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Sample records for ames wet oxidation process

  1. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  2. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  3. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M. [Delphi Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  4. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  5. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  6. The Study of LeachateTreatment by Using Three Advanced Oxidation Process Based Wet air Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behroz Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300[degree sign] as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  7. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Behroz; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Ebrahimi, Asghar; Mokhtari, Mehdi

    2013-01-02

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  8. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  9. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  10. Development and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for waste treatment aboard manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzmann, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The wet oxidation process is considered as a potential treatment method for wastes aboard manned spacecraft for these reasons: (1) Fecal and urine wastes are processed to sterile water and CO2 gas. However, the water requires post-treatment to remove salts and odor; (2) the residual ash is negligible in quantity, sterile and easily collected; and (3) the product CO2 gas can be processed through a reduction step to aid in material balance if needed. Reaction of waste materials with oxygen at elevated temperature and pressure also produces some nitrous oxide, as well as trace amounts of a few other gases.

  11. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  12. Glycerol-based carbon materials for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Rui S.; Silva, Adrián; Pinho, Maria; Figueiredo,José; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2013-01-01

    It is known that metal-free carbon materials can act as catalysts for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process to treat organic pollutants in aqueous solutions [I]. On the other hand, crude glycerol, such as resulting from biodiesel production, is being offered as an abundant and low cost feedstock [2]. In the present work, glycerol-based carbon materials (OBCMs) with distinct properties were produced and tested as catalysts for CWPO, using 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) as a ...

  13. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Skammelsen Schmidt, A.

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates `losses` of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation.

  14. Integration of advanced oxidation processes at mild conditions in wet scrubbers for odourous sulphur compounds treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Esther; Martin, Maria J; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The effectiveness of different advanced oxidation processes on the treatment of a multicomponent aqueous solution containing ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide (0.5 mg L(-1) of each sulphur compound) was investigated with the objective to assess which one is the most suitable treatment to be coupled in wet scrubbers used in odour treatment facilities. UV/H2O2, Fenton, photo-Fenton and ozone treatments were tested at mild conditions and the oxidation efficiency obtained was compared. The oxidation tests were carried out in magnetically stirred cylindrical quartz reactors using the same molar concentration of oxidants (hydrogen peroxide or ozone). The results show that ozone and photo-Fenton are the most efficient treatments, achieving up to 95% of sulphur compounds oxidation and a mineralisation degree around 70% in 10 min. Furthermore, the total costs of the treatments taking into account the capital and operational costs were also estimated for a comparative purpose. The economic analysis revealed that the Fenton treatment is the most economical option to be integrated in a wet scrubber to remove volatile organic sulphur compounds, as long as there are no space constraints to install the required reactor volume. In the case of reactor volume limitation or retrofitting complexities, the ozone and photo-Fenton treatments should be considered as viable alternatives.

  15. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge with a hybrid process of low pressure wet oxidation and nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöcher, Christoph; Niewersch, Claudia; Melin, Thomas

    2012-04-15

    Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge will become increasingly important within the next decades due to depletion of mineral phosphorus resources. In this work a new process concept was investigated, which aims at realising phosphorus recovery in a synergistic way with the overall sewage sludge treatment scheme. This process combines a low pressure wet oxidation for sewage sludge decomposition as well as phosphorus dissolution and a nanofiltration process to separate phosphorus from heavy metals and obtain a clean diluted phosphoric acid, from which phosphorus can be recovered as clean fertiliser. It was shown that this process concept is feasible for sewage sludge for wastewater treatment plants that apply enhanced biological removal or precipitation with alumina salts for phosphorus removal. The critical parameter for phosphorus dissolution in the low pressure wet oxidation process is the iron concentration, while in the nanofiltration multi-valent cations play a predominant role. In total, a phosphorus recovery of 54% was obtained for an exemplary wastewater treatment plant. Costs of the entire process are in the same range as conventional sewage sludge disposal, with the benefit being phosphorus recovery and reduced emission of greenhouse gases due to avoidance of sludge incineration.

  16. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities.

  17. Relative influence of process variables during non-catalytic wet oxidation of municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Smit, Anne-Marie; Gapes, Daniel James

    2013-11-01

    Individual and interactive effects of process variables on the degradation of fermented municipal sludge were examined during wet oxidation. The process was carried out at 220-240°C using 1:1-2:1 oxygen to biomass ratio and 300-500 rpm stirring speed. Response surface methodology coupled with a faced-centred central composite design was used to evaluate the effect of these variables on total suspended solids, volatile suspended solids and total chemical oxygen demand. Multivariate analysis was conducted for the initial and near completion stages of reaction: 5 and 60 min treatments, respectively. Temperature had the most significant effect on degradation rate throughout. During the initial stage the effect of mixing intensity was less significant than that of oxygen ratio. Mixing intensity did not influence degradation rate at the later stage in the process. During the near completion stage, the interaction of temperature and oxygen ratio had significant effect on sludge degradation.

  18. Operational wastes management - 'wet oxidation' - an innovative process to manage radiological spent resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, F.; Maggini, F.; Mazzoni, C.; Orlandi, S.; Ricci, C. [Nuclear System Engineering Department, Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, 16161 Genova (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    A new system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the organic radioactive waste such spent ion exchange resins. The purpose of the process is to enable a high degree of volume reduction of the waste and compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and it works in mild conditions. Verification tests have been performed in a large scale pilot plant with not contaminated ion exchange resin samples similar to those ones used in NPPs. (authors)

  19. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1983-02-01

    A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

  20. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Design, fabrication and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for manned space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The wet oxidation of sewage sludge during space flight was studied for water and gas recovery, and the elimination of overboard venting. The components of the system are described. Slurry and oxygen supply modules were fabricated and tested. Recommendations for redesign of the equipment are included.

  2. Wet oxidation of sewage sludge: full-scale experience and process modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanza, Giorgio; Galessi, Raniero; Menoni, Laura; Salvetti, Roberta; Slavik, Edoardo; Zanaboni, Sabrina

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, sewage sludge management represents one of the most important issues in wastewater treatment. Within the European project "ROUTES," wet oxidation (WO) was proposed for sludge minimization. Four different types of sludge were treated in an industrial WO plant: (1) municipal primary sludge (chemical oxygen demand COD: 73.0 g/L; volatile suspended solid VSS: 44.1 g/L); (2) secondary sludge from an industrial wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) without primary sedimentation (COD: 71.8 g/L; VSS: 34.2 g/L); (3) secondary sludge from a mixed municipal and industrial WWTP without primary sedimentation (COD: 61.9 g/L; VSS: 38.7 g/L); and (4) mixed primary (70%) and secondary (30%) municipal sludge (COD: 81.2 g/L; VSS: 40.6 g/L). The effect of process parameters (temperature, reaction time, oxygen dosage) on WO performance was investigated. Depending on operating conditions, VSS and COD removal efficiency varied in the range 80-97% and 43-71%, respectively. A correlation between process efficiency and the initial VSS/TSS (total suspended solids) ratio was highlighted. Furthermore, a mathematical model of WO process for simulating VSS and COD profiles was developed.

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy).

  4. Effect of wet etching process on the morphology and transmittance of fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, S. L.; Kusumandari; Suryana, R.

    2016-11-01

    Wet etching process was performed on the surface of FTO. The FTO coated glasses subtrates with size of 2×2 cm covered by screen were patterned using zinc powder and concentrated hydrochloric acid (1 M). The substrates were then cleaned in ultrasonic baths of special detergent(helmanex) diluted in deionized water and isopropanol in sequence. The screens with various of hole size denotes by T32, T49 and T55 were used in order to create a pattern of surface textured. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) image revealed that wet etching process changes the morphology of FTO. It indicates that texturization occured. Moreover, from the UV-Vis Spectrophotometer measurement, the transmittance of FTO increase after wet etching process. The time of etching and pattern of screen were affect to the morphology and the transmittance of FTO.

  5. Catalytic wet oxidation of black liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Riera, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The major aspects of wet air oxidation and catalytic wet air oxidation have been reviewed in this work paying special attention to the reaction mechanisms, kinetics and the industrial process. In the experimental section a set of heterogeneous catalysts have been tested in the wet oxidation of non-wood black liquor. The oxidation runs were performed batchwise in a laboratory-scale mechanically stirred slurry reactor for 1 h at a temperature of 170°C and total pressure of 12 bar. Pure oxygen w...

  6. Catalytic oxidation with Al-Ce-Fe-PILC as a post-treatment system for coffee wet processing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Nancy R; Peralta, Yury M; Montañez, Mardelly K; Rodríguez-Valencia, Nelson; Molina, Rafael; Moreno, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The effluent from the anaerobic biological treatment of coffee wet processing wastewater (CWPW) contains a non-biodegradable compound that must be treated before it is discharged into a water source. In this paper, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process using Al-Ce-Fe-PILC catalysts was researched as a post-treatment system for CWPW and tested in a semi-batch reactor at atmospheric pressure and 25 °C. The Al-Ce-Fe-PILC achieved a high conversion rate of total phenolic compounds (70%) and mineralization to CO(2) (50%) after 5 h reaction time. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of coffee processing wastewater after wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation was reduced in 66%. The combination of the two treatment methods, biological (developed by Cenicafé) and catalytic oxidation with Al-Ce-Fe-PILC, achieved a 97% reduction of COD in CWPW. Therefore, the WHPCO using Al-Ce-Fe-PILC catalysts is a viable alternative for the post-treatment of coffee processing wastewater.

  7. Application of advanced oxidation processes for cleaning of industrial water generated in wet dedusting of shaft furnace gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplicka, Marianna; Kurowski, Ryszard; Jaworek, Katarzyna; Bratek, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies into advanced oxidation processes in 03 and 03/UV systems. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) was conducted to reduce the load of impurities in circulating waters from wet de-dusting of shaft furnace gases. Besides inorganic impurities, i.e. mainly arsenic compounds (16 g As L(-1) on average), lead, zinc, chlorides and sulphates, the waters also contain some organic material. The organic material is composed of a complex mixture that contains, amongst others, aliphatic compounds, phenol and its derivatives, pyridine bases, including pyridine, and its derivatives. The test results show degradation of organic and inorganic compounds during ozonation and photo-oxidation processes. Analysis of the solutions from the processes demonstrated that the complex organic material in the industrial water was oxidized in ozonation and in photo-oxidation, which resulted in formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Kinetic degradation of selected pollutants is presented. Obtained results indicated that the O3/UV process is more effective in degradation of organic matter than ozonation. Depending on the process type, precipitation of the solid phase was observed. The efficiency of solid-phase formation was higher in photo-oxidation with ozone. It was found that the precipitated solid phase is composed mainly of arsenic, iron and oxygen.

  8. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)/ultraviolet radiations) at 25°C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) at 50°C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)), system operating at 50°C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  9. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  10. Progress of catalytic wet air oxidation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin Jing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO is one of the most economical and environmental-friendly advanced oxidation process for high strength, toxic, hazardous and non-biodegradable contaminants under milder conditions, which is developed on the basic of wet air oxidation. Various heterogeneous catalysts including noble metals and metal oxides have been extensively studied to enhance the efficiency of CWAO. The advances in the research on wastewater treatment by CWAO process are summarized in aspects of reaction mechanism investigation, reaction kinetics study and catalyst development. It is pointed out that the preparation of active and stable catalysts, the investigation on reaction mechanisms and the study on reaction kinetics models are very important for the promotion of CWAO application.

  11. [Research on synergy of combining electrochemical oxidation and catalytic wet oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Li, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Fang; Huang, Ju-Wen

    2009-07-15

    A new catalytic wet oxidation fixed-bed reactor combined with three-dimensional electric-field was developed to investigate catalytic wet oxidation, electrochemical oxidation and electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation of the solution containing phenol in the presence of a catalyst Mn-Sn-Sb-3/gamma-Al2O3. Good electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation efficiency was obtained in the setup for the combination system even at mild conditions (T = 130 degrees C, po2 = 1.0 MPa) that the phenol conversion and TOC reduction were up to 94.0% and 88.4% after 27 min treatment, respectively. The result also shows that the rate constants of electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation are much higher than that of not only both catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation process alone but also additive efficiencies of catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation processes, which indicates an apparent synergetic effect between CWO and ECO processes.

  12. Wet air oxidation of resorcinol as a model treatment for refractory organics in wastewaters from the wood processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernd; Chavez, Alma; Morales-Mejia, Julio; Eichenauer, Sabrina; Stadlbauer, Ernst A; Almanza, Rafael

    2015-09-15

    Wastewater treatment systems are important tools to enhance sustainability in terms of reducing environmental impact and complying with sanitary requirements. This work addresses the wet air oxidation (WAO) process for pre-treatment of phenolic wastewater effluents. The aim was to increase biodegradability prior to a subsequent anaerobic stage. In WAO laboratory experiments using a micro-autoclave, the model compound resorcinol was degraded under different oxygen availability regims within the temperature range 150 °C-270 °C. The activation energy was determined to be 51.5 kJ/mol. Analysis of the products revealed that after 3 h of reaction at 230 °C, 97.5% degradation of resorcinol was achieved. At 250 °C and the same reaction time complete removal of resorcinol was observed. In this case the total organic carbon content was reduced down to 29%, from 118.0 mg/L down to 34.4 mg/L. Under these process conditions, the pollutant was only partially mineralized and the ratio of the biological oxygen demand relative to the chemical oxygen demand, which is 0.07 for resorcinol, was increased to a value exceeding 0.5. The main by-product acetic acid, which is a preferred compound for methanogenic bacteria, was found to account for 33% of the total organic carbon.

  13. Wet flue gas desulfurization processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrunnisa Çavuşoğlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The wet flue gas desulfurization process is widely used for the treatment of exhaust gases in power stations. Due to its high level of effectiveness over the already available processes, it has also been the mostly preferred method by industry. Its high SO2 removal efficiency, wide applicability of absorption chemicals and the ease of the chemical process handling which does not require comprehensive konowledge are among the main advantages of this process. In this article, various wet flue gas desulfurization processes such as lime/limestone have beendiscussed.

  14. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  15. Preparation and Photocatalytic Activity of Potassium- Incorporated Titanium Oxide Nanostructures Produced by the Wet Corrosion Process Using Various Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yoon Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured potassium-incorporated Ti-based oxides have attracted much attention because the incorporated potassium can influence their structural and physico-chemical properties. With the aim of tuning the structural and physical properties, we have demonstrated the wet corrosion process (WCP as a simple method for nanostructure fabrication using various Ti-based materials, namely Ti–6Al–4V alloy (TAV, Ti–Ni (TN alloy and pure Ti, which have 90%, 50% and 100% initial Ti content, respectively. We have systematically investigated the relationship between the Ti content in the initial metal and the precise condition of WCP to control the structural and physical properties of the resulting nanostructures. The WCP treatment involved various concentrations of KOH solutions. The precise conditions for producing K-incorporated nanostructured titanium oxide films (nTOFs were strongly dependent on the Ti content of the initial metal. Ti and TAV yielded one-dimensional nanowires of K-incorporated nTOFs after treatment with 10 mol/L-KOH solution, whereas TN required a higher concentration (20 mol/L-KOH solution to produce comparable nanostructures. The obtained nanostructures revealed a blue-shift in UV absorption spectra due to the quantum confinement effects. A significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity was observed via the chromomeric change and the intermediate formation of methylene blue molecules under UV irradiation. This study demonstrates the WCP as a simple, versatile and scalable method for the production of nanostructured K-incorporated nTOFs to be used as high-performance photocatalysts for environmental and energy applications.

  16. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process.

  17. Reuse of a dyehouse effluent after being treated with the combined catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process and the aerated constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D K; Kim, S C; Yoon, J H

    2007-01-01

    A catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process was combined with the aerated constructed wetland in order to treat the raw dyehouse wastewater to in acceptable level for reuse as washing process water. More than 90% of BOD and CODs could be removed with the wet peroxide oxidation reactor and the remaining pollutants in the treated water were transformed into biodegradable ones which could have been successfully treated at the following aerated constructed wetland. The highest values of BOD5, CODMn, CODCr, SS and T-N in the treated water were 1.6, 1.8, 2.1, 0.5 and 12.8 mg/L, respectively. These values were low enough for the treated water to be reused at the washing process.

  18. Removal of salicylic acid on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Xu, Aihua; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Can

    2007-01-02

    It has been found that salicylic acid can be removal effectively at the lower temperature of 140 degrees C on perovskite-type oxide LaFeO3 catalyst in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Under the same condition, the activities for the CWAO of phenol, benzoic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid have been also investigated. The results indicated that, with compared to the very poor activities for phenol and benzoic acid, the activities for salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid were very high, which are attributed to their same intramolecular H-bonding structures. With the role of hard acidity of intramolecular H-bonding, salicylic acid and sulfonic salicylic acid can be adsorbed effectively on the basic center of LaFeO3 catalyst and are easy to take place the total oxidation reaction. However, at temperatures higher than 140 degrees C, the intramolecular H-bonding structure of salicylic acid was destroyed and the activities at 160 and 180 degrees C decreased greatly, which confirms further the key role of intramolecular H-bonding in the CWAO. Moreover, the LaFeO3 catalyst also indicated a superior stability of activity and structure in CWAO of salicylic acid.

  19. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  20. Post-treatment of biologically treated wastewater containing organic contaminants using a sequence of H2O2 based advanced oxidation processes: photolysis and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Sillanpää, M; Pocostales, P; Acevedo, A; Manzano, M A

    2015-03-15

    In this paper the feasibility of a multi-barrier treatment (MBT) for the regeneration of synthetic industrial wastewater (SIWW) was evaluated. Industrial pollutants (orange II, phenol, 4-chlorophenol and phenanthrene) were added to the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant. The proposed MBT begins with a microfiltration membrane pretreatment (MF), followed by hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and finishing, as a polishing step, with catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) using granular activated carbon (GAC) at ambient conditions. During the microfiltration step (0.7 μm) the decrease of suspended solids concentration, turbidity and Escherichia coli in treated water were 88, 94 and 99%, respectively. Also, the effluent's transmittance (254 nm) was increased by 14.7%. Removal of more than 99.9% of all added pollutants, mineralization of 63% of organic compounds and complete disinfection of total coliforms were reached during the H2O2/UVC treatment step (H2O2:TOC w/w ratio = 5 and an UVC average dose accumulated by wastewater 8.80 WUVC s cm(-2)). The power and efficiency of the lamp, the water transmittance and photoreactor geometry are taken into account and a new equation to estimate the accumulated dose in water is suggested. Remaining organic pollutants with a higher oxidation state of carbon atoms (+0.47) and toxic concentration of residual H2O2 were present in the effluent of the H2O2/UVC process. After 2.3 min of contact time with GAC at CWPO step, 90 and 100% of total organic carbon and residual H2O2 were removed, respectively. Also, the wastewater toxicity was studied using Vibrio fischeri and Sparus aurata larvae. The MBT operational and maintenance costs (O&M) was estimated to be 0.59 € m(-3).

  1. Wet peroxide oxidation and catalytic wet oxidation of stripped sour water produced during oil shale refining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Jaidev; Tardio, James; Jani, Harit; Bhargava, Suresh K; Akolekar, Deepak B; Grocott, Stephen C

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) and wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) of stripped sour water (SSW) from an oil shale refinery was investigated. Greater than 70% total organic carbon (TOC) removal from SSW was achieved using Cu(NO(3))(2) catalysed WO under the following conditions using a glass lined reaction vessel: 200 degrees C, pO(2)=0.5MPa, 3h, [Cu(NO(3))(2)]=67mmol/L. Significant TOC removal ( approximately 31%) also occurred in the system without added oxygen. It is proposed that this is predominantly due to copper catalysed oxidative decarboxylation of organics in SSW based on observed changes in copper oxidation state. Greater than 80% TOC removal was achieved using WPO under the following conditions: 150 degrees C, t=1.5h, [H(2)O(2)]=64g/L. Significantly more TOC could be removed from SSW by adding H(2)O(2) in small doses as opposed to adding the same total amount in one single dose. It was concluded that WPO was a far more effective process for removing odorous compounds from SSW.

  2. Experimental research on influencing factors of wet removal of NO from coal-fired flue gas by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Wet removal of NO from coal-fired flue gas by UV/H2O2 Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated in a self-designed UV-bubble reactor. Several main influencing factors (UV intensity, H2O2 initial concentration, initial pH value, solution temperature, NO initial concentration, liquid-gas ratio and O2 percentage content) on the NO removal efficiency were studied. The results showed that UV intensity, H2O2 initial concentration, NO initial concentration and liquid-gas ratio are the main influencing factors. In the best conditions, the highest NO removal efficiency by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process could reach 82.9%. Based on the experimental study, the influencing mechanism of the relevant influencing factors were discussed in depth.

  3. Application of sludge-based carbonaceous materials in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julcour Lebigue, Carine; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; N'Guessan Krou; Ayral, Catherine; Mohamed, Elham; Wilhelm, Anne-Marie; Delmas, Henri; Le Coq, Laurence; Gerente, Claire; Smith, Karl M; Pullket, Suangusa; Fowler, Geoffrey D; Graham, Nigel J D

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of the performance of carbonaceous materials prepared from sewage sludges (SBCMs) in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation; phenol was used as the model pollutant. Three different sewage sludges were treated by either carbonisation or steam activation, and the physico-chemical properties of the resultant carbonaceous materials (e.g. hardness, BET surface area, ash and elemental content, surface chemistry) were evaluated and compared with a commercial reference activated carbon (PICA F22). The adsorption capacity for phenol of the SBCMs was greater than suggested by their BET surface area, but less than F22; a steam activated, dewatered raw sludge (SA_DRAW) had the greatest adsorption capacity of the SBCMs in the investigated range of concentrations (oxidation tests, the SBCMs demonstrated catalytic behaviour arising from their substrate adsorptivity and metal content. Recycling of SA_DRAW in successive oxidations led to significant structural attrition and a hardened SA_DRAW was evaluated, but found to be unsatisfactory during the oxidation step. In a combined adsorption-oxidation sequence, both the PICA carbon and a selected SBCM showed deterioration in phenol adsorption after oxidative regeneration, but a steady state performance was reached after 2 or 3 cycles.

  4. Catalytic wet Air Oxidation of o-Chlorophenol in Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 汪大翬

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments for the treatment of o-chlorophenol in wastewater. Experimental results showed that wet air oxidation (WAO) process in the absence of catalyst was also effective for o-chlorophenol in wastewater treatment. Up to 80% of the initial CODCr was removed by wet air oxidation at 270℃ with twice amount of the required stoichiometric oxygen supply. At temperature of 150℃, the removal rate of CODCr was only 30%. Fe2(SO4)3, CuSO4, Cu(NO3)2 and MnSO4 exhibited high catalytic activity. Higher removal rate of CODCr was obtained by CWAO. More than 96% of the initial CODCr was removed at 270℃ and 84.6%-93.6% of the initial CODCr was removed at 150℃. Mixed catalysts had better catalytic activity for the degradation of o-chlorophenol in wastewater.

  5. Processing Earth Observing images with Ames Stereo Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, R. A.; Moratto, Z. M.; Alexandrov, O.; Fong, T.; Shean, D. E.; Smith, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    ICESat with its GLAS instrument provided valuable elevation measurements of glaciers. The loss of this spacecraft caused a demand for alternative elevation sources. In response to that, we have improved our Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) software (version 2.1+) to ingest satellite imagery from Earth satellite sources in addition to its support of planetary missions. This enables the open source community a free method to generate digital elevation models (DEM) from Digital Globe stereo imagery and alternatively other cameras using RPC camera models. Here we present details of the software. ASP is a collection of utilities written in C++ and Python that implement stereogrammetry. It contains utilities to manipulate DEMs, project imagery, create KML image quad-trees, and perform simplistic 3D rendering. However its primary application is the creation of DEMs. This is achieved by matching every pixel between the images of a stereo observation via a hierarchical coarse-to-fine template matching method. Matched pixels between images represent a single feature that is triangulated using each image's camera model. The collection of triangulated features represents a point cloud that is then grid resampled to create a DEM. In order for ASP to match pixels/features between images, it requires a search range defined in pixel units. Total processing time is proportional to the area of the first image being matched multiplied by the area of the search range. An incorrect search range for ASP causes repeated false positive matches at each level of the image pyramid and causes excessive processing times with no valid DEM output. Therefore our system contains automatic methods for deducing what the correct search range should be. In addition, we provide options for reducing the overall search range by applying affine epipolar rectification, homography transform, or by map projecting against a prior existing low resolution DEM. Depending on the size of the images, parallax, and image

  6. Evolution of toxicity upon wet catalytic oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A; Yustos, P; Quintanilla, A; García-Ochoa, F; Casas, J A; Rodríguez, J J

    2004-01-01

    This work reports on the evolution of the toxicity of phenol-containing simulated wastewater upon catalytic wet oxidation with a commercial copper-based catalyst (Engelhard Cu-0203T). The results of the study show that this catalyst enhances detoxification, in addition to its effect on the oxidation rate. The EC50 values of the intermediates identified throughout the oxidation route of phenol have been determined and used to predict the evolution of toxicity upon oxidation. The predicted values have been compared with the ones measured directly from the aqueous solution during the oxidation process. To learn about the evolution of toxicity through out the routes of phenol oxidation, experiments have been performed with simulated wastewaters containing separately phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone as original pollutants. The significant increase of toxicity observed during the early stages of phenol oxidation is not directly related to the development of the brown color that derives mainly from catechol oxidation. This increase of toxicity is caused by the formation of hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone as intermediates, the former showing the highest toxicity. Furthermore, synergistic effects, giving rise to a significant increase of toxicity, have been observed. These effects derive from the interactions among copper leached from the catalyst and catechol, hydroquinone, and p-benzoquinone and demand that close attention be paid to this potential problem in catalytic wet oxidation.

  7. Wet oxidation as a waste treatment in closed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1981-01-01

    The chemistry of the wet oxidation process has been investigated in relation to production of plant nutrients from plant and human waste materials as required for a closed life-support system. Hydroponically grown lettuce plants were used as a model plant waste and oxygen gas was used as oxidant. Organic nitrogen content was decreased 88-100% depending on feed material. Production of ammonia and nitrogen gas account for all of the observed decrease in organic nitrogen content. No nitrous oxide (N2O) was detected. The implications of these results for closed life-support systems are discussed.

  8. Wet Oxidation as a Waste Treatment Method in Closed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of the wet oxidation process was investigated in relation to production of plant nutrients from plant and human waste materials as required for a closed life support system. Hydroponically grown lettuce plants were used as a model plant waste, and oxygen gas was used as an oxidant. Organic nitrogen content was decreased 88-100%, depending on feed material. Production of ammonia and nitrogen gas accounted for all of the observed decrease in organic nitrogen content. No nitrous oxide (N2O) was detected. The implications of these results for closed life support systems are discussed.

  9. Wet air and catalytic wet air oxidation of several azodyes from wastewaters: the beneficial role of catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; García, J; Ovejero, G; Mestanza, M

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of several azo dyes, Acid Orange 7 (AO7), Acid Orange 74 (AO74), Direct Blue 71 (DB71), Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Eriochrome Blue Black B (EBBB), well-known non-biodegradable mono, di and tri azo dyes has been studied using, wet-air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO). The efficiency of substrate decolorization and mineralization in each process has been comparatively discussed by evolution concentration, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon content and toxicity of dyes solutions. The most efficient method on decolorization and mineralization (TOC) was observed to be CWAO process. Mineralization efficiency with wet air and catalytic wet air oxidation essays was observed in the order of mono-azo > di-azo > tri-azo dye. Final solutions of CWAO applications after 180 min treatment can be disposed safely to environment.

  10. Optimization of wet oxidation pretreatment of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A.S.; Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The wet oxidation process (water; oxygen and elevated temperature) was investigated under alkaline conditions for fractionation of hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin from wheat straw. At higher temperature and longer reaction time, a purified cellulose fraction (69% w/w) was produced with high ...... for by saccharides and carboxylic acids; hence, a significant proportion of reaction products remained unidentified. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Transformation and removal of wood extractives from pulp mill sludge using wet oxidation and thermal hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Robinson, Murray; Smit, Anne-Marie; Wijeyekoon, Suren; Gapes, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    In order to remove wood extractive compounds from pulp mill sludge and thereby enhancing anaerobic digestibility, samples were subjected to either oxidative hydrothermal treatment (wet oxidation) or non-oxidative hydrothermal treatment (thermal hydrolysis). Treatments were carried out at 220 °C with initial pressure of 20 bar. More than 90% destruction of extractive compounds was observed after 20 min of wet oxidation. Wet oxidation eliminated 95.7% of phenolics, 98.6% fatty acids, 99.8% resin acids and 100% of phytosterols in 120 min. Acetic acid concentration increased by approximately 2 g/l after 120 min of wet oxidation. This has potential for rendering sludge more amenable to anaerobic digestion. In contrast thermal hydrolysis was found to be ineffective in degrading extractive compounds. Wet oxidation is considered to be an effective process for removal of recalcitrant and inhibitive compounds through hydrothermal pre-treatment of pulp mill sludge.

  12. Damage-free back channel wet-etch process in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors using a carbon-nanofilm barrier layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dongxiang; Zhao, Mingjie; Xu, Miao; Li, Min; Chen, Zikai; Wang, Lang; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2014-07-23

    Amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (IZO-TFTs) with damage-free back channel wet-etch (BCE) process were investigated. A carbon (C) nanofilm was inserted into the interface between IZO layer and source/drain (S/D) electrodes as a barrier layer. Transmittance electron microscope images revealed that the 3 nm-thick C nanofilm exhibited a good corrosion resistance to a commonly used H3PO4-based etchant and could be easily eliminated. The TFT device with a 3 nm-thick C barrier layer showed a saturated field effect mobility of 14.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a subthreshold swing of 0.21 V/decade, an on-to-off current ratio of 8.3 × 10(10), and a threshold voltage of 2.0 V. The favorable electrical performance of this kind of IZO-TFTs was due to the protection of the inserted C to IZO layer in the back-channel-etch process. Moreover, the low contact resistance of the devices was proved to be due to the graphitization of the C nanofilms after annealing. In addition, the hysteresis and thermal stress testing confirmed that the usage of C barrier nanofilms is an effective method to fabricate the damage-free BCE-type devices with high reliability.

  13. Study on mechanism of wet air oxidation of emulsification wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen W; Zeng, Xin P; Xiao, Yao M; Gu, Guo W

    2009-04-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) can effectively be used to treat high-concentration, non-biodegradable emulsification wastewater that contains nonionic matters. Gas chromatograph analysis of emulsification wastewater after oxidation indicated that a catalyst increased production of fatty acids but could not promote its oxidation between 160 and 180 degrees C. When the temperature was greater than or equal to 220 degrees C, the catalyst not only increased production of fatty acids initially but effectively promoted its oxidation in later stages and significantly reduced the concentration of residual surfactants. Experiments proved that fatty acids (especially acetic acid) were the primary intermediate products and that oxidation of these acids was the rate-limiting step. During the process of catalytic WAO of emulsification wastewater, active oxygen molecules attacked organic matters resulting in production of fatty acids, ketone, alcohol, hydrocarbon, and oligo-polyether through radical chain reactions.

  14. Photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide from simulated flue gas by wet scrubbing using ultraviolet/TiO2/H2O2 process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张波; 仲兆平; 付宗明

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) from flue gas is hard to remove because of low solubility and reactivity. A new technology for photocatalytic oxidation of NO using ultraviolet (UV)/TiO2/H2O2 process is studied in an efficient laboratory-scale reactor. Effects of several key operational parameters on NO removal efficiency are studied, including TiO2 content, H2O2 initial concentration, UV lamp power, NO initial content, oxygen volume fraction and TiO2/H2O2 solution volume. The results illustrate that the NO removal efficiency increases with the increasing of H2O2 initial concentration or UV lamp power. Meanwhile, a lower NO initial content or a higher TiO2/H2O2 solution volume will result in higher NO removal efficiency. In addition, oxygen volume fraction has a little effect. The highest NO removal efficiency is achieved at the TiO2 content of 0.75 g/L, H2O2 initial concentration of 2.5 mol/L, UV lamp power of 36 W, NO initial content of 206×10−6 and TiO2/H2O2 solution volume of 600 mL. It is beneficial for the development and application of NO removal from coal-fired flue gas with UV/TiO2/H2O2 process.

  15. Microwave assisted wet oxidation of p-nitrophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO; Longli; CHEN; Shuo; QUAN; Xie; LIU; Xitao; ZHAO; Huimin

    2005-01-01

    Aqueous solution of p-nitrophenol (PNP) was treated continuously by microwave assisted wet oxidation while flowing through a granular activated carbon (GAC) fixed bed. PNP was pre-adsorbed onto GAC prior to being put into the reactor so as to prevent PNP adsorption on GAC during microwave irradiation. PNP solutions with different initial concentration (218.6 mg/L and 1200 mg/L) were treated under conditions of microwave power 500 W, liquid flow 6.4 mL/min and air flow 40 mL/min or 60 mL/min. The results indicated that the removal of PNP was higher than 90% and more than 65% PNP was mineralized. Phenol, nitrobenzene, hydroquinone and benzoquinone occurred as course products during the operation process, which were degraded further. The biodegradability of the outflow was improved greatly by microwave assisted wet oxidation.

  16. Combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis of polyvinylchloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the widespread aversion to burning polyvinylchloride (PVC) together with municipal waste, we have attempted an alternative approach to its decomposition. This paper describes a combined wet oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis yielding water soluble, biodegradable products. Experiments were...... carried out at temperatures from 180-260 degree C and reaction times of 8-24 min. The chloride liberated provides information on the rate constants. Considering the measured Cl- and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) values, we find hydrolysis and oxidation processes to be interdependent. The main products...

  17. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  18. Physical-Chemical Solid Waste Processing for Space Missions at Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Moran, Mark; Wignarajah, K.; Tleimat, Maher; Pace, Greg

    2001-01-01

    As space missions become longer in duration and reach out to more distant locations such as Mars, solids waste processing progresses from storage technologies to reclamation technologies. Current low Earth orbit technologies consist of store-and dispose to space or return to Earth. Fully regenerative technologies recycle wastes. The materials reclaimed from waste can be used to provide the basic materials to support plant growth for food including carbon dioxide, water, and nutrients. Other products can also be reclaimed from waste such as hydrocarbons and activated carbon. This poster describes development at Ames Research Center of a process to make activated carbon from space mission wastes and to make an incineration system that produces clean flue gas. Inedible biomass and feces contain hydrocarbons in a form that can be pyrolyzed and converted to activated carbon. The activated carbon can then be used to clean up contaminants from various other life support systems; in particular, the activated carbon can be used regeneratively to remove NOx from incinerator flue gas. Incinerator flue gas can also be cleaned up by the use of reductive and oxidative catalysts. A catalytic incinerator flue gas cleanup system has been developed at ARC that produces flue gas clean enough (with the exception of carbon dioxide) to meet the Space Minimum Allowable Concentration limits for human exposure.

  19. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  20. Degradation process analysis of the azo dyes by catalytic wet air oxidation with catalyst CuO/γ-Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Ma, Hongrui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Three azo dyes (Methyl Orange, Direct Brown and Direct Green) were treated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with the catalysts CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) prepared by consecutive impregnation. The relationship of decolorization extent, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal extent and total organic carbon (TOC) in dye solution were investigated. The results indicated that the CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst had excellent catalytic activity in treating azo dyes. Almost 99% of color and 70% of TOC were removed in 2h. The high removal extent of color and TOC indicated that the CWAO obtained perfect decomposition for pollutants. The degradation pathway of azo dyes was analyzed by UV-Vis, FTIR and MS. According to the examined results, the hydroxyl ((·)OH) radicals induced strong oxidizing effects in the target solution and destroyed the chromophoric groups of azo-benzene conjugated of the molecular structure. Considering characteristics of the dye structure, the azo bond (-N=N-) would first be attacked by the hydroxyl radical and other free radicals. With the continuous oxidization and the long reaction time at high temperature, these intermediates could be oxidized to the final oxidation products, such as water and carbon dioxide.

  1. Investigation on preparation of CuO-SnO2-CeO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation process and their catalytic activity for degradation of phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-jun; ZHANG Mi-lin; WAN Jia-feng; XIA Zhi; LIU Xiao-hui; LIU hui

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation process is an efficient measure for treatment of wastewater with great strength which is not biodegradable. Heterocatalysts now become the key investigation subject of catalytic wet air oxidation process due to their good stability and easy separation. In the paper, CuO-SnOE-CeO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts are prepared by impregnation method, with SnO2 as a doping component, CuO as an active component, CeO2 as a structure stabilizer, γ-Al2O3 as a substrate. XPS test is carried out to investigate the effect of Sn on the chemical surrounding of Cu and O element on the catalyst surface and their catalytic activity. It is shown that the right do-ping of Sn can increase Cu+ content on the catalyst surface, as a result the quantity of adsorption oxygen is also increased. It is found that Cu + content on the catalyst surface is one of the primary factors that determin catalytic activity of catalyst through analyzing the catalytic wet air oxidation process of phenol.

  2. Catalytic properties of carbon materials for wet oxidation of aniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Helder T; Machado, Bruno F; Ribeiro, Andreia; Moreira, Ivo; Rosário, Márcio; Silva, Adrián M T; Figueiredo, José L; Faria, Joaquim L

    2008-11-30

    A mesoporous carbon xerogel with a significant amount of oxygen functional groups and a commercial activated carbon, were tested in the catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline at 200 degrees C and 6.9 bar of oxygen partial pressure. Both carbon materials showed high activity in aniline and total organic carbon removal, a clear increase in the removal efficiency relatively to non-catalytic wet air oxidation being observed. The best results in terms of aniline removal were obtained with carbon xerogel, an almost complete aniline conversion after 1h oxidation with high selectivity to non-organic compounds being achieved. The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption, N(2) adsorption and scanning electron microscopy, in order to relate their performances to the chemical and textural characteristics. It was concluded that the removal efficiency, attributed to both adsorption and catalytic activity, is related to the mesoporous character of the materials and to the presence of specific oxygen containing functional groups at their surface. The effect of catalytic activity was found to be more important in the removal of aniline than the effect of adsorption at the materials surface. The results obtained indicate that mesoporous carbon xerogels are promising catalysts for CWAO processes.

  3. Catalytic properties of carbon materials for wet oxidation of aniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Helder T. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais (LCM), Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Escola Superior de Tecnologia e de Gestao, Instituto Politecnico de Braganca, Campus de Santa Apolonia, 5300-857 Braganca (Portugal); Machado, Bruno F.; Ribeiro, Andreia; Moreira, Ivo; Rosario, Marcio; Silva, Adrian M.T.; Figueiredo, Jose L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais (LCM), Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Joaquim L. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais (LCM), Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: jlfaria@fe.up.pt

    2008-11-30

    A mesoporous carbon xerogel with a significant amount of oxygen functional groups and a commercial activated carbon, were tested in the catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline at 200 deg. C and 6.9 bar of oxygen partial pressure. Both carbon materials showed high activity in aniline and total organic carbon removal, a clear increase in the removal efficiency relatively to non-catalytic wet air oxidation being observed. The best results in terms of aniline removal were obtained with carbon xerogel, an almost complete aniline conversion after 1 h oxidation with high selectivity to non-organic compounds being achieved. The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption, N{sub 2} adsorption and scanning electron microscopy, in order to relate their performances to the chemical and textural characteristics. It was concluded that the removal efficiency, attributed to both adsorption and catalytic activity, is related to the mesoporous character of the materials and to the presence of specific oxygen containing functional groups at their surface. The effect of catalytic activity was found to be more important in the removal of aniline than the effect of adsorption at the materials surface. The results obtained indicate that mesoporous carbon xerogels are promising catalysts for CWAO processes.

  4. Thermal and sonochemical synthesis of porous (Ce,Zr)O2 mixed oxides from metal β-diketonate precursors and their catalytic activity in wet air oxidation process of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Camille; Guari, Yannick; Chave, Tony; Larionova, Joulia; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2014-07-01

    Porous (Ce0.5Zr0.5)O2 solid solutions were prepared by thermolysis (T=285 °C) or sonolysis (20 kHz, I=32 W cm(-2), Pac=0.46 W mL(-1), T=200 °C) of Ce(III) and Zr(IV) acetylacetonates in oleylamine or hexadecylamine under argon followed by heat treatment of the precipitates obtained in air at 450 °C. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the samples show nanoparticles of ca. 4-6 nm for the two synthetic approaches. The powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and μ-Raman spectroscopy of solids obtained after heat treatment indicate the formation of (Ce0.5Zr0.5)O2 solid solutions with a metastable tetragonal crystal structure for the two synthetic routes. The specific surface area of the samples varies between 78 and 149 m(2) g(-1) depending on synthesis conditions. The use of Barrett-Joyner-Halenda and t-plot methods reveal the formation of mixed oxides with a hybrid morphology that combines mesoporosity and microporosity regardless of the method of preparation. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of the mixed oxides by sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV). It was found that the materials prepared by sonochemistry exhibit better resistance to dissolution during the deposition process of platinum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows the presence of Pt(0) and Pt(II) on the surface of mixed oxides. Porous (Ce0.5Zr0.5)O2 mixed oxides loaded with 1.5%wt. platinum exhibit high activity in catalytic wet air oxidation of formic acid at 40 °C.

  5. Surface wrinkling on polydimethylsiloxane microspheres via wet surface chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-07-16

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties.

  6. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  7. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised.

  8. Catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of a petrochemical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, M I; Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Gallego, A I

    2010-01-01

    Continuous Catalytic Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation (CWHPO) for the treatment of a petrochemical industry wastewater has been studied on a pilot plant scale process. The installation, based on a catalytic fixed bed reactor (FBR) coupled with a stirred tank reactor (STR), shows an interesting alternative for the intensification of a continuous CWHPO treatment. Agglomerated SBA-15 silica-supported iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15) was used as Fenton-like catalyst. Several variables such as the temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration, as well as the capacity of the pilot plant for the treatment of inlet polluted streams with different dilution degrees were studied. Remarkable results in terms of TOC reduction and increased biodegradability were achieved using 160 degrees C and moderate hydrogen peroxide initial concentration. Additionally, a good stability of the catalyst was evidenced for 8 hours of treatment with low iron leaching (less than 1 mg/L) under the best operating conditions.

  9. Kinetics of wet air oxidation (WAO) of alcaloide factory wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunukcu, Y Kaçar

    2005-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) of Afyon alcaloide factory wastewater, a typical high strength industrial wastewater, was carried out. The process was performed in a specifically designed titanium bubble reactor at temperatures in the range of 140-160 degrees C. The kinetics of WAO of alcaloide factory wastewater was modeled by assuming two distinct steps. The rates of destruction were measured with respect to reduction in COD. The oxidation reaction was found to be first order with respect to COD concentration and also second order with respect to oxygen concentration in both steps. The values of activation energies were found to be in the range of 4.93 x 10(4)-7.85 x 10(4) kJ/kmol.

  10. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand).

  11. Magnetic carbon xerogels for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of 4-nitrophenol solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, R.; Silva, Adrián; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) is a well-known advanced oxidation process for the removal of organic pollutants from industrial process waters and wastewater. Specifically, CWPO employs hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidation source and a suitable catalyst to promote its decomposition via formation of hydroxyl radicals (HO•), which exhibit high oxidizing potential and serve as effective species in the destruction of a huge range of organic pollutants

  12. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  13. Catalytic wet air oxidation for the treatment of emulsifying wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-fu; CHEN Ling; LU Yi-cheng; TANG Wen-wei

    2005-01-01

    The wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic WAO (CWAO) of the high strength emulsifying wastewater containing nonionic surfactants have been investigated in terms of COD and TOC removal. The WAO and homogeneous CWAO processes were carried out at the temperature from 433 K to 513 K, with initial oxygen pressure 1.2 MPa. It was found that homogeneous catalyst copper(Cu ( NO3 )2 )had an fairly good catalytic activity for the WAO process, and the oxidation was catalyzed when the temperature was higher than 473 K.Moreover, several heterogeneous catalysts were proved to be effective for the WAO process. At the temperature 473 K, after 2 h reaction,WAO process could achieve about 75% COD removal and 66% TOC removal, while catalysts Cu/Al2O3 and Mn-Ce/Al2O3 elevated the COD removal up to 86%-89% and that of TOC up to 82%. However, complete elimination of COD and TOC was proved to be difficult even the best non-noble catalyst was used. Therefore, the effluent from WAO or CWAO process need to be further disposed. The bioassay proved that the effluent from WAO process was amenable to the biochemical method.

  14. A review of wet air oxidation and Thermal Hydrolysis technologies in sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hii, Kevin; Baroutian, Saeid; Parthasarathy, Raj; Gapes, Daniel J; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2014-03-01

    With rapid world population growth and strict environmental regulations, increasingly large volumes of sludge are being produced in today's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) with limited disposal routes. Sludge treatment has become an essential process in WWTP, representing 50% of operational costs. Sludge destruction and resource recovery technologies are therefore of great ongoing interest. Hydrothermal processing uses unique characteristics of water at elevated temperatures and pressures to deconstruct organic and inorganic components of sludge. It can be broadly categorized into wet oxidation (oxidative) and thermal hydrolysis (non-oxidative). While wet air oxidation (WAO) can be used for the final sludge destruction and also potentially producing industrially useful by-products such as acetic acid, thermal hydrolysis (TH) is mainly used as a pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion. This paper reviews current hydrothermal technologies, roles of wet air oxidation and thermal hydrolysis in sludge treatment, and challenges faced by these technologies.

  15. Simulation of wet oxidation of silicon based on the interfacial silicon emission model and comparison with dry oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, Masashi; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Silicon oxidation in wet ambients is simulated based on the interfacial silicon emission model and is compared with dry oxidation in terms of the silicon-atom emission. The silicon emission model enables the simulation of wet oxidation to be done using the oxidant self-diffusivity in the oxide with a single activation energy. The amount of silicon emission from the interface during wet oxidation is smaller than that during dry oxidation. The small emission rate for wet oxidation is responsibl...

  16. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U.J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  17. Photocatalytic oxidation removal of Hg0 using ternary Ag/AgI-Ag2CO3 hybrids in wet scrubbing process under fluorescent light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anchao; Zhang, Lixiang; Chen, Xiaozhuan; Zhu, Qifeng; Liu, Zhichao; Xiang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A series of ternary Ag/AgI-Ag2CO3 photocatalysts synthesized using a facile coprecipitation method were employed to investigate their performances of Hg0 removal in a wet scrubbing reactor. The hybrids were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, SEM-EDS, HRTEM, XPS, DRS and ESR. The photocatalytic activities of Hg0 removal were evaluated under fluorescent light. The results showed that AgI content, fluorescent light irradiation, reaction temperature all showed significant influences on Hg0 removal. NO exhibited significant effect on Hg0 removal in comparison to SO2. Among these ternary Ag/AgI-Ag2CO3 hybrids, Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag2CO3 showed the highest Hg0 removal efficiency, which could be ascribed to the effective separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs between AgI and Ag2CO3 and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect in the visible region by metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag0 NPs). The trapping studies of reactive radicals showed that the superoxide radicals (rad O2-) may play a key role in Hg0 removal under fluorescent light. According to the experimental and characterization results, a possible photocatalytic oxidation mechanism for enhanced Hg0 removal over Ag/AgI(0.1)-Ag2CO3 hybrid under fluorescent light was proposed.

  18. Homogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation for the treatment oftextile wastewaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An extensive series of experiments was carried out in order to identify suitable catalysts to boost the reaction rate of wet air oxidation of real textile wastewaters at relatively mild temperature and pressure. Experimental results indicated that all catalysts tested in this investigation had shown an impressive increase in the initial COD and TOC removal rate as well as the COD and TOC removal levels in two hours reaction. Among all the catalysts tested, copper salts were more effective than the rest. Anions of the salt soluffonsalso played a role in the catalytic process with nitrate ions having better effect than sulfate ions. Hence copper nitrates were more effective than copper sulfates. It was also found that a mixture of salts with different metals performed better than either of the component single salt alone.

  19. Fabricating nanostructures through a combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching on silicon wafers with different surface conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the surface conditions of silicon wafers with native oxide layers (NOL) or hydrogen passivated layers (HPL) and how they influence the processes of nano-oxidation and wet etching. We also explore the combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching processes to produce nanostructures. Experimental results reveal that the surface conditions of silicon wafers have a considerable impact on the results of nano-oxidation when combined with wet etching. The height and width of oxides on NOL samples exceeded the dimensions of oxides on HPL samples, and this difference became increasingly evident with an increase in applied bias voltage. The height of oxidized nanolines on the HPL sample increased after wet etching; however, the width of the lines increased only marginally. After wet etching, the height and width of oxides on the NOL were more than two times greater than those on the HPL. Increasing the applied bias voltage during nano-oxidation on NOL samples increased both the height and width of the oxides. After wet etching however, the increase in bias voltage appeared to have little effect on the height of oxidized nanolines, but the width of oxidized lines increased. This study also discovered that the use of higher applied bias voltages on NOL samples followed by wet etching results in nanostructures with a section profile closely resembling a curved surface. The use of this technique enabled researchers to create molds in the shape of a silicon nanolens array and an elegantly shaped nanoscale complex structures mold.

  20. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-04

    A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.

