cleaves the bond between the carbohydrate and the peptide moieties of PGN. To establish the structural requirements of PGN recognition and the enzymatic mechanism of cleavage, we solved the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of AmiA (AmiA-cat) in complex with a peptidoglycan-derived ligand at 1.55 Å resolution. The peptide stem is clearly visible in the structure, forming extensive contacts with protein residues by docking into an elongated groove. Less well defined electron density and the analysis of surface features indicate likely positions of the carbohydrate backbone and the pentaglycine bridge. Substrate specificity analysis supports the importance of the pentaglycine bridge for fitting into the binding cleft of AmiA-cat. PGN of S. aureus with l-lysine tethered with d-alanine via a pentaglycine bridge is completely hydrolyzed, whereas PGN of Bacillus subtilis with meso-diaminopimelic acid directly tethered with d-alanine is not hydrolyzed. An active site mutant, H370A, of AmiA-cat was completely inactive, providing further support for the proposed catalytic mechanism of AmiA. The structure reported here is not only the first of any bacterial amidase in which both the PGN component and the water molecule that carries out the nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of the scissile bond are present; it is also the first peptidoglycan amidase complex structure of an important human pathogen.

  14. A breakthrough in enzyme technology to fight penicillin resistance-industrial application of penicillin amidase.

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    Buchholz, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic penicillin hydrolysis by penicillin amidase (also penicillin acylase, PA) represents a Landmark: the first industrially and economically highly important process using an immobilized biocatalyst. Resistance of infective bacteria to antibiotics had become a major topic of research and industrial activities. Solutions to this problem, the antibiotics resistance of infective microorganisms, required the search for new antibiotics, but also the development of derivatives, notably penicillin derivatives, that overcame resistance. An obvious route was to hydrolyse penicillin to 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), as a first step, for the introduction via chemical synthesis of various different side chains. Hydrolysis via chemical reaction sequences was tedious requiring large amounts of toxic chemicals, and they were cost intensive. Enzymatic hydrolysis using penicillin amidase represented a much more elegant route. The basis for such a solution was the development of techniques for enzyme immobilization, a highly difficult task with respect to industrial application. Two pioneer groups started to develop solutions to this problem in the late 1960s and 1970s: that of Günter Schmidt-Kastner at Bayer AG (Germany) and that of Malcolm Lilly of Imperial College London. Here, one example of this development, that at Bayer, will be presented in more detail since it illustrates well the achievement of a solution to the problems of industrial application of enzymatic processes, notably development of an immobilization method for penicillin amidase suitable for scale up to application in industrial reactors under economic conditions. A range of bottlenecks and technical problems of large-scale application had to be overcome. Data giving an inside view of this pioneer achievement in the early phase of the new field of biocatalysis are presented. The development finally resulted in a highly innovative and commercially important enzymatic process to produce 6-APA that

  15. In silico screening of 393 mutants facilitates enzyme engineering of amidase activity in CalB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hediger, Martin Robert; De Vico, Luca; Rannes, Julie Bille;

    2013-01-01

    Our previously presented method for high throughput computational screening of mutant activity (Hediger et al., 2012) is benchmarked against experimentally measured amidase activity for 22 mutants of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB). Using an appropriate cutoff criterion for the computed barriers......, the qualitative activity of 15 out of 22 mutants is correctly predicted. The method identifies four of the six most active mutants with ≥3-fold wild type activity and seven out of the eight least active mutants with ≤0.5-fold wild type activity. The method is further used to screen all sterically possible (386...

  16. PL3 Amidase, a Tailor-made Lysin Constructed by Domain Shuffling

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    Blas Blázquez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is pushing the need of alternative treatments. In this context, phage therapy is already a reality to successfully fight certain multiresistant bacteria. Among different phage gene products, murein hydrolases responsible of phage progeny liberation (also called lysins or endolysins are weapons that target specific peptidoglycan bonds, leading to lysis and death of susceptible bacteria when added from the outside. In the pneumococcal system, all but one phage murein hydrolases reported to date share a choline-binding domain that recognizes cell walls containing choline residues in the (lipoteichoic acids. Some purified pneumococcal or phage murein hydrolases, as well as several chimeric proteins combining natural catalytic and cell wall-binding domains have been used as effective antimicrobials. In this work we have constructed a novel chimeric N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (PL3 by fusing the catalytic domain of the Pal amidase (a phage-coded endolysin to the cell wall-binding domain of the LytA amidase, the major pneumococcal autolysin. The physicochemical properties of PL3 and the bacteriolytic effect against several pneumococci (including 48 multiresistant representative strain and related species, like Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis, have been studied. Results have shown that low doses of PL3, in the range of 0.5–5 µg/ml, are enough to practically sterilize all choline-containing strains tested. Moreover, a single 20-µg dose of PL3 fully protected zebrafish embryos from infection by S. pneumoniae D39 strain. Importantly, PL3 keeps 95% enzymatic activity after four weeks at 37ºC and can be lyophilized without losing activity, demonstrating a remarkable robustness. Such stability, together with a prominent efficacy against a narrow spectrum of human pathogens, confers to PL3 the characteristic to be an effective therapeutic. In

  17. Nitrile Hydratase and Amidase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous Hydrolyze Acrylic Fibers and Granular Polyacrylonitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, M. M.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Robra, K.-H.; Gübitz, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 produced nitrile hydratase (320 nkat mg of protein−1) and amidase activity (38.4 nkat mg of protein−1) when grown on a medium containing propionitrile. These enzymes were able to hydrolyze nitrile groups of both granular polyacrylonitriles (PAN) and acrylic fibers. Nitrile groups of PAN40 (molecular mass, 40 kDa) and PAN190 (molecular mass, 190 kDa) were converted into the corresponding carbonic acids to 1.8 and 1.0%, respectively. In contrast, surfacial nitrile groups of acrylic fibers were only converted to the corresponding amides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 16% of the surfacial nitrile groups were hydrolyzed by the R. rhodochrous enzymes. Due to the enzymatic modification, the acrylic fibers became more hydrophilic and thus, adsorption of dyes was enhanced. This was indicated by a 15% increase in the staining level (K/S value) for C.I. Basic Blue 9. PMID:10742253

  18. The quaternary structure of the amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8 is revealed by its crystal packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarkar, Vinod B. [Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Kimani, Serah W. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Cowan, Donald A.; Sayed, Muhammed F.-R. [Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Sewell, B. Trevor, E-mail: sewell@uctvms.uct.ac.za [Electron Microscope Unit, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Advanced Research Centre for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2006-12-01

    The amidase from G. pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned, expressed and purified, and then crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The amidase from Geobacillus pallidus RAPc8, a moderate thermophile, is a member of the nitrilase enzyme superfamily. It converts amides to the corresponding acids and ammonia and has application as an industrial catalyst. RAPc8 amidase has been cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and has been purified by heat treatment and a number of chromatographic steps. The enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals produced in the presence of 1.2 M sodium citrate, 400 mM NaCl, 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.6 were selected for X-ray diffraction studies. A data set having acceptable statistics to 1.96 Å resolution was collected under cryoconditions using an in-house X-ray source. The space group was determined to be primitive cubic P4{sub 2}32, with unit-cell parameter a = 130.49 (±0.05) Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the backbone of the hypothetical protein PH0642 from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PDB code 1j31) with all non-identical side chains substituted with alanine as a probe. There is one subunit per asymmetric unit. The subunits are packed as trimers of dimers with D3 point-group symmetry around the threefold axis in such a way that the dimer interface seen in the homologues is preserved.

  19. Structure-guided functional characterization of DUF1460 reveals a highly specific NlpC/P60 amidase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Patin, Delphine; Grant, Joanna C; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-12-02

    GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-tetrapeptide is a major peptidoglycan degradation intermediate and a cytotoxin. It is generated by lytic transglycosylases and further degraded and recycled by various enzymes. We have identified and characterized a highly specific N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiA) from Bacteroides uniformis, a member of the DUF1460 protein family, that hydrolyzes GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-peptide into disaccharide and stem peptide. The high-resolution apo structure at 1.15 Å resolution shows that AmiA is related to NlpC/P60 γ-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid amidases and shares a common catalytic core and cysteine peptidase-like active site. AmiA has evolved structural adaptations that reconfigure the substrate recognition site. The preferred substrates for AmiA were predicted in silico based on structural and bioinformatics data, and subsequently were characterized experimentally. Further crystal structures of AmiA in complexes with GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc and GlcNAc have enabled us to elucidate substrate recognition and specificity. DUF1460 is highly conserved in structure and defines another amidase family.

  20. Amidase, a cell wall hydrolase, elicits protective immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nisha; Vinod, Vivek; Suresh, Maneesha K; Vijayrajratnam, Sukhithasri; Biswas, Lalitha; Peethambaran, Reshmi; Vasudevan, Anil Kumar; Biswas, Raja

    2015-01-01

    The morbidity and the mortality associated with Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis infections have greatly increased due to the rapid emergence of highly virulent and antibiotic resistant strains. Development of a vaccine-based therapy is greatly desired. However, no staphylococcal vaccine is available till date. In this study, we have identified Major amidase (Atl-AM) as a prime candidate for future vaccine design against these pathogens. Atl-AM is a multi-functional non-covalently cell wall associated protein which is involved in staphylococcal cell separation after cell division, host extracellular matrix adhesion and biofilm formation. Atl-AM is present on the surface of diverse S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains. When used in combination with Freund's adjuvant, Atl-AM generated a mixed Th1 and Th2 mediated immune response which is skewed more toward Th1; and showed increased production of opsonophagocytic IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies. Significant protective immune response was observed when vaccinated mice were challenged with S. aureus or S. epidermidis. Vaccination prevented the systemic dissemination of both organisms. Our results demonstrate the remarkable efficacy of Atl-AM as a vaccine candidate against both of these pathogens.

  1. The aliphatic amidase AmiE is involved in regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamens, Thomas; Rosay, Thibaut; Crépin, Alexandre; Grandjean, Teddy; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Bortolotti, Perrine; Neidig, Anke; Mooij, Marlies; Hillion, Mélanie; Vieillard, Julien; Cosette, Pascal; Overhage, Joerg; O’Gara, Fergal; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie; Guery, Benoit; Cornelis, Pierre; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Lesouhaitier, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that the eukaryotic C-type natriuretic peptide hormone (CNP) regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and biofilm formation after binding on the AmiC sensor, triggering the amiE transcription. Herein, the involvement of the aliphatic amidase AmiE in P. aeruginosa virulence regulation has been investigated. The proteome analysis of an AmiE over-producing strain (AmiE+) revealed an expression change for 138 proteins, including some that are involved in motility, synthesis of quorum sensing compounds and virulence regulation. We observed that the AmiE+ strain produced less biofilm compared to the wild type, and over-produced rhamnolipids. In the same line, AmiE is involved in P. aeruginosa motilities (swarming and twitching) and production of the quorum sensing molecules N-acyl homoserine lactones and Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS). We observed that AmiE overproduction reduced levels of HCN and pyocyanin causing a decreased virulence in different hosts (i.e. Dictyostelium discoideum and Caenorhabditis elegans). This phenotype was further confirmed in a mouse model of acute lung infection, in which AmiE overproduction resulted in an almost fully virulence decrease. Taken together, our data suggest that, in addition to its role in bacterial secondary metabolism, AmiE is involved in P. aeruginosa virulence regulation by modulating pilus synthesis and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:28117457

  2. High yield recombinant penicillin G amidase production and export into the growth medium using Bacillus megaterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn Dieter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last years B. megaterium was continuously developed as production host for the secretion of proteins into the growth medium. Here, recombinant production and export of B. megaterium ATCC14945 penicillin G amidase (PGA which is used in the reverse synthesis of β-lactam antibiotics were systematically improved. Results For this purpose, the PGA leader peptide was replaced by the B. megaterium LipA counterpart. A production strain deficient in the extracellular protease NprM and in xylose utilization to prevent gene inducer deprivation was constructed and employed. A buffered mineral medium containing calcium ions and defined amino acid supplements for optimal PGA production was developed in microscale cultivations and scaled up to a 2 Liter bioreactor. Productivities of up to 40 mg PGA per L growth medium were reached. Conclusion The combination of genetic and medium optimization led to an overall 7-fold improvement of PGA production and export in B. megaterium. The exclusion of certain amino acids from the minimal medium led for the first time to higher volumetric PGA activities than obtained for complex medium cultivations.

  3. Mechanism-Guided Discovery of an Esterase Scaffold with Promiscuous Amidase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Kürten

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and generation of biocatalysts with extended catalytic versatilities are of immense relevance in both chemistry and biotechnology. An enhanced atomistic understanding of enzyme promiscuity, a mechanism through which living systems acquire novel catalytic functions and specificities by evolution, would thus be of central interest. Using esterase-catalyzed amide bond hydrolysis as a model system, we pursued a simplistic in silico discovery program aiming for the identification of enzymes with an internal backbone hydrogen bond acceptor that could act as a reaction specificity shifter in hydrolytic enzymes. Focusing on stabilization of the rate limiting transition state of nitrogen inversion, our mechanism-guided approach predicted that the acyl hydrolase patatin of the α/β phospholipase fold would display reaction promiscuity. Experimental analysis confirmed previously unknown high amidase over esterase activity displayed by the first described esterase machinery with a protein backbone hydrogen bond acceptor to the reacting NH-group of amides. The present work highlights the importance of a fundamental understanding of enzymatic reactions and its potential for predicting enzyme scaffolds displaying alternative chemistries amenable to further evolution by enzyme engineering.

  4. The Structure of Allophanate Hydrolase from Granulibacter bethesdensis Provides Insights into Substrate Specificity in the Amidase Signature Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Maurice, Martin [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2013-01-02

    Allophanate hydrolase (AH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of allophanate, an intermediate in atrazine degradation and urea catabolism pathways, to NH3 and CO2. AH belongs to the amidase signature family, which is characterized by a conserved block of 130 amino acids rich in Gly and Ser and a Ser-cis-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. In this study, the first structures of AH fromGranulibacter bethesdensis were determined, with and without the substrate analogue malonate, to 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures confirm the identity of the catalytic triad residues and reveal an altered dimerization interface that is not conserved in the amidase signature family. The structures also provide insights into previously unrecognized substrate specificity determinants in AH. Two residues, Tyr299 and Arg307, are within hydrogen bonding distance of a carboxylate moiety of malonate. Both Tyr299 and Arg307 were mutated, and the resulting modified enzymes revealed >3 order of magnitude reductions in both catalytic efficiency and substrate stringency. It is proposed that Tyr299 and Arg307 serve to anchor and orient the substrate for attack by the catalytic nucleophile, Ser172. The structure further suggests the presence of a unique C-terminal domain in AH. While this domain is conserved, it does not contribute to catalysis or to the structural integrity of the core domain, suggesting that it may play a role in mediating transient and specific interactions with the urea carboxylase component of urea amidolyase. Analysis of the AH active site architecture offers new insights into common determinants of catalysis and specificity among divergent members of the amidase signature family.

  5. Design and synthesis of potent N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA inhibitor as anti-inflammatory compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Li

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA is a lysosomal enzyme involved in biological deactivation of N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, which exerts anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects through the activation of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α. To develop selective and potent NAAA inhibitors, we designed and synthesized a series of derivatives of 1-pentadecanyl-carbonyl pyrrolidine (compound 1, a general amidase inhibitor. Structure activity relationship (SAR studies have identified a compound 16, 1-(2-Biphenyl-4-ylethyl-carbonyl pyrrolidine, which has shown the highest inhibition on NAAA activity (IC(50 =2.12 ± 0.41 µM and is characterized as a reversible and competitive NAAA inhibitor. Computational docking analysis and mutagenesis study revealed that compound 16 interacted with Asparagine 209 (Asn(209 residue flanking the catalytic pocket of NAAA so as to block the substrate entrance. In vitro pharmacological studies demonstrated that compound 16 dose-dependently reduced mRNA expression levels of iNOS and IL-6, along with an increase of intracellular PEA levels, in mouse macrophages with lipopolysaccharides (LPS induced inflammation. Our study discovered a novel NAAA inhibitor, compound 16, that could serve as a potential anti-inflammatory agent.

  6. A Metagenomic Study Highlights Phylogenetic Proximity of Quorum-Quenching and Xenobiotic-Degrading Amidases of the AS-Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannières, Mélanie; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Vigouroux, Armelle; Mondy, Samuel; Pellissier, Franck; Dessaux, Yves; Faure, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) signals of the N-acylhomoserine lactone (NAHL) class are cleaved by quorum-quenching enzymes, collectively named NAHLases. Here, functional metagenomics allowed the discovery of a novel bacterial NAHLase in a rhizosphere that was treated with γ-caprolactone. As revealed by rrs-DGGE and rrs-pyrosequencing, this treatment increased the percentage of the NAHL-degrading bacteria and strongly biased the structure of the bacterial community, among which Azospirillum dominated. Among the 29 760 fosmids of the metagenomic library, a single one was detected that expressed the qsdB gene conferring NAHL-degradation upon E. coli and decreased QS-regulated virulence in Pectobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis of the 34 orfs of the fosmid suggested that it would belong to an unknown Proteobacterium - probably a γ-proteobacterium. qPCR quantification of the NAHLase-encoding genes attM, qsdA, and qsdB revealed their higher abundance in the γ-caprolactone-treated rhizosphere as compared to an untreated control. The purified QsdB enzyme exhibited amidase activity. QsdB is the first amidase signature (AS) family member exhibiting NAHLase-activity. Point mutations in the AS-family catalytic triad K-S-S abolished the NAHLase activity of QsdB. This study extends the diversity of NAHLases and highlights a common phylogenic origin of AS-family enzymes involved in the degradation of natural compounds, such as NAHLs, and xenobiotics, such as nylon and linuron. PMID:23762380

  7. Amidase Activity of AmiC Controls Cell Separation and Stem Peptide Release and Is Enhanced by NlpD in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Jonathan D; Stohl, Elizabeth A; Robertson, Rosanna M; Hackett, Kathleen T; Fisher, Kathryn; Xiong, Kalia; Lee, Mijoon; Hesek, Dusan; Mobashery, Shahriar; Seifert, H Steven; Davies, Christopher; Dillard, Joseph P

    2016-05-13

    The human-restricted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes a single N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase involved in cell separation (AmiC), as compared with three largely redundant cell separation amidases found in Escherichia coli (AmiA, AmiB, and AmiC). Deletion of amiC from N. gonorrhoeae results in severely impaired cell separation and altered peptidoglycan (PG) fragment release, but little else is known about how AmiC functions in gonococci. Here, we demonstrated that gonococcal AmiC can act on macromolecular PG to liberate cross-linked and non-cross-linked peptides indicative of amidase activity, and we provided the first evidence that a cell separation amidase can utilize a small synthetic PG fragment as substrate (GlcNAc-MurNAc(pentapeptide)-GlcNAc-MurNAc(pentapeptide)). An investigation of two residues in the active site of AmiC revealed that Glu-229 is critical for both normal cell separation and the release of PG fragments by gonococci during growth. In contrast, Gln-316 has an autoinhibitory role, and its mutation to lysine resulted in an AmiC with increased enzymatic activity on macromolecular PG and on the synthetic PG derivative. Curiously, the same Q316K mutation that increased AmiC activity also resulted in cell separation and PG fragment release defects, indicating that activation state is not the only factor determining normal AmiC activity. In addition to displaying high basal activity on PG, gonococcal AmiC can utilize metal ions other than the zinc cofactor typically used by cell separation amidases, potentially protecting its ability to function in zinc-limiting environments. Thus gonococcal AmiC has distinct differences from related enzymes, and these studies revealed parameters for how AmiC functions in cell separation and PG fragment release.

  8. Structures of D-amino-acid amidase complexed with L-phenylalanine and with L-phenylalanine amide: insight into the D-stereospecificity of D-amino-acid amidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi SV3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Seiji; Suzuki, Atsuo; Mizushima, Tsunehiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa; Yamane, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    The crystal structures of D-amino-acid amidase (DAA) from Ochrobactrum anthropi SV3 in complex with L-phenylalanine and with L-phenylalanine amide were determined at 2.3 and 2.2 A resolution, respectively. Comparison of the L-phenylalanine amide complex with the D-phenylalanine complex reveals that the D-stereospecificity of DAA might be achieved as a consequence of three structural factors: (i) the hydrophobic cavity in the region in which the hydrophobic side chain of the substrate is held, (ii) the spatial arrangement of Gln310 O and Glu114 O epsilon2 that fixes the amino N atom of the substrate and (iii) the existence of two cavities that keep the carboxyl/amide group of the substrate near or apart from Ser60 O gamma.

  9. Development of new inhibitors for N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase as promising tool against bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Bettiga, Arianna; Salonia, Andrea; Ciuffreda, Pierangela; Ottria, Roberta

    2017-02-01

    The endocannabinoid system is a signaling system involved in a wide range of biological effects. Literature strongly suggests the endocannabinoid system role in the pathogenesis of cancer and that its pharmacological activation produces therapeutic benefits. Last research promotes the endocannabinoid system modulation by inhibition of endocannabinoids hydrolytic enzymes instead of direct activation of endocannabinoid receptors to avoid detrimental effects on cognition and motor control. Here we report the identification of N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) inhibitors able to reduce cell proliferation and migration and cause cell death on different bladder cancer cell lines. These molecules were designed, synthesized and characterized and active compounds were selected by a fluorescence high-throughput screening method set-up on human recombinant NAAA that also allows to characterize the mechanism of inhibition. Together our results suggest an important role for NAAA in cell migration and in inducing tumor cell death promoting this enzyme as pharmacological target against bladder cancer.

