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Sample records for ames wet oxidation process

  1. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests

  2. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    DETOX SM is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit

  3. Preliminary comparison of three processes of AlN oxidation: dry, wet and mixed ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbutowicz R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three methods of AlN layers oxidation: dry, wet and mixed (wet with oxygen were compared. Some physical parameters of oxidized thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN layers grown on silicon Si(1 1 1 were investigated by means Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE. Three series of the thermal oxidations processes were carried out at 1012 °C in pure nitrogen as carrying gas and various gas ambients: (a dry oxidation with oxygen, (b wet oxidation with water steam and (c mixed atmosphere with various process times. All the research methods have shown that along with the rising of the oxidation time, AlN layer across the aluminum oxide nitride transforms to aluminum oxide. The mixed oxidation was a faster method than the dry or wet ones.

  4. Measurement of the oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention relates to processes for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid and more particularly to the oxidation-extraction steps in the DEPA-TOPO process for such recovery. A more efficient use of oxidant is obtained by monitoring the redox potential during the extraction step

  5. The Study of LeachateTreatment by Using Three Advanced Oxidation Process Based Wet air Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behroz Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300[degree sign] as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  6. Oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The invention involves an improvement to the reductive stripping process for recovering uranium values from wet-process phosphoric acid solution, where uranium in the solution is oxidized to uranium (VI) oxidation state and then extracted from the solution by contact with a water immiscible organic solvent, by adding sufficient oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, to obtain greater than 90 percent conversion of the uranium to the uranium (VI) oxidation state to the phosphoric acid solution and simultaneously extracting the uranium (VI)

  7. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  8. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  9. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Skammelsen Schmidt, A.

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates `losses` of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation.

  10. Development of chemical and biological processes for production of bioethanol. Optimization of the wet oxidation process and characterization of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Skammelsen Schmidt, A.

    1997-02-01

    The combination of the wet oxidation pretreatment process and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated in order to efficiently solubilize the hemicellulose, degrade the lignin, and open the solid crystalline cellulose structure of wheat straw lignocellulose without generating fermentation inhibitors. The effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, reaction time, and concentration of straw were evaluated. The degree of lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with the reaction temperature and time. The optimum conditions were 15 minutes at 185 deg. C, producing 9.8 g/L hemicellulose. For quantification of the solubilized hemicellulose the best overall acid hydrolysis was obtained by treatment with 4 %w/v sulfuric acid for 10 minutes. The Aminex HPX-87H column was less sensitive towards impurities than the Aminex HPX-87P column. HPX-87H gave improved recovery and reproducibility, and was chosen for routine quantification of hydrolyzed hemicellulose sugars. The purity of the solid cellulose fraction also improved with higher temperature. The optimum condition for obtaining enzymatic convertible cellulose (90%) was 10 minutes at 170 deg. C using a high carbonate concentration. The hemicellulose yield and recovery were significantly reduced under these conditions indicating that a simultaneous optimal utilization of the hemicellulose and cellulose was difficult. The oxygen pressure and sodium carbonate concentration had little effect on the solubilization of hemicellulose, however, by combining wet oxidation with alkaline hydrolysis the formation of 2-furfural, a known microbial inhibitor, was minimal. Much more hemicellulose and lignin were solubilized from the straw by wet oxidation than by steaming(an alternative process). More cellulose was solubilized (and degraded) by steaming than by wet oxidation. Overall carbohydrates 'losses' of 20.1% for steaming and 16.2% for wet oxidation were found. More 2-furfural was formed by steaming than by wet oxidation

  11. Effective treatment of oily scum via catalytic wet persulfate oxidation process activated by Fe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xingzhong; Guan, Renpeng; Wu, Zhibin; Jiang, Longbo; Li, Yifu; Chen, Xiaohong; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-04-05

    Oily scum, a hazardous by-product of petroleum industry, need to be deposed urgently to reduce environmental risks. This paper introduces catalytic wet persulfate oxidation (CWPO) process in the treatment of oily scum to realize risk relief. Under the activation of heat and Fe 2+ , persulfate (PS) was decomposed into sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals, which played a major role on the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. The effects of wet air oxidation (WAO) and CWPO process on the degradation of oily scum were compared. In CWPO process, the total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) content of oily scum was decreased from 92.63% to 16.75%, which was still up to 70.19% in WAO process. The degradation rate of TPHs in CWPO process was about 3.38 times higher than that in WAO process. The great performance of CWPO process was also confirmed by elemental analysis, which indicated that the C and H contents of oily scum were reduced significantly by CWPO process. These results indicated that CWPO process has high potential on the degradation of oily scum for environmental protection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Integration of advanced oxidation processes at mild conditions in wet scrubbers for odourous sulphur compounds treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Esther; Martin, Maria J; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The effectiveness of different advanced oxidation processes on the treatment of a multicomponent aqueous solution containing ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide (0.5 mg L(-1) of each sulphur compound) was investigated with the objective to assess which one is the most suitable treatment to be coupled in wet scrubbers used in odour treatment facilities. UV/H2O2, Fenton, photo-Fenton and ozone treatments were tested at mild conditions and the oxidation efficiency obtained was compared. The oxidation tests were carried out in magnetically stirred cylindrical quartz reactors using the same molar concentration of oxidants (hydrogen peroxide or ozone). The results show that ozone and photo-Fenton are the most efficient treatments, achieving up to 95% of sulphur compounds oxidation and a mineralisation degree around 70% in 10 min. Furthermore, the total costs of the treatments taking into account the capital and operational costs were also estimated for a comparative purpose. The economic analysis revealed that the Fenton treatment is the most economical option to be integrated in a wet scrubber to remove volatile organic sulphur compounds, as long as there are no space constraints to install the required reactor volume. In the case of reactor volume limitation or retrofitting complexities, the ozone and photo-Fenton treatments should be considered as viable alternatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge with a hybrid process of low pressure wet oxidation and nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöcher, Christoph; Niewersch, Claudia; Melin, Thomas

    2012-04-15

    Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge will become increasingly important within the next decades due to depletion of mineral phosphorus resources. In this work a new process concept was investigated, which aims at realising phosphorus recovery in a synergistic way with the overall sewage sludge treatment scheme. This process combines a low pressure wet oxidation for sewage sludge decomposition as well as phosphorus dissolution and a nanofiltration process to separate phosphorus from heavy metals and obtain a clean diluted phosphoric acid, from which phosphorus can be recovered as clean fertiliser. It was shown that this process concept is feasible for sewage sludge for wastewater treatment plants that apply enhanced biological removal or precipitation with alumina salts for phosphorus removal. The critical parameter for phosphorus dissolution in the low pressure wet oxidation process is the iron concentration, while in the nanofiltration multi-valent cations play a predominant role. In total, a phosphorus recovery of 54% was obtained for an exemplary wastewater treatment plant. Costs of the entire process are in the same range as conventional sewage sludge disposal, with the benefit being phosphorus recovery and reduced emission of greenhouse gases due to avoidance of sludge incineration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of toxic and hazardous organic wastes by wet oxidation process with oxygenated water at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccinno, T.; Salluzzo, A.; Nardi, L.; Gili, M.; Luce, A.; Troiani, F.; Cornacchia, G.

    1989-11-01

    The wet oxidation process using air or molecular oxygen is a well-known process from long time. It is suitable to oxidize several types of waste refractory to the usual biological, thermal and chemical treatments. The drastic operating conditions (high pressures and temperatures) prevented its industrial development. In the last years a new interest was assigned to the process for the treatment of nuclear wastes (organic resins and exhaust organic wastes); the treatment is carried out at widely reduced operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and boiling temperature) by means of metallic catalysts and hydrogen peroxide. With some limits, the wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide at low temperature can be applied to conventional waste waters containing toxic organic compounds. In the present report are summarized the activities developed at ENEA Fuel Cycle Department by the task force 'Deox' constituted by laboratory and plant specialists in order to verify the application of the wet oxidation process to the treatment of the toxic wastes. (author)

  15. Development of a novel wet oxidation process for hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. The over all objective of the effort described here is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of these multi-component wastes, with the aim of providing a versatile, non-thermal method which will destroy hazardous organic compounds while simultaneously containing and concentrating toxic and radioactive metals for recovery or disposal in a readily stabilized matrix. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials. The metal catalysts are in the form of salts dissolved in a dilute acid solution. A typical catalyst composition is 60% ferric chloride, 3--4% hydrochloric acid, 0.13% platinum ions, and 0.13% ruthenium ions in a water solution. The catalyst solution is maintained at 423--473 K. Wastes are introduced into contact with the solution, where their organic portion is oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. If the organic portion is chlorinated, hydrogen chloride will be produced as a product. The process is a viable alternative to incineration for the treatment of organic mixed wastes. Estimated costs for waste treatment using the process are from $2.50/kg to $25.00/kg, depending on the size of the unit and the amount of waste processed. Process units can be mobile for on-site treatment of wastes. Results from phase 1 and 2, design and engineering studies, are described

  16. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1983-02-01

    A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

  17. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Catalytic wet oxidation of black liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Riera, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The major aspects of wet air oxidation and catalytic wet air oxidation have been reviewed in this work paying special attention to the reaction mechanisms, kinetics and the industrial process. In the experimental section a set of heterogeneous catalysts have been tested in the wet oxidation of non-wood black liquor. The oxidation runs were performed batchwise in a laboratory-scale mechanically stirred slurry reactor for 1 h at a temperature of 170°C and total pressure of 12 bar. Pure oxygen w...

  19. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-01-01

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 /ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  20. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azabou, Samia [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Najjar, Wahiba [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouaziz, Mohamed [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, Abdelhamid [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Sayadi, Sami, E-mail: sami.sayadi@cbs.rnrt.tn [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  1. Extraction-wet oxidation process using sulphuric acid for treatment of TBP-dodecane wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshingkar, D.S.; Kartha, P.K.S.

    1998-03-01

    In the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, 30% n-tributyl phosphate in hydrocarbon diluent is used for extraction of uranium and plutonium from the spent fuel by Purex process. When TBP-dodecane can no longer be purified from its degradation products, it is discarded as alpha bearing, intermediate level wastes containing plutonium and ruthenium-106. To overcome shortcomings of extraction-pyrolysis and saponification processes, studies were undertaken to find the suitability of H 2 SO 4 as an alternative extractant for TBP. Oxidation of TBP to H 3 PO 4 using H 2 O 2 was also explored as H 3 PO 4 can be treated by known procedures for removal of plutonium and ruthenium-106. The experiments were conducted with aged spent solvent wastes discharged from reprocessing plant at Trombay using H 2 SO 4 and H 2 SO 4 - H 3 PO 4 mixture. The decontamination factors (DFs) for alpha activity were found to be satisfactory. The DFs for ruthenium were lower as compared to those obtained in experiments with simulated degraded waste. The gas chromatographic analysis of separated diluent revealed high branched alkane content and low n-dodecane content of separated diluent. It is very much different from that of diluent currently in use. Hence incineration of separated diluent is recommended. (author)

  2. Evaluation of wet air oxidation as a pretreatment strategy for bioethanol production from rice husk and process optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Saumita [Environmental Biotechnology Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440 020 Maharashtra (India); Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 West Bengal (India); Sen, Ramkrishna [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 West Bengal (India); Pandey, R.A.; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Satpute, Dewanand; Giri, Balendu Shekher; Mudliar, Sandeep [Environmental Biotechnology Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440 020 Maharashtra (India)

    2009-12-15

    The pretreatment of rice husk by the wet air oxidation (WAO) technique was investigated by means of a statistically designed set of experiments. Reaction temperature, air pressure, and reaction time were the process parameters considered. WAO pretreatment of rice husk increased the cellulose content of the solid fraction by virtue of lignin removal and hemicellulose solubilization. The cellulose recovery was around 92%, while lignin recovery was in the tune of 8-20%, indicating oxidation of a bulk quantity of lignin. The liquid fraction was found to be rich in hexose and pentose sugars, which could be directly utilized as substrate for ethanol fermentation. The WAO process was optimized by multi-objective numerical optimization with the help of MINITAB 14 suite of statistical software, and an optimum WAO condition of 185 C, 0.5 MPa, and 15 min was predicted and experimentally validated to give 67% (w/w) cellulose content in the solid fraction, along with 89% lignin removal, and 70% hemicellulose solubilization; 13.1 gl{sup -1} glucose and 3.4 gl{sup -1} xylose were detected in the liquid fraction. The high cellulose content and negligible residual lignin in the solid fraction would greatly facilitate subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, and result in improved ethanol yields from rice husk. (author)

  3. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S., E-mail: asl@ispms.tsc.ru; Glazkova, Elena A., E-mail: eagl@ispms.tsc.ru; Svarovskaya, Natalia V., E-mail: nvsv@ispms.tsc.ru; Bakina, Olga V., E-mail: ovbakina@ispms.tsc.ru; Kazantsev, Sergey O., E-mail: kzso@mail.ru; Lerner, Marat I., E-mail: lerner@ispms.tsc.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  4. Wet air oxidation of resorcinol as a model treatment for refractory organics in wastewaters from the wood processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernd; Chavez, Alma; Morales-Mejia, Julio; Eichenauer, Sabrina; Stadlbauer, Ernst A; Almanza, Rafael

    2015-09-15

    Wastewater treatment systems are important tools to enhance sustainability in terms of reducing environmental impact and complying with sanitary requirements. This work addresses the wet air oxidation (WAO) process for pre-treatment of phenolic wastewater effluents. The aim was to increase biodegradability prior to a subsequent anaerobic stage. In WAO laboratory experiments using a micro-autoclave, the model compound resorcinol was degraded under different oxygen availability regims within the temperature range 150 °C-270 °C. The activation energy was determined to be 51.5 kJ/mol. Analysis of the products revealed that after 3 h of reaction at 230 °C, 97.5% degradation of resorcinol was achieved. At 250 °C and the same reaction time complete removal of resorcinol was observed. In this case the total organic carbon content was reduced down to 29%, from 118.0 mg/L down to 34.4 mg/L. Under these process conditions, the pollutant was only partially mineralized and the ratio of the biological oxygen demand relative to the chemical oxygen demand, which is 0.07 for resorcinol, was increased to a value exceeding 0.5. The main by-product acetic acid, which is a preferred compound for methanogenic bacteria, was found to account for 33% of the total organic carbon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparation and Photocatalytic Activity of Potassium- Incorporated Titanium Oxide Nanostructures Produced by the Wet Corrosion Process Using Various Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yoon Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured potassium-incorporated Ti-based oxides have attracted much attention because the incorporated potassium can influence their structural and physico-chemical properties. With the aim of tuning the structural and physical properties, we have demonstrated the wet corrosion process (WCP as a simple method for nanostructure fabrication using various Ti-based materials, namely Ti–6Al–4V alloy (TAV, Ti–Ni (TN alloy and pure Ti, which have 90%, 50% and 100% initial Ti content, respectively. We have systematically investigated the relationship between the Ti content in the initial metal and the precise condition of WCP to control the structural and physical properties of the resulting nanostructures. The WCP treatment involved various concentrations of KOH solutions. The precise conditions for producing K-incorporated nanostructured titanium oxide films (nTOFs were strongly dependent on the Ti content of the initial metal. Ti and TAV yielded one-dimensional nanowires of K-incorporated nTOFs after treatment with 10 mol/L-KOH solution, whereas TN required a higher concentration (20 mol/L-KOH solution to produce comparable nanostructures. The obtained nanostructures revealed a blue-shift in UV absorption spectra due to the quantum confinement effects. A significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity was observed via the chromomeric change and the intermediate formation of methylene blue molecules under UV irradiation. This study demonstrates the WCP as a simple, versatile and scalable method for the production of nanostructured K-incorporated nTOFs to be used as high-performance photocatalysts for environmental and energy applications.

  6. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11 kg/m 3 of copper and 1.35 kg/m 3 of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100–500 nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. - Highlights: • From the Indium-Tin-Oxide etching wastewater

  8. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  9. 2-Hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPO): Equivocal in the ames assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobo, Krista L; Cheung, Jennifer R; Gunther, William C; Kenyon, Michelle O

    2018-05-01

    2-Hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPO) is a useful coupling reagent for synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients. It has been reported to be weakly mutagenic in the Ames assay (Ding W et al. []: J Chromatogr A 1386:47-52). According to the ICH M7 guidance (2014) regarding control of mutagenic impurities to limit potential carcinogenic risk, mutagens require control in drug substances such that exposure not exceeds the threshold of toxicological concern. Given the weak response observed in the Ames assay and the lack of any obvious structural features that could confer DNA reactivity we were interested to determine if the results were reproducible and investigate the role of potentially confounding experimental parameters. Specifically, Ames tests were conducted to assess the influence of compound purity, solvent choice, dose spacing, toxicity, type of S9 (aroclor vs phenobarbital/β-napthoflavone), and lot variability on the frequency of HOPO induced revertant colonies. Initial extensive testing using one lot of HOPO produced no evidence of mutagenic potential in the Ames assays. Subsequent studies with four additional lots produced conflicting results, with an ∼2.0-fold increase in revertant colonies observed. Given the rigor of the current investigation, lack of reproducibility between lots, and the weak increase in revertants, it is concluded that HOPO is equivocal in the bacterial reverse mutation assay. It is highly unlikely that HOPO poses a mutagenic risk in vivo; therefore, when it is used as a reagent in pharmaceutical synthesis, it should not be regarded as a mutagenic impurity, but rather a normal process related impurity. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:312-321, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of sludge-based carbonaceous materials in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julcour Lebigue, Carine; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; N'Guessan Krou; Ayral, Catherine; Mohamed, Elham; Wilhelm, Anne-Marie; Delmas, Henri; Le Coq, Laurence; Gerente, Claire; Smith, Karl M; Pullket, Suangusa; Fowler, Geoffrey D; Graham, Nigel J D

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of the performance of carbonaceous materials prepared from sewage sludges (SBCMs) in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation; phenol was used as the model pollutant. Three different sewage sludges were treated by either carbonisation or steam activation, and the physico-chemical properties of the resultant carbonaceous materials (e.g. hardness, BET surface area, ash and elemental content, surface chemistry) were evaluated and compared with a commercial reference activated carbon (PICA F22). The adsorption capacity for phenol of the SBCMs was greater than suggested by their BET surface area, but less than F22; a steam activated, dewatered raw sludge (SA_DRAW) had the greatest adsorption capacity of the SBCMs in the investigated range of concentrations (<0.05 mol L(-1)). In batch oxidation tests, the SBCMs demonstrated catalytic behaviour arising from their substrate adsorptivity and metal content. Recycling of SA_DRAW in successive oxidations led to significant structural attrition and a hardened SA_DRAW was evaluated, but found to be unsatisfactory during the oxidation step. In a combined adsorption-oxidation sequence, both the PICA carbon and a selected SBCM showed deterioration in phenol adsorption after oxidative regeneration, but a steady state performance was reached after 2 or 3 cycles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hepatic response to oxidative injury in long-lived Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liou Y; Bokov, Alex F; Richardson, Arlan; Miller, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Multiple stress resistance pathways were evaluated in the liver of Ames dwarf mice before and after exposure to the oxidative toxin diquat, seeking clues to the exceptional longevity conferred by this mutation. Before diquat treatment, Ames dwarf mice, compared with nonmutant littermate controls, had 2- to 6-fold higher levels of expression of mRNAs for immediate early genes and 2- to 5-fold higher levels of mRNAs for genes dependent on the transcription factor Nrf2. Diquat led to a 2-fold increase in phosphorylation of the stress kinase ERK in control (but not Ames dwarf) mice and to a 50% increase in phosphorylation of the kinase JNK2 in Ames dwarf (but not control) mice. Diquat induction of Nrf2 protein was higher in dwarf mice than in controls. Of 6 Nrf2-responsive genes evaluated, 4 (HMOX, NQO-1, MT-1, and MT-2) remained 2- to 10-fold lower in control than in dwarf liver after diquat, and the other 2 (GCLM and TXNRD) reached levels already seen in dwarf liver at baseline. Thus, livers of Ames dwarf mice differ systematically from controls in multiple stress resistance pathways before and after exposure to diquat, suggesting mechanisms for stress resistance and extended longevity in Ames dwarf mice.

  13. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, O.F.; Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recovering uranium from wetprocess phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange liquidliquid solvent extraction circuits in which in the first circuit (A) the uranium is reduced to the uranous form; (B) the uranous uranium is recovered by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using a mixture of mono- and di-(Alkyl-phenyl) esters of orthophosphoric acid as the ion exchange agent; and (C) the uranium oxidatively stripped from the agent with phosphoric acid containing an oxidizing agent to convert uranous to uranyl ions, and in the second circuit (D) recovering the uranyl uranium from the strip solution by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using di(2ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as a synergist; (E) scrubbing the uranium loaded agent with water; (F) stripping the loaded agent with ammonium carbonate, and (G) calcining the formed ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium oxide, the improvement comprising: (1) removing the organics from the raffinate of step (B) before recycling the raffinate to the wet-process plant, and returning the recovered organics to the circuit to substantially maintain the required balance between the mono and disubstituted esters; (2) using hydogren peroxide as the oxidizing agent in step (C); (3) using an alkali metal carbonate as the stripping agent in step (F) following by acidification of the strip solution with sulfuric acid; (4) using some of the acidified strip solution as the scrubbing agent in step (E) to remove phosphorus and other impurities; and (5) regenerating the alkali metal loaded agent from step (F) before recycling it to the second circuit

  14. Wet oxidation catalyzed by ruthenium supported on cerium (IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, S.; Fukuda, I.; Ishida, S.

    1988-01-01

    The activity of precious meta catalysts in the wet oxidation of organic compounds was investigated. Ruthenium was the most active catalyst among the precious metals examined, and cerium (IV) oxide was the most effective support. The Ru/Ce catalyst rivaled homogeneous copper catalyst, which is used in the practical wastewater treatment, for the oxidation of n-propyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, phenol, acetamide, poly (propylene glycol), and acetic acid. In addition, it was especially effective for the oxidation of some compounds with high oxygen content such as poly (ethylene glycol), ethylene glycol, formaldehyde, and formic acid

  15. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation components in mitochondria of long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Johnson, W Thomas; Rakoczy, Sharlene G

    2012-02-01

    Reduced signaling of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) pathway is associated with extended life span in several species. Ames dwarf mice are GH-deficient and live >50% longer than wild-type littermates. Previously, we have shown that tissues from Ames mice exhibit elevated levels of antioxidative enzymes, less H(2)O(2) production, and lower oxidative damage suggesting that mitochondrial function may differ between genotypes. To explore the relationship between hormone deficiency and mitochondria in mice with extended longevity, we evaluated activity, protein, and gene expression of oxidative phosphorylation components in dwarf and wild-type mice at varying ages. Liver complex I + III activity was higher in dwarf mice compared to wild-type mice. The activity of I + III decreased between 3 and 20 months of age in both genotypes with greater declines in wild-type mice in liver and skeletal muscle. Complex IV activities in the kidney were elevated in 3- and 20-month-old dwarf mice relative to wild-type mice. In Ames mice, protein levels of the 39 kDa complex I subunit were elevated at 20 months of age when compared to wild-type mouse mitochondria for every tissue examined. Kidney and liver mitochondria from 20-month-old dwarf mice had elevated levels of both mitochondrially-encoded and nuclear-encoded complex IV proteins compared to wild-type mice (p dwarf mice. Overall, we found that several components of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system were elevated in Ames mice. Mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratios were not different between genotypes despite the marked increase in PGC-1α levels in dwarf mice. The increased OXPHOS activities, along with lower ROS production in dwarf mice, predict enhanced mitochondrial function and efficiency, two factors likely contributing to long-life in Ames mice.

