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Sample records for amidases

  1. Purification and characterization of amidase from acrylamide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An amidase from a newly isolated acrylamide-degrading bacterium Burkholderia sp. strain DR.Y27 was purified to homogeneity by a combination of anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The purification strategy achieved 11.15 of purification fold and a yield of 1.55%. The purified amidase consisted of four ...

  2. The solution of nitrogen inversion in amidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrén, Per-Olof

    2013-07-01

    An important mechanistic aspect of enzyme catalyzed amide bond hydrolysis is the specific orientation of the lone pair of the nitrogen of the scissile amide bond during catalysis. As discussed in the literature during the last decades, stereoelectronic effects cause the single lone pair in the formed tetrahedral intermediate to be situated in a non-productive conformation in the enzyme active site and hence nitrogen inversion or rotation is necessary. By discussing recent mechanistic findings in the literature relevant for the conformation of the lone pair of the reacting amide nitrogen atom, it will be demonstrated that nature has evolved at least two catalytic strategies to cope with the stereoelectronic constraints inherent to amide bond hydrolysis regardless of the fold or catalytic mechanism. One solution to the inversion problem is to stabilize the transition state of inversion by hydrogen bond formation; another is to introduce a concerted proton shuttle mechanism that avoids inversion and delivers a hydrogen to the lone pair. By using molecular modeling it is demonstrated that the H-bond strategy is general and can be expanded to include many amidases/proteases with important metabolic functions, including the proteasome. Some examples of the proton shuttle mechanism will also be mentioned. To complete the picture of efficient enzyme catalyzed amide bond hydrolysis, general interactions in the active site of these catalysts will be discussed. An expanded knowledge of the prerequisites of efficient amide bond hydrolysis beyond the oxyanion hole and the catalytic dyad/triad will be of importance for enzyme and drug design. © 2013 The Author Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  3. Kallikrein-like amidase activity in renal ischemia and reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Carattino

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We assessed a kallikrein-like amidase activity probably related to the kallikrein-kinin system, as well as the participation of leukocyte infiltration in renal ischemia and reperfusion. Male C57BL/KSJmdb mice were subjected to 20 or 60 min of ischemia and to different periods of reperfusion. A control group consisted of sham-operated mice, under similar conditions, except for ischemia induction. Kallikrein-like amidase activity, Evans blue extravasation and myeloperoxidase activity were measured in kidney homogenates, previously perfused with 0.9% NaCl. Plasma creatinine concentration increased only in the 60-min ischemic group. After 20 min of ischemia and 1 or 24 h of reperfusion, no change in kallikrein-like amidase activity or Evans blue extravasation was observed. In the mice subjected to 20 min of ischemia, edema was evident at 1 h of reperfusion, but kidney water content returned to basal levels after 24 h of reperfusion. In the 60-min ischemic group, kallikrein-like amidase activity and Evans blue extravasation showed a similar significant increase along reperfusion time. Kallikrein-like amidase activity increased from 4 nmol PNA mg protein-1 min-1 in the basal condition to 15 nmol PNA mg protein-1 min-1 at 10 h of reperfusion. For dye extravasation the concentration measured was near 200 µg of Evans blue/g dry tissue in the basal condition and 1750 µg of Evans blue/g dry tissue at 10 h of reperfusion. No variation could be detected in the control group. A significant increase from 5 to 40 units of DAbs 655 nm g wet tissue-1 min-1 in the activity of the enzyme myeloperoxidase was observed in the 60-min ischemic group, when it was evaluated after 24 h of reperfusion. Histological analysis of the kidneys showed migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from the vascular bed to the interstitial tissue in the 60-min ischemic group after 24 h of reperfusion. We conclude that the duration of ischemia is critical for the development of damage

  4. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  5. Structural Insights into the Catalytic Active Site and Activity of Human Nit2/ω-Amidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Hsiang; Gao, Quan-Ze; Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Lyu, Jyun-Hong; Sheu, Sheh-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Human nitrilase-like protein 2 (hNit2) is a putative tumor suppressor, recently identified as ω-amidase. hNit2/ω-amidase plays a crucial metabolic role by catalyzing the hydrolysis of α-ketoglutaramate (the α-keto analog of glutamine) and α-ketosuccinamate (the α-keto analog of asparagine), yielding α-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate, respectively. Transamination between glutamine and α-keto-γ-methiolbutyrate closes the methionine salvage pathway. Thus, hNit2/ω-amidase links sulfur metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate the catalytic specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild type enzyme and its mutants to investigate enzyme-substrate interactions. Binding free energies were computed to characterize factors contributing to the substrate specificity. The predictions resulting from these computations were verified by kinetic analyses and mutational studies. The activity of hNit2/ω-amidase was determined with α-ketoglutaramate and succinamate as substrates. We constructed three catalytic triad mutants (E43A, K112A, and C153A) and a mutant with a loop 116–128 deletion to validate the role of key residues and the 116–128 loop region in substrate binding and turnover. The molecular dynamics simulations successfully verified the experimental trends in the binding specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase toward various substrates. Our findings have revealed novel structural insights into the binding of substrates to hNit2/ω-amidase. A catalytic triad and the loop residues 116–128 of hNit2 play an essential role in supporting the stability of the enzyme-substrate complex, resulting in the generation of the catalytic products. These observations are predicted to be of benefit in the design of new inhibitors or activators for research involving cancer and hyperammonemic diseases. PMID:22674578

  6. Competitive adsorptions of nitrile hydratase and amidase on polyacrylonitrile and its effect on surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Vikash; Choudhury, Bijan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, enzymatic surface modification of polyacrylonitrile was studied using nitrile metabolizing enzyme of Amycolatopsis sp. IITR 215. During enzymatic treatment of polyacrylonitrile at pH of 5.8 and 7, it was observed that the conversion of cyano group to carboxylic acid at pH 5.8 was three times higher than at pH 7. This difference in enzymatic treatment efficiency was explained by studying the differences in adsorption profiles of nitrile hydratase and amidase on polyacrylonitrile at pH of 5.8 and 7. Adsorption profiles were determined by monitoring the unbound activities of these two enzymes in the supernatant. From the specific activity profiles of bound nitrile hydratase and amidase it was concluded that more specific binding of nitrile hydratase was observed at pH 5.8 as compared to pH 7. In case of amidase, optimum adsorption was obtained at pH 5.8 within 5h whereas in case of pH 7 it was obtained within 20 h. Thus at pH 7, sequential adsorption of nitrile hydratase and amidase was observed and this adsorption profile was similar to the Vroman effect reported during plasma protein adsorption at solid-liquid interface. Ideally, specific nitrile hydratase adsorption followed by sequential adsorption of amidase may enhance higher conversion of cyano group to carboxylic acid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In silico screening of 393 mutants facilitates enzyme engineering of amidase activity in CalB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hediger, Martin Robert; De Vico, Luca; Rannes, Julie Bille

    2013-01-01

    Our previously presented method for high throughput computational screening of mutant activity (Hediger et al., 2012) is benchmarked against experimentally measured amidase activity for 22 mutants of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB). Using an appropriate cutoff criterion for the computed barrie...

  8. Crystallization, diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of hexagonal crystals of Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Jorge; Karmali, Amin; Carrondo, Maria A.; Frazão, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of aliphatic amidase (acylamide amidohydrolase; EC 3.5.1.4) from P. aeruginosa were obtained in space group P6 3 22 and diffracted to 1.25 Å resolution. The aliphatic amidase (acylamide amidohydrolase; EC 3.5.1.4) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a hexameric enzyme composed of six identical subunits with a molecular weight of ∼38 kDa. Since microbial amidases are very important enzymes in industrial biocatalysis, the structural characterization of this enzyme will help in the design of novel catalytic activities of commercial interest. The present study reports the successful crystallization of the wild-type amidase from P. aeruginosa. Native crystals were obtained and a complete data set was collected at 1.4 Å resolution, although the crystals showed diffraction to 1.25 Å resolution. The crystals were found to belong to space group P6 3 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.60, c = 151.71 Å, and contain one molecule in the asymmetric unit

  9. Biotransformation of benzonitrile herbicides via the nitrile hydratase-amidase pathway in rhodococci

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Pelantová, Helena; Šulc, Miroslav; Macková, M.; Lovecká, P.; Thimová, P.; Pasquarelli, F.; Pičmanová, Martina; Pátek, Miroslav; Bhalla, T. C.; Martínková, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2012), s. 1811-1819 ISSN 1367-5435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09046; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394; GA ČR GD305/09/H008 Keywords : Nitrile hydratase * Amidase * Benzonitrile herbicides Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.321, year: 2012

  10. Biotransformation of nitriles to hydroxamic acids via a nitrile hydratase–amidase cascade reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Martínková, Ludmila; Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Kaplan, Ondřej; Lutz-Wahl, S.; Fischer, L.; Uhnáková, Bronislava

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 71, 1-2 (2011), s. 51-55 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA MŠk OC09046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Nitrile hydratase * Rhodococcus erythropolis * Amidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.735, year: 2011

  11. Purification and Characterization of an L-Amino Amidase from Mycobacterium neoaurum ATCC 25795

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Tandler, R.F.; Sonke, T.; Dijkhuizen, L.; Meijer, E.M.

    An L-amino amidase from Mycobacterium neoaurum ATCC 25795 responsible for the enantioselective resolution of DL-α-methyl valine amide was purified and characterized. The purification procedure included ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion-exchange chromatography, which resulted

  12. Increasing plant growth by modulating omega-amidase expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2015-06-30

    The present disclosure relates to compositions and methods for increasing the leaf-to-root ratio of the signal metabolite 2-oxoglutaramate and related proline molecules in plants by modulating levels of .omega.-amidase to increase nitrogen use efficiency, resulting in enhanced growth, faster growth rates, greater seed and fruit/pod yields, earlier and more productive flowering, increased tolerance to high salt conditions, and increased biomass yields.

  13. Immobilization of fungal nitrilase and bacterial amidase – two enzymes working in accord

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Kaplan, Ondřej; Kubáč, David; Křen, Vladimír; Martínková, Ludmila

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2006), s. 414-418 ISSN 1024-2422 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA ČR GA203/05/2267; GA MŠk 1P05OC073; GA MŠk OC D25.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : amidase * 4-cyanopyridine * isonicotinic acid Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.437, year: 2006

  14. A breakthrough in enzyme technology to fight penicillin resistance-industrial application of penicillin amidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic penicillin hydrolysis by penicillin amidase (also penicillin acylase, PA) represents a Landmark: the first industrially and economically highly important process using an immobilized biocatalyst. Resistance of infective bacteria to antibiotics had become a major topic of research and industrial activities. Solutions to this problem, the antibiotics resistance of infective microorganisms, required the search for new antibiotics, but also the development of derivatives, notably penicillin derivatives, that overcame resistance. An obvious route was to hydrolyse penicillin to 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), as a first step, for the introduction via chemical synthesis of various different side chains. Hydrolysis via chemical reaction sequences was tedious requiring large amounts of toxic chemicals, and they were cost intensive. Enzymatic hydrolysis using penicillin amidase represented a much more elegant route. The basis for such a solution was the development of techniques for enzyme immobilization, a highly difficult task with respect to industrial application. Two pioneer groups started to develop solutions to this problem in the late 1960s and 1970s: that of Günter Schmidt-Kastner at Bayer AG (Germany) and that of Malcolm Lilly of Imperial College London. Here, one example of this development, that at Bayer, will be presented in more detail since it illustrates well the achievement of a solution to the problems of industrial application of enzymatic processes, notably development of an immobilization method for penicillin amidase suitable for scale up to application in industrial reactors under economic conditions. A range of bottlenecks and technical problems of large-scale application had to be overcome. Data giving an inside view of this pioneer achievement in the early phase of the new field of biocatalysis are presented. The development finally resulted in a highly innovative and commercially important enzymatic process to produce 6-APA that

  15. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye-Yeon [Protein Structure Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Ochang, Chungbuk, 363-883 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung Heon [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Geol, E-mail: igchoi@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr{sup 136} and Thr{sup 330}) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys{sup 84} as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser{sup 187} nucleophile in the catalytic triad. - Highlights: • We determined the first structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13). • Structure revealed spatially distinct architecture of the substrate-binding pocket. • Hydrogen-bonding with Tyr{sup 136} and Thr{sup 330} mediates ligand-binding and substrate.

  16. Structure and mechanism of Escherichia coli glutathionylspermidine amidase belonging to the family of cysteine; histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Chien-Hua; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2011-01-01

    The bifunctional Escherichia coli glutathionylspermidine synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Its amidase domain (GspA), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of Gsp into glutathione and spermidine, plays an important role in redox sensing and protein S-thiolation. To gain insight of the regulation and catalytic mechanism of and further understand the recycling of the Gsp dimer and Gsp-S-protein adducts, we solved two crystal structures of GspA and GspSA bot...

  17. The Drosophila amidase PGRP-LB modulates the immune response to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Rémy, Anna; Hervé, Mireille; Poidevin, Mickael; Pili-Floury, Sébastien; Kim, Min-Sung; Blanot, Didier; Oh, Byung-Ha; Ueda, Ryu; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2006-04-01

    The Drosophila host defense against gram-negative bacteria is mediated by the Imd pathway upon sensing of peptidoglycan by the peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP)-LC. Here we report a functional analysis of PGRP-LB, a catalytic member of the PGRP family. We show that PGRP-LB is a secreted protein regulated by the Imd pathway. Biochemical studies demonstrate that PGRP-LB is an amidase that specifically degrades gram-negative bacteria peptidoglycan. In agreement with its amidase activity, PGRP-LB downregulates the Imd pathway. Hence, activation of PGRP-LB by the Imd pathway provides a negative feedback regulation to tightly adjust immune activation to infection. Our study also reveals that PGRP-LB controls the immune reactivity of flies to the presence of ingested bacteria in the gut. Our work highlights the key role of PGRPs that encode both sensors and scavengers of peptidoglycan, which modulate the level of the host immune response to the presence of infectious microorganisms.

  18. Expression control of nitrile hydratase and amidase genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis and substrate specificities of the enzymes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rucká, Lenka; Volkova, Olga; Pavlík, Adam; Kaplan, Ondřej; Kracík, M.; Nešvera, Jan; Martínková, Ludmila; Pátek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 6 (2014), s. 1179-1190 ISSN 0003-6072 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Rhodococcus erythropolis * Amidase * Nitrile hydratase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2014

  19. High-yield continuous production of nicotinic acid via nitrile hydratase–amidase cascade reactions using cascade CSMRs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cantarella, L.; Gallifuoco, A.; Malandra, A.; Martínková, Ludmila; Spera, A.; Cantarella, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 48, 4-5 (2011), 345-350 ISSN 0141-0229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Nitrile hydratase-amidase cascade system * 3-Cyanopyridine bioconversion * Nicotinic acid Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.367, year: 2011

  20. PL3 Amidase, a Tailor-made Lysin Constructed by Domain Shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas Blázquez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is pushing the need of alternative treatments. In this context, phage therapy is already a reality to successfully fight certain multiresistant bacteria. Among different phage gene products, murein hydrolases responsible of phage progeny liberation (also called lysins or endolysins are weapons that target specific peptidoglycan bonds, leading to lysis and death of susceptible bacteria when added from the outside. In the pneumococcal system, all but one phage murein hydrolases reported to date share a choline-binding domain that recognizes cell walls containing choline residues in the (lipoteichoic acids. Some purified pneumococcal or phage murein hydrolases, as well as several chimeric proteins combining natural catalytic and cell wall-binding domains have been used as effective antimicrobials. In this work we have constructed a novel chimeric N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (PL3 by fusing the catalytic domain of the Pal amidase (a phage-coded endolysin to the cell wall-binding domain of the LytA amidase, the major pneumococcal autolysin. The physicochemical properties of PL3 and the bacteriolytic effect against several pneumococci (including 48 multiresistant representative strain and related species, like Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis, have been studied. Results have shown that low doses of PL3, in the range of 0.5–5 µg/ml, are enough to practically sterilize all choline-containing strains tested. Moreover, a single 20-µg dose of PL3 fully protected zebrafish embryos from infection by S. pneumoniae D39 strain. Importantly, PL3 keeps 95% enzymatic activity after four weeks at 37ºC and can be lyophilized without losing activity, demonstrating a remarkable robustness. Such stability, together with a prominent efficacy against a narrow spectrum of human pathogens, confers to PL3 the characteristic to be an effective therapeutic. In

  1. Protein S-Thiolation by Glutathionylspermidine (Gsp): THE ROLE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI Gsp SYNTHETASE/AMIDASE IN REDOX REGULATION*

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Bing-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Pai, Chien-Hua; Chou, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-He; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chang, Chun-Yang; Wu, Whei-Fen; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Certain bacteria synthesize glutathionylspermidine (Gsp), from GSH and spermidine. Escherichia coli Gsp synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Prior to the work reported herein, the physiological role(s) of Gsp or how the two opposing GspSA activities are regulated had not been elucidated. We report that Gsp-modified proteins from E. coli contain mixed disulfides of Gsp and protein thiols, representing a new type of post-translational modification forme...

  2. Ammonium acrylate biomanufacturing by an engineered Rhodococcus ruber with nitrilase overexpression and double-knockout of nitrile hydratase and amidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jizhe; Yu, Huimin; Chen, Jie; Luo, Hui; Shen, Zhongyao

    2016-12-01

    Rhodococcus ruber TH was selected as a parent strain to engineer for biomanufacturing of ammonium acrylate; the characteristics of this strain included accelerated growth rate, high cell tolerance and natively overexpressed nitrile hydratase (NHase). Transcriptome analysis revealed that the transcription levels of the native NHase, amidase and nitrilase were extremely high, moderate and extremely low, respectively. Through NHase-amidase double-knockout and amidase single-knockout, the engineered strains R. ruber THdAdN and R. ruber THdA were obtained for overexpression of a heterologous nitrilase from R. rhodochrous tg1-A6 using a urea-induced Pa2 promoter. The nitrilase activity toward substrate acrylonitrile in the engineered THdAdN(Nit) reached 187.0 U/mL at 42 h, threefold of that R. rhodochrous tg1-A6 and 2.3-fold of that of THdA(Nit). The optimal catalysis temperature and pH of the nitrilases in different cells exhibited no significant difference. Using the cells as catalysts, biomanufacturing of ammonium acrylate was performed under room temperature. When catalyzed by the engineered THdAdN(Nit), the titer and productivity of ammonium acrylate dramatically increased to 741.0 g/L and 344.9 g/L/h, which are the highest results reported to date.

  3. Protein S-thiolation by Glutathionylspermidine (Gsp): the role of Escherichia coli Gsp synthetASE/amidase in redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Bing-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Pai, Chien-Hua; Chou, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-He; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chang, Chun-Yang; Wu, Whei-Fen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2010-08-13

    Certain bacteria synthesize glutathionylspermidine (Gsp), from GSH and spermidine. Escherichia coli Gsp synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Prior to the work reported herein, the physiological role(s) of Gsp or how the two opposing GspSA activities are regulated had not been elucidated. We report that Gsp-modified proteins from E. coli contain mixed disulfides of Gsp and protein thiols, representing a new type of post-translational modification formerly undocumented. The level of these proteins is increased by oxidative stress. We attribute the accumulation of such proteins to the selective inactivation of GspSA amidase activity. X-ray crystallography and a chemical modification study indicated that the catalytic cysteine thiol of the GspSA amidase domain is transiently inactivated by H(2)O(2) oxidation to sulfenic acid, which is stabilized by a very short hydrogen bond with a water molecule. We propose a set of reactions that explains how the levels of Gsp and Gsp S-thiolated proteins are modulated in response to oxidative stress. The hypersensitivities of GspSA and GspSA/glutaredoxin null mutants to H(2)O(2) support the idea that GspSA and glutaredoxin act synergistically to regulate the redox environment of E. coli.

  4. Selective N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase inhibition reveals a key role for endogenous palmitoylethanolamide in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorzano, Carlos; Zhu, Chenggang; Battista, Natalia; Astarita, Giuseppe; Lodola, Alessio; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco; Russo, Roberto; Maccarrone, Mauro; Antonietti, Francesca; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele

    2009-12-08

    Identifying points of control in inflammation is essential to discovering safe and effective antiinflammatory medicines. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a naturally occurring lipid amide that, when administered as a drug, inhibits inflammatory responses by engaging peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha). PEA is preferentially hydrolyzed by the cysteine amidase N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA), which is highly expressed in macrophages. Here we report the discovery of a potent and selective NAAA inhibitor, N-[(3S)-2-oxo-3-oxetanyl]-3-phenylpropanamide [(S)-OOPP], and show that this inhibitor increases PEA levels in activated leukocytes and blunts responses induced by inflammatory stimuli both in vitro and in vivo. These effects are stereoselective, mimicked by exogenous PEA, and abolished by PPAR-alpha deletion. (S)-OOPP also attenuates inflammation and tissue damage and improves recovery of motor function in mice subjected to spinal cord trauma. The results suggest that PEA activation of PPAR-alpha in leukocytes serves as an early stop signal that contrasts the progress of inflammation. The PEA-hydrolyzing amidase NAAA may provide a previously undescribed target for antiinflammatory medicines.

  5. Mechanism-Guided Discovery of an Esterase Scaffold with Promiscuous Amidase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Kürten

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and generation of biocatalysts with extended catalytic versatilities are of immense relevance in both chemistry and biotechnology. An enhanced atomistic understanding of enzyme promiscuity, a mechanism through which living systems acquire novel catalytic functions and specificities by evolution, would thus be of central interest. Using esterase-catalyzed amide bond hydrolysis as a model system, we pursued a simplistic in silico discovery program aiming for the identification of enzymes with an internal backbone hydrogen bond acceptor that could act as a reaction specificity shifter in hydrolytic enzymes. Focusing on stabilization of the rate limiting transition state of nitrogen inversion, our mechanism-guided approach predicted that the acyl hydrolase patatin of the α/β phospholipase fold would display reaction promiscuity. Experimental analysis confirmed previously unknown high amidase over esterase activity displayed by the first described esterase machinery with a protein backbone hydrogen bond acceptor to the reacting NH-group of amides. The present work highlights the importance of a fundamental understanding of enzymatic reactions and its potential for predicting enzyme scaffolds displaying alternative chemistries amenable to further evolution by enzyme engineering.

  6. Role of Two Cell Wall Amidases in Septal Junction and Nanopore Formation in the Multicellular Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bornikoel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cyanobacteria have developed a strategy to perform incompatible processes in one filament by differentiating specialized cell types, N2-fixing heterocysts and CO2-fixing, photosynthetic, vegetative cells. These bacteria can be considered true multicellular organisms with cells exchanging metabolites and signaling molecules via septal junctions, involving the SepJ and FraCD proteins. Previously, it was shown that the cell wall lytic N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase, AmiC2, is essential for cell–cell communication in Nostoc punctiforme. This enzyme perforates the septal peptidoglycan creating an array of nanopores, which may be the framework for septal junction complexes. In Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, two homologs of AmiC2, encoded by amiC1 and amiC2, were identified and investigated in two different studies. Here, we compare the function of both AmiC proteins by characterizing different Anabaena amiC mutants, which was not possible in N. punctiforme, because there the amiC1 gene could not be inactivated. This study shows the different impact of each protein on nanopore array formation, the process of cell–cell communication, septal protein localization, and heterocyst differentiation. Inactivation of either amidase resulted in significant reduction in nanopore count and in the rate of fluorescent tracer exchange between neighboring cells measured by FRAP analysis. In an amiC1 amiC2 double mutant, filament morphology was affected and heterocyst differentiation was abolished. Furthermore, the inactivation of amiC1 influenced SepJ localization and prevented the filament-fragmentation phenotype that is characteristic of sepJ or fraC fraD mutants. Our findings suggest that both amidases are to some extent redundant in their function, and describe a functional relationship of AmiC1 and septal proteins SepJ and FraCD.

  7. The Structure of Allophanate Hydrolase from Granulibacter bethesdensis Provides Insights into Substrate Specificity in the Amidase Signature Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Maurice, Martin [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2013-01-02

    Allophanate hydrolase (AH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of allophanate, an intermediate in atrazine degradation and urea catabolism pathways, to NH3 and CO2. AH belongs to the amidase signature family, which is characterized by a conserved block of 130 amino acids rich in Gly and Ser and a Ser-cis-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. In this study, the first structures of AH fromGranulibacter bethesdensis were determined, with and without the substrate analogue malonate, to 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures confirm the identity of the catalytic triad residues and reveal an altered dimerization interface that is not conserved in the amidase signature family. The structures also provide insights into previously unrecognized substrate specificity determinants in AH. Two residues, Tyr299 and Arg307, are within hydrogen bonding distance of a carboxylate moiety of malonate. Both Tyr299 and Arg307 were mutated, and the resulting modified enzymes revealed >3 order of magnitude reductions in both catalytic efficiency and substrate stringency. It is proposed that Tyr299 and Arg307 serve to anchor and orient the substrate for attack by the catalytic nucleophile, Ser172. The structure further suggests the presence of a unique C-terminal domain in AH. While this domain is conserved, it does not contribute to catalysis or to the structural integrity of the core domain, suggesting that it may play a role in mediating transient and specific interactions with the urea carboxylase component of urea amidolyase. Analysis of the AH active site architecture offers new insights into common determinants of catalysis and specificity among divergent members of the amidase signature family.

  8. Improved penicillin amidase production using a genetically engineered mutant of escherichia coli ATCC 11105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robas, N.; Zouheiry, H.; Branlant, G.; Branlant, C. (Univ. de Nancy I, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France))

    1993-01-05

    Penicillin G amidase (PGA) is a key enzyme for the industrial production of penicillin G derivatives used in therapeutics. Escherichia coli ATCC 11105 is the more commonly used strain for PGA production. To improve enzyme yield, the authors constructed various recombinant E. coli HB 101 and ATCC 11105 strains. For each strain, PGA production was determined for various concentrations of glucose and phenylacetic acid (PAA) in the medium. The E. coli strain, G271, was identified as the best performer (800 U NIPAB/L). This strain was obtained as follows: an E. coli ATCC 11105 mutant (E. coli G133) was first selected based on a low negative effect of glucose on PGA production. This mutant was then transformed with a pBR322 derivative containing the PGA gene. Various experiments were made to try to understand the reason for the high productivity of E. coli G271. The host strain, E. coli G133, was found to be mutated in one (or more) gene(s) whose product(s) act(s) in trans on the PGA gene expression. Its growth is not inhibited by high glucose concentration in the medium. Interestingly, whereas glucose still exerts some negative effect on the PGA production by E. coli G133, PGA production by its transformant (E. coli G271) is stimulated by glucose. The reason for this stimulation is discussed. Transformation of E. coli G133 with a pBR322 derivative containing the HindIII fragment of the PGA gene, showed that the performance of E. coli G271 depends both upon the host strain properties and the plasmid structure. Study of the production by the less efficient E. coli HB101 derivatives brought some light on the mechanism of regulation of the PGA gene.

  9. Application of continuous stirred membrane reactor to 3-cyanopyridine bioconversion using the nitrile hydratase–amidase cascade system of Microbacterium imperiale CBS 498-74

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cantarella, L.; Gallifuoco, A.; Malandra, A.; Martínková, Ludmila; Pasquarelli, F.; Spera, A.; Cantarella, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2010), s. 64-70 ISSN 0141-0229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Nitrile hydratase-amidase cascade system * 3-Cyanopyridine bioconversion * Nicotinamide Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.287, year: 2010

  10. A metagenomic study highlights phylogenetic proximity of quorum-quenching and xenobiotic-degrading amidases of the AS-family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Tannières

    Full Text Available Quorum-sensing (QS signals of the N-acylhomoserine lactone (NAHL class are cleaved by quorum-quenching enzymes, collectively named NAHLases. Here, functional metagenomics allowed the discovery of a novel bacterial NAHLase in a rhizosphere that was treated with γ-caprolactone. As revealed by rrs-DGGE and rrs-pyrosequencing, this treatment increased the percentage of the NAHL-degrading bacteria and strongly biased the structure of the bacterial community, among which Azospirillum dominated. Among the 29 760 fosmids of the metagenomic library, a single one was detected that expressed the qsdB gene conferring NAHL-degradation upon E. coli and decreased QS-regulated virulence in Pectobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis of the 34 orfs of the fosmid suggested that it would belong to an unknown Proteobacterium - probably a γ-proteobacterium. qPCR quantification of the NAHLase-encoding genes attM, qsdA, and qsdB revealed their higher abundance in the γ-caprolactone-treated rhizosphere as compared to an untreated control. The purified QsdB enzyme exhibited amidase activity. QsdB is the first amidase signature (AS family member exhibiting NAHLase-activity. Point mutations in the AS-family catalytic triad K-S-S abolished the NAHLase activity of QsdB. This study extends the diversity of NAHLases and highlights a common phylogenic origin of AS-family enzymes involved in the degradation of natural compounds, such as NAHLs, and xenobiotics, such as nylon and linuron.