  1. Wet air oxidation induced enhanced biodegradability of distillery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S N; Saratchandra, T; Tembhekar, P D; Padoley, K V; Mudliar, S L; Mudliar, S N

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the feasibility of Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a pretreatment option for enhanced biodegradation of complex distillery effluent. Initially, the distillery effluent was pretreated by WAO at different process conditions (pressure, temperature and time) to facilitate enhancement in the biodegradability index (BI = BOD5: COD ratio). The biodegradability of WAO pretreated effluent was evaluated by subjecting it to aerobic biodegradation and anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation. Aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent with enhanced biodegradability index (BI = 0.4-0.8) showed enhanced COD reduction of up to 67.7%, whereas the untreated effluent (BI = 0.17) indicated poor COD reduction of only 22.5%. Anaerobic followed by aerobic biodegradation of pretreated effluent has shown up to 87.9% COD reduction, while the untreated effluent has shown only 43.1% COD reduction. Bio-kinetic parameters also confirmed the increased rate of bio-oxidation at enhanced BIs. The results indicate that the WAO pretreatment facilitates enhanced bio-oxidation/bio-degradation of complex effluents like the distillery spent wash.

  2. Evaluation of wet oxidation pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of softwood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palonen, H.; Thomsen, A.B.; Tenkanen, M.;

    2004-01-01

    The wet oxidation pretreatment (water, oxygen, elevated temperature, and pressure) of softwood (Picea abies) was investigated for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment was preliminarily optimized. Six different combinations of reaction time, temperature, and pH were applied......, and the compositions of solid and liquid fractions were analyzed. The solid fraction after wet oxidation contained 58-64% cellulose, 2-16% hemicellulose, and 24-30% lignin. The pretreatment series gave information about the roles of lignin and hemicellulose in the enzymatic hydrolysis. The temperature...

  3. Wet Oxidation of PVA-Containing Desizing Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷乐成; 汪大翬

    2000-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-containing desizing wastewater was treated by various wet oxidation methods.Parameters such as reaction temperature, initial solution pH, and the dosage of H2O2 were investigated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (CODcr) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal rate. Up to 90% of the initial CODcr was removed by wet air oxidation(WAO) at 270℃ with stoichiometric oxygen supply, while at temperature of 200℃, the CODcr removal rate was found to be 80%. Similar results were obtained by Promoted WAO (PWAO) and wet peroxide oxidation(WPO) at a lower temperature of 150℃. Reaction temperature was found to have a significant effect on the oxidation performance for all the methods. Initial solution pH was observed to play a significant role in PWAO and WPO where H2O2 was employed. Comparison of WAO, CWAO(catalytic wet air oxidation), PWAO and WPO shows that the rate of CODcr removal increases in the order: WAO, CWAO, PWAO and WPO.

  4. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  5. Oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy as SOFC interconnect in dry/wet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Li-Jun, E-mail: lijunwang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Fu-Shen [School of Material Science Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Chou, Kuo-Chih [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •A special thermodynamic description corresponding to the kinetics was applied. •We reported the relationships of degradation time with temperature and moisture. •”Turning time” in the Fe–16Cr alloy oxidation kinetic model was given. •The oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy in the wet air was discussed. -- Abstract: Experimental study on the oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was carried out at 800–1100 °C under dry/wet air conditions. Faster oxidation rate was observed at higher temperature and water vapor content. The degradation time t{sub d} between two stages in oxidation process showed an exponential relationship with elevating corrosion temperature in dry air, and a linear relationship with the water content in the case of water vapor introduced to the system. The mechanism of oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was suggested by the Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. It was found that the break-away oxidation in stage II was controlled by diffusion at initial both in dry and wet air, then became linear with the exposure time, which implied that the oxidation rate was then controlled by chemical reaction of the interface between the metal and the oxidized scale. Moreover, the effect of water in the oxidation process is not only to supply more oxygen into system, but also to modify the structures of oxide scale due to the existence of hydrogen atom, which results in the accelerated corrosions.

  6. Kinetics of wet oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Mahajani, V.V. [Univ. of Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1997-11-01

    Oxidation of lower molecular weight carboxylic acids such as formic, acetic, glyoxalic, and oxalic acids is often the rate-controlling step during wet oxidation (WO) of an aqueous waste stream exhibiting very high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The kinetics of WO of formic acid was studied in the absence and presence of a cupric sulfate as catalyst in the temperature range 150--240 C and oxygen partial pressure range 0.345--1.380 MPa. Wet oxidation of acetic acid was carried out in the presence of cupric sulfate in the temperature range 215--235 C. Homogeneous copper sulfate was found to be a very good catalyst for oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid.

  7. Fabrication of solution-processed amorphous indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors at low temperatures using deep-UV irradiation under wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jee Ho; Chae, Soo Sang; Yoo, Young Bum; Lee, Ji Hoon; Lee, Tae Il; Baik, Hong Koo

    2014-03-01

    We fabricated solution-processed indium zinc oxide (IZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) at annealing temperatures as low as 250 °C using deep UV (DUV) irradiation in water vapor medium. The DUV light decomposed the carbon compounds in the IZO films, and the hydroxyl radicals generated when water vapor reacted with ozone effectively oxidized the films. These phenomena were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Finally, we fabricated DUV-treated IZO TFTs in water-vapor medium at 250 °C with a mobility of 1.2 cm2/Vs and an on/off current ratio of 2.66 × 106.

  8. The applicability of the catalytic wet-oxidation to CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Nitta, K.; Ohya, H.; Oguchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    The wet oxidation catalysis of Au, Pd, Pt, Rh or Ru on a ceramic honeycomb carrier was traced in detail by 16 to 20 repetitive batch tests each. As a result, Pt or Pd on a honeycomb carrier was shown to catalyze complete nitrogen gasification as N2. Though the catalysts which realize both complete nitrogen gasification and complete oxidation could not be found, the Ru+Rh catalyst was found to be most promising. Ru honeycomb catalyzed both nitrification and nitrogen gasification.

  9. Reactive dye house wastewater treatment. Use of hybrid technology: Membrane, sonication followed by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhale, A.D.; Mahajani, V.V. [Univ. of Mumbai (India)

    1999-05-01

    To address problems associated with treatment of an aqueous waste stream from a reactive dye house, a model dye, turquoise blue CI25, was studied. A hybrid technology, membrane separation followed by sonication and wet oxidation, has been demonstrated to treat the wastewater for reuse and discharge. Experiments were first performed with the reactive dye solution in water. A nanofiltration membrane (MPT 30) was found to be suitable to concentrate the dye. The concentrate was then treated with a wet oxidation process. Kinetics studies were performed with and without catalyst, in the temperature range of 170--215 C. The color destruction achieved was > 99%. After process parameters were fixed, studies were conducted with the actual dye waste stream. The actual waste stream was found to be refractory for wet oxidation under the above conditions. Sonication of the concentrate obtained after membrane filtration, in the presence of CuSO{sub 4}, made the waste stream amenable to wet oxidation. Sonication followed by wet oxidation was found to be more effective at near neutral conditions as compared to basic conditions.

  10. Wet Oxidation Pre-Treatment – the Way To Improve Economics of Energy Production From Manure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Langvad, Niels Bo

    2006-01-01

    and Wheatley, 1993). The combination of high temperature and pressure, together with the addition of oxygen in the wet oxidation process, has shown a superior potential for increasing the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass with subsequent ethanol fermentation. In the present study the wet oxidation process...... was tested as pretreatment for increasing the biogas yield of the fiber fraction of manure. The wet oxidation pretreatment in combination with solid liquid separation of manure by using either chemical precipitation or decanter centrifuge (Møller et al., 2004) could be a promising option for a significant......Throughout recent years, several physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods have been tested with limited success in order to increase hydrolysis of the lignocellulose structure of manure fibers (Fan et al., 1982; Gharpuray et al., 1983; Grethlein, 1984; Hartmann et. al. 2000; Hobson...

  11. A novel advanced oxidation process——wet electrocatalytic oxidation for high concentrated organic wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI QiZhou; ZHOU MingHua; LEI LeCheng; ZHANG Xing Wang

    2007-01-01

    A novel advanced oxidation process-wet electrocatalytic oxidation(WEO)was studied with p-nitrophenol as model pollutant and β-PbO2 electrode as the anode.Compared with the effect of the individual wet air oxidation(WAO)and electrochemical oxidation(EO),the effect of WEO showed synergistic effect on COD removal under the conditions of temperature 160℃,C=1000mg·L-1,PN2=0.50MPa,Po2=0.9 MPa,current density=3 mA·cm-2,Na2SO4 3 g·L-1.And the synergistic factor got the best value of 0.98 within 120 min after 180 min treatment.The synergistic factor was studied after 120 min treatment at 100℃,120℃,140℃and 160℃,and the effect of 120℃was the best with the value of 1.26.Possible mechanism for the synergistic effect was discussed based on the analysis of free-radical generation and intermediates detected by HPLC and GC/MS.

  12. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation components in mitochondria of long-living Ames dwarf mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduced signaling of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) pathway is associated with extended life span in several species. Ames dwarf mice are GH and IGF-1 deficient and live 50-68% longer than wild type littermates (males and females, respectively). Previously, we have shown...

  13. Characterization of degradation products from alkaline wet oxidation of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Ahring, B.K.; Schmidt, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation pre-treatment (water, sodium carbonate, oxygen, high temperature and pressure) of wheat straw was performed as a 2(4-1) fractional factorial design with the process parameters: temperature, reaction time, sodium carbonate and oxygen. Alkaline wet oxidation was an efficient...... pre-treatment of wheat straw that resulted in solid fractions with high cellulose recovery (96%) and high enzymatic convertibility to glucose (67%). Carbonate and temperature were the most important factors for fractionation of wheat straw by wet oxidation. Optimal conditions were 10 min at 195...... the solid fraction (62%) did not provide a corresponding increase in the phenol monomer content but was correlated to high carboxylic acid concentrations. The degradation products in the hemicellulose fractions co-varied with the pre-treatment conditions in the principal component analysis according...

  14. Wet Etching of Heat Treated Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposited Zirconium Oxide in HF Based Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Raghavan, Srini

    2008-06-01

    Alternative materials are being considered to replace silicon dioxide as gate dielectric material. Of these, the oxides of hafnium and zirconium show the most promise. However, integrating these new high-k materials into the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process remains a challenge. One particular area of concern is the wet etching of heat treated high-k dielectrics. In this paper, work done on the wet etching of heat treated atomic layer chemical vapor deposited (ALCVD) zirconium oxide in HF based solutions is presented. It was found that heat treated material, while refractory to wet etching at room temperature, is more amenable to etching at higher temperatures when methane sulfonic acid is added to dilute HF solutions. Selectivity over SiO2 is still a concern.

  15. Formation and degradation of valuable intermediate products during wet oxidation of municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Gapes, Daniel J; Sarmah, Ajit K; Farid, Mohammed M; Young, Brent R

    2016-04-01

    The current study investigated the formation of organic acids and alcohols as major intermediate products of wet oxidation of municipal sludge. Municipal sludge was subjected to 60-min wet oxidation at temperatures ranging from 220 to 240°C, with 20bar oxygen partial pressure. Acetic acid was the main intermediate compound produced in this study, followed by propionic, n-butyric, iso-butyric and pentanoic acids and methanol. It was found that the process severity has a significant influence on the formation and degradation of these intermediate products.

  16. Wet oxidation of real coke wastewater containing high thiocyanate concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Coke wastewaters, in particular those with high thiocyanate concentrations, represent an important environmental problem because of their very low biodegradability. In this work, the treatment by wet oxidation of real coke wastewaters containing concentrations of thiocyanate above 17 mM has been studied in a 1-L semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 453 and 493 K, with total oxygen pressures in the range of 2.0-8.0 MPa. A positive effect of the matrix of real coke wastewater was observed, resulting in faster thiocyanate degradation than was obtained with synthetic wastewaters. Besides, the effect of oxygen concentration and temperature on thiocyanate wet oxidation was more noticeable in real effluents than in synthetic wastewaters containing only thiocyanate. It was also observed that the degree of mineralization of the matrix organic compounds was higher when the initial thiocyanate concentration increased. Taking into account the experimental data, kinetic models were obtained, and a mechanism implying free radicals was proposed for thiocyanate oxidation in the matrix considered. In all cases, sulphate, carbonates and ammonium were identified as the main reaction products of thiocyanate wet oxidation.

  17. A novel oxidation-based wet etching method for AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Jinbao; Wang Jinyan; Liu Yang; Xu Zhe; Wang Maojun; Yu Min; Xie Bing

    2013-01-01

    A novel wet etching method for AlGaN/GaN heterojunction structures is proposed using thermal oxidation followed by wet etching in KOH solution.It is found that an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure after high temperature oxidation above 700 ℃ could be etched off in a homothermal (70 ℃) KOH solution while the KOH solution had no etching effects on the region of the A1GaN/GaN heterostructure protected by a SiO2 layer during the oxidation process.A groove structure with 150 nm step depth on an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was formed after 8 h thermal oxidation at 900 ℃ followed by 30 min treatment in 70 ℃ KOH solution.As the oxidation time increases,the etching depth approaches saturation and the roughness of the etched surface becomes much better.The physical mechanism of this phenomenon is also discussed.

  18. COMPARISON BETWEEN WET OXIDATION AND STEAM EXPLOSION AS PRETREATMENT METHODS FOR ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF SUGARCANE BAGASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Martín

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline wet oxidation and steam explosion pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse were compared with regard to biomass fractionation, formation of by-products, and enzymatic convertibility of the pretreated material. Wet oxidation led to the solubilisation of 82% of xylan and 50% of lignin, and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one third. Wet oxidation formed more aliphatic acids and phenolics, and less furan aldehydes in the liquid fraction than steam explosion did. A better enzymatic convertibility of cellulose was achieved for the wet-oxidised material (57.4 % than for the steam-exploded material (48.9 %. Cellulose convertibility was lower for the whole slurry than for the washed solids in both pretreatments, but more significantly in steam explosion. This investigation demonstrates the potential of wet oxidation as a promising pretreatment method for enzyme-based bagasse-to-ethanol processes.

  19. Wet-oxidation waste management system for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Ohya, H.

    1986-01-01

    A wet oxidation system will be useful in the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) as a facility to treat organic wastes and to redistribute inorganic compounds and elements. However at rather higher temperatures needed in this reaction, for instance, at 260 deg C, only 80% of organic in a raw material can be oxidized, and 20% of it will remain in the liquid mainly as acetic acid, which is virtually noncombustible. Furthermore, nitrogen is transformed to ammonium ions which normally cannot be absorbed by plants. To resolve these problems, it becomes necessary to use catalysts. Noble metals such as Ru, Rh and so on have proved to be partially effective as these catalysts. That is, oxidation does not occur completely, and the unexpected denitrification, instead of the expected nitrification, occurs. So, it is essential to develop the catalysts which are able to realize the complete oxidation and the nitrification.

  20. Autonomy @ Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dalsem, William; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    This is a powerpoint presentation that highlights autonomy across the 15 NASA technology roadmaps, including specific examples of projects (past and present) at NASA Ames Research Center. The NASA technology roadmaps are located here: http:www.nasa.govofficesocthomeroadmapsindex.html

  1. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  2. Power generation characteristics of tubular type SOFC by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajiri, H.; Nakayama, T. [Kyushu Electric Power Company, Inc., Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroishi, M. [TOTO Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The development of a practical solid oxide fuel cell requires improvement of a cell performance and a cell manufacturing technology suitable for the mass production. In particular tubular type SOFC is thought to be superior in its reliability because its configuration can avoid the high temperature sealing and reduce the thermal stress resulting from the contact between cells. The authors have fabricated a tubular cell with an air electrode support by a wet processing technique, which is suitable for mass production in improving a power density. To enhance the power output of the module, the Integrated Tubular-Type (ITT) cell has been developed. This paper reports the performance of the single cells with various active anode areas and the bundle with series-connected 9-ITT cells with an active anode area of 840 cm{sup 2}.

  3. Determination of mutagenicity and genotoxicity of indium tin oxide nanoparticles using the Ames test and micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Tepekozcan, Aykut; Sağlam, Esra

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the mutagenicity and genotoxicity of indium tin oxide (ITO) nanomaterial were assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay. Seven different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, and 150 µg/plate) of this nanomaterial were tested using the Ames test on the TA98 and TA100 strains in the presence and absence of the S9 mixture. At all the concentrations tested, this substance did not significantly increase the number of revertant colonies compared with the control with or without S9 mixture. The genotoxic effects of ITO were investigated in human peripheral lymphocytes treated with 125, 250, 500, and 750 µg/ml concentrations of this substance for 24- and 48-h treatment periods using an MN test. Nuclear division index (NDI) was also calculated in order to determine the cytotoxicity of ITO. It was determined that ITO increased MN frequency in the 750 µg/ml concentration in 24- and 48-h treatments. In addition, ITO dose dependently decreased the NDI significantly for two treatment periods.

  4. 湿法烟气脱硫环境下亚硫酸钙的非催化氧化%NON-CATALYTIC OXIDATION KINETICS OF CALCIUM SULFITE IN WET LIMESTONE-GYPSUM FGD PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜谦; 吴少华; 朱群益; 秦裕琨

    2003-01-01

    A study on non-catalytic oxidation kinetics of calcium sulfite is presented under typical conditions of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD)in this paper. A laboratory-scale mechanically stirred tank reactor is used with continuous feed of both gas and liquid phase. The results show that increasing CaSO3 load from a lower value, the reaction rate increases and is limited by solid sulfite dissolution. The oxidation rate limitation is observed at loads exceeding certain concentration. The rate limitation is possibly caused by solid sulfite solubility or oxygen gas-liquid diffusion. The experimental conclusions are useful for design and operation of the holding tank in forced-oxidation wet FGD.

  5. Catalytic wet oxidation of thiocyanate with homogeneous copper(II) sulphate catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2010-05-15

    The wet oxidation of thiocyanate has been investigated in a semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 423 and 473 K and pressures between 6.1 x 10(3) and 1.0 x 10(4)kPa in the presence of copper(II) sulphate as catalyst. The effects of copper concentration, initial thiocyanate concentration, pressure and temperature on the reaction rate were analyzed and the main products of reaction were identified. A kinetic model for the Cu-catalyzed reaction is here proposed, including temperature, oxygen concentration, and the reduction of Cu(2+) to Cu(+) that gives an accurate prediction of the oxidation process under the assayed conditions. A mechanistic model based on the formation of a transition complex between a copper cation and two thiocyanate anions has been proposed for the catalytic wet oxidation.

  6. Catalytic wet oxidation of thiocyanate with homogeneous copper(II) sulphate catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, c/ Julian Claveria s/n, E-33071, Oviedo (Spain); Diaz, Mario, E-mail: mariodiaz@uniovi.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, c/ Julian Claveria s/n, E-33071, Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    The wet oxidation of thiocyanate has been investigated in a semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 423 and 473 K and pressures between 6.1 x 10{sup 3} and 1.0 x 10{sup 4} kPa in the presence of copper(II) sulphate as catalyst. The effects of copper concentration, initial thiocyanate concentration, pressure and temperature on the reaction rate were analyzed and the main products of reaction were identified. A kinetic model for the Cu-catalyzed reaction is here proposed, including temperature, oxygen concentration, and the reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +} that gives an accurate prediction of the oxidation process under the assayed conditions. A mechanistic model based on the formation of a transition complex between a copper cation and two thiocyanate anions has been proposed for the catalytic wet oxidation.

  7. Wet oxidation kinetics of refractory low molecular mass carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Levec, J.

    1999-10-01

    Wet oxidation kinetics of aqueous solutions of formic, acetic, oxalic, and glyoxalic acids was studied in a titanium autoclave at a temperature range of 150--320 C and oxygen partial pressures between 8 and 60 bar. Oxidation reactions obeyed a first-order kinetics with respect to concentration of all substrates. On the basis of acid concentration decay, the activation energy for acetic, oxalic, and glyoxalic acid oxidation was 178, 137, and 97 kJ/mol, respectively; whereas on the total organic carbon (TOC) conversion basis, these values were slightly higher, namely 182, 141, and 104 kJ/mol. The activation energy for formic acid took a unique value of 149 kJ/mol regardless of the type of concentration used. The rate of oxidation was proportional to a square root of oxygen concentration (partial pressure) for acetic, formic, and oxalic acids, whereas it was linearly proportional for glyoxalic acid. When sufficiently high oxygen partial pressure was applied ({ge}22 bar), the individual acid conversion in a mixture of these acids was well predicted by the rate expression derived for that acid. The lumped TOC concentration of mixtures did not obey a first-order kinetic behavior, although underlying TOC kinetics for each individual acid was linear. The oxidation results are also discussed in a view of speculated reaction pathways and the reactor material.

  8. Pretreatment of apramycin wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shao-xia; FENG Yu-jie; WAN Jia-feng; LIN Qing-ying; ZHU Wan-peng; JIANG Zhan-peng

    2005-01-01

    The pretreatment technology of wet air oxidation(WAO) and coagulation and acidic hydrolysis for apramycin wastewater was investigated in this paper. The COD, apramycin, NH4+ concentration, and the ratio of BOD5/COD were analyzed, and the color and odor of the effluent were observed. WAO of apramycin wastewater, without catalyst and with RuO2/Al2 O3 and RuO2-CeO2/Al2 O3 catalysts, was carried out at degradation temperature of 200℃ and the total pressure of 4 MPa in a 1 L batch reactor. The result showed that the apramycin removals were respectively 50.2% and 55.0%, COD removals were 40.0% and 46.0%, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was increased to 0.49 and 0.54 with RuO2/Al2 O3 and RuO2-CeO2/Al2 O3 catalysts in catylytic wet air oxidation(CWAO) after the reaction of 150 min. With the pretreatment of coagulation and acidic hydrolysis, COD and apramycin removals were slight decreased, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was increased to 0.45, and the effluents was not suitable to biological treatment. The color and odor of the wastewater were the apramycin wastewater. The addition of CeO2 could promote the activity and stability of RuO2/Al2 O3 in WAO of apramycin wastewater.

  9. Wet air oxidation of epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Liu, Zhengqian; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Beiping

    2010-06-15

    Epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater contained highly concentrated and toxic organic compounds. The wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were used to eliminate pollutants in order to examine the feasibility of the WAO/CWAO as a pre-treatment method for the industrial wastewater. The results showed that in the WAO 63% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 41% total organic carbon (TOC) removals were achieved and biological oxygen demand (BOD(5))/COD ratio increased from 0.13 to 0.72 after 3h reaction at 250 degrees C, 3.5MPa and the initial concentration of 100g(COD)/L. Among homogenous catalysts (Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) salts), Cu(2+) salt exhibited better performance. CuO catalyst was used in the CWAO of the wastewater, COD and TOC conversion were 77 and 54%, and good biodegradability was achieved. The results proved that the CWAO was an effective pre-treatment method for the epoxy acrylate monomer industrial wastewater.

  10. Oxidation and mineralisation of substituted phenols by Fenton's reagent and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A; Rodriguez, S; Garcia-Ochoa, F; Yustos, P

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic abatement of solutions of 1,000 mg/L in phenol, ortho and para nitrophenol and ortho and para cresols was acomplished by using two catalytic systems. Fenton's reagent was used at 50 degrees C by adding 10 mg/L of ferrous cation and different dosages of H2O2. The mixture was reacting isothermically in a batch way during 3 hours. Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) was carried out by using a commercial Activated Carbon, Industrial React FE01606A, CWO runs were carried out in a fixed bed reactor (FBR) with concurrent upflow. Temperature and oxygen pressure of the reactor were set to 160 degrees C and 16 bar, respectively. While phenols are quicky oxidised by the Fenton reagent higher mineralisation was obtained in the CWO process.

  11. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  12. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes.

  13. Pretreatment of wheat straw using combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis resulting in convertible cellulose and hemicellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Bjerring Olesen, A.; Fernqvist, T.

    1996-01-01

    addition readily oxidizes lignin from wheat straw facilitating the polysaccharides for enzymatic hy drolysis. By using a specially constructed autoclave system, the wet oxidation process was optimized with respect to both reaction time and temperature. The best conditions (20 g/L straw, 170 degrees C, 5...

  14. Valuable compounds from sewage sludge by thermal hydrolysis and wet oxidation. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Iglesias, Octavio; Urrea, José Luis; Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Díaz, Mario

    2017-04-15

    Sewage sludge is considered a costly waste, whose benefit has received a lot of attention for decades. In this sense, a variety of promising technologies, such as thermal hydrolysis and wet oxidation, are currently employed. Thermal hydrolysis is used as a pretreatment step ahead of anaerobic digestion processes and wet oxidation is intended for the solubilization and partial oxidation of the sludge. Such processes could be utilized for solubilizing polysaccharides, lipids, fragments of them and phosphorus (thermal hydrolysis) or for generating carboxylic acids (wet oxidation). This article compiles the available information on the production of valuable chemicals by these techniques and comments on their main features. Temperature, reaction duration times and sludge characteristics influence the experimental results significantly, but only the first two variables have been thoroughly studied. For thermal hydrolysis, a rise of temperature led to an increase in the solubilized biomolecules, but also to a greater decomposition of proteins and undesirable reactions of carbohydrates with themselves or with proteins. At constant temperature, the amounts of substances that can be recovered tend to become time independent after several minutes. Diluted and activated sludges seem to be more readily hydrolyzable than the thickened and primary ones. For wet oxidation, the dependence of the production of carboxylic acids with temperature and time is not simple: their concentration can increase, decrease or go through a maximum. At high temperatures, acetic acid is the main carboxylic acid obtained. Concentrated, fermented and secondary sludge seem to be more suitable for yielding higher amounts of acid than diluted, undigested and primary ones.

  15. Development of Pillared Clays for Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol and Its Application in the Posttreatment of Coffee Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R. Sanabria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the use of pillared clays as catalysts for the Fenton-like advanced oxidation, specifically wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO. This paper discusses the limitations on the application of a homogeneous Fenton system, development of solid catalysts for the oxidation of phenol, advances in the synthesis of pillared clays, and their potential application as catalysts for phenol oxidation. Finally, it analyzes the use of pillared clays as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts for a real wastewater treatment, emphasizing the oxidation of phenolic compounds present in coffee wastewater. Typically, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation in a real effluent system is used as pretreatment, prior to biological treatment. In the specific case of coffee wet processing wastewater, catalytic oxidation with pillared bentonite with Al-Fe is performed to supplement the biological treatment, that is, as a posttreatment system. According to the results of catalytic activity of pillared bentonite with Al-Fe for oxidation of coffee processing wastewater (56% phenolic compounds conversion, 40% selectivity towards CO2, and high stability of active phase, catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation emerges as a viable alternative for management of this type of effluent.

  16. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Descorme, Claude; Besson, Michèle

    2007-07-31

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2). 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3wt.% Ru/ZrO(2) is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393K) and lower total pressure (3MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect.

  17. Preparation of rare-earth metal complex oxide catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; LI Guangming; YAO Zhenya; ZHAO Jianfu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO)is one of the most promising technologies for pollution abatement.Developing catalysts with high activity and stability is crucial for the application of the CWAO process.The Mn/Ce complex oxide catalyrsts for CWAO of high concentration phenol containing wastewater were prepared by coprecipitation.The catalyst preparation conditions were optimized by using an orthogonal layout method and single-factor experimental analysis.The Mn/Ce serial catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET)analysis and the metal cation leaching was measured by inductively coupled plasma torch-atomic emission spectrometry(ICP-AES).The results show that the catalysts have high catalytic activities even at a low temperature(80℃)and low oxygen partial pressure(0.5 MPa)in a batch reactor.The metallic ion leaching is comparatively low(Mn<6.577 mg/L and Ce<0.6910 mg/L,respectively)in the CWAO process.The phenol,CODCD and TOC removal efficiencies in the solution exceed 98.5% using the optimal catalyst(named CSP).The new catalyst would have a promising application in CWAO treatment of high concentration organic wastewater.

  18. Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAloon Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymatic corn wet milling (E-milling is a process derived from conventional wet milling for the recovery and purification of starch and co-products using proteases to eliminate the need for sulfites and decrease the steeping time. In 2006, the total starch production in USA by conventional wet milling equaled 23 billion kilograms, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production 1. Process engineering and cost models for an E-milling process have been developed for a processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day. These models are based on the previously published models for a traditional wet milling plant with the same capacity. The E-milling process includes grain cleaning, pretreatment, enzymatic treatment, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the conventional models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. Additional information for the present models was obtained from our own experience with the development of the E-milling process and trials in the laboratory and at the pilot plant scale. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer® and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Results Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn, enzyme and other wet milling co-products. The work presented here describes the E-milling process and compares the process, the operation and costs with the conventional process. Conclusion The E-milling process

  19. Wet oxidation pretreatment of rape straw for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Efthalia; Bjerre, Anne Belinda; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Rape straw can be used for production of second generation bioethanol. In this paper we optimized the pretreatment of rape straw for this purpose using Wet oxidation (WO). The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, and oxygen gas pressure was investigated for maximum ethanol yield via...... Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). To reduce the water use and increase the energy efficiency in WO pretreatment features like recycling liquid (filtrate), presoaking of rape straw in water or recycled filtrate before WO, skip washing pretreated solids (filter cake) after WO, or use of whole...... slurry (Filter cake + filtrate) in SSF were also tested. Except ethanol yields, pretreatment methods were evaluated based on achieved glucose yields, amount of water used, recovery of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.The highest ethanol yield obtained was 67% after fermenting the whole slurry...

  20. Ultrasound assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol: kinetics and intraparticle diffusion effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Apostolos N; Igglessi-Markopoulou, Olga; Papayannakos, Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    The combination of ultrasound irradiation and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation was used as a means to degrade phenol. Direct and indirect irradiation were employed, while experiments in the absence of ultrasound were used as reference. A mixed (Al-Fe) pillared clay named FAZA, was used as a catalyst in the form of powder, extrudates and crushed extrudates. Ultrasound was found to clearly enhance the extrudates performance, increasing the conversion at 4h by more than 6 times under direct and almost 11 times under indirect irradiation. This observation is attributed to the reduction of diffusion resistance within the catalyst pores. The overall sonication-catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process appears very promising for environmental purposes.

  1. Treatment of desizing wastewater from the textile industry by wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of wet air oxidation to the treatment of desizing wastewater from two textile companies. A two-liter high temperature, high pressure autoclave reactor was used in the study. The range of operating temperatures examined was between 150 and 290℃, and the partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0. 375 to 2.25 MPa. Variations in pH,CODCr and TOD content were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the extent of conversion of the process. The effects of temperature, pressure and reaction time were explored extensively. More than 90 % CODCr reduction and 80 % TOC removal have been obtained. The results have also been demonstrated that WAO is a suitable pre-treatment methods due to improvement of the BOD5/CODCr ratio of desizing wastewater. The reaction kinetics of wet air oxidation of desizing wastewater has been proved to be two steps, a fast reaction followed by a slow reaction stage.

  2. Oxidation of anthracene using waste Mn oxide minerals: the importance of wetting and drying sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Catherine; Tourney, Janette; Johnson, Karen

    2012-02-29

    PAHs are a common problem in contaminated urban soils due to their recalcitrance. This study presents results on the oxidation of anthracene on synthetic and natural Mn oxide surfaces. Evaporation of anthracene spiked Mn oxide slurries in air results in the oxidation of 30% of the anthracene to anthraquinone. Control minerals, quartz and calcite, also oxidised a small but significant proportion of the anthracene (4.5% and 14% conversion, respectively) when spiked mineral slurries were evaporated in air. However, only Mn oxide minerals showed significant anthracene oxidation (5-10%) when evaporation took place in the absence of oxygen (N2 atmosphere). In the fully hydrated systems where no drying took place, natural Mn oxides showed an increase in anthracene oxidation with decreasing pH, with a conversion of 75% anthracene at pH 4. These results show both acidification and drying favor the oxidation of anthracene on Mn oxide mineral surfaces. It has also been demonstrated that non-redox active mineral surfaces, such as calcite, may play a role in contaminant breakdown during wetting and drying sequences. Given that climate changes suggest that wetting and drying sequences are likely to become more significant these results have important implications for contaminated land remediation technologies.

  3. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  4. Copper on activated carbon for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Dolores Martínez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is an important source of water contamination. Some of the organic contaminants cannot be eliminated by nature in a reasonable period. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation is one of the most effective methods to purify wastewater with organic contaminants. In this work, catalysts based on copper supported on activated carbon were synthesized. The activated carbons were obtained from industrial wastes (apricot core and grape stalk of San Juan, Argentina. These were impregnated with a copper salt and thermically treated in an inert atmosphere. Analysis of specific surface, pore volume, p zc, acidity, basicity and XRD patterns were made in order to characterize the catalysts. The catalytic activity was tested in the oxidation of methylene blue (MB and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA in aqueous phase with pure oxygen. Reaction tests were carried out in a Parr batch reactor at different temperatures, with a 0.2 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. The amount of unconverted organics was measured by spectrophotometry. Higher temperatures were necessary for the degradation of PVA compared to those for methylene blue.

  5. Wet oxidation of activated sludge: transformations and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, José Luis; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Amanda; Díaz, Mario

    2014-12-15

    Wet oxidation (WO) is an interesting alternative for the solubilization and mineralization of activated sludge. The effects of different temperatures (160-200 °C) and pressures (4-8 MPa), on the evolution of chemical composition and rheological characteristics of a thickened activated sludge during WO are analyzed in this work. Soluble COD increases initially to a maximum and then diminishes, while the apparent viscosity of the mixture falls continuously throughout the experiment. Based on the experimental evolution of the compositions and rheological characteristics of the sludge, a mechanism consisting of two stages in series is proposed. Initially, the solid organic compounds are solubilized following a pseudo-second order kinetic model with respect to solid COD. After that, the solubilized COD was oxidized, showing a pseudofirst kinetic order, by two parallel pathways: the complete mineralization of the organic matter and the formation of highly refractory COD. Kinetic parameters of the model, including the activation energies are mentioned, with good global fitting to the experiments described.

  6. Treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater by wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yan, Xiuyi; Zhou, Jinghui; Ma, Jiuli

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production is characterized by high salinity and high chemical oxygen demand (COD). We applied a combination of flocculation and wet air oxidation technology to optimize the reduction of COD in the treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater. The experiments used different values of flocculant, coagulant, and oxidizing agent added to the wastewater, as well as different reaction times and treatment temperatures. The use of flocculants for the pretreatment of fracturing wastewater was shown to improve treatment efficiency. The addition of 500 mg/L of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and 20 mg/L of anionic polyacrylamide (APAM) during pretreatment resulted in a COD removal ratio of 8.2% and reduced the suspended solid concentration of fracturing wastewater to 150 mg/L. For a solution of pretreated fracturing wastewater with 12 mL of added H2O2, the COD was reduced to 104 mg/L when reacted at 300 °C for 75 min, and reduced to 127 mg/L when reacted at the same temperature for 45 min while using a 1 L autoclave. An optimal combination of these parameters produced treated wastewater that met the GB 8978-1996 'Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard' level I emission standard.

  7. Solid state oxidation of phenols to quinones with sodium perborate on wet montmorillonite K10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Mohammed M.; Eftekhari-Sis, Bagher; Khalili, Behzad; Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry]. E-mail: mhashemi@sharif.edu

    2005-09-15

    Phenols were oxidized to quinones using sodium perborate (SPB) on wet montmorillonite as oxidant. The reaction was carried out at ambient temperature on the solid phase under solvent free conditions. (author)

  8. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Hun; Ihm, Son-Ki

    2011-02-15

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is one of the most economical and environmental-friendly advanced oxidation process. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. Various heterogeneous catalysts including noble metals and metal oxides have been extensively studied to enhance the efficiency of CWAO. The present review is concerned about the literatures published in this regard. Phenolics, carboxylic acids, and nitrogen-containing compounds were taken as model pollutants in most cases, and noble metals such as Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt as well as oxides of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, and Ce were applied as heterogeneous catalysts. Reports on their characterization and catalytic performances for the CWAO of aqueous pollutants are reviewed. Discussions are also made on the reaction mechanisms and kinetics proposed for heterogeneous CWAO and also on the typical catalyst deactivations in heterogeneous CWAO, i.e. carbonaceous deposits and metal leaching.

  9. Effects of operational conditions on sludge degradation and organic acids formation in low-critical wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Lee, Mikyung; Ahn, Jaehwan; Bae, Wookeun; Lee, Yong-Woo; Shim, Hojae

    2009-02-15

    Wet air oxidation processes are to treat highly concentrated organic compounds including refractory materials, sludge, and night soil, and usually operated at supercritical water conditions of high temperature and pressure. In this study, the effects of operational conditions including temperature, pressure, and oxidant dose on sludge degradation and conversion into subsequent intermediates such as organic acids were investigated at low critical wet oxidation conditions. The reaction time and temperature in the wet air oxidation process was shown an important factor affecting the liquefaction of volatile solids, with more significant effect on the thermal hydrolysis reaction rather than the oxidation reaction. The degradation efficiency of sludge and the formation of organic acids were improved with longer reaction time and higher reaction temperature. For the sludge reduction and the organic acids formation under the wet air oxidation, the optimal conditions for reaction temperature, time, pressure, and oxidant dose were shown approximately 240 degrees C, 30min, 60atm, and 2.0L/min, respectively.

  10. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wangjinustb@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Matsuda, Nozomu [Bar and Wire Product Unit, Nippon steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Fukuoka, 802-8686 (Japan); Shinozaki, Nobuya [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Miyoshi, Noriko [The Center for Instrumental Analysis, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 804-8550 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takanobu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 852-8588 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S.

  11. Comparison of the chemical properties of wheat straw and beech fibers following alkaline wet oxidation and laccase treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A. S.; Mallon, S.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda;

    2002-01-01

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum) and beech (Fagus sylvatica), were used to evaluate the effects of two pre-treatment processes (alkaline wet oxidation and enzyme treatment with laccase) on lignocellulosic materials for applications in particleboards and fiberboards. Wheat straw and beech fibers...... reacted differently in the two processes. The chemical composition changed little following enzyme treatment. After alkaline wet oxidation, fibers enriched in cellulose were obtained. With both materials, almost all hemicellulose (80%) together with a large portion of the lignin were solubilised...... by alkaline wet oxidation, but essentially all cellulose remained in the solid fraction. Following enzyme treatment most material remained as a solid. For wheat straw, reaction with acetic anhydride indicated that both treatments resulted in more hydroxyl groups being accessible for reaction. The enzyme...

  12. Thermal wet oxidation improves anaerobic biodegradability of raw and digested biowaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; De Baere, L.;

    2004-01-01

    profits. The objective of this research was to enhance the anaerobic biodegradability and methane yields from different biowastes (food waste, yard waste, and digested biowaste already treated in a full-scale biogas plant (DRANCO, Belgium)) by assessing thermal wet oxidation. The biodegradability...... of the waste was evaluated by using biochemical methane potential assays and continuous 3-L methane reactors. Wet oxidation temperature and oxygen pressure (T, 185-220 degreesC; O-2 pressure, 0-12 bar; t, 15 min) were varied for their effect on total methane yield and digestion kinetics of digested biowaste....... Measured methane yields for raw yard waste, wet oxidized yard waste, raw food waste, and wet oxidized food waste were 345, 685, 536, and 571 mL of CH4/g of volatile suspended solids, respectively. Higher oxygen pressure during wet oxidation of digested biowaste considerably increased the total methane...

  13. Biodiesel production from wet microalgae feedstock using sequential wet extraction/transesterification and direct transesterification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Lung; Huang, Chien-Chang; Ho, Kao-Chia; Hsiao, Ping-Xuan; Wu, Meng-Shan; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-10-01

    Although producing biodiesel from microalgae seems promising, there is still a lack of technology for the quick and cost-effective conversion of biodiesel from wet microalgae. This study was aimed to develop a novel microalgal biodiesel producing method, consisting of an open system of microwave disruption, partial dewatering (via combination of methanol treatment and low-speed centrifugation), oil extraction, and transesterification without the pre-removal of the co-solvent, using Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 with 68.7 wt% water content as the feedstock. Direct transesterification with the disrupted wet microalgae was also conducted. The biomass content of the wet microalgae increased to 56.6 and 60.5 wt%, respectively, after microwave disruption and partial dewatering. About 96.2% oil recovery was achieved under the conditions of: extraction temperature, 45°C; hexane/methanol ratio, 3:1; extraction time, 80 min. Transesterification of the extracted oil reached 97.2% conversion within 15 min at 45°C and 6:1 solvent/methanol ratio with simultaneous Chlorophyll removal during the process. Nearly 100% biodiesel conversion was also obtained while conducting direct transesterification of the disrupted oil-bearing microalgal biomass.

  14. Treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewater by wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Luan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation (WAO is one of the most economical and environmentally-friendly advanced oxidation processes. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. In wet air oxidation aqueous waste is oxidized in the liquid phase at high temperatures (125–320 °C and pressures (0.5–20 MPa in the presence of an oxygen-containing gas (usually air. The advantages of the process include low operating costs and minimal air pollution discharges. The present review is concerned about the literature published in the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters, such as dyes. Phenolics were taken as model pollutants in most cases. Reports on effect of treatment for the WAO of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters are reviewed, such as emulsified wastewater, TNT red water, etc. Discussions are also made on the mechanism and kinetics of WAO and main technical parameters influencing WAO. Finally, development direction of WAO is summed up.

  15. Experimental coupling and modelling of wet air oxidation and packed-bed biofilm reactor as an enhanced phenol removal technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minière, Marine; Boutin, Olivier; Soric, Audrey

    2017-01-25

    Experimental coupling of wet air oxidation process and aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor is presented. It has been tested on phenol as a model refractory compound. At 30 MPa and 250 °C, wet air oxidation batch experiments led to a phenol degradation of 97% and a total organic carbon removal of 84%. This total organic carbon was mainly due to acetic acid. To study the interest of coupling processes, wet air oxidation effluent was treated in a biological treatment process. This step was made up of two packed-bed biofilm reactors in series: the first one acclimated to phenol and the second one to acetic acid. After biological treatment, phenol and total organic carbon removal was 99 and 97% respectively. Thanks to parameters from literature, previous studies (kinetic and thermodynamic) and experimental data from this work (hydrodynamic parameters and biomass characteristics), both treatment steps were modelled. This modelling allows the simulation of the coupling process. Experimental results were finally well reproduced by the continuous coupled process model: relative error on phenol removal efficiency was 1 and 5.5% for wet air oxidation process and packed-bed biofilm reactor respectively.

  16. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  17. Comparative kinetic analysis of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhina, Ekaterina V; Repo, Eveliina; Virkutyte, Jurate

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic study of silent and ultrasound-assisted catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol in water was performed to qualitatively assess the effect of ultrasound on the process kinetics. Various kinetic parameters such as the apparent kinetic rate constants, the surface utilization coefficient and activation energy of phenol oxidation over RuI(3) catalyst were investigated. Comparative analysis revealed that the use of ultrasound irradiation reduced the energy barrier of the reaction but had no impact on the reaction pathway. The activation energy for the oxidation of phenol over RuI(3) catalyst in the presence of ultrasound was found to be 13kJmol(-1), which was four times smaller in comparison to the silent oxidation process (57kJmol(-1)). Finally, 'figures-of-merit' was utilized to assess different experimental strategies such as sonolysis alone, H(2)O(2)-enhanced sonolysis and sono-catalytic oxidation of phenol in order to estimate the electric energy consumption based on the kinetic rate constants of the oxidation process.

  18. Purification of carbon nanotube by wet oxidation; Shisshiki sanka ni yoru carbon nanotube no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    In order to efficiently recover carbon nanotubes, the purification method by wet oxidation with orthoperiodic acid and perchloric acid is investigated. The reactivity of the carbonaceous material toward the acids depends on the type of carbon. Carbon nanotubes are selectively recovered under the mild oxidation conditions. The degree of purification depends on the concentration of orthoperiodic acid. It is suggested that wet oxidation is an effective method for purification of carbon nanotubes. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Wet Oxidation: A Promising Option for the Treatment of Pulp and Paper Mill Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) is used to degrade persistent organic or inorganic impurities present in industrial wastewater. The process utilizes severe oxidation conditions (i.e., high temperature and pressures) to achieve the efficient degradation of pollutants. To obtain high degradation at lower operation conditions, catalytic WO process is being suggested. The wastewater generated from a pulp and paper mill contains several recalcitrant compounds like lignin, hemi-cellulose, phenols, sulfides etc. Therefore, pulp and paper mill effluent have low biodegradability and are not amenable for conventional biological process. With the implementation of stringent regulations, pulp and paper mill operators need a cleaner disposal route for the wastewater. In this mini-review, the results obtained from the recently published studies on WO treatment for pulp and paper mill effluent are compiled and presented. Finally, the recommendations for the future work are also given.

  20. Catalytic wet-oxidation of a mixed liquid waste: COD and AOX abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goi, D; de Leitenburg, C; Trovarelli, A; Dolcetti, G

    2004-12-01

    A series of catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reactions, at temperatures of 430-500 K and in a batch bench-top pressure vessel were carried out utilizing a strong wastewater composed of landfill leachate and heavily organic halogen polluted industrial wastewater. A CeO2-SiO2 mixed oxide catalyst with large surface area to assure optimal oxidation performance was prepared. The catalytic process was examined during batch reactions controlling Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Adsorbable Organic Halogen (AOX) parameters, resulting AOX abatement to achieve better effect. Color and pH were also controlled during batch tests. A simple first order-two stage reaction behavior was supposed and verified with the considered parameters. Finally an OUR test was carried out to evaluate biodegradability changes of wastewater as a result of the catalytic reaction.

  1. Ethanol production from wet oxidized corn straw by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Q.; Yin, Y.; Thygesen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    In order to find out the appropriate process for ethanol production from corn straw, alkaline wet-oxidation pretreatment (195°C, 15 min, Na2CO3 2 g/L, O2 1200 kPa) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were adopted to produce ethanol. The results showed that 90% of cellulose...... was obtained. The estimated total ethanol production was 262.7 kg/t raw material by assuming the consumption of both C-6 and C-5. No obvious inhibition effect occurred during SSF. These offered experiment evidences for ethanol production from corn straw....

  2. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  3. Kinetics of Wet Air Oxidation of Wastewater from Natural Fiber Web Desizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This work described the application of wet air oxidation (WAO) to the treatment of desizing wastewater from natural fiber processing. A two-liter autoclave batch reactor was used for the experiments. The range of operating temperature examined was between 150 and 290℃, and partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0.375 to 2.25 MPa standardized at 25℃. Variations in Chemical Oxygen Demand(COD) and Total Organic Carbon(TOC) were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the performance of the process. Experimental results showed that WAO can be an efficient method for the treatment of desizing wnstewater. Furthermore, Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) was applied to reduce the reaction temperature and pressure in WAO process. A higher COD removal ratio was achieved under more mild reaction condition with the aid of CWAO. A mathematical model was also proposed to simulate the WAO process of desizing wastewater, in which three distinct kinetics steps were considered to describe the degradation of starch. The model simulations were in well agreement with the experimental data.

  4. [Degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Yu, Chao-Ying; Zhao, Pei-Qing; Chen, Ge-Xin

    2012-11-01

    A series of MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalysts were prepared and their application in degradation of beta-naphthol by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated. The catalysts preparation conditions, reaction conditions and its stability were tested. The catalysts had been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) measurements. The results showed that the decrease of the COD removal for the degradation of beta-naphthol at high Mn loading was due to the aggregation of the highly dispersed Mn species and the formation of the correlated crystals. The decline of the COD removal at high calcination temperature was probably attributed to the weak electron transfer between Mn2O3 and MnO2 and the formation of the inactive Mn2O3. The COD removal had been falling slightly when the catalyst was used 6 times, and this was likely related to the decrease of the diffraction peaks. The catalyst had a high activity when the Mn loading (mass fraction) was 4% and the calcination temperature was 450 degrees C. The COD removal was up to 96.4% at 110 degrees C and 0.5 MPa with this catalyst. The COD removal of 92.4% could be obtained with the MnO(x)/nano-TiO2 catalyst was recycled 6 times. The Mn leaching at 50, 80, 110 and 150 degrees C were all less than 9.3 mg x L(-1) by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The probable degradation pathway was proposed according to some publications.

  5. Spin-on metal oxide materials with high etch selectivity and wet strippability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huirong; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; McKenzie, Douglas; Rahman, Dalil; Cho, JoonYeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna; Petermann, Claire; Hong, SungEun; Her, YoungJun

    2016-03-01

    Metal oxide or metal nitride films are used as hard mask materials in semiconductor industry for patterning purposes due to their excellent etch resistances against the plasma etches. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques are usually used to deposit the metal containing materials on substrates or underlying films, which uses specialized equipment and can lead to high cost-of-ownership and low throughput. We have reported novel spin-on coatings that provide simple and cost effective method to generate metal oxide films possessing good etch selectivity and can be removed by chemical agents. In this paper, new spin-on Al oxide and Zr oxide hard mask formulations are reported. The new metal oxide formulations provide higher metal content compared to previously reported material of specific metal oxides under similar processing conditions. These metal oxide films demonstrate ultra-high etch selectivity and good pattern transfer capability. The cured films can be removed by various chemical agents such as developer, solvents or wet etchants/strippers commonly used in the fab environment. With high metal MHM material as an underlayer, the pattern transfer process is simplified by reducing the number of layers in the stack and the size of the nano structure is minimized by replacement of a thicker film ACL. Therefore, these novel AZ® spinon metal oxide hard mask materials can potentially be used to replace any CVD or ALD metal, metal oxide, metal nitride or spin-on silicon-containing hard mask films in 193 nm or EUV process.