  16. Processing Earth Observing images with Ames Stereo Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, R. A.; Moratto, Z. M.; Alexandrov, O.; Fong, T.; Shean, D. E.; Smith, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    ICESat with its GLAS instrument provided valuable elevation measurements of glaciers. The loss of this spacecraft caused a demand for alternative elevation sources. In response to that, we have improved our Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) software (version 2.1+) to ingest satellite imagery from Earth satellite sources in addition to its support of planetary missions. This enables the open source community a free method to generate digital elevation models (DEM) from Digital Globe stereo imagery and alternatively other cameras using RPC camera models. Here we present details of the software. ASP is a collection of utilities written in C++ and Python that implement stereogrammetry. It contains utilities to manipulate DEMs, project imagery, create KML image quad-trees, and perform simplistic 3D rendering. However its primary application is the creation of DEMs. This is achieved by matching every pixel between the images of a stereo observation via a hierarchical coarse-to-fine template matching method. Matched pixels between images represent a single feature that is triangulated using each image's camera model. The collection of triangulated features represents a point cloud that is then grid resampled to create a DEM. In order for ASP to match pixels/features between images, it requires a search range defined in pixel units. Total processing time is proportional to the area of the first image being matched multiplied by the area of the search range. An incorrect search range for ASP causes repeated false positive matches at each level of the image pyramid and causes excessive processing times with no valid DEM output. Therefore our system contains automatic methods for deducing what the correct search range should be. In addition, we provide options for reducing the overall search range by applying affine epipolar rectification, homography transform, or by map projecting against a prior existing low resolution DEM. Depending on the size of the images, parallax, and image

  17. Catalytic wet oxidative degradation of filter paper waste simulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatta, H.A.; Saleh, H.M.; Bayoumi, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of a comprehensive research program carried out at Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Egypt, aiming at the treatment of organic wastes simulate to achieve acceptable weight and volume reduction. The process is based on the wet oxidative degradation of these wastes, at a laboratory scale, using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant at atmospheric pressure and at 100 degree C. The present study was concerned with the treatment of filter paper waste simulates, as one of organic wastes originating from the peaceful applications of the nuclear technology, in the presence of two types of catalysts namely; copper sulphate and ferrous sulphate. The main aim of this treatment is to achieve an acceptable weight and volume reduction. That waste was subjected to wet oxidative degradation process at atmospheric pressure and 100 degree C using 35% hydrogen peroxide as oxidant in the presence of different concentrations of ferrous sulphate or copper sulphate as catalysts. Elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy were performed for the solid residue and the secondary waste solution resulted from the treatment process to follow the degradation process. Increasing the concentration of catalyst was accompanied with an acceptable increase in the weight reduction and conversion percentages. Up to 95% total weight reduction was obtained in the case of using copper sulphate as catalyst. Also, through this technique, the organic portion of these wastes is converted to carbon dioxide and water and hence the remaining solution is considered as a form suitable for subsequent immobilization process

  18. Endothelial function and vascular oxidative stress in long-lived GH/IGF-deficient Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, Anna; Labinskyy, Nazar; Perez, Viviana; Recchia, Fabio A; Podlutsky, Andrej; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Pacher, Pal; Austad, Steven N; Bartke, Andrzej; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2008-11-01

    Hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice have low circulating growth hormone (GH)/IGF-I levels, and they have extended longevity and exhibit many symptoms of delayed aging. To elucidate the vascular consequences of Ames dwarfism we compared endothelial O2(-) and H2O2 production, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, expression of antioxidant enzymes, and nitric oxide (NO) production in aortas of Ames dwarf and wild-type control mice. In Ames dwarf aortas endothelial O2(-) and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria were enhanced compared with those in vessels of wild-type mice. In Ames dwarf aortas there was a less abundant expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). NO production and acetylcholine-induced relaxation were also decreased in aortas of Ames dwarf mice. In cultured wild-type mouse aortas and in human coronary arterial endothelial cells treatment with GH and IGF significantly reduced cellular O2(-) and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria and upregulated expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, GPx-1, and eNOS. Thus GH and IGF-I promote antioxidant phenotypic changes in the endothelial cells, whereas Ames dwarfism leads to vascular oxidative stress.

  19. Process for recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiewiorowski, T.K.; Thornsberry, W.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Process is claimed for the recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution in which an organic extractant, containing uranium values and dissolved iron impurities and comprising a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkylphosphine oxide dissolved in a water immiscible organic solvent, is contacted with a substantially iron-free dilute aqueous phosphoric acid to remove said iron impurities. The removed impurities are bled from the system by feeding the resulting iron-loaded phosphoric acid to a secondary countercurrent uranium extraction operation from which they leave as part of the uranium-depleted acid raffinate. Also, process for recovering uranium in which the extractant, after it has been stripped of uranium values by aqueous ammonium carbonate, is contacted with a dilute aqueous acid selected from the group consisting of H 2 SO 4 , HCl, HNO 3 and iron-free H 3 PO 4 to improve the extraction efficiency of the organic extractant

  20. Enhanced wet air oxidation : synergistic rate acceleration upon effluent recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Birchmeier; Charles G. Hill; Carl J. Houtman; Rajai H. Atalla; Ira A. Weinstock

    2000-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) reactions of cellobiose, phenol, and syringic acid were carried out under mild conditions (155°C; 0.93MPa 02; soluble catalyst, Na5[PV2Mo10O40]). Initial oxidation rates were rapid but decreased to small values as less reactive oxidation products accumulated. Recalcitrant oxidation products were consumed more rapidly, however, if additional...

  1. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  2. Combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis of polyvinylchloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the widespread aversion to burning polyvinylchloride (PVC) together with municipal waste, we have attempted an alternative approach to its decomposition. This paper describes a combined wet oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis yielding water soluble, biodegradable products. Experiments were...... carried out at temperatures from 180-260 degree C and reaction times of 8-24 min. The chloride liberated provides information on the rate constants. Considering the measured Cl- and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) values, we find hydrolysis and oxidation processes to be interdependent. The main products...... are Cl- and CO-2, the rest comprising a range of water-soluble compounds, a small, Cl-free residue, and a recognizable amount of H-2....

  3. Comparison between wet oxidation and steam explosion as pretreatment methods for enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, Carlos Martín; Marcet, M.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2008-01-01

    , and to a two-fold increase of cellulose content in the pretreated solids, while steam explosion solubilised only 60% of xylan and 35% of lignin and increased cellulose content in the solid material by one third. Wet oxidation formed more aliphatic acids and phenolics, and less furan aldehydes in the liquid...... significantly in steam explosion. This investigation demonstrates the potential of wet oxidation as a promising pretreatment method for enzyme-based bagasse-to-ethanol processes....

  4. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  5. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was ...

  6. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was monitored by ATR FTIR by ...

  7. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U.J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  8. Reuse of Ammonium Nitrate - Wet Air Oxidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maloney, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    ... it. AN is commonly used as a fertilizer (80 percent of AN produced) and an oxidizer. Owing to the high demand and wide availability of AN for its most common use, the commercial cost is very low...

  9. Optimization of wet oxidation pretreatment of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A.S.; Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The wet oxidation process (water; oxygen and elevated temperature) was investigated under alkaline conditions for fractionation of hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin from wheat straw. At higher temperature and longer reaction time, a purified cellulose fraction (69% w/w) was produced with high...... with a 15-min reaction time. Under these conditions, 55% of the lignin and 80% of the hemicellulose were solubilized, while 95% of the cellulose remained in the solid fraction. At 185 degrees C, the reaction kinetics was of pseudo first-order. The rate constant for hemicellulose solubilization was higher...... than that for lignin, whereas the rate for cellulose was very low. The cellulose recovery (95-100%) was significantly higher than that for hemicellulose (60%). At temperatures above 185 degrees C, recoveries decreased due to increased degradation. Only half of the COD-content could be accounted...

  10. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-04

    A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.

  11. Subcritical wet air oxidation of organic solvents and chelating agents of the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachir, Souley

    1999-01-01

    This document deals with the environment control, more specially organic solvents and chelating agents destruction, employed in the nuclear industry. This work details the subcritical wet air oxidation process. Another part of the document deals with the possible coupling between this process and the biodegradation technic in the framework of the sewage sludges treatment. (A.L.B.)

  12. Testing of wet scrap recovery equipment for mixed oxide scrap reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demiter, J.A.; Klem, M.J.; Owen, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    The Wet Scrap Recovery (WSR) program was initiated at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) by Westinghouse Hanford Company in Richland, Washington to demonstrate fuel fabrication scrap recovery and reconversion to fuel grade oxide powder using the continuous coprecipitation-calcination (COPRECAL) conversion process. Advancements in process control equipment and instrumentation were also developed and demonstrated

  13. Modeling and optimization of wet sizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai Ba Cau; Vu Thanh Quang and Nguyen Ba Tien

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical simulation on basis of Stock law has been done for wet sizing process on cylinder equipment of laboratory and semi-industrial scale. The model consists of mathematical equations describing relations between variables, such as: - Resident time distribution function of emulsion particles in the separating zone of the equipment depending on flow-rate, height, diameter and structure of the equipment. - Size-distribution function in the fine and coarse parts depending on resident time distribution function of emulsion particles, characteristics of the material being processed, such as specific density, shapes, and characteristics of the environment of classification, such as specific density, viscosity. - Experimental model was developed on data collected from an experimental cylindrical equipment with diameter x height of sedimentation chamber equal to 50 x 40 cm for an emulsion of zirconium silicate in water. - Using this experimental model allows to determine optimal flow-rate in order to obtain product with desired grain size in term of average size or size distribution function. (author)

  14. Process for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.; Carrington, O.F.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium is conventionally recovered from wet-process phosphoric acid by two liquid ion exchange steps using a mixture of mono- and disubstituted phenyl esters of orthophosphoric acid (OPPA). Efficiency of the process drops as the mono-OPPA is lost preferentially to the aqueous phase. This invention provides a process for the removal of the uranium process organics (OPPA and organic solvents) from the raffinate of the first liquid ion exchange step and their return to the circuit. The process organics are removed by a combination flotation and absorption step, which results in the recovery of the organics on beads of a hydrophobic styrene polymer

  15. Dust emission from wet, low-emission coke quenching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosiński, Bogusław; Bobik, Bartłomiej; Konieczny, Tomasz; Cieślik, Ewelina

    2018-01-01

    Coke plants, which produce various types of coke (metallurgical, foundry or heating), at temperatures between 600 and 1200°C, with limited access to oxygen, are major emitters of particulates and gaseous pollutants to air, water and soils. Primarily, the process of wet quenching should be mentioned, as one of the most cumbersome. Atmospheric pollutants include particulates, tar substances, organic pollutants including B(a)P and many others. Pollutants are also formed from the decomposition of water used to quench coke (CO, phenol, HCN, H2S, NH3, cresol) and decomposition of hot coke in the first phase of quenching (CO, H2S, SO2) [1]. The development of the coke oven technology has resulted in the changes made to different types of technological installations, such as the use of baffles in quench towers, the removal of nitrogen oxides by selective NOx reduction, and the introduction of fabric filters for particulates removal. The BAT conclusions for coke plants [2] provide a methodology for the measurement of particulate emission from a wet, low-emission technology using Mohrhauer probes. The conclusions define the emission level for wet quenching process as 25 g/Mgcoke. The conducted research was aimed at verification of the presented method. For two of three quench towers (A and C) the requirements included in the BAT conclusions are not met and emissions amount to 87.34 and 61.35 g/Mgcoke respectively. The lowest particulates emission was recorded on the quench tower B and amounted to 22.5 g/Mgcoke, therefore not exceeding the requirements.

  16. Dust emission from wet, low-emission coke quenching process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komosiński Bogusław

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Coke plants, which produce various types of coke (metallurgical, foundry or heating, at temperatures between 600 and 1200°C, with limited access to oxygen, are major emitters of particulates and gaseous pollutants to air, water and soils. Primarily, the process of wet quenching should be mentioned, as one of the most cumbersome. Atmospheric pollutants include particulates, tar substances, organic pollutants including B(aP and many others. Pollutants are also formed from the decomposition of water used to quench coke (CO, phenol, HCN, H2S, NH3, cresol and decomposition of hot coke in the first phase of quenching (CO, H2S, SO2 [1]. The development of the coke oven technology has resulted in the changes made to different types of technological installations, such as the use of baffles in quench towers, the removal of nitrogen oxides by selective NOx reduction, and the introduction of fabric filters for particulates removal. The BAT conclusions for coke plants [2] provide a methodology for the measurement of particulate emission from a wet, low-emission technology using Mohrhauer probes. The conclusions define the emission level for wet quenching process as 25 g/Mgcoke. The conducted research was aimed at verification of the presented method. For two of three quench towers (A and C the requirements included in the BAT conclusions are not met and emissions amount to 87.34 and 61.35 g/Mgcoke respectively. The lowest particulates emission was recorded on the quench tower B and amounted to 22.5 g/Mgcoke, therefore not exceeding the requirements.

  17. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  18. Power generation characteristics of tubular type SOFC by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajiri, H.; Nakayama, T. [Kyushu Electric Power Company, Inc., Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroishi, M. [TOTO Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The development of a practical solid oxide fuel cell requires improvement of a cell performance and a cell manufacturing technology suitable for the mass production. In particular tubular type SOFC is thought to be superior in its reliability because its configuration can avoid the high temperature sealing and reduce the thermal stress resulting from the contact between cells. The authors have fabricated a tubular cell with an air electrode support by a wet processing technique, which is suitable for mass production in improving a power density. To enhance the power output of the module, the Integrated Tubular-Type (ITT) cell has been developed. This paper reports the performance of the single cells with various active anode areas and the bundle with series-connected 9-ITT cells with an active anode area of 840 cm{sup 2}.

  19. Process for winning uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for winning uranium from wet process phosphoric acid by means of liquid-liquid extraction with organic phosphoric acid esters. The process is optimised by keeping the sulphate percentage in the phosphoric acid below 2% by weight, and preferably below 0.6% by weight, as compared to P 2 O 5 in the phosphoric acid. This is achieved by adding an excess of Ba and/or Ca carbonate or sulfide solution and filtering off the formed calcium and/or barium sulphate precipitates. Solid KClO 3 is then added to the filtrate to oxidise U 4+ to U 6+ . The normal extraction procedure using organic phosphoric esters as extraction liquid, can then be applied. (Th.P.)

  20. Evaluation of wet oxidation pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of softwood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palonen, H.; Thomsen, A.B.; Tenkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    , and the compositions of solid and liquid fractions were analyzed. The solid fraction after wet oxidation contained 58-64% cellulose, 2-16% hemicellulose, and 24-30% lignin. The pretreatment series gave information about the roles of lignin and hemicellulose in the enzymatic hydrolysis. The temperature...... of the pretreatment, the residual hemicellulose content of the substrate, and the type of the commercial cellulase preparation used were the most important factors affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest sugar yield in a 72-h hydrolysis, 79% of theoretical, was obtained using a pretreatment of 200degrees...

  1. The recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, A.; Sialino, A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for the recovery of uranium from a wet-process phosphoric acid is claimed. The preliminary oxidized acid is treated first with an organic solvent consisting of a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkylphosphine oxide, dissolved in an inert and unreactive organic solvent in order to obtain uranium-free phosphoric acid and an organic extract consisting of the solvent containing the major portion of uranium. The uranium is separated from the extract as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by reacting with ammonium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate and the uranium-free solvent is recycled to the extraction step. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus having at least two stages: the extract is introduced at the head of the first stage and ammonia or ammonium hydroxide solution at the bottom. The pH of the first stage is maintained in the range 8.0 to 8.5. An ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is introduced at the bottom of the last stage. The amount of ammonium carbonate used is equal to 50 to 80 percent by weight of the theoretical molar quantity which is necessary to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and convert the uranium in ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. The ammoniated solvent obtained after the re-extraction step is regenerated by treatment with an acid before recycling it to the extraction step

  2. Thermo-fluid dynamic analysis of wet compression process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Abhay; Kim, Heuy Dong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chidambaram, Palani Kumar [FMTRC, Daejoo Machinery Co. Ltd., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Suryan, Abhilash [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2016-12-15

    Wet compression systems increase the useful power output of a gas turbine by reducing the compressor work through the reduction of air temperature inside the compressor. The actual wet compression process differs from the conventional single phase compression process due to the presence of latent heat component being absorbed by the evaporating water droplets. Thus the wet compression process cannot be assumed isentropic. In the current investigation, the gas-liquid two phase has been modeled as air containing dispersed water droplets inside a simple cylinder-piston system. The piston moves in the axial direction inside the cylinder to achieve wet compression. Effects on the thermodynamic properties such as temperature, pressure and relative humidity are investigated in detail for different parameters such as compression speeds and overspray. An analytical model is derived and the requisite thermodynamic curves are generated. The deviations of generated thermodynamic curves from the dry isentropic curves (PV{sup γ} = constant) are analyzed.

  3. Thermo-fluid dynamic analysis of wet compression process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Abhay; Kim, Heuy Dong; Chidambaram, Palani Kumar; Suryan, Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Wet compression systems increase the useful power output of a gas turbine by reducing the compressor work through the reduction of air temperature inside the compressor. The actual wet compression process differs from the conventional single phase compression process due to the presence of latent heat component being absorbed by the evaporating water droplets. Thus the wet compression process cannot be assumed isentropic. In the current investigation, the gas-liquid two phase has been modeled as air containing dispersed water droplets inside a simple cylinder-piston system. The piston moves in the axial direction inside the cylinder to achieve wet compression. Effects on the thermodynamic properties such as temperature, pressure and relative humidity are investigated in detail for different parameters such as compression speeds and overspray. An analytical model is derived and the requisite thermodynamic curves are generated. The deviations of generated thermodynamic curves from the dry isentropic curves (PV γ = constant) are analyzed

  4. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  5. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning; Descorme, Claude; Besson, Michele

    2007-01-01

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO 2 . 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO 2 is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393 K) and lower total pressure (3 MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect

  6. Development of Pillared Clays for Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol and Its Application in the Posttreatment of Coffee Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R. Sanabria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the use of pillared clays as catalysts for the Fenton-like advanced oxidation, specifically wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO. This paper discusses the limitations on the application of a homogeneous Fenton system, development of solid catalysts for the oxidation of phenol, advances in the synthesis of pillared clays, and their potential application as catalysts for phenol oxidation. Finally, it analyzes the use of pillared clays as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts for a real wastewater treatment, emphasizing the oxidation of phenolic compounds present in coffee wastewater. Typically, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation in a real effluent system is used as pretreatment, prior to biological treatment. In the specific case of coffee wet processing wastewater, catalytic oxidation with pillared bentonite with Al-Fe is performed to supplement the biological treatment, that is, as a posttreatment system. According to the results of catalytic activity of pillared bentonite with Al-Fe for oxidation of coffee processing wastewater (56% phenolic compounds conversion, 40% selectivity towards CO2, and high stability of active phase, catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation emerges as a viable alternative for management of this type of effluent.

  7. Autonomy @ Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dalsem, William; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    This is a powerpoint presentation that highlights autonomy across the 15 NASA technology roadmaps, including specific examples of projects (past and present) at NASA Ames Research Center. The NASA technology roadmaps are located here: http:www.nasa.govofficesocthomeroadmapsindex.html

  8. Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Edna C; Johnston, David B; McAloon, Andrew J; Singh, Vijay

    2009-01-21

    Enzymatic corn wet milling (E-milling) is a process derived from conventional wet milling for the recovery and purification of starch and co-products using proteases to eliminate the need for sulfites and decrease the steeping time. In 2006, the total starch production in USA by conventional wet milling equaled 23 billion kilograms, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production 1. Process engineering and cost models for an E-milling process have been developed for a processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day). These models are based on the previously published models for a traditional wet milling plant with the same capacity. The E-milling process includes grain cleaning, pretreatment, enzymatic treatment, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the conventional models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. Additional information for the present models was obtained from our own experience with the development of the E-milling process and trials in the laboratory and at the pilot plant scale. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer) and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn, enzyme and other wet milling co-products. The work presented here describes the E-milling process and compares the process, the operation and costs with the conventional process. The E-milling process was found to be cost competitive with the conventional

  9. Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAloon Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymatic corn wet milling (E-milling is a process derived from conventional wet milling for the recovery and purification of starch and co-products using proteases to eliminate the need for sulfites and decrease the steeping time. In 2006, the total starch production in USA by conventional wet milling equaled 23 billion kilograms, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production 1. Process engineering and cost models for an E-milling process have been developed for a processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day. These models are based on the previously published models for a traditional wet milling plant with the same capacity. The E-milling process includes grain cleaning, pretreatment, enzymatic treatment, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the conventional models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. Additional information for the present models was obtained from our own experience with the development of the E-milling process and trials in the laboratory and at the pilot plant scale. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer® and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Results Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn, enzyme and other wet milling co-products. The work presented here describes the E-milling process and compares the process, the operation and costs with the conventional process. Conclusion The E-milling process

  10. Bench scale demonstration and conceptual engineering for DETOXSM catalyzed wet oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moslander, J.; Bell, R.; Robertson, D.; Dhooge, P.; Goldblatt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory and bench scale studies of the DETOX SM catalyzed wet oxidation process have been performed with the object of developing the process for treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes. Reaction orders, apparent rates, and activation energies have been determined for a range of organic waste surrogates. Reaction intermediates and products have been analyzed. Metals' fates have been determined. Bench scale units have been designed, fabricated, and tested with solid and liquid organic waste surrogates. Results from the laboratory and bench scale studies have been used to develop conceptual designs for application of the process to hazardous and mixed wastes

  11. Quantitative analysis of precipitation over Fukushima to understand the wet deposition process in March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatagai, A.; Onda, Y.; Watanabe, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake caused a severe accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), leading to the emission of large amounts of radioactive pollutants into the environment. The transport and diffusion of these radioactive pollutants in the atmosphere caused a disaster for residents in and around Fukushima. Studies have sought to understand the transport, diffusion, and deposition process, and to understand the movement of radioactive pollutants through the soil, vegetation, rivers, and groundwater. However, a detailed simulation and understanding of the distribution of radioactive compounds depend on a simulation of precipitation and on the information on the timing of the emission of these radioactive pollutants from the NPP. Past nuclear expansion studies have demonstrated the importance of wet deposition in distributing pollutants. Hence, this study examined the quantitative precipitation pattern in March 2011 using rain-gauge observations and X-band radar data from Fukushima University. We used the AMeDAS rain-gauge network data of 1) the Japan Meteorological Agency (1273 stations in Japan) and 2) the Water Information System (47 stations in Fukushima prefecture) and 3) the rain-gauge data of the Environmental Information Network of NTT Docomo (30 stations in Fukushima) to construct 0.05-degree mesh data using the same method used to create the APHRODITE daily grid precipitation data (Yatagai et al., 2009). Since some AMeDAS data for the coastal region were lost due to the earthquake, the complementary network of 2) and 3) yielded better precipitation estimates. The data clarified that snowfall was observed on the night of Mar 15 into the morning of Mar 16 throughout Fukushima prefecture. This had an important effect on the radioactive contamination pattern in Fukushima prefecture. The precipitation pattern itself does not show one-on-one correspondence with the contamination pattern. While the pollutants transported northeast of the

  12. Comparison of the chemical properties of wheat straw and beech fibers following alkaline wet oxidation and laccase treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A. S.; Mallon, S.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2002-01-01

    reacted differently in the two processes. The chemical composition changed little following enzyme treatment. After alkaline wet oxidation, fibers enriched in cellulose were obtained. With both materials, almost all hemicellulose (80%) together with a large portion of the lignin were solubilised......Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum) and beech (Fagus sylvatica), were used to evaluate the effects of two pre-treatment processes (alkaline wet oxidation and enzyme treatment with laccase) on lignocellulosic materials for applications in particleboards and fiberboards. Wheat straw and beech fibers...... by alkaline wet oxidation, but essentially all cellulose remained in the solid fraction. Following enzyme treatment most material remained as a solid. For wheat straw, reaction with acetic anhydride indicated that both treatments resulted in more hydroxyl groups being accessible for reaction. The enzyme...