  11. Enabling cell-cell communication via nanopore formation: structure, function and localization of the unique cell wall amidase AmiC2 of Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Felix M; Faulhaber, Katharina; Forchhammer, Karl; Maldener, Iris; Stehle, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    To orchestrate a complex life style in changing environments, the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme facilitates communication between neighboring cells through septal junction complexes. This is achieved by nanopores that perforate the peptidoglycan (PGN) layer and traverse the cell septa. The N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase AmiC2 (Npun_F1846; EC 3.5.1.28) in N. punctiforme generates arrays of such nanopores in the septal PGN, in contrast to homologous amidases that mediate daughter cell separation after cell division in unicellular bacteria. Nanopore formation is therefore a novel property of AmiC homologs. Immunofluorescence shows that native AmiC2 localizes to the maturing septum. The high-resolution crystal structure (1.12 Å) of its catalytic domain (AmiC2-cat) differs significantly from known structures of cell splitting and PGN recycling amidases. A wide and shallow binding cavity allows easy access of the substrate to the active site, which harbors an essential zinc ion. AmiC2-cat exhibits strong hydrolytic activity in vitro. A single point mutation of a conserved glutamate near the zinc ion results in total loss of activity, whereas zinc removal leads to instability of AmiC2-cat. An inhibitory α-helix, as found in the Escherichia coli AmiC(E. coli) structure, is absent. Taken together, our data provide insight into the cell-biological, biochemical and structural properties of an unusual cell wall lytic enzyme that generates nanopores for cell-cell communication in multicellular cyanobacteria. The novel structural features of the catalytic domain and the unique biological function of AmiC2 hint at mechanisms of action and regulation that are distinct from other amidases. The AmiC2-cat structure has been deposited in the Protein Data Bank under accession number 5EMI. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Transition state analogue imprinted polymers as artificial amidases for amino acid p-nitroanilides: morphological effects of polymer network on catalytic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Divya; Thomas, Benny; Devaky, K S

    2017-11-13

    The morphology of the polymer network - porous/less porous - plays predominant role in the amidase activities of the polymer catalysts in the hydrolytic reactions of amino acid p-nitroanilides. Polymers with the imprints of stable phosphonate analogue of the intermediate of hydrolytic reactions were synthesized as enzyme mimics. Molecular imprinting was carried out in thermodynamically stable porogen dimethyl sulphoxide and unstable porogen chloroform, to investigate the morphological effects of polymers on catalytic amidolysis. It was found that the medium of polymerization has vital influence in the amidase activities of the enzyme mimics. The morphological studies of the polymer catalysts were carried out by scanning electron microscopy and Bruner-Emmett-Teller analysis. The morphology of the polymer catalysts and their amidase activities are found to be dependent on the composition of reaction medium. The polymer catalyst prepared in dimethyl sulphoxide is observed to be efficient in 1:9 acetonitrile (ACN)-Tris HCl buffer and that prepared in chloroform is noticed to be stereo specifically and shape-selectively effective in 9:1 ACN-Tris HCl buffer. The solvent memory effect in catalytic amidolysis was investigated using the polymer prepared in acetonitrile.

  13. Latin-American Co-operation in Biotechnology Programme: Industrial penicillin amidase for 6 amino penicillanic acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Montoya C.

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates technological and economic transference related to the Production of Penicillin Amidase for use in 6 Amine Penicillanic acid (6-APA Production Project, wich is a part of the United Nations1 Regional Biotechnology Programme for Latin America and the Caribbean. This paper analyses the evolution of international cooperation by looking at the project's development. The methodology used includes analysis of: the project's development; participant and budgetary goals; results; copyright; project conditions; and sale of biocatalyst and 6-APA. All technical objectives were achieved; international co-operation, as well as co-operation between Industry and University were successful. Technological transference to the pilot plant was effective; many students involved in the project were simultaneously taking M.Sc. and Ph.D's courses. Nevertheless, neither the technology necessary for the biocatalyst's manufacture nor the biocatalyst itself were used. Analysis of the project has provided some orientation concerning those internal and external problems which arose during the development and sale of biotechnology in our countries and has tried to propose some alternatives for taking advantage of international co-operation.

  14. Amidase-responsive controlled release of antitumoral drug into intracellular media using gluconamide-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, Inmaculada; Aznar, Elena; Mondragón, Laura; Torre, Cristina De La; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Sancenón, Félix; Marcos, M. Dolores; Amorós, Pedro; Guillem, Carmen; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Costero, Ana; Gil, Salvador; Parra, Margarita

    2012-10-01

    MCM-41 silica nanoparticles were used as inorganic scaffolding to prepare a nanoscopic-capped hybrid material S1, which was able to release an entrapped cargo in the presence of certain enzymes, whereas in the absence of enzymes, a zero release system was obtained. S1 was prepared by loading nanoparticles with Safranine O dye and was then capped with a gluconamide derivative. In the absence of enzymes, the release of the dye from the aqueous suspensions of S1 was inhibited as a result of the steric hindrance imposed by the bulky gluconamide derivative, the polymerized gluconamide layer and the formation of a dense hydrogen-bonded network around the pore outlets. Upon the addition of amidase and pronase enzymes, delivery of Safranine O dye was observed due to the enzymatic hydrolysis of the amide bond in the anchored gluconamide derivative. S1 nanoparticles were not toxic for cells, as demonstrated by cell viability assays using HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines, and were associated with lysosomes, as shown by confocal microscopy. Finally, the S1-CPT material loaded with the cytotoxic drug camptothecin and capped with the gluconamide derivative was prepared. The HeLa cells treated with S1-CPT underwent cell death as a result of material internalization, and of the subsequent cellular enzyme-mediated hydrolysis and aperture of the molecular gate, which induced the release of the camptothecin cargo.

  15. New enzymatic method of chiral amino acid synthesis by dynamic kinetic resolution of amino acid amides: use of stereoselective amino acid amidases in the presence of alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam racemase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shigenori; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2007-08-01

    D- and L-amino acids were produced from L- and D-amino acid amides by D-aminopeptidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi C1-38 and L-amino acid amidase from Pseudomonas azotoformans IAM 1603, respectively, in the presence of alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam racemase from Achromobacter obae as the catalyst by dynamic kinetic resolution of amino acid amides.

  16. Structure determination by 1H NMR spectroscopy of (sulfated) sialylated N-linked carbohydrate chains released from porcine thyroglobulin by peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase-F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Waard, P. de; Koorevaar, A.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The N-linked carbohydrate chains of porcine thyroglobulin were released by peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase-F (PNGase- F). The resulting oligosaccharides were fractionated by a combination of fast protein liquid chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography and

  17. New Enzymatic Method of Chiral Amino Acid Synthesis by Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Amino Acid Amides: Use of Stereoselective Amino Acid Amidases in the Presence of α-Amino-ɛ-Caprolactam Racemase▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shigenori; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2007-01-01

    d- and l-amino acids were produced from l- and d-amino acid amides by d-aminopeptidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi C1-38 and l-amino acid amidase from Pseudomonas azotoformans IAM 1603, respectively, in the presence of α-amino-ɛ-caprolactam racemase from Achromobacter obae as the catalyst by dynamic kinetic resolution of amino acid amides. PMID:17586677

  18. Transcriptional Regulation and Characteristics of a Novel N-Acetylmuramoyl-l-Alanine Amidase Gene Involved in Bacillus thuringiensis Mother Cell Lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingni; Peng, Qi; Chen, Zhen; Deng, Chao; Shu, Changlong; Huang, Dafang

    2013-01-01

    In Bacillus thuringiensis, a novel N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase gene (named cwlB) was detected, and the CwlB protein was purified and characterized. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) results indicated that cwlB and an upstream gene (named cwlA) formed one transcriptional unit. 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′-RACE)-PCR and transcriptional fusions with the lacZ gene indicated that transcription of the operon was directed by a promoter, PcwlA, which is located upstream from the cwlA gene and that the transcription start site is a single 5′-end nucleotide residue T located 25 nucleotides (bp) upstream from the cwlA translational start codon. Moreover, the activity of PcwlA was controlled by σK. Morphological analysis suggested that the mutation of cwlB could delay spore release compared to the timing of spore release in the wild-type strain. Western blot assay demonstrated that purified CwlB bound to the B. thuringiensis cell wall. Observations with laser confocal microscopy and a green fluorescent protein-based reporter system demonstrated that the CwlB protein localizes to the cell envelope. All results suggest that the CwlB protein is involved in mother cell lysis in B. thuringiensis. PMID:23603740

  19. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of N-(2-oxo-3-oxetanyl)amides as N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorzano, Carlos; Antonietti, Francesca; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Rivara, Silvia; Lodola, Alessio; Vacondio, Federica; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele; Mor, Marco

    2010-08-12

    The fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) are a family of bioactive lipid mediators that include the endogenous agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). FAEs are hydrolyzed intracellularly by either fatty acid amide hydrolase or N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA). Selective inhibition of NAAA by (S)-N-(2-oxo-3-oxetanyl)-3-phenylpropionamide [(S)-OOPP, 7a] prevents PEA degradation in mouse leukocytes and attenuates responses to proinflammatory stimuli. Starting from the structure of 7a, a series of beta-lactones was prepared and tested on recombinant rat NAAA to explore structure-activity relationships (SARs) for this class of inhibitors and improve their in vitro potency. Following the hypothesis that these compounds inhibit NAAA by acylation of the catalytic cysteine, we identified several requirements for recognition at the active site and obtained new potent inhibitors. In particular, (S)-N-(2-oxo-3-oxetanyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (7h) was more potent than 7a at inhibiting recombinant rat NAAA activity (7a, IC(50) = 420 nM; 7h, IC(50) = 115 nM) in vitro and at reducing carrageenan-induced leukocyte infiltration in vivo.

  20. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationships of N-(2-Oxo-3-oxetanyl)amides as N-Acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing Acid Amidase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorzano, Carlos; Antonietti, Francesca; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Rivara, Silvia; Lodola, Alessio; Vacondio, Federica; Tarzia, Giorgio; Piomelli, Daniele; Mor, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) are a family of bioactive lipid mediators that include the endogenous agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). FAEs are hydrolyzed intracellularly by either fatty acid amide hydrolase or N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA). Selective inhibition of NAAA by (S)-N-(2-oxo-3-oxetanyl)-3-phenylpropionamide [(S)-OOPP, 7a] prevents PEA degradation in mouse leukocytes and attenuates responses to proinflammatory stimuli. Starting from the structure of 7a a series of β-lactones was prepared and tested on recombinant rat NAAA to explore structure-activity relationships (SARs) for this class of inhibitors and improve their in vitro potency. Following the hypothesis that these compounds inhibit NAAA by acylation of the catalytic cysteine, we identified several requirements for recognition at the active site and obtained new potent inhibitors. In particular, (S)-N-(2-oxo-3-oxetanyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (7h) was more potent than 7a at inhibiting recombinant rat NAAA activity (7a, IC50 = 420 nM; 7h, IC50 = 115 nM) in vitro and at reducing carrageenan-induced leukocyte infiltration in vivo. PMID:20604568

  1. Facilitated stimulus-response associative learning and long-term memory in mice lacking the NTAN1 amidase of the N-end rule pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, S A; McDowell, C S; Tae Kwon, Y; Denenberg, V H

    2001-02-23

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. Inactivation of the NTAN1 gene encoding the asparagine-specific N-terminal amidase in mice results in impaired spatial memory [26]. The studies described here were designed to further characterize the effects upon learning and memory of inactivating the NTAN1 gene. NTAN1-deficient mice were found to be better than wild-type mice on black-white and horizontal-vertical discrimination learning. They were also better at 8-week Morris maze retention testing when a reversal trial was not included in the testing procedures. In all three tasks NTAN1-deficient mice appeared to use a strong win-stay strategy. It is concluded that inactivating the asparagine-specific branch of the N-end rule pathway in mice results in impaired spatial learning with concomitant compensatory restructuring of the nervous system in favor of non-spatial (stimulus-response) learning.

  2. Purification and characterization of amidase from acrylamide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ELO

    2012-01-05

    *, Siti Aqlima Ahmad, Norzila Kusnin and Mohd Yunus Abdul Shukor. Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400. UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

  3. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins with amidase activity in early deuterostomes (Echinodermata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coteur, Geoffroy; Mellroth, Peter; De Lefortery, Coline; Gillan, David; Dubois, Philippe; Communi, David; Steiner, Håkan

    2007-01-01

    Despite the ecological and evolutionary importance of echinoderms, very little is known about the immune mechanisms in this group especially regarding humoral immunity. In this paper, we screened for proteins putatively involved in immunity in the common European seastar Asterias rubens using a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. Two proteins showed striking sequence similarities with peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs). The two seastar proteins were identified as a single protein, termed PGRP-S1a, occurring in two forms in the coelomic plasma, one of 20kDa and another of 22kDa. We also cloned and sequenced a second member of the PGRP family, termed PGRP-S2a. It has a calculated molecular mass of 21.3kDa and is expressed in circulating phagocytes. Both the S1a-cDNA from coelomic epithelium RNA and the S2a-cDNA from phagocytes code for the amino acid residues necessary for peptidoglycan degradation. PGRP-S1a did not affect the phagocytic activity of seastar immune cells towards Micrococcus luteus but inhibited their production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A recombinant, His-tagged, PGRP-S2a degrades peptidoglycan and increases the phagocytosis of M. luteus cells by seastar phagocytes.

  4. Lytr, a phage-derived amidase is most effective in induced lysis of Lactococcus lactis compared with other lactococcal amidases and glucosaminidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Anton; van Schalkwijk, Saskia; Buist, Girbe; Twigt, Marja; Szeliga, Monika; Meijer, Wilco; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    In the genome of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 five genes encoding peptidoglycan hydrolases are present: four glucosaminidases (acmA, acmB, acmC and acmD) and an endopeptidase (yjgB). Genes for six prophage lysins have also been identified. The genes acmB, acmC, acmD, yjgB and the lysin lytR of prophage

  5. Differential regulation of amidase- and formamidase-mediated ammonia production by the Helicobacter pylori fur repressor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); J. Stoof (Jeroen); S.W. Poppelaars (Sophie); S. Bereswill (Stefan); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Kist (Manfred); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe production of high levels of ammonia allows the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori to survive the acidic conditions in the human stomach. H. pylori produces ammonia through urease-mediated degradation of urea, but it is also able to convert a range of amide

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein-deconjugating enzyme is an unusual aspartate amidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin E; McAllister, Fiona E; Schwerdtfeger, Carsten; Mintseris, Julian; Cerda-Maira, Francisca; Noens, Elke E; Wilmanns, Matthias; Hubbard, Stevan R; Melandri, Francesco; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P; Darwin, K Heran

    2012-10-26

    Deamidase of Pup (Dop), the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup)-deconjugating enzyme, is critical for the full virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is unique to bacteria, providing an ideal target for the development of selective chemotherapies. We used a combination of genetics and chemical biology to characterize the mechanism of depupylation. We identified an aspartate as a potential nucleophile in the active site of Dop, suggesting a novel protease activity to target for inhibitor development.

  7. Studies on peptide amidase-catalysed C-terminal peptide amidation in organic media with respect to its substrate specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeřovský, Václav; Kula, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2001), s. 183-187 ISSN 0885-4513 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/1458 Keywords : enzymic amidation * peptide amides * peptide synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.408, year: 2001

  8. The linkage between binding of the C-terminal domain of hirudin and amidase activity in human alpha-thrombin.

    OpenAIRE

    de Cristofaro, R; Rocca, B; Bizzi, B; Landolfi, R

    1993-01-01

    A method derived from the analysis of viscosity effects on the hydrolysis of the amide substrates D-phenylalanylpipecolyl-arginine-p-nitroaniline, tosylglycylprolylarginine-p-nitroanaline and cyclohexylglycylalanylarginine-p-nitroalanine by human alpha-thrombin was developed to dissect the Michaelis-Menten parameters Km and kcat into the individual rate constants of the binding, acylation and deacylation reactions. This method was used to analyse the effect of the C-terminal hirudin (residues...

  9. Expression of a Clostridium perfringens genome-encoded putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase as a potential antimicrobial to control the bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a substantial role in non-foodborne human, animal and avian diseases as well as human foodborne disease. Previously discovered C. perfringens bacteriophage lytic enzyme amino acid sequences were utilized to iden...

  10. Recombinant Expression of a Genome-encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase that Synergistically Lyses Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms with a Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes plays a significant role in human food-borne disease caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium and although incidence is low it is a leading cause of life-threatening, bacterial food-borne disease in humans. L. monocytogenes serotypes 1/2a and 4b can form mixed-cu...

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... protease/amidase [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... Length = 171 ... Query: 39 ... MRVGILATDGVERVE...LDQPRGALQGAGAKTEIVSLHPGEIQARQFDLNAAGTFPVDRLVA 98 ... MRVGILATDGVERVE...LDQPRGALQGAGAKTEIVSLHPGEIQARQFDLNAAGTFPVDRLVA Sbjct: 1 ... MRVGILATDGVERVELDQPRGALQGAGAKTEIVSLHPGEIQARQFDLNAA

  12. A sensitive substrate for the clotting enzyme in horseshoe crab hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Morita, T; Iwanaga, S; Niwa, M; Takahashi, K

    1977-05-01

    An endotoxin-activated hemocyte lysate from horseshoe crab (Tachypleus and Limulus) was found to hydrolyze specifically BZ-Ile-Glu-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide, which was recently introduced as the substrate for assay of the blood coagulation factor, Factor Xa. Further, this amidase activity increased by increasing the concentration of bacterial endotoxin (Salmonella minnesota R595) added to the lysate. Thus, the measurement of the amidase activity in the hemocyte lysate can be very useful to detect and determine the endotoxin.

  13. Staphylococcal phage 2638A endolysin is lytic for Staphylococcus aureus and harbors an inter-lytic-domain secondary translational start site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaev, Igor; Foster-Frey, Juli; Korobova, Olga; Shishkova, Nina; Kiseleva, Natalia; Kopylov, Pavel; Pryamchuk, Sergey; Schmelcher, Mathias; Becker, Stephen C; Donovan, David M

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a notorious pathogen highly successful at developing resistance to virtually all antibiotics to which it is exposed. Staphylococcal phage 2638A endolysin is a peptidoglycan hydrolase that is lytic for S. aureus when exposed externally, making it a new candidate antimicrobial. It shares a common protein organization with more than 40 other reported staphylococcal peptidoglycan hydrolases. There is an N-terminal M23 peptidase domain, a mid-protein amidase 2 domain (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase), and a C-terminal SH3b cell wall-binding domain. It is the first phage endolysin reported with a secondary translational start site in the inter-lytic-domain region between the peptidase and amidase domains. Deletion analysis indicates that the amidase domain confers most of the lytic activity and requires the full SH3b domain for maximal activity. Although it is common for one domain to demonstrate a dominant activity over the other, the 2638A endolysin is the first in this class of proteins to have a high-activity amidase domain (dominant over the N-terminal peptidase domain). The high activity amidase domain is an important finding in the quest for high-activity staphylolytic domains targeting novel peptidoglycan bonds.

  14. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Haddad Kashani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+ expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3 strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and enterococcus. However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis. Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  15. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Fahimi, Hossein; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman; Moniri, Rezvan

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+) expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA 252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA 252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis , and enterococcus . However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis . Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  16. Chromogenic substrates for horseshoe crab clotting enzyme. Its application for the assay of bacterial endotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, S; Morita, T; Harada, T; Nakamura, S; Niwa, M; Takada, K; Kimura, T; Sakakibara, S

    1978-01-01

    An endotoxin-activated hemocyte lysate from the horseshoe crab (Tachypleus and Limulus) was found to hydrolyze Bz-Ile-Glu-(gamma-OR)-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide (PNA), Bz-Val-Gly-Arg-PNA, Boc-Val-Leu-Gly-Arg-PNA, and Boc-Leu-Gly-Arg-PNA, all of which have the COOH-terminal Gly-Arg sequence. This amidase activity was due to a clottting enzyme contained in the lysate. Furthermore, the amidase activity increased by increasing the concentration of bacterial endotoxin (E. coli, 0111-B4) added to the lysate. Therefore, the measurement of the endotoxin-induced amidase activity made it possible to determine the concentration of the endotoxin.

  17. A chimeric LysK-lysostaphin fusion enzyme lysing Staphylococcus aureus cells: a study of both kinetics of inactivation and specifics of interaction with anionic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities comprised of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of K-L...

  18. Acid Ceramidase in Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Realini, Natalia; Palese, Francesca; Pizzirani, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC) is a lysosomal cysteine amidase that controls sphingolipid signaling by lowering the levels of ceramides and concomitantly increasing those of sphingosine and its bioactive metabolite, sphingosine 1-phosphate. In the present study, we evaluated the role of AC-regulated sphing...

  19. Characterization of proteolytic and anti-proteolytic activity involvement in sterlet spermatozoon maturation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzyuba, V.; Słowińska, M.; Cosson, J.; Ciereszko, A.; Boryshpolets, S.; Štěrba, Ján; Rodina, M.; Linhart, O.; Dzyuba, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2016), s. 1755-1766 ISSN 0920-1742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : amidase activity * anti-proteolytic activity * casein and gelatin zymography * siberian sturgeon sperm * sperm atozoon maturation * sterlet sperm Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.647, year: 2016

  20. Isolation and structure determination of the intact sialylated N-linked carbohydrate chains of recombinant human follitropin expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Hård, K.; Mekking, A.; Damm, J.B.L.; Kamerling, J.P.; Boer, W. de; Wijnands, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Biologically active recombinant human follitropin has been expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The carbohydrate chains of the recombinant glycoprotein hormone were enzymatically released by peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F. The oligosaccharides were separated from

  1. Physiological characterisation of Penicillium chrysogenum strains expressing the expandase gene from Streptomyces clavuligerus during batch cultivations. Growth and adipoyl-7- aminodeacetoxycephalosporanic acid production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robin, Jarno Jacky Christian; Jakobsen, M.; Beyer, M.

    2001-01-01

    The production of adipoyl-7-aminodeacetoxy-cephalosporanic acid (ad-7-ADCA) was studied, using two recombinant strains of Penicillium chrysogenum carrying the expandase gene from Streptomyces clavuligerus. The adipoyl-side chain of this compound may easily be removed using an amidase; and this pr...

  2. A high-throughput screening assay for distinguishing nitrile hydratases from nitrilases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Mara Lima Angelini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A modified colorimetric high-throughput screen based on pH changes combined with an amidase inhibitor capable of distinguishing between nitrilases and nitrile hydratases. This enzymatic screening is based on a binary response and is suitable for the first step of hierarchical screening projects.

  3. Biotransformation of 3-substituted methyl (R,S)-4-cyanobutanoates with nitrile- and amide-converting biocatalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Klempier, N.; Bardakji, J.; Kandelbauer, A.; Ovesná, M.; Podařilová, T.; Kuzma, Marek; Přepechalová, Irena; Griengl, G.; Křen, Vladimír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2001), s. 95-99 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4020802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : Rhodococcus equi * nitrile hydratase * amidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.408, year: 2001

  4. A dual role of extracellular DNA during biofilm formation of Neisseria meningitidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Claus, H.; van Alen, T.

    2010-01-01

    -acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase genes. In late biofilms, outer membrane phospholipase A-dependent autolysis, which was observed in most cc, but not in ST-8 and ST-11 strains, was required for shear force resistance of microcolonies. Taken together, N. meningitidis evolved two different biofilm formation strategies, an e...

  5. LysK CHAP endopeptidase domain is required for lysis of live staphylococcal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LysK is a staphylococcal bacteriophage endolysin composed of three domains, an N-terminal cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases (CHAP) endopeptidase domain (cleaves between D-alanine of the stem peptide and glycine of the cross-bridge peptide) a mid-protein amidase 2 domain (N-ace...

  6. Deciphering Physiological Functions of AHL Quorum Quenching Acylases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri D.; Vogel, Jan; Quax, Wim J.

    2017-01-01

    N-Acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-acylase (also known as amidase or amidohydrolase) is a class of enzyme that belongs to the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily. As the name implies, AHL-acylases are capable of hydrolysing AHLs, the most studied signaling molecules for quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. 78 FR 69700 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... bioavailability because of its resistance to metabolic amidases. Potential Commercial Applications: Therapeutic...) Therapeutic agent for restless legs syndrome Competitive Advantages: Higher affinity for the dopamine D3... of patients that is especially vulnerable to the side effects of current treatments for HCV infection...

  8. Selection and screening for enzymes of nitrile metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Křen, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 3 (2008), s. 318-326 ISSN 0168-1656 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200708; GA ČR GA203/05/2267; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA MŠk OC 171 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : nitrilase * nitrile hydratase * amidase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.748, year: 2008

  9. Molecular Cloning, Sequence Analysis, and Characterization of a Penicillin-Resistant dd-Carboxypeptidase of Myxococcus xanthus

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yoshio; Takashima, Yukie; Tokumasu, Yushi; Sato, Masayuki

    1999-01-01

    We have cloned a gene, pdcA, from the genomic library of Myxococcus xanthus with an oligonucleotide probe representing conserved regions of penicillin-resistant dd-carboxypeptidases. The amino- and carboxy-terminal halves of the predicted pdcA gene product showed significant sequence similarity to N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase and penicillin-resistant dd-carboxypeptidase, respectively. The pdcA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the characteristics of the gene product were simil...

  10. Application of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Rollins

    Full Text Available In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase NarG, and three proteins of unknown function. Using quantitative real-time PCR comparing RNA isolated from in vitro cultured B. anthracis to RNA isolated from BALB/c mice infected with virulent Ames strain B. anthracis, we confirmed induced expression in vivo for a subset of B. anthracis genes identified by IVIAT, including L-alanine amidases BA3767, BA4073, and amiA (pXO2-42; the bacteriophage holin gene BA4074; and pagA (pXO1-110. The exogenous addition of two purified putative autolysins identified by IVIAT, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases BA0485 and BA2446, to vegetative B. anthracis cell suspensions induced a species-specific change in bacterial morphology and reduction in viable bacterial cells. Many of the proteins identified in our screen are predicted to affect peptidoglycan re-modeling, and our results support significant cell wall structural remodeling activity during B. anthracis infection. Identification of L-alanine amidases with B. anthracis specificity may suggest new potential therapeutic targets.

  11. Chemical and biochemical characterization of sewage sludges from wastes treatment plant in Burgos (Spain); Caracterizacion quimica y bioqumica de lodos de depuradora de aguas residuales de Burgos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Gonzalez, M.; Saiz Orcajo, R. M.; Puente Miguel, G.; Carcedo Gonzalez, S. [Universidad de Burgos. Burgos (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    A study was carried out in order to evaluate the degree of heavy metals and potential of phosphohidrolitic, cellulotic and amidasic capacity of sewage sludges from Burgos wastewater treatment plant. The aim of the present paper is to look at the possibilities of using sewage sludge as an element in soil regeneration and maintaining green areas and the conditions governing its use on agricultural land. (Author) 15 refs.

  12. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens

    OpenAIRE

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstr...