  6. Catalytic wet air oxidation with Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides derived from hydrotalcites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; Gómez, P; García, J

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation of Basic Yellow 11 (BY11), a basic dye, was studied in a batch reactor. Layered double hydroxides with the hydrotalcite-like structure containing nickel or iron cations have been prepared by coprecipitation and subsequently calcined leading to Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides, respectively. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of BY11, these catalysts showed high activity for total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity and dye removal at 120 degrees C and 50 bars after 120 min. It has been demonstrated that the activity depended strongly on the presence of catalyst. The results show that catalysts containing nickel provide a higher extent of oxidation of the dye whereas the reaction carried out with the iron catalyst is faster. The Ni and Fe dispersion determined from the TPR results was higher for the catalysts with a lower Ni or Fe content and decreased for higher Ni or Fe contents. On the basis of activity and selectivity, the Ni containing catalyst with the medium (3%) Ni content was found to be the best catalyst. Finally, a relationship between metal content of the catalyst and reaction rate has been established.

  7. Wet deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the Pacific Northwest region...

  8. Graphene oxide as an effective catalyst for wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Cui, Yuhong; Sun, Yu; Yang, Hongwei

    2014-09-15

    The graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxides, used as catalysts in absence of any metals, were investigated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol in a batch reactor. The characterization of the materials was measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon materials exhibited good phenol and total organic compounds (TOC) removals in the CWAO of phenol. The GO had the highest catalytic activity, total phenol removal was achieved after 40 min, and ca. 84% TOC removal was obtained after 120 min at reaction temperature of 155°C, total pressure of 2.5 MPa and catalyst loading of 0.2 gL(-1).

  9. COMPARISON BETWEEN WET OXIDATION AND STEAM EXPLOSION AS PRETREATMENT METHODS FOR ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF SUGARCANE BAGASSE

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Martín; Marcelo Marcet; Anne Belinda Thomsen

    2008-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation and steam explosion pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse were compared with regard to biomass fractionation, formation of by-products, and enzymatic convertibility of the pretreated material. Wet oxidation led to the solubilisation of 82% of xylan and 50% of lignin, and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one thir...

  10. Decision criteria for the selection of wet oxidation and conventional biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2012-07-15

    The suitability of wet oxidation or biological treatments for the degradation of industrial wastewaters is here discussed. Advantages of these operations, either singly or in combination, are discussed on the basis of previous experimental results from laboratory and industry. Decision diagrams for the selection of conventional biological treatment, wet oxidation or a combination of both techniques are suggested according to the type of pollutant, its concentration and the wastewater flow rate.

  11. Green chemicals from pulp production black liquor by partial wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddassar, Hassan Raja; Melin, Kristian; de Villalba Kokkonen, Daniela; Riera, Gerard Viader; Golam, Sarwar; Koskinen, Jukka

    2015-11-01

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, more sustainable sources of energy, fuel and chemicals are needed. Biomass side streams such as black liquor, which is a by-product of pulp production, has the potential to be used for this purpose. The aim of the study was the production of carboxylic acids, such as lactic acid, formic acid and acetic acid, from kraft and non-wood black liquor. The processes studied were partial wet oxidation (PWO) and catalytic partial wet oxidation (CPWO). The results show that the yield of carboxylic acid is higher when treated by PWO than the results from CPWO at temperatures of 170 °C and 230 °C. The results shows that the PWO process can increase the yield of carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids in black liquor, reduce lignin content and decrease pH, which makes further separation of the acids more favourable. The hydroxy acids are valuable raw materials for biopolymers, and acetic acid and formic acid are commonly used chemicals conventionally produced from fossil feedstock.

  12. Effect of intermediate compounds and products on wet oxidation and biodegradation rates of pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Kinetics of pure compounds in batch agitated reactors are useful data to clarify the characteristics of a given reaction, but they frequently do not provide the required information to design industrial mixed continuous processes because in this case the final and intermediate products interact with the reaction of interest, due to backmixing effects. Simultaneously, the presence and transformations of other compounds, frequent in industrial wastewater treatments, adds more complexity to these types of interactions, whose effect can be different, favorable or unfavorable, for chemical or biological reactions. In this work, batch laboratory reactor data were obtained for the wet oxidation and biodegradation of four phenolic compounds present in a pharmaceutical wastewater and then compared with those collected from industrial continuous stirred tank reactors. For wet oxidation, batch laboratory degradation rates were significantly lower than those found in industrial continuous stirred operation. This behavior was explained by a different distribution of intermediate compounds in lab and industrial treatments, caused by the degree of backmixing and the synergistic effects between phenolic compounds (matrix effects). On the other hand, the specific utilization rates during aerobic biodegradation in the continuous industrial operation were lower than those measured in the laboratory, due to the simultaneous presence of the four pollutants in the industrial process (matrix effects) increasing the inhibitory effects of these compounds and its intermediates.

  13. CuO impregnated activated carbon for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an original approach to the removal of phenol in synthetic wastewater by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with copper binding activated carbon (CuAC) catalysts. The characteristics and oxidation performance of CuAC in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol were studied in a batch reactor at 80 degrees C. Complete conversion of the oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, was observed with CuAC catalyst in 20 min oxidation, and a highly efficient phenol removal and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement were achieved in the first 30 min. The good oxidation performance of CuAC catalyst was contributed to the activity enhancement of copper oxide, which was binding in the carbon matrix. It can be concluded that the efficiency of oxidation dominated by the residual H2O2 in this study. An over 90% COD removal was achieved by using the multiple-step addition in this catalytic oxidation.

  14. Kinetics study on catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol by several metal oxide catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Jia-feng; FENG Yu-jie; CAI Wei-min; YANG Shao-xia; SUN Xiao-jun

    2004-01-01

    Four metal oxide catalysts composed of copper (Cu), stannum (Sn), copper-stannum (Cu-Sn) and copper-cerium(Cu-Ce) respectively were prepared by the co-impregnation method, and γ-alumina(γ-Al2O3) is selected as support. A first-order kinetics model was established to study the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol at different temperature when these catalysts were used. The model simulations are good agreement with present experimental data. Results showed that the reaction rate constants can be significantly increased when catalysts were used, and the catalyst of 6% Cu-10%Ce/γ-Al2O3 showed the best catalytic activity. This is consistent with the result of catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol and the COD removal can be arrived at 98.2% at temperature 210℃, oxygen partial pressure 3 MPa and reaction time 30 min. The activation energies of each reaction with different catalysts are nearly equal, which is found to be about 42 kJ/mol and the reaction in this study is proved to be kinetics control.

  15. Pretreatment of refinery waste water by wet oxidation. LOPROX {sup registered} procedure: Alternative treatment of sulfidic waste lyes by wet oxidation; Vorbehandlung von Raffinerieabwasser durch Nassoxidation. LOPROX {sup registered} -Verfahren: Alternative Behandlung von sulfidischen Ablaugen durch Nassoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhaeuser, Johannes; Weissenberg, Dirk; Birkenbeul, Udo [Bayer Technology Services GmbH (BTS), Leverkusen (Germany). Technology Development and Engineering; Bloecher, Christoph [Currenta (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The authors of the contribution under consideration report on the treatment of refinery wastewater by means of the wet oxidation. The authors present the LOPROX {sup registered} method as an alternative treatment of sulfidic waste lyes. This method can not only treat successfully organic polluted wastewater from the chemical industry, but also various waste lyes from refinery processes. Based on a customer-specific process optimization in pilot scale, a cost-effective treatment can be achieved.

  16. Wet etching of InSb surfaces in aqueous solutions: Controlled oxide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aureau, D., E-mail: damien.aureau@chimie.uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Chaghi, R.; Gerard, I. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Sik, H.; Fleury, J. [Sagem Defense Sécurité, 72-74, rue de la tour Billy, 95101, Argenteuil Cedex (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the wet etching of InSb surfaces by two different oxidant agents: Br{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the consecutive oxides generation onto the surfaces. The strong dependence between the chemical composition of the etching baths and the nature of the final surface chemistry of this low band-gap III–V semiconductor will be especially highlighted. One aqueous etching solution combined hydrobromic acid and Bromine (HBr–Br{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O) with adjusted concentrations. The other solution combines orthophosphoric and citric acids with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O). Depending on its composition, each formulation gave rise to variable etching rate. The dosage of Indium traces in the etching solution by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) gives the kinetic variation of the dissolution process. The variations on etching rates are associated to the properties and the nature of the formed oxides on InSb surfaces. Surface characterization is specifically performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A clear evidence of the differences between the formed oxides is highlighted. Atomic force microscopy is used to monitor the surface morphology and pointed out that very different final morphologies can be reached. This paper presents new results on the strong variability of the InSb oxides in relation with the InSb reactivity toward environment interaction.

  17. Comparison between wet oxidation and steam explosion as pretreatment methods for enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, Carlos Martín; Marcet, M.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2008-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation and steam explosion pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse were compared with regard to biomass fractionation, formation of by-products, and enzymatic convertibility of the pretreated material. Wet oxidation led to the solubilisation of 82% of xylan and 50% of lignin......, and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one third. Wet oxidation formed more aliphatic acids and phenolics, and less furan aldehydes in the liquid...... fraction than steam explosion did. A better enzymatic convertibility of cellulose was achieved for the wet-oxidised material (57.4 %) than for the steam-exploded material (48.9 %). Cellulose convertibility was lower for the whole slurry than for the washed solids in both pretreatments, but more...

  18. Treatment of desizing wastewater from the textile industry by wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of wet air oxidation to the treatment of desizing wastewater from two textile companies. A two-liter high temperature, high pressure autoclave reactor was used in the study. The range of operating temperatures examined was between 150 and 290℃, and the partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0. 375 to 2.25 MPa. Variations in pH,CODCr and TOD content were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the extent of conversion of the process. The effects of temperature, pressure and reaction time were explored extensively. More than 90 % CODCr reduction and 80 % TOC removal have been obtained. The results have also been demonstrated that WAO is a suitable pre-treatment methods due to improvement of the BOD5/CODCr ratio of desizing wastewater. The reaction kinetics of wet air oxidation of desizing wastewater has been proved to be two steps, a fast reaction followed by a slow reaction stage.

  19. Pretreatment of Afyon alcaloide factory's wastewater by wet air oxidation (WAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçar, Y; Alpay, E; Ceylan, V K

    2003-03-01

    In this study, pretreatment of Afyon (Turkey) alcaloide factory wastewater, a typical high strength industrial wastewater (chemical oxygen demand (COD)=26.65 kgm(-3), biological oxygen demand (BOD(5))=3.95 kgm(-3)), was carried out by wet air oxidation process. The process was performed in a 0.75 litre specially designed bubble reactor. Experiments were conducted to see the advantages of one-stage and two-stage oxidation and the effects of pressure, pH, temperature, catalyst type, catalyst loading and air or oxygen as gas source on the oxidation of the wastewater. In addition, BOD(5)/COD ratios of the effluents, which are generally regarded as an important index of biodegradability of a high-strength industrial wastewater, were determined at the end of some runs. After a 2h oxidation (T=150 degrees C, P=0.65 MPa, airflowrate=1.57 x 10(-5)m(3)s(-1), pH=7.0), the BOD(5)/COD ratio was increased from 0.15 to above 0.5 by using the salts of metals such as Co(2+),Fe(2+),Fe(2+)+Ni(2+),Cu(2+)+Mn(2+) as catalyst.

  20. Study on Catalytic Wet Oxidation of H2S into Sulfur on Fe/Cu Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A wet catalytic oxidation at room temperature was investigated with solution containing ferric, ferrous and cupric ions for H2S removal. The experiments were carried out in a two step process,and the results obtained show that the removal efficiency of H2S can always reach 100% in a 300 mm scrubbing column with four sieve plates, and the regeneration of ferric ions in 200 mm bubble column can match the consumed ferric species in absorption. Removal of H2S, production of elemental sulfur and regeneration of ferric, cupric ions can all be accomplished at the same time. No raw material is consumed except O2 in flue gas or air, the process has no secondary pollution and no problem of catalyst degradation and congestion.

  1. Optimizing Oily Wastewater Treatment Via Wet Peroxide Oxidation Using Response Surface Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Xiuqing; Wang, Xiaoyin [Wuhan Textile Univ., Wuhan (China)

    2014-02-15

    The process of petroleum involves in a large amount of oily wastewater that contains high levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and toxic compounds. So they must be treated before their discharge into the receptor medium. In this paper, wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was adopted to treat the oily wastewater. Central composite design, an experimental design for response surface methodology (RSM), was used to create a set of 31 experimental runs needed for optimizing of the operating conditions. Quadratic regression models with estimated coefficients were developed to describe the COD removals. The experimental results show that WPO could effectively reduce COD by 96.8% at the optimum conditions of temperature 290 .deg. C, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} excess (HE) 0.8, the initial concentration of oily wastewater 3855 mg/L and reaction time 9 min. RSM could be effectively adopted to optimize the operating multifactors in complex WPO process.

  2. An approach to modeling of silicon oxidation in a wet ultra-diluted ambient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Hof, A.J.; Schmitz, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we make steps towards developing a new wet-oxidation model of silicon based on electron-stimulated dissociation of H2O molecules. The need for a new model arises from the fact that existing physical models are inadequate to describe the thin-oxide regime. Two regimes of silicon oxidati

  3. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  4. Kinetics of wet air oxidation of glyoxalic acid and oxalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Mahajani, V.V. (Univ. of Bombay (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology)

    1994-12-01

    Oxidation of lower molecular weight monobasic and dibasic acids such as formic acid, acetic acid, glyoxalic acid, and oxalic acid is often the rate-controlling step during wet air oxidation (WAO) of an aqueous waste stream exhibiting very high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The kinetics of WAO of glyoxalic acid and oxalic acid was studied in absence and presence of a cupric sulfate catalyst in the temperature range of 120--245 C and oxygen partial pressure of 0.345--1.380 MPa. The wet oxidation of oxalic acid was found to require more severe conditions as compared to glyoxalic acid. The reaction mechanism and kinetic model have been discussed.

  5. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon

  6. The Oxidation of AlN in Dry and Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth; Humphrey, Donald; Jacobson, Nathan; Yoshio, Tetsuo; Oda, Kohei

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of AlN containing 3.5 wt% Y2O3 were studied by thermogravimetric analysis in dry oxygen and 10% H2O/balance oxygen at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 C for times between 48 and 100 h. The oxidation kinetics for AlN in dry oxygen were parabolic and of approximately the same magnitude and temperature dependence as other alumina forming materials. In this case, diffusion of oxygen and/or aluminum through the alumina scale is the rate limiting mechanism. The oxidation kinetics for AlN in wet oxygen were nearly linear and much more rapid than rates observed in dry oxygen. Numerous micropores were observed in the alumina formed on AIN in wet oxygen. These pores provide a fast path for oxygen transport. The linear kinetics observed in this case suggest that the interface reaction rate of AlN with wet oxygen is the oxidation rate limiting step.

  7. Heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation systems for the treatment of an industrial pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Molina, R; Pariente, M I

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the treatment of wastewater coming from a pharmaceutical plant through a continuous heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process using an Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15 nanocomposite catalyst. This catalyst was preliminary tested in a batch stirred tank reactor (STR), to elucidate the influence of significant parameters on the oxidation system, such as temperature, initial oxidant concentration and initial pH of the reaction medium. In that case, a temperature of 80 degrees C using an initial oxidant concentration corresponding to twice the theoretical stoichiometric amount for complete carbon depletion and initial pH of ca. 3 allow TOC degradation of around 50% after 200 min of contact time. Thereafter, the powder catalyst was extruded with bentonite to prepare pellets that could be used in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Results in the up-flow FBR indicate that the catalyst shows high activity in terms of TOC mineralization (ca. 60% under steady-state conditions), with an excellent use of the oxidant and high stability of the supported iron species. The activity of the catalyst is kept constant, at least, for 55h of reaction. Furthermore, the BOD(5)/COD ratio is increased from 0.20 to 0.30, whereas the average oxidation stage (AOS) changed from 0.70 to 2.35. These two parameters show a high oxidation degree of organic compounds in the outlet effluent, which enhances its biodegradability, and favours the possibility of a subsequent coupling with a conventional biological treatment.

  8. Degradation of acid red 97 dye in aqueous medium using wet oxidation and electro-Fenton techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayan, Berkant; Gözmen, Belgin; Demirel, Muhammet; Gizir, A Murat

    2010-05-15

    Degradation of the acid red 97 dye using wet oxidation, by different oxidants, and electro-Fenton systems was investigated in this study. The oxidation effect of different oxidants such as molecular oxygen, periodate, persulfate, bromate, and hydrogen peroxide in wet oxidation system was compared. Mineralization of AR97 with periodate appeared more effective when compared with that of the other oxidants at equal initial concentration. When 5 mM of periodate was used, at the first minute of the oxidative treatment, the decolorization percentage of AR97 solution at 150 and 200 degrees C reached 88 and 98%, respectively. The total organic carbon removal efficiency at these temperatures also reached 60 and 80%. The degradation of AR97 was also studied by electro-Fenton process. The optimal current value and Fe(2+) concentration were found to be 300 mA and 0.2 mM, respectively. The results showed that electro-Fenton process can lead to 70 and 95% mineralization of the dye solution after 3 and 5h giving carboxylic acids and inorganic ions as final end-products before mineralization. The products obtained from degradation were identified by GC/MS as 1,2-naphthalenediol, 1,1'-biphenyl-4-amino-4-ol, 2-naphthalenol diazonium, 2-naphthalenol, 2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthalenedion, phthalic anhydride, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, phthaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 4-amino-benzoic acid, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid.

  9. Kinetics of wet oxidation of propionic and 3-hydroxypropionic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Levec, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. for Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering]|[Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-07-01

    Oxidation of aqueous solutions of 3-hydroxypropionic (3-HPA) and propionic acids (PA) was studied in a titanium high-pressure reactor at 280--310 C using oxygen partial pressures between 10 and 45 bar. Oxidation of both acids was found to obey first-order kinetic with respect to their concentrations as well as to their lumped TOC concentrations. Oxidation rate revealed a half order dependence with respect to oxygen for oxidation of both acids. In the case of 3-HPA oxidation, the activation energy was found to be 135 kJ/mol, and it was 140 kJ/mol when lumped concentration TOC was used. The activation energy for PA oxidation is 150 kJ/mol, and it is slightly higher, 158 kJ/mol, for TOC reduction. Almost complete conversion of 3-HPA was achieved at 300 C after 1 h, whereas 95% conversion of PA acid was obtained at 310 C after 3 h. During oxidation of 3-HPA, 3-oxopropionic and acetic acids were identified as intermediate products. Oxidation of PA yielded acetic and formic acids as intermediates; at oxygen partial pressures above 25 bar and 310 C, the formation of acetic acid was appreciably reduced. In both cases, however, direct oxidation to carbon dioxide and water was found to be the main reaction route.

  10. Wet air oxidation as a pretreatment option for selective biodegradability enhancement and biogas generation potential from complex effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoley, K V; Tembhekar, P D; Saratchandra, T; Pandit, A B; Pandey, R A; Mudliar, S N

    2012-09-01

    This study looks at the possibility of wet air oxidation (WAO) based pretreatment of complex effluent to selectively enhance the biodegradability (without substantial COD destruction) and facilitate biogas generation potential. A lab-scale wet air oxidation reactor with biomethanated distillery wastewater (B-DWW) as a model complex effluent (COD 40,000 mg L(-1)) was used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept. The studies were conducted using a designed set of experiments and reaction temperature (150-200°C), air pressure (6-12 bar) and reaction time (15-120 min) were the main process variables of concern for WAO process optimization. WAO pretreatment of B-DWW enhanced the biodegradability of the complex wastewater by the virtue of enhancing its biodegradability index (BI) from 0.2 to 0.88, which indicate favorable Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) for biogas generation. The kinetics of COD destruction and BI enhancement has also been reported.

  11. Inhibition and deactivation effects in catalytic wet oxidation of high-strength alcohol-distillery liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, K.; Larachi, F.; Hamoudi, S.; Turcotte, G.; Sayari, A. [Laval Univ., Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    The removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) from raw high-strength alcohol-distillery waste liquors was evaluated using three different treatments: thermolysis (T), noncatalytic wet oxidation (WO), and solid-catalyzed wet oxidation (CWO). The distillery liquors (TOC = 22,500 mg/l, sugars = 18,000 mg/l, and proteins = 13,500 mg/l) were produced by alcoholic fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates from steam-exploded timothy grass. TOC-abatement studies were conducted batchwise in a stirred autoclave to evaluate the influence of the catalyst (7:3, MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2} mixed oxide), oxygen partial pressure (0.5--2.5 MPa), and temperature (453--523 K) on T, WO, and CWO processes. Although CWO outperformed T and WO, TOC conversions did not exceed {approximately}60% at the highest temperature used. Experiments provided prima facie evidence for a gradual fouling of the catalyst and a developing inhibition in the liquors which impaired deep TOC removals. Occurrence of catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proven experimentally through quantitative and qualitative experiments such as elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Inhibition toward further degradation of the liquors was ascribed to the occurrence of highly stable antioxidant intermediates via the Maillard reactions between dissolved sugars and proteins. A lumping kinetic model involving both reaction inhibition by dissolved intermediates and catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proposed to account for the distribution of carbon in the liquid, solid, and the vapor phases.

  12. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Wet oxidation and fermentation by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Olsson, Lisbeth; Thomsen, A.B.;

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/L sodium carbonate and 12 bar oxygen at 195degreesC) was used as pretreatment method for wheat straw (60 g/L), resulting in a hydrolysate and a cellulosic solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (8 g/L), low......-molecular-weight carboxylic acids (3.9 g/L), phenols (0.27 g/L = 1.7 mM) and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/L). The wet oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present in the hydrolysate, were each tested...

  13. A 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure synthesized by a wet chemical oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zaizhu; Huang, Baibiao; Ma, Xiangchao; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zeyan; Dai, Ying; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2012-12-07

    A novel 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructure, with fast growth along the 〈111〉 directions of cubic seeds, is synthesized by using a wet chemical oxidation method. The morphological structures and the growth process are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures are analyzed by their crystallographic orientations. The surface energy of AgCl facets {100}, {110}, and {111} with absorbance of Cl(-) ions is studied by density functional theory calculations. Based on the experimental and computational results, a plausible mechanism is proposed to illustrate the formation of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures. With more active sites, the photocatalytic activity of the 3D AgCl hierarchical superstructures is better than those of concave and cubic ones in oxygen evolution under irradiation by visible light.

  14. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, Przemyslaw; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard

    2008-09-01

    In this communication, pretreatment of the anaerobically digested (AD) manure and the application of the pretreated AD manure as liquid medium for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were described. Furthermore, fermentation of pretreated maize silage and wheat straw was investigated using 2l bioreactors. Wet oxidation performed for 20 min at 121 degrees C was found as the most suitable pretreatment conditions for AD manure. High ammonia concentration and significant amount of macro- and micro-nutrients in the AD manure had a positive influence on the ethanol fermentation. No extra nitrogen source was needed in the fermentation broth. It was shown that the AD manure could successfully substitute process water in SSF of pretreated lignocellulosic fibres. Theoretical ethanol yields of 82% were achieved, giving 30.8 kg ethanol per 100 kg dry mass of maize silage.

  15. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  16. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-09-01

    The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution Dit(E), and density Dit,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on concentrated solutions. Therefore, special attention was put on the development of more environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing e.g. hot pure water with low contents of oxygen or hydrochloric acid, and of ozone, working at ambient temperatures. According to our results, these methods could be a high quality and low cost alternative to current approaches with liquid chemicals for the preparation of hydrophobic Si substrate surfaces and ultra-thin passivating oxide layers. As demonstrated for selected examples, the effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent soft plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositions of Si oxides (SiOx), or amorphous materials such as Si (a-Si:H), Si nitride (a

  17. Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Oxalic Acid using Platinum Catalysts in Bubble Column Reactor: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Saroha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment and re-use of industrial process water are critical issue for the development of human activities andenvironment conservation. Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO is an attractive and useful technique for treatment of effluentswhere the concentrations of organic pollutants are too low, for the incineration and other pollution control techniquesto be economically feasible and when biological treatments are ineffective, e.g. in the case of toxic effluents. In CWAO,combustion takes place on a Pt/Al2O3 catalysts usually at temperatures several degrees below those required forthermal incineration. In CWAO process, the organic contaminants dissolved in water are either partially degraded by meansof an oxidizing agent into biodegradable intermediates or mineralized into innocuous inorganic compounds such as CO2,H2O and inorganic salts, which remain in the aqueous phase. In contrast to other thermal processes CWAO produces no NOx,SO2, HCl, dioxins, furans, fly ash, etc. This review paper presents the application of platinum catalysts in bubble columnreactor for CWAO of oxalic acid.

  18. Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol: the role of promoter and ceramic support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S Tajammul; Jamil, Sadaf; Mazhar, Muhammad

    2009-04-14

    Complete mineralization of phenol has been achieved over a cerium-manganese catalyst, doped with potassium, supported on a modified zeolite with a high surface area, under very mild conditions (110 degrees C, P(O2) = 0.5 MPa). This newly developed supported catalyst restricts the formation of bulk polymeric species on the surface, thus increasing the lifetime of the catalyst. It demonstrates superior textural, structural and surface oxygen properties compared with the reference cerium-manganese oxide catalyst. The supported catalyst maintains not only the high surface area but also the nanoparticle size during the catalytic run, thereby providing the full availability of the surface for reacting molecules. The geometry of the catalyst is modified electronically by the addition of potassium, and the zeolite addition restricts the conversion of Ce, Mn and K to higher oxidation states, thereby maintaining the geometry of catalytic active sites. The performance measured with this novel catalyst indicates a major improvement in the efficient application of the catalytic wet oxidation process for complete purification ofa complex waste stream.

  19. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon

  20. Enhanced wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation performances based on CuS nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Guan, Qingmeng; Li, Henan; Xu, Hui; Liu, Qian; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Baijing

    2014-01-01

    CuS nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide (CuS NCs/rGO) composites were prepared by a facile one-pot solvothermal reaction. In this solvothermal system, thioacetamide was found to perform the dual roles of sulphide source and reducing agent, resulting in the formation of CuS NCs and simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets to rGO sheets. In addition, CuS NCs/rGO composites were further used as heterogeneous catalysts in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation process, with methylene blue as a model organic dye. The introduction of rGO to CuS NCs could effectively enhance the catalytic activity of CuS NCs, and the resultant CuS NCs/rGO composites with a starting GO amount of 5 wt% showed the highest catalytic activity. Furthermore, the CuS NCs/rGO composites showed high catalytic activity over a broad pH operation range from 3.0 to 11.0 under ambient conditions, and still retained 90% of the original catalytic activity after reuse in five cycles.

  1. Catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline with nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, R; Milman, M; Landau, M V; Brenner, A; Herskowitz, M

    2008-07-15

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of aqueous solution containing 1000 ppm aniline was conducted in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a novel nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst (surface area of 300 m2/g) prepared using SBA-15 silica as a hard template. A range of liquid hourly space velocities (5-20 h(-1)) and temperatures (110-140 degrees C) at 10 bar of oxygen were tested. The experiments were conducted to provide the intrinsic performance of the catalysts. Complete aniline conversion, 90% TOC conversion, and 80% nitrogen mineralization were achieved at 140 degrees C and 5 h(-1). Blank experiments yielded relatively low homogeneous aniline (<35%) and negligible TOC conversions. Fast deactivation of the catalysts was experienced due to leaching caused by complexation with aniline. Acidification of the solution with HCI (molar HCI to aniline ratio of 1.2) was necessary to avoid colloidization and leaching of the nanoparticulate catalyst components. The catalyst displayed stable performance for over 200 h on stream.

  2. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  3. Failure mechanisms and assembly-process-based solution of FCBGA high lead C4 bump non-wetting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wenqi; Qiu Yiming; Jin Xing; Wang Lei; Wu Qidi

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the typical failure modes and failure mechanisms of non-wetting in an FCBGA (flip chip ball grid array) assembly.We have identified that the residual lead and tin oxide layer on the surface of the die bumps as the primary contributor to non-wetting between die bumps and substrate bumps during the chipattach reflow process.Experiments with bump reflow parameters revealed that an optimized reflow dwell time and H2 flow rate in the reflow oven can significantly reduce the amount of lead and tin oxides on the surface of the die bumps,thereby reducing the non-wetting failure rate by about 90%.Both failure analysis results and mass production data validate the non-wetting failure mechanisms identified by this study.As a result of the reflow process optimization,the failure rate associated with non-wetting is significantly reduced,which further saves manufacturing cost and increases capacity utilization.

  4. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae, E-mail: arimoto@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2010-09-10

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in {phi}X174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  5. Porous Gold Films Fabricated by Wet-Chemistry Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Pastre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous gold films presented in this paper are formed by combining gold electroless deposition and polystyrene beads templating methods. This original approach allows the formation of conductive films (2 × 106 (Ω·cm−1 with tailored and interconnected porosity. The porous gold film was deposited up to 1.2 μm on the silicon substrate without delamination. An original zirconia gel matrix containing gold nanoparticles deposited on the substrate acts both as an adhesion layer through the creation of covalent bonds and as a seed layer for the metallic gold film growth. Dip-coating parameters and gold electroless deposition kinetics have been optimized in order to create a three-dimensional network of 20 nm wide pores separated by 20 nm thick continuous gold layers. The resulting porous gold films were characterized by GIXRD, SEM, krypton adsorption-desorption, and 4-point probes method. The process is adaptable to different pore sizes and based on wet-chemistry. Consequently, the porous gold films presented in this paper can be used in a wide range of applications such as sensing, catalysis, optics, or electronics.

  6. Influence of substrate particle size and wet oxidation on physical surface structures and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S

    2009-01-01

    In the worldwide quest for producing biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, the importance of the substrate pretreatment is becoming increasingly apparent. This work examined the effects of reducing the substrate particle sizes of wheat straw by grinding prior to wet oxidation and enzymatic hydrolysis. The yields of glucose and xylose were assessed after treatments with a benchmark cellulase system consisting of Celluclast 1.5 L (Trichoderma reesei) and Novozym 188 beta-glucosidase (Aspergillus niger). Both wet oxidized and not wet oxidized wheat straw particles gave increased glucose release with reduced particle size. After wet oxidation, the glucose release from the smallest particles (53-149 mum) reached 90% of the theoretical maximum after 24 h of enzyme treatment. The corresponding glucose release from the wet oxidized reference samples (2-4 cm) was approximately 65% of the theoretical maximum. The xylose release only increased (by up to 39%) with particle size decrease for the straw particles that had not been wet oxidized. Wet oxidation pretreatment increased the enzymatic xylose release by 5.4 times and the glucose release by 1.8 times across all particle sizes. Comparison of scanning electron microscopy images of the straw particles revealed edged, nonspherical, porous particles with variable surface structures as a result of the grinding. Wet oxidation pretreatment tore up the surface structures of the particles to retain vascular bundles of xylem and phloem. The enzymatic hydrolysis left behind a significant amount of solid, apparently porous structures within all particles size groups of both the not wet oxidized and wet oxidized particles.

  7. Quantification of activated carbon contents in soils and sediments using chemothermal and wet oxidation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändli, Rahel C; Bergsli, Anders; Ghosh, Upal; Hartnik, Thomas; Breedveld, Gijs D; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2009-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) strongly sorbs organic pollutants and can be used for remediation of soils and sediments. A method for AC quantification is essential to monitor AC (re)distribution. Since AC is black carbon (BC), two methods for BC quantification were tested for AC mixed in different soils and sediments: i) chemothermal oxidation (CTO) at a range of temperatures and ii) wet-chemical oxidation with a potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid solution. For three soils, the amount of AC was accurately determined by CTO at 375 degrees C. For two sediments, however, much of the AC disappeared during combustion at 375 degrees C, which could probably be explained by catalytic effects by sediment constituents. CTO at lower temperatures (325-350 degrees C) was a feasible alternative for one of the sediments. Wet oxidation effectively functioned for AC quantification in sediments, with almost complete AC recovery (81-92%) and low remaining amounts of native organic carbon (5-16%).

  8. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  9. A wet-chemical approach to perovskite and fluorite-type nanoceramics: synthesis and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd Antonius

    2015-01-01

    In thesis the low-temperature, wet-chemical approach to various functional inorganic oxide materials is described. The main focus of this research is to control the material’s synthesis from liquid precursor to metal oxide powder or thin film; while understanding its formation mechanism. In addition

  10. Effect of Alloying Additions on the Oxidation of High Speed Steels under Dry and Wet Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.C. RIZZO; M.J.MONTEIRO; S.R.J.SAUNDERS

    2009-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out into the effects of chromium and vanadium content on the oxidation rate and on the adhesion of oxide scales grown on three different chemical compositions of high speed steels under dry and wet conditions. The oxidation tests were carried out in a thermobalance at 650 ℃ for up to 14.4 ks. The mass gain of the specimens increased with increasing contents of water vapour. Alloy composition had no effect on the oxidation rate in dry conditions. The "adhesion" of the oxide scale was determined using indentation with a Rockwell C diamond and the pull adhesion test to determine the interfacial toughness and the tensile strength of the oxide metal bond, respectively. Generally, the results of the investigation indicated that oxide adhesion was lowest for the specimens exposed to dry conditions, and that with increasing water vapour content, the scale was more adherent. Indentation test results showed that an increase in the Ⅴ concentration was deleterious to oxidc adhesion in both the dry and wet environments, whereas an increase in the Cr-content had little effect on adhesion.

  11. Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of o-Chlorophenol in Wastewater%邻氯苯酚废水的催化湿式氧化处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 汪大翚

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments for the treatmentof o-chlorophenol in wastewater. Experimental results showed that wet air oxidation (WAO) process in the absence ofcatalyst was also effective for o-chlorophenol in wastewater treatment. Up to 80% of the initial CODCr was removedby wet air oxidation at 270℃ with twice amount of the required stoichiometric oxygen supply. At temperatureof 150℃, the removal rate of CODCr was only 30%. Fe2(SO4)3, CuSO4, Cu(NO3)2 and MnSO4 exhibited highcatalytic activity. Higher removal rate of CODCr was obtained by CWAO. More than 96% of the initial CODCrwas removed at 270℃ and 84.6%-93.6% of the initial CODCr was removed at 150℃. Mixed catalysts had bettercatalytic activity for the degradation of o-chlorophenol in wastewater.

  12. Phytoxicity study of the products of wet oxidation of a representative biomass (lettuce)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to verify the results reported previously concerning the phytotoxicity of wet-oxidation (wet-ox) products, lettuce solids were suspended in water and then heated to 548 K for 3.6 ksec (1 hr) under 4.1x10 to the -7 Pa (400 psig at 294 K) oxygen pressure and 1.52x10 to the 8th (1500 psig at 548 K) total pressure. Such treatment resulted in oxidation of 80% of the initial organic carbon to carbon dioxide. Thirty-three percent of the remaining organic carbon was present in acetic acid. Organic nitrogen in the feed was decreased 90% by the wet-ox treatment. Ammonia and nitrogen gas were the main nitrogen products. Analysis of the liquid product of wet-ox indicated that most of the minerals essential for plant growth were present. However, when tested using a lettuce-root growth-rate assay, the solution was toxic. This toxicity was not due to excessive salt or ammonia or to an improper pH. Analysis of the wet-ox solution revealed the presence of silver and chromium, thus implicating reactor corrosion as the cause of the phytotoxicity. Both cation and anion exchange resins removed the silver and the toxicity of the liquid effluent, indicating silver as the toxic component. Uptake of both silver and chromium by lettuce roots correlated with diminished root growth. Toxicity of the solution from wet-ox was not observed when precautions were taken to minimize contact of the liquid in the reactor with the metal reactor components.

  13. Value-added and Supporting - Inhibiting Factors for the Wet Processing of Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Hariyati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is one of the annual crops which are widely favored by coffee enjoyers. SidomulyoVillage is one of the fourth largest coffee producing villages in District of Silo with a land area of 180 ha in 2009. Coffee experiences a process of harvest and post harvest; one of the activities of post-harvest is coffee processing. Coffee processing is divided into two; wet processing and dry processing. The majority of farmers in SidomulyoVillage do dry processing; about 75% of farmers do dry processing and 25% of farmers do wet processing. This research was intended to: (1 to find out the value added coffee processed,(2 to identify supporting and inhibiting factors the farmers to do wet processing, and (3 to identify the income differences of farmers undertakingthe wet and dry processing. This research was carried out on purpose (purposive method in the Sidomulyo Village, District of Silo, by taking samples; that is the total sampling of farmer group of Sidomulyo 1. Data analysis used including value added, Force Field and financial analysis. The research results showed that: (1 value added of coffee beans processing turn to HS coffee was IDR 975,- whereas coffee beans processing turn to ose coffee was IDR 529,-. (2 The strongest supporting factor of wet processing was the ability to absorb workers, while the strongest inhibiting factor of wet processing was less adequate water facilities; (3 The coffee farmer incomescarrying out wet processing and dry processing were different. PerHa coffee income of wet processing was IDR 11,228,805,- and that of dry processing per ha was IDR 7,901,249,-

  14. Differential response of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to the wetting of salty arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA, AOB) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To examine their differential responses to the wetting of dry and salty arid soil, AOA and AOB amoA genes (encoding subunit A of the ammonia monooxygenase) and transcripts were enumerated in dry (summer) and wet (after the first rainfall) soil under the canopy of halophytic shrubs and between the shrubs. AOA and AOB were more abundant under shrub canopies than between shrubs in both the dry and wetted soil. Soil wetting caused a significant decrease in AOB abundance under the canopy and an increase of AOA between the shrubs. The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene transcript was similar for both the wet and dry soil, and the transcript-to-gene ratios were water content. In contrast, the bacterial amoA transcript-to-gene ratios were between 78 and 514. The lowest ratio was in dry soil under the canopy and the highest in the soil between the shrubs. The results suggest that the AOA are more resilient to stress conditions and maintain a basic activity in arid ecosystems, while the AOB are more responsive to changes in the biotic and abiotic conditions.

  15. Advanced treatment of wet-spun acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater using three-dimensional electrochemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianlong; Wang, Qunhui; Shi, Zhining; Fang, Yue; Shi, Shanshan; Wang, Juan; Wu, Chuanfu

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional electrochemical oxidation (3D-EC) reactor with introduction of activated carbon (AC) as particle micro-electrodes was applied for the advanced treatment of secondary wastewater effluent of a wet-spun acrylic fiber manufacturing plant. Under the optimized conditions (current density of 500A/m(2), circulation rate of 5mL/min, AC dosage of 50g, and chloride concentration of 1.0g/L), the average removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (CODcr), NH3-N, total organic carbon (TOC), and ultraviolet absorption at 254nm (UV254) of the 3D-EC reactor were 64.5%, 60.8%, 46.4%, and 64.8%, respectively; while the corresponding effluent concentrations of CODcr, NH3-N, TOC, and UV254 were 76.6, 20.1, and 42.5mg/L, and 0.08Abs/cm, respectively. The effluent concentration of CODcr was less than 100mg/L, which showed that the treated wastewater satisfied the demand of the integrated wastewater discharge standard (GB 8978-1996). The 3D-EC process remarkably improved the treatment efficiencies with synergistic effects for CODcr, NH3-N, TOC, and UV254 during the stable stage of 44.5%, 38.8%, 27.2%, and 10.9%, respectively, as compared with the sum of the efficiencies of a two-dimensional electrochemical oxidation (2D-EC) reactor and an AC adsorption process, which was ascribed to the numerous micro-electrodes of AC in the 3D-EC reactor. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that electrochemical treatment did not generate more toxic organics, and it was proved that the increase in acute biotoxicity was caused primarily by the production of free chlorine.

  16. Uncatalysed wet oxidation of D-glucose with hydrogen peroxide and its combination with hydrothermal electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Teresa; Kouzaki, Goushi; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu; Cocero, María José

    2012-02-15

    An increasing interest in biomass as a renewable feedstock for the chemical industry has risen over the last decades, and glucose, the monomer unit of cellulose, has been widely studied as a source material to produce value-added products such as carboxylic acids, mainly gluconic and formic. In this work, the non-catalysed wet oxidation of glucose using hydrogen peroxide has been analysed, obtaining molar yields to gluconic and formic acids up to 15% and 64%, respectively. Glucose conversion was generally between 40 and 50%, reaching over 80% under the highest temperature (200°C). An appropriate choice of temperature can tune product distribution as well as reaction rates. The interaction of the wet oxidation with an electrolytic reaction was also analysed.

  17. Pretreatment of Reed by Wet Oxidation and Subsequent Utilization of the Pretreated Fibers for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szijarto, Nora; Kádár, Zsófia; Varga, Eniko

    2009-01-01

    lignocelluloses usually do. In the present study, wet oxidation was investigated as the pretreatment method to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of reed cellulose to soluble sugars and thus improve the convertibility of reed to ethanol. The most effective treatment increased the digestibility of reed cellulose...... by cellulases more than three times compared to the untreated control. During this wet oxidation, 51.7% of the hemicellulose and 58.3% of the lignin were solubilized, whereas 87.1% of the cellulose remained in the solids. After enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated fibers from the same treatment, the conversion......Common reed (Phragmites australis) is often recognized as a promising source of renewable energy. However, it is among the least characterized crops from the bioethanol perspective. Although one third of reed dry matter is cellulose, without pretreatment, it resists enzymatic hydrolysis like...

  18. Preliminary Test of the Wet Oxidation of Organics in Basin F Wastewater at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    unless other costs such as heating and compression become prohibitive. It is particularly suitable for first-stage treatment of waste source containing...pressures lead to requirements for heavy walled vessels and high pressure pumps . j (2) Wet oxidation tends to produce oxygenated organic compounds of...From Table III, DIMP disappears during the first 10 or 20 percent of the COD reduction. Contrary to our experience with carbon adsorbtion , DIMP is not

  19. Kinetics of wet oxidation of phenol over an Fe/activated carbon catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintanilla, A.; Casas, J.A.; Rodriquez, J.J.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Wet oxidation of phenol over an Fe/activated carbon catalyst has been studied in a trickle-bed reactor in the following operational window: inlet C phenol=0.5 and 1 g/L, T=100-127 ºC, PT=3-8 atm, W=0-4.8 g, QL=0.125-2 mL/min and QO2=91.6 NmL/min. The experiments were carried out in the absence of ma

  20. Decomposition and Mineralization of Dimethyl Phthalate in an Aqueous Solution by Wet Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dar-Ren; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Shih-Yun; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chiang, Sheng-Wei; Hung, Zang-Sie; Shie, Je-Lueng; Chen, Yi-Hung; Yuan, Min-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl phthalate (DMP) was treated via wet oxygen oxidation process (WOP). The decomposition efficiency η DMP of DMP and mineralization efficiency η TOC of total organic carbons were measured to evaluate the effects of operation parameters on the performance of WOP. The results revealed that reaction temperature T is the most affecting factor, with a higher T offering higher η DMP and η TOC as expected. The η DMP increases as rotating speed increases from 300 to 500 rpm with stirring enhancement of gas liquid mass transfer. However, it exhibits reduction effect at 700 rpm due to purging of dissolved oxygen by overstirring. Regarding the effects of pressure P T, a higher P T provides more oxygen for the forward reaction with DMP, while overhigh P T increases the absorption of gaseous products such as CO2 and decomposes short-chain hydrocarbon fragments back into the solution thus hindering the forward reaction. For the tested P T of 2.41 to 3.45 MPa, the results indicated that 2.41 MPa is appropriate. A longer reaction time of course gives better performance. At 500 rpm, 483 K, 2.41 MPa, and 180 min, the η DMP and η TOC are 93 and 36%, respectively.

  1. The degradation of Isophorone by catalytic wet air oxidation on Ru/TiZrO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huangzhao; Yan, Xiaomiao; Li, Xianru; He, Songbo; Sun, Chenglin

    2013-01-15

    The catalyst Ru/TiZrO(4) was applied in the degradation of Isophorone by catalytic wet air oxidation. Mathematical models for the effects of reaction conditions on the Isophorone degradation by catalytic wet air oxidation were developed using a response surface methodology. A model was obtained for each response with multiple regression analysis and then was refined. Analysis of variance revealed that the models developed were adequate. The validity of the models was also verified by experimental data. Analysis of response surface showed that total organic carbon removal and Isophorone conversion were significantly affected (P≤0.01) by reaction time, temperature and their interactions, and affected (P≤0.05) by the square of reaction time. The point of zero charge of Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst was about 1.72. The total organic carbon removal and Isophorone conversion had a great association with the zeta potential of Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst. Finally, the degradation pathway of Isophorone in catalytic wet air oxidation was proposed. Within 410 h, the total organic carbon removal remained above 95%, indicating that the Ru/TiZrO(4) catalyst had a good stability.

  2. Catalytic wet oxidation of o-chlorophenol at mild temperatures under alkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Fukuta, Tadashi; Yamada, Takehisa; Onyango, Maurice S; Bernardo, Eileen C; Matsuda, Hitoki; Yagishita, Kohichi

    2005-01-01

    Wet oxidation of a 100 ppm aqueous solution of o-chlorophenol (o-CP) was performed in a lab-scale batch reactor using 3% Ru/TiO(2) catalyst at 373 and 413 K, and a partial oxygen pressure of 0.1 MPa. The experiments were conducted by varying the initial pH values of o-CP solution from pH 6.3 to 9.8 and 11.8. From the results, it was revealed that the catalytic decomposition of o-CP occurred most effectively at 413 K and at the initial pH of 9.8. Complete decomposition and dechlorination of o-CP were almost achieved within 1h, and about 85% of TOC was removed in 3.0 h. On the other hand, the catalytic wet oxidation of o-CP at a higher pH value of 11.8 was not effective in the removal of TOC. The incomplete removal of TOC at the initial pH of 11.8 is likely attributed to a low pK(a) of carboxylic acids formed during the wet oxidation of o-CP.

  3. Toluene removal by oxidation reaction in spray wet scrubber: experimental, modeling and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumporn Nikom

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Toluene, an important volatile organic compound (VOC, is used in many kinds of industries, such as painting, printing, coating, and petrochemical industries. The emission of toluene causes serious air pollution, odor problem, flammability problem and affects human health. This paper proposes the removal of toluene from waste air using a spray wet scrubber combining the absorption and oxidation reaction. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl solution was used as the scrubbing liquid in the system. NaOCl, the strongest oxidative agent, presents an effective toluene removal. As the scrubbed toluene is reacted, recirculation of the scrubbing liquid could be operated with a constant removal efficiency throughout the operting time. The investigated variables affecting the removal efficiency were air flow rate, inlet toluene concentration, NaOCl concentration, scrubbing liquid flow rate and size of spray nozzle. Influence of the scrubbing parameters was experimentally studied to develop a mathematical model of the toluene removal efficiency. The removal model reveals that the increase of scrubbing liquid flow rate, toluene concentration, and NaOCl concentration together with the decrease of air flow rate and size of spray nozzle can increase the toluene removal efficiency. Optimization problem with an objective function and constraints was set to provide the maximum toluene removal efficiency and solved by Matlab optimization toolbox. The optimization constraints were formed from the mathematical model and process limitation. The solution of the optimization was an air flow rate of 100 m3/h, toluene concentration of 1500 ppm, NaOCl concentration of 0.02 mol/l, NaOCl solution feed rate of 0.8 m3/h, and spray nozzle size of 0.5 mm. Solution of the optimization gave the highest toluene removal efficiency of 91.7%.

  4. Wet Chemical Synthesis and Screening of Thick Porous Oxide Films for Resistive Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm F. Maier

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A method of wet chemical synthesis suitable for high throughput and combinatorial applications has been developed for the synthesis of porous resistive thick-film gas sensors. This method is based on the robot-controlled application of unstable metal oxide suspensions on an array of 64 inter-digital electrodes positioned on an Al2O3 substrate. SnO2, WO3, ZrO2, TiO2, CeO2, In2O3 and Bi2O3 were chosen as base oxides, and were optimised by doping or mixed oxide formation. The parallel synthesis of mixed oxide sensors is illustrated by representative examples. The electrical characteristics and the sensor performance of the films were measured by high-throughput impedance spectroscopy while supplying various test gases (H2, CO, NO, NO2, propene. Data collection, data mining techniques applied and the best potential sensor materials discovered are presented.

  5. Influence of Substrate Particle Size and Wet Oxidation on Physical Surface Structures and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S.

    2009-01-01

    In the worldwide quest for producing biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, the importance of the substrate pretreatment is becoming increasingly apparent. This work examined the effects of reducing the substrate particle sizes of wheat straw by grinding prior to wet oxidation and enzymatic...... release only increased (by up to 39%) with particle size decrease for the straw particles that had not been wet oxidized. Wet oxidation pretreatment increased the enzymatic xylose release by 5.4 times and the glucose release by 1.8 times across all particle sizes. Comparison of scanning electron...... microscopy images of the straw particles revealed edged, nonspherical, porous particles with variable surface structures as a result of the grinding. Wet oxidation pretreatment tore up the surface structures of the particles to retain vascular bundles of xylem and phloem. The enzymatic hydrolysis left behind...

  6. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of p-nitrophenol by Fe (III) supported on resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Lai, Cheng-Lee; Shih, C Y; Chang, Jing-Song; Hung, Mu-Ya

    2010-01-01

    Fe(III) supported on resin (Fe(III)-resin) as an effective catalyst for peroxide oxidation was prepared and applied for the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) experiments with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant were performed in a batch rector with p-nitrophenol as the model pollutant. Under given conditions (PNP concentration 500 mg/L, H(2)O(2) 0.1 M, 80°C, resin dosage 0.6% g/mL), p-nitrophenol was almost completely removed, corresponding to an 84% of COD removal. It was found that the reaction temperature, oxidant concentration. and initial pH of solution significantly affected both p-nitrophenol conversion and COD removal by oxidation. It can be inferred from the experiments that Fe(III) supported on resin was an effective catalyst in the mineralization of p-nitrophenol. In an acidic environment of oxidation, the leaching test showed that there was only a slight leaching effect on the activity of catalytic oxidation. It was also confirmed by the aging test of catalysts in the oxidation.