  13. A big picture prospective for wet waste processing management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of general observations made relative to the technical and economical considerations being evaluated by many commercial nuclear power plants involving their decision making process for implementation of several new wet waste management technologies. The waste management processes reviewed include the use of, Reverse Osmosis, Non-Precoat Filters, Resin Stripping ampersand Recycling, Evaporation ampersand Calcination (RVR trademark, ROVER trademark ampersand Thermax trademark), Compression Dewatering (PressPak trademark), Incineration (Resin Express trademark), Survey ampersand Free Release (Green Is Clean) and Quantum Catalytic Extraction Processing (QCEP trademark). These waste management processes are reviewed relative to their general advantages and disadvantages associated with the processing of various wet waste streams including: reactor make-up water, floor drain sludges and other liquid waste streams such as boric acid concentrates and steam generator cleaning solutions. A summary of the conclusions generally being derived by most utilities associated with the use of these waste management processes is also provided

  14. Enhanced Control of Mercury and other HAPs by Innovative Modifications to Wet FGD Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, O.W.; Carey, T.R.; Richardson, C.F.; Skarupa, R.C.; Meserole, F.B.; Rhudy, R.G.; Brown, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to learn more about controlling emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from coal-fired power plants that are equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project was included by FETC as a Phase I project in its Mega-PRDA program. Phase I of this project focused on three research areas. These areas in order of priority were: (1) Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; (2) Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and (3) Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. Mercury can exist in two forms in utility flue gas--as elemental mercury and as oxidized mercury (predominant form believed to be HgCl 2 ). Previous test results have shown that wet scrubbers effectively remove the oxidized mercury from the gas but are ineffective in removing elemental mercury. Recent improvements in mercury speciation techniques confirm this finding. Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury is of interest in cases where a wet scrubber exists or is planned for SO 2 control. If a loW--cost process could be developed to oxidize all of the elemental mercury in the flue gas, then the maximum achievable mercury removal across the existing or planned wet scrubber would increase. Other approaches for improving control of HAPs included a method for improving particulate removal across the FGD process and the use of additives to increase mercury solubility. This paper discusses results related only to catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury

  15. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  16. Wet Oxidation: A Promising Option for the Treatment of Pulp and Paper Mill Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) is used to degrade persistent organic or inorganic impurities present in industrial wastewater. The process utilizes severe oxidation conditions (i.e., high temperature and pressures) to achieve the efficient degradation of pollutants. To obtain high degradation at lower operation conditions, catalytic WO process is being suggested. The wastewater generated from a pulp and paper mill contains several recalcitrant compounds like lignin, hemi-cellulose, phenols, sulfides etc. Therefore, pulp and paper mill effluent have low biodegradability and are not amenable for conventional biological process. With the implementation of stringent regulations, pulp and paper mill operators need a cleaner disposal route for the wastewater. In this mini-review, the results obtained from the recently published studies on WO treatment for pulp and paper mill effluent are compiled and presented. Finally, the recommendations for the future work are also given.

  17. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  18. Metatranscriptomic and metagenomic description of the bacterial nitrogen metabolism in waste water wet oxidation effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Crovadore

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is a common method for reducing the amount of sludge solids in used waters and enabling biogas production. The wet oxidation process (WOX improves anaerobic digestion by converting carbon into methane through oxidation of organic compounds. WOX produces effluents rich in ammonia, which must be removed to maintain the activity of methanogens. Ammonia removal from WOX could be biologically operated by aerobic granules. To this end, granulation experiments were conducted in 2 bioreactors containing an activated sludge (AS. For the first time, the dynamics of the microbial community structure and the expression levels of 7 enzymes of the nitrogen metabolism in such active microbial communities were followed in regard to time by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. It was shown that bacterial communities adapt to the wet oxidation effluent by increasing the expression level of the nitrogen metabolism, suggesting that these biological activities could be a less costly alternative for the elimination of ammonia, resulting in a reduction of the use of chemicals and energy consumption in sewage plants. This study reached a strong sequencing depth (from 4.4 to 7.6 Gb and enlightened a yet unknown diversity of the microorganisms involved in the nitrogen pathway. Moreover, this approach revealed the abundance and expression levels of specialised enzymes involved in nitrification, denitrification, ammonification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA and nitrogen fixation processes in AS. Keywords: Applied sciences, Biological sciences, Environmental science, Genetics, Microbiology

  19. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, P.; Holm-Nielsen, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    was investigated using 2 1 bioreactors. Wet oxidation performed for 20 min at 121 degrees C was found as the most suitable pretreatment conditions for AD manure. High ammonia concentration and significant amount of macro- and micro-nutrients in the AD manure had a positive influence on the ethanol fermentation....... No extra nitrogen source was needed in the fermentation broth. It was shown that the AD manure could successfully substitute process water in SSF of pretreated lignocellulosic fibres. Theoretical ethanol yields of 82% were achieved, giving 30.8 kg ethanol per 100 kg dry mass of maize silage. (C) 2007...

  20. Wet Mechanochemical Processing of Celestine using (NH42CO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Bingöl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, traditional (univariate method of processing to the wet mechanochemical treatment were applied to obtain both SrCO3 and (NH42SO4 from celestite (SrSO4-(NH42CO3-H2O mixtures in a planetary ball mill. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical analysis were used to analyze products formed during wet milling. A hydrometallurgical process was carried out to examine milling time, ball to grinding material mass ratio, (NH42CO3 to SrSO4 mole ratio and rotational speed of the mill in a planetary mill. Under optimum conditions, a conversion approaching 100% of SrCO3 was obtained.

  1. Environmental management system case study: textile wet processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreldin, A.A.

    2008-10-01

    Textile industry is one of the oldest industries, it started very early in the ancient ages, its grows and improves gradually at the first and then rapidly to satisfy other different need of the mankind, even for luxury purposes, this development caused damage to environment, then its need the treatment. Textile wet processes used significant quantities of water and various kind of chemicals marketed under the name textile auxiliaries, to enhance the appearance of the fabric, serviceability, and durability. The chemical contamination of textile wet processes can be a health risk for the mill workers, consumers and for the environment as well. A number of schemes have been proposed in different countries to control the textile wet processes to create better environment and protect the ecosystem from further degradation, the developing countries need to apply their designed policies from the beginning. A theoretical study for probability of application of environmental management system in textile industry, to prevent or eliminate textile industry pollution that considered as one of the largest polluters in Sudanese environment, especially after the government (industrial ministry) support and facilitate to textile industry development. Applying environmental management system can appreciably reduce the textile industry pollution as founded from the study.(Author)

  2. Wet oxidative degradation of cellulosic wastes 5- chemical and thermal properties of the final waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskander, S.B.; Saleh, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the residual solution arising from the wet oxidative degradation of solid organic cellulosic materials, as one of the component of radioactive solid wastes, using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Were incorporated into ordinary Portland cement matrix. Leaching as well as thermal characterizations of the final solidified waste forms were evaluated to meet the final disposal requirements. Factors, such as the amount of the residual solution incorporated, types of leachant. Release of different radionuclides and freezing-thaw treatment, that may affect the leaching characterization. Were studied systematically from the data obtained, it was found that the final solid waste from containing 35% residual solution in tap water is higher than that in ground water or sea water. Based on the data obtained from thermal analysis, it could be concluded that incorporating the residual solution form the wet oxidative degradation of cellulosic materials has no negative effect on the hydration of cement materials and consequently on the thermal stability of the final solid waste from during the disposal process

  3. Green chemicals from pulp production black liquor by partial wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddassar, Hassan Raja; Melin, Kristian; de Villalba Kokkonen, Daniela; Riera, Gerard Viader; Golam, Sarwar; Koskinen, Jukka

    2015-11-01

    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, more sustainable sources of energy, fuel and chemicals are needed. Biomass side streams such as black liquor, which is a by-product of pulp production, has the potential to be used for this purpose. The aim of the study was the production of carboxylic acids, such as lactic acid, formic acid and acetic acid, from kraft and non-wood black liquor. The processes studied were partial wet oxidation (PWO) and catalytic partial wet oxidation (CPWO). The results show that the yield of carboxylic acid is higher when treated by PWO than the results from CPWO at temperatures of 170 °C and 230 °C. The results shows that the PWO process can increase the yield of carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids in black liquor, reduce lignin content and decrease pH, which makes further separation of the acids more favourable. The hydroxy acids are valuable raw materials for biopolymers, and acetic acid and formic acid are commonly used chemicals conventionally produced from fossil feedstock. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Wet etching of InSb surfaces in aqueous solutions: Controlled oxide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aureau, D., E-mail: damien.aureau@chimie.uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Chaghi, R.; Gerard, I. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Sik, H.; Fleury, J. [Sagem Defense Sécurité, 72-74, rue de la tour Billy, 95101, Argenteuil Cedex (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the wet etching of InSb surfaces by two different oxidant agents: Br{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the consecutive oxides generation onto the surfaces. The strong dependence between the chemical composition of the etching baths and the nature of the final surface chemistry of this low band-gap III–V semiconductor will be especially highlighted. One aqueous etching solution combined hydrobromic acid and Bromine (HBr–Br{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O) with adjusted concentrations. The other solution combines orthophosphoric and citric acids with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O). Depending on its composition, each formulation gave rise to variable etching rate. The dosage of Indium traces in the etching solution by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) gives the kinetic variation of the dissolution process. The variations on etching rates are associated to the properties and the nature of the formed oxides on InSb surfaces. Surface characterization is specifically performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A clear evidence of the differences between the formed oxides is highlighted. Atomic force microscopy is used to monitor the surface morphology and pointed out that very different final morphologies can be reached. This paper presents new results on the strong variability of the InSb oxides in relation with the InSb reactivity toward environment interaction.

  5. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.F.; Phillips, J.F. Jr.; Tate, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is claimed where the acid is treated with a mixture of an ammonium salt or ammonia, a reducing agent, and then a miscible solvent. Solids are separated from the phosphoric acid liquid phase. The solid consists of a mixture of metal phosphates and uranium. It is washed free of adhering phosphoric acid with fresh miscible solvent. The solid is dried and dissolved in acid whereupon uranium is recovered from the solution. Miscible solvent and water are distilled away from the phosphoric acid. The distillate is rectified and water discarded. All miscible solvent is recovered for recycle. 5 claims

  6. Uranium tetrafluoride production via dioxide by wet process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, A.R. de.

    1988-01-01

    The study for the wet way obtention of uranium tetrafluoride by the reaction of hydrofluoric acid and powder uranium dioxide, is presented. From the results obtained at laboratory scale a pilot plant was planned and erected. It is presently in operation for experimental data aquisition. Time of reaction, temperature, excess of reagents and the hydrofluoric acid / uranium dioxide ratio were the main parameters studied to obtain a product with the following characteristics: - density greater than 1 g/cm 3 , conversion rate greater than 96%, and water content equal to 0,2% that allows its application to heaxafluoride convertion or to magnesiothermic process. (author) [pt

  7. Differential reflectance spectrum measurement to evaluate defects introduced by wet cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, K.; Miyata, T.; Endo, K.; Hirose, K.; Mori, Y.

    2006-01-01

    By employing differential reflectance spectrum (DRS) method, which can detect the small change of surface states with high sensitivity, reflectance change of silicon surfaces induced by a wet surface cleaning process is evaluated. Equally cleaned two surfaces are clarified to have almost same reflectance in the order of 10 -4 in DRS. However, repeat of the cleaning leads to reflectance change in the order of 10 -3 in the case of Si(1 1 1). The shape of the spectra is similar to that of oxidized surface which contains tensile strain at the interface. A conjecture on the origin of the spectrum change is proposed that the surface strain, which is generated by the repulsion between the adjacent hydrogen termination atoms, might affect. It should be noted that the small change of the surface atomic structure induced by the wet cleaning process result in the generation of the change of optical reflectance spectrum in the scale of 10 -3

  8. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  9. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon

  10. Heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation systems for the treatment of an industrial pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Molina, R; Pariente, M I

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the treatment of wastewater coming from a pharmaceutical plant through a continuous heterogeneous catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process using an Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15 nanocomposite catalyst. This catalyst was preliminary tested in a batch stirred tank reactor (STR), to elucidate the influence of significant parameters on the oxidation system, such as temperature, initial oxidant concentration and initial pH of the reaction medium. In that case, a temperature of 80 degrees C using an initial oxidant concentration corresponding to twice the theoretical stoichiometric amount for complete carbon depletion and initial pH of ca. 3 allow TOC degradation of around 50% after 200 min of contact time. Thereafter, the powder catalyst was extruded with bentonite to prepare pellets that could be used in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Results in the up-flow FBR indicate that the catalyst shows high activity in terms of TOC mineralization (ca. 60% under steady-state conditions), with an excellent use of the oxidant and high stability of the supported iron species. The activity of the catalyst is kept constant, at least, for 55h of reaction. Furthermore, the BOD(5)/COD ratio is increased from 0.20 to 0.30, whereas the average oxidation stage (AOS) changed from 0.70 to 2.35. These two parameters show a high oxidation degree of organic compounds in the outlet effluent, which enhances its biodegradability, and favours the possibility of a subsequent coupling with a conventional biological treatment.

  11. Process of recovering uranium from wet process acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Entrainment of contaminated water in the organic phase and poor phase disengagement is prevented in the second cycle scrubber, in a two cycle uranium recovery process, by washing the organic solvent stream containing entrained H 3 PO 4 from the second cycle extractor, with a dilute aqueous sulfuric or nitric acid solution in an acid scrubber, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle stripper. (author)

  12. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with wet age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrilla, P; Losada, M; Perez, A; Caravaca, G; Mulero, J

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with wet age related macular degeneration (AMD). Case-control study that includes 163 patients with wet AMD (age group of 55-82 years with the mean age of 71 years and 170 age-matched healthy controls in the age group of 55-78 years with the mean age of 71 years. The following parameters were determined: reduced and oxidized Glutathione (GSH/GSSH), protein carbonyl groups, total antioxidant activity in plasma and the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, such as, gluthatione peroxidase, gluthatione reductase and superoxide dismutase. We observed total antioxidant activity higher in control group (CG) compared with patients with wet AMD (7.1 ± 1.2 μM Trolox vs 5.8 ± 1.1 μM Trolox). Values of superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), gluthatione reductase (GR) and gluthatione peroxidase (GPx) are higher in control group than in patients with wet AMD. According to the GSH/GSSH results, average values were higher in the CG than in patients with wet AMD and data were not significantly different.. Values of protein carbonyl groups were higher in patients with wet AMD than in CG and significant differences were found. The finding of the present study suggests that the patients with wet AMD are an altered metabolic state of oxidation-reduction and that it is convenient to give therapeutic interventions with antioxidants. We have demonstrated that systematic oxidative stress, measured by different biomarkers is closely associated with the wet AMD.

  13. Ethanol production from wet oxidized corn straw by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Q.; Yin, Y.; Thygesen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    remained in the solid fraction and recovery of cellulose was 95.87% after pretreatment. After 24 h hydrolysis at 50°C using cellulase, the achieved conversion of cellulose to glucose was about 67.6%. After 142 h of SSF with substrate concentration of 8%, ethanol yield of 79.0% of the theoretical......In order to find out the appropriate process for ethanol production from corn straw, alkaline wet-oxidation pretreatment (195°C, 15 min, Na2CO3 2 g/L, O2 1200 kPa) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were adopted to produce ethanol. The results showed that 90% of cellulose...... was obtained. The estimated total ethanol production was 262.7 kg/t raw material by assuming the consumption of both C-6 and C-5. No obvious inhibition effect occurred during SSF. These offered experiment evidences for ethanol production from corn straw....

  14. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-09-01

    The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution Dit(E), and density Dit,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on concentrated solutions. Therefore, special attention was put on the development of more environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing e.g. hot pure water with low contents of oxygen or hydrochloric acid, and of ozone, working at ambient temperatures. According to our results, these methods could be a high quality and low cost alternative to current approaches with liquid chemicals for the preparation of hydrophobic Si substrate surfaces and ultra-thin passivating oxide layers. As demonstrated for selected examples, the effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent soft plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositions of Si oxides (SiOx), or amorphous materials such as Si (a-Si:H), Si nitride (a

  15. Rinsing of wafers after wet processing: Simulation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chieh-Chun

    In semiconductor manufacturing, a large amount (50 billion gallons for US semiconductor fabrication plants in 2006) of ultrapure water (UPW) is used to rinse wafers after wet chemical processing to remove ionic contaminants on surfaces. Of great concern are the contaminants left in narrow (tens of nm), high-aspect-ratio (5:1 to 20:1) features (trenches, vias, and contact holes). The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) stipulates that ionic contaminant levels be reduced to below ˜ 10 10 atoms/cm2. Understanding the bottlenecks in the rinsing process would enable conservation of rinse water usage. A comprehensive process model has been developed on the COMSOL platform to predict the dynamics of rinsing of narrow structures on patterned SiO 2 substrates initially cleaned with NH4OH. The model considers the effect of various mass-transport mechanisms, including convection and diffusion/dispersion, which occur simultaneously with various surface phenomena, such as adsorption and desorption of impurities. The influences of charged species in the bulk and on the surface, and their induced electric field that affect both transport and surface interactions, have been addressed. Modeling results show that the efficacy of rinsing is strongly influenced by the rate of desorption of adsorbed contaminants, mass transfer of contaminants from the mouth of the feature to the bulk liquid, and the trench aspect ratio. Detection of the end point of rinsing is another way to conserve water used for rinsing after wet processing. The applicability of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to monitor rinsing of Si processed in HF with and without copper contaminant was explored. In the first study, the effect of the nature of surface state (flat band, depletion, or accumulation) of silicon on rinsing rate was investigated. The experimental results show that the state of silicon could affect rinsing kinetics through modulation of ion adsorption. In the second

  16. Thermal wet oxidation improves anaerobic biodegradability of raw and digested biowaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; De Baere, L.

    2004-01-01

    yield and digestion kinetics and permitted lignin utilization during a subsequent second digestion. The increase of the specific methane yield for the full-scale biogas plant by applying thermal wet oxidation was 35-40%, showing that there is still a considerable amount of methane that can be harvested...... profits. The objective of this research was to enhance the anaerobic biodegradability and methane yields from different biowastes (food waste, yard waste, and digested biowaste already treated in a full-scale biogas plant (DRANCO, Belgium)) by assessing thermal wet oxidation. The biodegradability...

  17. Comparative study of the luminescence of structures with Ge nanocrystals formed by dry and wet oxidation of SiGe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RodrIguez, A; Ortiz, M I; Sangrador, J; RodrIguez, T; Avella, M; Prieto, A C; Torres, A; Jimenez, J; Kling, A; Ballesteros, C

    2007-01-01

    The luminescence emission of structures containing Ge nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix obtained by dry and wet oxidation of polycrystalline SiGe layers has been studied as a function of the oxidation time and initial SiGe layer thickness. A clear relationship between the intensity of the luminescence, the structure of the sample, the formation of Ge nanocrystals and the oxidation process parameters that allows us to select the appropriate process conditions to get the most efficient emission has been established. The evolution of the composition and thickness of the growing oxides and the remaining SiGe layer during the oxidation processes has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. For dry oxidation, the luminescence appears suddenly, regardless of the initial SiGe layer thickness, when all the Si of the SiGe has been oxidized and the remaining layer of the segregated Ge starts to be oxidized forming Ge nanocrystals. Luminescence is observed as long as Ge nanocrystals are present. For wet oxidation, the luminescence appears from the first stages of the oxidation, and is related to the formation of Ge-rich nanoclusters trapped in the mixed (Si and Ge) growing oxide. A sharp increase of the luminescence intensity for long oxidation times is also observed, due to the formation of Ge nanocrystals by the oxidation of the layer of segregated Ge. For both processes the luminescence is quenched when the oxidation time is long enough to cause the full oxidation of the Ge nanocrystals. The intensity of the luminescence in the dry oxidized samples is about ten times higher than in the wet oxidized ones for equal initial thickness of the SiGe layer

  18. Process for recovering yttrium and lanthanides from wet-process phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, J.A.; Weterings, C.A.

    1983-06-28

    Process for recovering yttrium and lanthanides from wet-process phosphoric acid by adding a flocculant to the phosphoric acid, separating out the resultant precipitate and then recovering yttrium and lanthanides from the precipitate. Uranium is recovered from the remaining phosphoric acid.

  19. Noncontact COS charge analysis for in-line monitoring of wet cleaning processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiafang; Juang, Min; Tai, Sung-Shan; Chen, Kuo-in; Wossen, Ejigu; Horner, Gregory

    1998-08-01

    Contamination levels in chemical cleaning equipment and wafer cleanliness in general are very critical to semiconductor manufacturers. In this work, a Keithley Instruments non contact electrical tester (Quantox) is used to measure the mobile ion (Qm) contamination in a variety of cleaning processes. Results show that photoresist strip cleaning process has a higher mobile ion concentration than standard pre-diffusion cleaning process. RCA1, RCA2 and HF solutions mapping measured by the Quantox indicates some negative static charges on the surface after cleaning. This negative field appears to assist Qm removal during wet chemical cleaning. The dependence of flatband voltage and other oxide charges on various cleaning processes has also been investigated using the Quantox. The data suggests that a dipole layer has been formed by a surface reaction during chemical cleaning.

  20. Wet Oxidation of Maleic Acid by a Pumice Supported Copper (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pumice supported Cu (II) Schiff base catalysts were prepared by surface chemical modification followed by complexation with Cu (II) acetate. The resulting materials were characterised by Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to confirm the modification. The materials were tested in a wet oxidation ...