  13. The Enzymology of 2-Hydroxyglutarate, 2-Hydroxyglutaramate and 2-Hydroxysuccinamate and Their Relationship to Oncometabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek A. Hariharan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Many enzymes make “mistakes”. Consequently, repair enzymes have evolved to correct these mistakes. For example, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH slowly catalyze the reduction of 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG to the oncometabolite l-2-hydroxyglutarate (l-2-HG. l-2-HG dehydrogenase corrects this error by converting l-2-HG to 2-OG. LDH also catalyzes the reduction of the oxo group of 2-oxoglutaramate (2-OGM; transamination product of l-glutamine. We show here that human glutamine synthetase (GS catalyzes the amidation of the terminal carboxyl of both the l- and d- isomers of 2-HG. The reaction of 2-OGM with LDH and the reaction of l-2-HG with GS generate l-2-hydroxyglutaramate (l-2-HGM. We also show that l-2-HGM is a substrate of human ω-amidase. The product (l-2-HG can then be converted to 2-OG by l-2-HG dehydrogenase. Previous work showed that 2-oxosuccinamate (2-OSM; transamination product of l-asparagine is an excellent substrate of LDH. Finally, we also show that human ω-amidase converts the product of this reaction (i.e., l-2-hydroxysuccinamate; l-2-HSM to l-malate. Thus, ω-amidase may act together with hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenases to repair certain “mistakes” of GS and LDH. The present findings suggest that non-productive pathways for nitrogen metabolism occur in mammalian tissues in vivo. Perturbations of these pathways may contribute to symptoms associated with hydroxyglutaric acidurias and to tumor progression. Finally, methods for the synthesis of l-2-HGM and l-2-HSM are described that should be useful in determining the roles of ω-amidase/4- and 5-C compounds in photorespiration in plants.

  14. The Enzymology of 2-Hydroxyglutarate, 2-Hydroxyglutaramate and 2-Hydroxysuccinamate and Their Relationship to Oncometabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Vivek A; Denton, Travis T; Paraszcszak, Sarah; McEvoy, Kyle; Jeitner, Thomas M; Krasnikov, Boris F; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2017-03-30

    Many enzymes make "mistakes". Consequently, repair enzymes have evolved to correct these mistakes. For example, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) slowly catalyze the reduction of 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) to the oncometabolite l-2-hydroxyglutarate (l-2-HG). l-2-HG dehydrogenase corrects this error by converting l-2-HG to 2-OG. LDH also catalyzes the reduction of the oxo group of 2-oxoglutaramate (2-OGM; transamination product of l-glutamine). We show here that human glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the amidation of the terminal carboxyl of both the l- and d- isomers of 2-HG. The reaction of 2-OGM with LDH and the reaction of l-2-HG with GS generate l-2-hydroxyglutaramate (l-2-HGM). We also show that l-2-HGM is a substrate of human ω-amidase. The product (l-2-HG) can then be converted to 2-OG by l-2-HG dehydrogenase. Previous work showed that 2-oxosuccinamate (2-OSM; transamination product of l-asparagine) is an excellent substrate of LDH. Finally, we also show that human ω-amidase converts the product of this reaction (i.e., l-2-hydroxysuccinamate; l-2-HSM) to l-malate. Thus, ω-amidase may act together with hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenases to repair certain "mistakes" of GS and LDH. The present findings suggest that non-productive pathways for nitrogen metabolism occur in mammalian tissues in vivo. Perturbations of these pathways may contribute to symptoms associated with hydroxyglutaric acidurias and to tumor progression. Finally, methods for the synthesis of l-2-HGM and l-2-HSM are described that should be useful in determining the roles of ω-amidase/4- and 5-C compounds in photorespiration in plants.

  15. Biotransformation of nitriles by Rhodococcus equi A4 immobilized in LentiKats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubáč, David; Čejková, A.; Masák, J.; Jirků, V.; Lemaire, M.; Gallienne, E.; Bolte, J.; Stloukal, R.; Martínková, Ludmila

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2006), s. 59-61 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2267; GA MŠk OC D25.001; GA AV ČR IAA4020213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : nitrile hydratase * amidase * nitriles Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2006

  16. Biotransformation of heterocyclic dinitriles by Rhodococcus erythropolis and fungal nitrilases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Šveda, Ondřej; Kaplan, Ondřej; Přikrylová, Věra; Elišáková, Veronika; Himl, Michal; Kubáč, David; Pelantová, Helena; Kuzma, Marek; Křen, Vladimír; Martínková, Ludmila

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 7 (2007), s. 1119-1124 ISSN 0141-5492 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200708; GA MŠk LC06010; GA MŠk OC D25.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : amidase * arpegillus nniger * heterocyclic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.222, year: 2007

  17. Nitrilase superfamily aryl acylamidase from the halotolerant mangrove Streptomyces sp. 211726.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanling; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Sihong; Hong, Kui; Deng, Zixin; Sun, Yuhui

    2014-10-01

    A novel nitrilase superfamily amidase gene, designated azl13, was cloned from Streptomyces sp. 211726. Bioinformatic and biochemical analysis indicated that Azl13 belongs to a new subfamily in branch 13 of the nitrilase superfamily. His6-Azl13 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and had the expected molecular mass of 31 kDa, and the enzymatic activity was best at 40 °C, pH 8.0. His6-Azl13 had amidase, aryl acylamidase, and acyl transferase activities, and it displayed an unusually wide substrate spectrum. His6-Azl13 was most active on 4-guanidinobutyramide, which is probably its natural substrate, moderately active on short-chain aliphatic amides and weakly active hydrolyzing aromatic and heterocyclic amides. His6-Azl13 also catalyzed acyl transfer to hydroxylamine from acetamide or the herbicide propanil. The substrate spectrum differs from that of the Pseudomonas amidase RamA, probably reflecting high salinity adaptation. The broad substrate spectrum of Azl13 is potentially useful for chemical synthesis and biodegradation.

  18. Isolation of identical nitrilase genes from multiple bacterial strains and real-time PCR detection of the genes from soils provides evidence of horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lee; Clarke, Adrienne; Duggan, Patrick; Tambling, Karen; Horgan, Serenia; Dowling, David; O'Reilly, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial enzymes capable of nitrile hydrolysis have significant industrial potential. Microbacterium sp. AJ115, Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 and AJ300 were isolated from the same location in England and harbour identical nitrile hydratase/amidase gene clusters. Strain AJ270 has been well studied due to its nitrile hydratase and amidase activity. R. erythropolis ITCBP was isolated from Denmark and carries a very similar nitrile hydratase/amidase gene cluster. In this study, an identical nitrilase gene (nit1) was isolated from the four strains, and the nitrilase from strain AJ270 cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the recombinant nitrilase has shown it to be functional with activity demonstrated towards phenylacetonitrile. A real-time PCR TaqMan assay was developed that allowed nit1 detection directly from soil enrichment cultures without DNA extraction, with nit1 detected in all samples tested. Real-time PCR screening of isolates from these soils resulted in the isolation of nit1 and also very similar nitrilase gene nit2 from a number of Burkholderia sp. The genes nit1 and nit2 have also been detected in many bacteria of different genera but are unstable in these isolates. It is likely that the genes were acquired by horizontal gene transfer and may be wide-spread in the environment.

  19. Protein S-Thiolation by Glutathionylspermidine (Gsp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Bing-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Pai, Chien-Hua; Chou, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-He; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chang, Chun-Yang; Wu, Whei-Fen; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Certain bacteria synthesize glutathionylspermidine (Gsp), from GSH and spermidine. Escherichia coli Gsp synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Prior to the work reported herein, the physiological role(s) of Gsp or how the two opposing GspSA activities are regulated had not been elucidated. We report that Gsp-modified proteins from E. coli contain mixed disulfides of Gsp and protein thiols, representing a new type of post-translational modification formerly undocumented. The level of these proteins is increased by oxidative stress. We attribute the accumulation of such proteins to the selective inactivation of GspSA amidase activity. X-ray crystallography and a chemical modification study indicated that the catalytic cysteine thiol of the GspSA amidase domain is transiently inactivated by H2O2 oxidation to sulfenic acid, which is stabilized by a very short hydrogen bond with a water molecule. We propose a set of reactions that explains how the levels of Gsp and Gsp S-thiolated proteins are modulated in response to oxidative stress. The hypersensitivities of GspSA and GspSA/glutaredoxin null mutants to H2O2 support the idea that GspSA and glutaredoxin act synergistically to regulate the redox environment of E. coli. PMID:20530482

  20. Lytic activity of the staphylolytic Twort phage endolysin CHAP domain is enhanced by the SH3b cell wall binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen C; Swift, Steven; Korobova, Olga; Schischkova, Nina; Kopylov, Pavel; Donovan, David M; Abaev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Increases in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus have elicited efforts to develop novel antimicrobials to treat these drug-resistant pathogens. One potential treatment repurposes the lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages as antimicrobials. The phage Twort endolysin (PlyTW) harbors three domains, a cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidase domain (CHAP), an amidase-2 domain and a SH3b-5 cell wall binding domain (CBD). Our results indicate that the CHAP domain alone is necessary and sufficient for lysis of live S. aureus, while the amidase-2 domain is insufficient for cell lysis when provided alone. Loss of the CBD results in ∼10X reduction of enzymatic activity in both turbidity reduction and plate lysis assays compared to the full length protein. Deletion of the amidase-2 domain resulted in a protein (PlyTW Δ172-373) with lytic activity that exceeded the activity of the full length construct in both the turbidity reduction and plate lysis assays. Addition of Ca(2+) enhanced the turbidity reduction activity of both the full length protein and truncation constructs harboring the CHAP domain. Chelation by addition of EDTA or the addition of zinc inhibited the activity of all PlyTW constructs. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Structural basis of cell wall cleavage by a staphylococcal autolysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Zoll

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The major autolysins (Atl of Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus play an important role in cell separation, and their mutants are also attenuated in virulence. Therefore, autolysins represent a promising target for the development of new types of antibiotics. Here, we report the high-resolution structure of the catalytically active amidase domain AmiE (amidase S. epidermidis from the major autolysin of S. epidermidis. This is the first protein structure with an amidase-like fold from a bacterium with a gram-positive cell wall architecture. AmiE adopts a globular fold, with several alpha-helices surrounding a central beta-sheet. Sequence comparison reveals a cluster of conserved amino acids that define a putative binding site with a buried zinc ion. Mutations of key residues in the putative active site result in loss of activity, enabling us to propose a catalytic mechanism. We also identified and synthesized muramyltripeptide, the minimal peptidoglycan fragment that can be used as a substrate by the enzyme. Molecular docking and digestion assays with muramyltripeptide derivatives allow us to identify key determinants of ligand binding. This results in a plausible model of interaction of this ligand not only for AmiE, but also for other PGN-hydrolases that share the same fold. As AmiE active-site mutations also show a severe growth defect, our findings provide an excellent platform for the design of specific inhibitors that target staphylococcal cell separation and can thereby prevent growth of this pathogen.

  2. Hydrolysis of ibuprofen nitrile and ibuprofen amide and deracemisation of ibuprofen using Nocardia corallina B-276.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievano, Ricardo; Pérez, Herminia Inés; Manjarrez, Norberto; Solís, Aida; Solís-Oba, Myrna

    2012-03-12

    A novel application of whole cells of Nocardia corallina B-276 for the deracemisation of ibuprofen is reported. This microorganism successfully hydrolysed ibuprofen nitrile to ibuprofen amide, and ibuprofen amide to ibuprofen, using a suspension of cells in a potassium phosphate buffer solution (0.1 M, pH = 7.0). These results can be explained by the presence of NHase and amidase enzymes, but the reactions are not enantioselective and low ee values were obtained. However, (R)-ibuprofen was isolated with > 99% ee by a deracemisation process catalysed by N. corallina B-276. This is the first report of this kind of catalysis with this microorganism.

  3. Hydrolysis of Ibuprofen Nitrile and Ibuprofen Amide and Deracemisation of Ibuprofen Using Nocardia corallina B-276

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Solís-Oba

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel application of whole cells of Nocardia corallina B-276 for the deracemisation of ibuprofen is reported. This microorganism successfully hydrolysed ibuprofen nitrile to ibuprofen amide, and ibuprofen amide to ibuprofen, using a suspension of cells in a potassium phosphate buffer solution (0.1 M, pH = 7.0. These results can be explained by the presence of NHase and amidase enzymes, but the reactions are not enantioselective and low ee values were obtained. However, (R-ibuprofen was isolated with >99% ee by a deracemisation process catalysed by N. corallina B-276. This is the first report of this kind of catalysis with this microorganism.

  4. Novel Cell Wall Hydrolase CwlC from Bacillus thuringiensis Is Essential for Mother Cell Lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomin; Gao, Tantan; Peng, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Chai, Yunrong; Song, Fuping

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a sporulation-specific gene (tentatively named cwlC ) involved in mother cell lysis in Bacillus thuringiensis was characterized. The encoded CwlC protein consists of an N-terminal N -acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase (Mur N Ac-LAA) domain and a C-terminal amidase02 domain. The recombinant histidine-tagged CwlC proteins purified from Escherichia coli were able to directly bind to and digest the B. thuringiensis cell wall. The CwlC point mutations at the two conserved glutamic acid residues (Glu-24 and Glu-140) shown to be critical for the catalytic activity in homologous amidases resulted in a complete loss of cell wall lytic activity, suggesting that CwlC is an N -acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase. Results of transcriptional analyses indicated that cwlC is transcribed as a monocistronic unit and that its expression is dependent on sporulation sigma factor K (σ K ). Deletion of cwlC completely blocked mother cell lysis during sporulation without impacting the sporulation frequency, Cry1Ac protein production, and insecticidal activity. Taken together, our data suggest that CwlC is an essential cell wall hydrolase for B. thuringiensis mother cell lysis during sporulation. Engineered B. thuringiensis strains targeting cwlC , which allows the crystal inclusion to remain encapsulated in the mother cell at the end of sporulation, may have the potential to become more effective biological control agents in agricultural applications since the crystal inclusion remains encapsulated in the mother cell at the end of sporulation. IMPORTANCE Mother cell lysis has been well studied in Bacillus subtilis , which involves three distinct yet functionally complementary cell wall hydrolases. In this study, a novel cell wall hydrolase, CwlC, was investigated and found to be essential for mother cell lysis in Bacillus thuringiensis CwlC of B. thuringiensis only shows 9 and 21% sequence identity with known B. subtilis mother cell hydrolases CwlB and CwlC, respectively

  5. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project will focus on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate amidase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative CN bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. The project is on schedule and no major difficulties have been encountered. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments have resulted in the isolation of promising cultures that may be capable of cleaving C-N bonds in aromatic amides, several amidase genes have been cloned and are currently undergoing directed evolution to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. Future research will address expression of these genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis. Enrichment culture experiments and directed evolution experiments continue to be a main focus of research activity and further work is required to obtain an appropriate amidase that will selectively cleave C-N bonds in aromatic substrates. Once an appropriate amidase gene is obtained it must be combined with genes encoding an enzyme capable of converting carbazole to 2'aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol: specifically carA genes. The carA genes from two sources have been cloned and are ready for construction of C-N bond cleavage

  6. Purification and Characterization of TrzF: Biuret Hydrolysis by Allophanate Hydrolase Supports Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Shapir, Nir; Cheng, Gang; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2006-01-01

    TrzF, the allophanate hydrolase from Enterobacter cloacae strain 99, was cloned, overexpressed in the presence of a chaperone protein, and purified to homogeneity. Native TrzF had a subunit molecular weight of 65,401 and a subunit stoichiometry of α2 and did not contain significant levels of metals. TrzF showed time-dependent inhibition by phenyl phosphorodiamidate and is a member of the amidase signature protein family. TrzF was highly active in the hydrolysis of allophanate but was not acti...

  7. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of a penicillin-resistant DD-carboxypeptidase of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Y; Takashima, Y; Tokumasu, Y; Sato, M

    1999-08-01

    We have cloned a gene, pdcA, from the genomic library of Myxococcus xanthus with an oligonucleotide probe representing conserved regions of penicillin-resistant DD-carboxypeptidases. The amino- and carboxy-terminal halves of the predicted pdcA gene product showed significant sequence similarity to N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and penicillin-resistant DD-carboxypeptidase, respectively. The pdcA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the characteristics of the gene product were similar to those of DD-carboxypeptidase (VanY) of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. No apparent changes in cell growth, sporulation, or germination were observed in pdcA deletion mutants.

  8. Biotransformation of nitriles to amides using soluble and immobilized nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus erythropolis A4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubáč, David; Kaplan, Ondřej; Elišáková, Veronika; Pátek, Miroslav; Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Slámová, Kristýna; Tóthová, A.; Lemaire, M.; Gallienne, E.; Lutz-Wahl, S.; Fischer, L.; Kuzma, Marek; Pelantová, Helena; van Pelt, S.; Bolte, J.; Křen, Vladimír; Martínková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 50, 2-4 (2008), s. 107-113 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2267; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA MŠk OC 171 Grant - others:XE(XE) ESF COST D25/0002/02; CZ(CZ) D10-CZ25/06-07; CZ(CZ) D-25 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : rhodococcus erythropolis * nitrile hydratase * amidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.015, year: 2008

  9. Hydrolysis of Ibuprofen Nitrile and Ibuprofen Amide and Deracemisation of Ibuprofen Using Nocardia corallina B-276

    OpenAIRE

    Myrna Solís-Oba; Norberto Manjarrez; Aida Solís; Ricardo Lievano; Herminia Inés Pérez

    2012-01-01

    A novel application of whole cells of Nocardia corallina B-276 for the deracemisation of ibuprofen is reported. This microorganism successfully hydrolysed ibuprofen nitrile to ibuprofen amide, and ibuprofen amide to ibuprofen, using a suspension of cells in a potassium phosphate buffer solution (0.1 M, pH = 7.0). These results can be explained by the presence of NHase and amidase enzymes, but the reactions are not enantioselective and low ee values were obtained. However, (R)-ibuprofen was is...

  10. Characterization of proteolytic and anti-proteolytic activity involvement in sterlet spermatozoon maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyuba, Viktoriya; Słowińska, Mariola; Cosson, Jacky; Ciereszko, Andrzej; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Štĕrba, Ján; Rodina, Marek; Linhart, Otomar; Dzyuba, Borys

    2016-12-01

    In sturgeon, the acquisition of the potential for motility activation called spermatozoon maturation takes place outside testes. This process can be accomplished in vitro by pre-incubation of immature testicular spermatozoa in seminal fluid collected from fully mature Wolffian duct sperm. Addition of trypsin inhibitor to the pre-incubation medium disrupts spermatozoon maturation. There are no available data for the role of proteolysis regulators in fish spermatozoon maturation, while their role is recognized in mammalian sperm maturation. The present study evaluated the involvement of seminal fluid proteases and anti-proteolytic activity in the sterlet spermatozoon maturation process. Casein and gelatin zymography and quantification of amidase and anti-proteolytic activity were conducted in sturgeon seminal fluid from Wolffian duct sperm and seminal fluid from testicular sperm, along with spermatozoon extracts from Wolffian duct spermatozoa, testicular spermatozoa, and testicular spermatozoa after in vitro maturation. We did not find significant differences in proteolytic profiles of seminal fluids from Wolffian duct sperm and ones from testicular sperm. Zymography revealed differences in spermatozoon extracts: Wolffian duct spermatozoon extracts were characterized by the presence of a broad proteolytic band ranging from 48 to 41 kDa, while testicular spermatozoon extracts did not show such activity until after in vitro maturation. The differences in amidase activity coincided with these results. It may not be the levels of proteolytic and anti-proteolytic activity per se, but the alterations in their interactions triggering a cascade of signaling events, that is crucial to the maturation process.

  11. Biochemical response of Anticarsia gemmatalis fed with soybean plants pulverized with the synthetic trypsin inhibitor benzamidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.G.A.; Pilon, A.M.; Pilon, F.M.; Ribeiro, F.R.; Silva, F.C.; Ribon, A.O.B.; Reis, A.P.; Visotto, L.E. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular; Guedes, R.N.C. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal; Oliveira, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Insects are responsible for severe crop losses. New alternatives for pest control other than agrochemicals have been investigated. Protease inhibitors are one of the prime candidates effective against insect pests. In this work we studied the effect of the synthetic trypsin inhibitor benzamidine on the development of Anticarsia gemmatalis, an important pest of the soybean culture. Larvae were reared on soybean plants containing 0.00, 0.15, 0.30, 0.45, 0.60 and 0.75% (w/w) of benzamidine. After 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of feeding midgut extracts were prepared and assayed for enzymatic activity (proteolytic, amidasic and stearic). Benzamidine altered the activity patterns but was not able to totally abolish enzyme activity. The proteolytic, amidasic and stearic activity showed the higher time of inhibition in 48 h in concentration of 0,75%, the inhibition was the around 93%, 63.1% and 36.6%, respectively. We suggest that the presence of inhibitor has made insects to adapt and produce proteases which are insensitive to the action of benzamidine. (author)

  12. Characterization of a novel cell wall binding domain-containing Staphylococcus aureus endolysin LysSA97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yoonjee; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-01-01

    Endolysin from Staphylococcus aureus phage SA97 (LysSA97) was cloned and investigated. LysSA97 specifically lyse the staphylococcal strains and effectively disrupted staphylococcal biofilms. Bioinformatic analysis of LysSA97 revealed a novel putative cell wall binding domain (CBD) as well as two enzymatically active domains (EADs) containing cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases (CHAP, PF05257) and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (Amidase-3, PF01520) domains. Comparison of 98 endolysin genes of S. aureus phages deposited in GenBank showed that they can be classified into six groups based on their domain composition. Interestingly, approximately 80.61 % of the staphylococcal endolysins have a src-homology 3 (SH3, PF08460) domain as CBD, but the remaining 19.39 %, including LysSA97, has a putative C-terminal CBD with no homology to the known CBD. The fusion protein containing green fluorescent protein and the putative CBD of LysSA97 showed a specific binding spectrum against staphylococcal cells comparable to SH3 domain (PF08460), suggesting that the C-terminal domain of LysSA97 is a novel CBD of staphylococcal endolysins.

  13. Characterization of Enterococcus faecium bacteriophage IME-EFm5 and its endolysin LysEFm5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pengjuan; Cheng, Mengjun; Li, Xinwei; Jiang, Haiyan; Yu, Chuang; Kahaer, Nadire; Li, Juecheng; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Feifei; Hu, Liyuan; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Han, Wenyu; Gu, Jingmin

    2016-05-01

    Due to the worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains, phages therapy has been revitalized recently. In this study, an Enterococcus faecium phage named IME-EFm5 was isolated from hospital sewage. Whole genomic sequence analysis demonstrated that IME-EFm5 belong to the Siphoviridae family, and has a double-stranded genome of 42,265bp (with a 35.51% G+C content) which contains 70 putative coding sequences. LysEFm5, the endolysin of IME-EFm5, contains an amidase domain in its N-terminal and has a wider bactericidal spectrum than its parental phage IME-EFm5, including 7 strains of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium. The mutagenesis analysis revealed that the zinc ion binding residues (H27, H132, and C140), E90, and T138 are required for the catalysis of LysEFm5. However, the antibacterial activity of LysEFm5 is zinc ion independent, which is inconsistent with most of other amidase members. The phage lysin LysEFm5 might be an alternative treatment strategy for infections caused by multidrug-resistant E. faecium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of peptidoglycan recognition protein OmPGRP-L2 from the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ju Hye; Kim, Hyun; Cho, Ju Hyun

    2017-10-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), a group of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are innate immune molecules that are structurally conserved through evolution in both invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In teleost fish, several PGRPs have been characterized recently. They have both amidase activity and bactericidal activity and are involved in indirectly killing bacteria and regulating multiple signaling pathways. However, the knowledge of functional similarity and divergence between PGRP paralogs for their role as an immune modulator in teleost fish is still limited. In this study, we identified a novel PGRP paralog, termed OmPGRP-L2 from the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). OmPGRP-L2 contains the conserved PGRP domain and the four Zn 2+ -binding amino acid residues required for amidase activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that OmPGRP-L2 is highly expressed in liver. Overexpression of OmPGRP-L2 in a rainbow trout hepatocyte cell line RTH-149 challenged with Edwardsiella tarda resulted in down-regulation of IL-1β and TNF-α expression. When overexpressed in RTH-149 cells, OmPGRP-L2 inhibited NF-κB activity with or without bacterial stimulation. Collectively, these findings suggest that OmPGRP-L2 has an immunomodulatory function, via NF-κB inhibition in liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrile Metabolizing Enzymes in Biocatalysis and Biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Virender; Thakur, Neerja; Savitri

    2018-01-30

    Nitrile metabolizing enzymes, i.e., aldoxime dehydratase, hydroxynitrile lyase, nitrilase, nitrile hydratase, and amidase, are the key catalysts in carbon nitrogen triple bond anabolism and catabolism. Over the past several years, these enzymes have drawn considerable attention as prominent biocatalysts in academia and industries because of their wide applications. Research on various aspects of these biocatalysts, i.e., sources, screening, function, purification, molecular cloning, structure, and mechanisms, has been conducted, and bioprocesses at various scales have been designed for the synthesis of myriads of useful compounds. This review is focused on the potential of nitrile metabolizing enzymes in the production of commercially important fine chemicals such as nitriles, carboxylic acids, and amides. A number of opportunities and challenges of nitrile metabolizing enzymes in bioprocess development for the production of bulk and fine chemicals are discussed.

  16. Autolysis of dairy leuconostocs and detection of peptidoglycan hydrolases by renaturing SDS-PAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, R; Chapot-Chartier, M P

    2000-11-01

    The autolysis of lactic acid bacteria plays a major role during cheese ripening. The aim of this study was to evaluate the autolytic properties and peptidoglycan hydrolase content of dairy leuconostocs. Autolysis of 59 strains of dairy Leuconostoc was examined under starvation conditions in potassium phosphate buffer. The ability of dairy leuconostocs to lyse is strain dependant and not related to the species. The peptidoglycan hydrolase profile of Leuc. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides 10L was analysed by renaturing gel electrophoresis. Two major activity bands migrating at 41 and 52 kDa were observed. According to the specificity analysis, strain 10L seems to contain a glycosidase and an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, or an endopeptidase. The peptidoglycan hydrolase profiles of various Leuconostoc species were also compared. Several peptidoglycan hydrolase activities could be detected in the different Leuconostoc species. Further characterization of the peptidoglycan hydrolases will help to control autolysis of leuconostocs in cheese.

  17. Production of cephalosporin intermediates by feeding adipic acid to recombinant Penicillium chrysogenum strains expressing ring expansion activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L; Stepan, A M; McAda, P C; Rambosek, J A; Conder, M J; Vinci, V A; Reeves, C D

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel and efficient bioprocess for production of the cephalosporin intermediates, 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) or 7-amino deacetoxycephalosporanic acid (7-ADCA). The Streptomyces clavuligerus expandase gene or the Cephalosporium acremonium expandase-hydroxylase gene, with and without the acetyltransferase gene, were expressed in a penicillin production strain of Penicillium chrysogenum. Growth of these transformants in media containing adipic acid as the side chain precursor resulted in efficient production of cephalosporins having an adipyl side chain, proving that adipyl-6-APA is a substrate for either enzyme in vivo. Strains expressing expandase produced adipyl-7-ADCA, whereas strains expressing expandase-hydroxylase produced both adipyl-7-ADCA and adipyl-7-ADAC (aminodeacetylcephalosporanic acid). Strains expressing expandase-hydroxylase and acetyltransferase produced adipyl-7-ADCA, adipyl-7-ADAC and adipyl-7-ACA. The adipyl side chain of these cephalosporins was easily removed with a Pseudomonas-derived amidase to yield the cephalosporin intermediates.

  18. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Bruce S

    2013-02-01

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently used antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human foodborne disease as well as non-foodborne human, animal, and avian diseases. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds have reported increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated diseases in poultry. To address these issues, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins encoded by the genomes of bacteriophages, are being identified in our laboratory. Poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage, and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that could lyse C. perfringens and produce clear plaques in spot assays. Bacteriophages were isolated that had long noncontractile tails, members of the family Siphoviridae, and with short noncontractile tails, members of the family Podoviridae. Several bacteriophage genes were identified that encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, lysozyme-endopeptidases, and a zinc carboxypeptidase domain that has not been previously reported in viral genomes. Putative phage lysin genes (ply) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lysins were amidases capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays, but did not lyse any clostridia beyond the species. Consequently, bacteriophage gene products could eventually be used to target bacterial pathogens, such as C. perfringens via a species-specific strategy, to control animal and human diseases without having deleterious effects on beneficial probiotic bacteria.