  7. Study on dynamics characteristics of wet air oxidation of non-ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is an effective method to deal with highly concentrated nondegradable emulsification wastewater which contains non-ionic surfactants. This article illustrates our investigation on dynamic characteristics of wet air oxidation of typical non-ionic surfactants like polyether, phenol ether and widely used alcohol ether. The experimental results indicated that the oxidation rate of polyether, phenol ether and alcohol ether obviously ascended as the temperature rose. A good oxidation effect was available at 240℃. The TOC removal rate could reach 88.0%, 94% and 91.5%, after 125 min reaction. Alcohol ether was prone to an easier oxidation compared with polyether and phenol ether when the temperature was 220℃ or below. The oxidation rate of alcohol ether was higher than that of polyether at 160℃, while the oxidation rate of polyether was higher than that of phenol ether between 180℃ and 220℃. During the later period of the reaction at 240℃, the rate of phenol ether was higher than that of alcohol ether, which was still higher than that of polyether. Partitioned first order kinetics model analy-sis showed that the apparent activation energy of alcohol ether was lower than that of both polyether and phenol ether in the leading stage and lagging stage, and it was easy to acquire a higher oxidation rate for alcohol ether at low temperature. Three parameter general dynamics model analyses showed that the reason why the oxidation rate of polyether was lower than that of alcohol ether was that the oxidation of polyether was more apt to be converted to intermediate production than that of alcohol ether, whereas between 200℃ and 220℃, the direct oxidation rate of polyether and the oxidation rate of intermediate product were obviously lower than that of alcohol ether. The apparent activation energy of direct and indirect oxidation of polyether was 43.37 and 60.45 kJ?mol?1, respectively, while the corre-sponding apparent activation energy of alcohol

  8. Study on dynamics characteristics of wet air oxidation of non-ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG XinPing; TANG WenWei; ZHAO JianFu; GU GuoWei

    2008-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is an effective method to deal with highly concentrated nondegradable emulsification wastewater which contains non-ionic surfactants. This article illustrates our investigation on dynamic characteristics of wet air oxidation of typical non-ionic surfactants like polyether, phenol ether and widely used alcohol ether. The experimental results indicated that the oxidation rate of polyether, phenol ether and alcohol ether obviously ascended as the temperature rose. A good oxidation effect was available at 240℃. The TOC removal rate could reach 88.0%, 94% and 91.5%, after 125 min reaction. Alcohol ether was prone to an easier oxidation compared with polyether and phenol ether when the temperature was 220℃ or below. The oxidation rate of alcohol ether was higher than that of polyether at 160℃, while the oxidation rate of polyether was higher than that of phenol ether between 180℃ and 220℃. During the later period of the reaction at 240℃, the rate of phenol ether was higher than that of alcohol ether, which was still higher than that of polyether. Partitioned first order kinetics model analysis showed that the apparent activation energy of alcohol ether was lower than that of both polyether and phenol ether in the leading stage and lagging stage, and it was easy to acquire a higher oxidation rate for alcohol ether at low temperature. Three parameter general dynamics model analyses showed that the reason why the oxidation rate of polyether was lower than that of alcohol ether was that the oxidation of polyether was more apt to be converted to intermediate production than that of alcohol ether, whereas between 200℃ and 220℃, the direct oxidation rate of polyether and the oxidation rate of intermediate product were obviously lower than that of alcohol ether. The apparent activation energy of direct and indirect oxidation of polyether was 43.37 and 60.45 kJ·mol-1, respectively, while the corresponding apparent activation energy of alcohol

  9. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  10. Oxidation kinetics of thin copper films and wetting behaviour of copper and Organic Solderability Preservatives (OSP) with lead-free solder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Mauricio, E-mail: mauricio.ramirez2@de.bosch.com [Robert Bosch GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Strasse 2, 71701 Schwieberdingen (Germany); Chair for Surface Science and Corrosion, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Henneken, Lothar [Robert Bosch GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Strasse 2, 71701 Schwieberdingen (Germany); Virtanen, Sannakaisa [Chair for Surface Science and Corrosion, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The oxide formation on thin copper films deposited on Si wafer was studied by XPS, SEM and Sequential Electrochemical Reduction Analysis SERA. The surfaces were oxidized in air with a reflow oven as used in electronic assembly at temperatures of 100 deg. C, 155 deg. C, 200 deg. C, 230 deg. C and 260 deg. C. The SERA analyses detected only the formation of Cu{sub 2}O but the XPS analysis done for the calibration of the SERA equipment proved also the presence of a CuO layer smaller than 2 nm above the Cu{sub 2}O oxide. The oxide growth follows a power-law dependence on time within this temperature range and an activation energy of 33.1 kJ/mol was obtained. The wettability of these surfaces was also determined by measuring the contact angle between solder and copper substrate after the soldering process. A correlation between oxide thickness and wetting angle was established. It was found that the wetting is acceptable only when the oxide thickness is smaller than 16 nm. An activation energy of 27 kJ/mol was acquired for the spreading of lead free solder on oxidized copper surfaces. From wetting tests on copper surfaces protected by Organic Solderability Preservatives (OSP), it was possible to calculate the activation energy for the thermal decomposition of these protective layers.

  11. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol solutions over CuO/CeO2 systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Paola; Ivorra, Fernando; Haure, Patricia; Fenoglio, Rosa

    2011-06-15

    Three 5% CuO/CeO(2) catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel, precipitation and combustion methods, followed by incipient wetness impregnation with copper nitrate. The samples were characterized by XRD, TPR, BET and tested for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of a phenol solution (5 g/L). The reaction took place in a batch reactor at atmospheric pressure, in a temperature range of 60-80°C, during 4h. Phenol conversion, H(2)O(2) consumption, pH and chemical oxygen demand were determined. The reaction temperature and the catalyst loading did improve the phenol and the H(2)O(2) conversions. The effect on the selectivity towards complete mineralization was less marked, with levels among 60-70%. Stepwise addition of H(2)O(2) was also tested.

  12. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol solutions over CuO/CeO{sub 2} systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Paola, E-mail: pamassa@fi.mdp.edu.ar [Division Catalizadores y Superficies, INTEMA, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata/CONICET, Juan B. Justo 4302, 7600 Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ivorra, Fernando; Haure, Patricia; Fenoglio, Rosa [Division Catalizadores y Superficies, INTEMA, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata/CONICET, Juan B. Justo 4302, 7600 Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    Three 5% CuO/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel, precipitation and combustion methods, followed by incipient wetness impregnation with copper nitrate. The samples were characterized by XRD, TPR, BET and tested for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of a phenol solution (5 g/L). The reaction took place in a batch reactor at atmospheric pressure, in a temperature range of 60-80{sup Degree-Sign }C , during 4 h. Phenol conversion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} consumption, pH and chemical oxygen demand were determined. The reaction temperature and the catalyst loading did improve the phenol and the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} conversions. The effect on the selectivity towards complete mineralization was less marked, with levels among 60-70%. Stepwise addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was also tested.

  13. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of lignin in a three-phase reactor with aromatic aldehyde production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales F.G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a process of catalytic wet air oxidation of lignin obtained from sugar-cane bagasse is developed with the objective of producing vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in a continuous regime. Palladium supported on g-alumina was used as the catalyst. The reactions in the lignin degradation and aldehyde production were described by a kinetic model as a system of complex parallel and series reactions, in which pseudo-first-order steps are found. For the purpose of producing aromatic aldehydes in continuous regime, a three-phase fluidized reactor was built, and it was operated using atmospheric air as the oxidizer. The best yield in aromatic aldehydes was of 12%. The experimental results were compatible with those values obtained by the pseudo-heterogeneous axial dispersion model (PHADM applied to the liquid phase.

  14. Chloride interference in the analysis of dissolved organic carbon by the wet oxidation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of Cl- in concentrations greater than 0.02 M is shown to interfere with the analysis of aqueous DOC concentrations by the wet oxidation method of analysis when a reaction time of 5 min is employed. Chloride competes with DOC for S2O82-, lowering the overall oxidation efficiency. The resulting HOCl from the oxidation of Cl- reacts with DOC, producing significant amounts of chlorinated intermediate compounds in addition to CO2. These compounds were found in the waste effluent from the reaction chamber and in the gas stream transporting CO2 to the detector. While a possible Cl- effect has been noted for DOC measurements in the past, it has not previously been demonstrated to be a source of error at the concentrations reported in this paper. The interference can be overcome either by increasing the digestion time or by diluting samples to contain less than 0.02 M Cl-.

  15. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the

  16. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanier, Virginie; Zalouk, Sofiane; Barbati, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated. Two step experiment was carried out consisting of a non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275 degrees C, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min. The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 +/- 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 +/- 13.2)% conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4(+)-N. Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid. It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity. The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance. The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution. Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  17. Application of Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation to Treatment of Landfill Leachate on Co/Bi Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-sheng; LIU Liang; ZHANG Rong; DONG De-ming; LIU Hong-liang; LI Yu

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO) was employed to reduce the organic compounds in landfill leachate and the effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, catalyst dosage, and concentration of the organic compounds on the TOC and CODCr removal rates were studied. The degradation kinetics of landfill leachate was also investigated and an exponential experiential model consisting of four influential factors was established to describe the reduction of the organic compounds in the landfill leachate. Meanwhile, the GC-MS technique was used to detect the components of the organic intermediates for the inference of the decomposition mechanisms of the organic compounds in landfill leachate. The results reveal that the reaction temperature and the catalyst dosage are the most important factors affecting the degradation reaction of the organic compounds and that the principal intermediates confirmed by GC-MS are organic acids at a percentage of more than 88% with no aldehydes or alcohols detected. The decomposition mechanisms of the organic compounds in landfill leachate were inferred based on the GC-MS information as follows: the activated gas phase O2 captured the hydrogen of the organic pollutants to produce free radicals, which then initiated the catalytic reaction. So most of the organic compounds were oxidized into CO2 and H2O ultimately. In general, catalytic wet air oxidation over catalyst Co3O4/Bi2O3 was a very promising technique for the treatment of landfill leachate.

  18. Chloride ions promoted the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol over clay-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Zhang, Changbo; Xu, Rui; Gu, Chuantao; Song, Zhengguo; Xu, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of phenol over clay-based catalysts in the presence and absence of NaCl was investigated. Changes in the H2O2, Cl(-), and dissolved metal ion concentration, as well as solution pH during phenol oxidation, were also studied. Additionally, the intermediates formed during phenol oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and the chemical bonding information of the catalyst surfaces was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the presence of Cl(-) increased the oxidation rate of phenol to 155%, and this phenomenon was ubiquitous during the oxidation of phenolic compounds by H2O2 over clay-based catalysts. Cl(-)-assisted oxidation of phenol was evidenced by several analytical techniques such as mass spectroscopy (MS) and XPS, and it was hypothesized that the rate-limiting step was accelerated in the presence of Cl(-). Based on the results of this study, the CWPO technology appears to be promising for applications in actual saline phenolic wastewater treatment.

  19. Pretreatment of corn stover using wet oxidation to enhance enzymatic digestibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, E.; Schmidt, A.S.; Reczey, K.

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is an abundant, promising raw material for fuel ethanol production. Although it has a high cellulose content, without pretreatment it resists enzymatic hydrolysis, like most lignocellulosic materials. Wet oxidation (water, oxygen, mild alkali or acid, elevated temperature and pressure......) was investigated to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Six different combinations of reaction temperature, time, and pH were applied. The best conditions (60 g/L of corn stover, 195degreesC, 15 min, 12 bar O-2, 2 g/L of Na2CO) increased the enzymatic conversion of corn stover four times, compared...

  20. Wet Oxidation Pretreatment of Tobacco Stalks and Orange Waste for Bioethanol Production. Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Carlos; Fernandez, Teresa; Garcia, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) was used as a pretreatment method prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of tobacco stalks and orange waste. The pretreatment, performed at 195 degrees C and an oxygen pressure of 1.2 MPa, for 15 min, in the presence of Na2CO3, increased the cellulose content of the materials and gave...... cellulose recoveries of approximately 90%. The pretreatment enhanced the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest enzymatic convertibility, that of 64.9%, was achieved for pretreated tobacco stalks. The ethanolic fermentation of the WO filtrates, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  1. Research on Synergy of Combining Electrochemical Oxidation and Catalytic Wet Oxidation%电场效应与催化湿式氧化协同作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 李光明; 张芳; 黄菊文

    2009-01-01

    A new catalytic wet oxidation fixed-bed reactor combined with three-dimensional electric-field was developed to investigate catalytic wet oxidation, electrochemical oxidation and electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation of the solution containing phenol in the presence of a catalyst Mn-Sn-Sb-3/γ-Al_2O_3 . Good eleetroassisted catalytic wet oxidation efficiency was obtained in the setup for the combination system even at mild conditions ( T = 130℃, po_2 =1.0 MPa) that the phenol conversion and TOC reduction were up to 94.0% and 88.4% after 27 min treatment, respectively. The result also shows that the rate constants of electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation are much higher than that of not only both catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation process alone but also additive efficiencies of catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation processes, which indicates an apparent synergetic effect between CWO and ECO processes.%在自行研制开发的一套固定床和复合三维电场一体化连续式催化湿式氧化反应器中,采用浸渍法制备的Mn-Sn-Sb-3/γAl_2O_3催化剂,实验研究了苯酚催化湿式氧化、电催化氧化以及电场效应下的催化湿式氧化过程的行为.结果表明,一体化反应器在较低反应温度(T=130℃)和氧分压(Po_2=1.0 MPa)下即可获得相当满意的处理效果,空时仅为27min时苯酚和TOC的去除率就分别可达到94.0%和88.4%.电场效应下的催化湿式氧化协同降解苯酚的反应速率常数大于单独电催化或催化湿式氧化降解苯酚的反应速率常数,而且还大大超过两者之和,电催化氧化对催化湿式氧化工艺存在明显的协同增效作用.

  2. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  3. pH Responsive and Oxidation Resistant Wet Adhesive based on Reversible Catechol-Boronate Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkar, Ameya R; Barker, Brett; Clisch, Matthew; Jiang, Jingfeng; Lee, Bruce P

    2016-08-09

    A smart adhesive capable of binding to a wetted surface was prepared by copolymerizing dopamine methacrylamide (DMA) and 3-acrylamido phenylboronic acid (AAPBA). pH was used to control the oxidation state and the adhesive property of the catechol side chain of DMA and to trigger the catechol-boronate complexation. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the complex at pH 9, which was not present at pH 3. The formation of the catechol-boronate complex increased the cross-linking density of the adhesive network. Most notably, the loss modulus values of the adhesive were more than an order of magnitude higher for adhesive incubated at pH 9 when compared to those measured at pH 3. This drastic increase in the viscous dissipation property is attributed to the introduction of reversible complexation into the adhesive network. Based on the Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics test, adhesive containing both DMA and AAPBA demonstrated strong interfacial binding properties (work of adhesion (Wadh) = 2000 mJ/m(2)) to borosilicate glass wetted with an acidic solution (pH 3). When the pH was increased to 9, Wadh values (180 mJ/m(2)) decreased by more than an order of magnitude. During successive contact cycles, the adhesive demonstrated the capability to transition reversibly between its adhesive and nonadhesive states with changing pH. Adhesive containing only DMA responded slowly to repeated changes in pH and became progressively oxidized without the protection of boronic acid. Although adhesive containing only AAPBA also demonstrated strong wet adhesion (Wadh ∼ 500 mJ/m(2)), its adhesive properties were not pH responsive. Both DMA and AAPBA are required to fabricate a smart adhesive with tunable and reversible adhesive properties.

  4. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  5. Alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation pretreatment approach to enhance enzymatic convertibility of rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Saumita; Sen, Ramkrishna; Mudliar, Sandeep; Pandey, R A; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Satpute, Dewanand

    2011-01-01

    Pretreatment of rice husk by alkaline peroxide assisted wet air oxidation (APAWAO) approach was investigated with the aim to enhance the enzymatic convertibility of cellulose in pretreated rice husk. Rice husk was presoaked overnight in 1% (w/v) H(2)O(2) solution (pH adjusted to 11.5 using NaOH) (equivalent to 16.67 g H(2)O(2) and 3.63 g NaOH per 100 g dry, untreated rice husk) at room temperature, followed by wet air oxidation (WAO). APAWAO pretreatment resulted in solubilization of 67 wt % of hemicellulose and 88 wt % of lignin initially present in raw rice husk. Some amount of oligomeric glucose (˜8.3 g/L) was also observed in the APAWAO liquid fraction. APAWAO pretreatment resulted in 13-fold increase in the amount of glucose that could be obtained from otherwise untreated rice husk. Up to 86 wt % of cellulose in the pretreated rice husk (solid fraction) could be converted into glucose within 24 hours, yielding over 21 g glucose per 100 g original rice husk. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to visualize changes in biomass structure following the APAWAO pretreatment. Enzymatic cellulose convertibility of the pretreated slurry at high dry matter loadings was also investigated.

  6. Conversion and Estrogenicity of 17β-estradiol During Photolytic/Photocatalytic Oxidation and Catalytic Wet-air Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistan, Mirjana; Tišler, Tatjana; Pintar, Albin

    2012-06-01

    Estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), produced by human body and excreted into municipal wastewaters, belongs to the group of endocrine disrupting compounds that are resistant to biological degradation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of E2 removal from aqueous solutions by means of catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) and photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation. CWAO experiments were conducted in a trickle-bed reactor at temperatures up to 230 °C and oxygen partial pressure of 10 bar over TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 solids. Photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation was carried out in a batch slurry reactor employing a TiO2 P-25 (Degussa) catalyst under visible or UV light. HPLC analysis and yeast estrogen screen assay were used to evaluate the removal of E2 and estrogenicity of treated samples. The latter was completely removed during photolytic/photocatalytic oxidation under UV (365 nm) light and photocatalytic oxidation under visible light. In CWAO experiments, complete removal of both E2 and estrogenicity from the feed solution were noticed in the presence of TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts.

  7. CuZnAl Mixed Oxide Catalyst Prepared from Hydrotalcite-like Precursor for Catalytic Wet Oxidation of Phenol%由类水滑石前驱体制备的CuZnAl复合氧化物催化剂催化湿氧化处理苯酚

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙颖; 杨民; 窦和瑞; 何雨; 王炜; 孙承林

    2003-01-01

    @@ The efficiency of several noble metals for catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of various pollutants has been demonstrated[1,2]. However, the noble metals are expensive, affecting greatly the economics of the corresponding process.

  8. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  9. Optical characteristics of wet-thermally oxidized bulk and nanoporous GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sinjae; Kadam, Mahadev; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2016-09-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films deposited on sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were successfully transformed into bulk and nanoporous gallium oxide (Ga2O3) using a wet thermal oxidation technique. Oxidation depth measurements confirmed that the oxide growth appeared to be faster in the case of nanoporous GaN than that of bulk GaN. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to evaluate and compare the optical properties of nanoporous and bulk Ga2O3 films, such as refractive index and extinction coefficient, which revealed improved optical properties for nanoporous Ga2O3 compared to the bulk. The simulations conducted on the ellipsometric spectra for bulk and nanoporous Ga2O3 using the Forouhi-Bloomer model and the Bruggeman effective medium approximation revealed the best fit with a low mean square error value. In the case of nanoporous Ga2O3, zero absorption was observed in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 840 nm, supporting the use of this material as a transparent coating in optoelectronic devices.

  10. Program Trainer for Operator of Phosphoric Acid production by Wet-Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir А. Krivonosov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the major problems of operator of phosphoric acid production by wet-process during production control, develops program trainer, enabling to speed up the process of operators training, promote their professional qualifications and the production control

  11. NASA Ames ATM Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denery, Dallas G.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Ames research Center, in cooperation with the FAA and the industry, has a series of major research efforts underway that are aimed at : 1) improving the flow of traffic in the national airspace system; and 2) helping to define the future air traffic management system. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide a brief summary of some of these activities.

  12. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Virginie Fontanier; Sofiane Zalouk; Stéphane Barbati

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated.Two step experiment was carried out consisting ofa non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275℃, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min.The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 ± 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 ± 13.2)%conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4+-N.Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid.It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity.The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance.The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution.Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  13. Utilization and application of wet potato processing coproducts for finishing cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M L

    2010-04-01

    Wet coproducts fed to beef cattle include processing coproducts of the fruit, vegetable, juice, and brewing industries. Considerations for their utilization in beef cattle diets include quantity available, feeding value, quality of animal products produced, economics (e.g., transportation of water), storage and preservation, consumer perception, nuisance concerns, contaminants, and interactions with other diet ingredients. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) coproducts from processing for frozen food products may be quantitatively most important because the 11.3 million t of potatoes (fresh weight) processed in the United States and Canada in 2008 resulted in an estimated 4.3 million t (as-is basis) of coproduct. Chemical composition and feeding value of potato coproducts depends on the coproduct type. The names of coproducts vary among potato processors and some processors combine the different coproducts into one product commonly called slurry. The 4 main potato coproducts are 1) potato peels; 2) screen solids (small potatoes and pieces); 3) fried product (fries, hash browns, batter, crumbles); and 4) material from the water recovery systems (oxidation ditch, belt solids, filter cake). The coproducts, except the fried products, ensile rapidly, reaching pH 5 in 7 d or less. Dry matter content varies from 10 to 30% and on a DM basis varies in CP (5 to 27%), starch (3 to 56%), NDF (4 to 41%), and ether extract (3 to 37%) content among potato coproducts. Type of coproduct and frying greatly affect the energy value (0.6 to 1.6 Mcal of NE(g)/kg of DM). Composition, quality, and shelf life of beef was not affected by potato coproduct feeding in contrast to perceptions of some purveyors and chefs. Potato coproducts are quantitatively important energy sources in beef cattle diets, which, in turn, solve a potentially massive disposal problem for the food processing industry.

  14. Wetting characteristics of the anodic aluminum oxide template and fabrication of cracks using ultraviolet curable resin solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Yoon, Jae; Phuong, NguyenThi; Hwan Kim, Jeong; Choi, Doo-Sun; Whang, Kyung-hyun; Yoo, Yeong-eun

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the wetting characteristics of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template with ultraviolet curable polymer resin. The wettability of the template depends on the pore size on the surface, where it is improved with smaller pores and vice versa. Plasma treatment on the surface of the template is used to improve the wettability and the adhesion of the cured polymer to the template. And we also introduce the cracks on the polymer layer for possible application as nano-sized cavities. The resin within the pore is cleaved during the curing process so that cavities or cracks could be made which are much smaller than the original pores of the AAO template.

  15. THERMAL PROCESS OF VACUUM FLUXLESS LASERSOLDERING AND ANALYSIS ON SOLDER SPREADING AND WETTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of vacuum fluxless soldering on the conditions of laser heating, the method of measuring temperature by the thermocouple is used to analyze the spreading and wetting process of boh fluxless SnPb solder in the vacuum surroundings and flux SnPb solder on Cu pad. Solder spreading and wetting affected by the soldering thermal process is also discussed according to the thermodynamics principle. Results show that vacuum fluxless soldering demands higher temperature, and the fall of the solder su rface tension is the important factor achieving fluxless laser soldering.

  16. Wet oxidation treatment of organic household waste enriched with wheat straw for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation into ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.;

    2004-01-01

    Organic municipal solid waste enriched with wheat straw was subjected to wet-oxidation as a pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation into bio-ethanol. The effect of tempera (185-195degrees C), oxygen pressure (3-12) and sodium carbonate (0-2 g l(-1)) addition on enzymatic...... cellulose and hemicellulose convertibility was studied at a constant wet oxidation retention time of 10 minutes. An enzyme convertibility assay at high enzyme loading (25 filter paper unit (FPU) g(-1) dry solids (DS) added) showed that up to 78% of the cellulose and up to 68% of the hemicellulose...... in the treated waste could be converted into respectively hexose and pentose sugars compared to 46% for cellulose and 36% for hemicellulose in the raw waste. For all wet oxidation conditions tested, total carbohydrate recoveries were high (> 89%) and 44-66% of the original lignin could be converted into non...

  17. Studies on the synthesis of europium activated yttrium oxide by wet-chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muresan, Laura [Raluca Ripan Institute for Research in Chemistry, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)], E-mail: laura_muresan2003@yahoo.com; Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Grecu, Rodica [Raluca Ripan Institute for Research in Chemistry, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tudoran, Lucian Barbu [Electronic Microscopy Center, Babes-Bolyai University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-03-05

    Europium activated yttrium oxide phosphor powders (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}) were prepared from yttrium-europium precursors obtained by wet-chemical method. With this purpose in view, precursors were prepared using the reagent simultaneous addition SimAdd technique from yttrium-europium nitrate and chloride as rare-earth supplier and urea, ammonium oxalate, ammonium carbonate and oxalic acid as precipitating agents. Precursors, obtained under controlled concentration, temperature and pH conditions, were fired at 1200 deg. C in order to generate Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor powders. Yttrium-europium precursors and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor powders were investigated by FTIR, TGA-DTA, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) in order to put in evidence the influence of the quality of yttrium-europium precursors obtained by wet-chemical method, using the SimAdd technique on the properties of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphor powders.

  18. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gwon Woo [Biomass and Waste Energy Laboratory, KIER, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju [Environmental and Plant Engineering Research Institute, KICT, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively.

  19. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of a chemical plant wastewater over platinum-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Andrzej; Trawczyński, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    Catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) of wastewater (chemical oxygen demand [COD] = 1800 mg O2/dm3) from a fine chemicals plant was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor at T = 393-473 K under total pressure of 5.0 or 8.0 MPa. Catalysts containing 0.3% wt. of platinum deposited on two supports, mixed silica-titania (SM1) and carbon black composites (CBC) were used. The CBC-supported catalyst appeared to be more active than the SM1-supported one. A slow decrease of activity of the platinum on SM1 (Pt-SM1) during the long-term operation is attributed to recrystallization of titania and leaching of a support component, while the Pt-CBC catalyst is deteriorated, owing to combustion of the support component. The power-law-kinetic equations were used to describe the rate of COD removal at CWAO over the catalysts. The kinetic parameters of COD reduction for the wastewater were determined and compared with the kinetic parameters describing phenol oxidation over the same catalysts. Rates of COD removal for the wastewater were found higher than those for phenol oxidation over the same catalysts and under identical operating conditions.

  20. Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of some lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-07-01

    Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium in a 1 l Parr autoclave at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Some physical properties such as surface area, bulk density, apparent density, mean pore radius, and porosity of the original and oxidised lignite samples were determined. For this purpose, BET and mercury intrusion porosimetry techniques were performed. In order to examine the effects of oxidation on the functional groups, FT-IR technique was applied for both original and oxidised lignite samples. On the other hand, some inorganic constituents were eliminated from the samples as a result of in situ formation of sulphuric acid from oxidation of sulphur compounds. The changes taken place in the physical properties were studied considering chemical compositions of the samples and the extent of the interaction between the samples and oxygen. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles as efficient catalysts for wet peroxide oxidation of organic aqueous wastes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manju Kurian; Divya S Nair

    2015-03-01

    Manganese substituted zinc nanoparticles, MnxZn1−xFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0) prepared by sol gel method were found to be efficient catalysts for wet peroxide oxidation of 4-chlorophenol. Complete degradation of the target pollutant occurred within 90 min at 70°C. Zinc substitution enhanced the catalytic efficiency and the unsubstituted ZnFe2O4 oxidized the target compound completely within 45 min. Studies on the effect of reaction variables revealed that only a small amount of the oxidant, H2O2 (3–4 mL) is required for complete degradation of 4-chlorophenol. More than 80% of 4-chlorophenol was removed at catalyst concentrations of 100 mg/L. Direct correlation between the amount of catalyst present and the extent of degradation of 4-chlorophenol was observed, ruling out hesterogeneous-homogeneous mechanism. The catalysts are reusable and complete degradation of target pollutant occurred after five successive runs. The extent of iron leaching was fairly low after five consecutive cycles indicating the mechanism to be heterogeneous.

  2. TOC reduction of alcohol distillery wastewater by wet oxidation using heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, K.; Hamoudi, S.; Larachi, F.; Montero, J.P.; Sayari, A.; Turcotte, G. [Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    We studied the potential of three heterogeneous wet air oxidation (WAO) catalysts to reduce the total organic carbon (TOC) content of two distillery waste liquors. The catalysts were 1% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mn/Ce composite oxides, and Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged NaY zeolite. The liquors were produced from alcohol fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates originating from steam- and ammonia-exploded forages and agricultural residues. Initial WAO reaction rates of the liquors were measured batchwise in the temperature range 180 to 250{sup o}C under pure oxygen at 0.5 to 2.5 MPa. The WAO initial rates were first order for TOC, and the activation energies of the catalysts varied between 34 and 51 kJ/mol. The highest TOC abatements were achieved over Mn/Ce oxides and Cu{sup 2+}/NaY catalysts. Kinetic tests over extended times revealed the formation of significant amounts of strongly adsorbed carbonaceous foulants, which were responsible for the loss of catalyst activity. Foulants were tentatively characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). (author)

  3. Fe salts as catalyst for the wet oxidation of o-chlorophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xin-hua; HE Ping; JIN Jian; HAO Zhi-wei

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of o-chlorophenol in wastewater was studied in a stainless steel autoclave using four different Fe catalysts in the temperature range of 100-200 ℃. Experimental results showed that high rate of o-chlorophenol and CODcr (Chemical Oxygen Demand, mg/L) removal by CWAO was obtained at relatively low temperature and pressure. The catalysts Fe2(SO4)3, FeSO4, Fe2O3 and FeCl3 all exhibited high catalytic activity. More than 93.7% of the initial CODCr and nearly100% of o-chlorophenol were removed at 150 ℃ after 150 min with FeSO4 as catalyst. The CWAO of o-chlorophenol was found to be pseudo-first order reaction with respect to o-chlorophenol, with activation energy of 75.56 k J/mol in the temperature range of100-175 ℃.

  4. High solid simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of wet oxidized corn stover to ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, E.; Klinke, H.B.; Reczey, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this study ethanol was produced from corn stover pretreated by alkaline and acidic wet oxidation (WO) (195 degreesC, 15 min, 12 bar oxygen) followed by nonisothermal simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). In the first step of the SSF, small amounts of cellulases were added at 50....../L) were present in the hemicellulose rich hydrolyzate at subinhibitory levels, thus no detoxification was needed prior to SSF of the whole slurry. Based on the cellulose available in the WO corn stover 83% of the theoretical ethanol yield was obtained under optimized SSF conditions. This was achieved...... with a substrate concentration of 12% dry matter (DM) acidic WO corn stover at 30 FPU/g DM (43.5 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading. Even with 20 and 15 FPU/g DM (corresponding to 29 and 22 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading, ethanol yields of 76 and 73%, respectively, were obtained. After 120 h of SSF the highest...

  5. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT and Köhler theory (KT to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method.

    Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to

  6. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  7. Degradation of phenylamine by catalytic wet air oxidation using metal catalysts with modified supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Escudero, Gabriel O; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acid treatments with HCl and HNO3 on the surface area and surface chemistry of three granular activated carbons was studied. These supports were characterized and the hydrochloric acid treatment leads to the best activated carbon support (AC2-C). The catalytic behavior of Pt, Ru and Fe (1 wt.%) supported on granular activated carbon treated with HCl was tested in the phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation in a three-phase, high-pressure catalytic reactor over a range of reaction temperatures 130-170ºC and total pressure of 1.0-3.0 MPa at LHSV = 0.4-1 h(-1), whereas the phenylamine concentration range and the catalyst loading were 5-16 mol.m(-3) and 0.5-1.5 g, respectively. Activity as well as conversion varied as a function of the metal, the catalyst preparation method and operation conditions. Higher activities were obtained with Pt incorporated on hydrochloric acid -treated activated carbon by the ion exchange method. In steady state, approximately 98% phenylamine conversion, 77% of TOC and 94% of COD removal, was recorded at 150ºC, 11 mol m(-3) of phenylamine concentration and 1.5 g of catalyst, and the selectivity to non-organic compounds was 78%. Several reaction intermediaries were detected. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model gave an excellent fit of the kinetic data of phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation over the catalysts of this work.

  8. Hydrolysis of solubilized hemicellulose derived from wet-oxidized wheat straw by a mixture of commercial fungal enzyme preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skammelsen Schmidt, Anette; Thomsen, Alle Belinda; Woidemann, Anders [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Tenkanen, Maija [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland)

    1998-04-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of the solubilized hemicellulose fraction from wet-oxidized wheat straw was investigated for quantification purposes. An optimal hydrolysis depends on factors such as composition of the applied enzyme mixture and the hydrolysis conditions (enzyme loading, hydrolysis time, pH-value, and temperature). A concentrated enzyme mixture was used in this study prepared at VTT Biotechnology and Food Research, Finland, by mixing four commercial enzyme preparations. No distinctive pH-value and temperature optima were identified after a prolonged incubation of 24 hours. By reducing the hydrolysis time to 2 hours a temperature optimum was found at 50 deg. C, where a pH-value higher than 5.2 resulted in reduced activity. An enzyme-substrate-volume-ratio of 0.042, a pH-value of 5.0, and a temperature of 50 deg. C were chosen as the best hydrolysis conditions due to an improved monosaccharide yield. The hydrolysis time was chosen to be 24 hours to ensure equilibrium and total quantification. Even under the best hydrolysis conditions, the overall sugar yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis was only 85% of that of the optimal acid hydrolysis. The glucose yield were approximately the same for the two types of hydrolyses, probably due to the high cellulase activity in the VTT-enzyme mixture. For xylose and arabinose the enzymatic hydrolysis yielded only 80% of that of the acid hydrolysis. As the pentoses existed mainly as complex polymers their degradation required many different enzymes, some of which might be missing from the VTT-enzyme mixture. Furthermore, the removal of side-choins from the xylan backbone during the wet-oxidation pretreatment process might enable the hemicellulosic polymers to interact and precipitate, hence, reducing the enzymatic digestibility of the hemicellulose. (au) 8 tabs., 10 ills., 65 refs.

  9. [Quality by design based high shear wet granulation process development for the microcrystalline cellulose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gan; Xu, Bing; Sun, Fei; Cui, Xiang-long; Shi, Xin-yuan; Qiao, Yan-jiang

    2015-03-01

    The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established and validated within the framework of quality by design (QbD). The system of microcrystalline cellulose-de-ioned water was used in this study. The median granule size and bulk density of granules were identified as critical quality attributes. Plackeet-Burmann experimental design was used to screen these factors as follows: dry mixing time, the impeller and chopper speed of dry mixing, water amount, water addition time, wet massing time, the impeller and chopper speed of wet massing and drying time. And the optimization was implemented with the central composite experimental design based on screened critical process parameters. The design space of the high shear wet granulation process was established based on the quadratic polynomial regression model. Since the P-values of both models were less than 0.05 and values of lack of fit were more than 0.1, the relationship between critical quality attributes and critical process parameters could be well described by the two models. The reliability of design space, illustrated by overlay plot, was improved with the addition of 95% confidence interval. For those granules whose process parameters were in the design space, the granule size could be controlled within 250 to 355 μm, and the bulk density could be controlled within a range of 0.4 to 0.6 g x cm(-3). The robustness and flexibility of the high shear wet granulation process have been enhanced via the establishment of the design space based on the QbD concept.

  10. Wet autoclave pretreatment for immunohistochemical demonstration of oestrogen receptors in routinely processed breast carcinoma tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, B; Bankfalvi, A; Grote, L; Blasius, S; Ofner, D; Böcker, W; Jasani, B; Schmid, K W

    1995-02-01

    The immunohistochemical demonstration of oestrogen receptor (OR) was performed on 32 randomly selected and routinely processed breast carcinomas after wet autoclave pretreatment of sections. The autoclave method was compared to the OR status found on frozen sections as well as to alternative pretreatment methods such as enzymatic predigestion and microwave irradiation. Using four different monoclonal antibody clones (H222, LH1, CC4-5, 1D5.26), the OR status was evaluated for each of the various pretreatment methods applied. All cases with a high OR content on frozen sections (n = 11) also showed a high OR status on wet autoclave-pretreated paraffin tissues using antibody clones 1D5.26 and CC4-5; in cases with low OR content on frozen sections, no false-negative cases were recorded using only the antibody 1D5.26 neither after wet autoclave nor microwave pretreatment. In addition, with this antibody, OR was detectable after autoclave pretreatment in two cases which were considered to be OR-negative even on frozen sections. When the primary antibody was omitted, no false-positive cases were observed after wet autoclave pretreatment. Thus, in our hands, wet autoclave pretreatment, in combination with the antibody 1D5.26, offers a highly sensitive method for the immunohistochemical demonstration of OR in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of breast carcinomas.

  11. P-chlorophenol wastewater treatment by microwave-enhanced catalytic wet peroxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guohua; Lv, Baoying; Jin, Yan; Li, Dongming

    2010-02-01

    A microwave-enhanced catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (MW-CWPO) technology was investigated to treat a high concentration of p-chlorophenol wastewater under a mild condition. The MW-CWPO experiments were carried out in a microwave autoclave using copper(II) oxide (CuO)-loaded active carbon as a catalyst. The p-chlorophenol was directly ring-opened within 5 minutes at 343 K and 0.3 MPa and then mineralized to carbon dioxide and water. More than 90% of the total organic carbon was removed within 15 minutes. The reaction activation energy (Ea) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decomposition was decreased from 47.7 to 43.1 kJ/mol under microwave irradiation. The H2O2 catalytic decomposition was fitted to a second-order reaction under microwave irradiation, while it followed a first-order reaction without microwave irradiation. The experimental results indicate that the MW-CWPO method has significant potential applications for a high concentration of p-chlorophenol wastewater.

  12. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yuting; Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong; Kong, Lingjun; Descorme, Claude

    2014-07-15

    A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pHPZC, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120°C under 0.9MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  13. [Copper leaching in catalytic wet oxidation of phenol with Cu-containing spinel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-hua; He, Song-bo; Yang, Min; Du, Hong-zhang; Sun, Cheng-lin

    2008-09-01

    The Cu0.10, Zn0.90 Al1.90 Fe0.10 O4 spinel type catalyst prepared by sol-gel method was tested for catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol. The performances of Cu0.10 Zn0.90 Al1.90 Fe0.10 O4 catalyst in TPR experiment, the influence of phenol as reducer, reaction temperature and phenol-to-catalyst mass ratio on copper leaching were checked respectively. According to the experimental results, it is suggested that the reduced active species can not be easily re-oxidized under low reaction temperature and high phenol-to-catalyst mass ratio are the main reasons for copper leaching. Under high enough reaction temperature and low phenol-to-catalyst mass ratio, the copper leaching reduces remarkably. At 190 degrees C in the presence of 100 mL aqueous solution of 4.29 g x L(-1) of phenol and 2.5 g catalyst, the copper leaching was only 0.96 mg x L(-1) after 2 h of reaction.

  14. Activity and leaching features of zinc-aluminum ferrites in catalytic wet oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aihua; Yang, Min; Qiao, Ruiping; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin

    2007-08-17

    A series of ZnFe(2-x)Al(x)O(4) spinel type catalysts prepared by sol-gel method have been characterized and tested for catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of phenol with pure oxygen. The iron species existed in these materials as aggregated iron oxide clusters and Fe3+ species in octahedral sites. With a decrease in iron content the concentration of the first iron species decreased and the latter increased. Complete phenol conversions and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals were obtained for all catalysts during phenol degradation at mild reaction conditions (160 degrees C and 1.0 MPa of oxygen pressure). Increasing with the concentration of Fe3+ species in octahedral sites, induction period became significantly shortened. After phenol was completely degraded, the concomitant recycling of the leaching Fe3+ ions back to the catalyst surface was observed, and in this case it is possible to perform successful CWO reactions with some cycles. It is also suggested that during the reaction the Fe3+ cations coordinated in octahedral sites in the ZnFe(2-x)Al(x)O(4) catalysts are resistant to acid leaching, but the reduced Fe2+ cations become much more labile, leading to increased Fe leaching.

  15. Ruthenium versus platinum on cerium materials in wet air oxidation of acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaalova, J. [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6, CZ (Czech Republic); Barbier, J., E-mail: Jacques.barbier.jr@univ-poitiers.fr [University of Poitiers, LACCO UMR 6503, Laboratoire de Catalyse par les Metaux, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, F-86022 POITIERS Cedex (France); Rossignol, S. [University of Limoges, ENSCI, 47 Avenue Albert Thomas 87000 Limoges France (France)

    2010-09-15

    This study was a comparison between Ru-catalysts and similar, previously investigated, Pt-catalysts. In this paper, ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation are prepared, characterized and tested. Both catalysts were supported on commercial CeO{sub 2} as well as mixed oxide Zr{sub 0.1}(Ce{sub 0.75}Pr{sub 0.25}){sub 0.9}O{sub 2}. The catalysts were characterized by measuring the oxygen storage capacities (OSC), BET, XRD, FTIR and chemisorption of hydrogen. In addition, the effect of sintering (treatments under H{sub 2}) was compared with both of the catalysts. The comparison of the results showed that initial intrinsic activity of ruthenium is not significantly influenced by the type of the support, which is contrast to platinum. Furthermore, the particle size of Ru had an important effect on CWAO activity: the higher the particle size, the better the activity. This was different with Pt-catalysts, where the optimal particle size was smaller, having about 15% of metal dispersion.

  16. Analytical aspects of the remediation of soil by wet oxidation - Characterisation of tar contaminants and their degradation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Nielsen, T.; Plöger, A.;

    1999-01-01

    Wet oxidation of tar compounds gives rise to a wide range of products. Due to the incorporation of oxygen, these products become increasingly more water soluble and the analytical strategy has to take into account the different physical/chemicalproperties of the compounds. An interplay between gas...

  17. [Quantitative and qualitative analysis of total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in Buji River in wet season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-mei; Bai, Jiao-jiao; Sun, Wei-ling; Shao, Jun

    2012-08-01

    Microbial community structure and biomass in river water can reflect the situation of water quality in some extent. Nitrogen removal was mainly achieved by the nitrification and denitrification processes, and ammonia oxidation catalyzed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To explore the AOB community structure and biomass in nitrogen polluted river, water samples were collected from Buji River (Shenzhen) in wet season. Quantification of 16S rRNA copy numbers of total bacteria and AOB were performed by real-time PCR, and the microbial community structures were studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that the number of total bacterial 16S rRNA changed from 4.73 x 10(10) - 3.90 x 10(11) copies x L(-1) in the water samples. The copy numbers of AOB varied from 5.44 x 10(6) - 5.96 x 10(8)copies x L(-1). Redundancy discrimination analysis (RDA) showed that the main factors affecting the structure and the numbers of bacteria were different. For total bacteria, nitrate influenced the biomass significantly (P analysis showed that water pollution in downstream resulted in evident difference in microbial community structure between upstream and downstream water samples.

  18. Process study of polycyanate resin for wet-filament wound high-strength composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    Polycyanate (or cyanate ester) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14 polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. T1000G/RS-14 composite cylinders were wet-wound and cured using different process schedules and then evaluated for hoop tensile strength and modulus, transverse flexural strength and short beam shear strength. The results of material characterization tests performed on the T1000G carbon fiber and RS-14 resin constituents used in this study are also presented.

  19. Differential photoacoustic cell to study the wetting process during porous silicon formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Edificio de Posgrado, Coyoacan, CP 04530, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Velazquez-Hernandez, Ruben [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Cerro de las Campanas, CP 76010, Queretaro, Qro (Mexico); Petricioli-Carranco, Julio; Quintero-Torres, Rafael; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario Enrique [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    This paper shows the in-situ study of the wetting process in Silicon during anodization process using an electrochemical Differential photoacoustic Cell (DPC). The Photoacoustic amplitude and phase signals were obtained for samples in air, ethanol, ethanol/HF and finally air. According to these results ethanol is responsible for a mechanical contact reducing the superficial tension and ethanol/HF produce the removing of the SiO{sub x} and SiO{sub 2}species on the Silicon surface. It was found that the DPC is a powerful technique to study the wet surface before the formation of the porous silicon layer (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  1. Solid waste management practices in wet coffee processing industries of Gidabo watershed, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsido, Mihret D; Li, Meng

    2016-07-01

    The financial and social contributions of coffee processing industries within most coffee export-based national economies like Ethiopia are generally high. The type and amount of waste produced and the waste management options adopted by these industries can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the solid waste management options adopted in wet coffee processing industries in the Gidabo watershed of Ethiopia. A field observation and assessment were made to identify whether the operational characteristics of the industries have any effect on the waste management options that were practiced. The investigation was conducted on 125 wet coffee processing industries about their solid waste handling techniques. Focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, key informant interview and transect walks are some of the tools employed during the investigation. Two major types of wastes, namely hull-bean-pulp blended solid waste and wastewater rich in dissolved and suspended solids were generated in the industries. Wet mills, on average, released 20.69% green coffee bean, 18.58% water and 60.74% pulp by weight. Even though these wastes are rich in organic matter and recyclables; the most favoured solid waste management options in the watershed were disposal (50.4%) and industrial or household composting (49.6%). Laxity and impulsive decision are the driving motives behind solid waste management in Gidabo watershed. Therefore, to reduce possible contamination of the environment, wastes generated during the processing of red coffee cherries, such as coffee wet mill solid wastes, should be handled properly and effectively through maximisation of their benefits with minimised losses.

  2. Fatty acid composition of maize germ oil from high-oil hybrids wet-milling processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Petar Lj.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize germ was obtained by wet-milling laboratory processing of domestic high-oil maize hybrids. After separation, the germ was subjected to extraction of maize oil. Fatty acid composition of maize germ oil was determined by gas chromatography. The results showed very high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and a constant sum of oleic and linoleic acids in oils of different maize hybrids.

  3. Effect of wet oxidation on the fingerprints of polymeric substances from an activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, José Luis; Collado, Sergio; Oulego, Paula; Díaz, Mario

    2016-11-15

    Thermal pre-treatments of activated sludge involve the release of a high amount of polymeric substances into the bulk medium. The molecular size of these polymers will largely define the subsequent biological treatment of the liquid effluent generated. In this work, the effects of wet oxidation treatment (WO) on the fingerprints of the polymeric substances which compose the activated sludge, were analysed. For a better understanding of these transformations, the sludge was separated into its main fractions: soluble microbial products (SMP), loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS), tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS) and naked cells, and then each one was subjected to WO separately (190 °C and 65 bar), determining the fingerprints evolution by size exclusion technique. Results revealed a fast degradation of larger molecules (over 500 kDa) during the first minutes of treatment (40 min). WO also increases the absorptive properties of proteins (especially for 30 kDa), which is possibly due to the hydroxylation of phenylalanine amino acids in their structure. WO of naked cells involved the formation of molecules between 23 and 190 kDa, which are related to the release of cytoplasmic polymers, and more hydrophobic polymers, probably from the cell membrane. The results allowed to establish a relationship between the location of polymeric material and its facility to become oxidised; thus, the more internal the polymeric material in the cell, the easier its oxidation. When working directly with the raw sludge, hydrolysis mechanisms played a key role during the starting period. Once a high degree of solubilisation was reached, the molecules were rapidly oxidised into other compounds with refractory characteristics. The final effluent after WO showed almost 90% of low molecular weight solubilised substances (0-35 kDa).

  4. Anaerobic treatability of liquid residue from wet oxidation of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanza, Giorgio; Galessi, Raniero; Menoni, Laura; Pedrazzani, Roberta; Salvetti, Roberta; Zanaboni, Sabrina

    2015-05-01

    Wet Oxidation (WO) of sewage sludge is a chemical oxidation of sludge at high temperatures and pressures by means of an oxygen-containing gas. The liquid stream originated by WO is easily biodegradable, and therefore, the recirculation to the biological Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) may be a feasible solution. However, the WO effluent has a residual organic and nitrogen content so that its treatment may be required when the receiving WWTP has no surplus treatment capacity left. The aim of this research was the assessment of the anaerobic treatability of the WO liquid residue, in order to reduce the organic load to be recirculated to the WWTP, simultaneously promoting energy recovery. For this purpose, the liquid residue obtained during full scale WO tests on two different types of sludge was submitted to anaerobic digestion in a continuous flow pilot reactor (V = 5 L). Furthermore, batch tests were carried out in order to evaluate possible inhibition factors. Experimental results showed that, after the start-up/acclimation period (~130 days), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal efficiency was stably around 60% for about 120 days, despite the change in operating conditions. In the last phase of the experimental activity, COD removal reached 70% under the following treatment conditions: Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) = 20 days, Volumetric Organic Loading Rate (VOLR) = 0.868 kg COD/m(3)/day, Organic Loading Rate per Volatile Suspended Solids (OLRvss) = 0.078 kg COD/kg VSS/day, temperature (T) = 36.5 °C, pH = 8. Energy balance calculation demonstrated anaerobic treatment sustainability.