  1. Pretreatment of corn stover using wet oxidation to enhance enzymatic digestibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, E.; Schmidt, A.S.; Reczey, K.

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is an abundant, promising raw material for fuel ethanol production. Although it has a high cellulose content, without pretreatment it resists enzymatic hydrolysis, like most lignocellulosic materials. Wet oxidation (water, oxygen, mild alkali or acid, elevated temperature and pressure...

  2. Examining Wetting and Dewetting Processes in Thin-films on Crystalline Substrates at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihath, Sahar

    Controlling the wetting and dewetting of ultra-thin films on solid substrates is important for a variety of technological and fundamental research applications. These applications include film deposition for semiconductor manufacturing, the growth of nanowires through nanoparticle-based catalysis sites, to making ordered arrays of nanoscale particles for electronic and optical devices. However, despite the importance of these processes, the underlying mechanisms by which a film wets a surface or dewets from it is still often unclear and widely debated. In this dissertation we examine wetting and dewetting processes in three materials systems that are relevant for device applications with the ultimate goal of understanding what mechanisms drive the wetting (or dewetting) process in each case. First, we examine the formation of wetting layers between nanoparticle films and highly conductive GaAs substrates for spintronic applications. In this case, the formation of a wetting layer is important for nanoparticle adhesion on the substrate surface. Wetting layers can be made by annealing these systems, which causes elemental diffusion from nanoparticles into the substrate, thereby adhesion between the nanoparticles and the substrate. Here we investigate the feasibility of forming a wetting layer underneath nanoparticles post-annealing in a system of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on a (100) GaAs substrate by studying the interface structure and composition via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Electron Energy-Loss fine structures of the Fe-L 3,2 and O-K absorption edges were quantitatively analyzed to gain insight about the compositional gradient of the interface between the nanoparticles and the GaAs substrate. Additionally, real-space density functional theory calculations of the dynamical form factor was performed to confirm the

  3. Porous Gold Films Fabricated by Wet-Chemistry Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Pastre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous gold films presented in this paper are formed by combining gold electroless deposition and polystyrene beads templating methods. This original approach allows the formation of conductive films (2 × 106 (Ω·cm−1 with tailored and interconnected porosity. The porous gold film was deposited up to 1.2 μm on the silicon substrate without delamination. An original zirconia gel matrix containing gold nanoparticles deposited on the substrate acts both as an adhesion layer through the creation of covalent bonds and as a seed layer for the metallic gold film growth. Dip-coating parameters and gold electroless deposition kinetics have been optimized in order to create a three-dimensional network of 20 nm wide pores separated by 20 nm thick continuous gold layers. The resulting porous gold films were characterized by GIXRD, SEM, krypton adsorption-desorption, and 4-point probes method. The process is adaptable to different pore sizes and based on wet-chemistry. Consequently, the porous gold films presented in this paper can be used in a wide range of applications such as sensing, catalysis, optics, or electronics.

  4. Recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The OPPA process offers three potential advantages over the DEPA-TOPO process. The OPPA extractant is much less expensive and has a higher extraction power for uranium than the DEPA-TOPO solvent. In addition it extracts U(IV), the prevailing oxidation state of uranium in wet-process phosphoric acid and this eliminates the liquor oxidation step required in the DEPA-TOPO process. However, the DEPA-TOPO solvent is known to be extremely stable and this process has been successfully demonstrated on a pilot-plant scale at phosphate plants. It is understood that several companies are planning to commercialize this process in the near future. On the other hand, the potentially more attractive OPPA process has not been proven in a pilot plant operation and some questions about the solubility and stability of the OPPA need to be answered. Because of the wide spread interest in this process, a program was started in cooperation with Mobil and Allied Chemical companies to study this extractant, to identify and isolate the material that solubilizes the mono- and diacids, and to determine the optimum concentration and ratios for uranium extraction. In addition, a long-term cyclic test is planned to better define solubility losses and stability of the extractant. Consideration will also be given to improving the recovery of uranium lost to the gypsum during calcination. 12 figures

  5. Reaction mechanisms at 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface during wet SiC oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Toru; Hori, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Masashi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    The reaction processes at the interface between SiC with 4H structure (4H-SiC) and SiO2 during wet oxidation are investigated by electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory. Our calculations for 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces with various orientations demonstrate characteristic features of the reaction depending on the crystal orientation of SiC: On the Si-face, the H2O molecule is stable in SiO2 and hardly reacts with the SiC substrate, while the O atom of H2O can form Si-O bonds at the C-face interface. Two OH groups are found to be at least necessary for forming new Si-O bonds at the Si-face interface, indicating that the oxidation rate on the Si-face is very low compared with that on the C-face. On the other hand, both the H2O molecule and the OH group are incorporated into the C-face interface, and the energy barrier for OH is similar to that for H2O. By comparing the calculated energy barriers for these reactants with the activation energies of oxide growth rate, we suggest the orientation-dependent rate-limiting processes during wet SiC oxidation.

  6. Valorization of Lignin by Partial Wet Oxidation Using Sustainable Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abayneh Getachew Demesa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of carboxylic acids by partial wet oxidation of alkali lignin at elevated temperatures and pressures was studied experimentally. Two different heteropoly acids, phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40 and phosphomolybdic acid (H3PMo12O40, were used to catalyze the oxidation of lignin under hydrothermal conditions. Factors influencing the total yield of carboxylic acids formed during the partial oxidation of lignin were investigated. Formic, acetic and succinic acids were the major products identified. Of the two catalysts used, phosphomolybdic acid gave the most promising results, with carboxylic acid yields and lignin conversions of up to 45% and 95%, respectively.

  7. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO2/CeO2 catalyst in a slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, A. J.; Rojas, L. O. A.; Melo, D. M. A.; Benachour, M.; Sousa, J. F. de

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process-Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO). A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3), the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl2 and CeCl3 in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO2/CeO2, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130ºC and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and...

  8. Development of the PNC wet process producing uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shingo

    1979-01-01

    Pilot plant operation for the industrialization of the PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp.) wet process, which consists of ore leaching, solvent extraction (Amex Chloride Conversion), electrolytic reduction, UF 4 hydrate precipitation and dehydration, has been carried out for over ten years with several technical developments and improvements. In this paper these results of investigation on hydrofluorination step, dehydration step and reactability of UF 4 to UF 6 are reported. A new hydrofluorination equipment for continuous precipitation of crystal hydrate (particle size of 50 -- 100 mu ) was developed, and this made it possible to simplify the procedures of liquid-solid separation, drying and granulation. The water molecule of product (UF 4 .1 -- 1.2H 2 O) is composed of 70 -- 80% molecule dehydrated at 150 -- 200 0 C and 20 -- 30% dehydrated at about 350 0 C. The reactor-grade UF 4 containing less than 0.1% H 2 O, about 1% UO 2 and about 0.3% UO 2 F 2 by weight was obtained under the conditions of retention time of 1 hour at 350 0 C in an atmosphere of nitrogen by batch-wise operation of 3-inch diameter fluidized-bed dehydrator. From batch-wise experimental operations of 3-inch diameter fluidized-bed reactor, high fluorine efficiencies over 99.9% (less than 0.1% of fluorine unreacted), were attained at 380 0 C with 41% fluorine in the inlet fluidizing gas under the continuous operation of UF 4 feed velocity of 0.1 kg/h.cm 2 . (author)

  9. A wet-chemical approach to perovskite and fluorite-type nanoceramics: synthesis and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd

    2015-01-01

    In thesis the low-temperature, wet-chemical approach to various functional inorganic oxide materials is described. The main focus of this research is to control the material’s synthesis from liquid precursor to metal oxide powder or thin film; while understanding its formation mechanism. In

  10. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko

    2010-09-10

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in phiX174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  11. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae, E-mail: arimoto@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2010-09-10

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in {phi}X174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  12. Effect of Drug Active Substance Particles on Wet Granulation Process.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bělohlav, Z.; Břenková, L.; Hanika, Jiří; Durdil, P.; Rapek, P.; Tomášek, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 85, A7 (2007) , s. 974-980 ISSN 0263-8762 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : wet granulation * control * active substance Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.837, year: 2007

  13. Investigating the intra-nuclear cascade process using the reaction 136Xe on deuterium at 500 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejmund F.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available More than 600 residual nuclei, formed in the spallation of 136Xe projectiles impinging on deuterium at 500 AMeV of incident energy, have been unambiguously identified and their production cross sections have been determined with high accuracy. By comparing these data to others previously measured for the reactions 136Xe  +  p at 1 AGeV and 136Xe  +  p at 500 AMeV we investigated the role that neutrons play in peripheral collisions and to understand the energy dissipation in frontal collisions in spallation reactions.

  14. Pretreatment of Reed by Wet Oxidation and Subsequent Utilization of the Pretreated Fibers for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szijarto, Nora; Kádár, Zsófia; Varga, Eniko

    2009-01-01

    lignocelluloses usually do. In the present study, wet oxidation was investigated as the pretreatment method to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of reed cellulose to soluble sugars and thus improve the convertibility of reed to ethanol. The most effective treatment increased the digestibility of reed cellulose...... by cellulases more than three times compared to the untreated control. During this wet oxidation, 51.7% of the hemicellulose and 58.3% of the lignin were solubilized, whereas 87.1% of the cellulose remained in the solids. After enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated fibers from the same treatment, the conversion...... of cellulose to glucose was 82.4%. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated solids resulted in a final ethanol concentration as high as 8.7 g/L, yielding 73% of the theoretical....

  15. Multivariate modelling of the tablet manufacturing process with wet granulation for tablet optimization and in-process control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, J.A; Coenegracht, P.M J; Lerk, C.F

    1997-01-01

    The process of tablet manufacturing with granulation is described as a two-step process. The first step comprises wet granulation of the powder mixture, and in the second step the granules are compressed into tablets. For the modelling of the pharmaceutical process of wet granulation and tableting,

  16. Process for recovering a uranium containing concentrate and purified phosphoric acid from a wet process phosphoric acid containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weterings, C.A.M.; Janssen, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process is claimed for recovering from a wet process phosphoric acid which contains uranium, a uranium containing concentrate and a purified phosphoric acid. The wet process phosphoric acid is treated with a precipitant in the presence of a reducing agent and an aliphatic ketone

  17. Process for recovering a uranium containing concentrate and purified phosphoric acid from a wet process phosphoric acid containing uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weterings, C.A.M.; Janssen, J.A.

    1985-04-30

    A process is claimed for recovering from a wet process phosphoric acid which contains uranium, a uranium containing concentrate and a purified phosphoric acid. The wet process phosphoric acid is treated with a precipitant in the presence of a reducing agent and an aliphatic ketone.

  18. Controlling the shape and gap width of silicon electrodes using local anodic oxidation and anisotropic TMAH wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhi, Jalal; Mahmud, Shahrom; Naderi, Nima; Abdullah, Mat Johar; Hutagalung, Sabar Derita; Kakooei, Saeid

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for fabricating silicon electrodes with various shapes and gap widths was designed using the special properties of anisotropic tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) wet etching and local anodic oxidation (LAO). A statistical system was used for the optimization of the parameters of the LAO process to facilitate a better understanding and precise analysis of the process. Analyses of the interaction effects among the significant factors of LAO showed that the relative humidity and applied voltage were interdependent. They had the strongest interaction effect on the dimensions of the oxide mask. TMAH with a concentration of 25% was used as an etchant solution in (1 0 0) silicon with a rectangular oxide mask. The observed undercutting at convex corners, tip shape of emitters and gap widths of electrodes were exactly consistent with theoretical studies. Combination of the LAO method and anisotropic TMAH wet etching was successfully used to fabricate Si nano-gap electrodes. This fabrication method of sharp and round tip emitters was simple, controllable and faster than common techniques. These results indicate that the method can be a new approach for studying the electrical properties of nano-gap electrodes. (paper)

  19. On the degradability of printing and dyeing wastewater by wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Lei, L; Chen, G; Yue, P L

    2001-06-01

    A modified first-order kinetics model was used to study the wet air oxidation of printing and dyeing wastewater. The model simulations are in good agreement with experimental data. The results indicate that a certain fraction of organic pollutants in the printing and dyeing wastewater could not be removed even at elevated temperature and prolonged reaction time. The ratio of degradable organic matter is found independent of temperature and can be improved by using a catalyst.

  20. Radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and wet thermal oxidation of ZnO thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. F.; Chua, S. J.; Hu, G. X.; Gong, H.; Xiang, N.

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied the growth and wet thermal oxidation (WTO) of ZnO thin films using a radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. X-ray diffraction reveals a preferred orientation of [1010]ZnO(0002)//[1120]Al 2 O 3 (0002) coexisted with a small amount of ZnO (1011) and ZnO (1013) crystals on the Al 2 O 3 (0001) substrate. The ZnO (1011) and ZnO (1013) crystals, as well as the in-plane preferred orientation, are absent from the growth of ZnO on the GaAs(001) substrate. WTO at 550 deg. C improves the crystalline and the photoluminescence more significantly than annealing in air, N 2 and O 2 ambient; it also tends to convert the crystal from ZnO (1011) and ZnO (1013) to ZnO (0002). The evolution of the photoluminescence upon WTO and annealing reveals that the green and orange emissions, centered at 520 and 650 nm, are likely originated from oxygen vacancies and oxygen interstitials, respectively; while the 420 nm emission, which is very sensitive to the postgrowth thermal processing regardless of the substrate and the ambient gas, is likely originated from the surface-state related defects

  1. Comparative mutability of the Ames tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium by ultraviolet radiation and by 4-nitroquinoline I-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, E.; Ichikawa-Ryo, H.; Kondo, S.

    1982-01-01

    A standard method for determining mutant frequencies per survivor was used to study the detailed kinetics of reverse mutations of Ames tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium induced by UV and by 4NQO. After UV irradiation, strain TA1538 was non-mutable, but its plasmid-containing derivative TA98 was mutable, whereas TA1535 was mutable and its plasmid-bearing derivative TA100 was about 10-fold more mutable. After treatment with 4NQO, TA98 was less mutable than TA1538, whereas TA100 was more mutable than TA1535 by a factor of 10-50. TA1537 was slightly less mutable than TA1535 by either UV or 4NQO. The differential mutabilities of these strains are briefly discussed in relation to the 'hot spot' base sequences for reversion and the nature of DNA damage caused by UV and 4NQO. (orig.)

  2. Wet oxidative destruction of spent ion-exchange resins using hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, C.; Ramaswamy, M.; Theyyunni, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Spent organic ion exchange resins are generated in large quantities during the operation of nuclear facilities. Wet oxidation as a mode of treatment of these gel-type ion exchange resins was investigated using H 2 O 2 as oxidant in the presence of CuSO 4 as catalyst. Experiments using commercial samples were conducted at 95-100 deg C under reflux conditions at atmospheric pressure. It was found that the reaction of cation resin with H 2 O 2 was instantaneous whereas with anion resin, there was a lag time. For efficient utilization of the oxidant, low rate of addition of H 2 O 2 , 0.01M concentration of CuSO 4 and neutral pH in mixed resin reactions, were found to be useful. Foaming was noted during reactions involving anion resins. This could be controlled by silicone-based agents. The residual solution left after resin oxidation is aqueous in nature and is expected to contain all the radioactivity originally present in the resin. Preliminary experiments showed that it could be efficiently trapped using available inorganic sorbents. Wet oxidation system offers a simple method of converting organic waste into environmentally acceptable inorganic products. (author). 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Wet Chemical Synthesis and Screening of Thick Porous Oxide Films for Resistive Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm F. Maier

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A method of wet chemical synthesis suitable for high throughput and combinatorial applications has been developed for the synthesis of porous resistive thick-film gas sensors. This method is based on the robot-controlled application of unstable metal oxide suspensions on an array of 64 inter-digital electrodes positioned on an Al2O3 substrate. SnO2, WO3, ZrO2, TiO2, CeO2, In2O3 and Bi2O3 were chosen as base oxides, and were optimised by doping or mixed oxide formation. The parallel synthesis of mixed oxide sensors is illustrated by representative examples. The electrical characteristics and the sensor performance of the films were measured by high-throughput impedance spectroscopy while supplying various test gases (H2, CO, NO, NO2, propene. Data collection, data mining techniques applied and the best potential sensor materials discovered are presented.

  4. Oxidation process of cadmium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Koshiro; Toda, Yoshitomo; Sato, Takayori

    1977-01-01

    Complicated thermogravimetric curve was observed on oxidation process of cadmium sulfide precipitate in air. Phases of various oxidation stage were identified by X-ray diffraction method. Cadmium sulfide was first oxidized to cadmium oxide at 400 0 C, while the successive reaction with sulfur dioxide and oxygen gases gave rise to cadmium sulfate. The phases such as 2 CdS. CdSO 4 , Cd 3 SO 6 and β-CdSO 4 appeared during the oxidation process up to 1100 0 C, at which all the particles were converted into cadmium oxide at 1100 0 C. Cadmium sulfide kept in nitrogen gas above 700 0 C was directly converted into cadmium oxide when oxygen gas was introduced into the furnace. (auth.)

  5. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: wet oxidation and fermentation by yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, H B; Olsson, L; Thomsen, A B; Ahring, B K

    2003-03-20

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/L sodium carbonate and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degrees C) was used as pretreatment method for wheat straw (60 g/L), resulting in a hydrolysate and a cellulosic solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (8 g/L), low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids (3.9 g/L), phenols (0.27 g/L = 1.7 mM) and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/L). The wet oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present in the hydrolysate, were each tested in concentrations of 50-100 times the concentration found in the hydrolysate for their effect on fermentation by yeast. At these high concentrations (10 mM), 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, 4-hydroxyacetophenone and acetovanillone caused a 53-67% decrease in the volumetric ethanol productivity in S. cerevisiae compared to controls with an ethanol productivity of 3.8 g/L. The phenol acids (4-hydroxy, vanillic and syringic acid), 2-furoic acid, syringaldehyde and acetosyringone were less inhibitory, causing a 5-16% decrease in ethanol productivity. By adding the same aromatic compounds to hydrolysate (10 mM), it was shown that syringaldehyde and acetovanillone interacted negatively with hydrolysate components on the ethanol productivity. Fermentation in WO hydrolysate, that had been concentrated 6 times by freeze-drying, lasted 4 hours longer than in regular hydrolysate; however, the ethanol yield was the same. The longer fermentation time could not be explained by an inhibitory action of phenols alone, but was more likely caused by inhibitory interactions of phenols with carboxylic acids, such as acetic and formic acid. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 81: 738-747, 2003.

  6. Cloud Nucleating Activity of Non-Spherical Particles: Applications of Wet CCN Measurement to Iodine Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, M. G.; Nakao, S.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    This study employs a new experimental approach to better characterize the hygroscopicity of fractal-like particles. Traditional methods of measuring particle hygroscopicity with a size-resolved Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) set-up require accurate measurement of the dry particle's volume. The relationship between the mobility diameter and the volume is straightforward for a spherical particle, or a slightly irregular particle with a known shape factor, but is not well known for fractal particles. The traditional CCN activity measurement overestimates the amount of solute in a particle when the particle has irregular geometry and thus underestimates hygroscopicity, as measured by the parameter κ developed in Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007. We used a new experimental approach to overcome this challenge: CCN measurements were carried out using wet particles so that the volume of the dry solute does not need to be measured directly. When sufficiently wetted, fractal particles collapse, and the spherical assumption for mobility sizing of the wetted particles is valid. In order to test the wet CCN approach on a fractal particle, iodine oxide particles were generated in a 65 L batch reactor by photolysis of CH2I2 to generate iodine radicals, which subsequently reacted with ozone under dry (RH65%)conditions in two separate series of experiments. The hygroscopicities of generated particles were measured using the traditional dry CCN method and our wet CCN method. For the particles generated under dry conditions, the observed κ for particles measured at low humidity was 0.2, an underestimate, while at RH above 40% κ values were 0.6-0.7, more in line with expectations. The wetted particles' observed higher hygroscopicity was consistent with collapsing of fractal particles at higher RH and was a more accurate determination of their water contents. Particles generated under humid reactor conditions exhibited κ≈0, suggesting the compounds produced via gas phase oxidation

  7. Hydrazide-Derivatized Microgels Bond to Wet, Oxidized Cellulose Giving Adhesion Without Drying or Curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Gustafsson, Emil; Stimpson, Taylor C; Esser, Anton; Pelton, Robert H

    2017-06-21

    Hydrazide-derivatized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgels gave strong adhesion to wet, TEMPO oxidized, regenerated cellulose membranes without a drying or heating step. Adhesion was attributed to hydrazone covalent bond formation with aldehyde groups present on the cellulose surfaces. This is one of only three chemistries we have found that gives significant never-dried adhesion between wet cellulose surfaces. By contrast, for cellulose joints that have been dried and heated before wet testing, the hydrazide-hydrazone chemistry offers no advantages over standard paper industry wet strength resins. The design rules for the hydrazide-microgel adhesives include: cationic microgels are superior to anionic gels; the lower the microgel cross-link density, the higher the adhesion; longer PEG-based hydrazide tethers offer no advantage over shorter attachments; and, adhesion is independent of microgel diameter. Many of these rules were in agreement with predictions of a simple adhesion model where the microgels were assumed to be ideal springs. We propose that the unexpected, high cohesion between neighboring microgels in multilayer films was a result of bond formation between hydrazide groups and residual NHS-carboxyl esters from the preparation of the hydrazide microgels.

  8. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of lignin in a three-phase reactor with aromatic aldehyde production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales F.G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a process of catalytic wet air oxidation of lignin obtained from sugar-cane bagasse is developed with the objective of producing vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in a continuous regime. Palladium supported on g-alumina was used as the catalyst. The reactions in the lignin degradation and aldehyde production were described by a kinetic model as a system of complex parallel and series reactions, in which pseudo-first-order steps are found. For the purpose of producing aromatic aldehydes in continuous regime, a three-phase fluidized reactor was built, and it was operated using atmospheric air as the oxidizer. The best yield in aromatic aldehydes was of 12%. The experimental results were compatible with those values obtained by the pseudo-heterogeneous axial dispersion model (PHADM applied to the liquid phase.

  9. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the

  10. Performance improvement and better scalability of wet-recessed and wet-oxidized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takhar, Kuldeep; Meer, Mudassar; Upadhyay, Bhanu B.; Ganguly, Swaroop; Saha, Dipankar

    2017-05-01

    We have demonstrated that a thin layer of Al2O3 grown by wet-oxidation of wet-recessed AlGaN barrier layer in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure can significantly improve the performance of GaN based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The wet-etching leads to a damage free recession of the gate region and compensates for the decreased gate capacitance and increased gate leakage. The performance improvement is manifested as an increase in the saturation drain current, transconductance, and unity current gain frequency (fT). This is further augmented with a large decrease in the subthreshold current. The performance improvement is primarily ascribed to an increase in the effective velocity in two-dimensional electron gas without sacrificing gate capacitance, which make the wet-recessed gate oxide-HEMTs much more scalable in comparison to their conventional counterpart. The improved scalability leads to an increase in the product of unity current gain frequency and gate length (fT × Lg).