  19. The crystal structure of 1-D-myo-inosityl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside deacetylase (MshB) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals a zinc hydrolase with a lactate dehydrogenase fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Jason T; Garen, Craig; Cherney, Maia M; Newton, Gerald; Arad, Dorit; Av-Gay, Yossef; Fahey, Robert C; James, Michael N G

    2003-11-21

    Mycothiol (1-D-myo-inosityl 2-(N-acetyl-L-cysteinyl)amido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside, MSH or AcCys-GlcN-inositol (Ins)) is the major reducing agent in actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The biosynthesis of MSH involves a deacetylase that removes the acetyl group from the precursor GlcNAc-Ins to yield GlcN-Ins. The deacetylase (MshB) corresponds to Rv1170 of M. tuberculosis with a molecular mass of 33,400 Da. MshB is a Zn2+ metalloprotein, and the deacetylase activity is completely dependent on the presence of a divalent metal cation. We have determined the x-ray crystallographic structure of MshB, which reveals a protein that folds in a manner resembling lactate dehydrogenase in the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain consisting of two beta-sheets and two alpha-helices. The zinc binding site is in the N-terminal domain occupying a position equivalent to that of the NAD+ co-factor of lactate dehydrogenase. The Zn2+ is 5 coordinate with 3 residues from MshB (His-13, Asp-16, His-147) and two water molecules. One water would be displaced upon binding of substrate (GlcNAc-Ins); the other is proposed as the nucleophilic water assisted by the general base carboxylate of Asp-15. In addition to the Zn2+ providing electrophilic assistance in the hydrolysis, His-144 imidazole could form a hydrogen bond to the oxyanion of the tetrahedral intermediate. The extensive sequence identity of MshB, the deacetylase, with mycothiol S-conjugate amidase, an amide hydrolase that mediates detoxification of mycothiol S-conjugate xenobiotics, has allowed us to construct a faithful model of the catalytic domain of mycothiol S-conjugate amidase based on the structure of MshB.

  20. MpaA is a murein-tripeptide-specific zinc carboxypeptidase that functions as part of a catabolic pathway for peptidoglycan-derived peptides in γ-proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Abbas; Hervé, Mireille; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Thomas, Gavin H

    2012-12-15

    The murein peptide amidase MpaA is a cytoplasmic enzyme that processes peptides derived from the turnover of murein. We have purified the enzyme from Escherichia coli and demonstrated that it efficiently hydrolyses the γ-D-glutamyl-diaminopimelic acid bond in the murein tripeptide (L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-meso-Dap), with Km and kcat values of 0.41±0.05 mM and 38.3±10 s-1. However, it is unable to act on the murein tetrapeptide (L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-meso-Dap-D-Ala). E. coli MpaA is a homodimer containing one bound zinc ion per chain, as judged by mass spectrometric analysis and size-exclusion chromatography. To investigate the structure of MpaA we solved the crystal structure of the orthologous protein from Vibrio harveyi to 2.17 Å (1Å=0.1 nm). Vh_MpaA, which has identical enzymatic and biophysical properties to the E. coli enzyme, has high structural similarity to eukaryotic zinc carboxypeptidases. The structure confirms that MpaA is a dimeric zinc metalloprotein. Comparison of the structure of MpaA with those of other carboxypeptidases reveals additional structure that partially occludes the substrate-binding groove, perhaps explaining the narrower substrate specificity of the enzyme compared with other zinc carboxypeptidases. In γ-proteobacteria mpaA is often located adjacent to mppA which encodes a periplasmic transporter protein previously shown to bind murein tripeptide. We demonstrate that MppA can also bind murein tetrapeptide with high affinity. The genetic coupling of these genes and their related biochemical functions suggest that MpaA amidase and MppA transporter form part of a catabolic pathway for utilization of murein-derived peptides that operates in γ-proteobacteria in addition to the established murein recycling pathways.

  1. Structure-Based Modification of a Clostridium difficile-Targeting Endolysin Affects Activity and Host Range▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J.; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Spoerl, Rebecca; Narbad, Arjan; Meijers, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Endolysin CD27L causes cell lysis of the pathogen Clostridium difficile, a major cause of nosocomial infection. We report a structural and functional analysis of the catalytic activity of CD27L against C. difficile and other bacterial strains. We show that truncation of the endolysin to the N-terminal domain, CD27L1–179, gave an increased lytic activity against cells of C. difficile, while the C-terminal region, CD27L180–270, failed to produce lysis. CD27L1–179 also has increased activity against other bacterial species that are targeted by the full-length protein and in addition was able to lyse some CD27L-insensitive strains. However, CD27L1–179 retained a measure of specificity, failing to lyse a wide range of bacteria. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled proteins demonstrated that both CD27L and CD27L1–179 bound to C. difficile cell walls. The crystal structure of CD27L1–179 confirms that the enzyme is a zinc-dependent N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase. A structure-based sequence analysis allowed us to identify four catalytic residues, a proton relay cascade, and a substrate binding pocket. A BLAST search shows that the closest-related amidases almost exclusively target Clostridia. This implied that the catalytic domain alone contained features that target a specific bacterial species. To test this hypothesis, we modified Leu 98 to a Trp residue which is found in an endolysin from a bacteriophage of Listeria monocytogenes (PlyPSA). This mutation in CD27L resulted in an increased activity against selected serotypes of L. monocytogenes, demonstrating the potential to tune the species specificity of the catalytic domain of an endolysin. PMID:21803993

  2. Structure-based modification of a Clostridium difficile-targeting endolysin affects activity and host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Spoerl, Rebecca; Narbad, Arjan; Meijers, Rob

    2011-10-01

    Endolysin CD27L causes cell lysis of the pathogen Clostridium difficile, a major cause of nosocomial infection. We report a structural and functional analysis of the catalytic activity of CD27L against C. difficile and other bacterial strains. We show that truncation of the endolysin to the N-terminal domain, CD27L1-179, gave an increased lytic activity against cells of C. difficile, while the C-terminal region, CD27L180-270, failed to produce lysis. CD27L1-179 also has increased activity against other bacterial species that are targeted by the full-length protein and in addition was able to lyse some CD27L-insensitive strains. However, CD27L1-179 retained a measure of specificity, failing to lyse a wide range of bacteria. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled proteins demonstrated that both CD27L and CD27L1-179 bound to C. difficile cell walls. The crystal structure of CD27L1-179 confirms that the enzyme is a zinc-dependent N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase. A structure-based sequence analysis allowed us to identify four catalytic residues, a proton relay cascade, and a substrate binding pocket. A BLAST search shows that the closest-related amidases almost exclusively target Clostridia. This implied that the catalytic domain alone contained features that target a specific bacterial species. To test this hypothesis, we modified Leu 98 to a Trp residue which is found in an endolysin from a bacteriophage of Listeria monocytogenes (PlyPSA). This mutation in CD27L resulted in an increased activity against selected serotypes of L. monocytogenes, demonstrating the potential to tune the species specificity of the catalytic domain of an endolysin.

  3. Listeria bacteriophage peptidoglycan hydrolases feature high thermoresistance and reveal increased activity after divalent metal cation substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Waldherr, Florian; Loessner, Martin J

    2012-01-01

    The ability of the bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) to destroy Gram-positive bacteria from without makes these enzymes promising antimicrobials. Recombinant endolysins from Listeria monocytogenes phages have been shown to rapidly lyse and kill the pathogen in all environments. To determine optimum conditions regarding application of recombinant Listeria phage endolysins in food or production equipments, properties of different Listeria endolysins were studied. Optimum NaCl concentration for the amidase HPL511 was 200 nM and 300 mM for the peptidases HPL118, HPL500, and HPLP35. Unlike most other peptidoglycan hydrolases, all four enzymes exhibited highest activity at elevated pH values at around pH 8-9. Lytic activity was abolished by EDTA and could be restored by supplementation with various divalent metal cations, indicating their role in catalytic function. While substitution of the native Zn(2+) by Ca(2+) or Mn(2+) was most effective in case of HPL118, HPL500, and HPLP35, supplementation with Co(2+) and Mn(2+) resulted in an approximately 5-fold increase in HPL511 activity. Interestingly, the glutamate peptidases feature a conserved SxHxxGxAxD zinc-binding motif, which is not present in the amidases, although they also require centrally located divalent metals for activity. The endolysins HPL118, HPL511, and HPLP35 revealed a surprisingly high thermostability, with up to 35% activity remaining after 30 min incubation at 90°C. The available data suggest that denaturation at elevated temperatures is reversible and may be followed by rapid refolding into a functional state.

  4. [The in vitro cross-effects of inhibitors of renin-angiotensin and fibrinolytic systems on the key enzymes of these systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhametova, L I; Gulin, D A; Binevskiĭ, P V; Aĭsina, R B; Kost, O A; Nikol'skaia, I I

    2008-01-01

    The effects of hypotensive agents (captopril, enalaprilate, and lisinopril) on the activities of components of the fibrinolytic system (FS) and the effects of antifibrinolytic agents (6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA) and tranexamic acid (t-AMCHA)) on the activities of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were studied in vitro. Enalaprilate did not affect the FS activity. Captopril considerably inhibited the amidase activities of urokinase (u-PA), plasminogen tissue activator (t-PA), and plasmin ([I]50 (2.0-2.6) +/- 0.1 mM), and the activation of Glu-plasminogen affected by t-PA and u-PA ([I]50 (1.50-1.80) +/- 0.06 mM), which may be due to the presence of a mercapto group in the inhibitor molecule. Lisinopril did not affect the amidase activities of FS enzymes, but stimulated Glu-plasminogen and u-PA activation and inhibited activation of t-PA-fibrin-bound Glu-plasminogen ([I]50 (12.0 +/- 0.5) mM). Presumably, these effects can be explained by the presence in lisinopril of a Lys side residue, whose binding to lysine-binding Glu-plasminogen centers resulted, on the one hand, in the transformation of its closed conformation to a semi-open one and, on the other hand, in its desorption from fibrin. Unspecific inhibition of the activity of ACE, a key enzyme of the renin-angiotensin system, in the presence of 6-AHA and t-AMCHA ([I]50 10.0 +/- 0.5 and 7.5 +/- 0.4 mM, respectively) was found. A decrease in the ACE activity along with the growth of the fibrin monomer concentration was revealed. The data demonstrate that, along with endogenous mediated interactions, relations based on the direct interactions of exogenous inhibitors of one system affecting the activities of components of another system can take place.

  5. Molecular characterization of podoviral bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and their comparison with members of the Picovirinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V Volozhantsev

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium responsible for human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. Because bacteriophages or their gene products could be applied to control bacterial diseases in a species-specific manner, they are potential important alternatives to antibiotics. Consequently, poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that lysed C. perfringens. Two bacteriophages, designated ΦCPV4 and ΦZP2, were isolated in the Moscow Region of the Russian Federation while another closely related virus, named ΦCP7R, was isolated in the southeastern USA. The viruses were identified as members of the order Caudovirales in the family Podoviridae with short, non-contractile tails of the C1 morphotype. The genomes of the three bacteriophages were 17.972, 18.078 and 18.397 kbp respectively; encoding twenty-six to twenty-eight ORF's with inverted terminal repeats and an average GC content of 34.6%. Structural proteins identified by mass spectrometry in the purified ΦCP7R virion included a pre-neck/appendage with putative lyase activity, major head, tail, connector/upper collar, lower collar and a structural protein with putative lysozyme-peptidase activity. All three podoviral bacteriophage genomes encoded a predicted N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and a putative stage V sporulation protein. Each putative amidase contained a predicted bacterial SH3 domain at the C-terminal end of the protein, presumably involved with binding the C. perfringens cell wall. The predicted DNA polymerase type B protein sequences were closely related to other members of the Podoviridae including Bacillus phage Φ29. Whole-genome comparisons supported this relationship, but also indicated that the Russian and USA viruses may be unique members of the sub-family Picovirinae.

  6. Impact of AmpC Derepression on Fitness and Virulence: the Mechanism or the Pathway?

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    Marcelo Pérez-Gallego

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interplay between antibiotic resistance and bacterial fitness and virulence is essential to guide individual treatments and improve global antibiotic policies. A paradigmatic example of a resistance mechanism is the intrinsic inducible chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC from multiple Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major nosocomial pathogen. The regulation of ampC expression is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance is frequently mediated by inactivating mutations in ampD, encoding an N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase, affecting the levels of ampC-activating muropeptides. Here we dissect the impact of the multiple pathways causing AmpC hyperproduction on P. aeruginosa fitness and virulence. Through a detailed analysis, we demonstrate that the lack of all three P. aeruginosa AmpD amidases causes a dramatic effect in fitness and pathogenicity, severely compromising growth rates, motility, and cytotoxicity; the latter effect is likely achieved by repressing key virulence factors, such as protease LasA, phospholipase C, or type III secretion system components. We also show that ampC overexpression is required but not sufficient to confer the growth-motility-cytotoxicity impaired phenotype and that alternative pathways leading to similar levels of ampC hyperexpression and resistance, such as those involving PBP4, had no fitness-virulence cost. Further analysis indicated that fitness-virulence impairment is caused by overexpressing ampC in the absence of cell wall recycling, as reproduced by expressing ampC from a plasmid in an AmpG (muropeptide permease-deficient background. Thus, our findings represent a major step in the understanding of β-lactam resistance biology and its interplay with fitness and pathogenesis.

  7. Purification and Characterization of Allophanate Hydrolase (AtzF) from Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapir, Nir; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    AtzF, allophanate hydrolase, is a recently discovered member of the amidase signature family that catalyzes the terminal reaction during metabolism of s-triazine ring compounds by bacteria. In the present study, the atzF gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was cloned and expressed as a His-tagged protein, and the protein was purified and characterized. AtzF had a deduced subunit molecular mass of 66,223, based on the gene sequence, and an estimated holoenzyme molecular mass of 260,000. The active protein did not contain detectable metals or organic cofactors. Purified AtzF hydrolyzed allophanate with a kcat/Km of 1.1 × 104 s−1 M−1, and 2 mol of ammonia was released per mol allophanate. The substrate range of AtzF was very narrow. Urea, biuret, hydroxyurea, methylcarbamate, and other structurally analogous compounds were not substrates for AtzF. Only malonamate, which strongly inhibited allophanate hydrolysis, was an alternative substrate, with a greatly reduced kcat/Km of 21 s−1 M−1. Data suggested that the AtzF catalytic cycle proceeds through a covalent substrate-enzyme intermediate. AtzF reacts with malonamate and hydroxylamine to generate malonohydroxamate, potentially derived from hydroxylamine capture of an enzyme-tethered acyl group. Three putative catalytically important residues, one lysine and two serines, were altered by site-directed mutagenesis, each with complete loss of enzyme activity. The identity of a putative serine nucleophile was probed using phenyl phosphorodiamidate that was shown to be a time-dependent inhibitor of AtzF. Inhibition was due to phosphoroamidation of Ser189 as shown by liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The modified residue corresponds in sequence alignments to the nucleophilic serine previously identified in other members of the amidase signature family. Thus, AtzF affects the cleavage of three carbon-to-nitrogen bonds via a mechanism similar to that of enzymes

  8. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

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    Rawana N. Alkhalili

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase.

  9. Purification and characterization of the enzymes involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide degradation by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Thanaa Hamed; El-Ghonemy, Dina Helmy

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate a new pathway for the degradation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829 extracts. Enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of NAD, i.e. alkaline phosphatase, aminohydrolase and glycohydrolase were determined. Alkaline phosphatase was found to catalyse the sequential hydrolysis of two phosphate moieties of NAD molecule to nicotinamide riboside plus adenosine. Adenosine was then deaminated by aminohydrolase to inosine and ammonia. While glycohydrolase catalyzed the hydrolysis of the nicotinamide-ribosidic bond of NAD+ to produce nicotinamide and ADP-ribose in equimolar amounts, enzyme purification through a 3-step purification procedure revealed the existence of two peaks of alkaline phosphatases, and one peak contained deaminase and glycohydrolase activities. NAD deaminase was purified to homogeneity as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 91 kDa. Characterization and determination of some of NAD aminohydrolase kinetic properties were conducted due to its biological role in the regulation of cellular NAD level. The results also revealed that NAD did not exert its feedback control on nicotinamide amidase produced by P. brevicompactum.

  10. The impact of N-glycosylation on conformation and stability of immunoglobulin Y from egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Long; He, Zhenjiao; Chen, Jiahui; Liu, Yaofa; Ma, Meihu; Cai, Zhaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Immunoglobulin Y (IgY) is a new therapeutic antibody, and its applications in industry are very broad. To provide insight into the effects of N-glycosylation on IgY, its conformation and stability were studied. In this research, IgY was extracted from egg yolk and then digested by peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl) asparagine-amidase. SDS-PAGE and infrared absorption spectrum showed that carbohydrates were distinctly reduced after enzymolysis. The circular dichroism spectrum indicated that the IgY molecule became more flexible and disordered after removal of N-glycan. The fluorescence intensity revealed that Trp residues were buried in a more hydrophobic environment after disposal of N-glycan. Storage stability decreased with the removal of oligosaccharide chains based on size-exclusion chromatography analysis. Deglycosylated IgY exhibited less resistance to guanidine hydrochloride-induced unfolding. After deglycosylation, IgY was more sensitive to pepsin. Therefore, N-glycosylation played an important role in the maintenance of the structure and stability of IgY. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mass spectrometry characterization for N-glycosylation of immunoglobulin Y from hen egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Long; He, Zhenjiao; Liu, Yaping; Ma, Meihu; Cai, Zhaoxia

    2018-03-01

    Immunoglobulin Y (IgY) is a new therapeutic antibody that exists in hen egg yolk. It is a glycoprotein, not much is known about its N-glycan structures, site occupancy and site-specific N-glycosylation. In this study, purified protein from hen egg yolk was identified as IgY based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. N-glycan was released from IgY using peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl) asparagine-amidase treatment, and the molecular weight of IgY was calculated using the difference between the molecular weight of IgY and deglycosylated IgY. Two potential N-Glycosylation sites (ASN 308 and ASN 409 ) were detected on IgY by nanoLC-ESI MS. Sugar chains were separated using normal phase liquid chromatography after fluorescence labeling, and 17 N-glycan structures were confirmed using ESI-MS. The sugar chain pattern contained high-mannose oligosaccharide, hybrid oligosaccharide and complex oligosaccharide. These results could lead to other important information regarding IgY glycosylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv using integrated approach of multiple computational algorithms and experimental analysis.

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    Sanjiv Kumar

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria interacting with eukaryotic host express adhesins on their surface. These adhesins aid in bacterial attachment to the host cell receptors during colonization. A few adhesins such as Heparin binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA, Apa, Malate Synthase of M. tuberculosis have been identified using specific experimental interaction models based on the biological knowledge of the pathogen. In the present work, we carried out computational screening for adhesins of M. tuberculosis. We used an integrated computational approach using SPAAN for predicting adhesins, PSORTb, SubLoc and LocTree for extracellular localization, and BLAST for verifying non-similarity to human proteins. These steps are among the first of reverse vaccinology. Multiple claims and attacks from different algorithms were processed through argumentative approach. Additional filtration criteria included selection for proteins with low molecular weights and absence of literature reports. We examined binding potential of the selected proteins using an image based ELISA. The protein Rv2599 (membrane protein binds to human fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Rv3717 (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and Rv0309 (L,D-transpeptidase bind to fibronectin and laminin. We report Rv2599 (membrane protein, Rv0309 and Rv3717 as novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Our results expand the number of known adhesins of M. tuberculosis and suggest their regulated expression in different stages.

  13. A second endolysin gene is fully embedded in-frame with the lysA gene of mycobacteriophage Ms6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalão, Maria João; Milho, Catarina; Gil, Filipa; Moniz-Pereira, José; Pimentel, Madalena

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages are dsDNA viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. The mycobacteriophage Ms6 accomplishes lysis by producing two cell wall hydrolytic enzymes, Lysin A (LysA) that possesses a central peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP) super-family conserved domain with the amidase catalytic site, that cleaves the amide bond between the N-acetylmuramic acid and L-alanine residues in the oligopeptide crosslinking chains of the peptidoglycan and Lysin B (LysB) a mycolylarabinogalactan esterase that hydrolyzes the mycolic acids from the mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex. Examination of the endolysin (lysA) DNA sequence revealed the existence of an embedded gene (lysA(241)) encoded in the same reading frame and preceded by a consensus ribosome-binding site. In the present work we show that, even though lysA is essential for Ms6 viability, phage mutants that express only the longer (Lysin(384)) or the shorter (Lysin(241)) endolysin are viable, but defective in the normal timing, progression and completion of host cell lysis. In addition, both endolysins have peptidoglycan hydrolase activity and demonstrated broad growth inhibition activity against various gram-positive bacteria and mycobacteria.

  14. Purification and physicochemical characterization of a serine protease with fibrinolytic activity from latex of a medicinal herb Euphorbia hirta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Girijesh Kumar; Kawale, Ashish Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2012-03-01

    A 34 kDa serine protease, designated as hirtin, with fibrinolytic activity was purified to homogeneity from the latex of Euphorbia hirta by the combination of ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of hirtin was found to be YAVYIGLILETAA/NNE. Hirtin exhibited esterase and amidase activities along with azocaseinolytic, gelatinolytic, fibrinogenolytic and fibrinolytic activities. It preferentially hydrolyzed Aα and α-chains, followed by Bβ and β, and γ and γ-γ chains of fibrinogen and fibrin clot respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity was found to be pH 7.2 and 50 °C respectively. Enzymatic activity of hirtin was significantly inhibited by PMSF and AEBSF. It showed higher specificity for synthetic substrate p-tos-GPRNA for thrombin. The CD spectra of hirtin showed a high content of β-sheets as compared to α-helix. The results indicate that hirtin is a thrombin-like serine protease and may have potential industrial and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A review of the interactions between acrylamide, microorganisms and food components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda-Chodak, A; Wajda, Ł; Tarko, T; Sroka, P; Satora, P

    2016-03-01

    Acrylamide (AA) and its metabolites have been recognized as potential carcinogens, but also they can cause other negative symptoms in human or animal organisms and therefore this class of chemical compounds has attracted a lot of attention. These substances are usually formed when heating asparagine in the presence of compounds that have α-hydroxycarbonyl groups, α,β,γ,δ-diunsaturated carbonyl groups or α-dicarbonyl groups. The acrolein pathway and enzymatic decarboxylation of asparagine, as well as endogenic processes, are other alternative routes to AA formation. It has been demonstrated that the animal model used for examining AA toxicity may not be sufficient to investigate these changes in humans, therefore it is necessary to design an in vitro model, which could provide more accurate insights into the direction of these processes in human organisms. Acrylamide can be metabolized through both oxidative and reductive pathways; moreover, there is also a chance that some representatives of intestinal microbiota are able to transform acrylamide. It was shown that there are various microorganisms, mostly bacteria, that produce amidases, i.e. enzymes decomposing AA. Lactic acid bacteria also appear to demonstrate the ability to use acrylamide as a carbon source, but this still requires further investigation. Another way to prevent AA toxicity is related to the presence of some food compounds, such as certain proteins or polyphenols. There are still lot of gaps in the current knowledge related to AA toxicity, so future potential research directions are presented in this review as well.

  16. Characterization of AmiBA2446, a novel bacteriolytic enzyme active against Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Krunal K; Paskaleva, Elena E; Azizi-Ghannad, Saba; Ley, Daniel J; Page, Martin A; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2013-10-01

    There continues to be a need for developing efficient and environmentally friendly treatments for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. One emerging approach for inactivation of vegetative B. anthracis is the use of bacteriophage endolysins or lytic enzymes encoded by bacterial genomes (autolysins) with highly evolved specificity toward bacterium-specific peptidoglycan cell walls. In this work, we performed in silico analysis of the genome of Bacillus anthracis strain Ames, using a consensus binding domain amino acid sequence as a probe, and identified a novel lytic enzyme that we termed AmiBA2446. This enzyme exists as a homodimer, as determined by size exclusion studies. It possesses N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase activity, as determined from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of muropeptides released due to the enzymatic digestion of peptidoglycan. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that AmiBA2446 was an autolysin of bacterial origin. We characterized the effects of enzyme concentration and phase of bacterial growth on bactericidal activity and observed close to a 5-log reduction in the viability of cells of Bacillus cereus 4342, a surrogate for B. anthracis. We further tested the bactericidal activity of AmiBA2446 against various Bacillus species and demonstrated significant activity against B. anthracis and B. cereus strains. We also demonstrated activity against B. anthracis spores after pretreatment with germinants. AmiBA2446 enzyme was also stable in solution, retaining its activity after 4 months of storage at room temperature.

  17. A Personal Retrospective: Elevating Anandamide (AEA by Targeting Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH and the Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Deutsch

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This perspective was adapted from a Career Achievement Award talk given at the International Cannabinoid Research Society Symposium in Bukovina, Poland on June 27, 2016. As a biochemist working in the neurosciences, I was always fascinated with neurotransmitter inactivation. In 1993 we identified an enzyme activity that breaks down anandamide. We called the enzyme anandamide amidase, now called FAAH. We and other laboratories developed FAAH inhibitors that were useful reagents that also proved to have beneficial physiological effects and, until recently, new generations of inhibitors were in clinical trials. Nearly all neurotransmitters are water soluble and, as such, require a transmembrane protein transporter to pass through the lipid membrane for inactivation inside the cell. However, using model systems, we and others have shown that this is unnecessary for anandamide, an uncharged hydrophobic molecule that readily diffuses across the cellular membrane. Interestingly, its uptake is driven by the concentration gradient resulting from its breakdown mainly by FAAH localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. We identified the FABPs as intracellular carriers that solubilize anandamide, transporting anandamide to FAAH. Compounds that bind to FABPs block AEA breakdown, raising its level. The cannabinoids (THC and CBD also were discovered to bind FABPs and this may be one of the mechanisms by which CBD works in childhood epilepsy, raising anandamide levels. Targeting FABPs may be advantageous since they have some tissue specificity and do not require reactive serine hydrolase inhibitors, as does FAAH, with potential for off-target reactions.

  18. TLR4 receptor expression and function in F11 dorsal root ganglion × neuroblastoma hybrid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Sanaz; Alhouayek, Mireille; Fowler, Christopher J

    2017-11-01

    TLR4 respond to bacterial LPS to produce inflammatory cytokines. TLR4 are expressed in dorsal root ganglia and play a role in pain. F11 dorsal root ganglia × mouse neuroblastoma cells possess many of the properties seen in nociceptive dorsal root ganglia neuronal cells. Here, we investigated the effect of 2 h and 6 h treatment with LPS upon the expression of inflammatory proteins in undifferentiated and differentiated F11 cells. The cells expressed mRNA for TRL4 (mouse, not rat) and proteins involved in TLR4 signaling. TLR4 expression was confirmed using immunohistochemistry. LPS produced modest increases in mouse and rat IL-6 and in mouse cyclooxygenase-2 levels in undifferentiated cells, but did not significantly affect mouse TNF-α expression. This contrasts with the robust effects of LPS upon cyclooxygenase-2 expression in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons. F11 cells expressed the endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase and N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (both murine), which were functionally active. These data suggest that F11 cells are not a useful model for the study of LPS-mediated effects but may be useful for the study of endocannabinoid catabolism.

  19. Elucidating the impact of microbial community biodiversity on pharmaceutical biotransformation during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Lauren B; Delgado Vela, Jeseth; Jain, Sunit; Dick, Gregory J; Love, Nancy G

    2017-10-27

    In addition to removing organics and other nutrients, the microorganisms in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) biotransform many pharmaceuticals present in wastewater. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between pharmaceutical biotransformation and biodiversity in WWTP bioreactor microbial communities and identify taxa and functional genes that were strongly associated with biotransformation. Dilution-to-extinction of an activated sludge microbial community was performed to establish cultures with a gradient of microbial biodiversity. Batch experiments were performed using the dilution cultures to determine biotransformation extents of several environmentally relevant pharmaceuticals. With this approach, because the communities were all established from the same original community, and using sequencing of the 16S rRNA and metatranscriptome, we identified candidate taxa and genes whose activity and transcript abundances associated with the extent of individual pharmaceutical biotransformation and were lost across the biodiversity gradient. Metabolic genes such as dehydrogenases, amidases and monooxygenases were significantly associated with pharmaceutical biotransformation, and five genera were identified whose activity significantly associated with pharmaceutical biotransformation. Understanding how biotransformation relates to biodiversity will inform the design of biological WWTPs for enhanced removal of chemicals that negatively impact environmental health. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  1. Crystal Structure of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Bound to the Carbamate Inhibitor URB597: Discovery of a Deacylating Water Molecule and Insight into Enzyme Inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileni, Mauro; Kamtekar, Satwik; Wood, David C.; Benson, Timothy E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (Pfizer)

    2010-08-12

    The endocannabinoid system regulates a wide range of physiological processes including pain, inflammation, and cognitive/emotional states. URB597 is one of the best characterized covalent inhibitors of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Here, we report the structure of the FAAH-URB597 complex at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure provides insights into mechanistic details of enzyme inactivation and experimental evidence of a previously uncharacterized active site water molecule that likely is involved in substrate deacylation. This water molecule is part of an extensive hydrogen-bonding network and is coordinated indirectly to residues lining the cytosolic port of the enzyme. In order to corroborate our hypothesis concerning the role of this water molecule in FAAH's catalytic mechanism, we determined the structure of FAAH conjugated to a urea-based inhibitor, PF-3845, to a higher resolution (2.4 {angstrom}) than previously reported. The higher-resolution structure confirms the presence of the water molecule in a virtually identical location in the active site. Examination of the structures of serine hydrolases that are non-homologous to FAAH, such as elastase, trypsin, or chymotrypsin, shows a similarly positioned hydrolytic water molecule and suggests a functional convergence between the amidase signature enzymes and serine proteases.