  5. Low adhesion, non-wetting phosphonate self-assembled monolayer films formed on copper oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, E; DeRose, J A; Bhushan, B; Hipps, K W

    2009-07-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films have been formed on oxidized copper (Cu) substrates by reaction with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecylphosphonic acid (PFDP), octadecylphosphonic acid (ODP), decylphosphonic acid (DP), and octylphosphonic acid (OP) and then investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement (CAM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The presence of alkyl phosphonate molecules, PFDP, ODP, DP, and OP, on Cu were confirmed by CAM and XPS analysis. No alkyl phosphonate molecules were seen by XPS on unmodified Cu as a control. The PFDP/Cu and ODP/Cu SAMs were found to be very hydrophobic having water sessile drop static contact angles of more than 140 degrees , while DP/Cu and OP/Cu have contact angles of 119 degrees and 76 degrees , respectively. PFDP/Cu, ODP/Cu, DP/Cu, and OP/Cu SAMs were studied by friction force microscopy, a derivative of AFM, to better understand their micro/nanotribological properties. PFDP/Cu, ODP/Cu, and DP/Cu had comparable adhesive force, which is much lower than that for unmodified Cu. ODP/Cu had the lowest friction coefficient followed by PFDP/Cu, DP/Cu, and OP/Cu while unmodified Cu had the highest. XPS data gives some indication that a bidentate bond forms between the alkyl phosphonate molecules and the oxidized Cu surface. Hydrophobic phosphonate SAMs could be useful as corrosion inhibitors in micro/nanoelectronic devices and/or as promoters for anti-wetting, low adhesion surfaces.

  6. Supported noble metal catalysts in the catalytic wet air oxidation of industrial wastewaters and sewage sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, M; Descorme, C; Bernardi, M; Gallezot, P; di Gregorio, F; Grosjean, N; Minh, D Pham; Pintar, A

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews some catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) investigations of industrial wastewaters over platinum and ruthenium catalysts supported on TiO2 and ZrO2 formulated to be active and resistant to leaching, with particular focus on the stability of the catalyst. Catalyst recycling experiments were performed in batch reactors and long-term stability tests were conducted in trickle-bed reactors. The catalyst did not leach upon treatment of Kraft bleaching plant and olive oil mill effluents, and could be either recycled or used for long periods of time in continuous reactors. Conversely, these catalysts were rapidly leached when used to treat effluents from the production of polymeric membranes containing N,N-dimethylformamide. The intermediate formation of amines, such as dimethylamine and methylamine with a high complexing capacity for the metal, was shown to be responsible for the metal leaching. These heterogeneous catalysts also deactivated upon CWAO of sewage sludges due to the adsorption of the solid organic matter. Pre-sonication of the sludge to disintegrate the flocs and improve solubility was inefficient.

  7. Catalytic wet oxidation of the pretreated synthetic pulp and paper mill effluent under moderate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anurag; Mishra, I M; Chand, Shri

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) was investigated for the destruction of organic pollutants in the thermally pretreated effluent from a pulp and paper mill under moderate temperature and pressure conditions. The thermal pretreatment studies were conducted at atmospheric pressure and 368K using copper sulfate as a catalyst. The thermal pretreatment reduced COD by about 61%. The filtrate of the thermal pretreatment step was used at pH 8.0 for CWO at 383-443K temperature and a total pressure of 0.85MPa for 4h. Catalysts used for the reaction include copper sulfate, 5% CuO/95% activated carbon, 60% CuO/40% MnO(2), and 60% CuO/40% CeO(2). Maximum COD reduction was found to be 89% during CWO step using 5% CuO/95% activated carbon with a catalyst loading of 8gl(-1) at 443K and 0.85MPa total pressure. Overall COD reduction for the pretreatment and the CWO was found to be 96%. Besides this, 60% CuO/40% CeO(2) catalyst also exhibited the similar activity as that of obtained with 5% CuO/95% activated carbon catalyst at 423K temperature and 0.85MPa total pressure. The pH of the solution during the experimental runs decreases initially due to the formation of carboxylic acid and then increases due to the decomposition of acids.

  8. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Congo red) using modified Y zeolite as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondru, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chand, Shri

    2009-07-15

    The present study explores the degradation of azo dye (Congo red) by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using Fe exchanged commercial Y zeolite as a catalyst. The effects of various operating parameters like temperature, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalyst loading on the removal of dye, color and COD from an aqueous solution were studied at atmospheric pressure. The percent removals of dye, color and COD at optimum pH(0) 7, 90 degrees C using 0.6 ml H(2)O(2)/350 ml solution and 1g/l catalyst was 97% (in 4h), 100% (in 45 min) and 58% (in 4h), respectively. The % dye removal has been found to be less in comparison to % color removal at all conditions, e.g. dye removal in 45 min and at above conditions was 82%, whereas the color removal was 100%. The results indicate that the Fe exchanged Y zeolite is a promising catalyst for dye removal. Fe exchanged catalyst is characterized using XRD, SEM/EDAX, surface area analyzer and FTIR. Though the dye, color and COD removals were maximum at pH(0) 2 but as the leaching of Fe from the catalyst was more in acidic pH range, pH(0) 7 was taken as operating pH due to almost comparable removals as of pH(0) 2 and no leaching of Fe ions.

  9. Wet adhesion of buckypaper produced from oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on soft animal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Andrea; Carru, Giovanna A; D'Ilario, Lucio; Caprioli, Fabrizio; Chiaretti, Massimo; Crisante, Fernanda; Francolini, Iolanda; Piozzi, Antonella

    2013-05-22

    Buckypaper (BP) is the general definition of a macroscopic assembly of entangled carbon nanotubes. In this paper, a new property of a BP film produced from oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes was investigated. In particular, BP shows to be able to promptly and strongly adhere to animal internal soft and wet tissues, as evaluated by peeling and shear tests. BP adhesion strength is higher than that recorded for a commercial prosthetic fabric (sealed to the tissue by fibrin glue) and comparable with that of other reported optimized nanopatterned surfaces. In order to give an interpretation of the observed behavior, the BP composition, morphology, porosity, water wettability, and mechanical properties were analyzed by AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, wicking tests, contact angle, and stress-strain measurements. Although further investigations are needed to assess the biocompatibility and safety of the BP film used in this work, the obtained results pave the way for a possible future use of buckypaper as adhesive tape in abdominal prosthetic surgery. This would allow the substitution of conventional sealants or the reduction in the use of perforating fixation.

  10. Techno-economic and environmental assessment of sewage sludge wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanza, Giorgio; Canato, Matteo; Heimersson, Sara; Laera, Giuseppe; Salvetti, Roberta; Slavik, Edoardo; Svanström, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Today, several technologies and management strategies are proposed and applied in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to minimise sludge production and contamination. In order to avoid a shifting of burdens between different areas, their techno-economic and environmental performance has to be carefully evaluated. Wet oxidation (WO) is an alternative solution to incineration for recovering energy in sewage sludge while converting it to mostly inorganic residues. This paper deals with an experimentation carried out within the EU project "ROUTES". A mass balance was made for a WWTP (500,000 person equivalents) in which a WO stage for sludge minimisation was considered to be installed. Both bench- and full-scale test results were used. Design of treatment units and estimation of capital and operational costs were then performed. Subsequently, technical and economic aspects were evaluated by means of a detailed methodology which was developed within the ROUTES project. Finally, an assessment of environmental impacts from a life cycle perspective was performed. The integrated assessment showed that for the specific upgrade considered in this study, WO technology, although requiring a certain increase of technical complexity at the WWTP, may contribute to environmental and economic advantages. The paper provides guidance in terms of which aspects need a more thorough evaluation in relation to the specific case in which an upgrade with WO is considered.

  11. Pretreatment of corn stover using wet oxidation to enhance enzymatic digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Eniko; Schmidt, Anette S; Réczey, Kati; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is an abundant, promising raw material for fuel ethanol production. Although it has a high cellulose content, without pretreatment it resists enzymatic hydrolysis, like most lignocellulosic materials. Wet oxidation (water, oxygen, mild alkali or acid, elevated temperature and pressure) was investigated to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Six different combinations of reaction temperature, time, and pH were applied. The best conditions (60 g/L of corn stover, 195 degrees C, 15 min, 12 bar O2, 2 g/L of Na2CO3) increased the enzymatic conversion of corn stover four times, compared to untreated material. Under these conditions 60% of hemicellulose and 30% of lignin were solubilized, whereas 90% of cellulose remained in the solid fraction. After 24-h hydrolysis at 50 degrees C using 25 filter paper units (FPU)/g of drymatter (DM) biomass, the achieved conversion of cellulose to glucose was about 85%. Decreasing the hydrolysis temperature to 40 degrees C increased hydrolysis time from 24 to 72 h. Decreasing the enzyme loading to 5 FPU/g of DM biomass slightly decreased the enzymatic conversion from 83.4 to 71%. Thus, enzyme loading can be reduced without significantly affecting the efficiency of hydrolysis, an important economical aspect.

  12. Study of wet etching thin films of indium tin oxide in oxalic acid by monitoring the resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammana, Suelene S., E-mail: ssmammana@abinfo.com.br [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Greatti, Alessandra; Luiz, Francis H.; Costa, Francisca I. da; Mammana, Alaide P. [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Calligaris, Guilherme A.; Cardoso, Lisandro P. [Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, CEP 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mammana, Carlos I.Z.; Engelsen, Daniel den [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-30

    We describe a study on wet etching of thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) using a simple method by monitoring the resistance of the thin film in aqueous solutions of oxalic acid and hydrochloric acid. Generally three different regimes can be distinguished during etching ITO in acids: (1) initial etching, which is slow, (2) a fast etching phase and (3) slow etching stage at the end. These regimes are explained in terms of a porosity–roughness model. This porosity model has been confirmed largely by X-ray reflection measurements at grazing incidence, roughness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A reliable method for monitoring the resistance during etching has been developed. This method is based on a 2-strips measuring jig with a very low series contact resistance. The activation energy of the etch rate of ITO films was found to be 80 ± 5 kJ/mol for oxalic acid and 56 ± 5 kJ/mol for HCl. SEM analyses in the final stage of the etching process indicate an enrichment of Sn in the residual film material. These observations are explained in terms of preferential etching of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. X-ray analyses showed that the density of the ITO film decreased by etching. By adding ferric chloride to the oxalic acid solution we could accelerate the etch rate substantially. - Highlights: • Etching of indium tin oxide thin films by monitoring the resistance. • Oxalic acid has 2–3 times lower etch rate than concentrated HCl. • The etch rate in oxalic acid can be accelerated substantially by adding FeCl{sub 3}. • The proposed etching model for indium tin oxide was confirmed by X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy. • Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy analyses showed preferential etching of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, enriching the film with SnO{sub 2}.

  13. A key process controlling the wet removal of aerosols: new observational evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Sho; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Mori, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The lifetime and spatial distributions of accumulation-mode aerosols in a size range of approximately 0.05–1 μm, and thus their global and regional climate impacts, are primarily constrained by their removal via cloud and precipitation (wet removal). However, the microphysical process that predominantly controls the removal efficiency remains unidentified because of observational difficulties. Here, we demonstrate that the activation of aerosols to cloud droplets (nucleation scavenging) predominantly controls the wet removal efficiency of accumulation-mode aerosols, using water-insoluble black carbon as an observable particle tracer during the removal process. From simultaneous ground-based observations of black carbon in air (prior to removal) and in rainwater (after removal) in Tokyo, Japan, we found that the wet removal efficiency depends strongly on particle size, and the size dependence can be explained quantitatively by the observed size-dependent cloud-nucleating ability. Furthermore, our observational method provides an estimate of the effective supersaturation of water vapour in precipitating cloud clusters, a key parameter controlling nucleation scavenging. These novel data firmly indicate the importance of quantitative numerical simulations of the nucleation scavenging process to improve the model’s ability to predict the atmospheric aerosol burden and the resultant climate forcings, and enable a new validation of such simulations. PMID:27703169

  14. Comparison of torque measurements and near-infrared spectroscopy in characterization of a wet granulation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna Cecilia; Luukkonen, Pirjo; Rantanen, Jukka

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare impeller torque measurements and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in the characterization of the water addition phase of a wet granulation process. Additionally, the effect of hydrate formation during granulation on the impeller torque was investigated...... recorded at-line. The torque and the NIR baseline-corrected water absorbances increased with increasing water content. A plateau in the NIR baseline-corrected water absorbances was observed for wet masses containing MCC. This was at the region of optimal water amount for granulation according to the torque....... In addition, the hydrate formation during granulation affected the granulation liquid requirement. The liquid requirement was different for monohydrate formed during granulation compared to one formed in high relative humidity before the granulation. The results suggest that NIR spectroscopy may be applicable...

  15. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Olsson, L.; Thomsen, A.B.;

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/L sodium carbonate and 12 bar oxygen at 195degreesC) was used as pretreatment method for wheat straw (60 g/L), resulting in a hydrolysate and a cellulosic solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (8 g/L), low......-molecular-weight carboxylic acids (3.9 g/L), phenols (0.27 g/L = 1.7 mM) and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/L). The wet oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present in the hydrolysate, were each tested...

  16. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/l sodium carbonate, and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degreesC) was used for pre-treating wheat straw (60 g/l), resulting in a hemicellulose-rich hydrolysate and a cellulose-rich solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (9 g....../l), aliphatic carboxylic acids (6 g/l), phenols (0.27 g/l or 1.7 mM), and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/l). The wet-oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol yield by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present...

  17. Calculating Soil Wetness, Evapotranspiration and Carbon Cycle Processes Over Large Grid Areas Using a New Scaling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Soil wetness typically shows great spatial variability over the length scales of general circulation model (GCM) grid areas (approx 100 km ), and the functions relating evapotranspiration and photosynthetic rate to local-scale (approx 1 m) soil wetness are highly non-linear. Soil respiration is also highly dependent on very small-scale variations in soil wetness. We therefore expect significant inaccuracies whenever we insert a single grid area-average soil wetness value into a function to calculate any of these rates for the grid area. For the particular case of evapotranspiration., this method - use of a grid-averaged soil wetness value - can also provoke severe oscillations in the evapotranspiration rate and soil wetness under some conditions. A method is presented whereby the probability distribution timction(pdf) for soil wetness within a grid area is represented by binning. and numerical integration of the binned pdf is performed to provide a spatially-integrated wetness stress term for the whole grid area, which then permits calculation of grid area fluxes in a single operation. The method is very accurate when 10 or more bins are used, can deal realistically with spatially variable precipitation, conserves moisture exactly and allows for precise modification of the soil wetness pdf after every time step. The method could also be applied to other ecological problems where small-scale processes must be area-integrated, or upscaled, to estimate fluxes over large areas, for example in treatments of the terrestrial carbon budget or trace gas generation.

  18. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  19. Prevalence of Salmonella in poultry processing environments in wet markets in Penang and Perlis, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Nidaullah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of various Salmonella serotypes in chickens, carcass contact surfaces as well as environmental samples collected from wet markets and small scale processing plant. Materials and Methods: A total of 182 poultry and environmental samples were collected at random on separate occasions from wet markets and small scale processing plant, during the period of October 2014 to July 2015 in Penang and Perlis, Malaysia. The samples were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella using ISO 6579:2002 conventional culture-based method. Presumptive Salmonella colonies were subjected to various biochemical tests (such as triple sugar iron and lysine iron test, serologically confirmed using polyvalent O and H antisera and further serotyped at Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, Perak, Malaysia. Results: Salmonella serotypes were isolated from 161 out of 182 samples (88.46% with 100% prevalence in the whole chicken carcass and chicken cuts - as well as transport crate, cage, drum, knife, chopping board, display table, floor, bench wash water, wash water, and drain water. Salmonella was isolated from 91.67%, 83.33%, and 66.67% of defeathering machines, drain swabs, and apron, respectively. 17 serotypes were isolated in this study with Salmonella Albany (57/161, Salmonella Corvallis (42/161, and Salmonella Brancaster (37/161 being the predominant serovars. Conclusion: The most carcass contact and environmental samples collected along the wet market chicken processing line were consistently contaminated with Salmonella. This indicates that Salmonella has established itself in poultry processing environments by colonizing the surfaces of the equipment and survives in these environments by establishing biofilms. Our results highlight the need of implementing strict hygiene and sanitation standards to reduce the incidence of Salmonella. The prevalence of Salmonella in poultry can be reduced effectively

  20. Al 2O 3 supported Ru catalysts prepared by thermolysis of Ru 3(CO) 12 for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chaoying; Zhao, Peiqing; Chen, Gexin; Hu, Bin

    2011-06-01

    Low loading catalysts Ru/γ-Al 2O 3 and Ru-Ce/γ-Al 2O 3 were prepared by thermolysis of Ru 3(CO) 12 on γ-Al 2O 3. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, XRD and SEM. Two new Ru species (Ru A and Ru B) were detected during the Ru 3(CO) 12 decomposition process due to chemical interaction with the active OH groups on the surface of Al 2O 3 support, and the reduction of them can lead to more dispersed metallic phases. The sample was completely decomposed at 673 K in H 2, and RuO 2 was formed with minor amounts of Ru 0. When the temperature was increased to 773 K to heat the sample, the ratio of Ru 0 to RuO 2 increased. However, after the addition of CeO 2, only RuO 2 was detected on surface. The catalysts exhibited high activities in Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of different organic compounds at high concentration such as isopropyl alcohol, phenol, acetic acids and N,N-dimethylformamide, which is attributed to the better dispersion of Ru particles and the addition of CeO 2 further enhanced number of effectively active sites on the cluster-derived catalyst surface.

  1. Evaluation of wet air oxidation variables for removal of organophosphorus pesticide malathion using Box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgoren, Melike; Gengec, Erhan; Veli, Sevil

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with finding optimum reaction conditions for wet air oxidation (WAO) of malathion aqueous solution, by Response Surface Methodology. Reaction conditions, which affect the removal efficiencies most during the non-catalytic WAO system, are: temperature (60-120 °C), applied pressure (20-40 bar), the pH value (3-7), and reaction time (0-120 min). Those were chosen as independent parameters of the model. The interactions between parameters were evaluated by Box-Behnken and the quadratic model fitted very well with the experimental data (29 runs). A higher value of R(2) and adjusted R(2) (>0.91) demonstrated that the model could explain the results successfully. As a result, optimum removal efficiency (97.8%) was obtained at pH 5, 20 bars of pressure, 116 °C, and 96 min. These results showed that Box-Behnken is a suitable design to optimize operating conditions and removal efficiency for non-catalytic WAO process. The EC20 value of raw wastewater was measured as 35.40% for malathion (20 mg/L). After the treatment, no toxicity was observed at the optimum reaction conditions. The results show that the WAO is an efficient treatment system for malathion degradation and has the ability of converting malathion to the non-toxic forms.

  2. Finite element simulation of dynamic wetting flows as an interface formation process

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows - the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the \\'hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting\\', is discovered where the influence of the capillary\\'s radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where excellent agreement is obtained. Practical recommendations on the spatial resolution required by the numerical scheme for a given set of non-dimensional similarity parameters are provided, and a comparison to asymptotic results available in limiting cases confirms that the code is converging to the correct solution. The appendix gives a user-friendly step-by-step guide specifying the entire implementation and allowing the reader to easily reproduce all presented results, including the benchmark calculations. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Finite Element Simulation of Dynamic Wetting Flows as an Interface Formation Process

    CERN Document Server

    Sprittles, James

    2012-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows -the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the `hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting', is discovered where the influence of the capillary's radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where...

  4. Wet oxidation pre-treatment of woody yard waste: Parameter optimization and enzymatic digestibility for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.

    2004-01-01

    Woody yard waste with high lignin content (22% of dry matter (DM)) was subjected to wet oxidation pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation. The effects of temperature (185-200 degreesC), oxygen pressure (3-12 bar) and addition of sodium carbonate (0-3.3 g per 100 g DM...... biomass) on enzymatic cellulose and hemicellulose (xylan) convertibility were studied. The enzymatic cellulose conversion was highest after wet oxidation for 15 min at 185 degreesC with addition of 12 bars of oxygen and 3.3 g Na2CO3 per 100g waste. At 25 FPU (filter paper unit) cellulase g(-1) DM added......% conversion efficiency was still reached at 15 FPU g(-1) DM. Total carbohydrate recoveries were high (91-100% for cellulose and 72-100% for hemicellulose) and up to 49% of the original lignin and 79% of the hemicellulose could be solubilized during wet oxidation treatment and converted into carboxylic acids...

  5. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate by catalytic wet air oxidation: Assessment of the role of operating parameters by factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2011-08-01

    The wet air oxidation (WAO) of municipal landfill leachate catalyzed by cupric ions and promoted by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effect of operating conditions such as WAO treatment time (15-30min), temperature (160-200°C), Cu(2+) concentration (250-750mgL(-1)) and H(2)O(2) concentration (0-1500mgL(-1)) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was investigated by factorial design considering a two-stage, sequential process comprising the heating-up of the reactor and the actual WAO. The leachate, at an initial COD of 4920mgL(-1), was acidified to pH 3 leading to 31% COD decrease presumably due to the coagulation/precipitation of colloidal and other organic matter. During the 45min long heating-up period of the WAO reactor under an inert atmosphere, COD removal values up to 35% (based on the initial COD value) were recorded as a result of the catalytic decomposition of H(2)O(2) to reactive hydroxyl radicals. WAO at 2.5MPa oxygen partial pressure advanced treatment further; for example, 22min of oxidation at 200°C, 250mgL(-1) Cu(2+) and 0-1500mgL(-1) H(2)O(2) resulted in an overall (i.e. including acidification and heating-up) COD reduction of 78%. Amongst the operating variables in question, temperature had the strongest influence on both the heating-up and WAO stages, while H(2)O(2) concentration strongly affected the former and reaction time the latter. Nonetheless, the effects of temperature and H(2)O(2) concentration were found to depend on the concentration levels of catalyst as suggested by the significance of their 3rd order interaction term.

  6. Artificial Intelligence Tools for Scaling Up of High Shear Wet Granulation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The results presented in this article demonstrate the potential of artificial intelligence tools for predicting the endpoint of the granulation process in high-speed mixer granulators of different scales from 25L to 600L. The combination of neurofuzzy logic and gene expression programing technologies allowed the modeling of the impeller power as a function of operation conditions and wet granule properties, establishing the critical variables that affect the response and obtaining a unique experimental polynomial equation (transparent model) of high predictability (R(2) > 86.78%) for all size equipment. Gene expression programing allowed the modeling of the granulation process for granulators of similar and dissimilar geometries and can be improved by implementing additional characteristics of the process, as composition variables or operation parameters (e.g., batch size, chopper speed). The principles and the methodology proposed here can be applied to understand and control manufacturing process, using any other granulation equipment, including continuous granulation processes.

  7. A quality by design approach to scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    High-shear wet granulation is a complex process that in turn makes scale-up a challenging task. Scale-up of high-shear wet granulation process has been studied extensively in the past with various different methodologies being proposed in the literature. This review article discusses existing scale-up principles and categorizes the various approaches into two main scale-up strategies - parameter-based and attribute-based. With the advent of quality by design (QbD) principle in drug product development process, an increased emphasis toward the latter approach may be needed to ensure product robustness. In practice, a combination of both scale-up strategies is often utilized. In a QbD paradigm, there is also a need for an increased fundamental and mechanistic understanding of the process. This can be achieved either by increased experimentation that comes at higher costs, or by using modeling techniques, that are also discussed as part of this review.

  8. Hydrothermal carbonization of biomass residuals: A comparative review of the chemistry, processes and applications of wet and dry pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reviews chemistry, processes and application of hydrothermcally carbonized biomass wastes. Potential feedstock for the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) includes variety of the non-traditional renewable wet agricultural and municipal waste streams. Pyrolysis and HTC show a comparable calor...

  9. Wet Oxidation of Crude Manure and Manure Fibers: Substrate Characteristics Influencing the Pretreatment Efficiency for Increasing the Biogas Yield of Manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    The biogas yield of manure is typically lower than 25 m3/t due to its low dry matter content and its high ratio of lignocellulosic fibers that are recalcitrant towards anaerobic digestion. A new pre-treatment method – wet oxidation – has been tested for disruption of the lignocellulosic fiber...... structure with subsequent higher degradation efficiencies and methane yields. A screening of crude manure and the separated fiber fraction shows that wet oxidation is more adequate for treatment of high concentrated solid fraction than for crude manure and an increase of 35% in biogas yield can be gained...... from wet oxidation of digested fibers. The wet oxidation treatment of the manure fiber fraction has to be carefully adjusted in order to achieve the highest increase in biogas yield for the manure fiber fraction under low production of inhibiting compounds and low losses of valuable organic matter....

  10. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO2/CeO2 catalyst in a slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process-Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO. A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3, the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl2 and CeCl3 in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO2/CeO2, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130ºC and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed.

  11. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2} catalyst in a slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, A.J. [Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial (INPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: airtonj@inpi.gov.br; Rojas, L.O.A.; Sousa, J.F. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Melo, D.M.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. of Chemistry; Benachour, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE)Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-15

    In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process - Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO). A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3), the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl{sub 2} and CeCl{sub 3} in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130 deg C and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed. (author)

  12. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  13. Role of Bismuth Oxide in Bi-MCo2O4(M=Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) Catalysts for Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Peng-bo; CHENG Tie-xin; ZHUANG Hong; CUI Xiang-hao; BI Ying-li; ZHEN Kai-ji

    2004-01-01

    Two series of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel catalysts were prepared by the decomposition of the corresponding nitrates. The catalysts doped with bismuth oxide exhibit a higher activity in the wet air oxidation of acetic acid than those without dopant bismuth oxide. The catalysts were investigated by XRD, TEM, ESR, UV-DRS and XPS, and the interaction between Co and Bi was studied as well. It has been found that nano-sized bismuth oxide is paved on the surface of cobalt spinel crystal and the structures of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel are still maintained. The shift of the binding energy of Bi4f7/2 is related to the catalytic activity of these catalysts doped with bismuth oxide.

  14. Wet air oxidation of formic acid using nanoparticle-modified polysulfone hollow fibers as gas-liquid contactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Seth R; Muthu, Satish; O'Callaghan, Michael; Lahitte, Jean-Francois; Bruening, Merlin L

    2012-03-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) using membrane contactors is attractive for remediation of aqueous pollutants, but previous studies of even simple reactions such as formic acid oxidation required multiple passes through tubular ceramic membrane contactors to achieve high conversion. This work aims to increase single-pass CWAO conversions by using polysulfone (PS) hollow fibers as contactors to reduce diffusion distances in the fiber lumen. Alternating adsorption of polycations and citrate-stabilized platinum colloids in fiber walls provides catalytically active PS hollow fibers. Using a single PS fiber, 50% oxidation of a 50 mM formic acid feed solution results from a single pass through the fiber lumen (15 cm length) with a solution residence time of 40 s. Increasing the number of PS fibers to five while maintaining the same volumetric flow rate leads to over 90% oxidation, suggesting that further scale up in the number of fibers will facilitate high single pass conversions at increased flow rates. The high conversion compared to prior studies with ceramic fibers stems from shorter diffusion distances in the fiber lumen. However, the activity of the Pt catalyst is 20-fold lower than in previous ceramic fibers. Focusing the Pt deposition near the fiber lumen and limiting pore wetting to this region might increase the activity of the catalyst.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of LiH ceramic pebbles by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Maoqiao; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com; Hong, Ming; Liu, Zhiang; Leng, Jiaxun; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Wenchang

    2014-09-15

    Lithium hydride (LiH) ceramic pebbles, a new potential tritium breeding material in fusion–fission or fusion reactor blanket, were prepared by wet process for the first time. XRD results showed that LiOH, LiOH·H{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}O were found in the surface of LiH pebbles. However, the pure phase of LiH pebbles without cracks could be obtained by paraffin wax coating technique. The average value (a.v.) of the sphericity and the diameter were 1.01 and 0.98 mm, respectively. The LiH pebbles sintered at 450 °C for 3 h under 80 ml/min flowing argon, reached ∼92.3% of the theoretical density, with the grain size of 5.59 μm (a.v.). And the crush load was measured to be 15 N on average. The described wet process exhibited multiple advantages for fabricating LiH pebbles.

  16. Rare earth extraction from wet process phosphoric acid by emulsion liquid membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张利昌; 陈前林; 康超; 马昕; 杨尊良

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of rare earths (RE) during the wet processing of phosphoric acid is very important, the method of emul-sion liquid membrane (ELM) with di(2-ethylhexly) phosphate (D2EHPA) as carrier has the high selectivity while cannot provide a satisfactory extraction rate. Here novel method of emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) using Aniline as carrier to extract RE from the feed solution was proposed. The method could increase the extraction rate of RE in the real sample to 93%. The effects of dif-ferent parameters such as type and concentration of carrier and surfactant, hydrochloric acid concentration, organic to internal phase volume ratio, membrane to external phase volume ratio on extraction of RE3+ were investigated. Quantitative extraction (>93%) of RE3+ was observed with 6 vol.% Aniline and 4 vol.% T154 liquid membrane at external to internal phase volume ratio of 10 for the feed solution. The proposed method of ELM using Aniline as carrier can be expected to provide a practical, efficient, and economical method for extracting RE from phosphate leach solution with high acidity in the industry of wet process phospho-ric acid.

  17. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  18. Wetting and evaporation behaviors of molten Mg-Al alloy drops on partially oxidized {alpha}-SiC substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Laixin [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China); Shen Ping, E-mail: shenping@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China); Zhang Dan; Jiang Qichuan [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} The wetting in the Mg-Al/SiC system was coupled with reaction and evaporation. {yields} The effect of the alloy composition on the wettability was investigated. {yields} Representative wetting stages were identified. {yields} A mechanism for the time-dependent diminishing in the drop volume was proposed. {yields} The interfacial reaction was analyzed based on thermodynamic considerations. - Abstract: The wetting and evaporation behaviors of Mg-Al alloys over a full composition range on partially oxidized polycrystalline {alpha}-SiC substrates were studied in a flowing Ar atmosphere using an improved sessile drop method. The time dependence of the changes in contact angle and drop geometry was monitored and representative wetting stages were identified. The initial contact angles at 1173 K were 100{sup o} for pure Al and 76{sup o} for pure Mg, with the maximum value of 106{sup o} for the 7.6 mol.% Mg-Al alloy. The interfacial reaction and the evaporation of Mg led to the decrease in the apparent contact angle in the spreading stage and their respective contribution was evaluated. After the pinning of the triple line, the decrease in the contact angle resulted from the diminishing drop volume as a consequence of the Mg evaporation. The effects of Mg concentration on the wetting and evaporation behaviors were discussed. A mechanism for the time-dependent diminishing drop volume was proposed in light of the competition between the Mg evaporation and its diffusion from the drop bulk to the surface. Finally, the interfacial reaction was analyzed based on thermodynamic considerations.

  19. The interconnection of wet and dry deposition and the alteration of deposition budgets due to incorporation of new process understanding in regional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, R. L.; Bash, J. O.; Foley, K. M.; Gilliam, R.; Pinder, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Deposition is affected by the chemical and physical processes represented in the regional models as well as source strength. The overall production and loss budget (wet and dry deposition) is dynamically connected and adjusts internally to changes in process representation. In addition, the scrubbing of pollutants from the atmosphere by precipitation is one of several processes that remove pollutants, creating a coupling with the atmospheric aqueous and gas phase chemistry that can influence wet deposition rates in a nonlinear manner. We explore through model sensitivities with the regional Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model the influence on wet and dry deposition, and the overall continental nitrogen budget, of changes in three process representations in the model: (1) incorporation of lightning generated NO, (2) improved representation of convective precipitation, and (3) replacement of the typical unidirectional dry deposition of NH3 with a state of the science representation of NH3 bi-directional air-surface exchange. Results of the sensitivity studies will be presented. (1) Incorporation of lightning generated NO significantly reduces a negative bias in summer wet nitrate deposition, but is sensitive to the choice of convective parameterization. (2) Use of a less active trigger of convective precipitation in the WRF meteorological model to reduce summertime precipitation over prediction bias reduces the generation of NO from lightning. It also reduces the wet deposition of nitrate and increases the dry deposition of oxidized nitrogen, as well as changing (reducing) the surface level exposure to ozone. Improvements in the convective precipitation processes also result in more non-precipitating clouds leading to an increase in SO4 production through the aqueous pathway resulting in improvements in summertime SO4 ambient aerosol estimates.(3) Incorporation of state of the science ammonia bi-directional air surface exchange affects both the dry

  20. Experimental Study on Wax Protective Coating for Wet Deep Silicon Etching Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jian-liang; ULRICH Hilleringmann

    2006-01-01

    In order to protect the finished structures on the front side during deep silicon wet etching processes,the wax coating for double-sided etching process on the wafer is studied to separate the aforementioned structures from the strong aqueous bases. By way of heating and vacuumization, the air bubbles are expelled from the coating to extend the protection duration. The air pressure in the sealed chamber is 0. 026 7 Pa, and the temperature of the heated wafer is 300 ℃. Two kinds of the wax are used, and the corresponding photos of the etched wafer and the protection times are given. In 75 ℃ 10 % KOH solution, the protection duration is more than 8 h.

  1. Mechanistic modelling of fluidized bed drying processes of wet porous granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F.C.; De Beer, Thomas; Gernaey, Krist;

    2011-01-01

    Fluidized bed dryers are frequently used in industrial applications and also in the pharmaceutical industry. The general incentives to develop mechanistic models for pharmaceutical processes are listed, and our vision on how this can particularly be done for fluidized bed drying processes of wet...... will reside in a certain interval. Population Balance Model (ling) (PBM) offers a tool to describe the distribution of particle properties which can be of interest for the application. PBM formulation and solution methods are therefore reviewed. In a fluidized bed, the granules show a fluidization pattern...... Eddy Simulation (LES). Another important aspect of CFD is the choice between the Eulerian–Lagrangian and the Eulerian–Eulerian approach. Finally, the PBM and CFD frameworks can be integrated, to describe the evolution of the moisture content of granules during fluidized bed drying....

  2. Degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution by microwave assisted wet air oxidation using Ni-loaded GAC as catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yao-bin; QUAN Xie; ZHAO Hui-min; CHEN Shuo; YANG Feng-lin

    2005-01-01

    A novel process, microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation(MW-CWO), was applied for the degradation of H-acid( 1-amino8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) in aqueous solution. Ni-loaded granular activated carbon (GAG), prepared by immersion-calcination method, was used as catalyst. The results showed that the MW-CWO process was very effective for the degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution under atmospheric pressure with 87.4% TOC (total organic carbon) reduction in 20 min. Ni on GAC existed in the form of NiO as specified by XRD. Loss of Ni was significant in the initial stage, and then remained almost constant after 20 min reaction. BET surface area results showed that the surface property of GAC after MW-CWO process was superior to that of blank GAC.

  3. Influence of the different oxidation treatment on the performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Wang, Xingang; Yang, Hongwei; Sun, Yu; Liu, Yunxia

    2012-09-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by different oxidants (HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4), H(2)O(2), O(3) and air) have been used as catalysts for the wet air oxidation of phenol. To investigate the effect of the oxidation conditions on the structure of the functionalized MWCNTs, various characterization techniques, e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. The MWCNTs treated with O(3) and H(2)O(2) show higher amounts of oxygen-containing functional groups and carboxylic acid groups, and a weaker acidic nature, in comparison with those treated with other oxidizing agents. All the functionalized MWCNTs exhibit good activity in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. However, the MWCNTs treated with O(3) show the highest activity with desirable stability in comparison with other functionalized MWCNTs, indicating that the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with O(3) is a very promising strategy in synthesizing efficient catalysts for CWAO.

  4. Wet Aerobic Oxidation of Lignin into Aromatic Aldehydes Catalysed by a Perovskite-type Oxide: LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The perovskite-type oxide catalyst LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 was prepared by the sol–gel method, and tested as a catalyst in the wet aerobic oxidation (WAO of lignin into aromatic aldehydes. The lignin conversion and the yield of each aromatic aldehyde were significantly enhanced in the catalytic process, compared with the non-catalyzed process. Moreover, it was shown that the stability of activity and structure of LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 remained nearly unchanged after a series of successive recyclings of the catalytic reactions, indicating it was an efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the conversion of lignin into aromatic aldehydes in the WAO process.

  5. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  6. Ruthenium catalysts supported on high-surface-area zirconia for the catalytic wet oxidation of N,N-dimethyl formamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanglu; Xu, Aihua; He, Yu; Yang, Min; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin

    2008-08-15

    Three weight percent ruthenium catalysts were prepared by incipient-wet impregnation of two different zirconium oxides, and characterized by BET, XRD and TPR. Their activity was evaluated in the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) in an autoclave reactor. Due to a better dispersion, Ru catalyst supported on a high-surface-area zirconia (Ru/ZrO(2)-A) possessed higher catalytic properties. Due to over-oxidation of Ru particles, the catalytic activity of the both catalysts decreased during successive tests. The effect of oxygen partial pressure and reaction temperature on the DMF reactivity in the CWO on Ru/ZrO(2)-A was also investigated. 98.6% of DMF conversion was obtained through hydrothermal decomposition within 300 min at conditions of 200 degrees C and 2.0 MPa of nitrogen pressure. At 240 degrees C and 2.0 MPa of oxygen pressure 98.3% of DMF conversion was obtained within 150 min.

  7. 生化剩余污泥湿式氧化减量机理研究%MECHANISM OF BIOCHEMICAL EXCESS SLUDGE REDUCTION BY WET AIR OXIDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李本高; 孙友; 张超

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of sludge dewater ability is essential to the volume reduction of waste activated sludge (WAS). The wet air oxidation process is used for WAS degradation. It is found that the volatile suspended sludge is decomposed into small molecular organic compounds,such as soluble protein,carbohydrate,short-chain fatty acids and ammonia by wet air oxidation,which improves the sludge dewater ability significantly.%改善污泥脱水性能对大幅减少生化剩余污泥体积意义重大。采用湿式氧化方法对生化剩余污泥进行消解,可将污泥的主要污染物高分子挥发性悬浮物降解,使其转变为水溶性蛋白质、糖、有机酸及氨氮等小分子有机物,使污泥脱水性能得到显著改善而容易脱水。

  8. [Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with Ru/ZrO2-CeO2 catalyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-bing; Zhu, Wan-peng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Shao-xia

    2007-07-01

    Wet air oxidation of phenol with Ru/ZrO2-CeO2 was systematically investigated and results showed that Ru/ZrO2-CeO2 could significantly increase the removal of COD and phenol. At the reaction temperature of 170 degrees C and pressure of 3MPa, about 99% COD and 100% phenol was removed respectively after 120 min. The optimal conditions were: reaction temperature, 170 degrees C; reaction pressure, 3 MPa; catalyst dosage, 5 g/L; agitator speed, 500 r/min. By analyzing intermediates, a simplified scheme of phenol oxidation was brought out. It includes two main steps. The first step is the production of organic acids, which is fast. The second step is the oxidation of organic acid, in which the oxidation of acetic acid is slow. Complete oxidation of acetic acid needs high temperature at which the radicals assault the C-H bond of a carbon and acetic acid is oxidized into carbon dioxide and water through formic acid.

  9. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy....... The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...

  10. Process parameter dependent growth phenomena of naproxen nanosuspension manufactured by wet media milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterlich, A; Laabs, C; Krautstrunk, I; Dengler, M; Juhnke, M; Grandeury, A; Bunjes, H; Kwade, A

    2015-05-01

    The production of nanosuspensions has proved to be an effective method for overcoming bioavailability challenges of poorly water soluble drugs. Wet milling in stirred media mills and planetary ball mills has become an established top-down-method for producing such drug nanosuspensions. The quality of the resulting nanosuspension is determined by the stability against agglomeration on the one hand, and the process parameters of the mill on the other hand. In order to understand the occurring dependencies, a detailed screening study, not only on adequate stabilizers, but also on their optimum concentration was carried out for the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) naproxen in a planetary ball mill. The type and concentration of the stabilizer had a pronounced influence on the minimum particle size obtained. With the best formulation the influence of the relevant process parameters on product quality was investigated to determine the grinding limit of naproxen. Besides the well known phenomenon of particle agglomeration, actual naproxen crystal growth and morphology alterations occurred during the process which has not been observed before. It was shown that, by adjusting the process parameters, those effects could be reduced or eliminated. Thus, besides real grinding and agglomeration a process parameter dependent ripening of the naproxen particles was identified to be a concurrent effect during the naproxen fine grinding process.

  11. The influence of Chromium supplied by tanning and wet finishing processes on the formation of cr(vi in leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Fuck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium used in leather manufacturing can be oxidized from the trivalent to the hexavalent state, causing environmental concerns. In this study, the influence of Cr(III from tanning, deacidification pH, fatliquors, chrome retanning and vegetable retanning on the formation of Cr(VI in leather was analyzed by comparing natural and aged samples. In wet-blue leather, even after aging and in fatliquored leathers that did not suffer the aging process, the presence of Cr(VI was always below the detection limit of 3 mg/kg. Considering the presence of Cr(VI, the supply of chromium during the retanning step had a more significant effect than during the tanning. In the fatliquoring process with sulfites, fish and synthetic fatliquor leather samples contained Cr(VI when aged, and the highest concentration detected was 26.7 mg/kg. The evaluation of Cr(VI formation led to recommendations for regulation in the leather industry.

  12. Oxidation process of lanthanum hexaboride ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Oxidation process of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) ceramic powder was investigated . The LaB6 powder samples were heated continually from room temperature to 1 473 K at a heating rate of 10 K/min by differential scanning calorimetry. The oxidation tests were conducted at different exposure temperatures. The phases and morphologies of the samples before and after exposure were analyzed by XRD and SEM. It was pointed out that before 1 273 K, LaB6 has high oxidation resistant ability, which was due to that the oxide layer hinders the oxygen diffusion from outer to the surface of LaB6 grains. The oxide layer was composed of the transition phases, which were composed of La2O3 and B2O3 formed from the initial oxidation; when the oxidation temperature exceeded 1 273 K, protective layer was destroyed due to the vaporization of liquid B2O3. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction analysis, oxidation process of LaB6 ceramic powder can be described as follows: Before 1 273 K, lanthanum borate,La(BO2)3 was formed on the surface of samples, then lanthanum oxide (La2O3) and boron oxide (B2O3) were present on the surface of samples oxidized when the temperature reached to 1 473 K.

  13. Wet processing and characterization of ZrO2/stainless steel composites: electrical and mechanical perfomance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. López-Esteban

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia/stainless steel composites have been prepared by a wet processing method with metal volume concentration ranging from 15% to 30%. The composites were characterized by electrical and mechanical measurements. The dependence of the electrical properties of these composites with the metal concentration presents a percolative behaviour with a metal-insulator transition, in addition to an increment of the capacity in the neighbourhood of a critical volume concentration. This value was found to be f c = 0.285, which is much higher than the theoretical value for randomly dispersed 3D composites (f c = 0.16. It has been found that the incorporation of stainless steel particles to zirconia matrix, increases the toughness and decreases both the hardness and the flexural strength. The enhancement of toughness is attributed to a crack deflection mechanism as a consequence of a weak ZrO2/stainless steel interface.

  14. Combination of wet irrigation and nitrification inhibitor reduced nitrous oxide and methane emissions from a rice cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Guangbin; Xu, Hua; Ma, Jing

    2016-09-01

    To conserve water resources and guarantee food security, a new technology termed as "wet irrigation" is developed and practiced in rice fields; thus, its impact on radiative forcing derived from nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions merits serious attention. Dicyandiamide (DCD), a kind of nitrification inhibitor, is proposed as a viable means to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emission while enhancing crop productivity. However, little is known about the response of GHG emission and grain yield to DCD application in a rice system under wet irrigation. In these regard, effects of water regime and DCD application on CH4 and N2O emissions, grain yield, global warming potential (GWP), and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from rice fields were studied. For this study, a field experiment, designed: Treatment II (intermittent irrigation), Treatment WI (wet irrigation), Treatment IID (II plus DCD), and Treatment WID (WI plus DCD), was conducted in Jurong, Jiangsu Province, China, from 2011 to 2012. Relative to Treatment II, Treatment WI decreased CH4 emission significantly by 49-71 % while increasing N2O emission by 33-72 %. By integrating CH4 and N2O emissions and grain yield, Treatment WI was 20-28 and 11-15 % lower than Treatment II in GWP and GHGI, respectively. The use of DCD under wet irrigation reduced N2O emission significantly by 25-38 % (p < 0.05) and CH4 emission by 7-8 %, relative to Treatment WI, resulting in a decline of 18-30 % in GWP. Due to the increase in N use efficiency, maximal grain yield (6-7 %) and minimal GHGI (22-34 %) was observed in Treatment WID. These findings indicate that combined application of N fertilizer and DCD is a win-win strategy in water-saving high-yield rice production with less GHG emission.

  15. [Catalytic stability in wet air oxidation of carboxylic acids over ZnFe0.25Al1.75 O4 catalyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-hua; Yang, Min; Du, Hong-zhang; Peng, Fu-yong; Sun, Cheng-lin

    2007-07-01

    Oxalic, formic and acetic acid are main intermediate products in catalytic wet air oxidation process (CWAO). The catalytic activity and stability in CWAO of the three short-chain organic acids over ZnFe0.25Al1.75O4 catalyst were studied. Oxalic acid is the only oxidizable intermediate and the largest amount of Fe leaching is 9.5 mg L(-1) at 160 degrees C during CWAO process. Formic and acetic acid have little influence on Fe leaching. Due to the strong reducible ability of oxalic acid, the amount of Fe leaching is larger in nitrogen atmosphere than that in oxygen atmosphere. Salicylic acid can be also degraded by ZnFe0.25Al1.75O4 catalyst with a high catalytic activity and stability.

  16. The development of a growth regime map for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Jonathan B; Martin, Gary P; Long, David F

    2016-10-15

    The feasibility of a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process has been established and potential advantages identified. Granule growth in the reverse-phase process proceeds via a steady state growth mechanism controlled by capillary forces, whereas granule growth in the conventional process proceeds via an induction growth regime controlled by viscous forces. The resultant reverse-phase granules generally have greater mass mean diameter and lower intragranular porosity when compared to conventional granules prepared under the same liquid saturation and impeller speed conditions indicating the two processes may be operating under different growth regimes. Given the observed differences in growth mechanism and consolidation behaviour of the reverse-phase and conventional granules the applicability of the current conventional granulation regime map is unclear. The aim of the present study was therefore to construct and evaluate a growth regime map, which depicts the regime as a function of liquid saturation and Stokes deformation number, for the reverse-phase granulation process. Stokes deformation number was shown to be a good predictor of both granule mass mean diameter and intragranular porosity over a wide range of process conditions. The data presented support the hypothesis that reverse-phase granules have a greater amount of surface liquid present which can dissipate collision energy and resist granule rebound resulting in the greater granule growth observed. As a result the reverse-phase granulation process results in a greater degree of granule consolidation than that produced using the conventional granulation process. Stokes deformation number was capable of differentiating these differences in the granulation process.

  17. Microstructural evolution of all-wet-processed CIGS films using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Soo; Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Pyo, Sung Gyu [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Seoul, 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Pil [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We report a wet process deposition in order to identify a cost-effective processing scheme for CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers on molybdenum/soda lime glass substrates from a Cu-In-Ga precursor solution. We employed a spin coater at various settings to evaluate the uniformity of the resulting CIGS solar cell layer. After the CIGS precursor film was deposited, we applied a selenization process. In the selenization process, we used a controlled temperature RTA system and compared it to a noncontrolled temperature system. We investigated the morphological properties for different selenization temperature treatments. We used Raman mapping to detect binary compounds and found the binary compound effect on the film. Raman mapping results show that the density of the binary compound in the CIGS layer increased with selenization temperature, and at 600 C, the density of the binary compounds was highest. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Development of wet-proofed catalyst and catalytic exchange process for tritium extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Myung Jae; Son, Soon Hwan; Chung, Yang Gun; Lee, Gab Bock [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center

    1995-12-31

    To apply a liquid phase catalytic exchange(LPCE) process for the tritium extraction from tritiated heavy water, the wet proofed catalyst to allow the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction between liquid water and hydrogen gas was developed. A styrene divinyl benzene copolymer was selected as am effective catalyst support and prepared by suspension copolymerization. After post-treatment, final catalyst supports were dipped in chloroplatinic acid solution. The catalyst support had a good physical properties at a particular preparation condition. The catalytic performance was successfully verified through hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in the exchange column. A mathematical model for the tritium removal process consisted of LPCE front-ended process and cryogenic distillation process was established using the NTU-HTU method for LPCE column and the FUG method for cryogenic distillation column, respectively. A computer program was developed using the model and then used to investigate optimum design variables which affect the size of columns and tritium inventory (author). 84 refs., 113 figs.

  19. Catalytic wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater on ruthenium-based eggshell catalysts in a bubbling bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Sun, Y; Xu, A H; Lu, X Y; Du, H Z; Sun, C L; Li, C

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic wet air of coke-plant wastewater was studied in a bubbling bed reactor. Two types of supported Ru-based catalysts, eggshell and uniform catalysts, were employed. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater, supported Ru uniform catalysts showed high activity for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia/ammonium compounds (NH3-N) removal at temperature of 250 degrees C and pressure of 4.8 MPa, and it has been demonstrated that the catalytic activity of uniform catalyst depended strongly on the distribution of active sites of Ru on catalyst. Compared to the corresponding uniform catalysts with the same Ru loading (0.25 wt.% and 0.1 wt.%, respectively), the eggshell catalysts showed higher activities for CODcr removal and much higher activities for NH3-N degradation. The high activity of eggshell catalyst for treatment of coke-plant wastewater can be attributed to the higher density of active Ru sites in the shell layer than that of the corresponding uniform catalyst with the same Ru loading. It has been also evidenced that the active Ru sites in the internal core of uniform catalyst have very little or no contribution to CODcr and NH3-N removal in the total oxidation of coke-plant wastewater.