  11. Core-shell polymer nanorods by a two-step template wetting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, S; Liang, J

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional core-shell polymer nanowires offer many advantages and great potential for many different applications. In this paper we introduce a highly versatile two-step template wetting process to fabricate two-component core-shell polymer nanowires with controllable shell thickness. PLLA and PMMA were chosen as model polymers to demonstrate the feasibility of this process. Solution wetting with different concentrations of polymer solutions was used to fabricate the shell layer and melt wetting was used to fill the shell with the core polymer. The shell thickness was analyzed as a function of the polymer solution concentration and viscosity, and the core-shell morphology was observed with TEM. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating polymer core-shell nanostructures using our two-step template wetting process and opens the arena for optimization and future experiments with polymers that are desirable for specific applications.

  12. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  13. Investigation of near dry EDM compared with wet and dry EDM processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipoor, Ahad [Islamic Azad University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baseri, Hamid [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shabgard, Mohammad Reza [University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Material removal rate (MRR), tool wear ratio (TWR) and surface roughness (SR) obtained by near-dry EDM process were compared with wet and dry EDM at three levels of discharge energy in drilling of SPK steel. Surface integrity machined by this process was studied and compared with wet and dry EDM processes, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that at high level of discharge energy, wet EDM has the most MRR, TWR and SR, and dry EDM has the least MRR, TWR and SR, while at low discharge energy levels, near-dry EDM process has the most MRR and the least SR. SEM micrographs showed that the quality of surface obtained by near-dry EDM process is better than others and the machined surfaces by near-dry EDM process have lower micro-cracks and craters, relatively.

  14. Investigation of near dry EDM compared with wet and dry EDM processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholipoor, Ahad; Baseri, Hamid; Shabgard, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Material removal rate (MRR), tool wear ratio (TWR) and surface roughness (SR) obtained by near-dry EDM process were compared with wet and dry EDM at three levels of discharge energy in drilling of SPK steel. Surface integrity machined by this process was studied and compared with wet and dry EDM processes, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that at high level of discharge energy, wet EDM has the most MRR, TWR and SR, and dry EDM has the least MRR, TWR and SR, while at low discharge energy levels, near-dry EDM process has the most MRR and the least SR. SEM micrographs showed that the quality of surface obtained by near-dry EDM process is better than others and the machined surfaces by near-dry EDM process have lower micro-cracks and craters, relatively.

  15. The use of thermal wet oxidation for enhanced biogas recovery from raw and digested biowaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissens, G.; Verstraete, W. [Gent Univ. (Belgium). LabMET; Thomsen, A.B. [Rise National Lab (Denmark). Dept. of Plant Research; Ahring, B.K. [Technical Univ., of Denmark (Denmark). Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology

    2004-07-01

    The energy content of biodegradable organic waste and sewage sludge generated in the European Union represents 8 per cent of the European petroleum consumption, or on a per capita basis about 180 litres per year. Most of this material is still incinerated or disposed of in landfills despite the potential for anaerobic digestion to make this energy available. Current biodegradation plants only convert the easily digested portion of the waste, converting this to methane, leaving the rest to be stabilized by, for instance, composting. However, increased environmental consciousness is causing researchers to look at ways of increasing the methane yield. In this study, the anaerobic biodegradability of three waste sources was investigated: source-separated food waste, woody yard waste, and mixed biowaste from yard and kitchen waste after digestion in a full-scale digester. Thermal alkaline wet oxidation was applied to establish its effect on methane production and the digestion kinetics of raw and digested biowaste in batch and continuous tests. Results show that thermal alkaline wet oxidation can significantly increase methane production. 1 fig.

  16. Mechanistic modelling of fluidized bed drying processes of wet porous granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F.C.; De Beer, Thomas; Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    granules is given. This review provides a basis for future mechanistic model development for the drying process of wet granules in pharmaceutical processes. It is intended for a broad audience with a varying level of knowledge on pharmaceutical processes and mathematical modelling. Mathematical models...... particle, can be described using the continuum approach, the pore network modelling method and the shrinkage of the diameter of the wet core approach. As several granules dry at a drying rate dependent on the gas temperature, gas velocity, porosity, etc., the moisture content of a batch of granules......Fluidized bed dryers are frequently used in industrial applications and also in the pharmaceutical industry. The general incentives to develop mechanistic models for pharmaceutical processes are listed, and our vision on how this can particularly be done for fluidized bed drying processes of wet...

  17. Wet etching mechanism and crystallization of indium–tin oxide layer for application in light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shui-Hsiang; Kong, Hsieng-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Chen, Guan-Yu

    2018-01-01

    In the article, we describe the etching mechanism of indium–tin oxide (ITO) film, which was wet-etched using a solution of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and ferric chloride (FeCl3). The etching mechanism is analyzed at various etching durations of ITO films by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and selective area diffraction (SAD) analysis. In comparison with the crystalline phase of SnO2, the In2O3 phase can be more easily transformed to In3+ and can form an inverted conical structure during the etching process. By adjusting the etching duration, the residual ITO is completely removed to show a designed pattern. This is attributed to the negative Gibbs energy of In2O3 transformed to In3+. The result also corresponds to the finding of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis that the Sn/In ratio increases with increasing etching duration.

  18. Platinum Catalysts Supported on Ce, Zr, Pr - Oxides in Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Jana; Rossignol, S.; Barbier Jr., J.; Duprez, D.; Kappenstein, C.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 3 (2007), s. 1248-1253 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : platinum * cerium oxide * carbonate species Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2007

  19. Characterizations of Platinum Catalysts Supported on Ce, Zr, Pr-oxides and Formation of Carbonate Species in Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Jana; Rossignol, S.; Barbier Jr., J.; Duprez, D.; Kappenstein, C.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 124, 3-4 (2007), s. 185-190 ISSN 0920-5861 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : acetic acid * cerium oxide * catalytic wet air oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.764, year: 2007

  20. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gwon Woo [Biomass and Waste Energy Laboratory, KIER, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju [Environmental and Plant Engineering Research Institute, KICT, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively.

  1. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gwon Woo; Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively

  2. Wet Oxidation Pretreatment of Tobacco Stalks and Orange Waste for Bioethanol Production. Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Carlos; Fernandez, Teresa; Garcia, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) was used as a pretreatment method prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of tobacco stalks and orange waste. The pretreatment, performed at 195 degrees C and an oxygen pressure of 1.2 MPa, for 15 min, in the presence of Na2CO3, increased the cellulose content of the materials and gave...... cellulose recoveries of approximately 90%. The pretreatment enhanced the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest enzymatic convertibility, that of 64.9%, was achieved for pretreated tobacco stalks. The ethanolic fermentation of the WO filtrates, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae......, was inhibited compared to the fermentation of a reference glucose solution. Inhibition was more intense for the filtrate of tobacco stalks than for that of orange waste. The inhibition degree of the volumetric productivity of ethanol was higher (79.1-86.8%) than that of the ethanol yield (7.1-9.5%)....

  3. High solid simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of wet oxidized corn stover to ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, E.; Klinke, H.B.; Reczey, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this study ethanol was produced from corn stover pretreated by alkaline and acidic wet oxidation (WO) (195 degreesC, 15 min, 12 bar oxygen) followed by nonisothermal simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). In the first step of the SSF, small amounts of cellulases were added at 50....../L) were present in the hemicellulose rich hydrolyzate at subinhibitory levels, thus no detoxification was needed prior to SSF of the whole slurry. Based on the cellulose available in the WO corn stover 83% of the theoretical ethanol yield was obtained under optimized SSF conditions. This was achieved...... with a substrate concentration of 12% dry matter (DM) acidic WO corn stover at 30 FPU/g DM (43.5 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading. Even with 20 and 15 FPU/g DM (corresponding to 29 and 22 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading, ethanol yields of 76 and 73%, respectively, were obtained. After 120 h of SSF the highest...

  4. Degradation of phenylamine by catalytic wet air oxidation using metal catalysts with modified supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Escudero, Gabriel O; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acid treatments with HCl and HNO3 on the surface area and surface chemistry of three granular activated carbons was studied. These supports were characterized and the hydrochloric acid treatment leads to the best activated carbon support (AC2-C). The catalytic behavior of Pt, Ru and Fe (1 wt.%) supported on granular activated carbon treated with HCl was tested in the phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation in a three-phase, high-pressure catalytic reactor over a range of reaction temperatures 130-170ºC and total pressure of 1.0-3.0 MPa at LHSV = 0.4-1 h(-1), whereas the phenylamine concentration range and the catalyst loading were 5-16 mol.m(-3) and 0.5-1.5 g, respectively. Activity as well as conversion varied as a function of the metal, the catalyst preparation method and operation conditions. Higher activities were obtained with Pt incorporated on hydrochloric acid -treated activated carbon by the ion exchange method. In steady state, approximately 98% phenylamine conversion, 77% of TOC and 94% of COD removal, was recorded at 150ºC, 11 mol m(-3) of phenylamine concentration and 1.5 g of catalyst, and the selectivity to non-organic compounds was 78%. Several reaction intermediaries were detected. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model gave an excellent fit of the kinetic data of phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation over the catalysts of this work.

  5. LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

    2004-03-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young

  6. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  7. Hydrolysis of solubilized hemicellulose derived from wet-oxidized wheat straw by a mixture of commercial fungal enzyme preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skammelsen Schmidt, Anette; Thomsen, Alle Belinda; Woidemann, Anders [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Tenkanen, Maija [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland)

    1998-04-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of the solubilized hemicellulose fraction from wet-oxidized wheat straw was investigated for quantification purposes. An optimal hydrolysis depends on factors such as composition of the applied enzyme mixture and the hydrolysis conditions (enzyme loading, hydrolysis time, pH-value, and temperature). A concentrated enzyme mixture was used in this study prepared at VTT Biotechnology and Food Research, Finland, by mixing four commercial enzyme preparations. No distinctive pH-value and temperature optima were identified after a prolonged incubation of 24 hours. By reducing the hydrolysis time to 2 hours a temperature optimum was found at 50 deg. C, where a pH-value higher than 5.2 resulted in reduced activity. An enzyme-substrate-volume-ratio of 0.042, a pH-value of 5.0, and a temperature of 50 deg. C were chosen as the best hydrolysis conditions due to an improved monosaccharide yield. The hydrolysis time was chosen to be 24 hours to ensure equilibrium and total quantification. Even under the best hydrolysis conditions, the overall sugar yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis was only 85% of that of the optimal acid hydrolysis. The glucose yield were approximately the same for the two types of hydrolyses, probably due to the high cellulase activity in the VTT-enzyme mixture. For xylose and arabinose the enzymatic hydrolysis yielded only 80% of that of the acid hydrolysis. As the pentoses existed mainly as complex polymers their degradation required many different enzymes, some of which might be missing from the VTT-enzyme mixture. Furthermore, the removal of side-choins from the xylan backbone during the wet-oxidation pretreatment process might enable the hemicellulosic polymers to interact and precipitate, hence, reducing the enzymatic digestibility of the hemicellulose. (au) 8 tabs., 10 ills., 65 refs.

  8. Ruthenium versus platinum on cerium materials in wet air oxidation of acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaalova, J. [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Prague 6, CZ (Czech Republic); Barbier, J., E-mail: Jacques.barbier.jr@univ-poitiers.fr [University of Poitiers, LACCO UMR 6503, Laboratoire de Catalyse par les Metaux, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, F-86022 POITIERS Cedex (France); Rossignol, S. [University of Limoges, ENSCI, 47 Avenue Albert Thomas 87000 Limoges France (France)

    2010-09-15

    This study was a comparison between Ru-catalysts and similar, previously investigated, Pt-catalysts. In this paper, ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation are prepared, characterized and tested. Both catalysts were supported on commercial CeO{sub 2} as well as mixed oxide Zr{sub 0.1}(Ce{sub 0.75}Pr{sub 0.25}){sub 0.9}O{sub 2}. The catalysts were characterized by measuring the oxygen storage capacities (OSC), BET, XRD, FTIR and chemisorption of hydrogen. In addition, the effect of sintering (treatments under H{sub 2}) was compared with both of the catalysts. The comparison of the results showed that initial intrinsic activity of ruthenium is not significantly influenced by the type of the support, which is contrast to platinum. Furthermore, the particle size of Ru had an important effect on CWAO activity: the higher the particle size, the better the activity. This was different with Pt-catalysts, where the optimal particle size was smaller, having about 15% of metal dispersion.

  9. Multivariate statistical modelling of the pharmaceutical process of wet granulation and tableting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, Johannes Arnold

    1997-01-01

    Wet granulation in high-shear mixers is a process of particle size enlargement much used in the pharmaceutical industry to improve the tableting properties of powder mixtures, such as flowability and compactibility, necessary for the large scale production of pharmaceutical talbets. ... Zie: Summary

  10. Comparison of torque measurements and near-infrared spectroscopy in characterization of a wet granulation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna Cecilia; Luukkonen, Pirjo; Rantanen, Jukka

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare impeller torque measurements and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in the characterization of the water addition phase of a wet granulation process. Additionally, the effect of hydrate formation during granulation on the impeller torque was investigated....... Anhydrous theophylline, alpha-lactose monohydrate, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were used as materials for the study. The materials and mixtures of them were granulated using purified water in a small-scale high-shear mixer. The impeller torque was registered and NIR spectra of wet samples were...... recorded at-line. The torque and the NIR baseline-corrected water absorbances increased with increasing water content. A plateau in the NIR baseline-corrected water absorbances was observed for wet masses containing MCC. This was at the region of optimal water amount for granulation according to the torque...

  11. Catalytic performances of supported gold nano-particles in catalytic oxidation of organic acids by wet way; Performances catalytiques de nanoparticules d'or supportees en oxydation catalytique d'acides organiques par voie humide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doan, Pham Minh; Aubert, G.; Gallezot, P.; Bessona, M. [Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse (IRC), UPR 5401-CNRS, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Zanella, R.; Delannoy, L.; Louis, C. [Paris-6 Univ., Lab. de Reactivite de Surface, UMR 7609-CNRS 75 (France)

    2004-07-01

    It has been shown for the first time that gold catalysts in the form of supported nano-particles, active in the reactions of CO oxidation and VOC combustion, are active too for the elimination reactions of organic acids in aqueous solution by the air wet oxidation process. The acids are mainly oxidized in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. (O.M.)

  12. Environmental aspects of the production process of ceramic tiles (wet process), with emphasis in liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Katia Regina

    2000-01-01

    Present study developed a simplified methodology to evaluate the environmental impacts of the wet process of production of ceramic tiles. In order to subsidize the development of the model of environmental evaluation and to achieve a better understanding of the productive process, there were elaborated matrices in which was correlated the stages of the productive system with the respective types and volumes of residues generated. To these matrices there were related the technical norms of the Brazilian Association of Norms and Techniques (ABNT), which determines the sampling methodologies, characterizations, monitoring and treatment of the solid residues and liquid and gaseous effluents; and the pertinent Federal and State Legislations which dispose on the control of the environmental pollution. The evaluation of the environmental impact model here proposed was developed fram the Interaction Matrix of Leopold and from the Risk Matrix proposed by Moura, in which identified the pollutant effects (critical, significant, reduced, marginal) of the stages of this productive process. The validation of these results was obtained through the accomplishment of analytic assays in the used raw materials and in the residues generated in the productive process. The results of the chemical analyses reinforce that the positive toxicity in the liquid effluent is related with the chemical composition of the synthetic raw material used in the decoration. It was concluded that the solid residues that more damage cause to the environment are those coming from the enamel and dying preparation and application sections. Concomitantly, it was performed a study of characterization of the natural raw materials and of the product, using different techniques as fluorescence X ray, differential thermal analysis with thermogravimetry, scanning electron microscopy and X ray diffraction, in order to understand the interactions of the components of the mass of the ceramic body, during the stage of

  13. Municipal solid waste processing and separation employing wet torrefaction for alternative fuel production and aluminum reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu'min, Gea Fardias; Prawisudha, Pandji; Zaini, Ilman Nuran; Aziz, Muhammad; Pasek, Ari Darmawan

    2017-09-01

    This study employs wet torrefaction process (also known as hydrothermal) at low temperature. This process simultaneously acts as waste processing and separation of mixed waste, for subsequent utilization as an alternative fuel. The process is also applied for the delamination and separation of non-recyclable laminated aluminum waste into separable aluminum and plastic. A 2.5-L reactor was used to examine the wet torrefaction process at temperatures below 200°C. It was observed that the processed mixed waste was converted into two different products: a mushy organic part and a bulky plastic part. Using mechanical separation, the two products can be separated into a granular organic product and a plastic bulk for further treatment. TGA analysis showed that no changes in the plastic composition and no intrusion from plastic fraction to the organic fraction. It can be proclaimed that both fractions have been completely separated by wet torrefaction. The separated plastic fraction product obtained from the wet torrefaction treatment also contained relatively high calorific value (approximately 44MJ/kg), therefore, justifying its use as an alternative fuel. The non-recyclable plastic fraction of laminated aluminum was observed to be delaminated and separated from its aluminum counterpart at a temperature of 170°C using an additional acetic acid concentration of 3%, leaving less than 25% of the plastic content in the aluminum part. Plastic products from both samples had high calorific values of more than 30MJ/kg, which is sufficient to be converted and used as a fuel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Supported noble metal catalysts in the catalytic wet air oxidation of industrial wastewaters and sewage sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, M; Descorme, C; Bernardi, M; Gallezot, P; di Gregorio, F; Grosjean, N; Minh, D Pham; Pintar, A

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews some catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) investigations of industrial wastewaters over platinum and ruthenium catalysts supported on TiO2 and ZrO2 formulated to be active and resistant to leaching, with particular focus on the stability of the catalyst. Catalyst recycling experiments were performed in batch reactors and long-term stability tests were conducted in trickle-bed reactors. The catalyst did not leach upon treatment of Kraft bleaching plant and olive oil mill effluents, and could be either recycled or used for long periods of time in continuous reactors. Conversely, these catalysts were rapidly leached when used to treat effluents from the production of polymeric membranes containing N,N-dimethylformamide. The intermediate formation of amines, such as dimethylamine and methylamine with a high complexing capacity for the metal, was shown to be responsible for the metal leaching. These heterogeneous catalysts also deactivated upon CWAO of sewage sludges due to the adsorption of the solid organic matter. Pre-sonication of the sludge to disintegrate the flocs and improve solubility was inefficient.

  15. Determination of boron in graphite by a wet oxidation decomposition/curcumin photometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo; Toida, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The wet oxidation decomposition of graphite materials has been studied for the accurate determination of boron using a curcumin photometric method. A graphite sample of 0.5 g was completely decomposed with a mixture of 5 ml of sulfuric acid, 3 ml of perchloric acid, 0.5 ml of nitric acid and 5 ml of phosphoric acid in a silica 100 ml Erlenmeyer flask fitted with an air condenser at 200degC. Any excess of perchloric and nitric acids in the solution was removed by heating on a hot plate at 150degC. Boron was distilled with methanol, and then recovered in 10 ml of 0.2 M sodium hydroxide. The solution was evaporated to dryness. To the residue were added curcumin-acetic acid and sulfuric-acetic acid. The mixture was diluted with ethanol, and the absorbance at 555 nm was measured. The addition of 5 ml of phosphoric acid proved to be effective to prevent any volatilization loss of boron during decomposition of the graphite sample and evaporation of the resulting solution. The relative standard deviation was 4-8% for samples with 2 μg g -1 levels of boron. The results on CRMs JAERI-G5 and G6 were in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  16. Ruthenium and Platinum Catalysts Supported on Ce, Zr, Pr-O Mixed Oxides Prepared by Soft Chemistry for Acetic Acid Wet Air Oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Jana; Rossignol, S.; Barbier Jr., J.; Mesnard, D.; Kappenstein, C.; Duprez, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 72, 1-2 (2007), s. 1-10 ISSN 0926-3373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : sol-gel * catalytic wet air oxidation * acetic acid Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2007

  17. Direct uranium extraction from dihydrate and hemi-dihydrate wet process phosphoric acids by liquid emulsion membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hazek, N.T.; El Sayed, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    A new liquid emulsion membrane (LEM) process for uranium extraction from either dihydrate 28-30% P 2 O 5 (DH) or hemi-dihydrate 42-45% P 2 O 5 (HDH) wet process phosphoric acid is proposed. In this process, the organic component of the LEM is composed of a synergistic mixture of 0.1M di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA) and 0.025M trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) with 4% Span 80. The internal or the strip acid phase is composed of 0.5M citric acid. The prepared LEM was proved to be stable in 42-45% P 2 O 5 acid concentration range and can, therefore, be applied to the phosphoric acid produced by the hemi-dihydrate process. After breakdown of the loaded emulsion, the uranyl citrate in the internal strip phase is separated by adding methanol followed by its calcination to the orange oxide. Most of the reagents used are recycled. The proposed process is characterized by simplicity, practically closed operation cycle in addition to lower capital and operating costs. (author)

  18. Dry followed by wet backside etching processes for micromachined endfire antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, M.; Pons, P.; Plana, R.; Bary, L.; Dubreuil, P.; Bourrier, D.; Vasilache, D.; Neculoiu, D.; Müller, A.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a novel technological process based on dry followed by wet backside silicon etching for the manufacturing of 'quasi-three edge' membranes-supported millimeter wave circuits. The process is based on a backside deep reactive ion etching used to remove the first 350 µm of silicon, followed by wet etching in KOH solution, to eliminate the remaining 50 µm of silicon and create quasi-free edge membranes, according to the undercut mechanism. In order to validate the technology, a Yagi-Uda antenna for 45 GHz was designed using the Zeland IE3D software package, and fabricated. The demonstrator was characterized in terms of return loss and isotropic gain using 'on wafer' measurements. The agreement between the modeling and the measurements is very good, and validates the new technological approach, which assures free-space propagation conditions for endfire membrane-supported antennae structures.

  19. Process study of polycyanate resin for wet-filament wound high-strength composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    Polycyanate (or cyanate ester) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14 polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. T1000G/RS-14 composite cylinders were wet-wound and cured using different process schedules and then evaluated for hoop tensile strength and modulus, transverse flexural strength and short beam shear strength. The results of material characterization tests performed on the T1000G carbon fiber and RS-14 resin constituents used in this study are also presented.