  2. Biochemical and Mutational Studies of the Bacillus cereus CECT 5050T Formamidase Support the Existence of a C-E-E-K Tetrad in Several Members of the Nitrilase Superfamily ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Maldonado, Pablo; Martínez-Gómez, Ana Isabel; Andújar-Sánchez, Montserrat; Neira, José L.; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Formamidases (EC 3.5.1.49) are poorly characterized proteins. In spite of this scarce knowledge, ammonia has been described as playing a central role in the pathogenesis of human pathogens such as Helicobacter pylori, for which formamidase has been shown to participate in the nitrogen metabolic pathway. Sequence analysis has revealed that at least two different groups of formamidases are classified as EC 3.5.1.49: on the one hand, the derivatives of the FmdA-AmdA superfamily, which are the best studied to date, and on the other hand, the derivatives of Helicobacter pylori AmiF. Here we present the cloning, purification, and characterization of a recombinant formamidase from Bacillus cereus CECT 5050T (BceAmiF), the second member of the AmiF subfamily to be characterized, showing new features of the enzyme further supporting its relationship with aliphatic amidases. We also present homology modeling-based mutational studies confirming the importance of the Glu140 and Tyr191 residues in the enzymatic activities of the AmiF family. Moreover, we can conclude that a second glutamate residue is critical in several members of the nitrilase superfamily, meaning that what has consistently been identified as a C-E-K triad is in fact a C-E-E-K tetrad. PMID:21705545

  3. Biochemical and mutational studies of the Bacillus cereus CECT 5050T formamidase support the existence of a C-E-E-K tetrad in several members of the nitrilase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Maldonado, Pablo; Martínez-Gómez, Ana Isabel; Andújar-Sánchez, Montserrat; Neira, José L; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2011-08-15

    Formamidases (EC 3.5.1.49) are poorly characterized proteins. In spite of this scarce knowledge, ammonia has been described as playing a central role in the pathogenesis of human pathogens such as Helicobacter pylori, for which formamidase has been shown to participate in the nitrogen metabolic pathway. Sequence analysis has revealed that at least two different groups of formamidases are classified as EC 3.5.1.49: on the one hand, the derivatives of the FmdA-AmdA superfamily, which are the best studied to date, and on the other hand, the derivatives of Helicobacter pylori AmiF. Here we present the cloning, purification, and characterization of a recombinant formamidase from Bacillus cereus CECT 5050T (BceAmiF), the second member of the AmiF subfamily to be characterized, showing new features of the enzyme further supporting its relationship with aliphatic amidases. We also present homology modeling-based mutational studies confirming the importance of the Glu140 and Tyr191 residues in the enzymatic activities of the AmiF family. Moreover, we can conclude that a second glutamate residue is critical in several members of the nitrilase superfamily, meaning that what has consistently been identified as a C-E-K triad is in fact a C-E-E-K tetrad.

  4. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas El Sahili

    Full Text Available Quorum-quenching (QQ are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL. Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated.

  5. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis, properties, and application in peptide chemistry of a magnetically separable and reusable biocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liria, Cleber W.; Ungaro, Vitor A.; Fernandes, Raphaella M.; Costa, Natália J. S.; Marana, Sandro R.; Rossi, Liane M.; Machini, M. Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed chemical processes are selective, very productive, and generate little waste. Nevertheless, they may be optimized using enzymes bound to solid supports, which are particularly important for protease-mediated reactions since proteases undergo fast autolysis in solution. Magnetic nanoparticles are suitable supports for this purpose owing to their high specific surface area and to be easily separated from reaction media. Here we describe the immobilization of bovine α-chymotrypsin (αCT) on silica-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@silica) and the characterization of the enzyme-nanoparticle hybrid (Fe3O4@silica-αCT) in terms of protein content, properties, recovery from reaction media, application, and reuse in enzyme-catalyzed peptide synthesis. The results revealed that (i) full acid hydrolysis of the immobilized protease followed by amino acid analysis of the hydrolyzate is a reliable method to determine immobilization yield; (ii) despite showing lower amidase activity and a lower K cat/ K m value for a specific substrate than free αCT, the immobilized enzyme is chemically and thermally more stable, magnetically recoverable from reaction media, and can be consecutively reused for ten cycles to catalyze the amide bond hydrolysis and ester hydrolysis of the protected dipeptide Z-Ala-Phe-OMe. Altogether, these properties indicate the potential of Fe3O4@silica-αCT to act as an efficient, suitably stable, and reusable catalyst in amino acid, peptide, and protein chemistry as well as in proteomic studies.

  7. Staphylococcus haemolyticus prophage ΦSH2 endolysin relies on Cysteine, Histidine-dependent Amidohydrolases/Peptidases activity for lysis ‘from without’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Korobova, Olga; Schischkova, Nina; Kiseleva, Natalia; Kopylov, Paul; Pryamchuk, Sergey; Donovan, David M.; Abaev, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, with methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and multi-drug resistant strains becoming increasingly prevalent in both human and veterinary clinics. S. aureus causing bovine mastitis yields high annual losses to the dairy industry. Conventional treatment of mastitis by broad range antibiotics is often not successful and may contribute to development of antibiotic resistance. Bacteriophage endolysins present a promising new source of antimicrobials. The endolysin of prophage ΦSH2 of Staphylococcus haemolyticus strain JCSC1435 (ΦSH2 lysin) is a peptidoglycan hydrolase consisting of two catalytic domains (CHAP and amidase) and an SH3b cell wall binding domain. In this work, we demonstrated its lytic activity against live staphylococcal cells and investigated the contribution of each functional module to bacterial lysis by testing a series of deletion constructs in zymograms and turbidity reduction assays. The CHAP domain exhibited three-fold higher activity than the full length protein and optimum activity in physiological saline. This activity was further enhanced by the presence of bivalent calcium ions. The SH3b domain was shown to be required for full activity of the complete ΦSH2 lysin. The full length enzyme and the CHAP domain showed activity against multiple staphylococcal strains, including MRSA strains, mastitis isolates, and CoNS. PMID:23026556

  8. Mycobacteriophage endolysins: diverse and modular enzymes with multiple catalytic activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Payne

    Full Text Available The mycobacterial cell wall presents significant challenges to mycobacteriophages--viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts--because of its unusual structure containing a mycolic acid-rich mycobacterial outer membrane attached to an arabinogalactan layer that is in turn linked to the peptidoglycan. Although little is known about how mycobacteriophages circumvent these barriers during the process of infection, destroying it for lysis at the end of their lytic cycles requires an unusual set of functions. These include Lysin B proteins that cleave the linkage of mycolic acids to the arabinogalactan layer, chaperones required for endolysin delivery to peptidoglycan, holins that regulate lysis timing, and the endolysins (Lysin As that hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Because mycobacterial peptidoglycan contains atypical features including 3→3 interpeptide linkages, it is not surprising that the mycobacteriophage endolysins also have non-canonical features. We present here a bioinformatic dissection of these lysins and show that they are highly diverse and extensively modular, with an impressive number of domain organizations. Most contain three domains with a novel N-terminal predicted peptidase, a centrally located amidase, muramidase, or transglycosylase, and a C-terminal putative cell wall binding domain.

  9. Characterization of an endolysin, LysBPS13, from a Bacillus cereus bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeeun; Yun, Jiae; Lim, Jeong-A; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-07-01

    Use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents is a promising tool for controlling pathogenic bacteria including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Not only bacteriophages but also endolysins, the peptidoglycan hydrolyzing enzymes encoded by bacteriophages, have high potential for applications as biocontrol agents against food-borne pathogens. In this study, a putative endolysin gene was identified in the genome of the bacteriophage BPS13, which infects Bacillus cereus. In silico analysis of this endolysin, designated LysBPS13, showed that it consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain (PGRP domain) and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (SH3_5 domain). Further characterization of the purified LysBPS13 revealed that this endolysin is an N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase, the activity of which was not influenced by addition of EDTA. In addition, LysBPS13 demonstrated remarkable thermostability in the presence of glycerol, and it retained its lytic activity even after incubation at 100 °C for 30 min. Taken together, these results indicate that LysBPS13 can be considered a favorable candidate for a new antimicrobial agent to control B. cereus. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A second endolysin gene is fully embedded in-frame with the lysA gene of mycobacteriophage Ms6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Catalão

    Full Text Available Mycobacteriophages are dsDNA viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. The mycobacteriophage Ms6 accomplishes lysis by producing two cell wall hydrolytic enzymes, Lysin A (LysA that possesses a central peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP super-family conserved domain with the amidase catalytic site, that cleaves the amide bond between the N-acetylmuramic acid and L-alanine residues in the oligopeptide crosslinking chains of the peptidoglycan and Lysin B (LysB a mycolylarabinogalactan esterase that hydrolyzes the mycolic acids from the mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex. Examination of the endolysin (lysA DNA sequence revealed the existence of an embedded gene (lysA(241 encoded in the same reading frame and preceded by a consensus ribosome-binding site. In the present work we show that, even though lysA is essential for Ms6 viability, phage mutants that express only the longer (Lysin(384 or the shorter (Lysin(241 endolysin are viable, but defective in the normal timing, progression and completion of host cell lysis. In addition, both endolysins have peptidoglycan hydrolase activity and demonstrated broad growth inhibition activity against various gram-positive bacteria and mycobacteria.

  11. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Swift

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ɸGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ɸCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50° C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production.

  12. Characterization of the Lytic Capability of a LysK-Like Endolysin, Lys-phiSA012, Derived from a Polyvalent Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Jumpei; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Furusawa, Takaaki; Ohno, Hazuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Kitana, Junya; Usui, Masaru; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Tanji, Yasunori; Tamura, Yutaka; Iwano, Hidetomo

    2018-02-24

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) have spread widely and rapidly, with their increased occurrence corresponding with the increased use of antibiotics. Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus have a considerable negative impact on human and livestock health. Bacteriophages and their peptidoglycan hydrolytic enzymes (endolysins) have received significant attention as novel approaches against ARB, including S. aureus . In the present study, we purified an endolysin, Lys-phiSA012, which harbors a cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) domain, an amidase domain, and a SH3b cell wall binding domain, derived from a polyvalent S. aureus bacteriophage which we reported previously. We demonstrate that Lys-phiSA012 exhibits high lytic activity towards staphylococcal strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Analysis of deletion mutants showed that only mutants possessing the CHAP and SH3b domains could lyse S. aureus , indicating that lytic activity of the CHAP domain depended on the SH3b domain. The presence of at least 1 mM Ca 2+ and 100 µM Zn 2+ enhanced the lytic activity of Lys-phiSA012 in a turbidity reduction assay. Furthermore, a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay showed that the addition of Lys-phiSA012 decreased the MIC of oxacillin. Our results suggest that endolysins are a promising approach for replacing current antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the proper use of antibiotics, leading to the reduction of ARB.

  13. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Steven M; Seal, Bruce S; Garrish, Johnna K; Oakley, Brian B; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M

    2015-06-12

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ɸGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ɸCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50° C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production.

  14. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Characterization of the Lytic Capability of a LysK-Like Endolysin, Lys-phiSA012, Derived from a Polyvalent Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Fujiki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB have spread widely and rapidly, with their increased occurrence corresponding with the increased use of antibiotics. Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus have a considerable negative impact on human and livestock health. Bacteriophages and their peptidoglycan hydrolytic enzymes (endolysins have received significant attention as novel approaches against ARB, including S. aureus. In the present study, we purified an endolysin, Lys-phiSA012, which harbors a cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP domain, an amidase domain, and a SH3b cell wall binding domain, derived from a polyvalent S. aureus bacteriophage which we reported previously. We demonstrate that Lys-phiSA012 exhibits high lytic activity towards staphylococcal strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Analysis of deletion mutants showed that only mutants possessing the CHAP and SH3b domains could lyse S. aureus, indicating that lytic activity of the CHAP domain depended on the SH3b domain. The presence of at least 1 mM Ca2+ and 100 µM Zn2+ enhanced the lytic activity of Lys-phiSA012 in a turbidity reduction assay. Furthermore, a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assay showed that the addition of Lys-phiSA012 decreased the MIC of oxacillin. Our results suggest that endolysins are a promising approach for replacing current antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the proper use of antibiotics, leading to the reduction of ARB.

  16. Characterization of the N-Terminal Catalytic Domain of Lytµ1/6, an Endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens Phage µ1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2016-10-01

    Previous characterization of Lytµ1/6, an endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens phage µ1/6, suggested that the N-terminal domain is responsible for the catalytic activity of Lytµ1/6. Mutational analyses (deletions and site-directed mutagenesis) demonstrated that lytic activity of Lytµ1/6 relies on the N-terminal part of about 200 amino acid residues. Various C-terminally truncated versions of Lytµ1/6 failed to cause lysis, indicating the necessity of the CBD for full enzyme activity. Functional analysis of the point mutants suggested that the residues K27, H31, E109, H176, and D184 were essential for lytic activity of the µ1/6 endolysin. Further characterization of the purified Lytµ1/6 revealed that this endolysin is an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase which seems to be unrelated to any of the known conserved catalytic domains of phage endolysins or bacterial autolysins.

  17. Genomic sequence of bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 and activity of its endolysin and engineered variants against Clostridium sporogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J; Gasson, Michael J; Narbad, Arjan

    2012-05-01

    Lytic bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 produces large plaques on its host Clostridium sporogenes. Sequencing of the 47,595-bp genome allowed the identification of 82 putative open reading frames, including those encoding proteins for head and tail morphogenesis and lysis. However, sequences commonly associated with lysogeny were absent. ORF 22 encodes an endolysin, CS74L, that shows homology to N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases, and when expressed in Escherichia coli, the protein causes effective lysis of C. sporogenes cells when added externally. CS74L was also active on Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum. The catalytic domain expressed alone (CS74L(1-177)) exhibited a similar activity and the same host range as the full-length endolysin. A chimeric endolysin consisting of the CS74L catalytic domain fused to the C-terminal domain of endolysin CD27L, derived from Clostridium difficile bacteriophage ΦCD27, was produced. This chimera (CSCD) lysed C. sporogenes cells with an activity equivalent to that of the catalytic domain alone. In contrast, the CD27L C-terminal domain reduced the efficacy of the CS74L catalytic domain when tested against C. tyrobutyricum. The addition of the CD27L C-terminal domain did not enable the lysin to target C. difficile or other CD27L-sensitive bacteria.

  18. Endolysin of bacteriophage BFK20: evidence of a catalytic and a cell wall binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerova, Martina; Halgasova, Nora; Ugorcakova, Jana; Bukovska, Gabriela

    2011-08-01

    A gene product of ORF24' was identified on the genome of corynephage BFK20 as a putative phage endolysin. The protein of endolysin BFK20 (gp24') has a modular structure consisting of an N-terminal amidase_2 domain (gp24CD) and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (gp24BD). The C-terminal domain is unrelated to any of the known cell wall binding domains of phage endolysins. The whole endolysin gene and the sequences of its N-terminal and C-terminal domains were cloned; proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The lytic activities of endolysin and its catalytic domain were demonstrated on corynebacteria and bacillus substrates. The binding activity of cell wall binding domain alone and in fusion with green fluorescent protein (gp24BD-GFP) were shown by specific binding assays to the cell surface of BFK20 host Brevibacterium flavum CCM 251 as well as those of other corynebacteria. 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Second Endolysin Gene Is Fully Embedded In-Frame with the lysA Gene of Mycobacteriophage Ms6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalão, Maria João; Milho, Catarina; Gil, Filipa; Moniz-Pereira, José; Pimentel, Madalena

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages are dsDNA viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. The mycobacteriophage Ms6 accomplishes lysis by producing two cell wall hydrolytic enzymes, Lysin A (LysA) that possesses a central peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP) super-family conserved domain with the amidase catalytic site, that cleaves the amide bond between the N-acetylmuramic acid and L-alanine residues in the oligopeptide crosslinking chains of the peptidoglycan and Lysin B (LysB) a mycolylarabinogalactan esterase that hydrolyzes the mycolic acids from the mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex. Examination of the endolysin (lysA) DNA sequence revealed the existence of an embedded gene (lysA241) encoded in the same reading frame and preceded by a consensus ribosome-binding site. In the present work we show that, even though lysA is essential for Ms6 viability, phage mutants that express only the longer (Lysin384) or the shorter (Lysin241) endolysin are viable, but defective in the normal timing, progression and completion of host cell lysis. In addition, both endolysins have peptidoglycan hydrolase activity and demonstrated broad growth inhibition activity against various Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacteria. PMID:21694774

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Polyacrylamide-Degrading Bacteria from Dewatered Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylamide (PAM is a water-soluble polymer that is widely used as a flocculant in sewage treatment. The accumulation of PAM affects the formation of dewatered sludge and potentially produces hazardous monomers. In the present study, the bacterial strain HI47 was isolated from dewatered sludge. This strain could metabolize PAM as its sole nutrient source and was subsequently identified as Pseudomonas putida. The efficiency of PAM degradation was 31.1% in 7 days and exceeded 45% under optimum culture condition (pH 7.2, 39 °C and 100 rpm. The addition of yeast extract and glucose improved the bacterial growth and PAM degradation. The degraded PAM samples were analyzed by gel-filtration chromatography, Fourier transform infrared and high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that high-molecular-weight PAM was partly cleaved to small molecular oligomer derivatives and part of the amide groups of PAM had been converted to carboxyl groups. The biodegradation did not accumulate acrylamide monomers. Based on the SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing results, the PAM amide groups were converted into carboxyl groups by a PAM-induced extracellular enzyme from the aliphatic amidase family.

  1. Purification and characterization of TrzF: biuret hydrolysis by allophanate hydrolase supports growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapir, Nir; Cheng, Gang; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2006-04-01

    TrzF, the allophanate hydrolase from Enterobacter cloacae strain 99, was cloned, overexpressed in the presence of a chaperone protein, and purified to homogeneity. Native TrzF had a subunit molecular weight of 65,401 and a subunit stoichiometry of alpha(2) and did not contain significant levels of metals. TrzF showed time-dependent inhibition by phenyl phosphorodiamidate and is a member of the amidase signature protein family. TrzF was highly active in the hydrolysis of allophanate but was not active with urea, despite having been previously considered a urea amidolyase. TrzF showed lower activity with malonamate, malonamide, and biuret. The allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, AtzF, was also shown to hydrolyze biuret slowly. Since biuret and allophanate are consecutive metabolites in cyanuric acid metabolism, the low level of biuret hydrolase activity can have physiological significance. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain containing atzD, encoding cyanuric acid hydrolase that produces biuret, and atzF grew slowly on cyanuric acid as a source of nitrogen. The amount of growth produced was consistent with the liberation of 3 mol of ammonia from cyanuric acid. In vitro, TrzF was shown to hydrolyze biuret to liberate 3 mol of ammonia. The biuret hydrolyzing activity of TrzF might also be physiologically relevant in native strains. E. cloacae strain 99 grows on cyanuric acid with a significant accumulation of biuret.

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization of the biuret hydrolase (BiuH) from the cyanuric acid catabolism pathway of Rhizobium leguminasorum bv. viciae 3841.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquirol, Lygie; Peat, Thomas S; Wilding, Matthew; Lucent, Del; French, Nigel G; Hartley, Carol J; Newman, Janet; Scott, Colin

    2018-01-01

    Biuret deamination is an essential step in cyanuric acid mineralization. In the well-studied atrazine degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, the amidase AtzE catalyzes this step. However, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 uses an unrelated cysteine hydrolase, BiuH, instead. Herein, structures of BiuH, BiuH with bound inhibitor and variants of BiuH are reported. The substrate is bound in the active site by a hydrogen bonding network that imparts high substrate specificity. The structure of the inactive Cys175Ser BiuH variant with substrate bound in the active site revealed that an active site cysteine (Cys175), aspartic acid (Asp36) and lysine (Lys142) form a catalytic triad, which is consistent with biochemical studies of BiuH variants. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations highlighted the presence of three channels from the active site to the enzyme surface: a persistent tunnel gated by residues Val218 and Gln215 forming a potential substrate channel and two smaller channels formed by Val28 and a mobile loop (including residues Phe41, Tyr47 and Met51) that may serve as channels for co-product (ammonia) or co-substrate (water).

  3. Structural and biochemical characterization of the biuret hydrolase (BiuH from the cyanuric acid catabolism pathway of Rhizobium leguminasorum bv. viciae 3841.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygie Esquirol

    Full Text Available Biuret deamination is an essential step in cyanuric acid mineralization. In the well-studied atrazine degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, the amidase AtzE catalyzes this step. However, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 uses an unrelated cysteine hydrolase, BiuH, instead. Herein, structures of BiuH, BiuH with bound inhibitor and variants of BiuH are reported. The substrate is bound in the active site by a hydrogen bonding network that imparts high substrate specificity. The structure of the inactive Cys175Ser BiuH variant with substrate bound in the active site revealed that an active site cysteine (Cys175, aspartic acid (Asp36 and lysine (Lys142 form a catalytic triad, which is consistent with biochemical studies of BiuH variants. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations highlighted the presence of three channels from the active site to the enzyme surface: a persistent tunnel gated by residues Val218 and Gln215 forming a potential substrate channel and two smaller channels formed by Val28 and a mobile loop (including residues Phe41, Tyr47 and Met51 that may serve as channels for co-product (ammonia or co-substrate (water.

  4. Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, protects against light-induced retinal degeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuki; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Ogami, Shiho; Yamane, Shinsaku; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-05-15

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous constellation of proteins related to cannabinoid 1 receptor signaling, including free fatty acids, diacylglycerol lipase, and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase, are localized in the murine retina. Moreover, the expression levels of endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors are changed in the vitreous fluid. However, the role of the endocannabinoid system in the retina, particularly in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration, remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated involvement of the cannabinoid 1 receptor in light-induced retinal degeneration using in vitro and in vivo models. To evaluate the effect of cannabinoid 1 receptors in light irradiation-induced cell death, the mouse retinal cone-cell line (661W) was treated with a cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Time-dependent changes of expression and localization of retinal cannabinoid 1 receptors were measured using Western blot and immunostaining. Retinal damage was induced in mice by exposure to light, followed by intravitreal injection of rimonabant. Electroretinograms and histologic analyses were performed. Rimonabant suppressed light-induced photoreceptor cell death. Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression was upregulated by light exposure. Treatment with rimonabant improved both a- and b-wave amplitudes and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These results suggest that the cannabinoid 1 receptor is involved in light-induced retinal degeneration and it may represent a therapeutic target in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Hentzer, Morten

    2002-01-01

    The expression of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is negatively regulated by the activity of an amidase, AmpD. In the present study we examined resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains and several resistant variants isolated from in vivo and in vitro biofilms for mutations...... in ampD to find evidence for the genetic changes leading to high-level expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase. A new insertion sequence, IS1669, was found located in the ampD genes of two clinical P. aeruginosa isolates and several biofilm-isolated variants. The presence of IS1669 in ampD resulted...... in the expression of high levels of AmpC beta-lactamase. Complementation of these isolates with ampD from the reference P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 caused a dramatic decrease in the expression of AmpC beta-lactamase and a parallel decrease of the MIC of ceftazidime to a level comparable to that of PAO1. One highly...

  6. Capillary electrophoresis of the proteolytic activity of the stratum corneum obtained by tape stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoiu, Alexandru D P; Yosipovitch, Gil; Shihabi, Zak

    2010-10-01

    Serine proteases and some cathepsins are present in the stratum corneum. They are known to play a significant role in the pathophysiological mechanism of several dermatological conditions (e.g. atopic dermatitis) and in the induction of itch. Tape stripping of skin is a simple technique used in the investigation of skin barrier function and in the penetration of topically applied drugs. Herein, we show that CE, under stacking conditions, is a well-suited technique to measure the proteolytic activity of enzymes in the stratum corneum. Disks of about 6 mm (id) were cut from adhered tapes and submerged directly in a buffer containing the appropriate peptide substrate. After incubation, the split peptides were separated and detected directly by CE at 214 nm in a borate buffer. The esterase activity on N-benzoyl-tyrosine ethyl ester and the amidase activity on succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide and the splitting of hemoglobin were detected by CE. The esterase activity was the highest when compared to the proteolytic activities. Skin scratching increased the enzymatic activity adhered to the tapes. The CE offered over the traditional end-point colorimetric methods the ability to measure the low enzymatic activity and the ability to detect the released peptides directly. This technique is simple, non-invasive, easy to perform and uses non-expensive substrates. It can be useful in quantifying cathepsins and serine proteases in the skin.

  7. BioGPS descriptors for rational engineering of enzyme promiscuity and structure based bioinformatic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Ferrario

    Full Text Available A new bioinformatic methodology was developed founded on the Unsupervised Pattern Cognition Analysis of GRID-based BioGPS descriptors (Global Positioning System in Biological Space. The procedure relies entirely on three-dimensional structure analysis of enzymes and does not stem from sequence or structure alignment. The BioGPS descriptors account for chemical, geometrical and physical-chemical features of enzymes and are able to describe comprehensively the active site of enzymes in terms of "pre-organized environment" able to stabilize the transition state of a given reaction. The efficiency of this new bioinformatic strategy was demonstrated by the consistent clustering of four different Ser hydrolases classes, which are characterized by the same active site organization but able to catalyze different reactions. The method was validated by considering, as a case study, the engineering of amidase activity into the scaffold of a lipase. The BioGPS tool predicted correctly the properties of lipase variants, as demonstrated by the projection of mutants inside the BioGPS "roadmap".

  8. Preparation and characterization of kasuga-silica-conjugated nanospheres for sustained antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guanglong; Li, Deguang; Liu, Yao; Guo, Mingcheng; Duan, Yongheng; Li, Jianqiang; Cao, Yongsong

    2014-11-01

    Controlled release formulation of pesticides is highly desirable for attaining the most effective utilization of the pesticide as well as reducing environmental pollution. Nano-sized controlled release formulations can provide better penetration through cuticle and deliver the active ingredients efficiently to the targeted tissue. In this study, a novel strategy for the preparation of a nanoconjugate derived from kasugamycin with amino-modified silica was developed. The kasugamycin was connected with amino-modified silica matrix by an amide bond, which could avoid the initial burst release effectively and prolong the duration remarkably. The results showed the kasuga-silica can protect kasugamycin against photo-degradation effectively and the release rate of the active ingredient of nanoconjugate was related to the temperature, pH value, and the particle size (52.5-315.4 nm). With reduced particle size as well as increased temperature and acidity, the release of the active ingredient was faster. This amide linkage of kasuga-silica could be degraded by amidase effectively. This nanoconjugate displayed a better and a sustained bactericidal efficacy against E. coli than kasugamycin technical, which makes it a potential candidate as a controlled release conjugate for kasugamycin in the future.