  20. Heavy metals in wet method coffee processing wastewater in Soconusco, Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Y; Mejia, G; Mejia-Saavedra, J; Pohlan, J; Sokolov, M

    2007-05-01

    One of the driving forces of the economy in southeast Mexico is agriculture. In Soconusco, Chiapas, coffee is one of the main agricultural products and is traded on the international market. Coffee grown in this region is processed using the wet method in order to be commercialized as green coffee. In the beneficio (coffee processing plant) water is an essential resource which is required in great quantities (Matuk et al., 1997; Sokolov, 2002) as it is used to separate good coffee berries from defective ones, as a method of transporting the coffee berries to the processing machinery, in the elimination of the berry husk from the coffee grains (pulping) and finally in the post-fermentation washing process. This process gives rise to one of the smoothest, high-quality coffees available (Zuluaga, 1989; Herrera, 2002). Currently, many producers in Soconusco are opting for ecological coffee production, which has, among its many criteria, human health and environmental protection (Pohlan, 2005). Furthermore, increasing concern during the past few years regarding the production of food that is free from contaminants such as heavy metals, and recent environmental policies in relation to aquatic ecosystem protection, have given rise to questions concerning the quality of water used in coffee processing, as well as pollutants produced by this agroindustry. Water used in the coffee processing plants originates from the main regional rivers whose hydrological basins stretch from the Sierra Madre mountain range down to the coastal plain. As well as providing water, these rivers also receive the wastewater produced during coffee processing (Sokolov, 2002).

  1. Laboratory-scale dry/wet-milling process for the extraction of starch and gluten from wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneken, P.A.M.; Helmens, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory-scale process is presented for the manufacture of starch and gluten from wheat. Main feature of this process is that whole wheat kernels are crushed dry between smooth rolls prior to wet disintegration in excess water in such way that gluten formation is prevented and fibres can be remo

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  3. Preparation of silica thin films by novel wet process and study of their optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sang-Hyeok; Kim, Nam-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Cha-Won; Yoon, Duck-Ki; Ryu, Bong-Ki

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films have gained considerable attention because of their various industrial applications. For example, SiO2 thin films are used in superhydrophilic self-cleaning surface glass, UV protection films, anti-reflection coatings, and insulating materials. Recently, many processes such as vacuum evaporation, sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and spin coating have been widely applied to prepare thin films of functionally graded materials. However, these processes suffer from several engineering problems. For example, a special apparatus is required for the deposition of films, and conventional wet processes are not suitable for coating the surfaces of substrates with a large surface area and complex morphology. In this study, we investigated the film morphology and optical properties of SiO2 films prepared by a novel technique, namely, liquid phase deposition (LPD). Images of the SiO2 films were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to study the surface morphology of these films: these images indicate that films deposited with different reaction times were uniform and dense and were composed of pure silica. Optical properties such as refractive index and transmittance were estimated by UV-vis spectroscopy and ellipsometry. SiO2 films with porous structures at the nanometer scale (100-250 nm) were successfully produced by LPD. The deposited film had excellent transmittance in the visible wavelength region.

  4. Wetting behavior of Al Si Mg alloys on Si3N4/Si substrates: optimization of processing parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Peña, J. L.; Pech-Canul, M. I.

    2008-06-01

    The wetting behavior of Al Si Mg alloys on Si3N4/Si substrates has been investigated using the sessile drop technique. Based on a Taguchi experiment design, the effect of the following processing parameters on the contact angle (θ) and surface tension (σLV) was studied: processing time and temperature, atmosphere (Ar and N2), substrate surface condition (with and without a silicon wafer), as well as the Mg and Si contents in the aluminium alloy. In nitrogen, non-wetting conditions prevail during the isothermal events while in argon a remarkable non-wetting to wetting transition leads to contact angles θ as low as 11±3° and a liquid surface tension σLV of 33± 10×10-5 kJ/m2. According to the multiple analysis of variance (Manova), the optimum conditions for minimizing the values of θ and σLV are as follows: temperature of 1100 °C, processing time of 90 min, argon atmosphere, no use of a silicon wafer, and the use of the Al-18% Mg-1% Si alloy. A verification test conducted under the optimized conditions resulted in a contact angle of θ=9±3° and a surface tension of σLV=29± 9×10-5 kJ/m2, both indicative of excellent wetting.

  5. Enhancement of dispersion and bonding of graphene-polymer through wet transfer of functionalized graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharif

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion of nanomaterials in polymeric matrices plays an important role in determining the final properties of the composites. Dispersion in nano scale, and especially in single layers, provides best opportunity for bonding. In this study, we propose that by proper functionalization and mixing strategy of graphene its dispersion, and bonding to the polymeric matrix can be improved. We then apply this strategy to graphene-epoxy system by amino functionalization of graphene oxide (GO. The process included two phase extraction, and resulted in better dispersion and higher loading of graphene in epoxy matrix. Rheological evaluation of different graphene-epoxy dispersions showed a rheological percolation threshold of 0.2 vol% which is an indication of highly dispersed nanosheets. Observation of the samples by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM, showed dispersion homogeneity of the sheets at micro and nano scales. Study of graphene-epoxy composites showed good bonding between graphene and epoxy. Mechanical properties of the samples were consistent with theoretical predictions for ideal composites indicating molecular level dispersion and good bonding between nanosheets and epoxy matrix.

  6. Wet oxidation of glycerol into fine organic acids: catalyst selection and kinetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. N. Brainer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid phase oxidation of glycerol was performed producing fine organic acids. Catalysts based on Pt, Pd and Bi supported on activated carbon were employed to perform the conversion of glycerol into organic acids at 313 K, 323 K and 333 K, under atmospheric pressure (1.0 bar, in a mechanically agitated slurry reactor (MASR. The experimental results indicated glycerol conversions of 98% with production of glyceric, tartronic and glycolic acids, and dihydroxyacetone. A yield of glyceric acid of 69.8%, and a selectivity of this compound of 70.6% were reached after 4 h of operation. Surface mechanisms were proposed and rate equations were formulated to represent the kinetic behavior of the process. Selective formation of glyceric acid was observed, and the kinetic parameter values indicated the lowest activation energy (38.5 kJ/mol for its production reaction step, and the highest value of the adsorption equilibrium constant of the reactant glycerol (10-4 dm³/mol.

  7. Surface Oxidation Study of Uranium Dioxide Under Wet and Dry Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    oxygen [ Colmenares , 1984]. This oxidation rate has been reported in the time frame of minutes to hours. During the preparation of the UO2 powder...Science (Seventh Edition). Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1997. Colmenares , C., Oxidation Mechanisms and Catalytic Properties of the Actinides, Progress in

  8. Direct synthesis of nanocrystalline oxide powders by wet-chemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Srdić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent period there is a great need for increasing the knowledge of tailoring the innovative procedures for the synthesis of electroceramic nanopowders and materials with improved quality for specific application. In order to produce electroceramics with desirable microstructure and properties, synthesis of stoichiometric, ultra-fine and agglomerate free powders with narrow size distributions is one of the most important steps. Within this scope, in the present paper we summarize our recent results on direct synthesis of some important perovskites and ferrites nanopowders by wet-chemical techniques.

  9. Assessment of methane emission and oxidation at Air Hitam Landfill site cover soil in wet tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Elfithri, Rahmah

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH₄) emissions and oxidation were measured at the Air Hitam sanitary landfill in Malaysia and were modeled using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change waste model to estimate the CH₄ generation rate constant, k. The emissions were measured at several locations using a fabricated static flux chamber. A combination of gas concentrations in soil profiles and surface CH₄ and carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions at four monitoring locations were used to estimate the CH₄ oxidation capacity. The temporal variations in CH₄ and CO₂ emissions were also investigated in this study. Geospatial means using point kriging and inverse distance weight (IDW), as well as arithmetic and geometric means, were used to estimate total CH₄ emissions. The point kriging, IDW, and arithmetic means were almost identical and were two times higher than the geometric mean. The CH₄ emission geospatial means estimated using the kriging and IDW methods were 30.81 and 30.49 gm(−2) day(−1), respectively. The total CH₄ emissions from the studied area were 53.8 kg day(−1). The mean of the CH₄ oxidation capacity was 27.5 %. The estimated value of k is 0.138 year(−1). Special consideration must be given to the CH₄ oxidation in the wet tropical climate for enhancing CH₄ emission reduction.

  10. Kinetics of Passive Oxidation of Hi-Nicalon-S SiC Fibers in Wet Air: Relationships between Si02 Scale Thickness, Crystallization, and Fiber Strength (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    crystallize to cristobalite and tridymite in 100 hours at 1000°C or in one hour at 1300°C. Crystallization kinetics for oxidation in wet air were...measured by TEM. Oxidation initially produces an amorphous scale that starts to crystallize to cristobalite and tridymite in 100 hours at 1000°C or in...using reflected light interference fringes observed by optical microscopy. Cross-sectional TEM specimens were prepared from oxidized fibers by

  11. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  12. Neutral wetting brush layers for block copolymer thin films using homopolymer blends processed at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresoli, M; Palermo, M; Ferrarese Lupi, F; Seguini, G; Perego, M; Zuccheri, G; Phadatare, S D; Antonioli, D; Gianotti, V; Sparnacci, K; Laus, M

    2015-10-16

    Binary homopolymer blends of two hydroxyl-terminated polystyrene (PS-OH) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-OH) homopolymers (Mn ∼ 16000 g mol(-1)) were grafted on SiO2 substrates by high-temperature (T > 150 °C), short-time (t layer was tested to screen preferential interactions of the SiO2 substrate with the different symmetric and asymmetric PS-b-PMMA block copolymers deposited on top of the grafted molecules. By properly adjusting the blend composition and the processing parameters, an efficient surface neutralization path was identified, enabling the formation, in the block copolymer film, of homogeneous textures of lamellae or cylinders perpendicularly oriented with respect to the substrate. A critical interplay between the phase segregation of the homopolymer blends and their grafting process on the SiO2 was observed. In fact, the polar SiO2 is preferential for the PMMA-rich phase that forms a homogeneous layer on the substrate, while the PS-rich phase is located at the polymer-air interface. During the thermal treatment, phase segregation and grafting proceed simultaneously. Complete wetting of the PS rich phase on the PMMA rich phase leads to the formation of a PS/PMMA bilayer. In this case, the progressive diffusion of PS chains toward the polymer-SiO2 interface during the thermal treatment allows tuning of the brush layer composition.

  13. Scale-up from batch to flow-through wet milling process for injectable depot formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehocký, Róbert; Pěček, Daniel; Štěpánek, František

    2016-12-01

    Injectable depot formulations are aimed at providing long-term sustained release of a drug into systemic circulation, thus reducing plasma level fluctuations and improving patient compliance. The particle size distribution of the formulation in the form of suspension is a key parameter that controls the release rate. In this work, the process of wet stirred media milling (ball milling) of a poorly water-soluble substance has been investigated with two main aims: (i) to determine the parametric sensitivity of milling kinetics; and (ii) to develop scale-up methodology for process transfer from batch to flow-through arrangement. Ball milling experiments were performed in two types of ball mills, a batch mill with a 30ml maximum working volume, and a flow-through mill with a 250ml maximum working volume. Milling parameters were investigated in detail by methodologies of QbD to map the parametric space. Specifically, the effects of ball size, ball fill level, and rpm on the particle breakage kinetics were systematically investigated at both mills, with an additional parameter (flow-rate) in the case of the flow-through mill. The breakage rate was found to follow power-law kinetics with respect to dimensionless time, with an asymptotic d50 particle size in the range of 200-300nm. In the case of the flow-through mill, the number of theoretical passes through the mill was found to be an important scale-up parameter.

  14. Double-layer optical fiber coating analysis in MHD flow of an elastico-viscous fluid using wet-on-wet coating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeeshan; Islam, Saeed; Shah, Rehan Ali; Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Bonyah, Ebenezer; Jan, Bilal; Khan, Aurangzeb

    Modern optical fibers require a double-layer coating on the glass fiber in order to provide protection from signal attenuation and mechanical damage. The most important plastic resins used in wires and optical fibers are plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and low and high density polyethylene (LDPE/HDPE), nylon and Polysulfone. One of the most important things which affect the final product after processing is the design of the coating die. In the present study, double-layer optical fiber coating is performed using melt polymer satisfying Oldroyd 8-constant fluid model in a pressure type die with the effect of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD). Wet-on-wet coating process is applied for double-layer optical fiber coating. The coating process in the coating die is modeled as a simple two-layer Couette flow of two immiscible fluids in an annulus with an assigned pressure gradient. Based on the assumptions of fully developed laminar and MHD flow, the Oldroyd 8-constant model of non-Newtonian fluid of two immiscible resin layers is modeled. The governing nonlinear equations are solved analytically by the new technique of Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). The convergence of the series solution is established. The results are also verified by the Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). The effect of important parameters such as magnetic parameter Mi , the dilatant constant α , the Pseodoplastic constant β , the radii ratio δ , the pressure gradient Ω , the speed of fiber optics V , and the viscosity ratio κ on the velocity profiles, thickness of coated fiber optics, volume flow rate, and shear stress on the fiber optics are investigated. At the end the result of the present work is also compared with the experimental results already available in the literature by taking non-Newtonian parameters tends to zero.

  15. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms.

  16. Carbon isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in fresh and saline (NaCl) water via continuous flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy following wet chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher H; Thomas, Burt; Saad, Nabil; Thordsen, James J; Kharaka, Yousif K

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the performance and limitations of a wet chemical oxidation carbon analyser interfaced with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (WCO-CRDS) in a continuous flow (CF) configuration for measuring δ(13)C of dissolved organic carbon (δ(13)C-DOC) in natural water samples. Low-chloride matrix (oxidation despite using high-concentration oxidant, extended reaction time, or post-wet chemical oxidation gas-phase combustion. However, through a combination of dilution, chloride removal, and increasing the oxidant:sample ratio, high-salinity samples with sufficient DOC (>22.5 µg C/aliquot) may be analysed. The WCO-CRDS approach requires more total carbon (µg C/aliquot) than conventional CF-isotope ratio mass spectrometer, but is nonetheless applicable to a wide range of DOC concentration and water types, including brackish water, produced water, and basinal brines.

  17. Tailoring Wet Explosion Process Parameters for the Pretreatment of Cocksfoot Grass for High Sugar Yields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2013-01-01

    The pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is crucial for efficient subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. In this study, wet explosion (WEx) pretreatment was applied to cocksfoot grass and pretreatment conditions were tailored for maximizing the sugar yields using response...

  18. Kinetic parameters of biomass growth in a UASB reactor treating wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Milton Montenegro Campos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the treatment of wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP in an anaerobic treatment system at a laboratory scale. The system included an acidification/equalization tank (AET, a heat exchanger, an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASB, a gas equalization device and a gas meter. The minimum and maximum flow rates and volumetric organic loadings rate (VOLR were 0.004 to 0.037 m 3 d -1 and 0.14 to 20.29 kgCOD m -3 d -1 , respectively. The kinetic parameters measured during the anaerobic biodegradation of the WCWP, with a minimal concentration of phenolic compounds of 50 mg L - ¹, were: Y = 0.37 mgTVS (mgCODremoved -1 , Kd = 0.0075 d-1 , Ks = 1.504mg L -1 , μmax = 0.2 d -1 . The profile of sludge in the reactor showed total solids (TS values from 22,296 to 55,895 mg L -1 and TVS 11,853 to 41,509 mg L -1 , demonstrating a gradual increase of biomass in the reactor during the treatment, even in the presence of phenolic compounds in the concentration already mentioned.

  19. Determination of sulfate in the wet-process of phosphoric acid by reverse flow injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method based on reverse flow injection is proposed for determining sulfate concentration in the wet-process of phosphoric acid (WPA. The effect of reagent composition, flow rate, temperature, acid concentration, length of the reaction coil, and linear response range on the flow system is discussed in detail. Optimal conditions are established for determining sulfate in the WPA samples. Baseline drift is avoided by a periodic washing step with EDTA in an alkaline medium. A linear response is observed within a range of 20 - 360 mg L-1, given by the equation A = 0.0020C (mg L-1 + 0.0300, R² = 0.9991. The detection limit of the proposed method for sulfate analysis is 3 mg L-1, and the relative standard deviation (n = 12 of sulfate absorbance peak is less than 1.60%. This method has a rate of up to 29 samples per hour, and the results compare well with those obtained with gravimetric method.

  20. NASA Ames Environmental Sustainability Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Ames Environmental Sustainability Report is the second in a series of reports describing the steps NASA Ames Research Center has taken toward assuring environmental sustainability in NASA Ames programs, projects, and activities. The Report highlights Center contributions toward meeting the Agency-wide goals under the 2011 NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Program.

  1. Photocatalytic activities of wet oxidation synthesized ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 thick porous films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruiqun; Han, Jie; Yan, Xiaodong; Zou, Chongwen; Bian, Jiming; Alyamani, Ahmed; Gao, Wei

    2011-05-01

    Highly porous zinc oxide (ZnO) film was produced by using reactive magnetron sputtering zinc target followed by wet oxidation. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was mixed to the porous films by using either TiO2 target magnetron sputter deposition or sol-spin method. The film thickness could reach 50 μm with uniform porosity. On the sputtering prepared ZnO-TiO2 film surface, fine nanorods with small anatase TiO2 nano-clusters on the tips were observed by SEM and TEM, and the titanium (Ti) composition was determined by XPS as 0.37%. The sol-spin treatment could increase the Ti composition to 4.9%, with reduced pore size compared to the untreated ZnO porous film. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the Ti containing porous film has strong ultraviolet-visible light emission. In the photo-catalysis testing, ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 have similar photo-catalysis activity under 365 nm UV irradiation, but under visible light, the photocatalysis activities of ZnO-TiO2 films were twice higher than that of ZnO porous film, implying promising applications of this porous oxide composite for industrial and dairy farm wastewater treatment.

  2. Effect of Composition and Mass Ratio on the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Catalyst Cu–Fe–La/FSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO technology is used for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater and also for investigating the catalyst performance indicators such as catalyst activity and stability. The catalyst activity is mainly reflected from the water decolorization and CODCr removal rates, and the stability of the catalyst is mainly reflected by the quantity of metal dissolution. The experimental results showed that the prepared Cu–Fe–La/FSC catalyst with a 1:1:2 ratio of Cu–Fe–La by the impregnation method exhibited good activity for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater by the CWAO method, and the decolorization and CODCr removal rates using this catalyst were 98.7% and 78.6%, respectively, with a higher catalytic activity, lower concentration of metal dissolution, and good stability.

  3. Wet air oxidation pretreatment of biomethanated distillery effluent: mapping pretreatment efficiency in terms color, toxicity reduction and biogas generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarat Chandra, T; Malik, S N; Suvidha, G; Padmere, M L; Shanmugam, P; Mudliar, S N

    2014-04-01

    The effluents from molasses-based distilleries after biomethanation are beset with problems of intensified dark brown color, high residual COD, low biodegradability index (BOD/COD ratio Wet air oxidation (WAO) pretreatment of biomethanated distillery effluent resulted in substantial enhancement in the biodegradability index (BI) (up to 0.8). WAO pretreated effluent on anaerobic digestion indicated favorable biogas generation with methane content up to 64% along with concomitant COD reduction up to 54.75%. The HPLC analysis indicated that the pretreatment facilitated degradation of major color containing compounds-namely melanoidins, up to 97.8%. The pretreated effluent with enhanced biodegradability along with substantially reduced color also indicated positive effect on seed germination (up to 100%), implying toxicity reduction of the effluent post WAO pretreatment.

  4. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, Henrik B.

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops....... The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...... oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy...

  5. Development of the Monolith Froth Reactor for Catalytic Wet Oxidation of CELSS Model Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Martin; Fisher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of acetic acid, used as a model compound for the treatment of CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System) waste, was carried out in the monolith froth reactor which utilizes two-phase flow in the monolith channels. The catalytic oxidation of acetic acid was carried out over a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst, prepared at The University of Tulsa, at temperatures and pressures below the critical point of water. The effect of externally controllable parameters (temperature, liquid flow rate, distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate) on the rate of acetic acid oxidation was investigated. Results indicate reaction rate increased with increasing temperature and exhibited a maximum with respect to liquid flow rate. The apparent activation energy calculated from reaction rate data was 99.7 kJ/mol. This value is similar to values reported for the oxidation of acetic acid in other systems and is comparable to intrinsic values calculated for oxidation reactions. The kinetic data were modeled using simple power law kinetics. The effect of "froth" feed system characteristics was also investigated. Results indicate that the reaction rate exhibits a maximum with respect to distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate. Fundamental results obtained were used to extrapolate where the complete removal of acetic acid would be obtained and for the design and operation of a full scale CELSS treatment system.

  6. Advanced oxidation processes: overall models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M. [Univ. de los Andes, Escuela Basica de Ingenieria, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela); Curco, D.; Addardak, A.; Gimenez, J.; Esplugas, S. [Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica. Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Modelling AOPs implies to consider all the steps included in the process, that means, mass transfer, kinetic (reaction) and luminic steps. In this way, recent works develop models which relate the global reaction rate to catalyst concentration and radiation absorption. However, the application of such models requires to know what is the controlling step for the overall process. In this paper, a simple method is explained which allows to determine the controlling step. Thus, it is assumed that reactor is divided in two hypothetical zones (dark and illuminated), and according to the experimental results, obtained by varying only the reaction volume, it can be decided if reaction occurs only in the illuminated zone or in the all reactor, including dark zone. The photocatalytic degradation of phenol, by using titania degussa P-25 as catalyst, is studied as reaction model. The preliminary results obtained are presented here, showing that it seems that, in this case, reaction only occurs in the illuminated zone of photoreactor. A model is developed to explain this behaviour. (orig.)

  7. Wet chemical synthesis of intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals via weak reduction reaction together with UPD process and their excellent electrocatalytic performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiaoli; Zhang, Jiawei; Jia, Yanyan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2014-05-01

    Platinum based alloy nanocrystals are promising catalysts for a variety of important practical process. However, it remains a great challenge to synthesize platinum-based intermetallic compound nanocrystals with well-defined surface structures. In this communication, taking the synthesis of concave cubic intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals with {hk0} facets as an example, we proposed a new synthesis strategy for intermetallic compounds by reduction of noble metal precursors via a slow reduction process and reduction of transition metal ions via an underpotential deposition (UPD) process in wet chemical synthesis. The as-prepared intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals exhibited superior CO poisoning tolerance and high electro-catalytic activity in both methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions in comparison with solid solution Pt3Zn nanocrystals and Pt/C.Platinum based alloy nanocrystals are promising catalysts for a variety of important practical process. However, it remains a great challenge to synthesize platinum-based intermetallic compound nanocrystals with well-defined surface structures. In this communication, taking the synthesis of concave cubic intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals with {hk0} facets as an example, we proposed a new synthesis strategy for intermetallic compounds by reduction of noble metal precursors via a slow reduction process and reduction of transition metal ions via an underpotential deposition (UPD) process in wet chemical synthesis. The as-prepared intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals exhibited superior CO poisoning tolerance and high electro-catalytic activity in both methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions in comparison with solid solution Pt3Zn nanocrystals and Pt/C. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00313f

  8. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-03-31

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is

  9. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(Ⅱ)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; YAN Yongsheng; XU Wanzhen

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(Ⅱ) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed.The hydroquinone wouid be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(Ⅱ)/active carbon catalyst.After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltoas nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(Ⅱ) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon.Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(Ⅱ) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone.Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard.Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(Ⅱ).The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃, pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  10. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  11. Treatment of refractory nano-filtration reject from a tannery using Pd-catalyzed wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Pranav K; Rao, Nageswara N; Chauhan, Chetan; Pophali, Girish R; Kashyap, Sanjay M; Lokhande, Satish K; Gan, Lihua

    2013-10-15

    We attempted catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of nanofiltration (NF)-reject using Pd based catalyst viz., Pd/activated charcoal (AC) and PdCl2 with the objective of degradation of refractory organic pollutants. Refractory organic pollutants in NF-reject before and after WAO and CWAO were confirmed by GC-MS analysis. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of temperature, catalyst dosage and air partial pressure on the rate of removal of total organic carbon (TOC). The reaction kinetics can be conveniently described by considering two-stage first order kinetics. The use of Pd/AC afforded 85% TOC removal, the corresponding rate constant (k) was 2.90 ± 0.075 × 10(-3)min(-1) (Pd/AC, 100mg/L; T, 473.15K; Pair, 0.69 MPa). On the other hand, 75% TOC was removed with k=2.31 ± 0.075 × 10(-3)min(-1) using Pd(2+) catalyst (Pd(2+), 16.66 mg/L; T, 473.15K; Pair, 0.69 MPa). The observed rate of mineralization under Pd-catalyzed conditions was significantly higher than that of the uncatalyzed oxidation (41%) under the similar experimental conditions. Catalyst stability experiments were performed and TEM, SEM, XRD, Raman and XPS characterization data collected. Despite some morphological transformation of support, Pd catalyst was stable under CWAO conditions.

  12. Corn processing method in finishing diets containing wet corn gluten feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, T L; Milton, C T; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Stock, R A

    2003-12-01

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effect of corn processing method on performance and carcass traits in steers fed finishing diets containing wet corn gluten feed (WCGF). In Trial 1, 480 steer calves (303 kg initial BW) were fed eight finishing diets: 1) dry-rolled corn (DRC) without; and 2) with 32% (DM basis) WCGF; 3) steam-flaked corn (SFC) without; and 4) with WCGF; 5) a combination of DRC and SFC without WCGF; 6) finely-ground corn (FGC) with WCGF; 7) high-moisture corn (HMC) with WCGF; and 8) whole corn (WC) with WCGF. Feeding WC + WCGF increased (P < 0.10) DMI and decreased gain:feed compared with all other treatments. Feeding DRC + WCGF increased (P < 0.10) DMI and decreased (P < 0.10) gain:feed compared with treatments other than WC + WCGF. Steers on treatments that included WCGF gained similarly, regardless of corn processing method, and at a rate 6% faster (P < 0.10) than steers fed diets that did not include WCGF. Gain:feed did not differ among steers fed SFC, SFC + WCGF, SFC + DRC, and HMC + WCGF. Steers fed SFC or SFC + WCGF were more efficient (P < 0.10) than steers fed DRC or FGC + WCGF. In Trial 2, 288 steer calves (382 kg initial BW) were fed six finishing diets: 1) DRC without; and 2) with 22% (DM basis) WCGF; 3) SFC without; and 4) with WCGF; 5) finely rolled corn (FRC) with WCGF; and 6) HMC corn with WCGF. Steers fed DRC + WCGF or FRC + WCGF consumed more DM (P < 0.10) than steers fed DRC, SFC, or SFC + WCGF. Feed intake did not differ between steers fed SFC + WCGF and HMC + WCGF. All treatment groups receiving WCGF consumed more DM (P < 0.10) feed than steers fed DRC or SFC without WCGF. Steers fed SFC + WCGF gained 8% faster (P < 0.10), and steers fed DRC 9.5% slower (P < 0.10) than steers receiving all other treatments. Daily gains did not differ among other treatment groups. Steers fed SFC or SFC + WCGF gained 10% more (P < 0.10) efficiently than all other treatment groups. Feed efficiency did not differ among steers fed DRC, DRC

  13. Unprecedented Catalytic Wet Oxidation of Glucose to Succinic Acid Induced by the Addition of n-Butylamine to a Ru(III) Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolean, Iunia; Rizescu, Cristina; Bala, Camelia; Rotariu, Lucian; Parvulescu, Vasile I; Coman, Simona M; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-09-08

    A new pathway for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of glucose is described. Employing a cationic Ru@MNP catalyst, succinic acid is obtained in unprecedently high yield (87.5 %) for a >99.9 % conversion of glucose, most probably through a free radical mechanism combined with catalytic didehydroxylation of vicinal diols and hydrogenation of the resulted unsaturated intermediate.

  14. Wet carbon-based solid acid/potassium permanganate as an efficient heterogeneous reagents for oxidation of alcohols under mild conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arash Shokrolahi; Abbas Zali; Mohammad Hossein Kes

    2008-01-01

    Wet carbon-based solid acid and potassium permanganate were used as new reagents for oxidation of alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in heterogeneous mixtures.The experiments were done moderately at mild condition and high yields in suitable times were obtained.

  15. Using δ15 N- and δ18 O-NO to Evaluate Mechanisms of Nitric Oxide Production Following the Wetting of Dry Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homyak, P. M.; Schimel, J.; Sickman, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    In xeric environments, where soils can remain dry for more than 6 months, abrupt transitions from dry-to-wet conditions produce NO pulses within seconds after soils wet up. During these periods of intense gaseous N production, biological processes (nitrification and denitrification) are known to control NO fluxes, but it is not clear how soil microbes can recover from drought-induced stress within seconds after soils wet up. Are NO pulses immediately following rewetting more so controlled by abiotic NO-producing reactions? Because biotic and abiotic mechanisms can occur simultaneously, distinguishing between these processes can be problematic. To understand the contribution of biotic and abiotic processes to NO pulses, and to better inform biogeochemical models, we measured the δ15N- and δ18O-NO following a field soil rewetting experiment in a California annual grassland. In October, during the end of the dry season, we artificially watered soils and captured NO emissions for up to 15 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, and 3 days after wet-up. Pulses of NO following the wetting of dry soil were explained by a two-component mixing model, where two distinct sources or processes produced NO. Within 15 minutes after soil wet-up, the isotopic composition of soil NO (δ15N =-8.95 ‰, δ18O=14.28 ‰) was similar to that of atmospheric samples (δ15N =-4.45 ‰, δ18O=15.20 ‰), but became increasingly depleted after 1 hour (δ15N =-21.08 ‰, δ18O=0.53 ‰), and more so after 1 day (δ15N =-37.44 ‰, δ18O=-9.45 ‰). After 3 days, the isotopic composition of NO (δ15N =-28.31 ‰, δ18O=-2.07 ‰) began to return to pre-wet-up conditions closely following the two-component mixing line. We conclude that NO-producing reactions immediately after the wetting of dry soil (up to 15 min) are different than those occurring after 1 hour post-wetting. We hypothesize that abiotic processes control the initial response to wetting, but that biological processes, which discriminate

  16. Effects of dry, wet, and rehydrated corn bran and corn processing method in beef finishing diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, C N; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Milton, C T; Stock, R A

    2004-12-01

    Two finishing trials were conducted to determine the effects of adding different types of corn bran, a component of corn gluten feed, on cattle performance. In Trial 1, 60 English crossbred yearling steers (283 +/- 6.7 kg) were used in a completely randomized design with four dietary treatments. Treatments were diets with no corn bran, dry corn bran (86% DM), wet corn bran (37% DM), and rehydrated dry bran (37% DM). Bran was fed at 40% of dietary DM. All finishing diets had (DM basis) 9% corn steep liquor with distillers solubles, 7.5% alfalfa hay, 3% tallow, and 5% supplement. Gain efficiency and ADG were greater (P < 0.01) for cattle fed no corn bran compared with all treatments containing corn bran; however, no differences were detected across corn bran types. In Trial 2, 340 English crossbred yearling steers (354 +/- 0.6 kg) were used in a randomized block design with treatments assigned based on a 2 x 4 + 2 factorial arrangement (four pens per treatment). One factor was the corn processing method used (dry-rolled corn, DRC; or steam-flaked corn, SFC). The other factor was corn bran type: dry (90% DM), wet (40% DM), or dry bran rehydrated to 40 or 60% DM. Bran was fed at 30% of dietary DM, replacing either DRC or SFC. Two control diets (DRC and SFC) were fed with no added bran. All finishing diets contained (DM basis) 10% corn steep liquor with distiller's solubles, 3.5% alfalfa hay, 3.5% sorghum silage, and 5% supplement. Corn bran type did not affect DMI (P = 0.61), ADG (P = 0.53), or G:F (P = 0.10). Dry matter intake was greater (P < 0.01) by steers fed bran compared with those fed no bran, and was greater by steers fed DRC than by steers fed SFC (P < 0.01). Interactions occurred (P < 0.01) between grain source and bran inclusion for ADG and G:F. The ADG by steers fed the SFC diet without bran was greater (P < 0.01) than by steers fed SFC diets with bran, whereas the ADG by steers fed DRC diets with or without bran was similar. Daily gain was 15.2% greater

  17. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  18. Microbial responses and nitrous oxide emissions during wetting and drying of organically and conventionally managed soil under tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M.; Jackson, L.E.; Lundquist, E.J.; Louie, D.T.; Miller, R.L.; Rolston, D.E.; Scow, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    The types and amounts of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) inputs, as well as irrigation management are likely to influence gaseous emissions and microbial ecology of agricultural soil. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) efflux, with and without acetylene inhibition, inorganic N, and microbial biomass C were measured after irrigation or simulated rainfall in two agricultural fields under tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). The two fields, located in the California Central Valley, had either a history of high organic matter (OM) inputs ("organic" management) or one of low OM and inorganic fertilizer inputs ("conventional" management). In microcosms, where short-term microbial responses to wetting and drying were studied, the highest CO2 efflux took place at about 60% water-filled pore space (WFPS). At this moisture level, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) indicative of microbial nutrient availability were elevated and a PLFA stress indicator was depressed, suggesting peak microbial activity. The highest N 2O efflux in the organically managed soil (0.94 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) occurred after manure and legume cover crop incorporation, and in the conventionally managed soil (2.12 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) after inorganic N fertilizer inputs. Elevated N2O emissions occurred at a WFPS >60% and lasted <2 days after wetting, probably because the top layer (0-150 mm) of this silt loam soil dried quickly. Therefore, in these cropping systems, irrigation management might control the duration of elevated N2O efflux, even when C and inorganic N availability are high, whereas inorganic N concentrations should be kept low during times when soil moisture cannot be controlled.

  19. Ames Life Science Data Archive: Translational Rodent Research at Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Alan E.; French, Alison J.; Ngaotheppitak, Ratana; Leung, Dorothy M.; Vargas, Roxana S.; Maese, Chris; Stewart, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Life Science Data Archive (LSDA) office at Ames is responsible for collecting, curating, distributing and maintaining information pertaining to animal and plant experiments conducted in low earth orbit aboard various space vehicles from 1965 to present. The LSDA will soon be archiving data and tissues samples collected on the next generation of commercial vehicles; e.g., SpaceX & Cygnus Commercial Cargo Craft. To date over 375 rodent flight experiments with translational application have been archived by the Ames LSDA office. This knowledge base of fundamental research can be used to understand mechanisms that affect higher organisms in microgravity and help define additional research whose results could lead the way to closing gaps identified by the Human Research Program (HRP). This poster will highlight Ames contribution to the existing knowledge base and how the LSDA can be a resource to help answer the questions surrounding human health in long duration space exploration. In addition, it will illustrate how this body of knowledge was utilized to further our understanding of how space flight affects the human system and the ability to develop countermeasures that negate the deleterious effects of space flight. The Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) includes current descriptions of over 700 experiments conducted aboard the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), NASA/MIR, Bion/Cosmos, Gemini, Biosatellites, Apollo, Skylab, Russian Foton, and ground bed rest studies. Research areas cover Behavior and Performance, Bone and Calcium Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chronobiology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental Monitoring, Gastrointestinal Physiology, Hematology, Immunology, Life Support System, Metabolism and Nutrition, Microbiology, Muscle Physiology, Neurophysiology, Pharmacology, Plant Biology, Pulmonary Physiology, Radiation Biology, Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, and Toxicology. These

  20. Microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation of H-acid in aqueous solution under the atmospheric pressure using activated carbon as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Yazhi; Yang, Fenglin

    2006-09-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is a promising method for the treatment of heavily contaminated wastewater. However, its application is restricted due to severe operation conditions (high pressure and high temperature). A microwave (MW) assisted oxidation method was investigated aiming to treat heavily contaminated wastewater under milder conditions. H-acid (1-amino-8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) was selected as target compound to evaluate the performance of this novel process. The removal of H-acid and TOC (total organic carbon) for H-acid solution of 3000 mg/L reached as high as 92.6% in 20 min and 84.2% in 60 min, respectively under optimal conditions. The existence of activated carbon and oxygen proved to be critical for effective treatment. The activated carbon acted not only as a catalyst for H-acid decomposition, but also as a special material for the absorption of MW energy. Air was supplied to the reactor as an oxygen source at constant flows. The amino group in H-acid was converted ultimately into nitrate, and sulfonic group into sulfate. This observation gave an evidence of H-acid mineralization although other organic intermediates were unable to be determined. The value of BOD(5)/COD (ratio of 5d biochemical oxygen demand to chemical oxygen demand) increased from 0.008 to 0.467 indicating a significant improvement of biodegradability for the solution, which is beneficial for the further biological treatment of the wastewater.

  1. Particle capture processes and evaporation on a microscopic scale in wet filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Braddock, Roger D; Agranovski, Igor E

    2004-11-01

    This paper details results of an experimental study of the capture of solid and liquid aerosols on fibrous filters wetted with water. A microscopic cell containing a single fibre (made from a variety of materials) was observed via a microscope, with a high speed CCD camera used to dynamically image the interactions between liquid droplets, zeolite and PSL particles and fibres. Variable quantities of liquid irrigation were used, and the possibility for subsequent fibre regeneration after clogging or drying was also studied. It was found that drainage of the wetting liquid (water) from the fibres occurred, even at very low irrigation rates when the droplet consisted almost completely of captured particles. It was also found that the fibre was rapidly loaded with captured particles when the irrigation was not supplied. However, almost complete regeneration (removal of the collected cake) by the liquid droplets occurred shortly after recommencement of the water supply. The study also examined the capture of oily liquid aerosols on fibres wetted with water. A predominance of the barrel shaped droplet on the fibre was observed, with oil droplets displacing water droplets (if the oil and fibre combination created a barrel shaped droplet), creating various compound droplets of oil and water not previously reported in literature. This preferential droplet shape implies that whatever the initial substance wetting a filter, a substance with a greater preferential adherence to the fibre will displace the former one.

  2. Chemical and toxicological evaluation of an emerging pollutant (enrofloxacin) by catalytic wet air oxidation and ozonation in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Yediler, Ayfer

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the degradation efficiency of enrofloxacin (ENR) by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) and ozonation. Results obtained by CWAO experiments show that 99.5% degradation, 37.0% chemical oxidation demand (COD) removal and 51.0% total organic carbon (TOC) conversion were obtained when 100 mol% FeCl(3) and 25 mol% NaNO(2) at 150 °C under 0.5 MPa oxygen pressure after 120 min are used. The degradation products are identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). The oxidation end products, F(-), NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) were determined by IC. The BOD(5)/COD ratio as a measure of the biodegradability of the parent compound increased from 0.01 to 0.12 after 120 min of reaction time, indicating an improved biodegradability of the parent compound. The inhibition of bioluminescence of the marine bacteria V. fischeri decreased from 43% to 12% demonstrating a loss in toxicity of ENR during CWAO. Ozonation of 0.2 mM ENR was carried out with an ozone concentration of 7.3 g m(-3) at pH 7. ENR decomposition with a degradation rate of 87% was obtained corresponding to the reaction time. Moderate changes in COD (18%) and TOC (17%) removal has been observed. The bioluminescence inhibition increased from 8% to 50%, due to the generation of toxic degradation products during ozonation. In comparison to the widely use of well developed method of ozonation CWAO exhibits better performance in terms of COD, TOC removals and generates less toxic products.

  3. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwa, Amogh N.; Barron, Troy J.; Davis, Virginia A.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the ‘nanoporous’ structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction-oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m2 (700 ft2) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications.

  4. A wetting experiment as a tool to study the physicochemical processes accompanying the contact of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic materials with aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    In most fields of technological application of superhydrophobic materials, such as protection against corrosion, icing, and capillary condensation, or micro fluidics applications, a superhydrophobic surface has to operate in contact with aggressive aqueous media. Therefore, the peculiarities of behaviour of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces on prolonged contact with water and the mechanisms of possible degradation of superhydrophobicity need to be discussed. In this study, a consideration of the physicochemical processes accompanying the contact of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic materials with water, acid, alkaline and saline aqueous solutions is presented on the basis of experimental data on three-phase equilibrium obtained by the sessile drop method. It is shown that simultaneous analysis of the contact angle and contact diameter of the sessile drop and liquid/vapour surface tension allows one to attribute degradation of the superhydrophobic and hydrophobic state to reversible and irreversible processes such as hydrolysis of hydrophobic molecules, growth of an oxide layer and so on. A method for estimating both the portion of wetted area and the intrinsic wettability state (hydrophobic versus hydrophilic) of texture elements for a heterogeneous wetting regime is proposed and discussed.

  5. Model-based analysis of high shear wet granulation from batch to continuous processes in pharmaceutical production - A critical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Gernaey, Krist; De Beer, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    , aggregation, breakage and consolidation. Further, population balance modelling (PBM) and the discrete element method (DEM), which are the current state-of-the-art methods for granulation modelling at micro- to meso-scale, are discussed. The DEM approach has a major role to play in future research...... reviews modelling and supporting measurement tools for the high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process, which is an important granulation technique due to the inherent benefits and the suitability of this unit operation for the desired switch to continuous mode. For gaining improved insight...... into the complete system, particle-level mechanisms are required to be better understood, and linked with an appropriate meso- or macro-scale model. A brief review has been provided to understand the mechanisms of the granulation process at micro- or particle-level such as those involving wetting and nucleation...

  6. Application of a bio-binder as a rejuvenator for wet processed asphalt shingles in pavement construction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the merits of application of bio-binder to enhance rheological properties of asphalt binder in the presence of wet processed recycled asphalt shingles (RAS). It will further examine the performance and workability of asphalt designed with and without a specified percentage of a bio-binder produced from swine manure and RAS. Bio-binder was introduced to liquid asphalt binder modified with four different percentages of RAS; the high and low temperature properties of each...

  7. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT and Köhler theory (KT to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (of low solubility compounds like calcite present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on a threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  8. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-04-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (of low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on a threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  9. A double stage dry-wet-fermentation process for a fast and safe digestion of different kinds of organic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, G.; Sieber, M.; Buschmann, J.; Burkhardat, M.

    2009-07-01

    The fermentation of organic material is a four-step-process. It is admissible to merge the first two steps (hydrolysis and acidification) to hydrolysis in general and the last two steps (aceto genesis and methano genesis) to methano genesis. The Brandenburg University of Technology in Cottbus has devised a double stage dry-wet-fermentation process for fast and safe anaerobic degradation. Using these processes, it is possible to decompose different kinds of organic material like renewable material (e. g. maize silage), waste (e. g. household-waste) and industrial material (e. g. glycerine). (Author)

  10. ESR ST study of hydroxyl radical generation in wet peroxide system catalyzed by heterogeneous ruthenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rokhina, E.V.; Golovina, E.A.; As, van H.; Virkutyte, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ru-based catalysts gained popularity because of their applicability for a variety of processes, including carbon monoxide oxidation, wet air catalytic oxidation and wastewater treatment. The focus of a current study was generation of hydroxyl radicals in the wet peroxide system catalyzed by heteroge

  11. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, P.; I. N. Sokolik; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water inter...

  12. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-07

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  13. Degradation of cellulose at the wet-dry interface. II. Study of oxidation reactions and effect of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myung-Joon; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2014-01-30

    To better understand the degradation of cellulose upon the formation of a tideline at the wet-dry interface when paper is suspended in water, the production of chemical species involved in oxidation reactions was studied. The quantitation of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals was carried out in reverse phase chromatography using triphenylphosphine and terephthalic acid, respectively, as chemical probes. Both reactive oxygen species were found in the tideline immediately after its formation, in the range of micromoles and nanomoles per gram of paper, respectively. The results indicate that hydroxyl radicals form for the most part in paper before the tideline experiment, whereas hydroperoxides appear to be produced primarily during tideline formation. Iron sulfate impregnation of the paper raised the production of hydroperoxides. After hygrothermal aging in sealed vials the hydroxyl radical content in paper increased significantly. When aged together in the same vial, tideline samples strongly influenced the degradation of samples from other areas of the paper (multi-sample aging). Different types of antioxidants were added to the paper before the tideline experiment to investigate their effect on the oxidation reactions taking place. In samples treated with iron sulfate or artificially aged, the addition of Irgafos 168 (tris(2,4-ditert-butylphenyl) phosphate) and Tinuvin 292 (bis(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate and methyl 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl sebacate) reduced the concentration of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Tinuvin 292 was also found to considerably lower the rate of cellulose chain scission reactions during hygrothermal aging of the paper.

  14. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1).

  15. Low-pressure catalytic wet-air oxidation of a high-strength industrial wastewater using Fenton's reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biçaksiz, Zeliha; Aytimur, Gülin; Atalay, Süheyda

    2008-06-01

    Wastewater from the Afyon Alkaloids Factory (Afyon, Turkey) was subjected to low-pressure catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) using Fenton's reagent, and the optimal reaction conditions were investigated. The CWAO using Fenton's reagent was applied to the factory effluent, diluted factory effluent, and aerobically pretreated wastewater. To find the optimum quantities of reagents, ferrous iron (Fe(+2))-to-substrate ratios of 1:10, 1:25, and 1:50 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-to-Fe(+2) ratios of 1, 5, and 10 were investigated, and the treatment was carried out at different temperatures. High chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals were obtained at 50 degrees C, with the Fe(+2)-to-substrate ratio range between 1:10 and 1:25. The change in H2O2-to-Fe(+2) ratios did not cause any considerable effect. Also, the percentages of COD removals were nearly the same, so the ratio H2O2:Fe(+2):1 is recommended. Aerobic pretreatment seems to be effective. On the other hand, no enhancement was observed in the case of the diluted wastewater.

  16. Resting Study of Tracer Experiment on Catalytic Wet Oxidation Reactor under Micro-gravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ji; JIA Jin-ping

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station(ISS) employs catalytic wet oxidation carried out in a Volatile Reactor Assembly (VRA) for water recycling. Previous earth gravity experiments show that the VRA is very effective at removing polar,low molecular weight organics. To compare the reactor performance under micro-gravity and Earth gravity conditions,a tracer study was performed on a space shuttle in 1999 by using 0. 2% potassium carbonate as the chemical tracer.In this paper, the experimental data were analyzed and it is indicated that the reactor can be considered as a plug flow one under both micro-gravity and earth gravity experimental conditions. It has also been proved that dispersion is not important in the VRA reactor under the experimental conditions. Tracer retardation was observed in the experiments and it is most likely caused by catalyst adsorption. It is concluded that the following reasons may also have influence on the retardation of mean residence time: (1) the liquid can be held by appurtenances, which will retard the mean residence time; (2) the pores can hold the tracer, which can also retard the mean residence time.

  17. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uellendahl, H; Wang, G; Møller, H B; Jørgensen, U; Skiadas, I V; Gavala, H N; Ahring, B K

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops. The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy crops competitive to the use of corn and this combination will make the production of biogas from energy crops more sustainable.

  18. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of aniline in wastewater using copper modified SBA-15 as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Liming; Zhou, Xiang; Yao, Yuan; Jian, Panming; Diao, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    SBA-15 mesoporous molecular sieves modified with copper (Cu-SBA-15) were prepared by pH-adjusting hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis and (29)Si MAS NMR. The pH of the synthesis gel has a significant effect on the amount and the dispersion of copper on SBA-15. The Cu-SBA-15(4.5) (where 4.5 denotes the pH value of the synthesis gel) modified with highly dispersed copper was used as catalyst for the oxidation of aniline by H2O2. The Cu-SBA-15(4.5) shows a higher catalytic activity compared to CuO on the surface of SBA-15. The influences of reaction conditions, such as initial pH of the aqueous solutions, temperature, as well as the dosages of H2O2 and catalyst were investigated. Under weakly alkaline aqueous solution conditions, the aniline conversion, the H2O2 decomposition and the total organic carbon (TOC) removal could be increased significantly compared to the acid conditions. The percentage of leaching Cu(2+) could be decreased from 45.0% to 3.66% when the initial pH of solution was increased from 5 to 10. The TOC removal could be enhanced with the increases of temperature, H2O2 and catalyst dosage, but the aniline conversion and H2O2 decomposition change slightly with further increasing dosage of catalyst and H2O2. At 343 K and pH 8.0, 100% aniline conversion and 66.9% TOC removal can be achieved under the conditions of 1.0 g/L catalyst and 0.05 mol/L H2O2 after 180 min. Although copper might be slightly leached from catalyst, the homogeneous Cu(2+) contribution to the whole catalytic activity is unimportant, and the highly dispersed copper on SBA-15 plays a dominant role.

  19. Characteristics of CuO-MoO3-P2O5 catalyst and its catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of dye wastewater under extremely mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongzhu; Zhuo, Qiongfang; Wang, Bo

    2007-11-01

    In order to develop a catalyst with high activity for catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) processing at lower temperatures (35 degrees C) and atmospheric pressure, a new CuO-MoO3-P2O5 catalystwas synthesized by a solid-state reaction method and was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), selected area electronic diffraction (SAED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) for elemental mapping. Methylene blue (MB) was adopted to investigate the catalytic activity of CuO-MoO3-P2O5 in CWO processing. The results show that this new catalyst has a high catalytic activity to decolorize MB under mild condition. The color removal of MB (the initial concentration was 0.3 g L(-1) and initial pH was 5) can reach to 99.26% within 10 min at 35 degrees C and atmospheric pressure. Catalyst lifespan and selectivity were also tested, and the results show that after the catalyst was used three times, catalyst activity still remains. Selectivity testing shows that CuO-MoO3-P2O5 has high catalytic activity on degradation of MB, whereas this catalyst has less impact on methyl orange (the color removal was 99.65% for MB and 55% for methyl orange under the same conditions). According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of MB was proposed.