  20. Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys in Wet Air; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Kramer; A. Thom; O. Degirmen; V. Behrani; M. Akinc

    2002-01-01

    Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing uses such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. The present work investigated the effect of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of Mo-Si-B phase assemblages. Three alloys were studied: Alloy 1= Mo(sub 5)Si(sub 3)B(sub x) (T1)- MoSi(sub 2)- MoB, Alloy 2= T1- Mo(sub 5)SiB(sub 2) (T2)- Mo(sub 3)Si, and Alloy 3= Mo- T2- Mo(sub 3)Si. Tests were conducted at 1000 and 1100C in controlled atmospheres of dry air and wet air nominally containing 18, 55, and 150 Torr H(sub 2)O. The initial mass loss of each alloy was approximately independent of the test temperature and moisture content of the atmosphere. The magnitude of these initial losses varied according to the Mo content of the alloys. All alloys formed a continuous, external silica scale that protected against further mass change after volatilization of the initially formed MoO(sub 3). All alloys experienced a small steady state mass change, but the calculated rates cannot be quantitatively compared due to statistical uncertainty in the individual mass measurements. Of particular interest is that Alloy 3, which contains a significant volume fraction of Mo metal, formed a protective scale. All alloys formed varying amounts of subscale Mo and MoO(sub 2). This implies that oxygen transport through the external silica scale has been significantly reduced. For all alloys, water vapor accelerated the growth of a multiphase interlayer at the silica scale/unoxidized alloy interface. This interlayer is likely composed of fine Mo and MoO(sub 2) that is dispersed within a thin silica matrix. Alloy 3 was particularly sensitive to water accelerated growth of this interlayer. At 1100 C, the scale thickness after 300 hours increased from about 20 mm in dry air to nearly 100 mm in wet air

  1. Fatty acid composition of maize germ oil from high-oil hybrids wet-milling processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Petar Lj.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize germ was obtained by wet-milling laboratory processing of domestic high-oil maize hybrids. After separation, the germ was subjected to extraction of maize oil. Fatty acid composition of maize germ oil was determined by gas chromatography. The results showed very high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and a constant sum of oleic and linoleic acids in oils of different maize hybrids.

  2. Solid waste management practices in wet coffee processing industries of Gidabo watershed, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsido, Mihret D; Li, Meng

    2016-07-01

    The financial and social contributions of coffee processing industries within most coffee export-based national economies like Ethiopia are generally high. The type and amount of waste produced and the waste management options adopted by these industries can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the solid waste management options adopted in wet coffee processing industries in the Gidabo watershed of Ethiopia. A field observation and assessment were made to identify whether the operational characteristics of the industries have any effect on the waste management options that were practiced. The investigation was conducted on 125 wet coffee processing industries about their solid waste handling techniques. Focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, key informant interview and transect walks are some of the tools employed during the investigation. Two major types of wastes, namely hull-bean-pulp blended solid waste and wastewater rich in dissolved and suspended solids were generated in the industries. Wet mills, on average, released 20.69% green coffee bean, 18.58% water and 60.74% pulp by weight. Even though these wastes are rich in organic matter and recyclables; the most favoured solid waste management options in the watershed were disposal (50.4%) and industrial or household composting (49.6%). Laxity and impulsive decision are the driving motives behind solid waste management in Gidabo watershed. Therefore, to reduce possible contamination of the environment, wastes generated during the processing of red coffee cherries, such as coffee wet mill solid wastes, should be handled properly and effectively through maximisation of their benefits with minimised losses. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. A key process controlling the wet removal of aerosols: new observational evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Sho; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Mori, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka

    2016-10-05

    The lifetime and spatial distributions of accumulation-mode aerosols in a size range of approximately 0.05-1 μm, and thus their global and regional climate impacts, are primarily constrained by their removal via cloud and precipitation (wet removal). However, the microphysical process that predominantly controls the removal efficiency remains unidentified because of observational difficulties. Here, we demonstrate that the activation of aerosols to cloud droplets (nucleation scavenging) predominantly controls the wet removal efficiency of accumulation-mode aerosols, using water-insoluble black carbon as an observable particle tracer during the removal process. From simultaneous ground-based observations of black carbon in air (prior to removal) and in rainwater (after removal) in Tokyo, Japan, we found that the wet removal efficiency depends strongly on particle size, and the size dependence can be explained quantitatively by the observed size-dependent cloud-nucleating ability. Furthermore, our observational method provides an estimate of the effective supersaturation of water vapour in precipitating cloud clusters, a key parameter controlling nucleation scavenging. These novel data firmly indicate the importance of quantitative numerical simulations of the nucleation scavenging process to improve the model's ability to predict the atmospheric aerosol burden and the resultant climate forcings, and enable a new validation of such simulations.

  4. Method for the recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid, originating from the wet-process of uraniferous phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.; Carrington, O.F.

    1978-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recoverying uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange circuits is described. (Auth.)

  5. Voluntary cleanup of the Ames chemical disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboas, A.L.; Freeman, R.; Peterson, J.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy completed a voluntary removal action at the Ames chemical disposal site, a site associated with the early days of the Manhattan Project. It contained chemical and low-level radioactive wastes from development of the technology to extract uranium from uranium oxide. The process included the preparation of a Remedial Investigation, Feasibility Study, Baseline Risk Assessment, and, ultimately, issuance of a Record of Decision. Various stakeholder groups were involved, including members of the regulatory community, the general public, and the landowner, Iowa State University. The site was restored and returned to the landowner for unrestricted use.

  6. Simulation of biodiesel production using hydro-esterification process from wet microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradana Yano Surya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, algae have received a lot of attention as a new biomass source for the production of renewable energy, such as biodiesel. Conventionally, biodiesel is made through esterification or transesterification of oils where the process involves a catalyst and alcohol to be reacted in a reactor. However, this process is energy intensive for drying and extraction step. To overcome this situation, we studied simulation of a new route of hydro-esterification process which is combine hydrolysis and esterification processes for biodiesel production from wet microalgae. Firstly, wet microalgae treated by hydrolyzer to produce fatty acids (FAs, separated with separator, and then mixed with methanol and esterified at subcritical condition to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs while H2SO4 conducted as the catalyst. Energy and material balance of conventional and hydrolysis-esterification process was evaluated by Aspen Plus. Simulation result indicated that conventional route is energy demanding process, requiring 4.40 MJ/L biodiesel produced. In contrast, the total energy consumption of hydrolysis-esterification method can be reduced significantly into 2.43 MJ/L biodiesel. Based on the energy consumption comparison, hydro-esterification process is less costly than conventional process for biodiesel production.

  7. High solid simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of wet oxidized corn stover to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Enikõ; Klinke, Helene B; Réczey, Kati; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2004-12-05

    In this study ethanol was produced from corn stover pretreated by alkaline and acidic wet oxidation (WO) (195 degrees C, 15 min, 12 bar oxygen) followed by nonisothermal simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). In the first step of the SSF, small amounts of cellulases were added at 50 degrees C, the optimal temperature of enzymes, in order to obtain better mixing condition due to some liquefaction. In the second step more cellulases were added in combination with dried baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) at 30 degrees C. The phenols (0.4-0.5 g/L) and carboxylic acids (4.6-5.9 g/L) were present in the hemicellulose rich hydrolyzate at subinhibitory levels, thus no detoxification was needed prior to SSF of the whole slurry. Based on the cellulose available in the WO corn stover 83% of the theoretical ethanol yield was obtained under optimized SSF conditions. This was achieved with a substrate concentration of 12% dry matter (DM) acidic WO corn stover at 30 FPU/g DM (43.5 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading. Even with 20 and 15 FPU/g DM (corresponding to 29 and 22 FPU/g cellulose) enzyme loading, ethanol yields of 76 and 73%, respectively, were obtained. After 120 h of SSF the highest ethanol concentration of 52 g/L (6 vol.%) was achieved, which exceeds the technical and economical limit of the industrial-scale alcohol distillation. The SSF results showed that the cellulose in pretreated corn stover can be efficiently fermented to ethanol with up to 15% DM concentration. A further increase of substrate concentration reduced the ethanol yield significant as a result of insufficient mass transfer. It was also shown that the fermentation could be followed with an easy monitoring system based on the weight loss of the produced CO2.

  8. Evaluation of wet air oxidation variables for removal of organophosphorus pesticide malathion using Box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgoren, Melike; Gengec, Erhan; Veli, Sevil

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with finding optimum reaction conditions for wet air oxidation (WAO) of malathion aqueous solution, by Response Surface Methodology. Reaction conditions, which affect the removal efficiencies most during the non-catalytic WAO system, are: temperature (60-120 °C), applied pressure (20-40 bar), the pH value (3-7), and reaction time (0-120 min). Those were chosen as independent parameters of the model. The interactions between parameters were evaluated by Box-Behnken and the quadratic model fitted very well with the experimental data (29 runs). A higher value of R 2 and adjusted R 2 (>0.91) demonstrated that the model could explain the results successfully. As a result, optimum removal efficiency (97.8%) was obtained at pH 5, 20 bars of pressure, 116 °C, and 96 min. These results showed that Box-Behnken is a suitable design to optimize operating conditions and removal efficiency for non-catalytic WAO process. The EC 20 value of raw wastewater was measured as 35.40% for malathion (20 mg/L). After the treatment, no toxicity was observed at the optimum reaction conditions. The results show that the WAO is an efficient treatment system for malathion degradation and has the ability of converting malathion to the non-toxic forms.

  9. Oxidation catalysts and process for preparing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Compounds particularly suitable as oxidation catalysis are described, comprising specified amounts of uranium, antimony and tin as oxides. Processes for making and using the catalysts are described. (U.K.)

  10. Analysis of wet granulation process with Plackett-Burman design--case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyna-Orlewicz, Krzysztof; Jachowicz, Renata

    2011-01-01

    According to Process Analytical Technology perspective, drug product quality should be ensured by manufacturing process design. Initial step of the process analysis is investigation of critical process parameters (CPPs). It is generally accepted to type the CPPs based on project team knowledge and experience [5]. This paper describes the use of Design of Experiments tool for selection of the CPPs. Seven factors of wet granulation process were investigated for criticality. Low and high levels of each factor represented maximal and minimal settings of wide operational ranges. Granulates were produced in line with Plackett-Burman experimental matrix, blended with extra-granular excipients and compressed into tablets. Semi-products and final products were tested. Out of specification result of any critical quality attribute was treated as critical failure. The high-shear granulation factors, i.e. quantity of binding solution, rotational speed of impeller and wet massing time were considered of critical importance. Operational ranges of the parameters were optimized. The process performance was confirmed in qualification trials.

  11. Calculating Soil Wetness, Evapotranspiration and Carbon Cycle Processes Over Large Grid Areas Using a New Scaling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Soil wetness typically shows great spatial variability over the length scales of general circulation model (GCM) grid areas (approx 100 km ), and the functions relating evapotranspiration and photosynthetic rate to local-scale (approx 1 m) soil wetness are highly non-linear. Soil respiration is also highly dependent on very small-scale variations in soil wetness. We therefore expect significant inaccuracies whenever we insert a single grid area-average soil wetness value into a function to calculate any of these rates for the grid area. For the particular case of evapotranspiration., this method - use of a grid-averaged soil wetness value - can also provoke severe oscillations in the evapotranspiration rate and soil wetness under some conditions. A method is presented whereby the probability distribution timction(pdf) for soil wetness within a grid area is represented by binning. and numerical integration of the binned pdf is performed to provide a spatially-integrated wetness stress term for the whole grid area, which then permits calculation of grid area fluxes in a single operation. The method is very accurate when 10 or more bins are used, can deal realistically with spatially variable precipitation, conserves moisture exactly and allows for precise modification of the soil wetness pdf after every time step. The method could also be applied to other ecological problems where small-scale processes must be area-integrated, or upscaled, to estimate fluxes over large areas, for example in treatments of the terrestrial carbon budget or trace gas generation.

  12. Prevalence of Salmonella in poultry processing environments in wet markets in Penang and Perlis, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Nidaullah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of various Salmonella serotypes in chickens, carcass contact surfaces as well as environmental samples collected from wet markets and small scale processing plant. Materials and Methods: A total of 182 poultry and environmental samples were collected at random on separate occasions from wet markets and small scale processing plant, during the period of October 2014 to July 2015 in Penang and Perlis, Malaysia. The samples were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella using ISO 6579:2002 conventional culture-based method. Presumptive Salmonella colonies were subjected to various biochemical tests (such as triple sugar iron and lysine iron test, serologically confirmed using polyvalent O and H antisera and further serotyped at Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, Perak, Malaysia. Results: Salmonella serotypes were isolated from 161 out of 182 samples (88.46% with 100% prevalence in the whole chicken carcass and chicken cuts - as well as transport crate, cage, drum, knife, chopping board, display table, floor, bench wash water, wash water, and drain water. Salmonella was isolated from 91.67%, 83.33%, and 66.67% of defeathering machines, drain swabs, and apron, respectively. 17 serotypes were isolated in this study with Salmonella Albany (57/161, Salmonella Corvallis (42/161, and Salmonella Brancaster (37/161 being the predominant serovars. Conclusion: The most carcass contact and environmental samples collected along the wet market chicken processing line were consistently contaminated with Salmonella. This indicates that Salmonella has established itself in poultry processing environments by colonizing the surfaces of the equipment and survives in these environments by establishing biofilms. Our results highlight the need of implementing strict hygiene and sanitation standards to reduce the incidence of Salmonella. The prevalence of Salmonella in poultry can be reduced effectively

  13. Prevalence of Salmonella in poultry processing environments in wet markets in Penang and Perlis, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidaullah, Hafiz; Abirami, Nadarajan; Shamila-Syuhada, Ahamed Kamal; Chuah, Li-Oon; Nurul, Huda; Tan, Teik Pei; Abidin, Farah Wahida Zainal; Rusul, Gulam

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of various Salmonella serotypes in chickens, carcass contact surfaces as well as environmental samples collected from wet markets and small scale processing plant. A total of 182 poultry and environmental samples were collected at random on separate occasions from wet markets and small scale processing plant, during the period of October 2014 to July 2015 in Penang and Perlis, Malaysia. The samples were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella using ISO 6579:2002 conventional culture-based method. Presumptive Salmonella colonies were subjected to various biochemical tests (such as triple sugar iron and lysine iron test), serologically confirmed using polyvalent O and H antisera and further serotyped at Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, Perak, Malaysia. Salmonella serotypes were isolated from 161 out of 182 samples (88.46%) with 100% prevalence in the whole chicken carcass and chicken cuts - as well as transport crate, cage, drum, knife, chopping board, display table, floor, bench wash water, wash water, and drain water. Salmonella was isolated from 91.67%, 83.33%, and 66.67% of defeathering machines, drain swabs, and apron, respectively. 17 serotypes were isolated in this study with Salmonella Albany (57/161), Salmonella Corvallis (42/161), and Salmonella Brancaster (37/161) being the predominant serovars. The most carcass contact and environmental samples collected along the wet market chicken processing line were consistently contaminated with Salmonella . This indicates that Salmonella has established itself in poultry processing environments by colonizing the surfaces of the equipment and survives in these environments by establishing biofilms. Our results highlight the need of implementing strict hygiene and sanitation standards to reduce the incidence of Salmonella . The prevalence of Salmonella in poultry can be reduced effectively by identifying and eliminating the sources and contamination

  14. Finite element simulation of dynamic wetting flows as an interface formation process

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows - the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the \\'hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting\\', is discovered where the influence of the capillary\\'s radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where excellent agreement is obtained. Practical recommendations on the spatial resolution required by the numerical scheme for a given set of non-dimensional similarity parameters are provided, and a comparison to asymptotic results available in limiting cases confirms that the code is converging to the correct solution. The appendix gives a user-friendly step-by-step guide specifying the entire implementation and allowing the reader to easily reproduce all presented results, including the benchmark calculations. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Wet-chemistry processing of powdery raw material for high-tech ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusova, Elena A.; Vokhmintcev, Kirill V.; Zagainov, Igor V.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop wet-chemistry approaches for the synthesis of ultradispersed and mesoporous metal oxide powders and powdery composites intended for usage in the production of ceramic materials with desired properties. The focus is on the development of template synthesis of mesoporous metal silicates as well as obtaining nano- and subnanopowders by a modified sol-gel technique and template methods. Families of mesoporous (2 to 300 nm) metal silicates and nano-oxides and subnanopowders (4 to 300 nm) were synthesized by the template method and modified sol-gel technique, respectively. Texture and morphology of the obtained objects have been studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, and N2 adsorption-desorption. It was found that morphological parameters of the metal oxide obtained by the modified sol-gel technique depend nonlinearly on the initial molar ratio value of the sol stabilizer and metal in the reaction medium as well as the nature of the stabilizer. It has been shown that the nature of structure-directing components determines the morphology of the silicate obtained by the template method: dispersion and shape of its particles. The developed laboratory technology corresponds to the conception of soft chemistry and may be adapted to the manufacture of ultradispersed materials for catalysis, solar cells, fuel cells, semiconductors, sensors, low-sized electronic devices of new generation, etc.

  16. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.; McKamey, D.R.; Baes, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Studies were continued of a process for recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate (OPAP), a mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. The mixture contained at least nine impurities, the principal one being octyl phenol, and also material that readily hydrolyzed to octyl phenol and orthophosphoric acid. The combination of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids was the principal uranium extractant, but some of the impurities also extracted uranium. Hydrolysis of the extractant had little effect on uranium extraction, as did the presence of moderate concentrations of octyl phenol and trioctylphenyl phosphate. Diluent choice among refined kerosenes, naphthenic mixtures, and paraffinic hydrocarbons also had little effect on uranium extraction, but extraction was much lower when an aromatic diluent was used. Purified OPAP fractions were sparingly soluble in aliphatic hydrocarbon diluents. The solubility was increased by the presence of impurities such as octyl phenol, and by the addition of water or an acidic solution to the extractant-diluent mixture. In continuous stability tests, extractant loss by distribution to the aqueous phase was much less to wet-process phosphoric acid than to reagent grade acid. Uranium recovery from wet-process acid decreased steadily because of the combined effects of extractant poisoning and precipitation of the extractant as a complex with ferric iron. Unaccountable losses of organic phase volume occurred in the continuous tests. While attempts to recover the lost organic phase were unsuccessful, the test results indicate it was not lost by entrainment or dissolution in the phosphoric acid solutions. 21 figures, 8 tables

  17. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO2/CeO2 catalyst in a slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process-Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO. A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3, the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl2 and CeCl3 in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO2/CeO2, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130ºC and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed.

  18. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the

  19. Investigation on the effect of seawater to hydraulic property and wetting process of bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takuma

    2004-01-01

    On high-level waste disposal, bentonite is one of the most promising material for buffer and backfill material. The hydraulic properties and wetting process of bentonite are important not only for barrier performance assessment but also for prediction of waste disposal environment, such as resaturation time and thermal distribution. In Japan, we should consider the effect of seawater for bentonite, because radioactive waste will be disposed of in coastal area and in marine sediment where seawater remained. However, it is not enough to understand the effect of seawater. Therefore, experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of seawater on the hydraulic conductivity and wetting process of bentonite. The effect of seawater on hydraulic conductivity is significant for Na-bentonite, the hydraulic conductivity of Na-bentonite in seawater is one order to magnitude higher than that in distilled water. On the other hand, the hydraulic conductivity of Ca-bentonite is not influenced by seawater. The hydraulic conductivity of bentonite decreases as effective montmorillonite density increases. The effective montmorillonite density is ratio between the weight of montmorillonite and volume of porosity and montmorillonite. The hydraulic conductivity of bentonite is close related to swelling property since the hydraulic conductivity decrease as the swelling pressure increase. Wetting process of compacted bentonite could be evaluated by diffusion phenomena since infiltration rate and change of saturation rate and represented by diffusion equation. The effect of seawater on water diffusivity is significant for Na-type bentonite with low effective montmorillonite density. Except for that condition, the water diffusivity of bentonite is almost constant and is not influenced by effective montmorillonite density and seawater. (author)

  20. The extraction of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid using a liquid surfactant membrane system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, N.; Davies, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid membrane extraction process is examined for the extraction of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid. Uranium is present in the acid in concentrations up to 100 ppm which in principle makes it ideal for treatment with a membrane process. The membrane system studied is based on extraction using DEHPA-TOPO reagents which are contained within the organic phase of a water in oil emulsion. Formulations of the emulsion membrane system have been studied, the limitations of acid temperature, P 2 O 5 concentration and solid dispersed impurities in the acid have been studied in laboratory batch experiments and in a continuous pilot plant unit capable of treating 5l of concentrated acid per minute. Data from the pilot plant work has been used to develop a flowsheet for a commercial unit based on this process. (author)

  1. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit`s objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements.

  2. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit's objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements

  3. Design Of A Small-Scale Hulling Machine For Improved Wet-Processed Coffee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The method of primary processing of coffee is a vital determinant of quality and price. Wet processing method produces higher quality beans but is very labourious. This work outlines the design of a small scale cost-effective ergonomic and easily maintained and operated coffee hulling machine that can improve quality and productivity of green coffee beans. The machine can be constructed from locally available materials at a relatively low cost of about NGN 140000.00 with cheap running cost. The beaters are made from rubber strip which can deflect when in contact with any obstruction causing little or no stresses on drum members and reducing the risk of damage to both the beans and machine. The machine is portable and detachable which make it fit to be owned by a group of farmers who can move it from one farm to the other making affordability and running cost easier. The easily affordable and relatively low running cost may be further reduced by the fact that the machine is powered by 3.0 Hp petrol engine which is suitable for other purposes among the rural dwellers. The eventual construction of the machine will encourage more farmers to go into wet processing of coffee and reduce the foreign exchange hitherto lost to this purpose.

  4. Transport and transformation of mercury during wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous metal smelting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhilou; Wang, Dongli; Peng, Bing; Chai, Liyuan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Shu; Yang, Bentao; Xiang, Kaisong; Liu, Cao

    2017-10-01

    Reducing mercury emission is hot topic for international society. The first step for controlling mercury in fuel gas is to investigate mercury distribution and during the flue gas treatment process. The mercury transport and transformation in wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous smelting industry was studied in the paper with critical important parameters, such as the solution temperature, Hg 0 concentration, SO 2 concentration, and Hg 2+ concentration at the laboratory scale. The mass ratio of the mercury distribution in the solution, flue gas, sludge, and acid fog from the simulated flue gas containing Hg 2+ and Hg 0 was 49.12~65.54, 18.34~35.42, 11.89~14.47, and 1.74~3.54%, respectively. The primary mercury species in the flue gas and acid fog were gaseous Hg 0 and dissolved Hg 2+ . The mercury species in the cleaning solution were dissolved Hg 2+ and colloidal mercury, which accounted for 56.56 and 7.34% of the total mercury, respectively. Various mercury compounds, including Hg 2 Cl 2 , HgS, HgCl 2 , HgSO 4 , and HgO, existed in the sludge. These results for mercury distribution and speciation are highly useful in understanding mercury transport and transformation during the wet flue gas cleaning process. This research is conducive for controlling mercury emissions from nonferrous smelting flue gas and by-products.

  5. Assessment for development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low-grade fuels. Final report, October 18, 1989--February 28, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundback, C.