  10. A metagenomic study highlights phylogenetic proximity of quorum-quenching and xenobiotic-degrading amidases of the AS-family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Tannières

    Full Text Available Quorum-sensing (QS signals of the N-acylhomoserine lactone (NAHL class are cleaved by quorum-quenching enzymes, collectively named NAHLases. Here, functional metagenomics allowed the discovery of a novel bacterial NAHLase in a rhizosphere that was treated with γ-caprolactone. As revealed by rrs-DGGE and rrs-pyrosequencing, this treatment increased the percentage of the NAHL-degrading bacteria and strongly biased the structure of the bacterial community, among which Azospirillum dominated. Among the 29 760 fosmids of the metagenomic library, a single one was detected that expressed the qsdB gene conferring NAHL-degradation upon E. coli and decreased QS-regulated virulence in Pectobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis of the 34 orfs of the fosmid suggested that it would belong to an unknown Proteobacterium - probably a γ-proteobacterium. qPCR quantification of the NAHLase-encoding genes attM, qsdA, and qsdB revealed their higher abundance in the γ-caprolactone-treated rhizosphere as compared to an untreated control. The purified QsdB enzyme exhibited amidase activity. QsdB is the first amidase signature (AS family member exhibiting NAHLase-activity. Point mutations in the AS-family catalytic triad K-S-S abolished the NAHLase activity of QsdB. This study extends the diversity of NAHLases and highlights a common phylogenic origin of AS-family enzymes involved in the degradation of natural compounds, such as NAHLs, and xenobiotics, such as nylon and linuron.

  11. Homologous gene clusters of nicotine catabolism, including a new ω-amidase for α-ketoglutaramate, in species of three genera of Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobzaru, Cristina; Ganas, Petra; Mihasan, Marius; Schleberger, Paula; Brandsch, Roderich

    2011-04-01

    Gram-positive soil bacteria Arthrobacter nicotinovorans, Nocardioides sp. JS614 and Rhodococcus opacus were shown to contain similarly organized clusters of homologous genes for nicotine catabolism. An uncharacterized gene of a predicted nitrilase within these gene clusters was cloned from A. nicotinovorans and biochemical data unexpectedly showed that the protein exhibited ω-amidase activity toward α-ketoglutaramate. Structural modelling of the protein suggested the presence of the catalytic triad Cys-Glu-Lys, characteristic of this class of enzymes, and supported α-ketoglutaramate as substrate. A-ketoglutaramate could be generated by hydrolytic cleavage of the C-N bond of the trihydroxypyridine ring produced by nicotine catabolism in these bacteria. This ω-amidase, together with glutamate dehydrogenase, may form a physiologically relevant enzyme couple, leading to transformation of metabolically inert α-ketoglutaramate derived from trihydroxypyridine into glutamate, a central compound of nitrogen metabolism.

  12. Effect of the increased stability of the penicillin amidase mRNA on the protein expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Sandra C; Schmidt, Dorothea; Kasche, Volker; Arraiano, Cecília M; Ignatova, Zoya

    2005-09-12

    Several factors at transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational level determine the fate of a target protein and can severely restrict its yield. Here, we focus on the post-transcriptional regulation of the biosynthesis of the periplasmic protein, penicillin amidase (PA). The PA mRNA stability was determined under depleted RNase conditions in strains carrying single or multiple RNase deletions. Single deletion of the endonuclease RNase E yielded, as the highest, a fourfold stabilization of the PA mRNA. This effect, however, was reduced twice at post-translational level. The RNase II, generating secondary exonucleolytic cleavages in the mRNA, although not significantly influencing the PA mRNA decay, led also to an increase of the amount of mature PA. The non-proportional correlation between increased mRNA longevity and amount of active enzyme propose that the rational strategies for yield improvement must be based on a simultaneous tuning of more than one yield restricting factor.

  13. PL3 Amidase, a Tailor-made Lysin Constructed by Domain Shuffling with Potent Killing Activity against Pneumococci and Related Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, Blas; Fresco-Taboada, Alba; Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Menéndez, Margarita; García, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is pushing the need of alternative treatments. In this context, phage therapy is already a reality to successfully fight certain multiresistant bacteria. Among different phage gene products, murein hydrolases responsible of phage progeny liberation (also called lysins or endolysins) are weapons that target specific peptidoglycan bonds, leading to lysis and death of susceptible bacteria when added from the outside. In the pneumococcal system, all but one phage murein hydrolases reported to date share a choline-binding domain that recognizes cell walls containing choline residues in the (lipo)teichoic acids. Some purified pneumococcal or phage murein hydrolases, as well as several chimeric proteins combining natural catalytic and cell wall-binding domains (CBDs) have been used as effective antimicrobials. In this work we have constructed a novel chimeric N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (PL3) by fusing the catalytic domain of the Pal amidase (a phage-coded endolysin) to the CBD of the LytA amidase, the major pneumococcal autolysin. The physicochemical properties of PL3 and the bacteriolytic effect against several pneumococci (including 48 multiresistant representative strain) and related species, like Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus oralis, have been studied. Results have shown that low doses of PL3, in the range of 0.5-5 μg/ml, are enough to practically sterilize all choline-containing strains tested. Moreover, a single 20-μg dose of PL3 fully protected zebrafish embryos from infection by S. pneumoniae D39 strain. Importantly, PL3 keeps 95% enzymatic activity after 4 weeks at 37°C and can be lyophilized without losing activity, demonstrating a remarkable robustness. Such stability, together with a prominent efficacy against a narrow spectrum of human pathogens, confers to PL3 the characteristic to be an effective therapeutic. In addition, our results demonstrate

  14. AmiE, a novel N-acylhomoserine lactone acylase belonging to the amidase family, from the activated-sludge isolate Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Seiji; Yasumoto, Sera; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2014-11-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum-sensing signal molecules. We have reported that Acinetobacter strains isolated from activated sludge have AHL-degrading activity. In this study, we cloned the amiE gene as an AHL-degradative gene from the genomic library of Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that AmiE functions as an AHL acylase, which hydrolyzes the amide bond of AHL. AmiE showed a high level of degrading activity against AHLs with long acyl chains but no activity against AHLs with acyl chains shorter than eight carbons. AmiE showed homology with a member of the amidases (EC 3.5.1.4) but not with any known AHL acylase enzymes. An amino acid sequence of AmiE from Ooi24 showed greater than 99% identities with uncharacterized proteins from Acinetobacter ursingii CIP 107286 and Acinetobacter sp. strain CIP 102129, but it was not found in the draft or complete genome sequences of other Acinetobacter strains. The presence of transposase-like genes around the amiE genes of these three Acinetobacter strains suggests that amiE is transferred by a putative transposon. Furthermore, the expression of AmiE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced AHL accumulation and elastase activity, which were regulated by AHL-mediated quorum sensing.

  15. Pro-sequence and Ca2+-binding: implications for folding and maturation of Ntn-hydrolase penicillin amidase from E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Zoya; Wischnewski, Frank; Notbohm, Holger; Kasche, Volker

    2005-05-13

    Penicillin amidase (PA) is a bacterial periplasmic enzyme synthesized as a pre-pro-PA precursor. The pre-sequence mediates membrane translocation. The intramolecular pro-sequence is expressed along with the A and B chains but is rapidly removed in an autocatalytic manner. In extensive studies we show here that the pro-peptide is required for the correct folding of PA. Pro-PA and PA unfold via a biphasic transition that is more pronounced in the case of PA. According to size-exclusion chromatography and limited proteolysis experiments, the inflection observed in the equilibrium unfolding curves corresponds to an intermediate in which the N-terminal domain (A-chain) still possesses native-like topology, whereas the B-chain is unfolded to a large extent. In a series of in vitro experiments with a slow processing mutant pro-PA, we show that the pro-sequence in cis functions as a folding catalyst and accelerates the folding rate by seven orders of magnitude. In the absence of the pro-domain the PA refolds to a stable inactive molten globule intermediate that has native-like secondary but little tertiary structure. The pro-sequence of the homologous Alcaligenes faecalis PA can facilitate the folding of the hydrolase domain of Escherichia coli PA when added in trans (as a separate polypeptide chain). The isolated pro-sequence has a random structure in solution. However, difference circular dichroism spectra of native PA and native PA with pro-peptide added in trans suggest that the pro-sequence adopts an alpha-helical conformation in the context of the mature PA molecule. Furthermore, our results establish that Ca2+, found in the crystal structure, is not directly involved in the folding process. The cation shifts the equilibrium towards the native state and facilitates the autocatalytic processing of the pro-peptide.

  16. Lytr, a phage-derived amidase is most effective in induced lysis of Lactococcus lactis compared with other lactococcal amidases and glucosaminidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Anton; van Schalkwijk, Saskia; Buist, Girbe; Twigt, Marja; Szeliga, Monika; Meijer, Wilco; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2007-01-01

    In the genome of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 five genes encoding peptidoglycan hydrolases are present: four glucosaminidases (acmA, acmB, acmC and acmD) and an endopeptidase (yjgB). Genes for six prophage lysins have also been identified. The genes acmB, acmC, acmD, yjgB and the lysin lytR of prophage

  17. Versatile Peptide C-Terminal Functionalization via a Computationally Engineered Peptide Amidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Bian; Wijma, Hein J.; Song, Lu; Rozeboom, Henriette J.; Poloni, Claudia; Tian, Yue; Arif, Muhammad I.; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J. L. M.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of synthetic peptides, including potency, stability, and bioavailability, are strongly influenced by modification of the peptide chain termini. Unfortunately, generally applicable methods for selective and mild C-terminal peptide functionalization are lacking. In this work, we explore

  18. Differential regulation of amidase- and formamidase-mediated ammonia production by the Helicobacter pylori fur repressor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); J. Stoof (Jeroen); S.W. Poppelaars (Sophie); S. Bereswill (Stefan); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Kist (Manfred); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe production of high levels of ammonia allows the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori to survive the acidic conditions in the human stomach. H. pylori produces ammonia through urease-mediated degradation of urea, but it is also able to convert a range of amide

  19. Recombinant expression of a putative prophage amidase cloned from the genome of Listeria monocytogenes that lyses the bacterium and its biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, non-sporeforming, catalase-positive rod that is a major bacterial food-borne disease agent, causing listeriosis. Listeria can be associated with uncooked meats including poultry, uncooked vegetables, soft cheeses and unpasteurized milk. The bacterium can be...

  20. Recombinant Expression of a Genome-encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase that Synergistically Lyses Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms with a Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes plays a significant role in human food-borne disease caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium and although incidence is low it is a leading cause of life-threatening, bacterial food-borne disease in humans. L. monocytogenes serotypes 1/2a and 4b can form mixed-cu...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0309 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0309 ref|ZP_01617108.1| putative amidase [marine gamma proteobacterium... HTCC2143] gb|EAW31290.1| putative amidase [marine gamma proteobacterium HTCC2143] ZP_01617108.1 6.6 35% ...

  2. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Pal, a phage natural chimeric lysin active against pneumococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varea, Julio; Monterroso, Begoña; Sáiz, José L; López-Zumel, Consuelo; García, José L; Laynez, José; García, Pedro; Menéndez, Margarita

    2004-10-15

    Pal amidase, encoded by pneumococcal bacteriophage Dp-1, represents one step beyond in the modular evolution of pneumococcal murein hydrolases. It exhibits the choline-binding module attaching pneumococcal lysins to the cell wall, but the catalytic module is different from those present in the amidases coded by the host or other pneumococcal phages. Pal is also an effective antimicrobial agent against Streptococcus pneumoniae that may constitute an alternative to antibiotic prophylaxis. The structural implications of Pal singular structure and their effect on the choline-amidase interactions have been examined by means of several techniques. Pal stability is maximum around pH 8.0 (Tm approximately 50.2 degrees C; DeltaHt = 183 +/- 4 kcal mol(-1)), and its constituting modules fold as two tight interacting cooperative units whose denaturation merges into a single process in the free amidase but may proceed as two well resolved events in the choline-bound state. Choline titration curves reflect low energy ligand-protein interactions and are compatible with two sets of sites. Choline binding strongly stabilizes the cell wall binding module, and the conformational stabilization is transmitted to the catalytic region. Moreover, the high proportion of aggregates formed by the unbound amidase together with choline preferential interaction with Pal dimers suggest the existence of marginally stable regions that would become stabilized through choline-protein interactions without significantly modifying Pal secondary structure. This structural rearrangement may underlie in vitro "conversion" of Pal from the low to the full activity form triggered by choline. The Pal catalytic module secondary structure could denote folding conservation within pneumococcal lytic amidases, but the number of functional choline binding sites is reduced (2-3 sites per monomer) when compared with pneumococcal LytA amidase (4-5 sites per monomer) and displays different intermodular interactions.

  3. GenBank blastx search result: AK059236 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059236 001-024-F01 AB016078.1 Rhodococcus sp. N-771 genes for nitrile hydratase r...egulator 2 and 1, amidase, nitrile hydratase alpha and beta subunits and nitrile hydratase activator, complete cds.|BCT BCT 8e-18 +3 ...

  4. GenBank blastx search result: AK243402 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243402 J100064O18 AB016078.1 AB016078 Rhodococcus sp. N-771 genes for nitrile hyd...ratase regulator 2 and 1, amidase, nitrile hydratase alpha and beta subunits and nitrile hydratase activator, complete cds. BCT 1e-27 1 ...

  5. Effect of dialysis on the proacrosin/acrosin system and motility of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) spermatozoa during liquid storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowińska, M; Dietrich, G J; Liszewska, E; Kozłowski, K; Jankowski, J; Ciereszko, A

    2013-01-01

    1. The effect of dialysis on the proacrosin/acrosin system and motility of turkey spermatozoa were examined after 24 and 48 h of liquid storage at 4°C. 2. Fifteen pools of semen diluted in extender were dialysed against Clemson Turkey Semen Diluent (dialysed semen) or stored in aerobic conditions (undialysed semen). Semen quality was assessed by measuring spermatozoa motility, amidase activity of spermatozoa suspension, spermatozoa extract and seminal plasma and anti-trypsin activity of seminal plasma. 3. Extracted amidase activity of dialysed semen was lower than undialysed by 28%. Higher values for speed parameters of spermatozoa were found in dialysed semen in comparison to undialysed, for example, 81.6 µm/s versus 75.0 µm/s for straight-line velocity (VSL), 114.7 µm/s versus 110.3 µm/s for curvilinear velocity (VCL) and 86.6 µm/s versus 79.8 µm/s for average path velocity (VAP). 4. It was concluded that dialysis caused lower amidase activity of spermatozoa and increased speed parameters of progressively motile turkey spermatozoa during storage. Lower extracted amidase activity of dialysed semen reflected better membrane integrity of dialysed semen and suggests that the proacrosin/acrosin system of dialysed spermatozoa is less susceptible to activation compared to undialysed semen.

  6. Purification and characterization of two chymotrypsin-like proteases from the pyloric caeca of rainbow trout oncorhynchus-mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansson, Magnus M.; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    1992-01-01

    unstable at pH values below 5. The amidase activity of both enzymes increased with temperature up to about 55.degree. C. Chymotrypsin I was found to be more heat stable than chymotrypsin II, an effect most likely explained by strong calcium binding of the former. The trout chymotrypsins were significantly...

  7. A chimeric LysK-lysostaphin fusion enzyme lysing Staphylococcus aureus cells: a study of both kinetics of inactivation and specifics of interaction with anionic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities comprised of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of K-L...

  8. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships for Organophosphate Enzyme Inhibition (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    Cleft Muscarinic/Nicotinic Receptor Cholinergic Nervous System “Normal Mechanism of Action” Citrate Pyruvate Acetyl CoA + + 6 Cholinergic...Choline Carrier Synaptic Cleft Muscarinic/Nicotinic Receptor CoA + + Acetylcholinesterase Hyperstimulation Citrate Pyruvate 7 Physiologically...neurotoxicity FAAH, CB1 Cannabinoid interactions AFMID teratogenesis APH neuropeptide metabolism Carboxylesterases Amidases Toxicity

  9. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Highly Enantiopure 1,4-Benzodioxane-2-carboxylic Acid and Amide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; WANG De-Xian; ZHENG Qi-Yu; WANG Mei-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Catalyzed by Rhodococcus erythropolis A J270, a nitrile hydratase and amidase containing microbial whole-cell catalyst, at 10 ℃ and with the use of methanol as a co-solvent, nitrile and amide biotransformations produce 2S-1,4-benzodioxane-2-carboxamide and 2R-1,4-benzodioxane-2-carboxylic acid in high yields with excellent enantioselectivity.

  10. Sequence Classification: 389974 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|31794485|ref|NP_856978.1| POSSIBLE N-ACYL-L-AMI...NO ACID AMIDOHYDROLASE AMIA1 (N-ACYL-L-AMINO ACID AMIDASE) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/31794485 ...

  11. Physiological characterisation of Penicillium chrysogenum strains expressing the expandase gene from Streptomyces clavuligerus during batch cultivations. Growth and adipoyl-7- aminodeacetoxycephalosporanic acid production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robin, Jarno Jacky Christian; Jakobsen, M.; Beyer, M.;

    2001-01-01

    The production of adipoyl-7-aminodeacetoxy-cephalosporanic acid (ad-7-ADCA) was studied, using two recombinant strains of Penicillium chrysogenum carrying the expandase gene from Streptomyces clavuligerus. The adipoyl-side chain of this compound may easily be removed using an amidase; and this pr......The production of adipoyl-7-aminodeacetoxy-cephalosporanic acid (ad-7-ADCA) was studied, using two recombinant strains of Penicillium chrysogenum carrying the expandase gene from Streptomyces clavuligerus. The adipoyl-side chain of this compound may easily be removed using an amidase......; and this process therefore represents a new route for the production of 7-ADCA, which serves as a precursor for the production of many semi-synthetic cephalosporins. In this study, one low- and one high-yielding strains were characterised and the specific productivities of ad-7-ADCA and byproducts...

  12. [Cloning of new acylamidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis and its expression in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, K V; Ianenko, A S

    2013-10-01

    The gene for new Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 acylamidase, which possesses unique substrate specificity, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. Substrates for this enzyme are not only simple amides, such as acetamide and propionamide, but also N-substituted amides, such as 4'-nitroacetanilide. The 1431-bp gene was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells on pET16b plasmid under the control of a promoter of the φ 10 gene from the T7 phage. The molecular mass of recombinant acylamidase in E. coli was 55 kDa, which corresponded to that of native acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37. Recombinant acylamidase was able to hydrolize N-substituted amides. A search of a nucleotide database and multiple alignment revealed that acylamidase belonged to the Amidase protein family PF01425, but its nucleotide and amino acid sequences differed significantly from those of the described amidases.

  13. Features of phospho- and amidohydrolases functioning in edaphotopes polluted by ore mill effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Artyushenko

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of aerotechnogenic contamination of soils on activity of some hydrolytic enzymes of nitrogen and phosphorus cycles is examined. Biochemical mobilization of organophosphorous and nitrogen-bearing compounds in soils polluted by heavy metals is depressed to a variable extent. In descending order of sensitivity to the pollution, the studied enzymes ranked as follows: urease > alkaline phosphatase > arginase > АТPase > acid phosphatase > amidase.

  14. A Novel Mechanism Underlies the Hepatotoxicity of Pyrazinamide

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Tung-Yuan; Pai, Chien-Yi; Yang, Ping; Chang, Wen-Liang; Wang, Ning-Chi; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the hepatotoxicity of pyrazinamide (PZA). PZA requires activation by amidase to form pyrazinoic acid (PA). Xanthine oxidase then hydroxylates PA to form 5-hydroxypyrazinoic acid (5-OH-PA). PZA can also be directly oxidized to form 5-OH-PZA. Before this study, it was unclear which metabolic pathway or PZA metabolites led to hepatotoxicity. This study determines whether PZA metabolites are responsible for PZA-induced hepatotoxicity. PZA metabolites were identifi...

  15. Application of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Rollins

    Full Text Available In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase NarG, and three proteins of unknown function. Using quantitative real-time PCR comparing RNA isolated from in vitro cultured B. anthracis to RNA isolated from BALB/c mice infected with virulent Ames strain B. anthracis, we confirmed induced expression in vivo for a subset of B. anthracis genes identified by IVIAT, including L-alanine amidases BA3767, BA4073, and amiA (pXO2-42; the bacteriophage holin gene BA4074; and pagA (pXO1-110. The exogenous addition of two purified putative autolysins identified by IVIAT, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases BA0485 and BA2446, to vegetative B. anthracis cell suspensions induced a species-specific change in bacterial morphology and reduction in viable bacterial cells. Many of the proteins identified in our screen are predicted to affect peptidoglycan re-modeling, and our results support significant cell wall structural remodeling activity during B. anthracis infection. Identification of L-alanine amidases with B. anthracis specificity may suggest new potential therapeutic targets.