  20. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, P.; Holm-Nielsen, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    In this communication, pretreatment of the anaerobically digested (AD) manure and the application of the pretreated AD manure as liquid medium for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were described. Furthermore, fermentation of pretreated maize silage and wheat straw....... No extra nitrogen source was needed in the fermentation broth. It was shown that the AD manure could successfully substitute process water in SSF of pretreated lignocellulosic fibres. Theoretical ethanol yields of 82% were achieved, giving 30.8 kg ethanol per 100 kg dry mass of maize silage. (C) 2007...

  1. Electro-oxidation process for molybdenum concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-gang; ZHONG Hong; BU Xiang-ming; WANG Fu-li

    2005-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite was used to treat the standard molybdenum concentrates; the oxidization conditions for sodium hypochlorite were investigated, and the electro-oxidation process was performed. The results indicate that in the suitable conditions, such as temperature around 25 ℃, NaCl concentration 4.0 mol/L, mass ratio of ore slurry liquid to solid (mL/mS) 20, electric charge per gram Mo 0.522 C, pH value of original slurry 8, anodic current density 700 A·m-2 (cell potential 2.7-2.9 V), the Mo leaching rate and the current efficiency reach 98% and 36%, respectively. In order to overcome some shortages of the electro-oxidation process, such as low current efficiency, low Mo concentration in the leaching solution, ultrasonic was adopted to intensify the leaching process. The results show that the Mo leaching rate exceeds 98%, current efficiency increases from 36% to 50% and the Mo concentration in the leaching solution reaches about 60 g/L at low mL/mS of 8 and low electric charge of 0.373 C.

  2. Different shades of oxide: from nanoscale wetting mechanisms to contact printing of gallium-based liquid metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudrick, Kyle; Liu, Shanliangzi; Mutunga, Eva M; Klein, Kate L; Damle, Viraj; Varanasi, Kripa K; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-06-17

    Gallium-based liquid metals are of interest for a variety of applications including flexible electronics, soft robotics, and biomedical devices. Still, nano- to microscale device fabrication with these materials is challenging because, despite having surface tension 10 times higher than water, they strongly adhere to a majority of substrates. This unusually high adhesion is attributed to the formation of a thin oxide shell; however, its role in the adhesion process has not yet been established. In this work, we demonstrate that, dependent on dynamics of formation and resulting morphology of the liquid metal-substrate interface, GaInSn adhesion can occur in two modes. The first mode occurs when the oxide shell is not ruptured as it makes contact with the substrate. Because of the nanoscale topology of the oxide surface, this mode results in minimal adhesion between the liquid metal and most solids, regardless of substrate's surface energy or texture. In the second mode, the formation of the GaInSn-substrate interface involves rupturing of the original oxide skin and formation of a composite interface that includes contact between the substrate and pieces of old oxide, bare liquid metal, and new oxide. We demonstrate that in this latter mode GaInSn adhesion is dominated by the intimate contact between new oxide and substrate. We also show that by varying the pinned contact line length using varied degrees of surface texturing, the adhesion of GaInSn in this mode can be either decreased or increased. Lastly, we demonstrate how these two adhesion modes limit microcontact printing of GaInSn patterns but can be exploited to repeatedly print individual sub-200 nm liquid metal drops.

  3. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol over Co-doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xu Chun; Zheng, Yi Fan; Yin, Hao Yong

    2013-08-01

    The Fe3O4 nanoparticles doped with cobalt ions have been successfully synthesized by the co-precipitation process. The X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the as-prepared nanoparticles. The results show that the phase structure of the nanoparticles is spinel structure of pure Fe3O4 with the particle size ranging from 40 to 50 nm. The Co-doping concentration can be controlled by changing the atomic ratio of the stock materials. The catalytic activity of the Co-doped Fe3O4 was further investigated by decomposing the phenol in liquid phase. The results show that cobalt ions doping can improve the catalytic efficiency of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in phenol degradation with catalytic reaction fitting the first-order kinetics. According to the estimated reaction rate of Co-doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles at different temperatures, the activation energy was calculated to be 45.63 kJ/mol.

  4. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by ¤Thermoanaerobacter mathranii¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, B.K.

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/l sodium carbonate, and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degreesC) was used for pre-treating wheat straw (60 g/l), resulting in a hemicellulose-rich hydrolysate and a cellulose-rich solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (9 g....../l), aliphatic carboxylic acids (6 g/l), phenols (0.27 g/l or 1.7 mM), and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/l). The wet-oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol yield by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present...

  5. Isolation, selection and evaluation of yeasts for use in fermentation of coffee beans by the wet process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Pandey, Ashok; Medeiros, Adriane Bianchi Pedroni; Andrade Lara, João Marcos Rodrigues; Gollo, André Luiz; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    During wet processing of coffee, the ripe cherries are pulped, then fermented and dried. This study reports an experimental approach for target identification and selection of indigenous coffee yeasts and their potential use as starter cultures during the fermentation step of wet processing. A total of 144 yeast isolates originating from spontaneously fermenting coffee beans were identified by molecular approaches and screened for their capacity to grow under coffee-associated stress conditions. According to ITS-rRNA gene sequencing, Pichia fermentans and Pichia kluyveri were the most frequent isolates, followed by Candida Candida glabrata, quercitrusa, Saccharomyces sp., Pichia guilliermondii, Pichia caribbica and Hanseniaspora opuntiae. Nine stress-tolerant yeast strains were evaluated for their ability to produce aromatic compounds in a coffee pulp simulation medium and for their pectinolytic activity. P. fermentans YC5.2 produced the highest concentrations of flavor-active ester compounds (viz., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate), while Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 was the best pectinase-producing strain. The potential impact of these selected yeast strains to promote flavor development in coffee beverages was investigated for inoculating coffee beans during wet fermentation trials at laboratory scale. Inoculation of a single culture of P. fermentans YC5.2 and co-culture of P. fermentans YC5.2 and Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 enhanced significantly the formation of volatile aroma compounds during the fermentation process compared to un-inoculated control. The sensory analysis indicated that the flavor of coffee beverages was influenced by the starter cultures, being rated as having the higher sensory scores for fruity, buttery and fermented aroma. This demonstrates a complementary role of yeasts associated with coffee quality through the synthesis of yeast-specific volatile constituents. The yeast strains P. fermentans YC5.2 and Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 have a great

  6. Carbon and nitrogen removal from glucose-glycine melanoidins solution as a model of distillery wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Thu, Le; Michèle, Besson

    2016-06-05

    Sugarcane molasses distillery wastewater contains melanoidins, which are dark brown recalcitrant nitrogenous polymer compounds. Studies were carried out in batch mode to evaluate Pt and Ru supported catalysts in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) process of a synthetic melanoidins solution, prepared by stoichiometric reaction of glucose with glycine. The addition of a catalyst slightly improved TOC removal compared with the non-catalytic reaction, and especially promoted the conversion of ammonium produced from organically-bound nitrogen in melanoidins to molecular nitrogen and nitrate. The selectivity to N2 attained 89% in the presence of the Pt catalysts in the reaction conditions used (TOC=2200mgL(-1), TN=280mgL(-1), 0.5g catalyst loaded with 3% metal, 210°C, 70bar total air pressure). To avoid leaching of the active metal by organically-bound nitrogen, the reaction was very efficiently performed in a two-step reaction consisting in WAO to convert nitrogen into ammonium, before the introduction of a catalyst.

  7. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES H/quality assurance program was conducted.

  8. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of organic, wet wastes for carbon cycling in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Luther, Amanda; Rabaey, Korneel; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter; Brilman, Wim

    2016-07-01

    For long-term human spaceflight missions, one of the major requirements is the regenerative life support system which has to be capable of recycling carbon, nutrients and water from both solid and liquid wastes generated by the crew and by the local production of food through living organisms (higher plants, fungi, algae, bacteria, …). The European Space Agency's Life Support System, envisioned by the MELiSSA project, consists of a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem, in which the waste receiving compartment (so-called compartment I or briefly 'CI') is based on thermophilic fermentation. However, as the waste generated by the crew compartment and food production compartment contain typical plant fibres (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), these recalcitrant fibres end up largely unaffected in the digestate (sludge) generated in the C-I compartment. Therefore, the C-I compartment has to be supplemented with a so-called fibre degradation unit (in short, FDU) for further oxidation or degradation of said plant fibres. A potential solution to degrading these plant fibres and other recalcitrant organics is their oxidation, by means of subcritical or supercritical water, into reusable CO2 while retaining the nutrients in an organic-free liquid effluent. By taking advantage of the altered physicochemical properties of water above or near its critical point (647 K, 22.1 MPa) - including increased solubility of non-polar compounds and oxygen, ion product and diffusivity - process conditions can be created for rapid oxidation of C into CO2. In this research, the oxidizer is provided as a hydrogen peroxide solution which, at elevated temperature, will dissociated into O2. The purpose of this study is to identify ideal process conditions which (a) ensure complete oxidation of carbon, (b) retaining the nutrients other than C in the liquid effluent and (c) require as little oxidizer as possible. Experiments were conducted on a continuous, tubular heated reactor and on batch

  9. Doxycycline Degradation by the Oxidative Fenton Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A. Borghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxycycline is a broad-spectrum tetracycline occurring in domestic, industrial, and rural effluents, whose main drawback is the increasing emergence of resistant bacteria. This antibiotic could be degraded by the so-called Fenton process, consisting in the oxidation of organic pollutants by oxygen peroxide (H2O2 in the presence of Fe2+. Experiments were performed according to an experimental Rotational Central Composite Design to investigate the influence of temperature (0–40.0°C, H2O2 concentration (100–900 mg/L, and Fe2+ concentration (5–120 mg/L on residual doxycycline and total organic carbon concentrations. Whereas the final residual doxycycline concentration ranged from 0 to 55.8 mg/L, the oxidation process proved unable to reduce the total organic carbon by more than 30%. The best operating conditions were concentrations of H2O2 and Fe2+ of 611 and 25 mg/L, respectively, and temperature of 35.0°C, but the analysis of variance revealed that only the first variable exerted a statistically significant effect on the residual doxycycline concentration. These results suggest possible application of this process in the treatment of doxycycline-containing effluents and may be used as starting basis to treat tetracycline-contaminated effluents.

  10. Catalytic wet oxidation of dyehouse effluents with Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al-Cu pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.K.; Kim, S.C.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, G.S.; Yoon, S.B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering/Environmental Protection, Environment and Regional Development Inst., Gyeongsang National Univ., Gyeongnam (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation of real dyehouse effluents was performed in a batch reactor and a continuous flow pilot plant scale reactor by using Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al-Cu-PILC catalysts. Hydrogen peroxide was used as the oxidant. The removal of TOC and color was strongly related to the consumption of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the subsequent formation of HO-. Copper components in the catalysts, especially in the Al-Cu-PILCs, showed successful activity toward complete removal of TOC and color. In addition the Al-Cu-PILC catalysts were extremely stable against copper leaching. (orig.)

  11. One-pot wet-chemical co-reduction synthesis of bimetallic gold-platinum nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Jun; Zhang, Qian-Li; Feng, Jin-Xia; Ju, Ke-Jian; Wang, Ai-Jun; Wei, Jie; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a simple, rapid and facile one-pot wet-chemical co-reduction method is developed for synthesis of bimetallic Au-Pt alloyed nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide (Au-Pt NCs/RGO), in which caffeine is acted as a capping agent and a structure-directing agent, while no any seed, template, surfactant or polymer involved. The as-prepared nanocomposites display enlarged electrochemical active surface area, significantly enhanced catalytic activity and better stability for methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation, compared with commercial Pt-C (Pt 50 wt%), PtRu-C (Pt 30 wt% and Ru 15 wt%) and Pt black.

  12. Protection effect of a SiO2 layer in Al0.85Ga0.15As wet oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Wenfei; Ye Xiaoling; Xu Bo; Zhang Shizhu; Wang Zhanguo

    2012-01-01

    The Al0.85Ga0.15As layers buried below the GaAs core layer with and without the SiO2 layer were successfully oxidized in a wet ambient environment.The experimental results show that the SiO2 layer has little impact on the lateral-wet-oxidation rate of the Al0.85Ga0.15As layer.The contrast of the SEM image of the oxidized regions and the absence of As-related Raman peaks for samples with the SiO2 layer arise from the removal of As ingredients with the largest atomic number,which leads to improvements in the thermal stability of the oxidized layer.The PL intensities of samples with the SiO2 layer are much stronger than those without the SiO2 layer.The PL emission peak is almost unshifted with a slight broadening under the protection of the SiO2 layer.This is attributed to the SiO2 layer preventing oxidation damage to the GaAs capping layer.

  13. Application of a wet oxidation method for the quantification of ³H and ¹⁴C in low-level radwastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H J; Song, B C; Sohn, S C; Lee, M H; Song, K; Jee, K Y

    2013-11-01

    Wet oxidation methods are utilized to separate and quantify (3)H and (14)C radionuclides in inorganic and organic radwastes generated at nuclear facilities. Because (3)H and (14)C are pure beta emitters with half-lives of 12.3 and 5,730 years, respectively, these radionuclides should be chemically separated from other radionuclides present in radwastes for accurate quantification. In particular, a collection technique for (14)C radionuclide in radwastes is needed because it is converted into (14)CO2 gas by an oxidation reaction. To confirm the recoveries of (3)H and (14)C, various standard radioactive sources were used to verify the proposed method. Because the majority of (3)H radionuclides are distributed in tritiated water (HTO), only tritiated water was used as a standard for (3)H radionuclides. Additionally, (14)C-labeled methanol ((14)CH3OH), lauric acid ((14)CH3(CH2)10COOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaH(14)CO3), and toluene (C6H5(14)CH3) were used as (14)C standards. The compounds were oxidized with chemical oxidants and then separated. The individual species were mixed with a scintillation cocktail and counted using a liquid scintillation counter. The recoveries of (14)C and (3)H were 82-97% and 98%, respectively. The wet oxidation method will be applied to RI wastes for clearance.

  14. Density improvement of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles fabricated by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Fuchinoue, K.; Sawada, H.; Watarumi, K.

    1998-03-01

    Lithium titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) has attracted the attention of many researchers from a point of tritium recovery at low temperature, chemical stability, etc.. The application of small Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} sphere has been proposed in some designs of fusion blanket. On the other hand, the wet process is most advantageous as the fabrication method of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles from a point of mass production, and of reprocessing necessary for effective use of resources and reduction of radioactive wastes. In the preliminary fabrication test, density of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles was about 40%T.D.. Therefore, in this study, density improvement tests and preliminary characterization of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles by wet process were performed, noting the aging condition and sintering condition in the fabrication process of the gel-spheres. This study yielded Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles in target range of 80-85%T.D.. (author)

  15. APPLICATION OF MAGNETIC CATALYSTS TO THE CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CWPO OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER CONTAINING NON BIODEGRADABLE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Munoz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new ferromagnetic -Al2O3-supported iron catalyst has been prepared and its activity and stability have been compared with those of a previous iron-based conventional catalyst and with the traditional homogeneous Fenton process in the oxidation of chlorophenols. The use of solid catalysts improved significantly the efficiency on the use of H2O2, achieving higher mineralization degrees. The magnetic catalyst led to significantly higher oxidation rates than the conventional one due to the presence of both Fe (II and Fe (III. On the other hand, the use of a catalyst with magnetic properties is of interest, since it allows rapid recovery after treatment using a magnetic field. Moreover, it showed a high stability with fairly low iron leaching (<1% upon CWPO runs. An additional clear advantage of this new catalyst is its easy separation and recovery from the reaction medium by applying an external magnetic field.

  16. High-temperature processing of oxide superconductors and superconducting oxide-silver oxide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. K.; Loo, B. H.; Peters, P. N.; Huang, C. Y.

    1988-01-01

    High temperature processing was found to partially convert the green 211 phase oxide to 123 phase. High Tc superconductivity was observed in Bi-Sr-Cu-O and Y-Sr-Cu-O systems prepared using the same heat treatment process. High temperature processing presents an alternative synthetic route in the search for new high Tc superconductors. An unusual magnetic suspension with enhancement in critical current density was observed in the 123 and AgO composite.

  17. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Electron Microscopy Study of the Wet and Dry High-Temperature Oxidation of Alumina- and Chromia- Forming Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Foils of T347 stainless steel and a developmental alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel were oxidized at 800 C in dry air, air with 10% H2O, and air with 10% D2O. The T347 foils exhibited a transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation between 24 and 72 h of exposure in H2O and D2O, but exhibited protective Cr-rich oxide formation in dry air. In contrast, only thin, protective Al-rich oxide surfaces were observed for the AFA alloy foils under all conditions studied. Changes in the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signal were observed for the T347 stainless steel as a function of oxidation time in dry air, attributed to oxide grain growth and porosity formation/partial scale detachment associated with spinel phase at the scale/gas interface. For the AFA alloy, only minor changes in scattering as a result of oxidation time were observed. For both T347 and AFA, similar scattering was observed in dry and wet air (H2O and D2O) exposure. This finding indicates that water vapor exposure did not induce significant morphological changes in the oxide scales (such as increased porosity) in the 5-300 nm size regime accessed by SANS.

  18. How self-determination theory can assist our understanding of the teaching and learning processes in medical education. AMEE guide No. 59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Th J; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Williams, Geoffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Self-determination Theory (SDT), designed by Edward Deci and Richard Ryan, serves among the current major motivational theories in psychology. SDT research has been conducted in many areas, among which are education and health care, but its applications in medical education are rare. The potential of SDT to help understand processes in medical education justifies this Guide. SDT is explained in seven principles, one of which is the distinction of three innate psychological needs of human beings: for competence, for autonomy and for relatedness. Further, SDT elaborates how humans tend to internalise regulation of behaviour that initially has been external, in order to develop autonomous, self-determined behaviour. Implications of SDT for medical education are discussed with reference to preparation and selection, curriculum structure, classroom teaching, assessments and examinations, self-directed learning, clinical teaching, students as teachers and researchers, continuing professional development, faculty development and stress among trainees.

  19. Twin screw wet granulation: Effect of process and formulation variables on powder caking during production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-12-30

    This work focuses on monitoring the behaviour and the mass of the built up/caking of powder during wet granulation using Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). The variables changed during this work are; powder (α-lactose monohydrate and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC)), the screw configuration (conveying and kneading elements) and the weight percentage of hydroxypropyl-methyl cellulose (HPMC) dissolved in the granulation liquid (i.e. changing liquid viscosity). Additionally, the effect of these variables on the size distribution, of the granules produced, was determined. The experiments were conducted using an acrylic transparent barrel. A stainless steel barrel was then used to conduct the two extreme granulation liquid viscosities with two different screw configurations, using lactose only. This was done to compare the findings to those obtained from the transparent barrel for validation purpose. These variables showed to affect the behaviour and the mass of the powder caking as well as the size distribution of granules. Overall, the use of kneading element resulted in uniform behaviour in caking with higher mass. Furthermore, increasing the amount of HPMC resulted in a reduction of the mass of powder caking for lactose, while showing inconsistent trend for MCC. Furthermore, lactose showed to have a greater tendency to cake in comparison to MCC. The results, for lactose, obtained from the stainless steel barrel compared well with their corresponding conditions from the transparent barrel, as the screw configuration and HPMC mass varied.

  20. Sludge thermal oxidation processes: mineral recycling, energy impact, and greenhouse effect gases release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibelin, Eric

    2003-07-01

    Different treatment routes have been studied for a mixed sludge: the conventional agricultural use is compared with the thermal oxidation processes, including incineration (in gaseous phase) and wet air oxidation (in liquid phase). The interest of a sludge digestion prior to the final treatment has been also considered according to the two major criteria, which are the fossil energy utilisation and the greenhouse effect gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) release. Thermal energy has to be recovered on thermal processes to make these processes environmentally friendly, otherwise their main interest is to extract or destroy micropollutants and pathogens from the carbon cycle. In case of continuous energy recovery, incineration can produce more energy than it consumes. Digestion is especially interesting for agriculture: according to these two schemes, the energy final balance can also be in excess. As to wet air oxidation, it is probably one of the best way to minimize greenhouse effect gases emission. (author)

  1. Developing questionnaires for educational research: AMEE Guide No. 87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artino, Anthony R; La Rochelle, Jeffrey S; Dezee, Kent J; Gehlbach, Hunter

    2014-06-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the design and development of self-administered surveys, commonly called questionnaires. Questionnaires are widely employed in medical education research. Unfortunately, the processes used to develop such questionnaires vary in quality and lack consistent, rigorous standards. Consequently, the quality of the questionnaires used in medical education research is highly variable. To address this problem, this AMEE Guide presents a systematic, seven-step process for designing high-quality questionnaires, with particular emphasis on developing survey scales. These seven steps do not address all aspects of survey design, nor do they represent the only way to develop a high-quality questionnaire. Instead, these steps synthesize multiple survey design techniques and organize them into a cohesive process for questionnaire developers of all levels. Addressing each of these steps systematically will improve the probabilities that survey designers will accurately measure what they intend to measure.

  2. Progress in Cleaning and Wet Processing for Kesterite Thin Film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    B. Vermang, A. Mule, N. Gampa, S. Sahayaraj, S. Ranjbar, G. Brammertz, M. Meuris, J. Poortmans

    2016-01-01

    Copper indium gallium selenide/sulfide (CIGS) and copper zinc tin selenide/sulfide (CZTS) are two thin film photovoltaic materials with many similar properties. Therefore, three new processing steps – which are well-known to be beneficial for CIGS solar cell processing – are developed, optimized and implemented in CZTS solar cells. For all these novel processing steps an increase in minority carrier lifetime and cell conversion efficiency is measured, as compared to standard CZTS processing. ...

  3. Study on the Genetics and Development of Fiber Pigments and Color Deviation After Wetting Process of Naturally Colored Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Xin-mian; ZHOU Wen-long

    2003-01-01

    The genetic control of fiber pigment color in naturally colored cotton was studied. The expres-sion of brown and green fiber color was controlled by incompletely dominant single genes and incompletelydominant major genes, respectively. Production and accumulation of the fiber pigment were related to specialexpression of enzymatic genes for pigment synthesis in fiber cells. At the stage of fiber lengthening, naturallycolored cotton, like white cotton, appeared purely white. But when fiber cell walls entered the thickeningstage, pigment appeared by degrees. When the fiber was completely matured (on boll dehiscence), the colorreached its darkest level. After wetting process treatment, the hues of the fiber pigment changed in regularpatterns. The hue circle for brown and green cotton changed in the opposite direction with wetting processtreatment. In general, the treated cotton color and luster became dark and vivid, and this trend provided the possibili-ty for enhancing the fiber quality by suitable enviromnental friendly finishing. The analysis showed that the color andluster of the cotton may be controlled by a series of pigments which show different chemical performance.

  4. 湿法烟气脱硫技术进展%Technical Progress in Flue Gas Desulphurization with Wet Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丰琳; 王海芳

    2012-01-01

    The pollution of sulfur dioxide caused widespread concern in the world,through the comparative study of several major wet flue gas desulphurization(FGD) process,a wet flue gas desulfurization technology-cystine desulfurization technology was concluded from the ferrous cysteine solution of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification technology.The situation of research,the reaction mechanism and the relative advantages and merits of cystine desulfurization were also described,which conformed to be a promising desulfurization method.%二氧化硫的污染情况已引起世界各国的广泛关注,通过对几种主要湿式脱硫工艺的对比研究,从半胱氨酸亚铁溶液同时脱硫脱氮工艺技术中归纳出一种湿法烟气脱硫技术———胱氨酸脱硫技术,阐述了胱氨酸脱硫技术的反应机理和国内外研究现状,并总结出此方法的优缺点,是一种很有潜力的脱硫方法。

  5. Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R J; Johnson, Jr, A B; Lund, A L; Gilbert, E R [and others

    1996-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

  6. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  7. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  8. Effects of monensin and tylosin in finishing diets containing corn wet distillers grains with solubles with differing corn processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, N F; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Benton, J R; Luebbe, M K; Laudert, S B

    2013-05-01

    A total of 3,632 crossbred steers were used in 3 separate randomized complete-block designed finishing experiments. Data from Exp. 1 were analyzed separately whereas data were combined for Exp. 2 and 3, based on corn processing method used [Exp.1 = equal combination of dry-rolled and high-moisture (DRC:HMC); Exp. 2 and 3 = steam-flaked (SFC)]. Steers were fed 1 of 5 treatments to evaluate the effects of monensin and tylosin in feedlot diets containing 25% corn wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS; DM basis). Treatments included: 1) corn-based diet (no WDGS) with 360 mg/d monensin and 90 mg/d tylosin (CORN+MT), 2) 25% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS-CON), 3) 25% WDGS with 360 mg/d monensin (WDGS+M), 4) WDGS with monensin and tylosin at same levels as treatment 1, and 5) WDGS with 480 mg/d monensin and 90 mg/d tylosin (WDGS+HIMT). In Exp. 1, WDGS+MT increased (P tylosin in a diet containing WDGS increased G:F (P tylosin were fed in a WDGS diet compared with WDGS-CON. Feeding WDGS+MT reduced total liver abscesses by 79.3% (Exp. 1) and 57.6% (Exp. 2 and 3) compared with WDGS-CON. Compared with WDGS+MT, minimal differences were observed when monensin was fed at 480 mg/steer daily with tylosin in diets containing WDGS. Inclusion of WDGS in finishing steer diets did not alter effectiveness of monensin with tylosin in improving G:F and reducing prevalence of liver abscesses, regardless of corn processing method. Corn processing method appears to be an important factor in performance response to WDGS with feeding value of WDGS, measured as an increase in feed efficiency, being greater in a DRC:HMC-based diet compared with a SFC-based diet.

  9. Application of hydrogen injection and oxidation to low temperature solution-processed oxide semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Miyakawa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed oxide semiconductors are promising candidates for the low cost, large scale fabrication of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs. In this work, a method using hydrogen injection and oxidation (HIO that allows the low temperature solution processing of oxide semiconductors was demonstrated. We found that this method significantly decreases the concentration of residual species while improving the film densification. Additionally, enhanced TFT performance was confirmed following the use of processing temperatures as low as 300 °C. The proposed process is potentially applicable to the fabrication of a wide variety of solution-processed oxide semiconductors.

  10. Application of hydrogen injection and oxidation to low temperature solution-processed oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Masashi; Nakata, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Solution-processed oxide semiconductors are promising candidates for the low cost, large scale fabrication of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). In this work, a method using hydrogen injection and oxidation (HIO) that allows the low temperature solution processing of oxide semiconductors was demonstrated. We found that this method significantly decreases the concentration of residual species while improving the film densification. Additionally, enhanced TFT performance was confirmed following the use of processing temperatures as low as 300 °C. The proposed process is potentially applicable to the fabrication of a wide variety of solution-processed oxide semiconductors.

  11. Simulation of a Wet Sulfuric Acid Process (WSA for Utilization of Acid Gas Separated from Omani Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Jawad Ali Al-Dallal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a proposed process for the utilization of hydrogen sulphide separated with other gases from omani natural gas for the production of sulphuric acid by wet sulphuric acid process (WSA was studied. The processwas simulated at an acid gas feed flow of 5000 m3/hr using Aspen ONE- V7.1-HYSYS software. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the optimum conditions for the operation of plant. This included primarily the threepacked bed reactors connected in series for the production of sulphur trioxidewhich represented the bottleneck of the process. The optimum feed temperature and catalyst bed volume for each reactor were estimated and then used in the simulation of the whole process for two cases namely 4 and 6 mole% SO2 stream fed to the first catalytic reactor. The 4mole% SO2 gaves the highest conversion (98% compared with 6 mole% SO2 (94.7%. A valuable quantity of heat was generated from the process. This excess heat could also be transformed into power in a turbine or used as a heating media in neighbouring process units.

  12. Abatement of phenolic mixtures by catalytic wet oxidation enhanced by Fenton's pretreatment: effect of H2O2 dosage and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A; Yustos, P; Rodriguez, S; Simon, E; Garcia-Ochoa, F

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of a phenolic mixture containing phenol, o-cresol and p-cresol (500mg/L on each pollutant) has been carried out using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst, placed in a continuous three-phase reactor. Total pressure was 16 bar and temperature was 127 degrees C. Pollutant conversion, mineralization, intermediate distribution, and toxicity were measured at the reactor outlet. Under these conditions no detoxification of the inlet effluent was found even at the highest catalyst weight (W) to liquid flow rate (Q(L)) ratio used. On the other hand, some Fenton Runs (FR) have been carried out in a batch way using the same phenolic aqueous mixture previously cited. The concentration of Fe(2+) was set to 10mg/L. The influence of the H(2)O(2) amount (between 10 and 100% of the stoichiometric dose) and temperature (30, 50, and 70 degrees C) on phenols conversion, mineralization, and detoxification have been analyzed. Phenols conversion was near unity at low hydrogen peroxide dosage but mineralization and detoxification achieved an asymptotic value at each temperature conditions. The integration of Fenton reagent as pretreatment of the CWO process remarkably improves the efficiency of the CWO reactor and allows to obtain detoxified effluents at mild temperature conditions and relatively low W/Q(L) values. For a given phenolic mixture a temperature range of 30-50 degrees C in the Fenton pretreatment with a H(2)O(2) dosage between 20 and 40% of the stoichiometric amount required can be proposed.

  13. Production of ethanol from wet oxidised wheat straw by Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, B.K.; Licht, D.; Schmidt, A.S.;

    1999-01-01

    The wet oxidation process (water, oxygen, elevated temperature, sodium carbonate) was investigated as a means of solubilising hemicellulose from wheat straw. Sixteen different combinations of oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration were applied. The hemicellulose hydrolysates were...

  14. Initiation of waves in the Belousov Zhaboyinsky system via the reaction-diffusion process of wet stamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraja, C.; Park, Do Young; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Huh, Do Sung

    2007-06-01

    Periodic waves were studied via the process of wet stamping, in a heterogeneous media soaked in different solutions of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction system containing ferroin and malonic acid. The experiments were performed by making an initial contact of soaked polyacrylamide (PAA) gel with agarose stamp for a short period of time, and then placing the gel onto the glass plate after exposing both of its surfaces. This led to the development of propagating waves on the surface of the gel. The results show that patterns have a dependence on the concentration of individual species, which are represented in the form of bifurcation diagrams. The behavioral trend of this system is also compared with the current perspectives of the reaction diffusion system.

  15. A simple cost-effective and eco-friendly wet chemical process for the fabrication of superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, Edna; Lakshmi, R.V.; Aruna, S.T., E-mail: aruna_reddy@nal.res.in; Basu, Bharathibai J.

    2013-07-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces were created on hydrophilic cotton fabrics by a simple wet chemical process. The fabric was immersed in a colloidal suspension of zinc hydroxide followed by subsequent hydrophobization with stearic acid. The wettability of the modified cotton fabric sample was studied by water contact angle (WCA) and water shedding angle (WSA) measurements. The modified cotton fabrics exhibited superhydrophobicity with a WCA of 151° for 8 μL water droplet and a WSA of 5–10° for 40 μL water droplet. The superhydrophobic cotton sample was also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The method is simple, eco-friendly and cost-effective and can be applied to large area of cotton fabric materials. It was shown that superhydrophobicity of the fabric was due to the combined effect of surface roughness imparted by zinc hydroxide and the low surface energy of stearic acid.

  16. Size distribution of agglomerates of milk powder in wet granulation process in a vibro-fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Banjac

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of experiments on the influence of technological parameters (intensity of vibration, granulation of the liquid feed, temperature of fluidization agent on the change of size distribution, as well as mass mean diameter of the milk powder particles subjected to the wet granulation process (agglomeration in a vibro-fluidized bed granulator are shown in this paper. Using water as a granulation liquid and air as a fluidization agent, it was found that mass mean diameter increases with increase of water feed, intensity of vibration, and decrease of air temperature. Increasing the intensity of vibration and decreasing the air temperature, primarily induces the increase of the dimensions of the initial nuclei. This can be explained on the basis of different influences that these changes (velocity of particle motion, intensity of particle collision, drying rate have on the coalescence of particles with smaller and/or bigger dimensions.

  17. Long-time constant-capacitance DLTS investigations of 6H SiC/MOS structures: comparison of dry and wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassler, M.; Pensl, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1999-07-30

    A long-time constant-capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (LT-CC-DLTS) method has been established to investigate the energy distribution D{sub it} and the capture-cross-section {sigma}{sub n/p} of states at the interface of 6H SiC/MOS structures. A comparison of dry and wet oxidation (1120 C) reveals a change in the distribution of interface states and a different magnitude of capture-cross-sections indicating that the interface states consist of at least two types of defects. (orig.)

  18. Surface improvement of asbestos by wet process. Shisshiki shori ni yoru asbesto no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasue, T.; Kojima, Y.; Obata, H.; Ogura, T.; Arai, Y. (Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering)

    1991-09-01

    The eluting process of each ion in asbestos was pursued up to the decomposition by processing with hydrochloric acid and phosphoric acid to verify the acid processing condition making asbestos harmless and holding the fibrous structure. The decomposition of asbestos is significantly affected by the eluting condition. When treated by 3N hydrochloric acid, Mg{sup 2+} in asbestos elutes perfectly after 7days at 20 centigrade and after 30 minutes at 100 centigrade, remaining amorphous silica of comparatively high purity. When asbestos fiber which was acid-processed to exchange almost all sites with Ca{sup 2+} ion after Mg{sup 2+} in the first to fifth layers eluted, is put in Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solution, hydroxyapatite is formed on the surface. When this asbestos is hydrothermally processed in the Ca(OH){sub 2} solution adjusted so that the atomic ratio of Ca{sup 2+}/Si{sup 4+} to silicate radical remained on the surface becomes 0.8, calcium silicate hydrate is formed on the surface. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Wetting by Liquid Metals—Application in Materials Processing: The Contribution of the Grenoble Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Eustathopoulos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wettability of ceramics by liquid metals is discussed from both the fundamental point of view and the point of view of applications. The role of interfacial reactions (simple dissolution of the solid in the liquid or formation of a layer of a new compound is illustrated and analysed. Several results are presented in order to illustrate the role of wettability in materials processing, namely infiltration processing, joining dissimilar materials by brazing and selecting crucibles for crystallising liquid metals and semiconductors. The review includes results obtained during the last 15 years mainly, but not only, by the Grenoble group.

  20. Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Wet Biomass Feedstocks and Upgrading – Process Design and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse

    Liquid biofuels will play a major role for a more sustainable energy system of the future. The CatLiq® process is a 2nd generation biomass conversion process that is based on hydrothermal liquefaction. Hydrothermal liquefaction offers a very efficient and feedstock flexible way of converting...... biomass to bio-oil. Bio-oils from hydrothermal liquefaction are characterised by their high feedstock flexibility. Upgrading of complete bio-oils derived from hydrothermal conversion has not yet been extensively studied. Purpose of this work is to reduce the oxygen content of the bio-oil to improve...

  1. Properties of Ceramic Fiber and Ceramic Shot in Wet-laid Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Long-di

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with the different sinking properties of ceramic fiber and the ceramic shot in wetlaid nonwoven processes. The difference between the sinking properties of the fiber and the shot is very great according to theory analysis and the test. From results of calculating and practical testing, the method of removing ceramic shots during manufacturing is put forward.

  2. Development and Optimization of a Wet Granulation Process at Elevated Temperature for a Poorly Compactible Drug Using Twin Screw Extruder for Continuous Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Anuprabha K; Desai, Divyakant; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance tabletability of a poorly compactible drug, acetaminophen, by wet granulation using twin screw extruder at high temperature. It was desired that there would be minimum amounts of excipients used and the granules obtained after extrusion would be dry and fall within a size range suitable for tableting without any further processing. Mixtures of acetaminophen (95%) with binders (5% povidone or partially pregelatinized starch) were wet granulated through twin screw extruder at 70°C by adding 7% w/w water. The process had a short granulation time (90% granules in the size range of 125 to 1000 μm (1.7 MPa, which was superior to that of tablets prepared by conventional high shear wet granulation. As the granules could be extruded continuously and did not require drying and milling, the method was amenable to continuous processing.

  3. Purification of wet process phosphoric acid by decreasing iron and uranium using white silica sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bayaa, A.A., E-mail: amina.elbayaa@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University (Girls), Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Badawy, N.A.; Gamal, A.M.; Zidan, I.H.; Mowafy, A.R. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University (Girls), Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-06-15

    Natural white silica sand as an adsorbent has been developed to reduce the concentration of iron and uranium ions as inorganic impurities in crude Egyptian phosphoric acid. Several parameters such as adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, volume to weight ratio and temperature, were investigated. Equilibrium isotherm studies were used to evaluate the maximum sorption capacity of adsorbent. Thermodynamic parameters showed the exothermic nature of the process and the negative entropy reflects the affinity of the adsorbent material towards each metal ion.

  4. Evaluation of Friction Stir Processing of HY-80 Steel Under Wet and Dry Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    material on Littoral Combat Ships along with the surface treatment of nickel aluminum bronze propellers. In the last ten years, research on FSW/P...processing was polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) embedded in a tungsten -rhenium (W-Re) binder, Figure 4. The tool material is also designated as... bronze . The grains remain equi-axed and not elongated due to deformation. 42 2. Scanning Electron Microscopy a. Base Material Using the SEM, the

  5. Evaluation of Friction Stir Processing of HY-80 Steel Under Wet and Dry Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Garth William II

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the microstructural and mechanical property changes associated with Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of HY-80 steel under dry and underwater conditions. HY-80 is a low-carbon alloy steel that is used in a quenched and tempered condition and is highly susceptible to hydrogen assisted cracking associated with conventional fusion welding. FSW/P (400 RPM/ 2 IPM) was conducted using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool having a pin length of 6.35 mm. Two sets ...

  6. Organization Domain Modeling (ODM): Extending systematic D-AME beyond software domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, M.A. [Organon Motives, Inc., Belmont, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The emerging discipline of domain analysis, modeling, and engineering, or D-AME, has received most attention from the field of systematic software reuse, where the term {open_quotes}domain{close_quotes} usually denotes a well-scoped area of functionality within a set or class of software systems. A central challenge in D-AME research has been in defining processes and representations sufficiently general to apply in the diverse organizational and technical environments in which D-AME can make useful contribution. The systematic reuse community has established ambitious goals for what a D-AME process should address, such as the ability to support design for reuse for all products and processes of the software life cycle, and applicability beyond software domains: e.g., to domains such as business processes, product variability models, or more generally, domains of shared knowledge about particular technical areas of expertise. In practice, though, the search for generalized domain analysis processes and methods has been fraught. with difficulties. Obstacles include: adoption of a too-narrow conception of the nature of {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}; tight coupling of D-AME process and methods with software engineering representations; and a consequent lack of understanding of the unique aspects of D-AME as a qualitative process. This paper discusses the goals for the extensibility of D-AME, the primary barriers to achieving these goals, and specific features of the Organization Domain Modeling (ODM) methodology that address these issues. ODM is structured as a core life cycle process model which is broadly applicable to diverse domains and organizational contexts. The core process is augmented by a set of supporting methods which facilitate tailorability, for example, by encapsulating commitments to specific software design representations and processes.

  7. Scalable shape-controlled fabrication of curved microstructures using a femtosecond laser wet-etching process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng, E-mail: chenfeng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Hewei; Du, Guangqing; Deng, Zefang; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2013-07-01

    Materials with curvilinear surface microstructures are highly desirable for micro-optical and biomedical devices. However, realization of such devices efficiently remains technically challenging. This paper demonstrates a facile and flexible method to fabricate curvilinear microstructures with controllable shapes and dimensions. The method composes of femtosecond laser exposures and chemical etching process with the hydrofluoric acid solutions. By fixed-point and step-in laser irradiations followed by the chemical treatments, concave microstructures with different profiles such as spherical, conical, bell-like and parabola were fabricated on silica glasses. The convex structures were replicated on polymers by the casting replication process. In this work, we used this technique to fabricate high-quality microlens arrays and high-aspect-ratio microwells which can be used in 3D cell culture. This approach offers several advantages such as high-efficient, scalable shape-controllable and easy manipulations. - Highlights: • We demonstrate a flexible method to fabricate curvilinear microstructures. • This method composes of femtosecond laser exposures and chemical etching process. • Concave microstructures with different profiles were fabricated on silica glasses. • High-quality microlens arrays and high-aspect-ratio microwells were fabricated.

  8. Kinetic study of wet oxidation of Si0.5Ge0.5 alloy by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of Si0. sGeo.5 alloy has been investigated at the temperatures of 800℃ and 900 ℃. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy has been employed to determine the composition and thickness of the oxide layers. Only Sio.5Geo. 5O2 layer formed during the oxidation at 800℃, whilst three layers, Si0.5Ge0.5O2, SiO2 and Ge, are existed after the oxidation at 900℃. Experimental results are interpreted by adding a germanium flux F4 in Deal-Grove oxidation model of Silicon.

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by wet-chemical oxidation and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virendra K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    Precision and accuracy results are described for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon (SOC) by silver-filter filtration, wet-chemical oxidation, and infrared determination of hte resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) used at the U.S. Geological Survey's nationalWater Quality Laboratory. An aliquot of raw water isfiltered through a 0.45-micrometer silver filter. The trapped organic material is oxidized using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in a scaled glass ampule,and the rseulting CO2 is measured by an infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO3 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the sample. The SOC method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 milligram per liter. The average percent recovery is 97.1 percent and the average standard deviation is 11 percent.

  10. USE OF GAC TECHNOLOGY AND TWO STAGE ION EXCHANGE TECHNIQUE FOR RECYCLING OF WASTEWATER IN TEXTILE WET PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PROF. MAHESH B. CHOUGULE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential natural resource for sustaining life and environment, which is always thought to be available in abundance and free gift of nature. Textile industries are one of the major consumers of water and disposing large volumes of effluent to the environment. The textile industry utilizes abundant water in dyeing and finishing processes. There is need to adopt economical practices for the use of water in textile industries. It has been estimated that 3.5 % of the total cost of running the industry is required for water utilization in textile industry. In India textile units are developed all over the country in the form of small industrial estates. Textiles are manufactured to perform a multitude of functions. They are produced to a range of specifications using avariety of fibers, resulting in a complex waste or effluent. Textile waste occurs in a variety of forms throughout production process. The surface water sources are limited and availability of water from them vary from year to year depending upon monsoon conditions. The underground water resources are also getting depleted with theincreasing amount of water drawn from them every year without adequate replenishments. Therefore, the cost of water is rising steeply and the textile mills, which need a large quantity of water, have started taking measures to conserve and recycling. This paper focuses on recycling of wastewater in textile wet processing with experimental analysis of GAC technology and two-stage ion exchange technology.

  11. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  12. Wetting behavior of Al-Si-Mg alloys on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si substrates: optimization of processing parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, J.L. de la; Pech-Canul, M.I. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Saltillo, Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2008-06-15

    The wetting behavior of Al-Si-Mg alloys on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si substrates has been investigated using the sessile drop technique. Based on a Taguchi experiment design, the effect of the following processing parameters on the contact angle ({theta}) and surface tension ({sigma}{sub LV}) was studied: processing time and temperature, atmosphere (Ar and N{sub 2}), substrate surface condition (with and without a silicon wafer), as well as the Mg and Si contents in the aluminium alloy. In nitrogen, non-wetting conditions prevail during the isothermal events while in argon a remarkable non-wetting to wetting transition leads to contact angles {theta} as low as 11{+-}3 and a liquid surface tension {sigma}{sub LV} of 33{+-}10 x 10{sup -5} kJ/m{sup 2}. According to the multiple analysis of variance (Manova), the optimum conditions for minimizing the values of {theta} and {sigma}{sub LV} are as follows: temperature of 1100 C, processing time of 90 min, argon atmosphere, no use of a silicon wafer, and the use of the Al-18% Mg-1% Si alloy. A verification test conducted under the optimized conditions resulted in a contact angle of {theta}=9{+-}3 and a surface tension of {sigma}{sub LV}=29{+-} 9 x 10{sup -5} kJ/m{sup 2}, both indicative of excellent wetting. (orig.)

  13. Study of an ammonia-based wet scrubbing process in a continuous flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnik, Kevin P.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2013-03-01

    A continuous gas and liquid flow, regenerative scrubbing process for CO{sub 2} capture was demonstrated at the bench-scale level. An aqueous ammonia-based solution captures CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in an absorber and releases a nearly pure stream of CO{sub 2} in the regenerator. After the regeneration, the solution of ammonium compounds is recycled to the absorber. The design of a continuous flow unit was based on earlier exploratory results from a semi-batch reactor, where a CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} simulated flue gas mixture flowed through a well-mixed batch of ammonia-based solution. During the semi-batch tests, the solution was cycled between absorption and regeneration steps to measure the carrying capacity of the solution at various initial ammonia concentrations and temperatures. Consequentially, a series of tests were conducted on the continuous unit to observe the effect of various parameters on CO{sub 2} removal efficiency and regenerator effectiveness within the flow system. The parameters that were studied included absorber temperature, regenerator temperature, initial NH{sub 3} concentration, simulated flue gas flow rate, liquid solvent inventory in the flow system, and height of the packed-bed absorber. From this testing and subsequent testing, ammonia losses from both the absorption and regeneration steps were quantified, and attempts were made to maintain steady state during operations. Implications of experimental results with respect to process design are discussed.

  14. Two step esterification-transesterification process of wet greasy sewage sludge for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, C; Sangaletti-Gerhard, N; Cea, M; Suazo, A; Aliberti, A; Navia, R

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge generated in municipal wastewater treatment plants was used as a feedstock for biodiesel production via esterification/transesterification in a two-step process. In the first esterification step, greasy and secondary sludge were tested using acid and enzymatic catalysts. The results indicate that both catalysts performed the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) simultaneously with the transesterification of triacylglycerols (TAG). Acid catalyst demonstrated better performance in FFA esterification compared to TAG transesterification, while enzymatic catalyst showed the ability to first hydrolyze TAG in FFA, which were esterified to methyl esters. In addition, FAME concentration using greasy sludge were higher (63.9% and 58.7%), compared with those of secondary sludge (11% and 16%), using acid and enzymatic catalysts, respectively. Therefore, only greasy sludge was used in the second step of alkaline transesterification. The alkaline transesterification of the previously esterified greasy sludge reached a maximum FAME concentration of 65.4% when using acid catalyst.

  15. H 2 O2湿式氧化法脱除铝酸钠溶液中的有机物%Removal of Organics From Industrial Sodium Aluminate Solution by Hydrogen Peroxide Wet Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜振华; 李军旗; 金会心; 米秋秋

    2014-01-01

    By wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation ,the effects of alkali concentration ,oxidation time ,the amount of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation temperature on the removal of organics in Bayer liquor were investigated .The experiment results show that wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation method can effectively eliminate most of the organics in the sodium aluminate solution .T he better oxidation conditions is alkali concentration of 280 g/L ,oxidation temperature of 80 ℃ ,the amount of hydrogen peroxide of 80 mL ,oxidation time of 120 min for sodium aluminate solution of 80 mL .The removal rate of sodium oxalate is 65 .31% and the removal rate of total organic carbon is 60 .86% at the best conditions .T he process is simple ,no impurity is introduced in the system .%研究了采用 H2 O2湿式氧化法脱除某铝厂分解母液中的有机物,考察了母液苛性碱浓度、氧化时间、双氧水用量、温度对脱除有机物的影响。结果表明:H2 O2湿式氧化法可有效脱除铝酸钠溶液中的大部分有机物;试验获得的适宜工艺条件为苛性碱质量浓度280 g/L ,氧化时间120 min ,氧化温度80℃,双氧水用量80 mL。适宜条件下,草酸钠脱除率为65.31%,总有机物脱除率为60.86%。H2 O2湿式氧化法脱除铝酸钠溶液中有机物工艺简单,系统中不引入杂质。

  16. The AMES network strategy developments within and outside the EU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevini, F.; Debarberis, L. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Advanced Materials, Petten (Netherlands); Davies, L.M. [LMD Consultancy, Oxford (United Kingdom); English, C. [AEA Technology, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The AMES (Ageing Materials Evaluation and Studies) network started its activity in 1993 with the aim of studying the consequences and the mechanisms of the ageing process in materials used for nuclear reactor components. Together with ENIQ, NESC, EPERC, it forms the so-called ''Structural Integrity of Industrial Components'' cluster of networks operated by the Joint Research Centre - Institute for Advanced Materials of the European Commission. After two initial phases dedicated to the compilation of state-of-the-art reports on non-destructive monitoring techniques for thermal ageing, dosimetry, survey of regulatory requirements, predictive formulas for irradiation embrittlement, AMES has entered its third strategy phase with the fifth EURATOM Framework Program, Nuclear Fission Safety Key Action. Most of the projects proposed for this program and sustained by the Steering committee were selected for funding. Their focus is on the influence of chemical composition, namely phosphorus and nickel content, on the irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials, on the improvement of surveillance temperature measurement, on the validation of the Master Curve approach, and on ND techniques to monitor ageing of irradiated steels. The paper describes the objectives of the new fifth Framework Program projects and how they are part of the AMES strategy, pointing out the involvement of CEEC and NIS countries. (authors)

  17. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  18. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Eric A.; Fegley, Jr., M. Bruce; Bowen, H. Kent

    1985-01-01

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 micron can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed.

  19. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES FOR FOOD INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER DECONTAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Krzemińska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available High organic matter content is a basic problem in food industry wastewaters. Typically, the amount and composition of the effluent varies considerably. In the article four groups of advanced processes and their combination of food industry wastewater treatment have been reviewed: electrochemical oxidation (EC, Fenton’s process, ozonation of water and photocatalytic processes. All advanced oxidation processes (AOP`s are characterized by a common chemical feature: the capability of exploiting high reactivity of HO• radicals in driving oxidation processes which are suitable for achieving decolonization and odour reduction, and the complete mineralization or increase of bioavailability of recalcitrant organic pollutants.