  9. Decoding the biosynthesis and function of diphthamide, an enigmatic modification of translation elongation factor 2 (EF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffael Schaffrath

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diphthamide is a highly conserved modification of archaeal and eukaryal translation elongation factor 2 (EF2 and yet why cells need EF2 to contain diphthamide is unclear. In yeast, the first steps of diphthamide synthesis and the genes (DPH1-DPH5 required to form the intermediate diphthine are well-documented. However, the last step, amidadation of diphthine to diphthamide, had largely been ill-defined. Remarkably, through mining genome-wide synthetic gene array (SGA and chemical genomics databases, recent studies by Uthman et al. [PLoS Genetics (2013 9, e1003334] and Su et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (2012 109, 19983-19987] have identified two more diphthamide players, DPH6 and DPH7. Consistent with roles in the amidation step, dph6 and dph7 deletion strains fail to complete diphthamide synthesis and accumulate diphthine-modified EF2. In contrast to Dph6, the catalytically relevant amidase, Dph7 appears to be regulatory. As shown by Uthman et al., it promotes dissociation of diphthine synthase (Dph5 from EF2, allowing diphthine amidation by Dph6 to occur and thereby coupling diphthine synthesis to the terminal step in the pathway. Remarkably, the study by Uthman et al. suggests that Dph5 has a novel role as an EF2 inhibitor that affects cell growth when diphthamide synthesis is blocked or incomplete and, importantly, shows that diphthamide promotes the accuracy of EF2 performance during translation.

  10. Cloning, Characterization and Effect of TmPGRP-LE Gene Silencing on Survival of Tenebrio Molitor against Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Soo Han

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs are a family of innate immune molecules that recognize bacterial peptidoglycan. PGRP-LE, a member of the PGRP family, selectively binds to diaminopimelic acid (DAP-type peptidoglycan to activate both the immune deficiency (Imd and proPhenoloxidase (proPO pathways in insects. A PGRP-LE-dependent induction of autophagy to control Listeria monocytogenes has also been reported. We identified and partially characterized a novel PGRP-LE homologue, from Tenebrio molitor and analyzed its functional role in the survival of the insect against infection by a DAP-type PGN containing intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. The cDNA is comprised of an open reading frame (ORF of 990 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 329 residues. TmPGRP-LE contains one PGRP domain, but lacks critical residues for amidase activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed a broad constitutive expression of the transcript at various stages of development spanning from larva to adult. RNAi mediated knockdown of the transcripts, followed by a challenge with L. monocytogenes, showed a significant reduction in survival rate of the larvae, suggesting a putative role of TmPGRP-LE in sensing and control of L. monocytogenes infection in T. molitor. These results implicate PGRP-LE as a defense protein necessary for survival of T. molitor against infection by L. monocytogenes.

  11. Cloning, characterization and effect of TmPGRP-LE gene silencing on survival of Tenebrio molitor against Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindwa, Hamisi; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Mun, Seulgi; Jo, Yong Hun; Lee, Bok Luel; Lee, Yong Seok; Kim, Nam Jung; Han, Yeon Soo

    2013-11-14

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are a family of innate immune molecules that recognize bacterial peptidoglycan. PGRP-LE, a member of the PGRP family, selectively binds to diaminopimelic acid (DAP)-type peptidoglycan to activate both the immune deficiency (Imd) and proPhenoloxidase (proPO) pathways in insects. A PGRP-LE-dependent induction of autophagy to control Listeria monocytogenes has also been reported. We identified and partially characterized a novel PGRP-LE homologue, from Tenebrio molitor and analyzed its functional role in the survival of the insect against infection by a DAP-type PGN containing intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. The cDNA is comprised of an open reading frame (ORF) of 990 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 329 residues. TmPGRP-LE contains one PGRP domain, but lacks critical residues for amidase activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed a broad constitutive expression of the transcript at various stages of development spanning from larva to adult. RNAi mediated knockdown of the transcripts, followed by a challenge with L. monocytogenes, showed a significant reduction in survival rate of the larvae, suggesting a putative role of TmPGRP-LE in sensing and control of L. monocytogenes infection in T. molitor. These results implicate PGRP-LE as a defense protein necessary for survival of T. molitor against infection by L. monocytogenes.

  12. Production of enantiomerically pure D-Phenylglycine using Pseudomonas aeruginosa 10145 as biocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. M. Alonso

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Different bacterial strains were screened to detect nitrilase and/or nitrile hidratase/amidase activities towards benzonitrile, to be used as biocatalyst to produce enantiomerically pure non-proteinogenic amino acids using amino nitriles as starting material. The best biocatalyst found was Pseudomonas aeruginosa 10145, which showed high enzyme activities. Whole cells were used as catalyst for the transformation of 2-phenyl-2-amino-acetonitrile for the corresponding D-phenylglycine. The percentage conversion was followed by chiral HPLC. After 1 hour reaction 18% of 2-phenyl-2-amino-acetonitrile was converted into D-phenylglycine with an enantiomeric excess of over 95%. When an inducer was added to the media, an increase in nitrile hydrolyzing activities was detected, hence leading to total conversion of (R-2-phenyl-2-amino-acetonitrile to the corresponding amino acid in 30 min reaction. The isolated yield of the target product was 50% and its characterization was performed by polarimetry, chiral HPLC, IR-FT spectroscopy and GC-MS.

  13. Identification and recombinant expression of anandamide hydrolyzing enzyme from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegan Dhamodharan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anandamide (Arachidonoyl ethanolamide is a potent bioactive lipid studied extensively in humans, which regulates several neurobehavioral processes including pain, feeding and memory. Bioactivity is terminated when hydrolyzed into free arachidonic acid and ethanolamine by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. In this study we report the identification of a FAAH homolog from Dictyostelium discoideum and its function to hydrolyze anandamide. Results A putative FAAH DNA sequence coding for a conserved amidase signature motif was identified in the Dictyostelium genome database and the corresponding cDNA was isolated and expressed as an epitope tagged fusion protein in either E.coli or Dictyostelium. Wild type Dictyostelium cells express FAAH throughout their development life cycle and the protein was found to be predominantly membrane associated. Production of recombinant HIS tagged FAAH protein was not supported in E.coli host, but homologous Dictyostelium host was able to produce the same successfully. Recombinant FAAH protein isolated from Dictyostelium was shown to hydrolyze anandamide and related synthetic fatty acid amide substrates. Conclusions This study describes the first identification and characterisation of an anandamide hydrolyzing enzyme from Dictyostelium discoideum, suggesting the potential of Dictyostelium as a simple eukaryotic model system for studying mechanisms of action of any FAAH inhibitors as drug targets.

  14. Using directed evolution to probe the substrate specificity of mandelamide hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan-Fen; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L; McLeish, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    Mandelamide hydrolase (MAH), a member of the amidase signature family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of mandelamide to mandelate and ammonia. X-ray structures of several members of this family, but not that of MAH, have been reported. These reveal nearly superimposable conformations of the unusual Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad. Conversely, the residues involved in substrate recognition are not conserved, implying that the binding pocket could be modified to change the substrate specificity, perhaps by directed evolution. Here we show that MAH is able to hydrolyze small aliphatic substrates such as lactamide, albeit with low efficiency. A selection method to monitor changes in mandelamide/lactamide preference was developed and used to identify several mutations affecting substrate binding. A homology model places some of these mutations close to the catalytic triad, presumably in the MAH active site. In particular, Gly202 appears to control the preference for aromatic substrates as the G202A variant showed three orders of magnitude decrease in k(cat)/K(m) for (R)- and (S)-mandelamide. This reduction in activity increased to six orders of magnitude for the G202V variant.

  15. Exploring suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) for discriminating Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris SK11 and ATCC 19257 in mixed culture based on the expression of strain-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, B; Lessard, M-H; LaPointe, G; Roy, D

    2011-02-01

    An approach based on quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) was developed for monitoring two strains of lactococci in co-culture in milk by measuring the expression of specific genes identified by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). SSH was used to identify strain-specific genes of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris SK11 and ATCC 19257. RT-qPCR was then employed to validate gene specificity and compare the expression of selected specific genes (glycosyltransferase and amidase genes for L. lactis ssp. cremoris ATCC 19257 and a hypothetical protein for SK11) identified by SSH. The time profile of changes in gene expression relative to ldh transcription differed between pure and mixed cultures as well as between media. At the stationary phase, gene expression of mixed cultures in GM17 attained the highest proportion of ldh transcription while mixed cultures in milk peaked at the postexponential phase. Strain ratios expressed as RNA proportion appear to favour SK11 in GM17 medium, while ATCC 19257 dominated in milk co-cultures. This approach was useful to determine the contribution of strain SK11 in relation to strain ATCC 19257 during co-culture in milk compared to rich medium. The ability to track the metabolic contribution of each lactococcal strain during fermentation of milk or cheese ripening will extend our understanding of the impact of process parameters on the production performance of strains. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. A novel Dps-type protein from insect gut bacteria catalyses hydrolysis and synthesis of N-acyl amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Liyan; Büchler, Rita; Mithöfer, Axel; Svatos, Ales; Spiteller, Dieter; Dettner, Konrad; Gmeiner, Sophie; Piel, Jörn; Schlott, Bernhard; Boland, Wilhelm

    2007-06-01

    A novel type of a microbial N-acyl amino acid hydrolase (AAH) from insect gut bacteria was purified, cloned and functionally characterized. The enzyme was obtained from Microbacterium arborescens SE14 isolated from the foregut of larvae of the generalist herbivore Spodoptera exigua. The substrates of AAH are N-acyl-glutamines previously reported to elicit plant defence reactions after introduction into the leaf during feeding. The isolated AAH catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond (K(m) = 36 micromol l(-1)) and, less efficient, the formation (K(m) = 3 mmol l(-1)) of the elicitor active N-acyl amino acids. The AAH from M. arborescens SE14 shows no homology to known fatty acyl amidases (EC 3.5.1.4) but belongs to the family of Dps proteins (DNA-binding protein from starved cell). In line with other DPS proteins AAH is a homododecamer (monomer 17 181 Da) and contains iron atoms (c. 1-16 iron atoms per subunit). Unlike genuine DPS proteins the enzyme does not significantly bind DNA. Amino acid hydrolase is the first member of the DPS family that catalyses the cleavage or formation of amide bonds. The participation of a microbial enzyme in the homeostasis of N-acyl-glutamines in the insect gut adds further complexity to the interaction between plants and their herbivores.

  17. PGRP-LB is a maternally transmitted immune milk protein that influences symbiosis and parasitism in tsetse’s offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwen; Aksoy, Serap

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial microbe functions range from host dietary supplementation to development and maintenance of host immune system. In mammals, newborn progeny are quickly colonized with a symbiotic fauna that is provisioned in mother’s milk and that closely resembles that of the parent. Tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae) also depends on the obligate symbiont Wigglesworthia for nutritional supplementation, optimal fecundity, and immune system development. Tsetse progeny develop one at a time in an intrauterine environment and receive nourishment and symbionts in mother’s milk. We show that the host Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein (PGRP-LB) is expressed only in adults and is a major component of the milk that nourishes the developing progeny. The amidase activity associated with PGRP-LB may scavenge the symbiotic peptidoglycan and prevent the induction of tsetse's Immune Deficiency pathway that otherwise can damage the symbionts. Reduction of PGRP-LB experimentally diminishes female fecundity and damages Wigglesworthia in the milk through induction of antimicrobial peptides, including Attacin. Larvae that receive less maternal PGRP-LB give rise to adults with fewer Wigglesworthia and hyperimmune responses. Such adults also suffer dysregulated immunity, as indicated by the presence of higher trypanosome densities in parasitized adults. We show that recPGRP-LB has antimicrobial and antitrypanosomal activities that may regulate symbiosis and impact immunity. Thus, PGRP-LB plays a pivotal role in tsetse’s fitness by protecting symbiosis against host-inflicted damage during development and by controlling parasite infections in adults that can otherwise reduce host fecundity. PMID:22689989

  18. PGRP-LB is a maternally transmitted immune milk protein that influences symbiosis and parasitism in tsetse's offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwen; Aksoy, Serap

    2012-06-26

    Beneficial microbe functions range from host dietary supplementation to development and maintenance of host immune system. In mammals, newborn progeny are quickly colonized with a symbiotic fauna that is provisioned in mother's milk and that closely resembles that of the parent. Tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae) also depends on the obligate symbiont Wigglesworthia for nutritional supplementation, optimal fecundity, and immune system development. Tsetse progeny develop one at a time in an intrauterine environment and receive nourishment and symbionts in mother's milk. We show that the host Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein (PGRP-LB) is expressed only in adults and is a major component of the milk that nourishes the developing progeny. The amidase activity associated with PGRP-LB may scavenge the symbiotic peptidoglycan and prevent the induction of tsetse's Immune Deficiency pathway that otherwise can damage the symbionts. Reduction of PGRP-LB experimentally diminishes female fecundity and damages Wigglesworthia in the milk through induction of antimicrobial peptides, including Attacin. Larvae that receive less maternal PGRP-LB give rise to adults with fewer Wigglesworthia and hyperimmune responses. Such adults also suffer dysregulated immunity, as indicated by the presence of higher trypanosome densities in parasitized adults. We show that recPGRP-LB has antimicrobial and antitrypanosomal activities that may regulate symbiosis and impact immunity. Thus, PGRP-LB plays a pivotal role in tsetse's fitness by protecting symbiosis against host-inflicted damage during development and by controlling parasite infections in adults that can otherwise reduce host fecundity.

  19. Constitutive high expression of chromosomal beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by a new insertion sequence (IS1669) located in ampD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Hentzer, Morten

    2002-01-01

    resistant, constitutive beta-lactamase-producing variant contained no mutations in ampD, but a point mutation was observed in ampR, resulting in an Asp-135-->Asn change. An identical mutation of AmpR in Enterobacter cloacae has been reported to cause a 450-fold higher AmpC expression. However, in many...... of the isolates expressing high levels of chromosomal beta-lactamase, no changes were found in either ampD, ampR, or in the promoter region of ampD, ampR, or ampC. Our results suggest that multiple pathways may exist leading to increased antimicrobial resistance due to chromosomal beta-lactamase.......The expression of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is negatively regulated by the activity of an amidase, AmpD. In the present study we examined resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains and several resistant variants isolated from in vivo and in vitro biofilms for mutations...

  20. Inactivation of chloramphenicol and florfenicol by a novel chloramphenicol hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Wu, Jing; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Chung, Eunsook; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2012-09-01

    Chloramphenicol and florfenicol are broad-spectrum antibiotics. Although the bacterial resistance mechanisms to these antibiotics have been well documented, hydrolysis of these antibiotics has not been reported in detail. This study reports the hydrolysis of these two antibiotics by a specific hydrolase that is encoded by a gene identified from a soil metagenome. Hydrolysis of chloramphenicol has been recognized in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a chloramphenicol acetate esterase gene, estDL136. A hydrolysate of chloramphenicol was identified as p-nitrophenylserinol by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The hydrolysis of these antibiotics suggested a promiscuous amidase activity of EstDL136. When estDL136 was expressed in E. coli, EstDL136 conferred resistance to both chloramphenicol and florfenicol on E. coli, due to their inactivation. In addition, E. coli carrying estDL136 deactivated florfenicol faster than it deactivated chloramphenicol, suggesting that EstDL136 hydrolyzes florfenicol more efficiently than it hydrolyzes chloramphenicol. The nucleotide sequences flanking estDL136 encode proteins such as amidohydrolase, dehydrogenase/reductase, major facilitator transporter, esterase, and oxidase. The most closely related genes are found in the bacterial family Sphingomonadaceae, which contains many bioremediation-related strains. Whether the gene cluster with estDL136 in E. coli is involved in further chloramphenicol degradation was not clear in this study. While acetyltransferases for chloramphenicol resistance and drug exporters for chloramphenicol or florfenicol resistance are often detected in numerous microbes, this is the first report of enzymatic hydrolysis of florfenicol resulting in inactivation of the antibiotic.

  1. [Nicotinamidase and the so-called pyrazinamidase in mycobacteria; the simultaneous occurrence of both activites (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnok, I; Pechmann, H; Krallmann-Wenzel, U; Röhrscheidt, E; Tarnok, Z

    1979-07-01

    Nicotin- and the so-called pyrazinamidase (in the following: "pyrazinamidase") have been found in strains of four mycobacteria species, M. fortuitum, M. gastri, M. bovis and M. microti. These findings are in contradiction to those summarized in Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology (1974). The reason for the discrepancies is that the original method (Bönicke, 1961) for amidase determination has not taken the following aspects into consideration: a) The inducibility of the nicotin- and "pyrazinamidase" (example: M. fortuitum); b) The temperature sensitivity of these enzymes (M. gastri); c) The light sensitivity of nicotinamidase (in photochromogenic M. gastri strains); d) The optimal substrate concentration which must be at least 4 mM instead of 0,8 mm. The following consequences can be drawn for the taxonomy and biochemistry of the tested organisms: e) The species status of M. gastri should be annuled. The main difference between M. gastri and M. kansasii consists only of the non-agglutinability of M. gastri by anti-M. kansasii serum. "Pyrazinamidase" and also nitrate reductase (Tarnok et al., in press) are positive in strains of both species; f) M. bovis possesses nicotin- and "pyrazinamidase" as M. tuberculosis too. Thus, these two species are more closely related than suggested earlier; g) Till now, no Mycobacterium has been found showing nicotinamidase without "pyrazinamidase" activity (or vice versa). It seems to be very probable that nicotinamidase, an enzyme of low substrate specificity, is able to hydrolyze several compounds with a nicotinamide-like structure such as pyrazinamide. Thus, we suggest the annulment of the term pyrazinamidase or the employment of quotation marks ("pyrazinamidase") to show the fictitious value of this designation.

  2. Expression of Mycobacterium smegmatis pyrazinamidase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis confers hypersensitivity to pyrazinamide and related amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshoff, H I; Mizrahi, V

    2000-10-01

    A pyrazinamidase (PZase)-deficient pncA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, constructed by allelic exchange, was used to investigate the effects of heterologous amidase gene expression on the susceptibility of this organism to pyrazinamide (PZA) and related amides. The mutant was highly resistant to PZA (MIC, >2,000 microg/ml), in accordance with the well-established role of pncA in the PZA susceptibility of M. tuberculosis (A. Scorpio and Y. Zhang, Nat. Med. 2:662-667, 1996). Integration of the pzaA gene encoding the major PZase/nicotinamidase from Mycobacterium smegmatis (H. I. M. Boshoff and V. Mizrahi, J. Bacteriol. 180:5809-5814, 1998) or the M. tuberculosis pncA gene into the pncA mutant complemented its PZase/nicotinamidase defect. In both pzaA- and pncA-complemented mutant strains, the PZase activity was detected exclusively in the cytoplasm, suggesting an intracellular localization for PzaA and PncA. The pzaA-complemented strain was hypersensitive to PZA (MIC, /=20 microg/ml) and was also sensitive to benzamide (MIC, 20 microg/ml), unlike the wild-type and pncA-complemented mutant strains, which were highly resistant to this amide (MIC, >500 microg/ml). This finding was consistent with the observation that benzamide is hydrolyzed by PzaA but not by PncA. Overexpression of PzaA also conferred sensitivity to PZA, nicotinamide, and benzamide on M. smegmatis (MIC, 150 microg/ml in all cases) and rendered Escherichia coli hypersensitive for growth at low pH.

  3. Population pharmacokinetics of modafinil acid and estimation of the metabolic conversion of modafinil into modafinil acid in 5 major ethnic groups of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-hua; Guo, Tao; Deng, Chen-hui; Guan, Zheng; Li, Liang; Zhou, Tian-yan; Lu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To describe the population pharmacokinetic profile of modafinil acid and to compare the extent of metabolism of modafinil into modafinil acid in 5 major ethnic groups (Han, Mongolian, Korean, Uygur, and Hui) of China. Methods: In a multi-center, open-label, single dose clinical trial, 49 healthy volunteers from the 5 ethnic groups received 200 mg of modafinil orally. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic evaluation of modafinil and modafinil acid were drawn before and at different time after the administration. Systematic population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling for modafinil acid was conducted, integrating with our previous PopPK model for modafinil. The influence of ethnicity, gender, height, body weight and body mass index (BMI) was estimated. The extent of metabolism of modafinil into modafinil acid, expressed as the relative conversion fraction, was estimated and compared among the 5 ethnic groups. Results: When combined with the PopPK model of modafinil, the concentration of modafinil acid versus time profile was best described with a one-compartment model. The typical clearance and volume of distribution for modafinil acid were 4.94 (l/h) and 2.73 (l), respectively. The Korean group had 25% higher clearance, and the Uygur and Hui groups had 12% higher clearance than the Han group. The median for the relative conversion fraction was 0.53 for Koreans, and 0.24 for the other 4 ethnicities. Conclusion: Ethnicity has significant influence on the clearance of modafinil acid. When patients in the 5 ethnic groups are administered drugs or prodrugs catalyzed by esterases and/or amidases, the variability in the extent of drug metabolism should be considered. PMID:23103618

  4. Peltatoside Isolated from Annona crassiflora Induces Peripheral Antinociception by Activation of the Cannabinoid System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristina da Costa; Veloso, Clarice de Carvalho; Ferreira, Renata Cristina Mendes; Lage, Gisele Avelar; Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Duarte, Igor Dimitri Gama; Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Perez, Andrea de Castro

    2017-02-01

    Peltatoside is a natural compound isolated from leaves of Annona crassiflora Mart., a plant widely used in folk medicine. This substance is an analogue of quercetin, a flavonoid extensively studied because of its diverse biological activities, including analgesic effects. Besides, a previous study suggested, by computer structure analyses, a possible quercetin-CB 1 cannabinoid receptor interaction. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the antinociceptive effect of peltatoside and analyze the cannabinoid system involvement in this action. The mouse paw pressure test was used and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of carrageenan (200 µg/paw). All used drugs were administered by intraplantar administration in Swiss male mice (n = 6). Peltatoside (100 µg/paw) elicited a local inhibition of hyperalgesia. The peripheral antinociceptive action of peltatoside was antagonized by the CB 1 cannabinoid antagonist AM251 (160 µg/paw), but not by CB 2 cannabinoid antagonist AM630 (100 µg/paw). In order to assess the role of endocannabinoids in this peripheral antinociceptive effect, we used (i) [5 Z ,8 Z ,11 Z ,14 Z ]-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenyl-methyl ester phosphonofluoridic acid, an inhibitor of anandamide amidase; (ii) JZL184, an inhibitor for monoacylglycerol lipase, the primary enzyme responsible for degrading the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol; and (iii) VDM11, an endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor. MAFP, JZL184, and VDM11 did not induce antinociception, respectively, at the doses 0.5, 3.8, and 2.5 µg/paw, however, these three drugs were able to potentiate the peripheral antinociceptive effect of peltatoside at an intermediary dose (50 µg/paw). Our results suggest that this natural substance is capable of inducing analgesia through the activation of peripheral CB 1 receptors, involving endocannabinoids in this process. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianyu [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ding, Jinjing; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Da-Cheng, E-mail: dcwang@ibp.ac.cn [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: dcwang@ibp.ac.cn [The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex associated with the bacterial type VI secretion system of P. aeruginosa has been solved and refined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structural basis of the recognition of the muramidase effector and its inactivation by its cognate immunity protein is revealed. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a β-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair.

  6. Antiacanthain A: New proteases isolated from Bromelia antiacantha Bertol. (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallés, Diego; Cantera, Ana M B

    2018-03-06

    Crude extract (CE) from pulp of Bromelia antiacantha Bertol. mature fruit, contains at least 3 cysteine proteases with proteolytic activity. By single step cation exchange chromatography (Hi-trap SP-HP) of partially purified CE, the protease with the lowest pI, Antiacanthain A (AntA), was isolated. It showed maximum activity at pH9, and 75% of remaining activity was maintained over a wide pH range (pH6-10). The AntA activity exhibits a constant increase up to 70°C. Maintains almost 100% of its activity at 45 at pH6 and 9. A 60% of AntA was active by titration with specific inhibitor, E64. Amidasic activity was studied with pyroglutamyl-phenyl-leucyl-paranitroaniline (PFLNA) substrate having higher AntA catalytic efficiency of (k cat /K m =470s -1 M -1 ) relative to stem bromelain (k cat /K m =305s -1 M -1 ). Esterase activity using p-nitrophenyl esters of N-α-CBZ-l-Lysine (z-L-LysONp) showed a 10-fold higher catalytic efficiency for AntA (k cat /K m =6376s -1 M -1 ) relative to stem bromelain (k cat /K m =688s -1 M -1 ). Incubation with 8M Urea did not affect AntA activity and remained unchanged for 18h, with 6M GndHCl resulted in a 41% decrease in activity after 30min incubation, maintained this activity 18h. AntA exhibits high sequence identity with proteases of the Bromeliaceae family. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Structure and evolutionary conservation of the plant N-end rule pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciet, Emmanuelle; Mesiti, Francesca; Wellmer, Frank

    2010-03-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal amino acid residue. While some N-terminal residues result in metabolically stable proteins, other, so-called destabilizing residues, lead to rapid protein turnover. The N-end rule pathway, which mediates the recognition and degradation of proteins with N-terminal destabilizing residues, is present in all organisms examined, including prokaryotes. This protein degradation pathway has a hierarchical organization in which some N-terminal residues, called primary destabilizing residues, are directly recognized by specific ubiquitin ligases. Other destabilizing residues, termed secondary and tertiary destabilizing residues, require modifications before the corresponding proteins can be targeted for degradation by ubiquitin ligases. In eukaryotes, the N-end rule pathway is a part of the ubiquitin/proteasome system and is known to play essential roles in a broad range of biological processes in fungi, animals and plants. While the structure of the N-end rule pathway has been extensively studied in yeast and mammals, knowledge of its organization in plants is limited. Using both tobacco and Arabidopsis, we identified the complete sets destabilizing and stabilizing N-terminal residues. We also characterized the hierarchical organization of the plant N-end rule by identifying and determining the specificity of two distinct N-terminal amidohydrolases (Nt-amidases) of Arabidopsis that are essential for the destabilizing activity of the tertiary destabilizing residues Asn and Gln. Our results indicate that both the N-end rule itself and mechanistic aspects of the N-end rule pathway in angiosperms are very similar to those of mammals.

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of modafinil acid and estimation of the metabolic conversion of modafinil into modafinil acid in 5 major ethnic groups of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-hua; Guo, Tao; Deng, Chen-hui; Guan, Zheng; Li, Liang; Zhou, Tian-yan; Lu, Wei

    2012-11-01

    To describe the population pharmacokinetic profile of modafinil acid and to compare the extent of metabolism of modafinil into modafinil acid in 5 major ethnic groups (Han, Mongolian, Korean, Uygur, and Hui) of China. In a multi-center, open-label, single dose clinical trial, 49 healthy volunteers from the 5 ethnic groups received 200 mg of modafinil orally. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic evaluation of modafinil and modafinil acid were drawn before and at different time after the administration. Systematic population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling for modafinil acid was conducted, integrating with our previous PopPK model for modafinil. The influence of ethnicity, gender, height, body weight and body mass index (BMI) was estimated. The extent of metabolism of modafinil into modafinil acid, expressed as the relative conversion fraction, was estimated and compared among the 5 ethnic groups. When combined with the PopPK model of modafinil, the concentration of modafinil acid versus time profile was best described with a one-compartment model. The typical clearance and volume of distribution for modafinil acid were 4.94 (l/h) and 2.73 (l), respectively. The Korean group had 25% higher clearance, and the Uygur and Hui groups had 12% higher clearance than the Han group. The median for the relative conversion fraction was 0.53 for Koreans, and 0.24 for the other 4 ethnicities. Ethnicity has significant influence on the clearance of modafinil acid. When patients in the 5 ethnic groups are administered drugs or prodrugs catalyzed by esterases and/or amidases, the variability in the extent of drug metabolism should be considered.