  16. The Enzymology of 2-Hydroxyglutarate, 2-Hydroxyglutaramate and 2-Hydroxysuccinamate and Their Relationship to Oncometabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Vivek A; Denton, Travis T; Paraszcszak, Sarah; McEvoy, Kyle; Jeitner, Thomas M; Krasnikov, Boris F; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2017-03-30

    Many enzymes make "mistakes". Consequently, repair enzymes have evolved to correct these mistakes. For example, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) slowly catalyze the reduction of 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) to the oncometabolite l-2-hydroxyglutarate (l-2-HG). l-2-HG dehydrogenase corrects this error by converting l-2-HG to 2-OG. LDH also catalyzes the reduction of the oxo group of 2-oxoglutaramate (2-OGM; transamination product of l-glutamine). We show here that human glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the amidation of the terminal carboxyl of both the l- and d- isomers of 2-HG. The reaction of 2-OGM with LDH and the reaction of l-2-HG with GS generate l-2-hydroxyglutaramate (l-2-HGM). We also show that l-2-HGM is a substrate of human ω-amidase. The product (l-2-HG) can then be converted to 2-OG by l-2-HG dehydrogenase. Previous work showed that 2-oxosuccinamate (2-OSM; transamination product of l-asparagine) is an excellent substrate of LDH. Finally, we also show that human ω-amidase converts the product of this reaction (i.e., l-2-hydroxysuccinamate; l-2-HSM) to l-malate. Thus, ω-amidase may act together with hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenases to repair certain "mistakes" of GS and LDH. The present findings suggest that non-productive pathways for nitrogen metabolism occur in mammalian tissues in vivo. Perturbations of these pathways may contribute to symptoms associated with hydroxyglutaric acidurias and to tumor progression. Finally, methods for the synthesis of l-2-HGM and l-2-HSM are described that should be useful in determining the roles of ω-amidase/4- and 5-C compounds in photorespiration in plants.

  17. Structural basis of cell wall cleavage by a staphylococcal autolysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Zoll

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The major autolysins (Atl of Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus play an important role in cell separation, and their mutants are also attenuated in virulence. Therefore, autolysins represent a promising target for the development of new types of antibiotics. Here, we report the high-resolution structure of the catalytically active amidase domain AmiE (amidase S. epidermidis from the major autolysin of S. epidermidis. This is the first protein structure with an amidase-like fold from a bacterium with a gram-positive cell wall architecture. AmiE adopts a globular fold, with several alpha-helices surrounding a central beta-sheet. Sequence comparison reveals a cluster of conserved amino acids that define a putative binding site with a buried zinc ion. Mutations of key residues in the putative active site result in loss of activity, enabling us to propose a catalytic mechanism. We also identified and synthesized muramyltripeptide, the minimal peptidoglycan fragment that can be used as a substrate by the enzyme. Molecular docking and digestion assays with muramyltripeptide derivatives allow us to identify key determinants of ligand binding. This results in a plausible model of interaction of this ligand not only for AmiE, but also for other PGN-hydrolases that share the same fold. As AmiE active-site mutations also show a severe growth defect, our findings provide an excellent platform for the design of specific inhibitors that target staphylococcal cell separation and can thereby prevent growth of this pathogen.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of the heat-stable acrylamidase from a newly isolated thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius AUT-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Minseok; Chambliss, Glenn H

    2013-02-01

    A thermophilic bacterium capable of degrading acrylamide, AUT-01, was isolated from soil collected from a hot spring area in Montana, USA. The thermophilic strain grew with 0.2 % glucose as the sole carbon source and 1.4 mM acrylamide as the sole nitrogen source. The isolate AUT-01 was identified as Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius based on 16S rDNA sequence. An enzyme from the strain capable of transforming acrylamide to acrylic acid was purified by a series of chromatographic columns. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme activity had pH and temperature optima of 6.2 and 70 ºC, respectively. The influence of different metals and amino acids on the ability of the purified protein to transform acrylamide to acrylic acid was evaluated. The gene from G. thermoglucosidasius encoding the acrylamidase was cloned, sequenced, and compared to aliphatic amidases from other bacterial strains. The G. thermoglucosidasius gene, amiE, encoded a 38 kDa, monomeric, heat-stable amidase that catalysed the cleavage of carbon-nitrogen bonds in acrylamide. Comparison of the amino acid sequence to other bacterial amidases revealed 99 and 82 % similarity to the amino acid sequences of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively.

  19. A new acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 can hydrolyze N-substituted amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, K V; Zalunin, I A; Kotlova, E K; Yanenko, A S

    2010-08-01

    A new acylamidase was isolated from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 and characterized. N-Substituted acrylamides (isopropyl acrylamide, N,N-dimethyl-aminopropyl acrylamide, and methylene-bis-acrylamide), acid para-nitroanilides (4'-nitroacetanilide, Gly-pNA, Ala-pNA, Leu-pNA), and N-acetyl derivatives of glycine, alanine, and leucine are good substrates for this enzyme. Aliphatic amides (acetamide, acrylamide, isobutyramide, n-butyramide, and valeramide) are also used as substrates but with less efficiency. The enzyme subunit mass by SDS-PAGE is 55 kDa. Maximal activity is exhibited at pH 7-8 and 55°C. The enzyme is stable for 15 h at 22°C and for 0.5 h at 45°C. The Michaelis constant (K(m)) is 0.25 mM with Gly-pNA and 0.55 mM with Ala-pNA. The acylamidase activity is suppressed by inhibitors of serine proteases (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate) but is not suppressed by inhibitors of aliphatic amidases (acetaldehyde and nitrophenyl disulfides). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the acylamidase is highly homologous to those of two putative amidases detected from sequenced R. erythropolis genomes. It is suggested that the acylamidase together with the detected homologs forms a new class within the amidase signature family.

  20. Product-induced gene expression, a product-responsive reporter assay used to screen metagenomic libraries for enzyme-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2010-11-01

    A reporter assay-based screening method for enzymes, which we named product-induced gene expression (PIGEX), was developed and used to screen a metagenomic library for amidases. A benzoate-responsive transcriptional activator, BenR, was placed upstream of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein and used as a sensor. Escherichia coli sensor cells carrying the benR-gfp gene cassette fluoresced in response to benzoate concentrations as low as 10 μM but were completely unresponsive to the substrate benzamide. An E. coli metagenomic library consisting of 96,000 clones was grown in 96-well format in LB medium containing benzamide. The library cells were then cocultivated with sensor cells. Eleven amidase genes were recovered from 143 fluorescent wells; eight of these genes were homologous to known bacterial amidase genes while three were novel genes. In addition to their activity toward benzamide, the enzymes were active toward various substrates, including d- and l-amino acid amides, and displayed enantioselectivity. Thus, we demonstrated that PIGEX is an effective approach for screening novel enzymes based on product detection.

  1. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-S5 functions as a negative regulator of the antimicrobial peptide pathway in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kangkang; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Feng; Peng, Yachun; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Prophenoloxidase (proPO), immune deficiency (IMD), and Toll are the major signaling pathways leading to melanization and antimicrobial peptide production in insect hemolymph. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) act as receptors and negative regulators in these pathways, and some PGRPs exhibit antimicrobial activity. Previously, we demonstrated that silkworm PGRP-S5 recognizes peptidoglycans (PGs) and triggers activation of the proPO pathway. It also acts as a bactericide, via its amidase activity (Chen et al., 2014). Here, we generated a C177S site-mutated silkworm PGRP-S5 protein that lacked amidase activity but retained its PG-binding capacity. Functional studies showed that the mutation caused loss of its receptor function for activation of the proPO pathway, suggesting that processing of PG by PGRP-S5 is necessary for formation of the pathway initiation complex. Further, we found that PGRP-S5 negatively regulates antimicrobial peptides generation in an amidase-dependent manner, likely through the IMD pathway. Thus, silkworm PGRP-S5 acts as a sensor, a modulator, and an effector in the silkworm humoral immune system.

  2. Structural insights into the specific recognition of N-heterocycle biodenitrogenation-derived substrates by microbial amide hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Geng; Chen, Duoduo; Tang, Hongzhi; Ren, Yiling; Chen, Qihua; Lv, Yang; Zhang, Zhenyi; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Yao, Yuxiang; Xu, Ping

    2014-03-01

    N-heterocyclic compounds from industrial wastes, including nicotine, are environmental pollutants or toxicants responsible for a variety of health problems. Microbial biodegradation is an attractive strategy for the removal of N-heterocyclic pollutants, during which carbon-nitrogen bonds in N-heterocycles are converted to amide bonds and subsequently severed by amide hydrolases. Previous studies have failed to clarify the molecular mechanism through which amide hydrolases selectively recognize diverse amide substrates and complete the biodenitrogenation process. In this study, structural, computational and enzymatic analyses showed how the N-formylmaleamate deformylase Nfo and the maleamate amidase Ami, two pivotal amide hydrolases in the nicotine catabolic pathway of Pseudomonas putida S16, specifically recognize their respective substrates. In addition, comparison of the α-β-α groups of amidases, which include Ami, pinpointed several subgroup-characteristic residues differentiating the two classes of amide substrates as containing either carboxylate groups or aromatic rings. Furthermore, this study reveals the molecular mechanism through which the specially tailored active sites of deformylases and amidases selectively recognize their unique substrates. Our work thus provides a thorough elucidation of the molecular mechanism through which amide hydrolases accomplish substrate-specific recognition in the microbial N-heterocycles biodenitrogenation pathway.

  3. Enzymatic assays for the diagnosis of bradykinin-dependent angioedema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Defendi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The kinins (primarily bradykinin, BK represent the mediators responsible for local increase of vascular permeability in hereditary angioedema (HAE, HAE I-II associated with alterations of the SERPING1 gene and HAE with normal C1-Inhibitor function (HAE-nC1INH. Besides C1-Inhibitor function and concentration, no biological assay of kinin metabolism is actually available to help physicians for the diagnosis of angioedema (AE. We describe enzymatic tests on the plasma for diagnosis of BK-dependent AE. METHODS: The plasma amidase assays are performed using the Pro-Phe-Arg-p-nitroanilide peptide substrate to evaluate the spontaneous amidase activity and the proenzyme activation. We analyzed data of 872 patients presenting with BK-dependent AE or BK-unrelated diseases, compared to 303 controls. Anti-high MW kininogen (HK immunoblot was achieved to confirm HK cleavage in exemplary samples. Reproducibility, repeatability, limit of blank, limit of detection, precision, linearity and receiver operating characteristics (ROC were used to calculate the diagnostic performance of the assays. RESULTS: Spontaneous amidase activity was significantly increased in all BK-dependent AE, associated with the acute phase of disease in HAE-nC1INH, but preserved in BK-unrelated disorders. The increase of the amidase activity was associated to HK proteolysis, indicating its relevance to identify kininogenase activity. The oestrogens, known for precipitating AE episodes, were found as triggers of enzymatic activity. Calculations from ROC curves gave the optimum diagnostic cut-off for women (9.3 nmol⋅min(-1⋅mL(-1, area under curve [AUC] 92.1%, sensitivity 80.0%, and specificity 90.1% and for men (6.6 nmol·min(-1⋅mL(-1, AUC 91.0%, sensitivity 87.0% and specificity 81.2%. CONCLUSION: The amidase assay represents a diagnostic tool to help physicians in the decision to distinguish between BK-related and -unrelated AE.

  4. Molecular evolution of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Steven D

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urea amidolyase breaks down urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide in a two-step process, while another enzyme, urease, does this in a one step-process. Urea amidolyase has been found only in some fungal species among eukaryotes. It contains two major domains: the amidase and urea carboxylase domains. A shorter form of urea amidolyase is known as urea carboxylase and has no amidase domain. Eukaryotic urea carboxylase has been found only in several fungal species and green algae. In order to elucidate the evolutionary origin of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase, we studied the distribution of urea amidolyase, urea carboxylase, as well as other proteins including urease, across kingdoms. Results Among the 64 fungal species we examined, only those in two Ascomycota classes (Sordariomycetes and Saccharomycetes had the urea amidolyase sequences. Urea carboxylase was found in many but not all of the species in the phylum Basidiomycota and in the subphylum Pezizomycotina (phylum Ascomycota. It was completely absent from the class Saccharomycetes (phylum Ascomycota; subphylum Saccharomycotina. Four Sordariomycetes species we examined had both the urea carboxylase and the urea amidolyase sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two enzymes appeared to have gone through independent evolution since their bacterial origin. The amidase domain and the urea carboxylase domain sequences from fungal urea amidolyases clustered strongly together with the amidase and urea carboxylase sequences, respectively, from a small number of beta- and gammaproteobacteria. On the other hand, fungal urea carboxylase proteins clustered together with another copy of urea carboxylases distributed broadly among bacteria. The urease proteins were found in all the fungal species examined except for those of the subphylum Saccharomycotina. Conclusions We conclude that the urea amidolyase genes currently found only in fungi are the results of a horizontal

  5. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project will focus on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate amidase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative CN bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. The project is on schedule and no major difficulties have been encountered. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments have resulted in the isolation of promising cultures that may be capable of cleaving C-N bonds in aromatic amides, several amidase genes have been cloned and are currently undergoing directed evolution to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. Future research will address expression of these genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis. Enrichment culture experiments and directed evolution experiments continue to be a main focus of research activity and further work is required to obtain an appropriate amidase that will selectively cleave C-N bonds in aromatic substrates. Once an appropriate amidase gene is obtained it must be combined with genes encoding an enzyme capable of converting carbazole to 2'aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol: specifically carA genes. The carA genes from two sources have been cloned and are ready for construction of C-N bond cleavage

  6. Synthesis of Cholecystokinin Peptide CCK-4 Exclusively by Enzymatic Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The synthesis of CCK-4 (H-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) by using enzymes exclusively wasdescribed. As protection group for the amino group we used the Phenylacetyl group (Phac) whichhad been cleaved at the end of the synthesis with Penicillin G Amidase (PGA) without affectingthe peptide bonds. Thus, beginning with Phac-Trp-OH we had successfully synthesized the targetpeptide with following 4 enzymes, α-Chymotrypsin, Papain, Thermolysin and PGA in four reac-tion steps. All reactions were carried out in aqueous buffer in reasonable yields (>65 %). FAB-MS or FD-MS verified the correct molecular mass of all peptides.

  7. Characterization of a novel cell wall binding domain-containing Staphylococcus aureus endolysin LysSA97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yoonjee; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-01-01

    Endolysin from Staphylococcus aureus phage SA97 (LysSA97) was cloned and investigated. LysSA97 specifically lyse the staphylococcal strains and effectively disrupted staphylococcal biofilms. Bioinformatic analysis of LysSA97 revealed a novel putative cell wall binding domain (CBD) as well as two enzymatically active domains (EADs) containing cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases (CHAP, PF05257) and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (Amidase-3, PF01520) domains. Comparison of 98 endolysin genes of S. aureus phages deposited in GenBank showed that they can be classified into six groups based on their domain composition. Interestingly, approximately 80.61 % of the staphylococcal endolysins have a src-homology 3 (SH3, PF08460) domain as CBD, but the remaining 19.39 %, including LysSA97, has a putative C-terminal CBD with no homology to the known CBD. The fusion protein containing green fluorescent protein and the putative CBD of LysSA97 showed a specific binding spectrum against staphylococcal cells comparable to SH3 domain (PF08460), suggesting that the C-terminal domain of LysSA97 is a novel CBD of staphylococcal endolysins.

  8. Biochemical response of Anticarsia gemmatalis fed with soybean plants pulverized with the synthetic trypsin inhibitor benzamidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.G.A.; Pilon, A.M.; Pilon, F.M.; Ribeiro, F.R.; Silva, F.C.; Ribon, A.O.B.; Reis, A.P.; Visotto, L.E. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular; Guedes, R.N.C. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal; Oliveira, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Insects are responsible for severe crop losses. New alternatives for pest control other than agrochemicals have been investigated. Protease inhibitors are one of the prime candidates effective against insect pests. In this work we studied the effect of the synthetic trypsin inhibitor benzamidine on the development of Anticarsia gemmatalis, an important pest of the soybean culture. Larvae were reared on soybean plants containing 0.00, 0.15, 0.30, 0.45, 0.60 and 0.75% (w/w) of benzamidine. After 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of feeding midgut extracts were prepared and assayed for enzymatic activity (proteolytic, amidasic and stearic). Benzamidine altered the activity patterns but was not able to totally abolish enzyme activity. The proteolytic, amidasic and stearic activity showed the higher time of inhibition in 48 h in concentration of 0,75%, the inhibition was the around 93%, 63.1% and 36.6%, respectively. We suggest that the presence of inhibitor has made insects to adapt and produce proteases which are insensitive to the action of benzamidine. (author)

  9. EC300: a phage-based, bacteriolysin-like protein with enhanced antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Daniela; Leandro, Clara; Garcia, Miguel; Pimentel, Madalena; São-José, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Bacteriophage lytic enzymes, either endolysins or virion-associated lysins, have been receiving considerable attention as potential antibacterial agents, particularly for the combat of antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. A conclusion that easily emerges from the careful analysis of a great number of reports on the field is that the activity of phage lytic enzymes is rarely studied in conditions that support robust growth of the target bacteria. Here, we report the construction and study of a chimerical lysin, EC300, which was designed to target and kill Enterococcus faecalis in conditions supporting vigorous bacterial growth. EC300 resulted from the fusion of a predicted M23 endopeptidase domain of a virion-associated lysin to the putative cell wall binding domain of a previously characterized amidase endolysin, both produced by the E. faecalis phage F170/08. This bacteriolysin-like protein exhibited a clear enhanced lytic activity over the parental endolysin when both were assayed in a rich bacterial growth medium. We demonstrate the killing efficacy of EC300 against growing cells of a panel of typed E. faecalis clinical strains with high level of antibiotic resistance. The possible reasons for the marked difference between the lytic performance of EC300 and that of the amidase are discussed.

  10. Characterization of Enterococcus faecium bacteriophage IME-EFm5 and its endolysin LysEFm5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pengjuan; Cheng, Mengjun; Li, Xinwei; Jiang, Haiyan; Yu, Chuang; Kahaer, Nadire; Li, Juecheng; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Feifei; Hu, Liyuan; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Han, Wenyu; Gu, Jingmin

    2016-05-01

    Due to the worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains, phages therapy has been revitalized recently. In this study, an Enterococcus faecium phage named IME-EFm5 was isolated from hospital sewage. Whole genomic sequence analysis demonstrated that IME-EFm5 belong to the Siphoviridae family, and has a double-stranded genome of 42,265bp (with a 35.51% G+C content) which contains 70 putative coding sequences. LysEFm5, the endolysin of IME-EFm5, contains an amidase domain in its N-terminal and has a wider bactericidal spectrum than its parental phage IME-EFm5, including 7 strains of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium. The mutagenesis analysis revealed that the zinc ion binding residues (H27, H132, and C140), E90, and T138 are required for the catalysis of LysEFm5. However, the antibacterial activity of LysEFm5 is zinc ion independent, which is inconsistent with most of other amidase members. The phage lysin LysEFm5 might be an alternative treatment strategy for infections caused by multidrug-resistant E. faecium.

  11. Selective adsorption of plant cysteine peptidases onto TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena-Suster, C R F; Foresti, M L; Briand, L E; Morcelle, S R

    2009-08-01

    A crude extract rich in plant cysteine peptidases was obtained from the latex of the fruits of Araujia hortorum, a South American climbing plant. The highly concentrated extract was immobilized onto titanium dioxide to produce biocatalysts through a simple adsorption procedure. Absorbance measurement at 280 nm and Bradford's method for protein quantification revealed that the protein content of the crude extract was selectively adsorbed onto the titanium dioxide surface at a very high rate. In 5 min of contact with the support all protein present in the crude extract was selectively withdrawn from the solution, leading to an immobilized biocatalyst with a high protein concentration. Caseinolytic assays indicated that, except for the catalyst obtained with the highest crude amount contacted with the support, all the proteolytic activity present in the crude extract was adsorbed onto TiO(2). The amidasic activity of the immobilized catalysts (Ah/TiO(2)) was tested in the hydrolysis of a synthetic chromogenic substrate (PFLNA) showing partial deactivation with respect to the native enzyme. In amidasic activity assays the ionic strength of the buffer medium showed to be a key feature to consider in order to avoid protease desorption from the support, indicating the importance of electrostatic interactions between the enzymes and TiO(2). Reuse of the produced biocatalysts with PFLNA as substrate revealed that after five successive uses Ah/TiO(2) retained more than 20% of its initial activity.

  12. Molecular and functional characterization of peptidoglycan-recognition protein SC2 (PGRP-SC2) from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) involved in the immune response to Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhen; Chen, Shannan; Hou, Jing; Huo, Huijun; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ruan, Baiye; Laghari, Zubair Ahmed; Li, Li; Lu, Yishan; Nie, Pin

    2016-07-01

    PGRP-SC2, the member of PGRP family, plays an important role in regulation of innate immune response. In this paper, a PGRP-SC2 gene of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (designated as On-PGRP-SC2) was cloned and its expression pattern under the infection of Streptococcus agalactiae was investigated. Sequence analysis showed main structural features required for amidase activity were detected in the deduced amino acid sequence of On-PGRP-SC2. In healthy tilapia, the On-PGRP-SC2 transcripts could be detected in all the examined tissues, with the most abundant expression in the muscle. When infected with S. agalactiae, there was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of On-PGRP-SC2 in the spleen, head kidney and brain. The assays for the amidase activity suggested that recombinant On-PGRP-SC2 protein had a Zn(2+)-dependent PGN-degrading activity. Moreover, our works showed that recombinant On-PGRP-SC2 protein could significantly reduce bacterial load in target organs attacked by S. agalactiae. These findings indicated that On-PGRP-SC2 may play important roles in the immune response to S. agalactiae in Nile tilapia.

  13. Characterization of an Indole-3-Acetamide Hydrolase from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis and Its Application in Efficient Preparation of Both Enantiomers of Chiral Building Block 2,3-Dihydro-1,4-Benzodioxin-2-Carboxylic Acid.