    1995-05-01

    The ultimate goal of this program was to demonstrate safe, reliable, and effective operation of the supercritical water oxidation process (SCWO) at a pilot plant-level throughput. This program was a three phase program. Phase 1 of the program preceded MODEC's participation in the program. MODEC did participate in Phases 2 and 3 of the program. In Phase 2, the target waste and industry were pulp mill sludges from the pulp and paper industry. In Phase 3, the target was modified to be DOE-generated mixed low level waste; wastes containing RCRA hazardous constituents and radionuclide surrogates were used as model wastes. The paper describes the research unit planning and design; bench-scale development of SCWO; research and development of wet oxidation of fuels; and the design of a super-critical water pilot plant

  6. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  7. Activity and resistance of iron-containing amorphous, zeolitic and mesostructured materials for wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, G; Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Molina, R

    2005-05-01

    Iron-containing materials have been prepared following several strategies of synthesis and using different silica supports (amorphous, zeolitic and mesostructured materials). Activity and stability of these materials was evaluated on the wet peroxide oxidation of phenol under mild reaction conditions (100 degrees C, air pressure of 1MPa and stoichiometric amount of hydrogen peroxide for the complete mineralisation of phenol). Their catalytic performance was monitored in terms of phenol and total organic carbon (TOC) conversions, by-products distribution (aromatics compounds and carboxylic acids) and degree of metal leached into the aqueous solution. The nature and local environment of iron species is strongly dependent on the synthetic route, which dramatically influences their catalytic performance. Crystalline iron oxide species supported over mesostructured SBA-15 materials have demonstrated to be the most interesting catalysts for phenol degradation according to its high organic mineralisation, low sensitivity to leaching out and good oxidant efficiency.

  8. Development of an improved two-cycle process for recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.M.; Chen, H.J.; Tsai, Y.M.; Lee, T.W.; Ting, G.

    1987-01-01

    An improved two-cycle separation process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid by extraction with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) plus dibutyl butylphosphonate (DBBP) in kerosene has been developed and demonstrated successfully in bench-scale, continuous mixer-settler tests. The sulfuric acid and water scrubbing steps for the recycled extraction in the second cycle solve the problems of the contamination and dilution of the phosphoric acid by the ammonium ion and water and also avoid the formation of undesirable phosphatic precipitates during the subsequent extraction of uranium by recycled organic extractant

  9. PROCESSES OF CHLORINATION OF URANIUM OXIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is described in the process fur making UCl/sub 4/ from uranium oxide and carbon tetrachloride. In that process, oxides of uranium are contacted with carbon tetrachloride vapor at an elevated temperature. It has been fuund that the reaction product and yield are improved if the uranlum oxide charge is disposed in flat trays in the reaction zone, to a depth of not more than 1/2 centimeter.

  10. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  11. Wet Aerobic Oxidation of Lignin into Aromatic Aldehydes Catalysed by a Perovskite-type Oxide: LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The perovskite-type oxide catalyst LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 was prepared by the sol–gel method, and tested as a catalyst in the wet aerobic oxidation (WAO of lignin into aromatic aldehydes. The lignin conversion and the yield of each aromatic aldehyde were significantly enhanced in the catalytic process, compared with the non-catalyzed process. Moreover, it was shown that the stability of activity and structure of LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 remained nearly unchanged after a series of successive recyclings of the catalytic reactions, indicating it was an efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the conversion of lignin into aromatic aldehydes in the WAO process.

  12. Analysis and Optimization of Oxidized Heterolayers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Eicke

    1998-01-01

    .... A systematic study of the fundamental properties of the wet thermal oxides is being performed, including the dependence on oxide processing parameters, hydrogen and other dopant concentrations...

  13. Synthesis control and characterization of hydroxyapatite prepared by wet precipitation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Santos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques have been utilized for the preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA and other calcium phosphates for the development of biomaterials. It is vital to know the reaction kinetics to be able to control the material obtained by the aqueous solution route. In the present work, HA has been produced by different wet precipitation processes and different experimental conditions. Calcium hydroxide, calcium phosphate, ammonium phosphate and phosphoric acid were used as reagents. The precipitate was dried at 100 °C overnight and then some samples were treated at 900 °C for 2 h. The powder samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray fluorescence (XRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses. SEM photomicrographs showed an aggregate powder, granular to dense and suggested typical columnar particles. Qualitative XRF showed that the main components of HA powders were calcium and phosphorus. Pure HA and other phases according to processing parameters were observed by XRD analysis.

  14. Bio-ethanol production from wet coffee processing waste in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldesenbet, Asrat Gebremariam; Woldeyes, Belay; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Large amounts of coffee residues are generated from coffee processing plants in Ethiopia. These residues are toxic and possess serious environmental problems following the direct discharge into the nearby water bodies which cause serious environmental and health problems. This study was aimed to quantify wet coffee processing waste and estimate its bio-ethanol production. The study showed that the wastes are potential environmental problems and cause water pollution due to high organic component and acidic nature. The waste was hydrolyzed by dilute H 2 SO 4 (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 M) and distilled water. Total sugar content of the sample was determined titrimetrically and refractometry. Maximum value (90%) was obtained from hydrolysis by 0.4 M H 2 SO 4 . Ethanol production was monitored by gas chromatography. The optimum yield of ethanol (78%) was obtained from the sample hydrolyzed by 0.4 M H 2 SO 4 for 1 h at hydrolysis temperature of 100 °C and after fermentation for 24 h and initial pH of 4.5. Based on the data, it was concluded that reuse of the main coffee industry wastes is of significant importance from environmental and economical view points. In conclusion, this study has proposed to utilize the wet coffee processing waste to produce bio-ethanol which provides the alternative energy source from waste biomass and solves the environmental waste disposal as well as human health problem.

  15. Double-layer optical fiber coating analysis in MHD flow of an elastico-viscous fluid using wet-on-wet coating process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Khan

    Full Text Available Modern optical fibers require a double-layer coating on the glass fiber in order to provide protection from signal attenuation and mechanical damage. The most important plastic resins used in wires and optical fibers are plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC and low and high density polyethylene (LDPE/HDPE, nylon and Polysulfone. One of the most important things which affect the final product after processing is the design of the coating die. In the present study, double-layer optical fiber coating is performed using melt polymer satisfying Oldroyd 8-constant fluid model in a pressure type die with the effect of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD. Wet-on-wet coating process is applied for double-layer optical fiber coating. The coating process in the coating die is modeled as a simple two-layer Couette flow of two immiscible fluids in an annulus with an assigned pressure gradient. Based on the assumptions of fully developed laminar and MHD flow, the Oldroyd 8-constant model of non-Newtonian fluid of two immiscible resin layers is modeled. The governing nonlinear equations are solved analytically by the new technique of Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM. The convergence of the series solution is established. The results are also verified by the Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM. The effect of important parameters such as magnetic parameter Mi, the dilatant constant α, the Pseodoplastic constant β, the radii ratio δ, the pressure gradient Ω, the speed of fiber optics V, and the viscosity ratio κ on the velocity profiles, thickness of coated fiber optics, volume flow rate, and shear stress on the fiber optics are investigated. At the end the result of the present work is also compared with the experimental results already available in the literature by taking non-Newtonian parameters tends to zero. Keywords: Non-Newtonian fluid, Oldroyd 8-constant fluid, MHD flow, Double-layer fiber coating, OHAM, ADM, Wet-on-wet coating process

  16. Multivariate modelling of the pharmaceutical two-step process of wet granulation and tableting with multiblock partial least squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, J.A; Coenegracht, P.M J

    1997-01-01

    The pharmaceutical process of wet granulation and tableting is described as a two-step process. Besides the process variables of both steps and the composition variables of the powder mixture, the physical properties of the intermediate granules are also used to model the crushing strength and

  17. Preparation and evaluation of doped ceria interlayer on supported stabilized zirconia electrolyte SOFCs by wet ceramic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tuong Lan; Honda, Takeo; Iimura, Youko; Kato, Ken; Neghisi, Akira; Nozaki, Ken; Tappero, Fabrizio; Kato, Tohru [Fuel Cell Group, Energy Electronics Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kenichi; Sasaki, Kazuya; Shirahama, Hiroshi; Dokiya, Masayuki [Graduate School of Environment and Information Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-7 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama, 240-8501 (Japan); Ota, Kenichiro [Department of Energy and Safety Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-7 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama, 240-8501 (Japan)

    2004-10-29

    We have fabricated anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) for reduced temperature operation by wet ceramic processes. Nickel/yttria-stabilised ZrO{sub 2} (Ni-YSZ), nickel/scandia-stabilised ZrO{sub 2} (Ni-ScSZ) cermets, ScSZ, gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC), and strontium-doped LaCoO{sub 3} (LSCO) were used as materials for anode substrate, anode functional layer, electrolyte, interlayer, and cathode, respectively. The influences of firing temperature of GDC films to the characteristics of ScSZ/GDC interface were investigated in detail using XRD and AC impedance spectroscopy; 1200C was considered as the optimum firing temperature of GDC film on ScSZ electrolyte. By combining the ScSZ electrolyte film with GDC interlayer, we succeeded in preventing the solid-state reactions between ScSZ and LSCO. The anode-supported SOFCs with GDC interlayer fired at 1200C generated electricity successfully at reduced temperature. However, in the case of SOFCs, with whole functional layers cofired together at 1200C, the performances of the cell were badly affected by the contact between ScSZ and GDC films. Further investigation for matching the sintering behaviors of ScSZ and GDC green films are required to realize a cost-effective cofiring process for fabricating the anode-supported SOFCs employing CGO interlayer.

  18. The influence of Chromium supplied by tanning and wet finishing processes on the formation of cr(vi in leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Fuck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium used in leather manufacturing can be oxidized from the trivalent to the hexavalent state, causing environmental concerns. In this study, the influence of Cr(III from tanning, deacidification pH, fatliquors, chrome retanning and vegetable retanning on the formation of Cr(VI in leather was analyzed by comparing natural and aged samples. In wet-blue leather, even after aging and in fatliquored leathers that did not suffer the aging process, the presence of Cr(VI was always below the detection limit of 3 mg/kg. Considering the presence of Cr(VI, the supply of chromium during the retanning step had a more significant effect than during the tanning. In the fatliquoring process with sulfites, fish and synthetic fatliquor leather samples contained Cr(VI when aged, and the highest concentration detected was 26.7 mg/kg. The evaluation of Cr(VI formation led to recommendations for regulation in the leather industry.

  19. [Catalytic stability in wet air oxidation of carboxylic acids over ZnFe0.25Al1.75 O4 catalyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-hua; Yang, Min; Du, Hong-zhang; Peng, Fu-yong; Sun, Cheng-lin

    2007-07-01

    Oxalic, formic and acetic acid are main intermediate products in catalytic wet air oxidation process (CWAO). The catalytic activity and stability in CWAO of the three short-chain organic acids over ZnFe0.25Al1.75O4 catalyst were studied. Oxalic acid is the only oxidizable intermediate and the largest amount of Fe leaching is 9.5 mg L(-1) at 160 degrees C during CWAO process. Formic and acetic acid have little influence on Fe leaching. Due to the strong reducible ability of oxalic acid, the amount of Fe leaching is larger in nitrogen atmosphere than that in oxygen atmosphere. Salicylic acid can be also degraded by ZnFe0.25Al1.75O4 catalyst with a high catalytic activity and stability.

  20. Wet oxidation treatment of organic household waste enriched with wheat straw for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation into ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.

    2004-01-01

    Organic municipal solid waste enriched with wheat straw was subjected to wet-oxidation as a pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation into bio-ethanol. The effect of tempera (185-195degrees C), oxygen pressure (3-12) and sodium carbonate (0-2 g l(-1)) addition on enzymatic...... conversion efficiency during SSF was 50, 62 65 and 70% for a total enzyme loading of 5, 10, 15 and 25 FPU g(-1) DS, respectively. Hence, this study shows that wet oxidation is a suitable pre-treatment for the conversion of organic waste carbohydrates into ethanol and that compatible conversion yields (60......-toxic carboxylic acids mainly (2.2-4.5 % on DS basis). Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the treated waste at 10% DS by Saccharomyces cerevisae yielded average ethanol concentrations of 16.5 to 22 g l(-1) for enzyme loadings of 5 and 25 FPU g(-1) DS, respectively. The cellulose to ethanol...

  1. Wet oxidation pre-treatment of woody yard waste: Parameter optimization and enzymatic digestibility for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.

    2004-01-01

    Woody yard waste with high lignin content (22% of dry matter (DM)) was subjected to wet oxidation pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation. The effects of temperature (185-200 degreesC), oxygen pressure (3-12 bar) and addition of sodium carbonate (0-3.3 g per 100 g DM...... biomass) on enzymatic cellulose and hemicellulose (xylan) convertibility were studied. The enzymatic cellulose conversion was highest after wet oxidation for 15 min at 185 degreesC with addition of 12 bars of oxygen and 3.3 g Na2CO3 per 100g waste. At 25 FPU (filter paper unit) cellulase g(-1) DM added......, 58-67% and 80-83% of the cellulose and hemicellulose contained in the waste were converted into monomeric sugars. The cellulose conversion efficiency during a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) assay at 10% DM was 79% for the highest enzyme loading (25 FPU g(-1) DM) while 69...

  2. Wet-Lay Process - A Novel Approach to Scalable Fabrication of Tissue Scaffolds and Reinforcement Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Andrew

    Fibrous materials received a great deal of interest in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine due to the beneficial cell-interactions and tunable properties for various biomedical applications. These materials are highly advantageous as they provide a large surface area for cellular attachment, proliferation, high porosity values for cellular in-growth, and the ability to modify the membrane to achieve desired responses to both mechanical loading as well as environmental stimuli. A prominent method currently used to fabricate such membranes is electrospinning which uses electrostatic forces to produce fibers on the range of nanometers giving them high morphological saliency to the native extra cellular matrix (ECM). These fibers are also advantageous mechanically with strength and flexibility due to their larger aspect ratio when compared to larger diameter micro/macro fibers. While this spinning technique has many advantages and has seen the most quantity of research in recent years, it does have its own set of drawbacks. Among them is the use cytotoxic solvents during processing which must be fully removed before implantation. In addition, since the fiber produced have smaller diameters, the resulting average pore-size of the scaffold is decreased which in turn hinders cellular penetration into the bulk scaffold. In this work, we have proposed and characterized a novel method called wet-lay process for the rapid fabrication of fibrous membranes for tissue scaffolds. Wet-laying is a method common to textiles and paper industry but unexplored for tissue scaffolds. Short fibers are first suspended in an aqueous bath and homogeneously dispersed using shear force. After draining away the aqueous solution, a nonwoven fibro-porous membrane is deposited onto the draining screen. The implementation of wet-laid membranes into weak hydrogel matrices has shown a reinforcement effect for the composite. Further analyses were carried out to determine the

  3. Obtaining and characterization catalyst Ki/Al2O3 by physical dispersion process via wet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.C. da; Dantas, J.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Costa, N.C.O.; Freitas, N.L. de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is the Obtention and characterization of catalysts being supported alumina impregnated with KI by physical dispersion in wet via attritor mill in periods of 30 and 60 minutes. Before and after impregnation the catalysts were characterized by XRD, X ray fluorescence, particle size distribution, textural analysis (BET). The results show the presence of the stable crystalline phase Al 2 O 3 in all samples after impregnation and the second phase formed from KI and K 2 O. There was a decrease in the agglomerates incorporated with the potassium due to the milling process. It was observed that the highest specific surface area was obtained by the impregnated sample into a 60 min. (author)

  4. Artificial Intelligence Tools for Scaling Up of High Shear Wet Granulation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The results presented in this article demonstrate the potential of artificial intelligence tools for predicting the endpoint of the granulation process in high-speed mixer granulators of different scales from 25L to 600L. The combination of neurofuzzy logic and gene expression programing technologies allowed the modeling of the impeller power as a function of operation conditions and wet granule properties, establishing the critical variables that affect the response and obtaining a unique experimental polynomial equation (transparent model) of high predictability (R 2 > 86.78%) for all size equipment. Gene expression programing allowed the modeling of the granulation process for granulators of similar and dissimilar geometries and can be improved by implementing additional characteristics of the process, as composition variables or operation parameters (e.g., batch size, chopper speed). The principles and the methodology proposed here can be applied to understand and control manufacturing process, using any other granulation equipment, including continuous granulation processes. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Productivity of a Wet Separation Process of Traditional and Bio-Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Moroni

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The separation process within a mechanical recycling plant plays a major role in the context of the production of high-quality secondary raw materials and the reduction of extensive waste disposal in landfills. Traditional plants for plastic separation employ dry or wet processes that rely on the different physical properties among the polymers. The hydraulic separator is a device employing a wet technology for particle separation. It allows the separation of two-polymer mixtures into two products, one collected within the instrument and the other one expelled through its outlet ducts. Apparatus performance were analyzed as a function of fluid and solid flow rates, flow patterns developing within the apparatus, in addition to the density, shape, and size of the polymers. For the hydraulic configurations tested, a two-way coupling takes place where the fluid exerts an influence on the plastic particles and the opposite occurs too. The interaction between the solid and liquid phases determines whether a certain polymer settles within the device or is expelled from the apparatus. Tests carried out with samples of increasing volumes of solid particles demonstrate that there are no significant differences in the apparatus effectiveness as far as a two-way interaction takes place. Almost pure concentrates of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET, Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC, and Polycarbonate (PC can be obtained from a mixture of traditional polymers. Tests conducted on Polylactic Acid (PLA and Mater-Bi® samples showed that the hydraulic separator can be effectively employed to separate bio-plastics from conventional plastics with remarkable grade and recovery.

  6. Groundwater hydrology study of the Ames Chemical Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stickel, T.

    1996-01-01

    The Ames Laboratory Chemical Disposal Site is located in northwestern Ames, Iowa west of Squaw Creek. From 1957 to 1966, Ames Laboratory conducted research to develop processes to separate uranium and thorium from nuclear power fuel and to separate yttrium from neutron shielding sources. The wastes from these processes, which contained both hazardous and radiological components, were placed into nine burial pits. Metal drums, plywood boxes, and steel pails were used to store the wastes. Uranium was also burned on the ground surface of the site. Monitoring wells were placed around the waste burial pits. Groundwater testing in 1993 revealed elevated levels of Uranium 234, Uranium 238, beta and alpha radiation. The north side of the burial pit had elevated levels of volatile organic compounds. Samples in the East Ravine showed no volatile organics; however, they did contain elevated levels of radionuclides. These analytical results seem to indicate that the groundwater from the burial pit is flowing down hill and causing contamination in the East Ravine. Although there are many avenues for the contamination to spread, the focus of this project is to understand the hydrogeology of the East Ravine and to determine the path of groundwater flow down the East Ravine. The groundwater flow data along with other existing information will be used to assess the threat of chemical migration down the East Ravine and eventually off-site. The primary objectives of the project were as follows: define the geology of the East Ravine; conduct slug tests to determine the hydraulic conductivity of both oxidized and unoxidized till; develop a three-dimensional mathematical model using ModIME and MODFLOW to simulate groundwater flow in the East Ravine

  7. The development of a growth regime map for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Jonathan B; Martin, Gary P; Long, David F

    2016-10-15

    The feasibility of a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process has been established and potential advantages identified. Granule growth in the reverse-phase process proceeds via a steady state growth mechanism controlled by capillary forces, whereas granule growth in the conventional process proceeds via an induction growth regime controlled by viscous forces. The resultant reverse-phase granules generally have greater mass mean diameter and lower intragranular porosity when compared to conventional granules prepared under the same liquid saturation and impeller speed conditions indicating the two processes may be operating under different growth regimes. Given the observed differences in growth mechanism and consolidation behaviour of the reverse-phase and conventional granules the applicability of the current conventional granulation regime map is unclear. The aim of the present study was therefore to construct and evaluate a growth regime map, which depicts the regime as a function of liquid saturation and Stokes deformation number, for the reverse-phase granulation process. Stokes deformation number was shown to be a good predictor of both granule mass mean diameter and intragranular porosity over a wide range of process conditions. The data presented support the hypothesis that reverse-phase granules have a greater amount of surface liquid present which can dissipate collision energy and resist granule rebound resulting in the greater granule growth observed. As a result the reverse-phase granulation process results in a greater degree of granule consolidation than that produced using the conventional granulation process. Stokes deformation number was capable of differentiating these differences in the granulation process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microstructural evolution of all-wet-processed CIGS films using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Soo; Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Pyo, Sung Gyu [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Seoul, 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Pil [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We report a wet process deposition in order to identify a cost-effective processing scheme for CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers on molybdenum/soda lime glass substrates from a Cu-In-Ga precursor solution. We employed a spin coater at various settings to evaluate the uniformity of the resulting CIGS solar cell layer. After the CIGS precursor film was deposited, we applied a selenization process. In the selenization process, we used a controlled temperature RTA system and compared it to a noncontrolled temperature system. We investigated the morphological properties for different selenization temperature treatments. We used Raman mapping to detect binary compounds and found the binary compound effect on the film. Raman mapping results show that the density of the binary compound in the CIGS layer increased with selenization temperature, and at 600 C, the density of the binary compounds was highest. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Enhanced activity and stability of copper oxide/γ-alumina catalyst in catalytic wet-air oxidation: Critical roles of cerium incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongli; Zhou, Yanbo; Peng, Chao; Shi, Junjun; Wang, Qingyu; He, Lingfeng; Shi, Liang

    2018-04-01

    By successive impregnation method, the Ce-modified Cu-O/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared and characterized using nitrogen adsorption-desorption, scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and H2-Temperature programming reduction (H2-TPR). In catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) process for the printing and dyeing wastewater (PDW), the effects of Ce addition on performance, mechanism and kinetics of the catalyst were investigated. The Ce addition increases the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume of the catalyst and makes the active components uniformly distributed on the catalyst surface. Formation of a stable CuAl2O4 solid solution by anchoring Cu onto the γ-Al2O3 crystal lattice leads to a significant decrease in metal leaching of the Ce-modified catalyst. The proportion of lattice oxygen in the catalyst substantially increases and the apparent activation energy of Cu-O/γ-Al2O3 catalyst decreases owing to Ce addition. Therefore, the catalytic activity and stability of the Ce-modified catalyst are considerably improved. The scavengers experiments identify the active species existed in the CWAO reaction system, with the order of reactivity: h+ > O2•- > H2O2 > HO•. This novel Cu-Ce-O/γ-Al2O3 catalyst has great potential in applications for treatment of concentrated organic wastewater due to its superior catalytic activity and improved stability.

  10. Assessment of methane emission and oxidation at Air Hitam Landfill site cover soil in wet tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Elfithri, Rahmah

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH₄) emissions and oxidation were measured at the Air Hitam sanitary landfill in Malaysia and were modeled using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change waste model to estimate the CH₄ generation rate constant, k. The emissions were measured at several locations using a fabricated static flux chamber. A combination of gas concentrations in soil profiles and surface CH₄ and carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions at four monitoring locations were used to estimate the CH₄ oxidation capacity. The temporal variations in CH₄ and CO₂ emissions were also investigated in this study. Geospatial means using point kriging and inverse distance weight (IDW), as well as arithmetic and geometric means, were used to estimate total CH₄ emissions. The point kriging, IDW, and arithmetic means were almost identical and were two times higher than the geometric mean. The CH₄ emission geospatial means estimated using the kriging and IDW methods were 30.81 and 30.49 gm(−2) day(−1), respectively. The total CH₄ emissions from the studied area were 53.8 kg day(−1). The mean of the CH₄ oxidation capacity was 27.5 %. The estimated value of k is 0.138 year(−1). Special consideration must be given to the CH₄ oxidation in the wet tropical climate for enhancing CH₄ emission reduction.