  9. X-ray crystallography and its impact on understanding bacterial cell wall remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Renner-Schneck, Michaela; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-02-01

    The molecular structure of matter defines its properties and function. This is especially true for biological macromolecules such as proteins, which participate in virtually all biochemical processes. A three dimensional structural model of a protein is thus essential for the detailed understanding of its physiological function and the characterization of essential properties such as ligand binding and reaction mechanism. X-ray crystallography is a well-established technique that has been used for many years, but it is still by far the most widely used method for structure determination. A particular strength of this technique is the elucidation of atomic details of molecular interactions, thus providing an invaluable tool for a multitude of scientific projects ranging from the structural classification of macromolecules over the validation of enzymatic mechanisms or the understanding of host-pathogen interactions to structure-guided drug design. In the first part of this review, we describe essential methodological and practical aspects of X-ray crystallography. We provide some pointers that should allow researchers without a background in structural biology to assess the overall quality and reliability of a crystal structure. To highlight its potential, we then survey the impact X-ray crystallography has had on advancing an understanding of a class of enzymes that modify the bacterial cell wall. A substantial number of different bacterial amidase structures have been solved, mostly by X-ray crystallography. Comparison of these structures highlights conserved as well as divergent features. In combination with functional analyses, structural information on these enzymes has therefore proven to be a valuable template not only for understanding their mechanism of catalysis, but also for targeted interference with substrate binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of a novel molluscan short-type peptidoglycan recognition protein in disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) involved in host antibacterial defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premachandra, H K A; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2014-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are a widely studied group of pattern recognition receptors found in invertebrate as well as vertebrate lineages, and are involved in bacterial pathogen sensing. However, in addition to this principal role, they can also function in multiple host defense processes, including cell phagocytosis and hydrolysis of peptidoglycans (PGNs). In this study, a novel invertebrate short-type PGRP was identified in disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) designated as AbPGRP. The complete coding sequence of AbPGRP was 534 bp, encoding a 178-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 20 kDa. The AbPGRP gene had a bipartite arrangement consisting of two exons separated by a single intron. Homology analysis revealed that AbPGRP shares conserved features, including amino acid residues critical for substrate and ion binding as well as for its amidase activity, with homologs of other species. Phylogenetic analysis of AbPGRP revealed that it likely evolved from a common ancestor of invertebrates, having significant homology with other molluscan PGRPs. Recombinant AbPGRP exhibited detectable, dose-dependent PGN-hydrolyzing activity with the presence of Zn(2+), and strong antibacterial activity against Vibrio tapetis, consistent with the functional properties previously reported for PGRPs in other mollusks. Moreover, AbPGRP transcription was induced upon treatment of healthy abalones with bacterial peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide, although the expression profiles differed with treatment, suggesting a capacity for discriminating between bacterial pathogens through molecular pattern recognition. Collectively, the findings of this study indicate that AbPGRP is a true homolog of invertebrate PGRPs and likely plays an indispensable role in host immunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Precise Null Deletion Mutations of the Mycothiol Synthesis Genes Reveal Their Role in Isoniazid and Ethionamide Resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xia; Vilchèze, Catherine; Av-Gay, Yossef; Gómez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Jacobs, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycothiol (MSH; AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the glutathione analogue for mycobacteria. Mutations in MSH biosynthetic genes have been associated with resistance to isoniazid (INH) and ethionamide (ETH) in mycobacteria, but rigorous genetic studies are lacking, and those that have been conducted have yielded different results. In this study, we constructed independent null deletion mutants for all four genes involved in the MSH biosynthesis pathway (mshA, mshB, mshC, and mshD) in Mycobacterium smegmatis and made complementing constructs in integrating plasmids. The resulting set of strains was analyzed for levels of MSH, INH resistance, and ETH resistance. The mshA and mshC single deletion mutants were devoid of MSH production and resistant to INH, whereas the mshB deletion mutant produced decreased levels of MSH yet was sensitive to INH, suggesting that MSH biosynthesis is essential for INH susceptibility in M. smegmatis. Further evidence supporting this conclusion was generated by deleting the gene encoding the MSH S-conjugate amidase (mca) from the ΔmshB null mutant. This double mutant, ΔmshB Δmca, completely abolished MSH production and was resistant to INH. The mshA, mshC, and mshB single deletion mutants were also resistant to ETH, indicating that ETH resistance is modulated by the level of MSH in M. smegmatis. Surprisingly, the mshD deletion mutant lacked MSH production but was sensitive to both INH and ETH. The drug sensitivity was likely mediated by the compensated synthesis of N-formyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins, previously demonstrated to substitute for MSH in an mshD mutant of M. smegmatis. We conclude that MSH or N-formyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins is required for susceptibility to INH or ETH in M. smegmatis. PMID:21502624

  12. The First Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophage Endolysin (PlyPl23 with High Potential to Control American Foulbrood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Oliveira

    Full Text Available Endolysins, which are peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes expressed during the terminal stage of the reproduction cycle of bacteriophages, have great potential to control Gram-positive pathogens. This work describes the characterization of a novel endolysin (PlyPl23 encoded on the genome of Paenibacillus larvae phage phiIBB_Pl23 with high potential to control American foulbrood. This bacterial disease, caused by P. larvae, is widespread in North America and Europe and causes important economic losses in apiculture. The restriction to antibiotic residues in honey imposed by the EU legislation hinders its therapeutic use to combat American foulbrood and enforces the development of alternative antimicrobial methods. The new endolysin described herein has an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase catalytic domain and exhibits a broad-spectrum activity against common P. larvae genotypes. Moreover, the enzyme displays high antimicrobial activity in a range of pH that matches environmental conditions (pH between 5.0 and 7.0, showing its feasible application in the field. At pH 7.0, a concentration of 0.2 μM of enzyme was enough to lyse 104 CFU.mL-1 of P. larvae in no more than 2 h. The presence of sucrose and of the substances present in the larvae gut content did not affect the enzyme activity. Interestingly, an increase of activity was observed when PlyPl23 was previously incubated in royal jelly. Furthermore, in vivo safety evaluation assays demonstrated that this enzyme is not toxic to the bee larvae. The present work describes for the first time an endolysin encoded in a P. larvae phage that presents high potential to integrate a commercial product to control the problematic American foulbrood.

  13. Lack of association of genetic variants in genes of the endocannabinoid system with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herpertz-Dahlmann Beate

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of evidence indicate that the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 as well as the major endocannabinoid degrading enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL are implicated in mediating the orexigenic effects of cannabinoids. The aim of this study was to analyse whether nucleotide sequence variations in the CNR1, FAAH, NAAA and MGLL genes are associated with anorexia nervosa (AN. Methods We analysed the association of a previously described (AATn repeat in the 3' flanking region of CNR1 as well as a total of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs representative of regions with restricted haplotype diversity in CNR1, FAAH, NAAA or MGLL in up to 91 German AN trios (patient with AN and both biological parents using the transmission-disequilibrium-test (TDT. One SNP was additionally analysed in an independent case-control study comprising 113 patients with AN and 178 normal weight controls. Genotyping was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, ARMS-PCR or using 3730xl capillary sequencers. Results The TDT revealed no evidence for association for any of the SNPs or the (AATn repeat with AN (all two-sided uncorrected p-values > 0.05. The lowest p-value of 0.11 was detected for the A-allele of the CNR1 SNP rs1049353 for which the transmission rate was 59% (95% confidence interval 47%...70%. Further genotyping of rs1049353 in 113 additional independent patients with AN and 178 normal weight controls could not substantiate the initial trend for association (p = 1.00. Conclusion As we found no evidence for an association of genetic variation in CNR1, FAAH, NAAA and MGLL with AN, we conclude that genetic variations in these genes do not play a major role in the etiology of AN in our study groups.

  14. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid supplementation alters the expression of genes involved in the endocannabinoid system in the bovine endometrium and increases plasma progesterone concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolghasemi, A; Dirandeh, E; Ansari Pirsaraei, Z; Shohreh, B

    2016-10-01

    Endocannabinoids are derived from phospholipids and reduce fertility by interfering with implantation. Identification of changes in the expression of genes of the endocannabinoid system as a result of dietary inclusion of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is critical to the advancement of our understanding of the nutritional regulation of uterine function. An experiment was conducted on transition cows to evaluate the expression of key endocannabinoid genes in bovine endometrium in response to dietary supplementation with CLA. A total of 16 cows were randomly assigned to two treatments: (1) control (75 g/day palm oil) and (2) CLA (75 g/day CLA) from 21 days prepartum to Day 42 postpartum. Cows underwent uterine biopsy on days 21 and 42 postpartum. The abundance of mRNA encoding endocannabinoid receptor (CNR2), N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPEPLD), fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA), and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) was measured by real-time PCR. Results reported that relative levels of mRNA encoding CNR2 and NAPEPLD were decreased (P  0.05) in the same situation. Mean plasma progesterone concentrations were higher in CLA-fed cows compared with control cows at Day 42 postpartum (3.51 and 1.42 ng/mL, respectively, P endocannabinoid receptor (CNR2) and enzymes that synthesize fatty acid amides (NAPEPLD) and of an increase in the expression of PTGS2 that in turn can oxidate endocannabinoids and consequently resulted in increased plasma progesterone concentrations during early lactation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel Filamentous Flower mutant suppresses brevipedicellus developmental defects and modulates glucosinolate and auxin levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Douglas

    Full Text Available BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP encodes a class-I KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX transcription factor that plays a critical role in conditioning a replication competent state in the apical meristem, and it also governs growth and cellular differentiation in internodes and pedicels. To search for factors that modify BP signaling, we conducted a suppressor screen on bp er (erecta plants and identified a mutant that ameliorates many of the pleiotropic defects of the parent line. Map based cloning and complementation studies revealed that the defect lies in the FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL gene, a member of the YABBY family of transcriptional regulators that contribute to meristem organization and function, phyllotaxy, leaf and floral organ growth and polarity, and are also known to repress KNOX gene expression. Genetic and cytological analyses of the fil-10 suppressor line indicate that the role of FIL in promoting growth is independent of its previously characterized influences on meristem identity and lateral organ polarity, and likely occurs non-cell-autonomously from superior floral organs. Transcription profiling of inflorescences revealed that FIL downregulates numerous transcription factors which in turn may subordinately regulate inflorescence architecture. In addition, FIL, directly or indirectly, activates over a dozen genes involved in glucosinolate production in part by activating MYB28, a known activator of many aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis genes. In the bp er fil-10 suppressor mutant background, enhanced expression of CYP71A13, AMIDASE1 (AMI and NITRILASE genes suggest that auxin levels can be modulated by shunting glucosinolate metabolites into the IAA biosynthetic pathway, and increased IAA levels in the bp er fil-10 suppressor accompany enhanced internode and pedicel elongation. We propose that FIL acts to oppose KNOX1 gene function through a complex regulatory network that involves changes in secondary metabolites and auxin.

  16. Selective and reversible thiol-pegylation, an effective approach for purification and characterization of five fully active ficin (iso)forms from Ficus carica latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Matagne, André; Wattiez, Ruddy; Bolle, Laetitia; Vandenameele, Julie; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2011-10-01

    The latex of Ficus carica constitutes an important source of many proteolytic components known under the general term of ficin (EC 3.4.22.3) which belongs to the cysteine proteases of the papain family. So far, no data on the purification and characterization of individual forms of these proteases are available. An effective strategy was used to fractionate and purify to homogeneity five ficin forms, designated A, B, C, D1 and D2 according to their sequence of elution from a cation-exchange chromatographic support. Following rapid fractionation on a SP-Sepharose Fast Flow column, the different ficin forms were chemically modified by a specific and reversible monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) reagent. In comparison with their un-derivatized counterparts, the mPEG-protein derivatives behaved differently on the ion-exchanger, allowing us for the first time to obtain five highly purified ficin molecular species titrating 1mol of thiol group per mole of enzyme. The purified ficins were characterized by de novo peptide sequencing and peptide mass fingerprinting analyzes, using mass spectrometry. Circular dichroism measurements indicated that all five ficins were highly structured, both in term of secondary and tertiary structure. Furthermore, analysis of far-UV CD spectra allowed calculation of their secondary structural content. Both these data and the molecular masses determined by MS reinforce the view that the enzymes belong to the family of papain-like proteases. The five ficin forms also displayed different specific amidase activities against small synthetic substrates like dl-BAPNA and Boc-Ala-Ala-Gly-pNA, suggesting some differences in their active site organization. Enzymatic activity of the five ficin forms was completely inhibited by specific cysteine and cysteine/serine proteases inhibitors but was unaffected by specific serine, aspartic and metallo proteases inhibitors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasmin enzymatic activity in the presence of actin

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    Yusova E. I.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the changes in the plasmin activity towards substrates with high and low molecular mass in the presence of actin. Methods. The proteins used for this investigation were obtained by affinity chromatography and gel-filtration. The plasmin enzymatic activity was determined by a turbidimetric assay and a chromogenic substrate-based assay. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and biotin-avidin-phosphatase system were used to study the interaction of plasminogen and its fragments with actin. Results. It was shown that G-actin causes 1.5-fold decrease in the rate of polymeric fibrin hydrolysis by plasmin and Glu-plasminogen activated by the tissue plasminogen activator. However, actin did not impede plasmin autolysis and had no influence on its amidase activity. We have studied an interaction of biotinylated Glu-plasminogen and its fragments (kringle 1-3, kringle 4 and mini-plasminogen with immobilized G-actin. Glu-plasminogen and kringle 4 had a high affinity towards actin (C50 is 113 and 117 nM correspondingly. Mini-plasminogen and kringe 4 did not bind to actin. A similar affinity of Glu-plasminogen and kringle 1-3 towards actin proves the involvement of the kringle 1-3 lysine-binding sites of the native plasminogen form in the actin interaction. Conclusions. Actin can modulate plasmin specificity towards high molecular mass substrates through its interaction with lysine-binding sites of the enzyme kringle domains. Actin inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity of plasmin is due to its competition with fibrin for thelysine binding sites of plasminogen/plasmin.

  18. Characterization of a novel endolysin LysSA11 and its utility as a potent biocontrol agent against Staphylococcus aureus on food and utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yoonjee; Kim, Minsik; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-12-01

    Here we show that the LysSA11 endolysin, derived from the virulent Staphylococcus aureus phage SA11, has lytic activity against staphylococcal strains. Bioinformatics analysis revealed an enzymatically active CHAP (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases) domain at the N-terminus of LysSA11 that showed amidase activity. A novel cell wall binding domain (CBD) in the C-terminus could bind to a broad spectrum of staphylococcal cells. The bactericidal activity of LysSA11 was determined in food and utensils artificially contaminated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The amounts of MRSA bacteria in milk and on ham were significantly reduced by 1.44-log CFU/mL and 3.12-log CFU/cm 3 , respectively, within 15 min at refrigeration temperature (4 °C) and by 2.02-log CFU/mL and 3.37-log CFU/cm 2 , respectively, within 15 min at room temperature (25 °C). Moreover, a polypropylene plastic cutting board and a stainless steel knife artificially contaminated with approximately 4-log CFU/cm 2 of MRSA also showed complete bacterial elimination after a 30-min treatment with 1.35 μM of LysSA11. The data presented here strongly suggest that the novel CBD-containing staphylococcal endolysin LysSA11 can be used both as a food antimicrobial and as a practical sanitizer for utensils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The First Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophage Endolysin (PlyPl23) with High Potential to Control American Foulbrood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana; Leite, Marta; Kluskens, Leon D; Santos, Sílvio B; Melo, Luís D R; Azeredo, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Endolysins, which are peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes expressed during the terminal stage of the reproduction cycle of bacteriophages, have great potential to control Gram-positive pathogens. This work describes the characterization of a novel endolysin (PlyPl23) encoded on the genome of Paenibacillus larvae phage phiIBB_Pl23 with high potential to control American foulbrood. This bacterial disease, caused by P. larvae, is widespread in North America and Europe and causes important economic losses in apiculture. The restriction to antibiotic residues in honey imposed by the EU legislation hinders its therapeutic use to combat American foulbrood and enforces the development of alternative antimicrobial methods. The new endolysin described herein has an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase catalytic domain and exhibits a broad-spectrum activity against common P. larvae genotypes. Moreover, the enzyme displays high antimicrobial activity in a range of pH that matches environmental conditions (pH between 5.0 and 7.0), showing its feasible application in the field. At pH 7.0, a concentration of 0.2 μM of enzyme was enough to lyse 104 CFU.mL-1 of P. larvae in no more than 2 h. The presence of sucrose and of the substances present in the larvae gut content did not affect the enzyme activity. Interestingly, an increase of activity was observed when PlyPl23 was previously incubated in royal jelly. Furthermore, in vivo safety evaluation assays demonstrated that this enzyme is not toxic to the bee larvae. The present work describes for the first time an endolysin encoded in a P. larvae phage that presents high potential to integrate a commercial product to control the problematic American foulbrood.

  20. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable evolution among core genes with therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siragusa Gregory R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricultural and human pathogen. Results Phage whole-genome tetra-nucleotide signatures and proteomic tree topologies correlated closely with host phylogeny. Comparisons of our phage genomes to 26 others revealed three shared COGs; of particular interest within this core genome was an endolysin (PF01520, an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and a holin (PF04531. Comparative analyses of the evolutionary history and genomic context of these common phage proteins revealed two important results: 1 strongly significant host-specific sequence variation within the endolysin, and 2 a protein domain architecture apparently unique to our phage genomes in which the endolysin is located upstream of its associated holin. Endolysin sequences from our phages were one of two very distinct genotypes distinguished by variability within the putative enzymatically-active domain. The shared or core genome was comprised of genes with multiple sequence types belonging to five pfam families, and genes belonging to 12 pfam families, including the holin genes, which were nearly identical. Conclusions Significant genomic diversity exists even among closely-related bacteriophages. Holins and endolysins represent conserved functions across divergent phage genomes and, as we demonstrate here, endolysins can have significant variability and host-specificity even among closely-related genomes. Endolysins in our phage genomes may be subject to different selective pressures than the rest of the genome. These findings may have important implications for potential biotechnological applications of phage gene products.

  1. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of PlyGRCS, a bacteriophage endolysin active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Sara B; Zhang, Helena; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Shen, Yang; Schmelcher, Mathias; Eichenseher, Fritz; Nelson, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    The increasing rate of resistance of pathogenic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, to classical antibiotics has driven research toward identification of other means to fight infectious disease. One particularly viable option is the use of bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases, called endolysins or enzybiotics. These enzymes lyse the bacterial cell wall upon direct contact, are not inhibited by traditional antibiotic resistance mechanisms, and have already shown great promise in the areas of food safety, human health, and veterinary science. We have identified and characterized an endolysin, PlyGRCS, which displays dose-dependent antimicrobial activity against both planktonic and biofilm S. aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The spectrum of lytic activity for this enzyme includes all S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains tested, but not other Gram-positive pathogens. The contributions of the PlyGRCS putative catalytic and cell wall binding domains were investigated through deletion analysis. The cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) catalytic domain displayed activity by itself, though reduced, indicating the necessity of the binding domain for full activity. In contrast, the SH3_5 binding domain lacked activity but was shown to interact directly with the staphylococcal cell wall via fluorescent microscopy. Site-directed mutagenesis studies determined that the active site residues in the CHAP catalytic domain were C29 and H92, and its catalytic functionality required calcium as a co-factor. Finally, biochemical assays coupled with mass spectrometry analysis determined that PlyGRCS displays both N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and D-alanyl-glycyl endopeptidase hydrolytic activities despite possessing only a single catalytic domain. These results indicate that PlyGRCS has the potential to become a revolutionary therapeutic option to combat bacterial infections.

  2. Role of SH3b binding domain in a natural deletion mutant of Kayvirus endolysin LysF1 with a broad range of lytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benešík, Martin; Nováček, Jiří; Janda, Lubomír; Dopitová, Radka; Pernisová, Markéta; Melková, Kateřina; Tišáková, Lenka; Doškař, Jiří; Žídek, Lukáš; Hejátko, Jan; Pantůček, Roman

    2018-02-01

    The spontaneous host-range mutants 812F1 and K1/420 are derived from polyvalent phage 812 that is almost identical to phage K, belonging to family Myoviridae and genus Kayvirus. Phage K1/420 is used for the phage therapy of staphylococcal infections. Endolysin of these mutants designated LysF1, consisting of an N-terminal cysteine-histidine-dependent aminohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) domain and C-terminal SH3b cell wall-binding domain, has deleted middle amidase domain compared to wild-type endolysin. In this work, LysF1 and both its domains were prepared as recombinant proteins and their function was analyzed. LysF1 had an antimicrobial effect on 31 Staphylococcus species of the 43 tested. SH3b domain influenced antimicrobial activity of LysF1, since the lytic activity of the truncated variant containing the CHAP domain alone was decreased. The results of a co-sedimentation assay of SH3b domain showed that it was able to bind to three types of purified staphylococcal peptidoglycan 11.2, 11.3, and 11.8 that differ in their peptide bridge, but also to the peptidoglycan type 11.5 of Streptococcus uberis, and this capability was verified in vivo using the fusion protein with GFP and fluorescence microscopy. Using several different approaches, including NMR, we have not confirmed the previously proposed interaction of the SH3b domain with the pentaglycine bridge in the bacterial cell wall. The new naturally raised deletion mutant endolysin LysF1 is smaller than LysK, has a broad lytic spectrum, and therefore is an appropriate enzyme for practical use. The binding spectrum of SH3b domain covering all known staphylococcal peptidoglycan types is a promising feature for creating new chimeolysins by combining it with more effective catalytic domains.

  3. Unraveling the differential structural stability and dynamics features of T7 endolysin partially folded conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2018-04-01

    Characterization of partially collapsed protein conformations at atomic level is a daunting task due to their inherent flexibility and conformational heterogeneity. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L) is a single-domain amidase that facilitates the lysis of Gram-negative bacteria. T7L exhibits a pH-dependent structural transition from native state to partially folded (PF) conformation. In the pH range 5-3, T7L PF states display differential ANS binding characteristics. CD, fluorescence, NMR spectroscopy and lysis assays were used to investigate the structure-stability- dynamics relationships of T7L PF conformations. Structural studies indicated a partial loss of secondary/tertiary structures compared to its native state. The loss in the tertiary structure and the hydrophobic core opening increases upon decrease of pH from 5 to 3. Thermal denaturation experiments delineated that the pH 5 conformation is thermally irreversible in contrast to pH 3, depicting that hydrophobic core opening is essential for thermal reversibility. Further, urea dependent unfolding features of PF state at pH 5 and 4 evidenced for a collapsed conformation at intermediate urea concentrations. Residue level studies revealed that α1-helix and β3-β4 segment of T7L are the major contributors for such a structural collapse and inherent dynamics. The results suggested that the low pH PF states of T7L are heterogeneous and exhibits differential structural, unfolding, thermal reversibility, and dynamic features. Unraveling the structure-stability characteristics of different endolysin conformations is essential for designing novel chimeric and engineered phage endolysins as broadband antimicrobial agents over a varied pH range. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biochemical properties of anionic trypsin acting at high concentration of NaCl purified from the intestine of a carnivorous fish: smooth hound (Mustelus mustelus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougatef, Ali; Balti, Rafik; Nasri, Rim; Jellouli, Kemel; Souissi, Nabil; Nasri, Moncef

    2010-05-12

    Trypsin from the intestine of smooth hound (Mustelus mustelus) was purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration, and DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography, with a 65-fold increase in specific activity and 15% recovery. The molecular weight of the purified trypsin was estimated to be 24 kDa using size exclusion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The purified enzyme showed esterase-specific activity on N(alpha)-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (TAME) that was four times greater than its amidase-specific activity on Nalpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA). The optimum pH and temperature for the trypsin activity were pH 8.5 and 50 degrees C, respectively, using TAME as a substrate. The enzyme was extremely stable in the pH range of 7.0-9.0 and highly stable up to 40 degrees C after 1 h of incubation. The purified enzyme was strongly inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) and N-p-tosyl-1-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), specific inhibitors for trypsin. In addition, smooth hound trypsin showed higher proteolytic activity at high NaCl concentration, demonstrating its potential for protein hydrolysis at high salt content. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the first 12 amino acids of the purified trypsin was IVGGYECKPHSQ. This sequence showed high homology with trypsins from marine vertebrates and invertebrates. Purified trypsin had a Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) and catalytic constant (K(cat)) of 0.387 +/- 0.02 mM and 2.62 +/- 0.11 s(-1), respectively, when BAPNA was used as a substrate. For the hydrolysis of TAME, K(m) and K(cat) were 0.156 +/- 0.01 mM and 59.15 +/- 2.2 s(-1), respectively.

  5. Post-translational Modification of the NKG2D Ligand RAET1G Leads to Cell Surface Expression of a Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked Isoform*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Maki; Eagle, Robert A.; Trowsdale, John

    2010-01-01

    NKG2D is an important activating receptor on lymphocytes. In human, it interacts with two groups of ligands: the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A/B (MICA/B) family and the UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family, also known as retinoic acid early transcript (RAET1). MIC proteins are membrane-anchored, but all of the ULBP/RAET1 proteins, except for RAET1E and RAET1G, are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored. To address the reason for these differences we studied the association of RAET1G with the membrane. Using epitope-tagged RAET1G protein in conjunction with antibodies to different parts of the molecule and in pulse-chase experiments, we showed that the C terminus of the protein was cleaved soon after protein synthesis. Endoglycosidase H and peptide N-glycosidase treatment and cell surface immunoprecipitation indicated that most of the protein stayed in the endoplasmic reticulum, but some of the cleaved form was modified in the Golgi and transported to the cell surface. We examined the possibility of GPI anchoring of the protein in three ways: (i) Phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C released the PI-linked form of the protein. (ii) The surface expression pattern of RAET1G decreased in cells defective in GPI anchoring through mutant GPI-amidase. (iii) Site-directed mutagenesis, to disrupt residues predicted to facilitate GPI-anchoring, resulted in diminished surface expression of RAET1G. Thus, a form of RAET1G is GPI-anchored, in line with most other ULBP/RAET1 family proteins. The cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane domains appear to result from gene duplication and frameshift mutation. Together with our previous results, our data suggest that RAET1G is regulated post-translationally to produce a GPI-anchored isoform. PMID:20304922

  6. Post-translational modification of the NKG2D ligand RAET1G leads to cell surface expression of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Maki; Eagle, Robert A; Trowsdale, John

    2010-05-28

    NKG2D is an important activating receptor on lymphocytes. In human, it interacts with two groups of ligands: the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A/B (MICA/B) family and the UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family, also known as retinoic acid early transcript (RAET1). MIC proteins are membrane-anchored, but all of the ULBP/RAET1 proteins, except for RAET1E and RAET1G, are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored. To address the reason for these differences we studied the association of RAET1G with the membrane. Using epitope-tagged RAET1G protein in conjunction with antibodies to different parts of the molecule and in pulse-chase experiments, we showed that the C terminus of the protein was cleaved soon after protein synthesis. Endoglycosidase H and peptide N-glycosidase treatment and cell surface immunoprecipitation indicated that most of the protein stayed in the endoplasmic reticulum, but some of the cleaved form was modified in the Golgi and transported to the cell surface. We examined the possibility of GPI anchoring of the protein in three ways: (i) Phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C released the PI-linked form of the protein. (ii) The surface expression pattern of RAET1G decreased in cells defective in GPI anchoring through mutant GPI-amidase. (iii) Site-directed mutagenesis, to disrupt residues predicted to facilitate GPI-anchoring, resulted in diminished surface expression of RAET1G. Thus, a form of RAET1G is GPI-anchored, in line with most other ULBP/RAET1 family proteins. The cytoplasmic tail and transmembrane domains appear to result from gene duplication and frameshift mutation. Together with our previous results, our data suggest that RAET1G is regulated post-translationally to produce a GPI-anchored isoform.

  7. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-08

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  8. [Covalent stretokinase-polyethylene glycol conjugates with increased stability and decreased side effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aĭsina, R B; Mukhametova, L I; Tiupa, D V; Gershkovich, K B; Gulin, D A; Varfolomeev, S D

    2014-01-01

    By variation of incubation time of streptokinase (SK) with activated polyethylene glycol (M 2 and 5 kDa, PEG2 and PEG5) it was obtained covalent SK-PEG2 and SK-PEG5 conjugates with different modification degrees of amino groups of protein and their properties were studied in vitro as compared with free SK. It was shown, that maximal stable and retaining 80% fibrinolytic activity SK-PEG2 and SK-PEG5 conjugates are formed when the modification degrees of amino groups of protein are 54 and 52%, respectively. At interaction of the given conjugates with equimolar plasminogen concentration it were formed the plasmin (Pm)·SK-PEG2 and Pm·SK-PEG5 activator complexes, the maximal amidase activity of which is equal to activity of unmodified Pm·SK complex. It was found, that the catalytic efficiency of plasminogen activation (kPg/KPg) by Pm·SK-PEG2 complex is some higher (2.84 min(-1) μM(-1)) and by Pm·SK-PEG5 complex is lower (1.17 min(-1) μM(-1)), than that by unmodified Pm·SK complex (2.1 min(-1) μM(-1)). Investigation of lysis kinetics of human plasma clots and depletion of plasminogen and fibrinogen in plasma under the action of free SK and SK-PEG2 and SK-PEG5 conjugates showed, that the latter's have high thrombolytic activity (89 and 72%, respectively) and cause 3.5-4 fold lower side effects, than free SK. Obtained by us SK-PEG2 and SK-PEG5 conjugates with increased stability and decreased side effects may be used in the therapy of thrombotic disorders.