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    Pradeep Mishra

    Full Text Available Both the enantiomers of 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid are valuable chiral synthons for enantiospecific synthesis of therapeutic agents such as (S-doxazosin mesylate, WB 4101, MKC 242, 2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzodioxin, and N-[2,4-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-yl]-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide. Pharmaceutical applications require these enantiomers in optically pure form. However, currently available methods suffer from one drawback or other, such as low efficiency, uncommon and not so easily accessible chiral resolving agent and less than optimal enantiomeric purity. Our interest in finding a biocatalyst for efficient production of enantiomerically pure 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid lead us to discover an amidase activity from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis, which was able to kinetically resolve 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxyamide with E value of >200. Thus, at about 50% conversion, (R-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid was produced in >99% e.e. The remaining amide had (S-configuration and 99% e.e. The amide and acid were easily separated by aqueous (alkaline-organic two phase extraction method. The same amidase was able to catalyse, albeit at much lower rate the hydrolysis of (S-amide to (S-acid without loss of e.e. The amidase activity was identified as indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (IaaH. IaaH is known to catalyse conversion of indole-3-acetamide (IAM to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, which is phytohormone of auxin class and is widespread among plants and bacteria that inhabit plant rhizosphere. IaaH exhibited high activity for 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which was about 65% compared to its natural substrate, indole-3-acetamide. The natural substrate for IaaH indole-3-acetamide shared, at least in part a similar bicyclic structure with 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which may account for high activity of enzyme towards this un-natural substrate. To

  14. Characterization of proacrosin/acrosin system after liquid storage and cryopreservation of turkey semen (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowińska, M; Liszewska, E; Dietrich, G J; Ciereszko, A

    2012-09-15

    This study was designed to identify the effect of liquid storage at 4 °C for 48 h and cryopreservation on the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey spermatozoa. Anti-acrosin I antibodies were produced and used to demonstrate Western blot analysis profile of the proacrosin/acrosin system of sperm and seminal plasma and possible changes in the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey sperm stored for 2.5, 24, and 48 h or cryopreserved. At the same time acrosin-like activity was examined by the measurement of amidase activity of sperm extracts, sperm suspension, and seminal plasma of turkey semen. A computer-assisted sperm analysis system was used to monitor the sperm motility characteristics of turkey sperm stored for 48 h or cryopreserved. Different profiles of the sperm proacrosin/acrosin system were observed regarding the presence or absence of inhibitors (p-nitrophenyl-p'-guanidine benzoate [NPGB] and Kazal family inhibitor) during the extraction process. When NPGB was present three main bands were observed with the molecular weight ranging from 66 to 35 kDa. Bands corresponding to acrosin I and II were not observed. In sperm extract without NPGB, three or four bands were observed with the molecular weight ranging from 41 to 30 kDa. The bands corresponding to acrosin I and II were observed. During liquid storage a decrease in sperm motility and an increase in sperm-extracted amidase activity were observed. After 24 and 48 h of storage, extracted amidase activity was higher than at 2.5 h by 24% and 31%, respectively. However, no changes in the Western blot analysis profiles of sperm extract and seminal plasma were visible during liquid storage. After cryopreservation a decrease in sperm motility and all sperm motility parameters were observed. In contrast to liquid storage, cryopreservation did not increase extracted amidase activity. However, changes in Western blot analysis profiles were visible in sperm extract and seminal plasma after cryopreservation. After

  15. The multiple functions of the PGRP family in Drosophila immunity

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    A Goto

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system discriminates between infectious non-self and self using germ-line-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that are highly conserved from insects to mammals. Peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP is one of the hallmark pattern recognition receptors responsible for detecting unique bacteria-derived peptidoglycans. The PGRP family comprises several members (13 in Drosophila, 7 in Anopheles, and 4 in mammals and are differentially expressed on immune-responsive organs. Some PGRPs have amidase or bactericidal activities and function as immune modulators, whereas others have lost their enzymatic activity, but still have crucial roles in the activation of innate immune signaling. Evidence from recent Drosophila studies suggests that PGRPs have a role in a variety of immune reactions, such as in the activation of the prophenoloxidase cascade, the production of antimicrobial peptides through the activation of the Toll and Imd pathways, intracellular bacteria recognition, and phagocytosis.

  16. Neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Jos A.G. Van Strijp

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For invading staphylococci, phagocytosis an killing bij human neutrophils is the biggest threat. Neutrophils are the only cells that can effectively kill staphylococci by engulfment and subsequent bombardment with proteases, amidases, antimicrobial peptides and proteins in concert with reactive oxygen species that are generated during the metabolic burst.Both complement and antibodies are crucial for effective uptake and neutrophil activation. S. aureus is not an innocent bystander in this process. It actively secretes several proteins to impair every single step in this process from receptor modulation, to complement inhibition to neutrophil lysis to protease, antimicrobial peptide inhibition and resistance to reactive oxygen species. For the design of future novel antimicrobial strategies: therapeutic antibodies, vaccines, novel antibiotics, all this should be taken into account. Still the best way to treat diseases is to help to enhance the natural defence mechanism that are already in place.

  17. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents.

  18. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  19. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  20. Gene expression analysis of the endosymbiont-bearing midgut tissue during ontogeny of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzka, Carolin; Gross, Roy; Feldhaar, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Insects have frequently evolved mutualistic relationships with extracellular and/or intracellular bacterial endosymbionts. Infection with endosymbionts seems to affect several cellular functions of the host such as immune pathways, oxidative stress regulation and autophagy. Our current knowledge about specific host factors leading to endosymbiont tolerance and/or control is still scarce and is based on very few associations between insect hosts and bacteria only. Camponotus floridanus ants harbour the obligate intracellular bacterium Blochmannia floridanus within specialized midgut cells called bacteriocytes. The number of Blochmannia endosymbionts within the midgut tissue increases strongly during host development and reaches a maximum at the late pupal stage, where the entire midgut is transformed into a symbiotic organ. After eclosion of workers the number of Blochmannia strongly decreases again. We chose 15 candidate genes from C. floridanus likely to be involved in host-symbiont interactions based on their significant homology to previously investigated symbiosis-relevant genes from other insects. We determined the expression of these genes in the endosymbiont-bearing midgut tissue in comparison to the residual body tissue at different developmental stages of C. floridanus in order to reveal changes in gene expression correlating with changes in endosymbiont number per host. Strikingly, two pattern recognition receptors (amidase PGRP-LB and PGRP-SC2) were highly expressed in the midgut tissue at the pupal stage, potentially down-modulating the IMD pathway to enable endosymbiont tolerance. Moreover, we investigated the immune gene expression in response to bacterial challenge at the pupal stage. Results showed that the midgut tissue differs in expression pattern in contrast to the residual body. Our results support a key role for amidase PGRPs, especially PGRP-LB, in regulation of the immune response towards endosymbionts in C. floridanus and suggest an

  1. Metabolism of growth hormone releasing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andreas; Delahaut, Philippe; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-04

    New, potentially performance enhancing compounds have frequently been introduced to licit and illicit markets and rapidly distributed via worldwide operating Internet platforms. Developing fast analytical strategies to follow these new trends is one the most challenging issues for modern doping control analysis. Even if reference compounds for the active drugs are readily obtained, their unknown metabolism complicates effective testing strategies. Recently, a new class of small C-terminally amidated peptides comprising four to seven amino acid residues received considerable attention of sports drug testing authorities due to their ability to stimulate growth hormone release from the pituitary. The most promising candidates are the growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-1, -2, -4, -5, -6, hexarelin, alexamorelin, and ipamorelin. With the exemption of GHRP-2, the entity of these peptides represents nonapproved pharmaceuticals; however, via Internet providers, all compounds are readily available. To date, only limited information on the metabolism of these substances is available and merely one metabolite for GHRP-2 is established. Therefore, a comprehensive in vivo (po and iv administration in rats) and in vitro (with human serum and recombinant amidase) study was performed in order to generate information on urinary metabolites potentially useful for routine doping controls. The urine samples from the in vivo experiments were purified by mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction and analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry. Combining the high resolution power of a benchtop Orbitrap mass analyzer for the first metabolite screening and the speed of a quadrupole/time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument for identification, urinary metabolites were screened by means of a sensitive full scan analysis and subsequently confirmed by high-accuracy product ion scan experiments. Two

  2. Biosynthesis of mercapturic acid derivative of the labdane-type diterpene, cyslabdan that potentiates imipenem activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: cyslabdan is generated by mycothiol-mediated xenobiotic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Haruo; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Genome mining of cyslabdan-producing Streptomyces cyslabdanicus K04-0144 revealed that a set of four genes, cldA, cldB, cldC, and cldD (the cld cluster), which formed a single transcriptional unit, were involved in the biosynthesis of cyslabdan that potentiates imipenem activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Experimental studies supported the heterologous expression of the cld cluster of S. cyslabdanicus K04-0144 in S. avermitilis SUKA22, and transformants carrying the cld cluster produced not only cyslabdan A (1), but also its new derivatives, 17-hydroxyl-1 (2) and 2-hydroxyl-1 (3), in the culture broth. An analysis of diterpene metabolites in the mycelia showed that a large amount of a novel intermediate had accumulated and its structure was elucidated as (7S, 8S, 12E)-8,17-epoxy-7-hydroxylabda-12,14-diene (4). The cld-like cluster (rmn cluster) was also detected in the genome of S. anulatus GM95 by searching our in-house genome databases, and the heterologous expression of the rmn cluster in S. avermitilis SUAK22 demonstrated that the rmn cluster was involved in the biosynthesis of the labdane-type bicyclic diterpene, raimonol (7). CldA/RmnA catalyzed the generation of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) from dimethylallyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate. CldB/RmnB converted GGPP to (+)-copalyl diphosphate, and CldD/RmnD generated labda-8(17),12(E),14-triene (5). CldC introduced two oxygen atoms at C-7 and C-8,17 to generate 4, while RmnC hydroxylated 5 at C-7 to generate 7. The heterologous expression of the cld cluster suggested that four gene products catalyzed to generate 4, but not 1. The deletion mutant of the gene encoding the mycothiol (MSH)-S-conjugate amidase (mca) of S. avermitilis SUKA22 carrying the cld cluster failed to produce 1, but accumulated 4 in the mycelia, whereas S. avermitilis SUKA22 and its mca-deletion mutant carrying the cld cluster both produced the MSH-S-conjugate of 4. The intermediate 4 was converted

  3. Synthesis and characterization of diazomethylarachidonyl ketone: an irreversible inhibitor of N-arachidonylethanolamine amidohydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgemond, W S; Greenberg, M J; McGinley, P J; Muthian, S; Campbell, W B; Hillard, C J

    1998-07-01

    N-Arachidonylethanolamine (AEA), a putative endogenous agonist of neuronal (CB1) cannabinoid receptors, is a substrate for N-arachidonylethanolamine amidohydrolase (AEA amidohydrolase), a serine amidase present in cell membranes. Following a strategy that has been used to develop inhibitors that covalently bind to the active site of serine peptidases, diazomethyl arachidonyl ketone (DAK) was synthesized and its effects on AEA amidohydrolase were determined. DAK inhibits the hydrolysis of AEA by rat brain membranes with an IC50 value of 0.5 microM. At low concentrations, DAK reduces the Vmax and increases the K(m) of the enzyme for its substrate AEA, which suggests that it is both a competitive and noncompetitive inhibitor. At higher concentrations, DAK inhibition is completely noncompetitive. DAK inhibition of membrane-associated AEA amidohydrolase is irreversible because hydrolytic activity is not restored with extensive washing or dialysis of the membranes. Furthermore, DAK inhibition is not reversible by anion exchange chromatography of the subsequently solubilized enzyme. In contrast, DAK inhibition of detergent-solubilized enzyme exhibits competitive kinetics and is reversible upon ion exchange chromatography. Exposure of C6 glioma cells to DAK results in concentration-related inhibition of AEA amidohydrolase activity in cellular membranes with an IC50 value of 0.3 microM. In summary, these studies demonstrate that DAK is an irreversible inhibitor of AEA amidohydrolase in its native membrane and provides a useful tool with which to study the role of AEA amidohydrolase in the termination of action of AEA.

  4. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalili, Rawana N.; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  5. Gelatinases and serine proteinase inhibitors of seminal plasma and the reproductive tract of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotłowska, M; Kowalski, R; Glogowski, J; Jankowski, J; Ciereszko, A

    2005-04-01

    This study examined proteolytic enzymes and serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma with relation to their distribution within the reproductive tract and to yellow semen syndrome (YSS). Proteases of blood plasma, extracts from the reproductive tract, and seminal plasma were analyzed by gelatin zymography. We found a clear regional distribution of proteolytic enzymes in the turkey reproductive tract. Each part was characterized by a unique profile of serine proteolytic enzymes of molecular weights ranging from 29 to 88 kDa. The ductus deferens was found to be a site of very intense proteolytic activity. Two metalloproteases of 58 and 66 kDa were detected in all parts of the reproductive tract and seminal plasma. Using electrophoretic methods for detection of anti-trypsin activity, we found three serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma. Two inhibitors were found in the testis and epididymis and a third in the ductus deferens and seminal plasma. Blood plasma was characterized by the presence of two metalloproteinases and one serine proteinase inhibitor (of low migration rate) that were also detected in the reproductive tract. Amidase and anti-trypsin activities (expressed per gram of protein) differed for yellow and white seminal plasma. We concluded that turkey seminal plasma contains metalloproteases, serine proteinases, and serine proteinase inhibitors. The metalloproteases and one proteinase inhibitor are related to blood proteinases but the other two inhibitors and serine proteinases seem to be unique for the reproductive tract.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Polyacrylamide-Degrading Bacteria from Dewatered Sludge

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    Feng Yu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylamide (PAM is a water-soluble polymer that is widely used as a flocculant in sewage treatment. The accumulation of PAM affects the formation of dewatered sludge and potentially produces hazardous monomers. In the present study, the bacterial strain HI47 was isolated from dewatered sludge. This strain could metabolize PAM as its sole nutrient source and was subsequently identified as Pseudomonas putida. The efficiency of PAM degradation was 31.1% in 7 days and exceeded 45% under optimum culture condition (pH 7.2, 39 °C and 100 rpm. The addition of yeast extract and glucose improved the bacterial growth and PAM degradation. The degraded PAM samples were analyzed by gel-filtration chromatography, Fourier transform infrared and high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that high-molecular-weight PAM was partly cleaved to small molecular oligomer derivatives and part of the amide groups of PAM had been converted to carboxyl groups. The biodegradation did not accumulate acrylamide monomers. Based on the SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing results, the PAM amide groups were converted into carboxyl groups by a PAM-induced extracellular enzyme from the aliphatic amidase family.

  7. E factors, green chemistry and catalysis: an odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Roger A

    2008-08-07

    The development of green chemistry is traced from the introduction of the concepts of atom economy (atom utilisation) and E factors in the early 1990s. The important role of catalysis in reducing or eliminating waste is emphasised and illustrated with examples from heterogeneous catalytic oxidations with hydrogen peroxide, homogeneous catalytic oxidations and carbonylations and organocatalytic oxidations with stable N-oxy radicals. Catalytic reactions in non-conventional media, e.g. aqueous biphasic, supercritical carbon dioxide and ionic liquids, are presented. Biotransformations involving non-natural reactions of enzymes, e.g. ester ammoniolysis, and the rational design of semi-synthetic enzymes, such as vanadate phytase, are discussed. The optimisation of enzyme properties using in vitro evolution and improvement of their operational stability by immobilisation as cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEA) are presented. The ultimate in green chemistry is the integration of catalytic steps into a one-pot, catalytic cascade process. An example of a chemoenzymatic synthesis of an enantiomerically pure amino acid in water and a trienzymatic cascade process using a triple-decker oxynitrilase/nitrilase/amidase CLEA are discussed. Finally, catalytic conversions of renewable raw materials are examined and the biocatalytic aerobic oxidation of starch to carboxy starch is presented as an example of green chemistry in optima forma i.e. a biocompatible product from a renewable raw material using a biocatalytic air oxidation.

  8. Identification of target promoters for the Bacillus subtilis sigma X factor using a consensus-directed search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X; Helmann, J D

    1998-05-29

    The promoter selectivity of RNA polymerase (RNAP) can be altered by the association with alternative sigma subunits. Bacillus subtilis hosts a multitude of sigma factors, several of which coordinate the complex developmental program culminating in endospore formation. Genome sequencing has revealed an unanticipated seven new sigma factors of the highly divergent extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sub-family. Virtually nothing is known regarding either the promoter selectivity or the target genes for these newly identified sigma factors. We have used saturation mutagenesis to define a promoter consensus for recognition by one such ECF sigma factor, sigma X. The resulting consensus sequence was used to identify candidate sigma X target sites. Three newly identified sigma X-dependent promoters precede genes encoding regulatory proteins: an AbrB homolog (Abh), a putative response regulator aspartate phosphatase (RapD), and a regulator of autolysin expression (LytR). sigma X also contributes to the expression of CsbB, a putative membrane-bound glucosyl transferase that is partially controlled by the sigma B stress response sigma factor. Since LytR modulates the expression of the major autolytic amidase and CsbB may function in peptidoglycan synthesis or modification, we suggest that sigma X participates in the regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis and turnover.

  9. Enhanced detection of in-gel released N-glycans by MALDI-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiz, Stefan; Kamalakumar, Aryaline; Biskup, Karina; Blanchard, Véronique

    2015-05-01

    Many biologically relevant glycoproteins need to be separated on 1D- or 2D-gels prior to analysis and are available in picomole amounts. Therefore, it is important to have optimized methods to unravel the glycome that combine in-gel digestions with MALDI-TOF-MS. In this technical report, we investigated how the detection of in-gel released N-glycans could be improved by MALDI-TOF-MS. First, an AnchorChip target was tested and compared to ground steel target using several reference oligosaccharides. The highest signals were obtained with an AnchorChip target and D-arabinosazone as the matrix; a LOD of 1.3 to 10 fmol was attained. Then, the effect of octyl-β-glucopyranoside, a nonionic detergent, was studied during in-gel peptide-N(4) -(acetyl-ß-glucosaminyl) asparagine amidase F digestion of standard glycoproteins and during glycan extraction. Octyl-β-glucopyranoside increased the intensity and the amount of detected neutral as well as acidic N-glycans. A LOD of under 7 pmol glycoprotein could be achieved.

  10. Synthesis of tetrapeptide Bz-RGDS-NH2 by a combination of chemical and enzymatic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Bing; Cai, Yu; Yang, Sen; Wang, Hua; Hou, Rui-Zhen; Xu, Li; Xiao-Xia, Wu; Zhang, Xue-Zhong

    2006-09-18

    The tetrapeptide Bz-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-NH(2) (Bz-RGDS-NH(2)) was successfully synthesized by a combination of chemical and enzymatic methods in this study. Firstly, the precursor tripeptide Gly-Asp-Ser-NH(2) (GDS-NH(2)) was synthesized by a novel chemical method in four steps including chloroacetylation of l-aspartic acid, synthesis of chloroacetyl l-aspartic acid anhydride, the synthesis of ClCH(2)COAsp-SerOMe and ammonolysis of ClCH(2)COAsp-SerOMe. Secondly, lipase (PPL) was used to catalyze the formation of Bz-RGDS-NH(2) in aqueous water-miscible organic cosolvent systems using Bz-Arg-OEt as the acyl donor and GDS-NH(2) as the nucleophile. The optimum conditions were Bz-Arg-OEt 50 mM; GDS-NH(2) 400 mM; 10 degrees C, 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.5; 60% DMF or 58% DMSO, PPL: 10 mg ml(-1) with the maximum yields of the tetrapeptide of 73.6% for DMF and 70.4% for DMSO, respectively. The secondary hydrolysis of the tetrapeptide product did not take place due to the absence of amidase activity of lipase.

  11. Production of enantiomerically pure D-Phenylglycine using Pseudomonas aeruginosa 10145 as biocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. M. Alonso

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Different bacterial strains were screened to detect nitrilase and/or nitrile hidratase/amidase activities towards benzonitrile, to be used as biocatalyst to produce enantiomerically pure non-proteinogenic amino acids using amino nitriles as starting material. The best biocatalyst found was Pseudomonas aeruginosa 10145, which showed high enzyme activities. Whole cells were used as catalyst for the transformation of 2-phenyl-2-amino-acetonitrile for the corresponding D-phenylglycine. The percentage conversion was followed by chiral HPLC. After 1 hour reaction 18% of 2-phenyl-2-amino-acetonitrile was converted into D-phenylglycine with an enantiomeric excess of over 95%. When an inducer was added to the media, an increase in nitrile hydrolyzing activities was detected, hence leading to total conversion of (R-2-phenyl-2-amino-acetonitrile to the corresponding amino acid in 30 min reaction. The isolated yield of the target product was 50% and its characterization was performed by polarimetry, chiral HPLC, IR-FT spectroscopy and GC-MS.