  20. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-04-01

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  1. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei

    2015-04-20

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  2. Effect of CeO2 doping on catalytic activity of Fe2O3/gamma-Al2O(3) catalyst for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Sun, Dezhi

    2007-05-08

    In order to find a catalyst with high activity and stability for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process under normal condition, with Fe(2)O(3)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) and Fe(2)O(3)-CeO(2)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) catalysts prepared by impregnation method, the effect of CeO(2) doping on the structure and catalytic activity of Fe(2)O(3)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dyes at 25 degrees C and atmospheric pressure is evaluated using BET, SEM, XRF, XRD, XPS and chemical analysis techniques, and test results show that, better dispersion and smaller size of Fe(2)O(3) crystal can be achieved by adding CeO(2), and the content of chemisorbed oxygen can also be increased on the surface of catalyst. CWPO experimental results indicate that azo dyes in simulated wastewater can be efficiently mineralized and the catalytic activity of Fe(2)O(3)-CeO(2)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) can be increased by about 10% compared with that of Fe(2)O(3)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) because of the promotion of the structural and redox properties of the ferric oxide by ceria doped. Leaching tests indicate that Fe(2)O(3)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) and Fe(2)O(3)-CeO(2)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) are stable with a negligible amount of irons found in the aqueous solution after reaction for 2h. It can therefore be concluded from results and discussion that in comparison with Fe(2)O(3)/gamma-Al(2)O(3), Fe(2)O(3)-CeO(2)/gamma-Al(2)O(3) is a suitable catalyst, which can effectively degrade contaminants at normal temperature and atmospheric pressure.

  3. 湿式过氧化氢氧化处理高浓度染料废水的工艺研究%Technological Study on Treatment of High Concentration Dye Wastewater by the Wet Peroxide Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周书天; 杨润昌; 黄明; 谢磊

    2001-01-01

    Advanced treatment were used to degrade azodyes at highconcentration.Wet pe roxide oxidation(WPO)-iron filings scree ning -coagulation process was found to b e the best method in terms of color and COD removal.Methyl orange,the least biod egradable was chosen as a model dye for determining the most suitable reaction c onditions.The results showed that the re moval efficiency of COD,and color could reach 85%and 99% respectively.Temperatur e,FeSO4 amount,sulfuric acid amount and added hydrogen peroxide amount affected the wet peroxide oxidation(WPO).The remo val of COD and color were found to be ve ry sensitive to the reactio temperature .The COD removal rate was found to be pr oportional to the dosage of hydrogen per oxide,the color removal was also found t o be closely.Related to the removal of C OD until an equilibrium COD was reached.%采用湿式过氧化氢氧化—铁屑过滤—混凝技术处理高浓度偶氮染料废水,用难生化降解的甲基橙进行模拟试验。实验结果表明,该工艺COD和色度的去除率分别高达85%和99%。湿式过氧化氢氧化处理过程受温度、硫酸投量、Fe2+投量、H2O2投量的影响,反应温度对COD和色度的去除率影响较大,COD去除率的增加与H2O2投量成正比,色度的去除率随COD的增高而增大。

  4. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  5. Factors influencing catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of maleic acid in aqueous phase over copper/micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Lilian; Katima, Jamidu H Y

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of initial maleic acid feed concentration (0.005 to 0.03 M) was carried out in a temperature range of 20-50 degrees Celsius, on micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (MTS-AMP) supported copper catalyst. The influence of various operating parameters such as initial feed concentration of maleic acid, temperature, catalyst loading and the stability of the catalyst were investigated. CWPO reactions were performed in a stirred batch reactor at an atmospheric pressure in the presence of H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. Total conversion of maleic acid into acetic acid was obtained under mild conditions (i.e. atmospheric pressure and 40 degrees Celsius). Blank experiments showed no measurable maleic acid conversion (i.e. only approximately 0.5% conversion of initial maleic acid), indicating that a significant oxidation reaction of maleic acid is enhanced by the presence of a catalyst. Copper on micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane catalyst therefore was found to be suitable for aqueous phase oxidation of maleic acid with 100% of maleic acid conversion.

  6. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallet, Ana [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ovejero, Gabriel, E-mail: govejero@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodríguez, Araceli [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Peres, José A. [Centro de Química de Vila Real, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Apartado 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); García, Juan, E-mail: juangcia@quim.ucm.es [Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación (CyPS), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Ni supported over hydrotalcite calcined precursors as catalyst. ► Catalytic wet air oxidation in trickle bed reactor for Chromotrope 2R removal. ► Dye removal depends on temperature, initial dye concentration and flow rate. ► The catalyst proved to bare-usable after in situ regeneration. -- Abstract: Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg–Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min{sup −1} and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min{sup −1}, respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}. After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T{sub r} = 0.098 g{sub Ni} min mL{sup −1}, attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity.

  7. Characterization of a calcium phosphate cement based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate obtained by wet precipitation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmer, M.B.; Diehl, C.E.; Vieira, R.S.; Coelho, W.T.G.; Santos, L.A., E-mail: monicathurmer@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    There are several systems of calcium phosphate cements being studied. Those based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate are of particular interest. After setting they produce calcium deficient hydroxyapatite similar to bone like hydroxyapatite. This work aims to obtain alpha-tricalcium phosphate powders by the wet precipitation process, using calcium nitrate and phosphoric acid as reagents. This powder was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. In order to prepare the calcium phosphate cement, the powder was mixed with an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The mechanical properties of the cement were assessed and it was evaluated by means of apparent density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The described method produced crystalline alpha-tricalcium phosphate as the major phase. The calcium phosphate cement showed high values of compression strength (50 MPa). The soaking of the cement in a simulated body fluid (SBF) formed a layer of hydroxyapatite like crystals in the surface of the samples. (author)

  8. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  9. Terminal Area ATM Research at NASA Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Leonard

    1997-01-01

    The presentation will highlight the following: (1) A brief review of ATC research underway 15 years ago; (2) A summary of Terminal Area ATM Tool Development ongoing at NASA Ames; and (3) A projection of research activities 10-15 years from now.

  10. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  11. AIM: Ames Imaging Module Spacecraft Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The AIM camera is a small, lightweight, low power, low cost imaging system developed at NASA Ames. Though it has imaging capabilities similar to those of $1M plus spacecraft cameras, it does so on a fraction of the mass, power and cost budget.

  12. Features oxidative processes in sturgeons fish (Acipenseridae (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Symon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To anayze scientific sources on physiological-biochemical pecularities of reducing-oxidizing processes, including peroxide oxidation of lipids and work of the system of antioxidant protection system in sturgeon species (Acipenseridae. The initiation and process of the oxidative stress have been described. The main products of peroxide oxidation of lipids, antioxidants of natural and artificial origin, organs and tissues for the studies of reducing-oxidizing processes have been examined. Findings. The work generalizes the processes of lipid peroxidation. Briefly outlined the main mechanism of action of antioxidant enzymes. Antioxidant defense system plays one of key role in the life of organism due regulating its series of metabolic processes, use of assessing of its state gives an opportunity obtain quantitative information on the progress of these processes. The products of free radical peroxidation (dien conjugates and malonic dialdehyde can also act as a sort of biomarkers of tissue damage, because their content can judge about the intensity of the flow of free radical processes in the various systems in organism. The review contains a description of the peculiarities of the liver and its involvement in lipid metabolism and antioxidant defense system. It is shown the most common antioxidants used in the feeding of sturgeon. Organs and tissues, which should be used for studying the processes of peroxide oxidation of lipids in sturgeon species, have been examined. Practical value. The systematized data regarding peroxide oxidation of lipids, oxidative stress and antioxidant protection system allow finding a balance between these processes. The data on antioxidants, which are used in feeds for sturgeon species, will be useful for sturgeon culturists. The array of the generalized information will be important for scientists who study the pecularities of the processes of peroxide oxidation of lipids and antioxidant protection system in

  13. In vitro/in vivo evaluation of felodipine micropowders prepared by the wet-milling process combined with different solidification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia; Li, Song; Yao, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Weng, Yan; Cai, Cuifang; Xu, Hui; Tang, Xing

    2014-07-01

    In order to improve the in vitro dissolution rate and in vivo oral bioavailability of the poorly water soluble drug, felodipine (FELO), the wet-milling process was employed involving co-grinding with HPMC E5 and the in vitro release rate as investigated. After solidification by spray drying or freeze drying, the microsized powders were characterized in terms of their size, morphology, and in vitro dissolution rate. The oral bioavailability of this dry powder for suspension was evaluated in rats. After milling with 8% HPMC E5 and freeze drying, the powder mixture had an average particle size of 2.249 ± 1.497 μm and displayed an excellent dissolution rate of up to 93.2% within 10 minutes. DSC and PXRD investigations confirmed the absence of any crystal transformation during the wet-milling process. Using two different solidification methods, powders were stable for 6 months with regard to their in vitro dissolution rate. Significantly improved bioavailability was obtained for the wet-milled suspension before solidification and freeze dried powders with 6.8- (p  0.05) in bioavailability was seen for the spray dried powders. These effects suggest that the solidification method plays an important role in modifying the bioavailability of FELO after wet milling. Consequently, wet-milling is an effective technique to enhance the bioavailability of FELO and to maintain these benefits, freeze-drying is a feasible approach to solidifying the wet-milled suspension for industrial applications.

  14. INVESTIGATIONS ON SEWAGE TREATMENT PROCESS USING COMBINED BIO-OXIDIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Jaromsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on process of aerobic waste water treatment with combined bio-oxidizers at milk processing enterprises. It has been shown that attached biocenosis, free-floating biocenosis and also bio-module rotation frequency  have exerted a significant influence on the process of an aerobic sewage treatment. It has been established that combined bio-oxidizers can be used for cleaning high concentrated waste water at the enterprises of food industry.

  15. INVESTIGATIONS ON SEWAGE TREATMENT PROCESS USING COMBINED BIO-OXIDIZERS

    OpenAIRE

    V. N. Jaromsky; E. I. Mihnevich

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigations on process of aerobic waste water treatment with combined bio-oxidizers at milk processing enterprises. It has been shown that attached biocenosis, free-floating biocenosis and also bio-module rotation frequency  have exerted a significant influence on the process of an aerobic sewage treatment. It has been established that combined bio-oxidizers can be used for cleaning high concentrated waste water at the enterprises of food industry.

  16. Oxidation of artificial sweetener sucralose by advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet; Kim, Hyunook

    2014-01-01

    Sucralose, a chlorinated carbohydrate, has shown its increased use as an artificial sweetener and persistently exists in wastewater treatment plant effluents and aquatic environment. This paper aims to review possible degradation of sucralose and related carbohydrates by biological, electrochemical, chemical, and advanced oxidation processes. Biodegradation of sucralose in waterworks did not occur significantly. Electrochemical oxidation of carbohydrates may be applied to seek degradation of sucralose. The kinetics of the oxidation of sucralose and the related carbohydrates by different oxidative species is compared. Free chlorine, ozone, and ferrate did not show any potential to degrade sucralose in water. Advanced oxidation processes, generating highly strong oxidizing agent hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), have demonstrated effectiveness in transforming sucralose in water. The mechanism of oxidation of sucralose by (•)OH is briefly discussed.

  17. Dynamic Wetting of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO Liquid Oxide on MgAl2O4 Spinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeyazdan, Hamed; Dogan, Neslihan; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Chapman, Michael W.; Monaghan, Brian J.

    2015-02-01

    Inclusion type and content in steel is critical in steelmaking, affecting both productivity through clogging, and downstream physical properties of the steel. They are normally removed from steel by reacting with a slag (liquid oxide) phase. For efficient inclusion removal, the inclusions must attach/bond with this liquid phase. The strength of the attachment can be in part characterized by the wettability of the liquid oxide on the inclusions. In this study, the dynamic wetting of liquid oxides of the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO system on a solid spinel (MgAl2O4) substrate with low porosity of 1.9 pct was measured at 1773 K (1500 °C) using a modified sessile drop technique. The dynamic contact angle between the liquid and solid spinel was determined for different CaO/Al2O3 mass percent ratios ranging from 0.98 to 1.55. Characteristic curves of wettability ( θ) vs time showed a rapid decrease in wetting in the first 10 seconds tending to a plateau value at extended times. A mathematical model for spreading behavior of liquid oxides by Choi and Lee was adopted and shown to provide a reasonable representation of the spreading behavior with time. The chemical interaction at the interface between spinel (MgAl2O4) and slag was analyzed by carrying out detailed thermodynamic evaluation and characterization using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy. There is evidence of liquid penetrating the substrate via pores and along grain boundaries, forming a penetration layer in the substrate. The depth of the penetration layer was found to be a function of substrate porosity and sample cooling rate. It decreased from ~350 µm for 6.7 pct-porous substrate to ~190 µm for substrate with porosity of 1.9 pct and from ~190 µm to ~50 µm for a slow-cooled liquid oxide-spinel substrate sample in the furnace to a rapidly cooled liquid cooled-spinel substrate sample, respectively.

  18. Recovery of phosphorus and aluminium from sewage sludge ash by a new wet chemical elution process (SESAL-Phos-recovery process).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzet, S; Peplinski, B; Bodkhe, S Y; Cornel, P

    2011-01-01

    The potential of a new wet chemical process for phosphorus and aluminium recovery from sewage sludge ash by sequential elution with acidic and alkaline solutions has been investigated: SESAL-Phos (sequential elution of sewage sludge ash for aluminium and phosphorus recovery). Its most innovative aspect is an acidic pre-treatment step in which calcium is leached from the sewage sludge ash. Thus the percentage of alkaline soluble aluminium phosphates is increased from 20 to 67%. This aluminium phosphate is then dissolved in alkali. Subsequently, the dissolved phosphorus is precipitated as calcium phosphate with low heavy metal content and recovered from the alkaline solution. Dissolved aluminium is recovered and may be reused as a precipitant in wastewater treatment plants.

  19. Wet air oxidation of pretreatment of pharmaceutical wastewater by Cu2+ and [PxWmOy]q- co-catalyst system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guowen; Wang, Dong; Xu, Xiaochen; Liu, Lifen; Yang, Fenglin

    2012-05-30

    This study concentrates on the pretreatment of real wastewater using catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO). WO(3-) and PO(4)(3-) contained in fosfomycin pharmaceutical wastewater (FPW) and Cu(2+) contained in berberine pharmaceutical wastewater (BPW) were studied as CWAO influent. Mixture of this two streams were reused to form Cu(2+) and [P(x)W(m)O(y)](q-), namely polyoxometalates (POMs) as co-catalyst system to treat themselves. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the initial oxygen pressure and temperature on the COD (chemical oxygen demand), TOC (total organic carbon) removal and biodegradable enhancement, it was discovered that over 40% of COD and TOC removal can be easily realized in an hour of WAO oxidation at 523 K, 1.4 MPa. The BOD(5)/COD (BOD(5), biochemical oxygen demand in 5 days) of this two pharmaceutical mixture ascended from nonexistent to maximum 0.41 depends on the optimal FPW:BPW volume ratio 4:1, to compose POM co-catalyst system. Organic pollutants were incompletely oxidized to propionic acid and other intermediates. Some properties (e.g., TGA, IR, XRF) of POM catalyst separated from effluent, were obtained to provide additional information.

  20. Sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials for catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of m-cresol in batch and continuous reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Huangzhao; Yu, Li; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Bin; Sun, Chenglin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials (SWs) were evaluated for their catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWPO) performance of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. The SWs were produced by carbonization (SW); carbonization with the addition of CaO (CaO-SW); HNO3 pretreatment (HNO3-SW) and steam activation (Activated-SW). The properties of SW catalysts were assessed by thermogravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence, Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and zeta potential. The results showed that SW treated by HNO3 (HNO3-SW) had a high conversion of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. Under the conditions of batch reaction (Cm-cresol = 100 mg L(-1), CH2O2 = 15.7 mmol L(-1), initial pH=7.0, 0.5 g L(-1) catalyst, 80°C, 180 min adsorption and 210 min oxidation), the conversion of m-cresol reached 100% and total organic carbon removal was 67.1%. It had a high catalytic activity and stability on the treatment of m-cresol in CWPO for more than 1100 h. Furthermore, a possible reaction mechanism for the oxidation of m-cresol to 2-methyl-p-benzoquinone by CWPO was proposed.

  1. Catalytic wet oxidation of aqueous methylamine: comparative study on the catalytic performance of platinum-ruthenium, platinum, and ruthenium catalysts supported on titania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aiying; Lu, Gongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Promotion of the dispersion of Ru species supported on TiO2 was achieved by introduction of Pt component and the role of Pt in enhancing the catalytic performances of Pt-Ru was investigated with catalytic wet air oxidation of methylamine used as a probing reaction. It was found that Pt-Ru/TiO2 displayed a much better catalytic performance compared with Pt/TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts due to having the highest dispersion of active species. Both high total organic carbon conversion and nitrogen selectivity (∼100%) over Pt-Ru/TiO2 catalyst were achieved at low temperature (200 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization indicated that there were strong interactions between metal particles and the support, which may increase the catalytic performance of catalysts.

  2. Treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation: comparative study over CuO/CeO2 and NiO/Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersöz, Gülin; Atalay, Süheyda

    2012-12-30

    The treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was studied in a bubble reactor. The experiments were performed to investigate the effects of catalyst loading, temperature, reaction time, air flow rate, and pressure on aniline removal. The catalytic effects of the prepared nanostructured catalysts, CuO/CeO(2) (10% wt) and NiO/Al(2)O(3) (10% wt), on the CWAO treatment efficiency were also examined and compared. The prepared catalysts seem to be active having an aniline removal of 45.7% with CuO/CeO(2) and 41.9% with NiO/Al(2)O(3). The amount of N(2) formed was approximately the same for both of the catalysts.

  3. Performance of the wet oxidation unit of the HPLC isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for halogenated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilevska, Tetyana; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans Hermann

    2014-08-05

    The performance of liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) for polar halogenated compounds was evaluated. Oxidation capacity of the system was tested with halogenated acetic acids and halogenated aromatic compounds. Acetic acid (AA) was selected as a reference compound for complete oxidation and compared on the molar basis to the oxidation of other analytes. The isotope values were proofed with calibrated δ(13)C values obtained with an elemental analyzer (EA). Correct isotope values were obtained for mono- and dichlorinated, fluorinated, and tribrominated acetic acids and also for aniline, phenol, benzene, bromobenzene, chlorobenzene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, pentafluorophenol, and nitrobenzene. Incomplete oxidation of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) resulted in lower recovery compared to AA (37% and 24%, respectively) and in isotopic shift compared to values obtained with EA (TCA Δδ(13)C(EA/LC-IRMS) = 8.8‰, TFA Δδ(13)C(EA/LC-IRMS) = 6.0‰). Improvement of oxidation by longer reaction time in the reactor and increase in the concentration of sulfate radicals did not lead to complete combustion of TCA and TFA needed for δ(13)C analysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such highly chlorinated compounds were studied with the LC-IRMS system. This work provides information for method development of LC-IRMS methods for halogenated contaminants that are known as potential threats to public health and the environment.

  4. The Evonik-Uhde HPPO process for proplene oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, B.; Baerz, M. [Evonik Industries, Hanau (Germany); Schemel, J.; Kolbe, B. [Uhde GmbH, Dortmund/Bad Soden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In 2008 the HPPO technology has shown up as an economically and environmentally friendly alternative for manufacturing of propylene oxide. The HPPO technology offers the advantage of an on purpose process for manufacturing of propylene oxide without dependency on disposal or marketing of coupling products. (orig.)

  5. Improved Aeration Process - Catalytic Role Of The Iron Oxides In Arsenic Oxidation And Coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    an improved aeration process that can also help in developing better arsenic removal treatment. The results present advantages of arsenic oxidation in an aeration process in the presence of ferrihydrite surface that have been shown to adsorb arsenic simultaneously to its oxidation. The presence...... of precipitated (ferrihydrite surface) and dissolved iron enhanced arsenic oxidation in comparison to solution with absence of precipitated iron in laboratory scale experiments. However, in the pilot scale studies the adsorption of arsenite on ferrihydrite was found to be the main process occurring during...... implementation of the process in the waterworks that are struggling with arsenic related issues....

  6. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation –Process Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  7. Improved method for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon in natural water by silver filter filtration, wet chemical oxidation, and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Brenton, R.W.; Kammer, J.A.; Jha, V.K.; O'Mara-Lopez, P. G.; Woodworth, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    Precision and accuracy are reported for the first time for the analysis of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by silver membrane filtration followed by wet chemical oxidation. A water sample is pressure filtered through a 0.45-??m-pore-size, 47-mm-diameter silver membrane filter. The silver membrane filter then is cut into ribbons and placed in a flame-sealable glass ampule. The organic material trapped on the membrane filter strips is acidified, purged with oxygen to remove inorganic carbonates and volatile organic compounds, and oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in the sealed glass ampule. The resulting CO2 is measured by a nondispersive infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO2 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the environmental water sample. The quantitation and method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 mg/L. The average percent recovery in five representative matrices was 97 ?? 11%. The errors associated with sampling and sample preparation of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon are also described.Precision and accuracy are reported for the first time for the analysis of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by silver membrane filtration followed by wet chemical oxidation. A water sample is pressure filtered through a 0.45-??m-pore-size, 47-mm-diameter silver membrane filter. The silver membrane filter then is cut into ribbons and placed in a flame-sealable glass ampule. The organic material trapped on the membrane filter strips is acidified, purged with oxygen to remove inorganic carbonates and volatile organic compounds, and oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in the sealed glass ampule. The resulting CO2 is measured by a nondispersive infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO2 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the environmental water sample

  8. Comparisons of Three Advanced Oxidation Processes in Organic Matter Removal from Esfahan Composting Factory Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    karimi B.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and Objectives: Wet air oxidation (WAO is one of the advanced oxidation process which is mostly used to reduce organic matter concentration from industrial wastewater, toxic and non biodegradable substance and solid waste leachate.The objective of this paper is comparisons of three advance oxidation in organic matter removal in different conditions from Esfahan composing factory leachateMaterial and Methods: The experiment was carried out by adding 1.5 Lit pretreated leachate sample to 3Lit autoclave reactor and adding 10 bar pressure at temperature of 100, 200 and 300 °C and pressure (10 bars with retention time of 30, 60 and 90 min. leachate sample in 18 stages from composting factory in Isfahan in the volume of 20 lit was taken and the three methodsWAO, WPO, and a combination of WAO/GAC were used for pre-treatments. Pure oxygen and 30% hydrogen peroxide was used as oxidation agent.Results: The result shows significant improvement on the removal rate of COD (7.8-33.3%, BOD5 (14.7-50.6%by WAO process.The removal efficiency of 4.6-34% COD, 24-50% BOD, was observed in the reactor.Adding theGACto the reactor improved removal efficiency of all parameters.Combination Process (WAO/GAC removed 48% of COD, 31-43.6% of BOD.Combination process demonstrated higher efficiency than two other previous methods as BOD5/COD ratio of 90% achieved.Conclusion: The WAO process presented in this paper is efficient for pretreatment of leachate, And the modified WPO process remove organic materials and ammonia moreover WAO/GAC can be considered as an excellent alternative treatment for removing reluctant organic matter (COD, BOD5 and organic nitrogen compounds, which found in leachate.

  9. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Kolovratník Michal; Bartoš Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  10. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  11. Wetting and Interfacial Characteristics of Mg AZ61 Alloy/Galvanized Steel in Cold Metal Transfer Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiaoli; Yang, Fan; Cao, Rui; Chen, Jianhong; Guo, Tingbiao

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic sessile drop method was used to study the wetting behavior of galvanized steel by molten Mg AZ61 alloy under cold metal transfer condition. The interfacial microstructures were also analyzed by using scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometry. The observed results showed that the wetting behavior was directly determined by the wire feed speed (or the heat input). The Al-Fe intermetallic layer and Zn-rich zone were observed both at the interface and at the close of triple line. The formations of these interfacial characteristics satisfy the thermodynamic characteristic of Mg-Al/Fe and Mg-Zn/Fe systems.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of synthetic CoS oxidation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štrbac N.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of kinetics and mechanism for synthetic a-CoS oxidation process are presented in this paper. Based on experimental data obtained using DTA and XRD analysis and constructed PSD diagrams for Co-S-O system, mechanism of synthetic a-CoS oxidation process is suggested. Characteristic kinetic parameters were obtained for experimental isothermal investigations of desulfurization degree using Sharp method.

  13. Ames vision group research overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    A major goal of the reseach group is to develop mathematical and computational models of early human vision. These models are valuable in the prediction of human performance, in the design of visual coding schemes and displays, and in robotic vision. To date researchers have models of retinal sampling, spatial processing in visual cortex, contrast sensitivity, and motion processing. Based on their models of early human vision, researchers developed several schemes for efficient coding and compression of monochrome and color images. These are pyramid schemes that decompose the image into features that vary in location, size, orientation, and phase. To determine the perceptual fidelity of these codes, researchers developed novel human testing methods that have received considerable attention in the research community. Researchers constructed models of human visual motion processing based on physiological and psychophysical data, and have tested these models through simulation and human experiments. They also explored the application of these biological algorithms to applications in automated guidance of rotorcraft and autonomous landing of spacecraft. Researchers developed networks for inhomogeneous image sampling, for pyramid coding of images, for automatic geometrical correction of disordered samples, and for removal of motion artifacts from unstable cameras.

  14. Oxidation processes and clogging in intermittent unsaturated infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancolé, A; Brissaud, F; Gnagne, T

    2003-01-01

    Intermittent infiltration of wastewater through a non saturated sand bed is an extensive treatment process aimed at eliminating organic pollution, oxidizing ammonia and removing pathogens. A 1D numerical model, IPOX, has been worked out to simulate the transfer and oxidation of dissolved organic matter and nitrogen in unsaturated sand beds. IPOX was calibrated after real scale tests performed in Spain and Burkina Faso. Simulations allowed us to point out the influence of (i) kinetics on oxidation performances and (ii) biomass development on the process sustainability. These results brought a new light on the sizing and operation of infiltration percolation and soil aquifer treatment (SAT) plants.

  15. 高级氧化技术在水处理中的研究进展%RESEARCH PROCESS OF ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江传春; 肖蓉蓉; 杨平

    2011-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes can effectively treat industrial wastewater of high density,high toxicity and poor biodegradability.The basic principle of advanced oxidation technologies was reviewed.The research process in recent years for wastewater treatment by Fenton.photo-catalytic oxi-dation,ozone oxidation,ultrasonic oxidation,wet oxidation and supercritical water oxidation,was summarized.The advantages and shortcomings in practice of each advanced oxidation technology were researched into.and the main development direction in future of them were also pointed out.%高级氧化技术对高浓度、高毒性、可生化性差的工业废水具有很好的降解效果.介绍了高级氧化技术的机理,综述了Fenton氧化法、光催化氧化法、臭氧氧化法、超声氧化法、湿式氧化法和超临界水氧化法在水处理领域的研究进展和应用,探讨了各种高级氧化技术在实践应用中的优势和缺陷,并指出其今后的主要发展方向.

  16. Photoresist-Free Fully Self-Patterned Transparent Amorphous Oxide Thin-Film Transistors Obtained by Sol-Gel Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Soo; Rim, You Seung; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrated self-patterned solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) using photosensitive sol-gels. The photosensitive sol-gels were synthesized by adding β-diketone compounds, i.e., benzoylacetone and acetylacetone, to sol-gels. The chemically modified photosensitive sol-gels showed a high optical absorption at specific wavelengths due to the formation of metal chelate bonds. Photoreactions of the modified solutions enabled a photoresist-free process. Moreover, Zn-Sn-O with a high Sn ratio, which is hard to wet-etch using conventional photolithography due to its chemical durability, was easily patterned via the self-patterning process. Finally, we fabricated a solution-processed oxide TFT that included fully self-patterned electrodes and an active layer.

  17. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for "realistic" surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH3-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is - apart from a slight change in surface composition - identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  18. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol over CeO2-TiO2 catalyst in the batch reactor and the packed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng; Wang, Jianbing; Chen, Zhengxiong

    2008-05-30

    CeO2-TiO2 catalysts are prepared by coprecipitation method, and the activity and stability in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol are investigated in a batch reactor and packed-bed reactor. CeO2-TiO2 mixed oxides show the higher activity than pure CeO2 and TiO2, and CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst displays the highest activity in the CWAO of phenol. In a batch reactor, COD and TOC removals are about 100% and 77% after 120 min in the CWAO of phenol over CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst at reaction temperature of 150 degrees C, the total pressure of 3 MPa, phenol concentration of 1000 mg/L, and catalyst dosage of 4 g/L. In a packed-bed reactor using CeO2-TiO2 1/1 particle catalyst, over 91% COD and 80% TOC removals are obtained at the reaction temperature of 140 degrees C, the air total pressure of 3.5 MPa, the phenol concentration of 1000 mg/L for 100 h continue reaction. Leaching of metal ions of CeO2-TiO2 1/1 particle catalyst is very low during the continuous reaction. CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst exhibits the excellent activity and stability in the CWAO of phenol.

  19. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A; García, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg-Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min(-1) and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min(-1), respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1). After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1), attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity.

  20. Degradation of cationic red GTL by catalytic wet air oxidation over Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst under room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin; Li, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Xiang; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Xueye

    2012-03-06

    To overcome the drawback of catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with high temperature and high pressure, the catalytic activity of Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst for degradation of cationic red GTL under room temperature and atmospheric pressure was investigated. Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst was prepared by coprecipitation and impregnation. XRD, TG-DTG, and XPS were used to characterize the resulting sample. Central composition design using response surface methodology was employed to optimize correlation of factors on the decolorization of cationic red GTL. The results show that the optimal conditions of pH value, initial concentration of dye and catalyst dosage were found to be 4.0, 85 mg/L and 2.72 g/L, respectively, for maximum decolorization of 80.1% and TOC removal of 50.9%. Furthermore, the reaction on the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst and degradation mechanism of cationic red GTL was studied by Electron spin resonance (ESR) and GC-MS technique. The possible reaction mechanism was that the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst can efficiently react with adsorbed oxygen/H(2)O to produce ·OH and (1)O(2) and finally induce the degradation of cationic red GTL. GC-MS analysis of the degradation products indicates that cationic red GTL was initiated by the cleavage of -N ═ N- and the intermediates were further oxidized by ·OH or (1)O(2).

  1. Wet oxidation of phenol on Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocevar, S.; Batista, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering; Levec, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Lab. of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering]|[Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-05-15

    Ce{sub 1{minus}x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2{minus}{delta}} catalysts with 0.05 < x < 0.20 for catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in aqueous solutions have been synthesized using the coprecipitation method. The three most important synthesis parameters, the concentration of the mixed metal salt solution, the rate of coprecipitant addition and the stirrer speed during coprecipitation, were optimized with central composite design using the catalytic activity as a response function. The catalytic activity strongly depends on stirrer speed during coprecipitation. A high mutual dispersion of copper oxide and ceria, having the average crystallite size of about 9 nm, enhances solid solution formation. The unit cell parameter of ceria decreases when the overall concentration of copper in the catalyst increases, most probably obeying Vegard`s law. The catalysts proved to be very stable in hydrothermal reaction conditions at low pH values. After 5 h of reaction in the semibatch CST reactor less than 100 ppm of Cu was leached out of catalyst samples that were calcined in a flow of air for 2 h above 1033 K, and only a very low quantity of carbonaceous deposits were formed on the surface of the catalysts (0.6 wt%). The kinetics of phenol degradation could be interpreted by an equation valid for homogeneous autocatalytic reactions, in which the rate constant depends linearly on the heterogeneous catalyst (Cu) concentrations. This demonstrates that the reaction proceeds through a heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-branched chain mechanism.

  2. Degradation of remazol golden yellow dye wastewater in microwave enhanced ClO2 catalytic oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoyi; Wang, Peng; Jiao, Chunyan; Cao, Hailei

    2009-09-15

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the removal of remazol golden yellow dye in order to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of microwave enhanced chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) catalytic oxidation process. The catalyst used in this process was CuO(n)-La(2)O(3)/gamma-Al(2)O(3). The operating parameters such as the ClO(2) dosage, catalyst dosage, and pH were evaluated. The results showed that microwave enhanced catalytic oxidation process could effectively degrade remazol golden yellow dye with low oxidant dosage in a short reaction time and extensive pH range compared to the conventional wet catalytic oxidation. Under the optimal condition (ClO(2) concentration 80 mg/L, microwave power 400 W, contacting time 1.5 min, catalyst dosage 70 g/L, and pH 7), color removal efficiency approached 94.03%, corresponding to 67.92% of total organic carbon removal efficiency. It was found that the fluorescence intensity in microwave enhanced ClO(2) catalytic oxidation system was about 500a.u. which was verified that there was much hydroxyl radical produced. Compared with different processes, microwave enhanced ClO(2) catalytic oxidation system could significantly enhance the degradation efficiency. It provides an effective technology for dye wastewater treatment.

  3. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  4. Characterization of wet pad surface in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process with full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Jung, Sung Pyo; Shin, Jun Geun; Yang, Danning; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2011-07-04

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a key process for global planarization of silicon wafers for semiconductors and AlTiC wafers for magnetic heads. Removal rate of wafer material is directly dependent on the surface roughness of a CMP pad, thus the structure of the pad surface has been evaluated with variable techniques. However, under in situ CMP process, the measurements have been severely limited due to the existence of polishing fluids including the slurry on the pad surface. In here, we newly introduce ultra-high resolution full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) to investigate the surface of wet pads. With FF-OCT, the wet pad surface could be quantitatively characterized in terms of the polishing pad lifetime, and also be three-dimensionally visualized. We found that reasonable polishing span could be evaluated from the surface roughness measurement and the groove depth measurement made by FF-OCT.

  5. Nano integrated circuit process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yung Sup

    2004-02-15

    This book contains nine chapters, which are introduction of manufacture of semiconductor chip, oxidation such as Dry-oxidation, wet oxidation, oxidation model and oxide film, diffusion like diffusion process, diffusion equation, diffusion coefficient and diffusion system, ion implantation, including ion distribution, channeling, multiimplantation and masking and its system, sputtering such as CVD and PVD, lithography, wet etch and dry etch, interconnection and flattening like metal-silicon connection, silicide, multiple layer metal process and flattening, an integrated circuit process, including MOSFET and CMOS.

  6. Unexpected toxicity to aquatic organisms of some aqueous bisphenol A samples treated by advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišler, Tatjana; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Şenilă, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, photocatalytic and catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) processes were used to examine removal efficiency of bisphenol A from aqueous samples over several titanate nanotube-based catalysts. Unexpected toxicity of bisphenol A (BPA) samples treated by means of the CWAO process to some tested species was determined. In addition, the CWAO effluent was recycled five- or 10-fold in order to increase the number of interactions between the liquid phase and catalyst. Consequently, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis indicated higher concentrations of some toxic metals like chromium, nickel, molybdenum, silver, and zinc in the recycled samples in comparison to both the single-pass sample and the photocatalytically treated solution. The highest toxicity of five- and 10-fold recycled solutions in the CWAO process was observed in water fleas, which could be correlated to high concentrations of chromium, nickel, and silver detected in tested samples. The obtained results clearly demonstrated that aqueous samples treated by means of advanced oxidation processes should always be analyzed using (i) chemical analyses to assess removal of BPA and total organic carbon from treated aqueous samples, as well as (ii) a battery of aquatic organisms from different taxonomic groups to determine possible toxicity.

  7. Downscaled anodic oxidation process for aluminium in oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, M.; Morgenstern, R.; Kuhn, D.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Schubert, A.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    The increasing multi-functionality of parts and assemblies in several fields of engineering demands, amongst others, highly functionalised surfaces. For the different applications, on the one hand, there is a need to scale up surface modification processes originating in the nano- and micro-scale. On the other hand, conventional macro-scale surface refinement methods offer a huge potential for application in the said nano- and micro-scale. The anodic oxidation process, which is established especially for aluminium and its alloys, allows the formation of oxide ceramic layers on the surface. The build-up of an oxide ceramic coating comes along with altered chemical, tribological and electrical surface properties. As a basis for further investigations regarding the use of the anodic oxidation process for micro-scale-manufacturing, the scale effects of oxalic acid anodising on commercially pure aluminium as well as on the AlZn5.5MgCu alloy are addressed in the present work. The focus is on the amount of oxide formed during a potentiostatic process in relation to the exchanged amount of charge. Further, the hardness of the coating as an integral measure to assess the porous oxide structure is approached by nano-indentation technique.

  8. Degradation of Arsenic in Wastewater of Wet-process Phosphoric Acid%湿法制磷酸废水中的有毒砷的消减

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄笛; 罗文明; 黄应平

    2014-01-01

    Physical absorption, photocatalysis and chemical flocculation methods were used to investigate the degradation of arsenic ( about 13.56 mg/L) in wastewater of wet-process phosphoric acid from a Chemical Co., Ltd in Yichang, China.The results showed that the absorption capacity of activated carbon was 1g/50mL and 84.4%arsenic could be absorbed efficiently,while the clay could not reach the saturat-ed adsorption in the physical absorption.As3+was oxidized to lower poisonous As5+by Fenton reagent and the removal rate reached 82.2%at the optimum parameter [ H2 O2 ] ∶[ Fe3+]=200 ∶1 using the photoca-talysis method.As to the method of chemical flocculation, the optimum conditions of flocculant-96, floc-culant-98, flocculant-diatomite were as follows: the optimum pH was 12.6, 12.6, 11.8, the optimum quantity of flocculant was 10,9,13 mg/mL and the removal rate of As3+was 65.7%,73.2%,76.3%,re-spectively.At last, an experimental device was designed to degradate arsenic in wastewater from Wet-process phosphoric acid and the concentration of As3+in the treated wastewater could meet the state stand-ard for discharging of industry wastewater.%采用物理吸附、光催化及化学絮凝三种方法对宜昌一化工有限公司湿法制磷酸中含As废水(砷含量为13.56 mg/L)进行了消减研究,三种方法中:物理吸附法活性炭的饱和吸附含量是1.0 g/50mL,此时废水84.4%的As被吸附除去,黏土的吸附试验中未发现吸附饱和现象;化学氧化法中,Fenton试剂最佳浓度比为[H2O2]∶[Fe3+]=200∶1,此时可以将82.2%的As3+氧化为低毒的As5+;化学絮凝法中,絮凝剂-96、絮凝剂-98及硅藻土三种絮凝剂作用的最佳pH分别为12.6、12.6、11.8,絮凝剂的最佳用量分别为10、9、13.0 mg/mL对废水中As3+转化率分别为65.7%、73.2%、76.3%.设计了含As废水处理装置,经处理后废水中As的含量达到国家工业废水排放标准.

  9. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  10. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Direct Blue 15) using solvothermally synthesized copper hydroxide nitrate as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuzhong; Zhou, Xiang; Fu, Bei; Chen, Yiliang

    2011-03-15

    Copper hydroxide nitrate (Cu(2)(OH)(3)NO(3)) was synthesized solvothermally in anhydrous ethanol and characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA and SEM. The peroxide degradation of an azo dye (Direct Blue 15) on this material was evaluated by examining catalyst loading, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide dosage, initial dye concentration and temperature. The leaching of Cu from the copper hydroxide nitrate during the reaction was also measured. The copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized solvothermally, which was of a novel spherical morphology with complex secondary structures and contained high-dispersed Cu(2)O impurity, showed good performance for oxidation degradation of the azo dye, especially high catalytic activity, high utilization of hydrogen peroxide and a wide pH range, whereas the copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized by the direct reaction of copper nitrate and sodium hydroxide showed low catalytic activity.

  11. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, P.; I. N. Sokolik; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water inter...

  12. Analysis of Pseudo-polymorphism Conversion of Theophylline During Wet Granulation and Drying Processes and Effect of Binder on Dehydration and Amorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Sasaki, Tetsuo; Katori, Noriko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a time-course analysis of the pseudo-polymorphism conversion (i.e., the hydration and dehydration) of the xanthine-related compound theophylline during wet granulation and drying processes, using terahertz spectroscopy. We also investigated the amorphization mechanism of theophylline hydrate during a drying process in a vacuum using terahertz, mid-infrared (mid-IR), and near-infrared (near-IR) spectroscopy. After a high-shear granulation process using a mixture of theophylline, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), and water, the terahertz spectrum (which was similar to that of an anhydride) was changed to a spectrum that was quite similar to that of a monohydrate. This result suggests that (1) an anhydride was converted to a monohydrate during the wet granulation process and (2) the spectrum was changed to the original waveform after the drying process with heat. This phenomenon indicates that the theophylline monohydrate was reconverted to an anhydride during the drying process. When wet granules were dried in a vacuum, the terahertz absorption lessened and finally disappeared with the passage of time, suggesting that the theophylline monohydrate in the granules was converted to an amorphous state. During the drying process with heat, the dehydration progressed temperature dependently regardless of the presence/absence of HPC. In addition, the reconversion from a monohydrate to an anhydride was completed concurrently with the completion of dehydration. The conversion rate of theophylline from a monohydrate to an amorphous form in granules (with HPC) was faster than that without HPC. This observation suggests that HPC promotes the amorphization of theophylline.

  13. A continuous production process for silica aerogel powders based on sodium silicate by fluidized bed drying of wet-gel slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Sharad D.; Park, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yong-Ha; Kim, Jong-Soon; Han, Jong-Hun

    2008-09-01

    The present study described a continuous process for the production of hydrophobic silica aerogel powders based on an inexpensive precursor such as sodium silicate. Fluidization technique was employed for the drying of wet-gel slurry at an ambient pressure. The fluidization column was fed with the silylated wet-gel slurry in a continuous mode and the fluidization was carried out at 220 °C. The aerogel powder collected in Trap-I was fluidized twice at room temperature in order to separate the lighter aerogel particles from the first trap. The tapping density of the aerogel powder decreased from 0.09 to 0.05 g/cm 3 for Trap-II, however, the microstructure did not differ significantly. Using this process, hydrophobic silica aerogel powders exhibiting tapping density as low as 0.05 g/cm 3, high specific surface area of 783 m 2/g and cumulative pore volume of 1.79 cm 3/g have been obtained. The aerogels were characterized by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), BET specific surface area, N 2 physisorption isotherms, pore size distribution and particle size analyses. The results have been compared with aerogel powders obtained by ambient pressure drying of the wet-gel slurry in a furnace.

  14. A continuous production process for silica aerogel powders based on sodium silicate by fluidized bed drying of wet-gel slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, Sh.D.; Park, K.T.; Kim, Y.H. [Pukyong National Univ., Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Powder Technology Lab., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.S. [NGETECH Inc., Nam-Gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Han, J.H. [Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The present study described a continuous process for the production of hydrophobic silica aerogel powders based on an inexpensive precursor such as sodium silicate. Fluidization technique was employed for the drying of wet-gel slurry at an ambient pressure. The fluidization column was fed with the silylated wet-gel slurry in a continuous mode and the fluidization was carried out at 220 C. The aerogel powder collected in Trap-I was fluidized twice at room temperature in order to separate the lighter aerogel particles from the first trap. The tapping density of the aerogel powder decreased from 0.09 to 0.05 g/cm{sup 3} for Trap-II, however, the microstructure did not differ significantly. Using this process, hydrophobic silica aerogel powders exhibiting tapping density as low as 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}, high specific surface area of 783 m{sup 2}/g and cumulative pore volume of 1.79 cm{sup 3}/g have been obtained. The aerogels were characterized by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), BET specific surface area, N{sub 2} physi-sorption isotherms, pore size distribution and particle size analyses. The results have been compared with aerogel powders obtained by ambient pressure drying of the wet-gel slurry in a furnace. (authors)

  15. Oxygen vacancy promoted methane partial oxidation over iron oxide oxygen carriers in the chemical looping process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Lang; Guo, Mengqing; Xu, Mingyuan; Fan, Jonathan A; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2016-11-30

    We perform ab initio DFT+U calculations and experimental studies of the partial oxidation of methane to syngas on iron oxide oxygen carriers to elucidate the role of oxygen vacancies in oxygen carrier reactivity. In particular, we explore the effect of oxygen vacancy concentration on sequential processes of methane dehydrogenation, and oxidation with lattice oxygen. We find that when CH4 adsorbs onto Fe atop sites without neighboring oxygen vacancies, it dehydrogenates with CHx radicals remaining on the same site and evolves into CO2via the complete oxidation pathway. In the presence of oxygen vacancies, on the other hand, the formed methyl (CH3) prefers to migrate onto the vacancy site while the H from CH4 dehydrogenation remains on the original Fe atop site, and evolves into CO via the partial oxidation pathway. The oxygen vacancies created in the oxidation process can be healed by lattice oxygen diffusion from the subsurface to the surface vacancy sites, and it is found that the outward diffusion of lattice oxygen atoms is more favorable than the horizontal diffusion on the same layer. Based on the proposed mechanism and energy profile, we identify the rate-limiting steps of the partial oxidation and complete oxidation pathways. Also, we find that increasing the oxygen vacancy concentration not only lowers the barriers of CH4 dehydrogenation but also the cleavage energy of Fe-C bonds. However, the barrier of the rate-limiting step cannot further decrease when the oxygen vacancy concentration reaches 2.5%. The fundamental insight into the oxygen vacancy effect on CH4 oxidation with iron oxide oxygen carriers can help guide the design and development of more efficient oxygen carriers and CLPO processes.

  16. Mechanical and tribological properties of oxide layers obtained on titanium in the thermal oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniołek, K.; Kupka, M.; Barylski, A.; Dercz, G.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of tests concerning a modification to the surface of titanium Grade 2 in the thermal oxidation process. It describes the oxidation kinetics of the tested material in the temperature range of 600-800 °C, with a duration from 20 min to 72 h. The greatest increase in mass was found in specimens oxidised at a temperature of 800 °C. The morphology of the obtained oxide layers was determined. The particles of oxides formed were noticeably larger after oxidation at a temperature of 600 °C. Raising temperature resulted in the formation of fine compact particles in the oxide layer. A phase analysis of oxidation products showed that TiO2 in the crystallographic form of rutile and Ti3O are the prevalent types of oxide at a temperature of 600 and 700 °C. On the other hand, only rutile formed at a temperature of 800 °C. Tribological tests showed that the presence of an oxide layer on the surface of titanium significantly improved resistance to abrasive wear. It was found that volumetric wear had decreased by 48% for a specimen oxidised at a temperature of 600 °C and by more than 60% for a specimen subjected to isothermal soaking at a temperature of 700 °C.

  17. Introduction to Wet Manufacture Process of Non-woven Wallpaper%浅析湿法无纺布壁纸制造工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 李晓春; 朱明

    2012-01-01

    介绍了湿法无纺布壁纸制造工艺流程,分析了造纸原料选择、悬浮液制备、湿法成形、热轧固化、印花及包装后整理等工艺技术对无纺布壁纸质量的影响.%Non-woven wallpaper is a kind of new environmentally friendly wallpaper which has excellent performance, and it will be developed very widely. In this paper, the wet manufacture process of non-woven wallpaper was introduced. The selection of raw materials, the suspension preparing technology, the wet netting technology, the hot-pressing and curing technology, the printing technology and package finishing technology were discussed in detail.

  18. Investigation of the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol over different types of Cu/ZSM-5 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkaj, K Maduna; Katovic, A; Zrncević, S

    2007-06-18

    In this work oxidation of phenol with hydrogen peroxide on Cu/ZSM-5 catalysts was studied. The catalysts samples were prepared by two different methods: by ionic exchange from the protonic form of commercial ZSM-5 zeolite, and by direct hydrothermal synthesis. Characterization of the catalysts extends to X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the adsorption techniques were used for the measurement of the specific surface area. The catalytic tests were carried out in a stainless steel Parr reactor in batch operation mode at the atmospheric pressure and the temperature range from 50 to 80 degrees C. The mass ratio of the active metal component on the zeolite was in the range of 1.62-3.24 wt.%. for catalyst prepared by direct hydrothermal synthesis and 2.23-3.52 wt.% for catalyst prepared by ion exchange method. The initial concentration of phenol and hydrogen peroxide was 0.01 and 0.1 mol dm(-3), respectively. The influence of different methods of Cu/ZSM-5 preparation on their catalytic performance was monitored in terms of phenol conversion and degree of metal leached into aqueous solution.

  19. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel, part 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A summary of optical techniques for the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels are discussed. Six optical techniques were studied: Schlieren, light sheet and laser vapor screen, angle of attack, model deformation, infrared imagery, and digital image processing. The study includes surveys and reviews of wind tunnel optical techniques, some conceptual designs, and recommendations for use of optical methods in the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels. Particular emphasis was placed on searching for systems developed for wind tunnel use and on commercial systems which could be readily adapted for wind tunnels. This final report is to summarize the major results and recommendations.

  20. Preparation of oxide powder by continuous oxidation process from recycled Fe-77Ni alloy scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, J. Y.; Park, D. H.; Jung, G. J.; Wang, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-77Ni alloy scrap was studied under a 0.2 atm oxygen partial pressure at the temperature range of 400°C to 900°C. The oxidation rate was found to be increased with an increase of temperature and followed the parabolic rate law with linearly proportional to temperature. Microstructure and cross-sectional area of the oxide layer were examined by SEM, EDX, and XRD. It could be speculated that rate-limiting step was controlled by diffusion through either the spinel structure or the NiO layer, both of which were present in this alloy during oxidation at elevated temperatures. In the long run, oxide powder less than 10 μm from Fe-77Ni alloy scrap was obtained using ball-milling and sieving processes and recovery ratio approached up to 97% for 15 hours.