  9. SpxB is a suicide gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae and confers a selective advantage in an in vivo competitive colonization model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Yochay, Gili; Trzcinski, Krzysztof; Thompson, Claudette M; Lipsitch, Marc; Malley, Richard

    2007-09-01

    The human bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae dies spontaneously upon reaching stationary phase. The extent of S. pneumoniae death at stationary phase is unusual in bacteria and has been conventionally attributed to autolysis by the LytA amidase. In this study, we show that spontaneous pneumococcal death is due to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), not LytA, and that the gene responsible for H(2)O(2) production (spxB) also confers a survival advantage in colonization. Survival of S. pneumoniae in stationary phase was significantly prolonged by eliminating H(2)O(2) in any of three ways: chemically by supplementing the media with catalase, metabolically by growing the bacteria under anaerobic conditions, or genetically by constructing DeltaspxB mutants that do not produce H(2)O(2). Likewise, addition of H(2)O(2) to exponentially growing S. pneumoniae resulted in a death rate similar to that of cells in stationary phase. While DeltalytA mutants did not lyse at stationary phase, they died at a rate similar to that of the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we show that the death process induced by H(2)O(2) has features of apoptosis, as evidenced by increased annexin V staining, decreased DNA content, and appearance as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Finally, in an in vivo rat model of competitive colonization, the presence of spxB conferred a selective advantage over the DeltaspxB mutant, suggesting an explanation for the persistence of this gene. We conclude that a suicide gene of pneumococcus is spxB, which induces an apoptosis-like death in pneumococci and confers a selective advantage in nasopharyngeal cocolonization.

  10. Diverse toxic effectors are harbored by vgrG islands for interbacterial antagonism in type VI secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiale; Sun, Min; Pan, Zihao; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun

    2018-04-16

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is considered as one of the key competition strategies by injecting toxic effectors for intestinal pathogens to acquire optimal colonization in host gut, a microenviroment with high-density polymicrobial community where bacteria compete for niches and resources. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a major cause of infectious diarrhea in human and animals, widely encode T6SS clusters in their genomes. In this report, we first identified VT1, a novel amidase effector in ETEC, significantly hydrolyzed D-lactyl-L-Ala crosslinks between N-acetylmuramoyl and L-Ala in peptidoglycan. Further study showed that the VT1/VTI1 effector/immunity pair is encoded within a typical vgrG island, and plays a critical role for the successful establishment of ETEC in host gut. Numerous putative effectors with diverse toxin domains were found by retrieving vgrG islands in pathogenic E. coli, and designated as VT modules. Therein, VT5, a lysozyme-like effector widely encoded in ETEC, was confirmed to effectively kill adjacent cells, suggesting that VT toxin modules may be critical for pathogenic E. coli to seize a significantly competitive advantage for optimal intestinal colonization. To expand our analyses for large-scale search of VT antibacterial effectors based on vgrG island, >200 predicted effectors from 20 bacterial species were found and classified into 11 predicted toxins. This work reports a new retrieval strategy for screening T6SS effectors, and provides an example how pathogenic bacteria antagonize and displace commensal microbiome to successfully colonize in the host niches through a T6SS-dependent manner. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Interactions between mutualist Wigglesworthia and tsetse peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP-LB) influence trypanosome transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwen; Wu, Yineng; Yang, Guangxiao; Aksoy, Serap

    2009-07-21

    Tsetse flies, the sole vectors of African trypanosomes, have coevolved with mutualistic endosymbiont Wigglesworthia glossinidiae. Elimination of Wigglesworthia renders tsetse sterile and increases their trypanosome infection susceptibility. We show that a tsetse peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP-LB) is crucial for symbiotic tolerance and trypanosome infection processes. Tsetse pgrp-lb is expressed in the Wigglesworthia-harboring organ (bacteriome) in the midgut, and its level of expression correlates with symbiont numbers. Adult tsetse cured of Wigglesworthia infections have significantly lower pgrp-lb levels than corresponding normal adults. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of pgrp-lb results in the activation of the immune deficiency (IMD) signaling pathway and leads to the synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which decrease Wigglesworthia density. Depletion of pgrp-lb also increases the host's susceptibility to trypanosome infections. Finally, parasitized adults have significantly lower pgrp-lb levels than flies, which have successfully eliminated trypanosome infections. When both PGRP-LB and IMD immunity pathway functions are blocked, flies become unusually susceptible to parasitism. Based on the presence of conserved amidase domains, tsetse PGRP-LB may scavenge the peptidoglycan (PGN) released by Wigglesworthia and prevent the activation of symbiont-damaging host immune responses. In addition, tsetse PGRP-LB may have an anti-protozoal activity that confers parasite resistance. The symbiotic adaptations and the limited exposure of tsetse to foreign microbes may have led to the considerable differences in pgrp-lb expression and regulation noted in tsetse from that of closely related Drosophila. A dynamic interplay between Wigglesworthia and host immunity apparently is influential in tsetse's ability to transmit trypanosomes.

  12. A Chimeric LysK-Lysostaphin Fusion Enzyme Lysing Staphylococcus aureus Cells: a Study of Both Kinetics of Inactivation and Specifics of Interaction with Anionic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Lyubov Y; Donovan, David M; Ishnazarova, Nadiya T; Foster-Frey, Juli A; Becker, Stephen C; Pugachev, Vladimir G; Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Dmitrieva, Natalia F; Klyachko, Natalia L

    2016-10-01

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (chimeric enzyme K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities composed of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of chimeric enzyme K-L was investigated. As a protein antimicrobial, with potential antigenic properties, the biophysical effect of including chimeric enzyme K-L in anionic polymer matrices that might help reduce the immunogenicity of the enzyme was tested. Chimeric enzyme K-L reveals a high lytic activity under the following optimal ( opt ) conditions: pH opt 6.0-10.0, t opt 20-30 °C, NaCl opt 400-800 mM. At the working temperature of 37 °C, chimeric enzyme K-L is inactivated by a monomolecular mechanism and possesses a high half-inactivation time of 12.7 ± 3.0 h. At storage temperatures of 22 and 4 °C, a complex mechanism (combination of monomolecular and bimolecular mechanisms) is involved in the chimeric enzyme K-L inactivation. The optimal storage conditions under which the enzyme retains 100 % activity after 140 days of incubation (4 °C, the enzyme concentration of 0.8 mg/mL, pH 6.0 or 7.5) were established. Chimeric enzyme K-L is included in complexes with block-copolymers of poly-L-glutamic acid and polyethylene glycol, while the enzyme activity and stability are retained, thus suggesting methods to improve the application of this fusion as an effective antimicrobial agent.

  13. Enzymatic defluorination and metabolism of fluoroacetate, fluoroacetamide, fluoroethanol, and (-)-erythro-fluorocitrate in rats and mice examined by 19F and 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecle, B; Casida, J E

    1989-01-01

    Fluoroacetate administered intraperitoneally (ip) to rats and mice is defluorinated to give fluoride ion evident in urine and kidney by 19F NMR. The use of [2-13C]-, [1,2-13C]-, and [1,2-14C]fluoroacetate, prepared from isotopically labeled glycine, combined with 13C NMR and TLC radioautography, respectively, reveals a complex mixture of urinary metabolites including an S-(carboxymethyl) conjugate complex in rats and mice and sulfoxidation products thereof in rats. Direct 13C NMR examination of the bile following treatment with [2-13C]fluoroacetate shows the presence of S-(carboxymethyl)glutathione or a related conjugate and an O-conjugate of fluoroacetate. Incubation of [13C]fluoroacetate with rat and mouse liver cytosol involves formation of S-[( 13C]carboxymethyl)glutathione and fluoride ion. Fluorocitrate is also detected by 19F NMR examination of fluoroacetate incubations with mouse liver cytosol. Fluoroacetamide administered ip to rats and mice yields urinary fluoride ion formed via fluoroacetate which is liberated on hydrolysis by an organophosphate-sensitive amidase. 19F NMR chemical shifts of other metabolites of fluoroacetamide are consistent with fluoroacetohydroxamic acid in the liver of mice and fluorocitrate in the urine of rats. Fluoroethanol gives urinary fluoroacetate and fluoride ion in rats and mice and is converted to fluoroacetaldehyde by mouse and rat liver microsomes. (-)- and (+)-erythro-fluorocitrates administered ip to rats yield mostly the parent compounds in urine at 6 h with increasing amounts of fluoride ion thereafter. 19F NMR establishes that rat and mouse liver cytosols defluorinate (-)- but not (+)-erythro-fluorocitrate and pig heart aconitase also defluorinates (-)-erythro-fluorocitrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Understanding the Role of Host Hemocytes in a Squid/Vibrio Symbiosis Using Transcriptomics and Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Collins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis between the squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, serves as a model for understanding interactions between beneficial bacteria and animal hosts. The establishment and maintenance of the association is highly specific and depends on the selection of V. fischeri and exclusion of non-symbiotic bacteria from the environment. Current evidence suggests that the host’s cellular innate immune system, in the form of macrophage-like hemocytes, helps to mediate host tolerance of V. fischeri. To begin to understand the role of hemocytes in this association, we analyzed these cells by high-throughput 454 transcriptomic and liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses. 454 high-throughput sequencing produced 650,686 reads totaling 279.9 Mb while LC-MS/MS analyses of circulating hemocytes putatively identified 702 unique proteins. Several receptors involved with the recognition of microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs were identified. Among these was a complete open reading frame (ORF to a putative peptidoglycan recognition protein (EsPGRP5 that has conserved residues for amidase activity. Assembly of the hemocyte transcriptome showed EsPGRP5 had high coverage, suggesting it is among the 5% most abundant transcripts in circulating hemocytes. Other transcripts and proteins identified included members of the conserved NFκB signaling pathway, putative members of the complement pathway, the carbohydrate binding protein galectin, and cephalotoxin. Quantitative PCR of complement-related genes, cephalotoxin, EsPGRP5, and a nitric oxide synthase showed differential expression in circulating hemocytes isolated from adult squid with colonized light organs compared to those for which the symbionts were removed. These data suggest that the presence of the symbiont influences gene expression of the cellular innate immune system of the host.

  15. A catalytic antibody programmed for torsional activation of amide bond hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ranjana; Benedetti, Fabio; Berti, Federico; Buchini, Sabrina; Colombatti, Alfonso; Dinon, Francesca; Galasso, Vinicio; Norbedo, Stefano

    2003-07-07

    Amidase antibody 312d6, obtained against the sulfonamide hapten 4 a that mimics the transition state for hydrolysis of a distorted amide, accelerates the hydrolysis of the corresponding amides 1 a-3 a by a factor of 10(3) at pH 8. The mechanisms of both the uncatalyzed and antibody-catalyzed reactions were studied. Between pH 8 and 12 the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of N-toluoylindoles 1 a and 3 a shows a simple first-order dependence on [OH(-)], while hydrolysis of 3 a is zeroth-order in [OH(-)] below pH 8. The pH profile for hydrolysis of the corresponding tryptophan amide 2 a is more complex due to the dissociation of the zwitterion into an anion with pK(a) 9.74; hydrolysis of the zwitterionic and the anionic form of 2 a both show simple first-order dependence on [OH(-)]. Absence of (18)O exchange between H(2) (18)O/(18)OH(-) and the substrate, a normal SKIE for both 1 a (k(H)/k(D)=1.12) and 3 a (k(H)/k(D)=1.24) and the value of the Hammett constant rho for hydrolysis of p-substituted amides 3 a-e are consistent with an ester-like mechanism in which formation of the tetrahedral intermediate is rate-determining and the amine departs as anion. The 312d6-catalyzed hydrolysis of 3 a was studied between pH 7.5 and 9, and its independence of pH in this range indicates that water is the reacting nucleophile. Hydrolysis of 3 a is only partially inhibited by the sulfonamide hapten, and this indicates that non-specific catalysis by the protein accompanies the specific process. Only the nonspecific process is observed in the hydrolysis of amides 3 with para substituents other than methyl. Binding studies on the corresponding series of p-substituted sulfonamides 5 a-e confirm the high specificity of antibody 312d6 for p-methyl substituted substrates.

  16. Complete Reconstitution of the Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Phenotype of Strain Mu50 in Vancomycin-Susceptible S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Miwa; Hishinuma, Tomomi; Aiba, Yoshifumi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstitution of the vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) phenotype of strain Mu50 was achieved by sequentially introducing mutations into six genes of vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) strain N315ΔIP. The six mutated genes were detected in VISA strain Mu50 but not in N315ΔIP. Introduction of the mutation Ser329Leu into vraS, encoding the sensor histidine kinase of the vraSR two-component regulatory (TCR) system, and another mutation, Glu146Lys, into msrR, belonging to the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) family, increased the level of vancomycin resistance to that detected in heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) strain Mu3. Introduction of two more mutations, Asn197Ser into graR of the graSR TCR system and His481Tyr into rpoB, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase, converted the hVISA strain into a VISA strain with the same level of vancomycin resistance as Mu50. Surprisingly, however, the constructed quadruple mutant strain ΔIP4 did not have a thickened cell wall, a cardinal feature of the VISA phenotype. Subsequent study showed that cell wall thickening was an inducible phenotype in the mutant strain, whereas it was a constitutive one in Mu50. Finally, introduction of the Ala297Val mutation into fdh2, which encodes a putative formate dehydrogenase, or a 67-amino-acid sequence deletion into sle1 [sle1(Δ67aa)], encoding the hydrolase of N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase in the peptidoglycan, converted inducible cell wall thickening into constitutive cell wall thickening. sle1(Δ67aa) was found to cause a drastic decrease in autolysis activity. Thus, all six mutated genes required for acquisition of the VISA phenotype were directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of cell physiology. The VISA phenotype seemed to be achieved through multiple genetic events accompanying drastic changes in cell physiology. PMID:27067329

  17. Crystal structure of the CN-hydrolase SA0302 from the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus belonging to the Nit and NitFhit Branch of the nitrilase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roni D; Qiu, Wei; Romanov, Vladimir; Lam, Kim; Soloveychik, Maria; Benetteraj, Diana; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Yuri N; Pai, Emil F; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y

    2013-10-01

    The nitrilases include a variety of enzymes with functional specificities of nitrilase, amidase, and hydrolase reactions. The crystal structure of the uncharacterized protein SA0302 from the pathogenic microorganism Staphylococcus aureus is solved at 1.7 Å resolution. The protein contains 261 amino acids and presents a four-layer αββα sandwich with a chain topology similar to that of a few known CN-hydrolase folds. In the crystal, the proteins are arranged as dimers whose monomers are related by a pseudo twofold rotation symmetry axis. Analysis of the sequences and structures of CN-hydrolases with known 3D structures shows that SA0302 definitely is a member of Branch 10 (Nit and NitFhit) of the nitrilase superfamily. Enzyme activities and substrate specificities of members of this branch are not yet characterized, in contrast to those of the members of Branches 1-9. Although the sequence identities between Branch 10 members are rather low, less than 30%, five conserved regions are common in this subfamily. Three of them contain functionally important catalytic residues, and the two other newly characterized ones are associated with crucial intramolecular and intermolecular interactions. Sequence homology of the area near the active site shows clearly that the catalytic triad of SA0302 is Glu41-Lys110-Cys146. We suggest also that the active site includes a fourth residue, the closely located Glu119. Despite an extensive similarity with other Nit-family structural folds, SA0302 displays an important difference. Protein loop 111-122, which follows the catalytic Lys110, is reduced to half the number of amino acids found in other Nit-family members. This leaves the active site fully accessible to solvent and substrates. We have identified conservative sequence motifs around the three core catalytic residues, which are inherent solely to Branch 10 of the nitrilase superfamily. On the basis of these new sequence fingerprints, 10 previously uncharacterized proteins

  18. Enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Xiang

    2015-03-17

    The hydration and hydrolysis of nitriles are valuable synthetic methods used to prepare carboxamides and carboxylic acids. However, chemical hydration and hydrolysis of nitriles involve harsh reaction conditions, have low selectivity, and generate large amounts of waste. Therefore, researchers have confined the scope of these reactions to simple nitrile substrates. However, biological transformations of nitriles are highly efficient, chemoselective, and environmentally benign, which has led synthetic organic chemists and biotechologists to study these reactions in detail over the last two decades. In nature, biological systems degrade nitriles via two distinct pathways: nitrilases catalyze the direct hydrolysis of nitriles to afford carboxylic acids with release of ammonia, and nitrile hydratases catalyze the conversion of nitriles into carboxamides, which then furnish carboxylic acids via hydrolysis in the presence of amidases. Researchers have subsequently developed biocatalytic methods into useful industrial processes for the manufacture of commodity chemicals, including acrylamide. Since the late 1990s, research by my group and others has led to enormous progress in the understanding and application of enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles in organic synthesis. In this Account, I summarize the important advances in enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles and amides, with a primary focus on research from my laboratory. I describe microbial whole-cell-catalyzed kinetic resolution of various functionalized nitriles, amino- and hydroxynitriles, and nitriles that contain small rings and the desymmetrization of prochiral and meso dinitriles and diamides. I also demonstrate how we can apply the biocatalytic protocol to synthesize natural products and bioactive compounds. These nitrile biotransformations offer an attractive and unique protocol for the enantioselective synthesis of polyfunctionalized organic compounds that are not readily obtainable by

  19. A novel form of ficin from Ficus carica latex: Purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Matagne, André; El Mahyaoui, Rachida; Wattiez, Ruddy; Azarkan, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    metallo-proteases inhibitors (EDTA, EGTA). Surprisingly, it was well affected by the metallo-protease inhibitor o-phenanthroline. The enzymatic activity was however completely blocked by cysteine proteases inhibitors (E-64, iodoacetamide), by thiol-blocking compounds (HgCl2) and by cysteine/serine proteases inhibitors (TLCK and TPCK). This is a novel ficin form according to peptide mass fingerprint analysis, specific amidase activity, SDS-PAGE and PAGE electrophoretic mobility, N-terminal sequencing and unproneness to thiol pegylation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization and complete genome sequence analysis of a novel virulent Siphoviridae phage against Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Xing, Shaozhen; Sun, Qiang; Pei, Guangqian; Cheng, Shi; Liu, Yannan; An, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianglilan; Qu, Yonggang; Tong, Yigang

    2017-06-01

    creation of a new lineage, thus adding to the knowledge on the diversity of Staphylococcus phages. An N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase gene and several conserved genes were predicted, while no virulence or antibiotic resistance genes were identified. This study isolated and characterized a novel S. aureus phage vB_SauS_IMEP5, and our findings suggest that this phage may be potentially utilized as a therapeutic or prophylactic candidate against S.aureus infections.

  1. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    ABSTRACT

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    IMPORTANCEPeptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural

  2. Crystal structure of the lytic CHAP(K) domain of the endolysin LysK from Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Gaitero, Marta; Keary, Ruth; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Coffey, Aidan; van Raaij, Mark J

    2014-07-26

    Bacteriophages encode endolysins to lyse their host cell and allow escape of their progeny. Endolysins are also active against Gram-positive bacteria when applied from the outside and are thus attractive anti-bacterial agents. LysK, an endolysin from staphylococcal phage K, contains an N-terminal cysteine-histidine dependent amido-hydrolase/peptidase domain (CHAP(K)), a central amidase domain and a C-terminal SH3b cell wall-binding domain. CHAP(K) cleaves bacterial peptidoglycan between the tetra-peptide stem and the penta-glycine bridge. The CHAP(K) domain of LysK was crystallized and high-resolution diffraction data was collected both from a native protein crystal and a methylmercury chloride derivatized crystal. The anomalous signal contained in the derivative data allowed the location of heavy atom sites and phase determination. The resulting structures were completed, refined and analyzed. The presence of calcium and zinc ions in the structure was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Zymogram analysis was performed on the enzyme and selected site-directed mutants. The structure of CHAP(K) revealed a papain-like topology with a hydrophobic cleft, where the catalytic triad is located. Ordered buffer molecules present in this groove may mimic the peptidoglycan substrate. When compared to previously solved CHAP domains, CHAP(K) contains an additional lobe in its N-terminal domain, with a structural calcium ion, coordinated by residues Asp45, Asp47, Tyr49, His51 and Asp56. The presence of a zinc ion in the active site was also apparent, coordinated by the catalytic residue Cys54 and a possible substrate analogue. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to demonstrate that residues involved in calcium binding and of the proposed active site were important for enzyme activity. The high-resolution structure of the CHAP(K) domain of LysK was determined, suggesting the location of the active site, the substrate-binding groove and revealing the presence of a

  3. Crystal structure of the lytic CHAPK domain of the endolysin LysK from Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage K

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteriophages encode endolysins to lyse their host cell and allow escape of their progeny. Endolysins are also active against Gram-positive bacteria when applied from the outside and are thus attractive anti-bacterial agents. LysK, an endolysin from staphylococcal phage K, contains an N-terminal cysteine-histidine dependent amido-hydrolase/peptidase domain (CHAPK), a central amidase domain and a C-terminal SH3b cell wall-binding domain. CHAPK cleaves bacterial peptidoglycan between the tetra-peptide stem and the penta-glycine bridge. Methods The CHAPK domain of LysK was crystallized and high-resolution diffraction data was collected both from a native protein crystal and a methylmercury chloride derivatized crystal. The anomalous signal contained in the derivative data allowed the location of heavy atom sites and phase determination. The resulting structures were completed, refined and analyzed. The presence of calcium and zinc ions in the structure was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Zymogram analysis was performed on the enzyme and selected site-directed mutants. Results The structure of CHAPK revealed a papain-like topology with a hydrophobic cleft, where the catalytic triad is located. Ordered buffer molecules present in this groove may mimic the peptidoglycan substrate. When compared to previously solved CHAP domains, CHAPK contains an additional lobe in its N-terminal domain, with a structural calcium ion, coordinated by residues Asp45, Asp47, Tyr49, His51 and Asp56. The presence of a zinc ion in the active site was also apparent, coordinated by the catalytic residue Cys54 and a possible substrate analogue. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to demonstrate that residues involved in calcium binding and of the proposed active site were important for enzyme activity. Conclusions The high-resolution structure of the CHAPK domain of LysK was determined, suggesting the location of the active site, the substrate-binding groove and

  4. Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Organization of the Atrazine Catabolic Plasmid pADP-1 from Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Betsy; Tomkins, Jeffrey; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wing, Rod; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete 108,845-nucleotide sequence of catabolic plasmid pADP-1 from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was determined. Plasmid pADP-1 was previously shown to encode AtzA, AtzB, and AtzC, which catalyze the sequential hydrolytic removal of s-triazine ring substituents from the herbicide atrazine to yield cyanuric acid. Computational analyses indicated that pADP-1 encodes 104 putative open reading frames (ORFs), which are predicted to function in catabolism, transposition, and plasmid maintenance, transfer, and replication. Regions encoding transfer and replication functions of pADP-1 had 80 to 100% amino acid sequence identity to pR751, an IncPβ plasmid previously isolated from Enterobacter aerogenes. pADP-1 was shown to contain a functional mercury resistance operon with 99% identity to Tn5053. Complete copies of transposases with 99% amino acid sequence identity to TnpA from IS1071 and TnpA from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes were identified and flank each of the atzA, atzB, and atzC genes, forming structures resembling nested catabolic transposons. Functional analyses identified three new catabolic genes, atzD, atzE, and atzF, which participate in atrazine catabolism. Crude extracts from Escherichia coli expressing AtzD hydrolyzed cyanuric acid to biuret. AtzD showed 58% amino acid sequence identity to TrzD, a cyanuric acid amidohydrolase, from Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRLB-12227. Two other genes encoding the further catabolism of cyanuric acid, atzE and atzF, reside in a contiguous cluster adjacent to a potential LysR-type transcriptional regulator. E. coli strains bearing atzE and atzF were shown to encode a biuret hydrolase and allophanate hydrolase, respectively. atzDEF are cotranscribed. AtzE and AtzF are members of a common amidase protein family. These data reveal the complete structure of a catabolic plasmid and show that the atrazine catabolic genes are dispersed on three disparate regions of the plasmid. These results begin to provide insight into how

  5. Dual-lifetime referencing (DLR: a powerful method for on-line measurement of internal pH in carrier-bound immobilized biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniello Caterina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Industrial-scale biocatalytic synthesis of fine chemicals occurs preferentially as continuous processes employing immobilized enzymes on insoluble porous carriers. Diffusional effects in these systems often create substrate and product concentration gradients between bulk liquid and the carrier. Moreover, some widely-used biotransformation processes induce changes in proton concentration. Unlike the bulk pH, which is usually controlled at a suitable value, the intraparticle pH of immobilized enzymes may deviate significantly from its activity and stability optima. The magnitude of the resulting pH gradient depends on the ratio of characteristic times for enzymatic reaction and on mass transfer (the latter is strongly influenced by geometrical features of the porous carrier. Design and selection of optimally performing enzyme immobilizates would therefore benefit largely from experimental studies of the intraparticle pH environment. Here, a simple and non-invasive method based on dual-lifetime referencing (DLR for pH determination in immobilized enzymes is introduced. The technique is applicable to other systems in which particles are kept in suspension by agitation. Results The DLR method employs fluorescein as pH-sensitive luminophore and Ru(II tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenantroline, abbreviated Ru(dpp, as the reference luminophore. Luminescence intensities of the two luminophores are converted into an overall phase shift suitable for pH determination in the range 5.0-8.0. Sepabeads EC-EP were labeled by physically incorporating lipophilic variants of the two luminophores into their polymeric matrix. These beads were employed as carriers for immobilization of cephalosporin C amidase (a model enzyme of industrial relevance. The luminophores did not interfere with the enzyme immobilization characteristics. Analytical intraparticle pH determination was optimized for sensitivity, reproducibility and signal stability under

  6. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project was focused on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate deaminase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative C-N bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments resulted in the isolation of microbial cultures that utilize aromatic amides as sole nitrogen sources, several amidase genes were cloned and were included in directed evolution experiments to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. During the second year of the project (October, 2003-September, 2004) enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating a mixed bacterial culture that can utilize 2-aminobiphenyl as a sole nitrogen source, directed evolution experiments were focused on the aniline dioxygenase enzyme that is capable of deaminating aniline, and expression vectors were constructed to enable the expression of genes encoding C-N bond cleaving enzymes in Rhodococcus hosts. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the

  7. The proteolytic system of pineapple stems revisited: Purification and characterization of multiple catalytically active forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matagne, André; Bolle, Laetitia; El Mahyaoui, Rachida; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Azarkan, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Crude pineapple proteases extract (aka stem bromelain; EC 3.4.22.4) is an important proteolytic mixture that contains enzymes belonging to the cysteine proteases of the papain family. Numerous studies have been reported aiming at the fractionation and characterization of the many molecular species present in the extract, but more efforts are still required to obtain sufficient quantities of the various purified protease forms for detailed physicochemical, enzymatic and structural characterization. In this work, we describe an efficient strategy towards the purification of at least eight enzymatic forms. Thus, following rapid fractionation on a SP-Sepharose FF column, two sub-populations with proteolytic activity were obtained: the unbound (termed acidic) and bound (termed basic) bromelain fractions. Following reversible modification with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG), both fractions were further separated on Q-Sepharose FF and SP-Sepharose FF, respectively. This procedure yielded highly purified molecular species, all titrating ca. 1 mol of thiol group per mole of enzyme, with distinct biochemical properties. N-terminal sequencing allowed identifying at least eight forms with proteolytic activity. The basic fraction contained previously identified species, i.e. basic bromelain forms 1 and 2, ananain forms 1 and 2, and comosain (MEROPS identifier: C01.027). Furthermore, a new proteolytic species, showing similarities with basic bomelain forms 1 and 2, was discovered and termed bromelain form 3. The two remaining species were found in the acidic bromelain fraction and were arbitrarily named acidic bromelain forms 1 and 2. Both, acidic bromelain forms 1, 2 and basic bromelain forms 1, 2 and 3 are glycosylated, while ananain forms 1 and 2, and comosain are not. The eight protease forms display different amidase activities against the various substrates tested, namely small synthetic chromogenic compounds (DL-BAPNA and Boc-Ala-Ala-Gly-pNA), fluorogenic compounds