  12. PGRP-LB is a maternally transmitted immune milk protein that influences symbiosis and parasitism in tsetse’s offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwen; Aksoy, Serap

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial microbe functions range from host dietary supplementation to development and maintenance of host immune system. In mammals, newborn progeny are quickly colonized with a symbiotic fauna that is provisioned in mother’s milk and that closely resembles that of the parent. Tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae) also depends on the obligate symbiont Wigglesworthia for nutritional supplementation, optimal fecundity, and immune system development. Tsetse progeny develop one at a time in an intrauterine environment and receive nourishment and symbionts in mother’s milk. We show that the host Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein (PGRP-LB) is expressed only in adults and is a major component of the milk that nourishes the developing progeny. The amidase activity associated with PGRP-LB may scavenge the symbiotic peptidoglycan and prevent the induction of tsetse's Immune Deficiency pathway that otherwise can damage the symbionts. Reduction of PGRP-LB experimentally diminishes female fecundity and damages Wigglesworthia in the milk through induction of antimicrobial peptides, including Attacin. Larvae that receive less maternal PGRP-LB give rise to adults with fewer Wigglesworthia and hyperimmune responses. Such adults also suffer dysregulated immunity, as indicated by the presence of higher trypanosome densities in parasitized adults. We show that recPGRP-LB has antimicrobial and antitrypanosomal activities that may regulate symbiosis and impact immunity. Thus, PGRP-LB plays a pivotal role in tsetse’s fitness by protecting symbiosis against host-inflicted damage during development and by controlling parasite infections in adults that can otherwise reduce host fecundity. PMID:22689989

  13. Decoding the biosynthesis and function of diphthamide, an enigmatic modification of translation elongation factor 2 (EF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffael Schaffrath

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diphthamide is a highly conserved modification of archaeal and eukaryal translation elongation factor 2 (EF2 and yet why cells need EF2 to contain diphthamide is unclear. In yeast, the first steps of diphthamide synthesis and the genes (DPH1-DPH5 required to form the intermediate diphthine are well-documented. However, the last step, amidadation of diphthine to diphthamide, had largely been ill-defined. Remarkably, through mining genome-wide synthetic gene array (SGA and chemical genomics databases, recent studies by Uthman et al. [PLoS Genetics (2013 9, e1003334] and Su et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (2012 109, 19983-19987] have identified two more diphthamide players, DPH6 and DPH7. Consistent with roles in the amidation step, dph6 and dph7 deletion strains fail to complete diphthamide synthesis and accumulate diphthine-modified EF2. In contrast to Dph6, the catalytically relevant amidase, Dph7 appears to be regulatory. As shown by Uthman et al., it promotes dissociation of diphthine synthase (Dph5 from EF2, allowing diphthine amidation by Dph6 to occur and thereby coupling diphthine synthesis to the terminal step in the pathway. Remarkably, the study by Uthman et al. suggests that Dph5 has a novel role as an EF2 inhibitor that affects cell growth when diphthamide synthesis is blocked or incomplete and, importantly, shows that diphthamide promotes the accuracy of EF2 performance during translation.

  14. Characterization, Genome Sequence, and Analysis of Escherichia Phage CICC 80001, a Bacteriophage Infecting an Efficient L-Aspartic Acid Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youqiang; Ma, Yuyue; Yao, Su; Jiang, Zengyan; Pei, Jiangsen; Cheng, Chi

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia phage CICC 80001 was isolated from the bacteriophage contaminated medium of an Escherichia coli strain HY-05C (CICC 11022S) which could produce L-aspartic acid. The phage had a head diameter of 45-50 nm and a tail of about 10 nm. The one-step growth curve showed a latent period of 10 min and a rise period of about 20 min. The average burst size was about 198 phage particles per infected cell. Tests were conducted on the plaques, multiplicity of infection, and host range. The genome of CICC 80001 was sequenced with a length of 38,810 bp, and annotated. The key proteins leading to host-cell lysis were phylogenetically analyzed. One protein belonged to class II holin, and the other two belonged to the endopeptidase family and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase family, respectively. The genome showed the sequence identity of 82.7% with that of Enterobacteria phage T7, and carried ten unique open reading frames. The bacteriophage resistant E. coli strain designated CICC 11021S was breeding and its L-aspartase activity was 84.4% of that of CICC 11022S.

  15. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Steven M; Seal, Bruce S; Garrish, Johnna K; Oakley, Brian B; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M

    2015-06-12

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ɸGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ɸCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50° C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production.

  16. Phage endolysins with broad antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Daniela; Fernandes, Sofia; Leandro, Clara; Silva, Filipa Antunes; Santos, Sofia; Lopes, Fátima; Mato, Rosario; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Pimentel, Madalena; São-José, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens has drawn the attention to the potential use of bacteriophage endolysins as alternative antibacterial agents. Here we have identified, characterized, and studied the lytic potential of two endolysins, Lys168 and Lys170, from phages infecting Enterococcus faecalis. Lys168 and Lys170 belong to the cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases (CHAP) and amidase-2 protein families, respectively. Lys168 is quite a unique enterococcal phage endolysin. It shares 95% amino acidic identity with the endolysin of Staphylococcus aureus phage SAP6, which in turn is distantly related to all known CHAP endolysins of S. aureus phages. Lys170 seems to be a natural chimera assembling catalytic and cell-wall-binding domains of different origin. Both endolysins showed a clear preference to act against E. faecalis and they were able to lyse a high proportion of clinical isolates of this species. Specifically, Lys168 and Lys170 lysed more than 70% and 90% of the tested isolates, respectively, which included a panel of diverse and typed strains representative of highly prevalent clonal complexes. Lys170 was active against all tested E. faecalis VRE strains. The quasi specificity toward E. faecalis is discussed considering the nature of the enzymes' functional domains and the structure of the cell wall peptidoglycan.

  17. BioGPS descriptors for rational engineering of enzyme promiscuity and structure based bioinformatic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Ferrario

    Full Text Available A new bioinformatic methodology was developed founded on the Unsupervised Pattern Cognition Analysis of GRID-based BioGPS descriptors (Global Positioning System in Biological Space. The procedure relies entirely on three-dimensional structure analysis of enzymes and does not stem from sequence or structure alignment. The BioGPS descriptors account for chemical, geometrical and physical-chemical features of enzymes and are able to describe comprehensively the active site of enzymes in terms of "pre-organized environment" able to stabilize the transition state of a given reaction. The efficiency of this new bioinformatic strategy was demonstrated by the consistent clustering of four different Ser hydrolases classes, which are characterized by the same active site organization but able to catalyze different reactions. The method was validated by considering, as a case study, the engineering of amidase activity into the scaffold of a lipase. The BioGPS tool predicted correctly the properties of lipase variants, as demonstrated by the projection of mutants inside the BioGPS "roadmap".

  18. Identification of novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv using integrated approach of multiple computational algorithms and experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria interacting with eukaryotic host express adhesins on their surface. These adhesins aid in bacterial attachment to the host cell receptors during colonization. A few adhesins such as Heparin binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA), Apa, Malate Synthase of M. tuberculosis have been identified using specific experimental interaction models based on the biological knowledge of the pathogen. In the present work, we carried out computational screening for adhesins of M. tuberculosis. We used an integrated computational approach using SPAAN for predicting adhesins, PSORTb, SubLoc and LocTree for extracellular localization, and BLAST for verifying non-similarity to human proteins. These steps are among the first of reverse vaccinology. Multiple claims and attacks from different algorithms were processed through argumentative approach. Additional filtration criteria included selection for proteins with low molecular weights and absence of literature reports. We examined binding potential of the selected proteins using an image based ELISA. The protein Rv2599 (membrane protein) binds to human fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Rv3717 (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) and Rv0309 (L,D-transpeptidase) bind to fibronectin and laminin. We report Rv2599 (membrane protein), Rv0309 and Rv3717 as novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Our results expand the number of known adhesins of M. tuberculosis and suggest their regulated expression in different stages.

  19. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawana N. Alkhalili

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase.

  20. Progress in research on bacteriophage lysins%噬菌体裂解酶的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞安; 刘军; 冯书章

    2012-01-01

    噬菌体裂解酶是噬菌体在感染细菌后期表达的一类细胞壁水解酶,具有酶活性和底物特异性.多数噬菌体具有编码3种细胞壁水解酶即溶菌酶、酰胺酶和内肽酶的基因.本文综述了噬菌体裂解酶重组及其应用的研究,并探讨了近年来重组裂解酶的研究进展.%Bacteriophage lysins are cell wall lytic enzymes expressed in the late phase of bacterial infection,with enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Most of bacteriophages contain the genes encoding three kinds of cell wall lytic enzymes,i.e. lysozyme,N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and endopeptidases. This paper reviews the recombination and application of bacteriophage lysins as well as the progress in research on recombinant lysins in recent years.

  1. Detoxification of toxins by bacillithiol in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Gerald L; Fahey, Robert C; Rawat, Mamta

    2012-04-01

    Bacillithiol (BSH), an α-anomeric glycoside of l-cysteinyl-d-glucosaminyl-l-malate, is a major low-molecular-mass thiol found in bacteria such as Bacillus sp., Staphylococcus aureus and Deinococcus radiodurans. Like other low-molecular-mass thiols such as glutathione and mycothiol, BSH is likely to be involved in protection against environmental toxins including thiol-reactive antibiotics. We report here a BSH-dependent detoxification mechanism in S. aureus. When S. aureus Newman strain was treated with monobromobimane and monochlorobimane, the cellular BSH was converted to the fluorescent S-conjugate BS-bimane. A bacillithiol conjugate amidase activity acted upon the BS-bimane to produce Cys-bimane, which was then acetylated by an N-acetyltransferase to generate N-acetyl-Cys-bimane, a mercapturic acid. An S. aureus mutant lacking BSH did not produce mercapturic acid when treated with monobromobimane and monochlorobimane, confirming the involvement of bacillithiol. Furthermore, treatment of S. aureus Newman with rifamycin, the parent compound of the first-line anti-tuberculosis drug, rifampicin, indicated that this thiol-reactive antibiotic is also detoxified in a BSH-dependent manner, since mercapturic acids of rifamycin were observed in the culture medium. These data indicate that toxins and thiol-reactive antibiotics are detoxified to less potent mercapturic acids in a BSH-dependent manner and then exported out of the cell in S. aureus.

  2. Genomic sequence of bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 and activity of its endolysin and engineered variants against Clostridium sporogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J; Gasson, Michael J; Narbad, Arjan

    2012-05-01

    Lytic bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 produces large plaques on its host Clostridium sporogenes. Sequencing of the 47,595-bp genome allowed the identification of 82 putative open reading frames, including those encoding proteins for head and tail morphogenesis and lysis. However, sequences commonly associated with lysogeny were absent. ORF 22 encodes an endolysin, CS74L, that shows homology to N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases, and when expressed in Escherichia coli, the protein causes effective lysis of C. sporogenes cells when added externally. CS74L was also active on Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum. The catalytic domain expressed alone (CS74L(1-177)) exhibited a similar activity and the same host range as the full-length endolysin. A chimeric endolysin consisting of the CS74L catalytic domain fused to the C-terminal domain of endolysin CD27L, derived from Clostridium difficile bacteriophage ΦCD27, was produced. This chimera (CSCD) lysed C. sporogenes cells with an activity equivalent to that of the catalytic domain alone. In contrast, the CD27L C-terminal domain reduced the efficacy of the CS74L catalytic domain when tested against C. tyrobutyricum. The addition of the CD27L C-terminal domain did not enable the lysin to target C. difficile or other CD27L-sensitive bacteria.

  3. Cloning, Characterization and Effect of TmPGRP-LE Gene Silencing on Survival of Tenebrio Molitor against Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Soo Han

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs are a family of innate immune molecules that recognize bacterial peptidoglycan. PGRP-LE, a member of the PGRP family, selectively binds to diaminopimelic acid (DAP-type peptidoglycan to activate both the immune deficiency (Imd and proPhenoloxidase (proPO pathways in insects. A PGRP-LE-dependent induction of autophagy to control Listeria monocytogenes has also been reported. We identified and partially characterized a novel PGRP-LE homologue, from Tenebrio molitor and analyzed its functional role in the survival of the insect against infection by a DAP-type PGN containing intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. The cDNA is comprised of an open reading frame (ORF of 990 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 329 residues. TmPGRP-LE contains one PGRP domain, but lacks critical residues for amidase activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed a broad constitutive expression of the transcript at various stages of development spanning from larva to adult. RNAi mediated knockdown of the transcripts, followed by a challenge with L. monocytogenes, showed a significant reduction in survival rate of the larvae, suggesting a putative role of TmPGRP-LE in sensing and control of L. monocytogenes infection in T. molitor. These results implicate PGRP-LE as a defense protein necessary for survival of T. molitor against infection by L. monocytogenes.

  4. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Hentzer, Morten

    2002-01-01

    The expression of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is negatively regulated by the activity of an amidase, AmpD. In the present study we examined resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains and several resistant variants isolated from in vivo and in vitro biofilms for mutations...... in the expression of high levels of AmpC beta-lactamase. Complementation of these isolates with ampD from the reference P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 caused a dramatic decrease in the expression of AmpC beta-lactamase and a parallel decrease of the MIC of ceftazidime to a level comparable to that of PAO1. One highly...... resistant, constitutive beta-lactamase-producing variant contained no mutations in ampD, but a point mutation was observed in ampR, resulting in an Asp-135-->Asn change. An identical mutation of AmpR in Enterobacter cloacae has been reported to cause a 450-fold higher AmpC expression. However, in many...

  5. Use of enzyme inhibitors to evaluate the conversion pathways of ester and amide prodrugs: a case study example with the prodrug ceftobiprole medocaril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Gary; Skibbe, Jennifer; Parkinson, Andrew; Johnson, Mark D; Baumgardner, Dawn; Ogilvie, Brian; Usuki, Etsuko; Tonelli, Fred; Holsapple, Jeff; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne

    2012-03-01

    An approach was developed that uses enzyme inhibitors to support the assessment of the pathways that are responsible for the conversion of intravenously administered ester and amide prodrugs in different biological matrices. The methodology was applied to ceftobiprole medocaril (BAL5788), the prodrug of the cephalosporin antibiotic, ceftobiprole. The prodrug was incubated in plasma, postmitochondrial supernatant fractions from human liver (impaired and nonimpaired), kidney, and intestine as well as erythrocytes, in the presence and absence of different enzyme inhibitors (acetylcholinesterase, pseudocholinesterase, retinyl palmitoyl hydrolase, serine esterases, amidases, and cholinesterase). Hydrolysis was rapid, extensive, and not dependent on the presence of β-nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form) in all matrices tested, suggesting the involvement of carboxylesterases but not P450 enzymes. Hydrolysis in healthy human plasma was rapid and complete and only partially inhibited in the presence of paraoxonase inhibitors or in liver from hepatic impaired patients, suggesting involvement of nonparaoxonase pathways. The results demonstrate the utility of this approach in confirming the presence of multiple conversion pathways of intravenously administered prodrugs and in the case of BAL5788 demonstrated that this prodrug is unlikely to be affected by genetic polymorphisms, drug interactions, or other environmental factors that might inhibit or induce the enzymes involved in its conversion.

  6. Enzymatic Synthesis of a CCK-8 Tripeptide Fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG,Hua(向华); ECKSTEIN,Heiner

    2004-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of CCK-8 tripeptide H-Gly-Trp-Met-OH catalyzed by immobilized enzyme was reported. Enzymes were used for the formation of peptide bonds and the removal of protecting group. Starting with phenylacetyl (PhAc) glycin, N-protected dipeptide PhAc-Gly-Trp-OMe was obtained by coupling PhAc-protected glycine carboxamidomethyl ester (OCam) with Trp-OMe catalyzed by immobilized papain in buffered ethyl acetate.motrypsin catalysis in solvent free system. Basic hydrolysis was followed getting PhAc-Gly-Trp-Met-OH. The PhAc-group was removed with penicillin G amidase and H-Gly-Trp-Met-OH was obtained in an overall yield of 43.9%. The reaction conversion of tripeptide in solvent free system was strongly affected by the system of basic salts added. The influence of the support materials used to deposit enzymes and structures of acyl donor and nucleophile on the reaction was also investigated.

  7. Purification and characterization of the enzymes involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide degradation by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Thanaa Hamed; El-Ghonemy, Dina Helmy

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate a new pathway for the degradation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829 extracts. Enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of NAD, i.e. alkaline phosphatase, aminohydrolase and glycohydrolase were determined. Alkaline phosphatase was found to catalyse the sequential hydrolysis of two phosphate moieties of NAD molecule to nicotinamide riboside plus adenosine. Adenosine was then deaminated by aminohydrolase to inosine and ammonia. While glycohydrolase catalyzed the hydrolysis of the nicotinamide-ribosidic bond of NAD+ to produce nicotinamide and ADP-ribose in equimolar amounts, enzyme purification through a 3-step purification procedure revealed the existence of two peaks of alkaline phosphatases, and one peak contained deaminase and glycohydrolase activities. NAD deaminase was purified to homogeneity as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 91 kDa. Characterization and determination of some of NAD aminohydrolase kinetic properties were conducted due to its biological role in the regulation of cellular NAD level. The results also revealed that NAD did not exert its feedback control on nicotinamide amidase produced by P. brevicompactum.

  8. Dual enzyme-responsive "turn-on" fluorescence sensing systems based on in situ formation of 7-hydroxy-2-iminocoumarin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debieu, Sylvain; Romieu, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A new strategy for the simultaneous fluorogenic detection of two distinct enzyme activities namely hydrolase (amidase or esterase) and reductase is described. This innovative biosensing method is based on the powerful "covalent-assembly" principle that involves in situ synthesis of a fluorophore from a non-fluorescent caged precursor and through domino reactions triggered by the two analytes of interest. To establish this approach, penicillin G acylase (PGA) (or pig liver esterase (PLE)) and nitroreductase (NTR) were chosen as model enzymes, and original bis-O-protected 2,4-dihydroxycinnamonitrile derivatives acting as dual-reactive probes readily convertible to highly fluorescent 7-hydroxy-2-iminocoumarin scaffolds upon reacting with the two selected enzymes were synthesised. The two phenolic groups available within the core structure of these probes play a pivotal role in generating iminocoumarin scaffold through an intramolecular cyclisation reaction (hydroxyl group in C-2 position) and in enhancing its push-pull character (hydroxyl group in C-4 position). Their orthogonal and temporary protection with two different enzyme-labile masking groups is the cornerstone in the design of this novel class of fluorogenic "turn-on" probes. Their evaluation using fluorescence-based in vitro assays and HPLC-fluorescence/-MS analyses have enabled us both to demonstrate the claimed activation mechanism (in particular the specific order in which the two enzymes react with the probe) and to highlight the potential utility of these advanced chemical tools in multi-analyte sensing applications.

  9. Occurrence and possible biological role of the endocannabinoid system in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Isabel; McPartland, John M; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-06-01

    A cannabinoid receptor orthologue (CiCBR) has been described in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. Here we report that CiCBR mRNA expression is highest in cerebral ganglion, branchial pharynx, heart and testis of C. intestinalis, and that this organism also contains cannabinoid receptor ligands and some of the enzymes for ligand biosynthesis and inactivation. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the endocannabinoid anandamide was found in all tissues analysed (0.063-5.423 pmol/mg of lipid extract), with the highest concentrations being found in brain and heart. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) was fivefold more abundant than anandamide, and was most abundant in stomach and intestine and least abundant in heart and ovaries (2.677-50.607 pmol/mg of lipid extract). Using phylogenomic analysis, we identified orthologues of several endocannabinoid synthesizing and degrading enzymes. In particular, we identified and partly sequenced a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) orthologue, showing 44% identity with human FAAH and containing nearly all the amino acids necessary for a functional FAAH enzyme. Ciona intestinalis also contained specific binding sites for cannabinoid receptor ligands, and an amidase enzyme with pH-dependency and subcellular/tissue distribution similar to mammalian FAAHs. Finally, a typical C. intestinalis behavioural response, siphon reopening after closure induced by mechanical stimulation, was inhibited by the cannabinoid receptor agonist HU-210, and this effect was significantly attenuated by mammalian cannabinoid receptor antagonists.

  10. Components of the peptidoglycan-recycling pathway modulate invasion and intracellular survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkesson, Anders; Eriksson, Sofia; Andersson, Mats; Park, James T; Normark, Staffan

    2005-01-01

    beta-Lactam resistance in enteric bacteria is frequently caused by mutations in ampD encoding a cytosolic N-acetylmuramyl- l-alanine amidase. Such mutants are blocked in murein (peptidoglycan) recycling and accumulate cytoplasmic muropeptides that interact with the transcriptional activator ampR, which de-represses beta-lactamase expression. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, an extensively studied enteric pathogen, was used to show that mutations in ampD decreased the ability of S. typhimurium to enter a macrophage derived cell line and made the bacteria more potent as inducers of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), as compared with the wild-type. ampG mutants, defective in the transport of recycled muropeptides across the cytoplasmic membrane, behaved essentially as the wild-type in invasion assays and in activation of iNOS. As ampD mutants also have reduced in vivo fitness in a murine model, we suggest that the cytoplasmic accumulation of muropeptides affects the virulence of the ampD mutants.

  11. Saliva microbiota carry caries-specific functional gene signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yang

    Full Text Available Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis.

  12. Identification and recombinant expression of anandamide hydrolyzing enzyme from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegan Dhamodharan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anandamide (Arachidonoyl ethanolamide is a potent bioactive lipid studied extensively in humans, which regulates several neurobehavioral processes including pain, feeding and memory. Bioactivity is terminated when hydrolyzed into free arachidonic acid and ethanolamine by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. In this study we report the identification of a FAAH homolog from Dictyostelium discoideum and its function to hydrolyze anandamide. Results A putative FAAH DNA sequence coding for a conserved amidase signature motif was identified in the Dictyostelium genome database and the corresponding cDNA was isolated and expressed as an epitope tagged fusion protein in either E.coli or Dictyostelium. Wild type Dictyostelium cells express FAAH throughout their development life cycle and the protein was found to be predominantly membrane associated. Production of recombinant HIS tagged FAAH protein was not supported in E.coli host, but homologous Dictyostelium host was able to produce the same successfully. Recombinant FAAH protein isolated from Dictyostelium was shown to hydrolyze anandamide and related synthetic fatty acid amide substrates. Conclusions This study describes the first identification and characterisation of an anandamide hydrolyzing enzyme from Dictyostelium discoideum, suggesting the potential of Dictyostelium as a simple eukaryotic model system for studying mechanisms of action of any FAAH inhibitors as drug targets.

  13. MAP1272c encodes an NlpC/P60 protein, an antigen detected in cattle with Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Lingle, Cari K; Stabel, Judith R; Ramyar, Kasra X; Garcia, Brandon L; Raeber, Alex J; Schacher, Pascal; Kapur, Vivek; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2012-07-01

    The protein encoded by MAP1272c has been shown to be an antigen of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that contains an NlpC/P60 superfamily domain found in lipoproteins or integral membrane proteins. Proteins containing this domain have diverse enzymatic functions that include peptidases, amidases, and acetyltransferases. The NlpC protein was examined in comparison to over 100 recombinant proteins and showed the strongest antigenicity when analyzed with sera from cattle with Johne's disease. To further localize the immunogenicity of NlpC, recombinant proteins representing defined regions were expressed and evaluated with sera from cattle with Johne's disease. The region from amino acids 74 to 279 was shown to be the most immunogenic. This fragment was also evaluated against a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two monoclonal antibodies were produced in mice immunized with the full-length protein, and each recognized a distinct epitope. These antibodies cross-reacted with proteins from other mycobacterial species and demonstrated variable sizes of the proteins expressed from these subspecies. Both antibodies were further analyzed, and their interaction with MAP1272c and MAP1204 was characterized by a solution-based, luminescent binding assay. These tools provide additional means to study a strong antigen of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  14. A review of the interactions between acrylamide, microorganisms and food components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda-Chodak, A; Wajda, Ł; Tarko, T; Sroka, P; Satora, P

    2016-03-01

    Acrylamide (AA) and its metabolites have been recognized as potential carcinogens, but also they can cause other negative symptoms in human or animal organisms and therefore this class of chemical compounds has attracted a lot of attention. These substances are usually formed when heating asparagine in the presence of compounds that have α-hydroxycarbonyl groups, α,β,γ,δ-diunsaturated carbonyl groups or α-dicarbonyl groups. The acrolein pathway and enzymatic decarboxylation of asparagine, as well as endogenic processes, are other alternative routes to AA formation. It has been demonstrated that the animal model used for examining AA toxicity may not be sufficient to investigate these changes in humans, therefore it is necessary to design an in vitro model, which could provide more accurate insights into the direction of these processes in human organisms. Acrylamide can be metabolized through both oxidative and reductive pathways; moreover, there is also a chance that some representatives of intestinal microbiota are able to transform acrylamide. It was shown that there are various microorganisms, mostly bacteria, that produce amidases, i.e. enzymes decomposing AA. Lactic acid bacteria also appear to demonstrate the ability to use acrylamide as a carbon source, but this still requires further investigation. Another way to prevent AA toxicity is related to the presence of some food compounds, such as certain proteins or polyphenols. There are still lot of gaps in the current knowledge related to AA toxicity, so future potential research directions are presented in this review as well.

  15. Cloning, characterization and effect of TmPGRP-LE gene silencing on survival of Tenebrio molitor against Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindwa, Hamisi; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Mun, Seulgi; Jo, Yong Hun; Lee, Bok Luel; Lee, Yong Seok; Kim, Nam Jung; Han, Yeon Soo

    2013-11-14

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are a family of innate immune molecules that recognize bacterial peptidoglycan. PGRP-LE, a member of the PGRP family, selectively binds to diaminopimelic acid (DAP)-type peptidoglycan to activate both the immune deficiency (Imd) and proPhenoloxidase (proPO) pathways in insects. A PGRP-LE-dependent induction of autophagy to control Listeria monocytogenes has also been reported. We identified and partially characterized a novel PGRP-LE homologue, from Tenebrio molitor and analyzed its functional role in the survival of the insect against infection by a DAP-type PGN containing intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. The cDNA is comprised of an open reading frame (ORF) of 990 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 329 residues. TmPGRP-LE contains one PGRP domain, but lacks critical residues for amidase activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed a broad constitutive expression of the transcript at various stages of development spanning from larva to adult. RNAi mediated knockdown of the transcripts, followed by a challenge with L. monocytogenes, showed a significant reduction in survival rate of the larvae, suggesting a putative role of TmPGRP-LE in sensing and control of L. monocytogenes infection in T. molitor. These results implicate PGRP-LE as a defense protein necessary for survival of T. molitor against infection by L. monocytogenes.

  16. Identification of novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv using integrated approach of multiple computational algorithms and experimental analysis.

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    Sanjiv Kumar

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria interacting with eukaryotic host express adhesins on their surface. These adhesins aid in bacterial attachment to the host cell receptors during colonization. A few adhesins such as Heparin binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA, Apa, Malate Synthase of M. tuberculosis have been identified using specific experimental interaction models based on the biological knowledge of the pathogen. In the present work, we carried out computational screening for adhesins of M. tuberculosis. We used an integrated computational approach using SPAAN for predicting adhesins, PSORTb, SubLoc and LocTree for extracellular localization, and BLAST for verifying non-similarity to human proteins. These steps are among the first of reverse vaccinology. Multiple claims and attacks from different algorithms were processed through argumentative approach. Additional filtration criteria included selection for proteins with low molecular weights and absence of literature reports. We examined binding potential of the selected proteins using an image based ELISA. The protein Rv2599 (membrane protein binds to human fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Rv3717 (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and Rv0309 (L,D-transpeptidase bind to fibronectin and laminin. We report Rv2599 (membrane protein, Rv0309 and Rv3717 as novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Our results expand the number of known adhesins of M. tuberculosis and suggest their regulated expression in different stages.

  17. Preparation and Immunomodulatory Properties of Modified Peptidoglycan Fragments

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    Tomić, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulators, known also as adjuvants, are added to vaccines to accelerate, extend or amplify the specific immune reaction to a specific antigen. One well known class of immuno- modulating compounds is based on muramylpeptides which are fragments of peptidoglycans, natural polymers that build up the cell wall of bacteria. Muramyldipeptide, N-acetyl- muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP, Fig. 1 is the smallest structural unit of the peptidoglycan monomer (PGM, Fig. 2 which shows immunostimulating activity. PGM isolated from Brevibacterium divaricatum, acts in itself as an effective adjuvant, and several derivatives were prepared to study the possible influence of different substituents on the immunomodulatory activity. Thus, lipophilic derivativestert-butyloxycarbonyl-L-tyrosyl-PGM and (adamant- 1-ylacetyl-PGM (Fig. 3 were prepared and their activities studied. They were also shown to be good substrates for N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase from human serum (Scheme 1 which specifically hydrolyzes the lactylamide bond. MDP which is an integral part of PGM and proven to be an effective adjuvant was further synthetically modified and obtained derivatives tested as possible immunomodulators. Romutide (MDP-Lys(L18, approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA, and mifamurtide (L-MTP-PE, approved by European Medicines Agency (EMA, highlight among many other MDP derivatives (Fig. 4. Since N-acetylglucosamine in the structure of MDP is not essential for the immunostimulating effect, desmuramyldipeptides (Fig. 5 with different acyl groups at N-terminus of L-Ala-D-isoGln dipeptide were prepared. In ada mantyl desmuramyldipeptides such as adamantylamide dipeptide (Fig 6, adamantyl tripeptides (Fig. 7 and desmuramylpeptides with (adamant-1-ylcarboxyamido group (Fig. 8, lipophilic adamantane moiety is bound to the dipeptide part. Binding of some specific sugars to immune active substances may help their targeted delivery. An example is mannose which

  18. Identify nature N-acylethanolamide-hydrolyzing acid amide(NAAA)inhibitor: effect of Angelicae Pubescentis Radix on anti-inflammation%独活挥发油对N-脂肪酰基乙醇胺水解酶的抑制作用及抗炎作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文畅; 杨隆河; 邱彦; 任杰; 黄锐; 傅瑾

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究独活挥发油对内源性大麻素水解酶N-脂肪酰基乙醇胺水解酶(N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase,NAAA)水解活性的影响以及对脂多糖(LPS)诱导的小鼠巨噬细胞RAW264.7炎症反应模型的抗炎作用.方法:采用水蒸气蒸馏法提取独活挥发油,GC-MS检测化学成分;采用LC-MS检测NAAA水解活性;采用LPS诱导RAW264.7细胞建立细胞炎症反应模型;采用LC-MS检测细胞内棕榈酸乙醇胺(N-palmitoylethanolamine,PEA)水平;采用实时定量PCR检测肿瘤坏子因子-α(TNF-α)、诱导型一氧化氮合酶(iNOS)和白细胞介素-6(IL-6)mRNA表达;采用酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)检测TNF-α含量;采用Griess法检测一氧化氮(NO)含量.结果:独活挥发油可抑制NAAA水解活性,升高LPS诱导的RAW264.7细胞内PEA水平;独活挥发油可下调LPS诱导的RAW264.7细胞炎症因子TNF-α,iNOS,IL-6 mRNA表达;独活挥发油可抑制LPS诱导的RAW264.7细胞TNF-α和NO释放.结论:独活挥发油能够抑制NAAA水解活性,升高细胞内PEA水平,降低炎症因子表达,具有一定的抗炎作用.%Objective: To investigate the effect of Angelicae Pubescentis Radix (APR) on the activity of endocannabinoid hydrolase and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase ( NAAA) , and to demonstrate the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect of APR by in vitro lipopolysaccharide ( LPS) -induced inflammation model. Method: APR essential oil was extracted by steam distillation , and the chemical components were identified by GC-MS. Enzymatic activity was performed by using recombinant NAAA-overex-pressing protein and detected by LC-MS. Lipids were extracted by methonal/chloroform mixure and analyzed by LC-MS. mRNA and protein expression levels of proinflammatory genes were examined by Real time-PCR and ELISA assay kit, respectively. The content of nitro oxide (NO) was detected by Griess reaction. Result: Twenty active components were identified from APR essential

  19. Structural and biochemical studies on Vibrio cholerae Hsp31 reveals a novel dimeric form and Glutathione-independent Glyoxalase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae experiences a highly hostile environment at human intestine which triggers the induction of various heat shock genes. The hchA gene product of V. cholerae O395, referred to a hypothetical intracellular protease/amidase VcHsp31, is one such stress-inducible homodimeric protein. Our current study demonstrates that VcHsp31 is endowed with molecular chaperone, amidopeptidase and robust methylglyoxalase activities. Through site directed mutagenesis coupled with biochemical assays on VcHsp31, we have confirmed the role of residues in the vicinity of the active site towards amidopeptidase and methylglyoxalase activities. VcHsp31 suppresses the aggregation of insulin in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Through crystal structures of VcHsp31 and its mutants, grown at various temperatures, we demonstrate that VcHsp31 acquires two (Type-I and Type-II) dimeric forms. Type-I dimer is similar to EcHsp31 where two VcHsp31 monomers associate in eclipsed manner through several intersubunit hydrogen bonds involving their P-domains. Type-II dimer is a novel dimeric organization, where some of the intersubunit hydrogen bonds are abrogated and each monomer swings out in the opposite directions centering at their P-domains, like twisting of wet cloth. Normal mode analysis (NMA) of Type-I dimer shows similar movement of the individual monomers. Upon swinging, a dimeric surface of ~400Å2, mostly hydrophobic in nature, is uncovered which might bind partially unfolded protein substrates. We propose that, in solution, VcHsp31 remains as an equilibrium mixture of both the dimers. With increase in temperature, transformation to Type-II form having more exposed hydrophobic surface, occurs progressively accounting for the temperature dependent increase of chaperone activity of VcHsp31. PMID:28235098

  20. Highly Effective Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by the First Metagenome-Derived AI-2 Quenching Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Kisch, Martin J.; Pinnow, Nicole; Liese, Andreas; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell–cell communication (quorum sensing, QS) represents a fundamental process crucial for biofilm formation, pathogenicity, and virulence allowing coordinated, concerted actions of bacteria depending on their cell density. With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistance of biofilms, there is an increasing need for novel strategies to control harmful biofilms. One attractive and most likely effective approach is to target bacterial communication systems for novel drug design in biotechnological and medical applications. In this study, metagenomic large-insert libraries were constructed and screened for QS interfering activities (quorum quenching, QQ) using recently established reporter strains. Overall, 142 out of 46,400 metagenomic clones were identified to interfere with acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), 13 with autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Five cosmid clones with highest simultaneous interfering activities were further analyzed and the respective open reading frames conferring QQ activities identified. Those showed homologies to bacterial oxidoreductases, proteases, amidases and aminotransferases. Evaluating the ability of the respective purified QQ-proteins to prevent biofilm formation of several model systems demonstrated highest inhibitory effects of QQ-2 using the crystal violet biofilm assay. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of the respective QQ proteins in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and monitoring biofilm formation in a continuous flow cell system. Moreover, QQ-2 chemically immobilized to the glass surface of the flow cell effectively inhibited biofilm formation of K. oxytoca as well as clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from patients with urinary tract infections. Indications were obtained by molecular and biochemical characterizations that QQ-2 represents an oxidoreductase most likely reducing the signaling molecules AHL and AI-2 to QS-inactive hydroxy-derivatives. Overall, we propose that the identified novel QQ-2 protein

  1. Structural and biochemical characterization reveals LysGH15 as an unprecedented "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding phage lysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jingmin; Feng, Yingang; Feng, Xin; Sun, Changjiang; Lei, Liancheng; Ding, Wei; Niu, Fengfeng; Jiao, Lianying; Yang, Mei; Li, Yue; Liu, Xiaohe; Song, Jun; Cui, Ziyin; Han, Dong; Du, Chongtao; Yang, Yongjun; Ouyang, Songying; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Han, Wenyu

    2014-05-01

    The lysin LysGH15, which is derived from the staphylococcal phage GH15, demonstrates a wide lytic spectrum and strong lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Here, we find that the lytic activity of the full-length LysGH15 and its CHAP domain is dependent on calcium ions. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, the structures of three individual domains of LysGH15 were determined. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure of the LysGH15 CHAP domain reveals an "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding site near the Cys-His-Glu-Asn quartet active site groove. To date, the calcium-binding site in the LysGH15 CHAP domain is unique among homologous proteins, and it represents the first reported calcium-binding site in the CHAP family. More importantly, the calcium ion plays an important role as a switch that modulates the CHAP domain between the active and inactive states. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the amidase-2 domain reveals that both the zinc ion and E282 are required in catalysis and enable us to propose a catalytic mechanism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and titration-guided mutagenesis identify residues (e.g., N404, Y406, G407, and T408) in the SH3b domain that are involved in the interactions with the substrate. To the best of our knowledge, our results constitute the first structural information on the biochemical features of a staphylococcal phage lysin and represent a pivotal step forward in understanding this type of lysin.

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization reveals LysGH15 as an unprecedented "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding phage lysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Gu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lysin LysGH15, which is derived from the staphylococcal phage GH15, demonstrates a wide lytic spectrum and strong lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Here, we find that the lytic activity of the full-length LysGH15 and its CHAP domain is dependent on calcium ions. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, the structures of three individual domains of LysGH15 were determined. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure of the LysGH15 CHAP domain reveals an "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding site near the Cys-His-Glu-Asn quartet active site groove. To date, the calcium-binding site in the LysGH15 CHAP domain is unique among homologous proteins, and it represents the first reported calcium-binding site in the CHAP family. More importantly, the calcium ion plays an important role as a switch that modulates the CHAP domain between the active and inactive states. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the amidase-2 domain reveals that both the zinc ion and E282 are required in catalysis and enable us to propose a catalytic mechanism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and titration-guided mutagenesis identify residues (e.g., N404, Y406, G407, and T408 in the SH3b domain that are involved in the interactions with the substrate. To the best of our knowledge, our results constitute the first structural information on the biochemical features of a staphylococcal phage lysin and represent a pivotal step forward in understanding this type of lysin.

  3. X-ray crystallography and its impact on understanding bacterial cell wall remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Renner-Schneck, Michaela; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-02-01

    The molecular structure of matter defines its properties and function. This is especially true for biological macromolecules such as proteins, which participate in virtually all biochemical processes. A three dimensional structural model of a protein is thus essential for the detailed understanding of its physiological function and the characterization of essential properties such as ligand binding and reaction mechanism. X-ray crystallography is a well-established technique that has been used for many years, but it is still by far the most widely used method for structure determination. A particular strength of this technique is the elucidation of atomic details of molecular interactions, thus providing an invaluable tool for a multitude of scientific projects ranging from the structural classification of macromolecules over the validation of enzymatic mechanisms or the understanding of host-pathogen interactions to structure-guided drug design. In the first part of this review, we describe essential methodological and practical aspects of X-ray crystallography. We provide some pointers that should allow researchers without a background in structural biology to assess the overall quality and reliability of a crystal structure. To highlight its potential, we then survey the impact X-ray crystallography has had on advancing an understanding of a class of enzymes that modify the bacterial cell wall. A substantial number of different bacterial amidase structures have been solved, mostly by X-ray crystallography. Comparison of these structures highlights conserved as well as divergent features. In combination with functional analyses, structural information on these enzymes has therefore proven to be a valuable template not only for understanding their mechanism of catalysis, but also for targeted interference with substrate binding.

  4. PSGL-1 on Leukocytes is a Critical Component of the Host Immune Response against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Urzainqui, Ana; de Andrés, Belén; González-Tajuelo, Rafael; Domenech, Mirian; González-Camacho, Fernando; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Brown, Jeremy S.; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial uptake by phagocytic cells is a vital event in the clearance of invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. A major role of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on leukocytes against invasive pneumococcal disease is described in this study. Phagocytosis experiments using different serotypes demonstrated that PSGL-1 is involved in the recognition, uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae. Co-localization of several clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with PSGL-1 was demonstrated, observing a rapid and active phagocytosis in the presence of PSGL-1. Furthermore, the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide and the main autolysin of the bacterium ―the amidase LytA― were identified as bacterial ligands for PSGL-1. Experimental models of pneumococcal disease including invasive pneumonia and systemic infection showed that bacterial levels were markedly increased in the blood of PSGL-1−/− mice. During pneumonia, PSGL-1 controls the severity of pneumococcal dissemination from the lung to the bloodstream. In systemic infection, a major role of PSGL-1 in host defense is to clear the bacteria in the systemic circulation controlling bacterial replication. These results confirmed the importance of this receptor in the recognition and clearance of S. pneumoniae during invasive pneumococcal disease. Histological and cellular analysis demonstrated that PSGL-1−/− mice have increased levels of T cells migrating to the lung than the corresponding wild-type mice. In contrast, during systemic infection, PSGL-1−/− mice had increased numbers of neutrophils and macrophages in blood, but were less effective controlling the infection process due to the lack of this functional receptor. Overall, this study demonstrates that PSGL-1 is a novel receptor for S. pneumoniae that contributes to protection against invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:26975045

  5. Highly effective inhibition of biofilm formation by the first metagenome-derived AI-2 quenching enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Weiland-Bräuer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell-cell communication (quorum sensing, QS represents a fundamental process crucial for biofilm formation, pathogenicity, and virulence allowing coordinated, concerted actions of bacteria depending on their cell density. With the widespread appearance of antibiotic-resistance of biofilms, there is an increasing need for novel strategies to control harmful biofilms. One attractive and most likely effective approach is to target bacterial communication systems for novel drug design in biotechnological and medical applications. In this study, metagenomic large-insert libraries were constructed and screened for QS interfering activities (quorum quenching, QQ using recently established reporter strains. Overall, 142 out of 46,400 metagenomic clones were identified to interfere with acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs, 13 with autoinducer-2 (AI-2. Five cosmid clones with highest simultaneous interfering activities were further analyzed and the respective open reading frames conferring QQ activities identified. Those showed homologies to bacterial oxidoreductases, proteases, amidases and aminotransferases. Evaluating the ability of the respective purified QQ-proteins to prevent biofilm formation of several model systems demonstrated highest inhibitory effects of QQ-2 using the crystal violet biofilm assay. This was confirmed by heterologous expression of the respective QQ proteins in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and monitoring biofilm formation in a continuous flow cell system. Moreover, QQ-2 chemically immobilized to the glass surface of the flow cell effectively inhibited biofilm formation of K. oxytoca as well as clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from patients with urinary tract infections. Indications were obtained by molecular and biochemical characterizations that QQ-2 represents an oxidoreductase most likely reducing the signaling molecules AHL and AI-2 to QS-inactive hydroxy-derivatives. Overall, we propose that the identified novel QQ-2

  6. Purification and characterization of a unique alkaline elastase from Micrococcus luteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D J; Hawrylik, S J; Kavanagh, E; Opheim, D J

    2000-02-01

    Micrococcus luteus isolated from human skin secretes an alkaline protease which degrades elastin. M. luteus protease (MLP) was produced in the late logarithmic and stationary phases of growth. MLP, purified to homogeneity by a three-step process, had a molecular mass of 32,812 Da and an isoelectric point of 9.3. MLP was active and highly stable in solution for 24 h from pH 6.0 to 10.5; it had maximal activity at temperatures between 57 and 59 degrees C. The presence of calcium in the solution was essential for enzyme activity and to prevent autolysis. Optimal activity occurred between pH 9.0 and 9.5, with 60% maximal activity from pH 6.5 to 11.0. The enzyme was inhibited by the serine enzyme inhibitors phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and chymostatin but not by the metalloenzyme inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline or sulfhydryl enzyme inhibitors. Casein, bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, and elastin were digested by the protease while collagen and keratin were resistant to digestion. MLP demonstrated both esterase and amidase activity on synthetic peptide substrates. MLP preferentially cleaved the Leu(15)-Tyr(16) and Phe(24)-Phe(25) bonds of the oxidized beta-chain of insulin. Longer digests of insulin and the pattern of activity against synthetic substrates suggest that MLP has a cleavage specificity for bulky, hydrophobic, or aromatic amino acids in the P(1) or P(1)' positions. Amino acid sequences from the N-terminus and internal peptides of MLP were unique.

  7. Lack of association of genetic variants in genes of the endocannabinoid system with anorexia nervosa

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    Herpertz-Dahlmann Beate

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of evidence indicate that the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 as well as the major endocannabinoid degrading enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL are implicated in mediating the orexigenic effects of cannabinoids. The aim of this study was to analyse whether nucleotide sequence variations in the CNR1, FAAH, NAAA and MGLL genes are associated with anorexia nervosa (AN. Methods We analysed the association of a previously described (AATn repeat in the 3' flanking region of CNR1 as well as a total of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs representative of regions with restricted haplotype diversity in CNR1, FAAH, NAAA or MGLL in up to 91 German AN trios (patient with AN and both biological parents using the transmission-disequilibrium-test (TDT. One SNP was additionally analysed in an independent case-control study comprising 113 patients with AN and 178 normal weight controls. Genotyping was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, ARMS-PCR or using 3730xl capillary sequencers. Results The TDT revealed no evidence for association for any of the SNPs or the (AATn repeat with AN (all two-sided uncorrected p-values > 0.05. The lowest p-value of 0.11 was detected for the A-allele of the CNR1 SNP rs1049353 for which the transmission rate was 59% (95% confidence interval 47%...70%. Further genotyping of rs1049353 in 113 additional independent patients with AN and 178 normal weight controls could not substantiate the initial trend for association (p = 1.00. Conclusion As we found no evidence for an association of genetic variation in CNR1, FAAH, NAAA and MGLL with AN, we conclude that genetic variations in these genes do not play a major role in the etiology of AN in our study groups.

  8. The First Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophage Endolysin (PlyPl23 with High Potential to Control American Foulbrood.

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    Ana Oliveira

    Full Text Available Endolysins, which are peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes expressed during the terminal stage of the reproduction cycle of bacteriophages, have great potential to control Gram-positive pathogens. This work describes the characterization of a novel endolysin (PlyPl23 encoded on the genome of Paenibacillus larvae phage phiIBB_Pl23 with high potential to control American foulbrood. This bacterial disease, caused by P. larvae, is widespread in North America and Europe and causes important economic losses in apiculture. The restriction to antibiotic residues in honey imposed by the EU legislation hinders its therapeutic use to combat American foulbrood and enforces the development of alternative antimicrobial methods. The new endolysin described herein has an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase catalytic domain and exhibits a broad-spectrum activity against common P. larvae genotypes. Moreover, the enzyme displays high antimicrobial activity in a range of pH that matches environmental conditions (pH between 5.0 and 7.0, showing its feasible application in the field. At pH 7.0, a concentration of 0.2 μM of enzyme was enough to lyse 104 CFU.mL-1 of P. larvae in no more than 2 h. The presence of sucrose and of the substances present in the larvae gut content did not affect the enzyme activity. Interestingly, an increase of activity was observed when PlyPl23 was previously incubated in royal jelly. Furthermore, in vivo safety evaluation assays demonstrated that this enzyme is not toxic to the bee larvae. The present work describes for the first time an endolysin encoded in a P. larvae phage that presents high potential to integrate a commercial product to control the problematic American foulbrood.

  9. Removal of polyvinylpyrrolidone from wastewater using different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julinová, Markéta; Kupec, Jan; Houser, Josef; Slavík, Roman; Marusincová, Hana; Cervenáková, Lenka; Klívar, Stanislav

    2012-12-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is a frequently used polymer in the pharmaceutical and foodstuff industries. Because it is not subject to metabolic changes and is virtually nondegradable, trace concentrations of PVP are often found in community wastewaters. The literature finds that the partial removal of PVP in wastewater treatment plants probably occurs through sorption. The primary objective of this study was to find an effective method to remove PVP from wastewaters. In this regard, the literature indicates the theoretical potential to use specific enzymes (e.g., gamma-lactamases, amidases) to gradually degrade PVP molecules. Polyvinylpyrrolidone biodegradability tests were conducted using suitable heterogeneous cultures (activated sludge) collected from a conventional wastewater treatment plant, treatment plants connected to a pharmaceutical factory, and using select enzymes. Aerobic biodegradation of PVP in a conventional wastewater environment was ineffective, even after adaptation of activated sludge using the nearly identical monomer 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Another potential method for PVP removal involves pretreating the polymer prior to biological degradation. Based on the results (approximately 10 to 15% biodegradation), pretreatment was partially effective, realistically, it could only be applied with difficulty at wastewater treatment plants. Sorption of PVP to an active carbon sorbent (Chezacarb S), which corresponded to the Langmuir isotherm, and sorption to activated sludge, which corresponded to the Freundlich isotherm, were also evaluated. From these sorption tests, it can be concluded that the considerable adsorption of PVP to activated sludge occurred primarily at low PVP concentrations. Based on the test results, the authors recommend the following methods for PVP removal from wastewater: (1) sorption; (2) application of specific microorganisms; and (3) alkaline hydrolysis, which is the least suitable of the three for use in wastewater treatment

  10. Understanding the Role of Host Hemocytes in a Squid/Vibrio Symbiosis Using Transcriptomics and Proteomics

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    Andrew J. Collins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis between the squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, serves as a model for understanding interactions between beneficial bacteria and animal hosts. The establishment and maintenance of the association is highly specific and depends on the selection of V. fischeri and exclusion of non-symbiotic bacteria from the environment. Current evidence suggests that the host’s cellular innate immune system, in the form of macrophage-like hemocytes, helps to mediate host tolerance of V. fischeri. To begin to understand the role of hemocytes in this association, we analyzed these cells by high-throughput 454 transcriptomic and liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses. 454 high-throughput sequencing produced 650,686 reads totaling 279.9 Mb while LC-MS/MS analyses of circulating hemocytes putatively identified 702 unique proteins. Several receptors involved with the recognition of microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs were identified. Among these was a complete open reading frame (ORF to a putative peptidoglycan recognition protein (EsPGRP5 that has conserved residues for amidase activity. Assembly of the hemocyte transcriptome showed EsPGRP5 had high coverage, suggesting it is among the 5% most abundant transcripts in circulating hemocytes. Other transcripts and proteins identified included members of the conserved NFκB signaling pathway, putative members of the complement pathway, the carbohydrate binding protein galectin, and cephalotoxin. Quantitative PCR of complement-related genes, cephalotoxin, EsPGRP5, and a nitric oxide synthase showed differential expression in circulating hemocytes isolated from adult squid with colonized light organs compared to those for which the symbionts were removed. These data suggest that the presence of the symbiont influences gene expression of the cellular innate immune system of the host.

  11. Functional analysis of TetR-family regulator AmtRsav in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Zhu, Hong; Zheng, Guosong; Jiang, Weihong; Lu, Yinhua

    2013-12-01

    In actinomycetes, two main regulators, the OmpR-like GlnR and the TetR-type AmtR, have been identified as the central regulators for nitrogen metabolism. GlnR-mediated regulation was previously identified in different actinomycetes except for members of the genus Corynebacterium, in which AmtR plays a predominant role in nitrogen metabolism. Interestingly, some actinomycetes (e.g. Streptomyces avermitilis) harbour both glnR- and amtR-homologous genes in the chromosome. Thus, it will be interesting to determine how these two different types of regulators function together in nitrogen regulation of these strains. In this study, AmtRsav (sav_6701) in S. avermitilis, the homologue of AmtR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, was functionally characterized. We showed, by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR (qPCR) in combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), that gene cluster sav_6697-6700 encoding a putative amidase, a urea carboxylase and two hypothetical proteins, respectively, and sav_6709 encoding a probable amino acid permease are under the direct control of AmtRsav. Using approaches of comparative analysis combined with site-directed DNA mutagenesis, the AmtRsav binding sites in the respective intergenic regions of sav_6700/6701 and sav_6709/6710 were defined. By genome screening coupled with EMSAs, two novel AmtRsav binding sites were identified. Taken together, AmtRsav seems to play a marginal role in regulation of nitrogen metabolism of S. avermitilis.

  12. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable evolution among core genes with therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siragusa Gregory R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricultural and human pathogen. Results Phage whole-genome tetra-nucleotide signatures and proteomic tree topologies correlated closely with host phylogeny. Comparisons of our phage genomes to 26 others revealed three shared COGs; of particular interest within this core genome was an endolysin (PF01520, an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and a holin (PF04531. Comparative analyses of the evolutionary history and genomic context of these common phage proteins revealed two important results: 1 strongly significant host-specific sequence variation within the endolysin, and 2 a protein domain architecture apparently unique to our phage genomes in which the endolysin is located upstream of its associated holin. Endolysin sequences from our phages were one of two very distinct genotypes distinguished by variability within the putative enzymatically-active domain. The shared or core genome was comprised of genes with multiple sequence types belonging to five pfam families, and genes belonging to 12 pfam families, including the holin genes, which were nearly identical. Conclusions Significant genomic diversity exists even among closely-related bacteriophages. Holins and endolysins represent conserved functions across divergent phage genomes and, as we demonstrate here, endolysins can have significant variability and host-specificity even among closely-related genomes. Endolysins in our phage genomes may be subject to different selective pressures than the rest of the genome. These findings may have important implications for potential biotechnological applications of phage gene products.

  13. Adelmidrol increases the endogenous concentrations of palmitoylethanolamide in canine keratinocytes and down-regulates an inflammatory reaction in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosino, S; Puigdemont, A; Della Valle, M F; Fusco, M; Verde, R; Allarà, M; Aveta, T; Orlando, P; Di Marzo, V

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate potential new target(s)/mechanism(s) for the palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) analogue, adelmidrol, and its role in an in vitro model of contact allergic dermatitis. Freshly isolated canine keratinocytes, human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, wild-type or transfected with cDNA encoding for N-acylethanolamine-hydrolysing acid amidase (NAAA), were treated with adelmidrol or azelaic acid, and the concentrations of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and related mediators (PEA and oleoylethanolamide) were measured. The mRNA expression of PEA catabolic enzymes (NAAA and fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH), and biosynthetic enzymes (N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D, NAPE-PLD) and glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase 1, was also measured. Brain or HEK-293 cell membrane fractions were used to assess the ability of adelmidrol to inhibit FAAH and NAAA activity, respectively. HaCaT cells were stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, monocyte chemotactic protein-2 (MCP-2), was measured in the presence of adelmidrol. Adelmidrol increased PEA concentrations in canine keratinocytes and in the other cellular systems studied. It did not inhibit the activity of PEA catabolic enzymes, although it reduced their mRNA expression in some cell types. Adelmidrol modulated the expression of PEA biosynthetic enzyme, NAPE-PLD, in HaCaT cells, and inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokine MCP-2 from stimulated HaCaT cells. This study demonstrates for the first time an 'entourage effect' of adelmidrol on PEA concentrations in keratinocytes and suggests that this effect might mediate, at least in part, the anti-inflammatory effects of this compound in veterinary practice.

  14. Purification, primary structures and evolution of coagulant proteases from Deinagkistrodon actus venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikandrov, Nikolai N; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Tani, Ayako; Chijiwa, Takahito; Shibata, Hiroki; Chang, Chang-Chun; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Ito, Tatsumi; Ohno, Motonori

    2005-12-15

    Deinagkistrodon (formerly Agkistrodon) actus (Taiwan) snake venom was found to contain at least seven closely related coagulant proteases. One of them, named actibin, was purified to homogeneity by means of four chromatographic steps. Actibin acted on fibrinogen to form fibrin clots with extremely high specific activity of 1,630 NIH units/mg and preferentially released fibrinopeptide A. Actibin was an acidic glycoprotein (pI 3.4) with molecular weight of 41,000, which was reduced to 28,800 after deglycosylation with N-glycanase. The k(cat)/K(m) values of actibin for hydrolysis of tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester and benzoyl-l-arginine p-nitroanilide were one-third to a half those for thrombin, reflecting a high potency of actibin in fibrinogen clotting. The amidase activities of actibin and its family proteases were inhibited by 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, a serine protease inhibitor, indicating that actibin and its family proteases are serine proteases. Four cDNAs, named DaP1 and DaP7-DaP9, encoding D. actus coagulant proteases were cloned. All cDNAs contain an open reading frame of 780 bp coding for 260 amino acid residues, including a signal peptide of 24 amino acid residues. Their amino acid sequences predicted are highly homologous to one another with one to five amino acid substitutions. When four D. actus protease cDNAs were compared with the cDNAs coding for Trimeresurus flavoviridis and T. gramineus venom serine proteases, accelerated evolution was clearly observed. Similarity of the nucleotide sequences of four D. actus protease cDNAs with no synonymous and one to five nonsynonymous substitutions seems not to be in direct conformity with accelerated evolution. This possibly suggests that they have evolved to a similar direction to enhance their clotting activity rather than to produce other physiological activities.

  15. N-glycans of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Susanne P; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Leeflang, Bas R; Koles, Kate; Mannesse, Maurice L M; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Pieper, Frank R; Kroos, Marian A; Reuser, Arnold J J; Zhou, Qun; Jin, Xiaoying; Zhang, Kate; Edmunds, Tim; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2007-06-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal glycogen storage disorder characterized by acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. More than 110 different pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding GAA have been observed. Patients with this disease are being treated by intravenous injection of recombinant forms of the enzyme. Focusing on recombinant approaches to produce the enzyme means that specific attention has to be paid to the generated glycosylation patterns. Here, human GAA was expressed in the mammary gland of transgenic rabbits. The N-linked glycans of recombinant human GAA (rhAGLU), isolated from the rabbit milk, were released by peptide-N(4)-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F. The N-glycan pool was fractionated and purified into individual components by a combination of anion-exchange, normal-phase, and Sambucus nigra agglutinin-affinity chromatography. The structures of the components were analyzed by 500 MHz one-dimensional and 600 MHz cryo two-dimensional (total correlation spectroscopy [TOCSY] nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, combined with two-dimensional (31)P-filtered (1)H-(1)H TOCSY spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-profiling of 2-aminobenzamide-labeled glycans combined with exoglycosidase digestions. The recombinant rabbit glycoprotein contained a broad array of different N-glycans, comprising oligomannose-, hybrid-, and complex-type structures. Part of the oligomannose-type glycans showed the presence of phospho-diester-bridged N-acetylglucosamine. For the complex-type glycans (partially) (alpha2-6)-sialylated (nearly only N-acetylneuraminic acid) diantennary structures were found; part of the structures were (alpha1-6)-core-fucosylated or (alpha1-3)-fucosylated in the upper antenna (Lewis x). Using HPLC-mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, information was generated with respect to the

  16. Molecular cloning, characterization and heterologous expression of bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) from Lactobacillus fermentum NCDO394.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Rajkumar, Hemalatha; Kumar, Manoj; Varikuti, Sudarshan Reddy; Athimamula, Ramakrishna; Shujauddin, Mohd; Ramagoni, Ramesh; Kondapalli, Narendrababu

    2013-08-01

    Bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) active probiotic strains hydrolyze bile acid amino conjugates in vivo, which triggers cholesterol consumption in liver to synthesize new bile leading to consequential cholesterol lowering. Hence, bile salt hydrolyzing potential was the criterion to select L. fermentum NCDO394 for this study and its gene encoding Bsh was identified and cloned. The resulting nucleotide sequence of bsh gene contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 978 nucleotides encoding a predicted protein of 325 amino acids with a theoretical pI of 6.39. Moreover, deduced Bsh protein had high similarity with the Bshs of L. fermentum only and also exhibited significant similarity to the Pencillin V amidases of other Lactobacillus spp. Five catalytically important amino acids were highly conserved in L. fermentum Bsh while four amino acid motifs around these active sites, were not as consistent as in other Bsh proteins. Furthermore, L. fermentum bsh gene was sub-cloned into pET-28b(+) vector, and its expression was induced with 0.05 mM isopropylthiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The recombinant Bsh (rBsh) was purified with homogeneity using Ni+2-NTA column and characterized for substrate specificity, pH and temperature. The rBsh hydrolyzed six major human bile salts with a slight preference towards glycine-conjugated bile salts. The optimum pH of rBsh was six, and its enzymatic activity declined below pH 5 and above pH 7. The enzyme was stable and functional even at 65 °C while showed its maximum activity at 37 °C. In conclusion, L. fermentum NCDO394 may be a promising candidate probiotic which may affect cholesterol metabolism in vivo.

  17. Insights into molecular plasticity of choline binding proteins (pneumococcal surface proteins) by SAXS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M; Monterroso, Begoña; Menéndez, Margarita; Diakun, Greg; Chacón, Pablo; Hermoso, Juan Antonio; Díaz, J Fernando

    2007-01-12

    Phosphocholine moieties decorating the pneumococcal surface are used as a docking station for a family of modular proteins, the so-called choline binding proteins or CBPs. Choline recognition is essential for CBPs function and may also be a determinant for their quaternary structure. There is little knowledge about modular arrangement or oligomeric structures in this family. Therefore, we have used the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique combined with analytical ultracentrifugation in order to model the three-dimensional envelope of two highly different CBPs: the phage encoded Cpl-1 lysozyme and the pneumococcal phosphorylcholine esterase Pce. Both enzymes have an N-terminal catalytic module and a C-terminal choline-binding module (CBM) that attaches them to the bacterial surface and comprises six and ten sequence repeats in Cpl-1 and Pce, respectively. SAXS experiments have shown an inherent conformational plasticity in Cpl-1 that accounts for the different relative position of these regions in the solution and crystal structures. Dimerization of Cpl-1 upon choline binding has been also visualised for the first time, and monomer-monomer interactions take place through the first CBR where a non-canonical choline binding site has now been identified. This mode of association seems to be independent of the absence or presence of the Cpl-1 catalytic module and reveals that the arrangement of the monomers differs from that previously found in the isolated CBM dimer of pneumococcal LytA amidase. In contrast, Pce displays the same modular disposition in the solution and crystal structures, and remains almost invariant upon choline binding. The present results suggest that protein dimerization and duplication of CBRs may be alternative but not equivalent ways of improving cell wall recognition by CBPs, since they provide different interaction geometries for choline residues present in (lipo)teichoic acids.

  18. Inducible Siphoviruses in superficial and deep tissue isolates of Propionibacterium acnes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen Magnus

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propionibacterium acnes is a commensal of human skin but is also known to be involved in certain diseases, such as acne vulgaris and infections of orthopaedic implants. Treatment of these conditions is complicated by increased resistance to antibiotics and/or biofilm formation of P. acnes bacteria. P. acnes can be infected by bacteriophages, but until recently little has been known about these viruses. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize inducible phages from P. acnes on a genetic and morphological basis. Results More than 70% (65/92 of P. acnes isolates investigated have inducible phages, classified morphologically as Siphoviruses. The phages have a head of 55 nm in diameter and a tail of 145–155 nm in length and 9–10 nm in width. There was no difference in carriage rate of phages between P. acnes isolates from deep infections and isolates from skin. However, there was a significant lower carriage rate of phages in P. acnes biotype IB, mostly attributed to the low carriage rate of inducible phages in biotype IB isolated from deep tissue. Most phages have a strong lytic activity against all P. acnes isolates with inducible phages, but have less lytic activity against isolates that have no prophages. Phages only infected and lysed P. acnes and not other closely related propionibacteria. All phages could infect and lyse their non-induced parental host, indicating that these prophages do not confer superinfection immunity. The phages have identical protein pattern as observed on SDS-PAGE. Finally, sequencing of two phage genes encoding a putative major head protein and an amidase and showed that the phages could be divided into different groups on a genetic basis. Conclusion Our findings indicate that temperate phages are common in P. acnes, and that they are a genetically and functionally homogeneous group of Siphoviruses. The phages are specific for P. acnes and do not seem to confer superinfection

  19. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianyu [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ding, Jinjing; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Da-Cheng, E-mail: dcwang@ibp.ac.cn [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: dcwang@ibp.ac.cn [The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex associated with the bacterial type VI secretion system of P. aeruginosa has been solved and refined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structural basis of the recognition of the muramidase effector and its inactivation by its cognate immunity protein is revealed. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a β-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair.

  20. A proteomic analysis of rice seed germination as affected by high temperature and ABA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Jun; Xu, Heng-Heng; Wang, Wei-Qing; Li, Ni; Wang, Wei-Ping; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-05-01

    Seed germination is a critical phase in the plant life cycle, but the specific events associated with seed germination are still not fully understood. In this study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry to investigate the changes in the proteome during imbibition of Oryza sativa seeds at optimal temperature with or without abscisic acid (ABA) and high temperature (germination thermoinhibition) to further identify and quantify key proteins required for seed germination. A total of 121 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance (1.5-fold increase/decrease) during germination under all conditions. Among these proteins, we found seven proteins specifically associated with seed germination including glycosyl hydrolases family 38 protein, granule-bound starch synthase 1, Os03g0842900 (putative steroleosin-B), N-carbamoylputrescine amidase, spermidine synthase 1, tubulin α-1 chain and glutelin type-A; and a total of 20 imbibition response proteins involved in energy metabolism, cell growth, cell defense and storage proteins. High temperature inhibited seed germination by decreasing the abundance of proteins involved in methionine metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, energy metabolism, reserve degradation, protein folding and stress responses. ABA treatment inhibited germination and decreased the abundance of proteins associated with methionine metabolism, energy production and cell division. Our results show that changes in many biological processes including energy metabolism, protein synthesis and cell defense and rescue occurred as a result of all treatments, while enzymes involved in methionine metabolism and weakening of cell wall specifically accumulated when the seeds germinated at the optimal temperature.

  1. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    ABSTRACT

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    IMPORTANCEPeptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural

  2. Comparative genomics and proteomics of 13 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsute Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At the current time, genome sequences of a total of 13 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are available, including five completed genomes (strains ATCC 33277, HG66, TDC60, JCVISC001, and W83 and eight high-coverage draft sequences (F0185, F0566, F0568, F0569, F0570, SJD2, W4087, and W50 that are assembled into fewer than 300 contigs. This study compared these genomes at both nucleotide and protein sequence levels in order to understand their phylogenetic and functional relatedness. There are four copies of 16S rRNA gene sequences in each of the strains of ATCC 33277, HG66, TDC60, and W83 and one copy in the other nine genomes. These 25 16S rRNA sequences represent only 13 unique sequences. The five copies in W83 and W50 are identical and the three copies in HG66 are identical to the four copies in ATCC 33277, suggesting close evolutionary lineage between W83 and W50, as well as HG66 and ATCC 33277. Genome-wide comparison based on “Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology” (RAST also showed that for the overall biological functions of the genomes, W83 is closer to W50, and HG66 to ATCC33277, than to other genomes. The comparison of the RAST subsystems identified biological functions that are unique to individual, shared by some, or by all genomes. Functions unique to individual genomes include: a tetracycline resistance protein TetQ, DNA metabolism gene YcfH, and DNA repair gene exonuclease SbcC (only in SJD2; very-short-patch mismatch repair endonuclease and a phage packaging terminase similar to Bacteroides phage B124-14 (in W4087; an internalin similar to a Listeria surface virulence protein (W83; a Type I restriction-modification system (F0569; an iron acquisition/heme transport protein (F0566; colicin I receptor and carbamoylputrescine amidase (W50; L-serine dehydratase (TDC60; and spermidine synthase and ribokinase (JCVISC001. The results also identified biological functions that are missing in individual or several genomes. For

  3. Enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Xiang

    2015-03-17

    The hydration and hydrolysis of nitriles are valuable synthetic methods used to prepare carboxamides and carboxylic acids. However, chemical hydration and hydrolysis of nitriles involve harsh reaction conditions, have low selectivity, and generate large amounts of waste. Therefore, researchers have confined the scope of these reactions to simple nitrile substrates. However, biological transformations of nitriles are highly efficient, chemoselective, and environmentally benign, which has led synthetic organic chemists and biotechologists to study these reactions in detail over the last two decades. In nature, biological systems degrade nitriles via two distinct pathways: nitrilases catalyze the direct hydrolysis of nitriles to afford carboxylic acids with release of ammonia, and nitrile hydratases catalyze the conversion of nitriles into carboxamides, which then furnish carboxylic acids via hydrolysis in the presence of amidases. Researchers have subsequently developed biocatalytic methods into useful industrial processes for the manufacture of commodity chemicals, including acrylamide. Since the late 1990s, research by my group and others has led to enormous progress in the understanding and application of enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles in organic synthesis. In this Account, I summarize the important advances in enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles and amides, with a primary focus on research from my laboratory. I describe microbial whole-cell-catalyzed kinetic resolution of various functionalized nitriles, amino- and hydroxynitriles, and nitriles that contain small rings and the desymmetrization of prochiral and meso dinitriles and diamides. I also demonstrate how we can apply the biocatalytic protocol to synthesize natural products and bioactive compounds. These nitrile biotransformations offer an attractive and unique protocol for the enantioselective synthesis of polyfunctionalized organic compounds that are not readily obtainable by

  4. A Novel Staphylococcus Podophage Encodes a Unique Lysin with Unusual Modular Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Katie; Dandu, Vidya Sree; Bari, S. M. Nayeemul; Lackey, Kim; Everett, Gabriel F. K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drug-resistant staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, are leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. Bacteriophages and their peptidoglycan hydrolytic enzymes (lysins) are currently being explored as alternatives to conventional antibiotics; however, only a limited diversity of staphylococcal phages and their lysins has yet been characterized. Here, we describe a novel staphylococcal phage and its lysins. Bacteriophage Andhra is the first reported S. epidermidis phage belonging to the family Podoviridae. Andhra possesses an 18,546-nucleotide genome with 20 open reading frames. BLASTp searches revealed that gene product 10 (gp10) and gp14 harbor putative catalytic domains with predicted peptidase and amidase activities, characteristic functions of phage lysins. We purified these proteins and show that both Andhra_gp10 and Andhra_gp14 inhibit growth and degrade cell walls of diverse staphylococci, with Andhra_gp10 exhibiting more robust activity against the panel of cell wall substrates tested. Site-directed mutagenesis of its predicted catalytic residues abrogated the activity of Andhra_gp10, consistent with the presence of a catalytic CHAP domain on its C terminus. The active site location combined with the absence of an SH3b cell wall binding domain distinguishes Andhra_gp10 from the majority of staphylococcal lysins characterized to date. Importantly, close homologs of Andhra_gp10 are present in related staphylococcal podophages, and we propose that these constitute a new class of phage-encoded lysins. Altogether, our results reveal insights into the biology of a rare family of staphylococcal phages while adding to the arsenal of antimicrobials with potential for therapeutic use. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is inciting a global public health crisis. Drug-resistant Staphylococcus species, especially S. aureus and S. epidermidis, have emerged in both hospital

  5. Properties of a subtilisin-like proteinase from a psychrotrophic Vibrio species comparison with proteinase K and aqualysin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, M M; Magnússon, O T; Gudmundsson, H M; Alfredsson, G A; Matsuzawa, H

    1999-03-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase purified from cultures of a psychrotrophic Vibrio species (strain PA-44) belongs to the proteinase K family of the superfamily of subtilisin-like proteinases. The enzyme is secreted as a 47-kDa protein, but under mild heat treatment (30 min at 40 degrees C) undergoes autoproteolytic cleavage on the carboxyl-side of the molecule to give a proteinase with a molecular mass of about 36 kDa that apparently shares most of the enzymatic characteristics and the stability of the 47-kDa protein. In this study, selected enzymatic properties of the Vibrio proteinase were compared with those of the related proteinases, proteinase K and aqualysin I, as representative mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for the amidase activity of the cold-adapted enzyme against succinyl-AAPF-p-nitroanilide was significantly higher than that of its mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, especially when compared with aqualysin I. The stability of the Vibrio proteinase, both towards heat and denaturants, was found to be significantly lower than of either proteinase K or aqualysin I. One or more disulfide bonds in the psychrotrophic proteinase are important for the integrity of the active enzyme structure, as disulfide cleavage, either by reduction with dithiothreitol or by sulfitolysis, led to a loss in its activity. Under the same conditions, aqualysin I was also partially inactivated by dithiothreitol, but the activity of proteinase K was unaffected. The disulfides of either proteinase K or aqualysin I were not reactive towards sulfitolysis, except under denaturing conditions, while all disulfides of the Vibrio proteinase reacted in absence of a denaturant. The reactivity of the disulfides of the proteins as a function of denaturant concentration followed the order: Vibrio proteinase > proteinase K > aqualysin I. The same order of reactivity was also observed for the inactivation of the enzymes by H2O2

  6. Biodegradation of propionitrile by Klebsiella oxytoca immobilized in alginate and cellulose triacetate gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Chen, S C; Fingas, M; Kao, C M

    2010-05-15

    A microbial process for the degradation of propionitrile by Klebsiella oxytoca was studied. The microorganism, K. oxytoca, was isolated from the discharged wastewater of metal plating factory in southern Taiwan and adapted for propionitrile biodegradation. The free and immobilized cells of K. oxytoca were then examined for their capabilities on degrading propionitrile under various conditions. Alginate (AL) and cellulose triacetate (CT) techniques were applied for the preparation of immobilized cells. The efficiency and produced metabolic intermediates and end-products of propionitrile degradation were monitored in bath and continuous bioreactor experiments. Results reveal that up to 100 and 150 mM of propionitrile could be removed completely by the free and immobilized cell systems, respectively. Furthermore, both immobilized cell systems show higher removal efficiencies in wider ranges of temperature (20-40 degrees C) and pH (6-8) compared with the free cell system. Results also indicate that immobilized cell system could support a higher cell density to enhance the removal efficiency of propionitrile. Immobilized cells were reused in five consecutive degradation experiments, and up to 99% of propionitrile degradation was observed in each batch test. This suggests that the activity of immobilized cells can be maintained and reused throughout different propionitrile degradation processes. A two-step pathway was observed for the biodegradation of propionitrile. Propionamide was first produced followed by propionic acid and ammonia. Results suggest that nitrile hydratase and amidase were involved in the degradation pathways of K. oxytoca. In the continuous bioreactor, both immobilized cells were capable of removing 150 mM of propionitriles completely within 16h, and the maximum propionitriles removal rates using AL and CT immobilized beads were 5.04 and 4.98 mM h(-1), respectively. Comparing the removal rates obtained from batch experiments with immobilized cells

  7. Kinetically Controlled Synthesis of Cefaclor using Penicillin G Acylase%酶法合成头孢克罗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柳; 魏东芝; 薛屏; 卢冠忠

    2003-01-01

    Enzymatic synthesis of cefaclor from 7-aminodesacetoxymethyl-3-chlorocephalosporanic acid (7-ACCA) and phenylglycine derivatives using penicillin G acylase was studied. Many factors that affect the conversion of 7-ACCA to cefaclor were examined. The immobilized enzyme from Bacillis megaterium gave a better catalytic properties and the higher conversion was obtained using phenylglycine methyl ester (PGME) as acyl donor. And the external mass transfer limitation could be eliminated when the stirring rate was more than 150 r/min. Low temperature was beneficial for the synthesis and the results showed that the synthetase activity was hardly influenced by temperature while the amidase activity was affected greatly by temperature. The optimum reaction conditions were determined at pH 6.5 and 10 ℃, respectively. The best 7-ACCA conversion of 56% was achieved when the initial concentration of 7-ACCA and PGME was at 50 mM and 150 mM, respectively.%以7-氨基去乙酰氧甲基-3-氯头孢烷酸(7-ACCA)和苯甘氨酸衍生物为底物, 利用青霉素酰化酶酶促合成头孢克罗(cefaclor). 对影响转化率的各种因素进行了考察. 来源于巨大芽孢杆菌的固定化酶催化头孢克罗合成的能力较好, 以苯甘氨酸甲酯(PGME)为底物较酰氨的效果好. 当搅拌转速超过150 r/min时, 外扩散限制可被消除. 实验表明: 低温有利于头孢克罗的合成, 青霉素酰化酶的合成酶活受温度影响较小, 而水解酶活受温度影响较大. 在pH6.5 和10 ℃下, 当7-ACCA和PGME浓度分别为50mM, 100mM时, 转化率可达56%.

  8. Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages ΦCP39O and ΦCP26F: genomic organization and proteomic analysis of the virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Bruce S; Fouts, Derrick E; Simmons, Mustafa; Garrish, Johnna K; Kuntz, Robin L; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M; Kropinski, Andrew M; Ackermann, Hans-W; Siragusa, Gregory R

    2011-01-01

    Poultry intestinal material, sewage and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages. Viruses isolated from broiler chicken offal washes (O) and poultry feces (F), designated ΦCP39O and ΦCP26F, respectively, produced clear plaques on host strains. Both bacteriophages had isometric heads of 57 nm in diameter with 100-nm non-contractile tails characteristic of members of the family Siphoviridae in the order Caudovirales. The double-strand DNA genome of bacteriophage ΦCP39O was 38,753 base pairs (bp), while the ΦCP26F genome was 39,188 bp, with an average GC content of 30.3%. Both viral genomes contained 62 potential open reading frames (ORFs) predicted to be encoded on one strand. Among the ORFs, 29 predicted proteins had no known similarity while others encoded putative bacteriophage capsid components such as a pre-neck/appendage, tail, tape measure and portal proteins. Other genes encoded a predicted DNA primase, single-strand DNA-binding protein, terminase, thymidylate synthase and a transcription factor. Potential lytic enzymes such as a fibronectin-binding autolysin, an amidase/hydrolase and a holin were encoded in the viral genomes. Several ORFs encoded proteins that gave BLASTP matches with proteins from Clostridium spp. and other Gram-positive bacterial and bacteriophage genomes as well as unknown putative Collinsella aerofaciens proteins. Proteomics analysis of the purified viruses resulted in the identification of the putative pre-neck/appendage protein and a minor structural protein encoded by large open reading frames. Variants of the portal protein were identified, and several mycobacteriophage gp6-like protein variants were detected in large amounts relative to other virion proteins. The predicted amino acid sequences of the pre-neck/appendage proteins had major differences in the central portion of the protein between the two phage gene products. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the large

  9. Bacterial genes in the aphid genome: absence of functional gene transfer from Buchnera to its host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruo Nikoh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome reduction is typical of obligate symbionts. In cellular organelles, this reduction partly reflects transfer of ancestral bacterial genes to the host genome, but little is known about gene transfer in other obligate symbioses. Aphids harbor anciently acquired obligate mutualists, Buchnera aphidicola (Gammaproteobacteria, which have highly reduced genomes (420-650 kb, raising the possibility of gene transfer from ancestral Buchnera to the aphid genome. In addition, aphids often harbor other bacteria that also are potential sources of transferred genes. Previous limited sampling of genes expressed in bacteriocytes, the specialized cells that harbor Buchnera, revealed that aphids acquired at least two genes from bacteria. The newly sequenced genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, presents the first opportunity for a complete inventory of genes transferred from bacteria to the host genome in the context of an ancient obligate symbiosis. Computational screening of the entire A. pisum genome, followed by phylogenetic and experimental analyses, provided strong support for the transfer of 12 genes or gene fragments from bacteria to the aphid genome: three LD-carboxypeptidases (LdcA1, LdcA2,psiLdcA, five rare lipoprotein As (RlpA1-5, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiD, 1,4-beta-N-acetylmuramidase (bLys, DNA polymerase III alpha chain (psiDnaE, and ATP synthase delta chain (psiAtpH. Buchnera was the apparent source of two highly truncated pseudogenes (psiDnaE and psiAtpH. Most other transferred genes were closely related to genes from relatives of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria. At least eight of the transferred genes (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5, bLys appear to be functional, and expression of seven (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5 are highly upregulated in bacteriocytes. The LdcAs and RlpAs appear to have been duplicated after transfer. Our results excluded the hypothesis that genome reduction in Buchnera has been accompanied by gene transfer to the

  10. Transcriptional Analysis and Subcellular Protein Localization Reveal Specific Features of the Essential WalKR System in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupel, Olivier; Moyat, Mati; Groizeleau, Julie; Antunes, Luísa C S; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Msadek, Tarek; Dubrac, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The WalKR two-component system, controlling cell wall metabolism, is highly conserved among Bacilli and essential for cell viability. In Staphylococcus aureus, walR and walK are followed by three genes of unknown function: walH, walI and walJ. Sequence analysis and transcript mapping revealed a unique genetic structure for this locus in S. aureus: the last gene of the locus, walJ, is transcribed independently, whereas transcription of the tetra-cistronic walRKHI operon occurred from two independent promoters located upstream from walR. Protein topology analysis and protein-protein interactions in E. coli as well as subcellular localization in S. aureus allowed us to show that WalH and WalI are membrane-bound proteins, which associate with WalK to form a complex at the cell division septum. While these interactions suggest that WalH and WalI play a role in activity of the WalKR regulatory pathway, deletion of walH and/or walI did not have a major effect on genes whose expression is strongly dependent on WalKR or on associated phenotypes. No effect of WalH or WalI was seen on tightly controlled WalKR regulon genes such as sle1 or saouhsc_00773, which encodes a CHAP-domain amidase. Of the genes encoding the two major S. aureus autolysins, AtlA and Sle1, only transcription of atlA was increased in the ΔwalH or ΔwalI mutants. Likewise, bacterial autolysis was not increased in the absence of WalH and/or WalI and biofilm formation was lowered rather than increased. Our results suggest that contrary to their major role as WalK inhibitors in B. subtilis, the WalH and WalI proteins have evolved a different function in S. aureus, where they are more accessory. A phylogenomic analysis shows a striking conservation of the 5 gene wal cluster along the evolutionary history of Bacilli, supporting the key importance of this signal transduction system, and indicating that the walH and walI genes were lost in the ancestor of Streptococcaceae, leading to their atypical 3 wal gene

  11. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project was focused on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate deaminase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative C-N bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments resulted in the isolation of microbial cultures that utilize aromatic amides as sole nitrogen sources, several amidase genes were cloned and were included in directed evolution experiments to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. During the second year of the project (October, 2003-September, 2004) enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating a mixed bacterial culture that can utilize 2-aminobiphenyl as a sole nitrogen source, directed evolution experiments were focused on the aniline dioxygenase enzyme that is capable of deaminating aniline, and expression vectors were constructed to enable the expression of genes encoding C-N bond cleaving enzymes in Rhodococcus hosts. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the

  12. Dual-lifetime referencing (DLR: a powerful method for on-line measurement of internal pH in carrier-bound immobilized biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniello Caterina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Industrial-scale biocatalytic synthesis of fine chemicals occurs preferentially as continuous processes employing immobilized enzymes on insoluble porous carriers. Diffusional effects in these systems often create substrate and product concentration gradients between bulk liquid and the carrier. Moreover, some widely-used biotransformation processes induce changes in proton concentration. Unlike the bulk pH, which is usually controlled at a suitable value, the intraparticle pH of immobilized enzymes may deviate significantly from its activity and stability optima. The magnitude of the resulting pH gradient depends on the ratio of characteristic times for enzymatic reaction and on mass transfer (the latter is strongly influenced by geometrical features of the porous carrier. Design and selection of optimally performing enzyme immobilizates would therefore benefit largely from experimental studies of the intraparticle pH environment. Here, a simple and non-invasive method based on dual-lifetime referencing (DLR for pH determination in immobilized enzymes is introduced. The technique is applicable to other systems in which particles are kept in suspension by agitation. Results The DLR method employs fluorescein as pH-sensitive luminophore and Ru(II tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenantroline, abbreviated Ru(dpp, as the reference luminophore. Luminescence intensities of the two luminophores are converted into an overall phase shift suitable for pH determination in the range 5.0-8.0. Sepabeads EC-EP were labeled by physically incorporating lipophilic variants of the two luminophores into their polymeric matrix. These beads were employed as carriers for immobilization of cephalosporin C amidase (a model enzyme of industrial relevance. The luminophores did not interfere with the enzyme immobilization characteristics. Analytical intraparticle pH determination was optimized for sensitivity, reproducibility and signal stability under

  13. Microbial/enzymatic synthesis of chiral drug intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R N

    2000-01-01

    intermediates required for total chemical synthesis of a beta 3 receptor agonist was demonstrated. These include: (a) microbial reduction of 4-benzyloxy-3-methanesulfonylamino-2'-bromoacetophenone 9 to corresponding (R)-alcohol 10 by S. paucimobilis SC16113, (b) enzymatic resolution of racemic alpha-methyl phenylalanine amide 11 and alpha-methyl-4-hydroxyphenylalanine amide 13 by amidase from M. neoaurum ATCC 25795 to prepare corresponding (S)-amino acids 12 and 14, and (c) asymmetric hydrolysis of methyl-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propanedioic acid ethyl diester 15 to corresponding (S)-monoester 16 by pig liver esterase. (S)[1-(acetoxyl)-4-(3-phenyl)butyl]phosphonic acid diethyl ester 21, a key chiral intermediate required for total chemical synthesis of BMS-188494 (an anticholesterol drug) was prepared by stereoselective acetylation of racemic [1-(hydroxy)-4-(3-phenyl)butyl]phosphonic acid diethyl ester 22 using G. candidum lipase. Lipase-catalyzed stereoselective acetylation of racemic 7-[N,N'-bis-(benzyloxy-carbonyl)N-(guanidinoheptanoyl)]-alpha-hydroxy-glycine 24 to corresponding S-(-)-acetate 25 was demonstrated. S-(-)-acetate 25 is a key intermediate for total chemical synthesis of (-)-15-deoxyspergualin 23, an immunosuppressive agent and antitumor antibiotic. Stereoselective microbial reduction of (1S)[3-chloro-2-oxo-1-(phenyl-methyl)propyl] carbamic acid, 1,1-dimethyl-ethyl ester 26 to corresponding chiral alcohol 27a (a key chiral intermediate for HIV protease inhibitors) was also demonstrated. Stereospecific enzymatic hydrolysis of racemic epoxide RS-1-[2',3'-dihydro benzo[b]furan-4'-yl]-1,2-oxirane 29 the corresponding R-diol 30 and unreacted chiral S-epoxide 28 was demonstrated using R. glutinis and A. niger. Dynamic resolution of racemic diol RS-1-[2',3'-dihydrobenzo[b]furan-4'-yl]-ethane-1,2-diol 32 to corresponding S-diol S-1-[2',3'-dihydrobenzo[b]furan-4'-yl]-ethane-1,2-diol 31 was demonstrated using C. boidinii and P. methanolica. Chiral (S)-epoxide 28 and (S)-diol 31