  11. Direct synthesis of nanocrystalline oxide powders by wet-chemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Srdić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent period there is a great need for increasing the knowledge of tailoring the innovative procedures for the synthesis of electroceramic nanopowders and materials with improved quality for specific application. In order to produce electroceramics with desirable microstructure and properties, synthesis of stoichiometric, ultra-fine and agglomerate free powders with narrow size distributions is one of the most important steps. Within this scope, in the present paper we summarize our recent results on direct synthesis of some important perovskites and ferrites nanopowders by wet-chemical techniques.

  12. Laboratory-scale dry/wet-milling process for the extraction of starch and gluten from wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneken, P.A.M.; Helmens, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory-scale process is presented for the manufacture of starch and gluten from wheat. Main feature of this process is that whole wheat kernels are crushed dry between smooth rolls prior to wet disintegration in excess water in such way that gluten formation is prevented and fibres can be

  13. Submicron processing of InAs based quantum wells: A new, highly selective wet etchant for AlSb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morpurgo, A F; van Wees, B J; Klapwijk, T M; Borghs, G

    1997-01-01

    We describe a processing technology for patterning InAs/AlSb heterostructures far in the submicron regime. The processing is based on a new, highly selective wet etchant for AlSb. We discuss the electrical characterization of narrow ballistic channels (down to approximate to 140 nm width) realized

  14. Preparation of silica thin films by novel wet process and study of their optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sang-Hyeok; Kim, Nam-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Cha-Won; Yoon, Duck-Ki; Ryu, Bong-Ki

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films have gained considerable attention because of their various industrial applications. For example, SiO2 thin films are used in superhydrophilic self-cleaning surface glass, UV protection films, anti-reflection coatings, and insulating materials. Recently, many processes such as vacuum evaporation, sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and spin coating have been widely applied to prepare thin films of functionally graded materials. However, these processes suffer from several engineering problems. For example, a special apparatus is required for the deposition of films, and conventional wet processes are not suitable for coating the surfaces of substrates with a large surface area and complex morphology. In this study, we investigated the film morphology and optical properties of SiO2 films prepared by a novel technique, namely, liquid phase deposition (LPD). Images of the SiO2 films were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to study the surface morphology of these films: these images indicate that films deposited with different reaction times were uniform and dense and were composed of pure silica. Optical properties such as refractive index and transmittance were estimated by UV-vis spectroscopy and ellipsometry. SiO2 films with porous structures at the nanometer scale (100-250 nm) were successfully produced by LPD. The deposited film had excellent transmittance in the visible wavelength region.

  15. The cause of the uneven carbonization process in wet coal charging in coke oven chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiji Nomura; Takashi Arima [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment and Process Technology Center

    2008-11-15

    In the case of the wet coal charging process in coke oven chamber, it is known that the coking process is uneven and a local carbonization delay occurs. The reason was investigated through a laboratory-scale experiment and a quantitative estimation. A partial carbonization test in a test coke oven replicated the uneven plastic layer and local carbonization delay. It was revealed that most of the gas generated in the uncarbonized coal layer results from the evaporation of condensed water and that steam can break through the plastic layer in a test coke oven. Moreover, the order estimation implied that steam that generates in the uncarbonized coal layer and breaks through the plastic layer has sufficient heat capacity to cool the heating wall and delay the carbonization. It was also shown that the steam pressure peak measured in a commercial coke oven is much lower than the estimated steam pressure in this study assuming steam not breaking through the plastic layer. The above-mentioned results and quantitative investigation strongly support the 'steam breaking through the plastic layer' theory proposed by Dr. Rohde that an uneven carbonization process is caused by vaporized coal moisture breaking through the plastic layer at definite, unforeseeable points, which results in cooling of the wall by the steam flow. 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Conference: the wet catalytic oxidation, a technology for the removal of organic pollutants in industrial waters; Conference: l'oxydation voie humide catalytique, une technologie pour l'elimination des polluants organiques dans les eaux industrielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, M. [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse - CNRS, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In this conference, it is taken stock on the use of catalysts in the wet oxidation process. Supported (TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}....) heterogeneous metallic catalysts (Pt, Ru...) are particularly studied. It is shown that this type of catalysts can answer to the required characteristics: activity for the removal of organic matter, lack of active metal leaching in aqueous acid medium, no deactivation...Examples are given. (O.M.)

  17. INVESTIGATION ON UTILITY OF PLASTIC WASTE AS AN ADDITIVE FOR BITUMINOUS CONCRETE USING WET PROCESS OF MIXING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Virendra Tiwari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Plastic waste has become a major environmental issue of concern due to its exponential growth due to rapid urbanization. The paper investigates utility of plastic waste as an additive for bituminous concrete using wet process of mixing. Methodology. The methodology for the present paper has been designed with complex research consisting of Marshall mix design of the bituminous mix added with plastic waste for modifying bitumen using wet process of mixing, performing the tests on the samples and analyzing the results in the form of table and figures. In the present paper LDPE and HDPE type of plastic waste are used to modify the bitumen. Finding. The results show that addition of 6 percent of bitumen improves the Marshall properties of the mix. Use of plastic to modify the bitumen not only makes the road surface more durable but also it is an eco-friendly way of proper disposal of plastic waste. Originality. The processes used for mixing the plastic waste to the bitumen are dry process and wet process. Dry process of mixing the plastic waste to the bituminous mix is most common and lot of study is carried out on its application. In the present paper wet process of mixing has not yet been studied much. Practical Value. The practical application of utilizing the plastic waste to modify bitumen in the bituminous mix improves the stability values resulting in the more durable road surface. Also the method ensures the proper disposal of plastic waste in eco-friendly way.

  18. Characterization of TiO2 films obtained by a wet chemical process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedik, Asma; Ferraria, Ana M.; Carapeto, Ana P.; Bellal, Bouzid; Trari, Mohamed; Outemzabet, Ratiba

    2017-12-01

    TiO2 has an easily tunable bandgap and a great absorption dye ability being widely used in many fields and in a number of fascinating applications. In this study, a wet chemical route, particularly a sol gel method using spin-coating is adopted to deposit TiO2 thin films onto soda lime glass and silicon substrates. TiO2 films were prepared by using an alcoholic solution of analytical reagent grade TiCl4 as titanium precursor at various experimental conditions. The accent was put on the conditions of preparation (spin time, spin speed, precursor concentration, number of coating layers etc), doping and on the post-deposit treatment namely the drying and the crystallization. The results showed a strong dependence on the drying temperature and on the temperature and duration of the crystallization. We found that the solution preparation and its color are important for getting a reproducible final product. The Raman spectra recorded at room temperature, showed the characteristic peaks of anatase which appear at 143 and around 396 cm-1. These peaks confirm the presence of TiO2. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the crystalline characteristic of TiO2 while the chemical states and relative amounts of the main elements existing in the samples were investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology of the samples was visualized by AFM. We show by this work the feasibility to obtain different nanostructured TiO2 by changing the concentration of the solution. Photocatalytic activity of TiO2 films was evaluated. Rhodamine B is a recalcitrant dye and TiO2 was successfully tested for its oxidation. An abatement of 60% was obtained under sunlight for an initial concentration of 10 mg/l.

  19. Double-layer optical fiber coating analysis in MHD flow of an elastico-viscous fluid using wet-on-wet coating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeeshan; Islam, Saeed; Shah, Rehan Ali; Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Bonyah, Ebenezer; Jan, Bilal; Khan, Aurangzeb

    Modern optical fibers require a double-layer coating on the glass fiber in order to provide protection from signal attenuation and mechanical damage. The most important plastic resins used in wires and optical fibers are plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and low and high density polyethylene (LDPE/HDPE), nylon and Polysulfone. One of the most important things which affect the final product after processing is the design of the coating die. In the present study, double-layer optical fiber coating is performed using melt polymer satisfying Oldroyd 8-constant fluid model in a pressure type die with the effect of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD). Wet-on-wet coating process is applied for double-layer optical fiber coating. The coating process in the coating die is modeled as a simple two-layer Couette flow of two immiscible fluids in an annulus with an assigned pressure gradient. Based on the assumptions of fully developed laminar and MHD flow, the Oldroyd 8-constant model of non-Newtonian fluid of two immiscible resin layers is modeled. The governing nonlinear equations are solved analytically by the new technique of Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). The convergence of the series solution is established. The results are also verified by the Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). The effect of important parameters such as magnetic parameter Mi , the dilatant constant α , the Pseodoplastic constant β , the radii ratio δ , the pressure gradient Ω , the speed of fiber optics V , and the viscosity ratio κ on the velocity profiles, thickness of coated fiber optics, volume flow rate, and shear stress on the fiber optics are investigated. At the end the result of the present work is also compared with the experimental results already available in the literature by taking non-Newtonian parameters tends to zero.

  20. Carbon isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in fresh and saline (NaCl) water via continuous flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy following wet chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher H; Thomas, Burt; Saad, Nabil; Thordsen, James J; Kharaka, Yousif K

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the performance and limitations of a wet chemical oxidation carbon analyser interfaced with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (WCO-CRDS) in a continuous flow (CF) configuration for measuring δ(13)C of dissolved organic carbon (δ(13)C-DOC) in natural water samples. Low-chloride matrix (towards lighter δ(13)C-DOC was observed because of incomplete oxidation despite using high-concentration oxidant, extended reaction time, or post-wet chemical oxidation gas-phase combustion. However, through a combination of dilution, chloride removal, and increasing the oxidant:sample ratio, high-salinity samples with sufficient DOC (>22.5 µg C/aliquot) may be analysed. The WCO-CRDS approach requires more total carbon (µg C/aliquot) than conventional CF-isotope ratio mass spectrometer, but is nonetheless applicable to a wide range of DOC concentration and water types, including brackish water, produced water, and basinal brines.

  1. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, Helene Bendstrup; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    /l), aliphatic carboxylic acids (6 g/l), phenols (0.27 g/l or 1.7 mM), and 2-furoic acid (0.007 g/l). The wet-oxidized wheat straw hydrolysate caused no inhibition of ethanol yield by the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. Nine phenols and 2-furoic acid, identified to be present...... in the hydrolysate, were each tested in concentrations of 10-100x the concentration found in the hydrolysate for their effect on fermentation by T. mathranii. At 2 mM, these aromatic compounds were not inhibitory to growth or ethanol yield in T mathranii. When the concentration of aromatics was increased to 10 m...

  2. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, Henrik B.

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops....... The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...... oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy...

  3. Process Analytical Technology for High Shear Wet Granulation: Wet Mass Consistency Reported by In-Line Drag Flow Force Sensor Is Consistent With Powder Rheology Measured by At-Line FT4 Powder Rheometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ajit S; Sheverev, Valery; Freeman, Tim; Both, Douglas; Stepaniuk, Vadim; Delancy, Michael; Millington-Smith, Doug; Macias, Kevin; Subramanian, Ganeshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Drag flow force (DFF) sensor that measures the force exerted by wet mass in a granulator on a thin cylindrical probe was shown as a promising process analytical technology for real-time in-line high-resolution monitoring of wet mass consistency during high shear wet granulation. Our previous studies indicated that this process analytical technology tool could be correlated to granulation end point established independently through drug product critical quality attributes. In this study, the measurements of flow force by a DFF sensor, taken during wet granulation of 3 placebo formulations with different binder content, are compared with concurrent at line FT4 Powder Rheometer characterization of wet granules collected at different time points of the processing. The wet mass consistency measured by the DFF sensor correlated well with the granulation's resistance to flow and interparticulate interactions as measured by FT4 Powder Rheometer. This indicated that the force pulse magnitude measured by the DFF sensor was indicative of fundamental material properties (e.g., shear viscosity and granule size/density), as they were changing during the granulation process. These studies indicate that DFF sensor can be a valuable tool for wet granulation formulation and process development and scale up, as well as for routine monitoring and control during manufacturing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Water resistant surfaces using zinc oxide structured nanorod arrays with switchable wetting property

    OpenAIRE

    Ennaceri, H.; Wang, L.; Erfurt, D.; Riedel, W.; Mangalgiri, G.; Khaldoun, A.; El Kenz, A.; Benyoussef, A.; Ennaoui, A

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an experimental approach for fabricating super hydrophobic coatings based on a dual roughness structure composed of zinc oxide nanorod arrays coated with a sputtered zinc oxide nano layer. The ZnO nanorod arrays were grown by means of a low temperature electrochemical deposition technique 75 C on FTO substrates. The ZnO nanorods show a 002 orientation along the c axis, and have a hexagonal structure, with an average length of 710 nm, and average width of 156 nm. On th...

  5. Conceptual Biorefinery Design and Research Targeted for 2022: Hydrothermal Liquefacation Processing of Wet Waste to Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhu, Yunhua [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bearden, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Seiple, Timothy E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Susanne B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schmidt, Andrew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Billing, Justin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hallen, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, Todd R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Jian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Albrecht, Karl O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Samuel P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maupin, Gary D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-12-28

    The Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) invests in research and development of new pathways for commercially viable conversion of biomass into drop-in ready transportation fuels, fuel blendstocks and products. The primary emphasis has been on terrestrial and algae feedstocks, but more recently BETO has begun to explore the potential of wet wastes for biofuel production, with focus on wastewater residuals, manure, food waste, and fats, oils and grease. A recent resource analysis estimates that 77 million dry tons per year of these wastes are generated annually, 65% of which are underutilized for any beneficial purpose. Approximately 14 million dry tons of the total resource is wastewater residuals (sludge and biosolids) generated at the nation’s wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Conversion of this resource into transportation fuels could significantly contribute to the creation of a new domestic bioenergy and bioproduct industry, while providing an economically and environmentally sustainable alternative for current waste disposal practices. Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a process that uses hot, pressurized water in the condensed phase to convert biomass to a thermally stable oil product, also known as “biocrude”, which can then be thermo-catalytically upgraded to hydrocarbon fuel blendstocks. HTL is conceptually simple, has a high carbon efficiency, and can be applied to a wide range of wet feedstocks at similar processing conditions. The purpose of this report is to document the conceptual design, economics and supporting data for a sludge-to-fuel pathway via HTL and biocrude upgrading. The configuration includes a HTL plant that is co-located with a WWTP and a larger scale biocrude upgrading plant for production of hydrocarbon fuel blendstocks. Experimental data from bench scale testing of a 1:1 mixture of primary:secondary sludges are used to establish the economic and technical assumptions for the analysis. The design

  6. Feasibility assessment for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process: the effect of liquid saturation and binder liquid viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2014-11-20

    A novel reverse-phase wet granulation process was developed and the feasibility of the process compared to a conventional wet granulation process. The reverse-phase granulation approach involves the immersion of the dry powder formulation into the binder liquid followed by controlled breakage to form granules. Conventional wisdom would warn against this approach due to the initial formation of a slurry or over-wetted powder formulation. However, a feasibility assessment of the novel approach was motivated by the potential advantages of eliminating traditional granule nucleation variables and reducing risk of uncontrolled granule growth. The effects of liquid saturation and binder liquid viscosity on the physical properties of granules formed using both the reverse-phase and conventional granulation processes were compared. Liquid saturation significantly affected the physical properties of granules prepared using both processes. At liquid saturation up to ∼1 the reverse-phase process typically resulted in larger, less porous granules than the conventional process. However, at a liquid saturation >1.1 the conventional process exhibited uncontrolled growth and significantly larger granule size as a result of decreased intragranular porosity. The response to liquid saturation was seen as a steady growth mechanism for the reverse-phase process compared to an induction growth mechanism for the conventional process, indicating potential robustness advantages of the reverse-phase approach. Despite institutional perceptions to the contrary, the reverse-phase process was shown to be feasible and merits further detailed investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic parameters of biomass growth in a UASB reactor treating wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Milton Montenegro Campos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the treatment of wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP in an anaerobic treatment system at a laboratory scale. The system included an acidification/equalization tank (AET, a heat exchanger, an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASB, a gas equalization device and a gas meter. The minimum and maximum flow rates and volumetric organic loadings rate (VOLR were 0.004 to 0.037 m 3 d -1 and 0.14 to 20.29 kgCOD m -3 d -1 , respectively. The kinetic parameters measured during the anaerobic biodegradation of the WCWP, with a minimal concentration of phenolic compounds of 50 mg L - ¹, were: Y = 0.37 mgTVS (mgCODremoved -1 , Kd = 0.0075 d-1 , Ks = 1.504mg L -1 , μmax = 0.2 d -1 . The profile of sludge in the reactor showed total solids (TS values from 22,296 to 55,895 mg L -1 and TVS 11,853 to 41,509 mg L -1 , demonstrating a gradual increase of biomass in the reactor during the treatment, even in the presence of phenolic compounds in the concentration already mentioned.

  8. Determination of sulfate in the wet-process of phosphoric acid by reverse flow injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method based on reverse flow injection is proposed for determining sulfate concentration in the wet-process of phosphoric acid (WPA. The effect of reagent composition, flow rate, temperature, acid concentration, length of the reaction coil, and linear response range on the flow system is discussed in detail. Optimal conditions are established for determining sulfate in the WPA samples. Baseline drift is avoided by a periodic washing step with EDTA in an alkaline medium. A linear response is observed within a range of 20 - 360 mg L-1, given by the equation A = 0.0020C (mg L-1 + 0.0300, R² = 0.9991. The detection limit of the proposed method for sulfate analysis is 3 mg L-1, and the relative standard deviation (n = 12 of sulfate absorbance peak is less than 1.60%. This method has a rate of up to 29 samples per hour, and the results compare well with those obtained with gravimetric method.

  9. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-03-31

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is

  10. Potential inhibitors from wet oxidation of wheat straw and their effect on growth and ethanol production by ¤Thermoanaerobacter mathranii¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, B.K.

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation (WO) (using water, 6.5 g/l sodium carbonate, and 12 bar oxygen at 195 degreesC) was used for pre-treating wheat straw (60 g/l), resulting in a hemicellulose-rich hydrolysate and a cellulose-rich solid fraction. The hydrolysate consisted of soluble hemicellulose (9 g/l), ali...

  11. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  12. Microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation of H-acid in aqueous solution under the atmospheric pressure using activated carbon as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaobin; Quan Xie; Chen Shuo; Zhao Yazhi; Yang Fenglin

    2006-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is a promising method for the treatment of heavily contaminated wastewater. However, its application is restricted due to severe operation conditions (high pressure and high temperature). A microwave (MW) assisted oxidation method was investigated aiming to treat heavily contaminated wastewater under milder conditions. H-acid (1-amino-8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) was selected as target compound to evaluate the performance of this novel process. The removal of H-acid and TOC (total organic carbon) for H-acid solution of 3000 mg/L reached as high as 92.6% in 20 min and 84.2% in 60 min, respectively under optimal conditions. The existence of activated carbon and oxygen proved to be critical for effective treatment. The activated carbon acted not only as a catalyst for H-acid decomposition, but also as a special material for the absorption of MW energy. Air was supplied to the reactor as an oxygen source at constant flows. The amino group in H-acid was converted ultimately into nitrate, and sulfonic group into sulfate. This observation gave an evidence of H-acid mineralization although other organic intermediates were unable to be determined. The value of BOD 5 /COD (ratio of 5d biochemical oxygen demand to chemical oxygen demand) increased from 0.008 to 0.467 indicating a significant improvement of biodegradability for the solution, which is beneficial for the further biological treatment of the wastewater

  13. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. Monitoring of multiple solvent induced form changes during high shear wet granulation and drying processes using online Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jay Poorna; Jones, John W; Wray, Patrick S; Dennis, Andrew B; Brown, Jonathan; Timmins, Peter

    2018-02-24

    Form changes during drug product processing can be a risk to the final product quality in terms of chemical stability and bioavailability. In this study, online Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor the form changes in real time during high shear wet granulation of Compound A, a highly soluble drug present at a high drug load in an extended release formulation. The effect of water content, temperature, wet massing time and drying technique on the degree of drug transformation were examined. A designed set of calibration standards were employed to develop quantitative partial least square regression models to predict the concentration of each drug form during both wet granulation and the drying process. Throughout all our experiments we observed complex changes of the drug form during granulation, manifest as conversions between the initial non-solvated form of Compound A, the hemi-hydrate form and the "apparent" amorphous form (dissolved drug). The online Raman data demonstrate that the non-solvated form converts to an "apparent" amorphous form (dissolved drug) due to drug dissolution with no appearance of the hemi-hydrate form during water addition stage. The extent of conversion of the non-solvated form was governed by the amount of water added and the rate of conversion was accelerated at higher temperatures. Interestingly, in the wet massing zone, the formation of the hemi-hydrate form was observed at a rate equivalent to the rate of depletion of the non-solvated form with no change in the level of the "apparent amorphous" form generated. The level of hemi-hydrate increased with an increase in wet massing time. The drying process had a significant effect on the proportion of each form. During tray drying, changes in drug form continued for hours. In contrast fluid bed drying appeared to lock the final proportions of drug form product attained during granulation, with comparatively small changes observed during drying. In conclusion, it was possible to

  16. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwa, Amogh N; Barron, Troy J; Davis, Virginia A; Tatarchuk, Bruce J

    2012-05-11

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the 'nanoporous' structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction-oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m² (700 ft²) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications.

  17. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwa, Amogh N; Davis, Virginia A; Tatarchuk, Bruce J; Barron, Troy J

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the ‘nanoporous’ structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction–oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m 2 (700 ft 2 ) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications. (paper)

  18. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwa, Amogh N.; Barron, Troy J.; Davis, Virginia A.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the ‘nanoporous’ structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction-oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m2 (700 ft2) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications.

  19. Model-based analysis of high shear wet granulation from batch to continuous processes in pharmaceutical production - A critical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Gernaey, Krist; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    continuous production line is still hampered by complex steps such as granulation and drying which are considered to be too inflexible to handle potential product change-overs. Granulation is necessary in order to achieve good flowability properties and better control of drug content uniformity. This paper...... reviews modelling and supporting measurement tools for the high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process, which is an important granulation technique due to the inherent benefits and the suitability of this unit operation for the desired switch to continuous mode. For gaining improved insight...... into the complete system, particle-level mechanisms are required to be better understood, and linked with an appropriate meso- or macro-scale model. A brief review has been provided to understand the mechanisms of the granulation process at micro- or particle-level such as those involving wetting and nucleation...

  20. Comparing oxidative and dilute acid wet explosion pretreatment of Cocksfoot grass at high dry matter concentration for cellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2013-01-01

    was investigated for cellulosic ethanol production. The biomass raw materials were pretreated using wet explosion (WEx) at 25% dry matter concentration with addition of oxygen or dilute sulfuric acid. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was significantly improved after pretreatment. The highest conversion......The choice of a suitable pretreatment method and the adjustment of the pretreatment parameters for efficient conversion of biomass are crucial for a successful biorefinery concept. In this study, cocksfoot grass, a suitable lignocellulosic biomass with a potential for large-scale production...... into cellulose monomeric C6 sugars was achieved for WEx condition AC-E (180°C, 15 min, and 0.2% sulfuric acid). For that condition, the highest ethanol yield of 197 g/kg DM (97% of theoretical maximum value) was achieved for SSF process by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the highest concentration...

  1. Degradation of cellulose at the wet-dry interface. II. Study of oxidation reactions and effect of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myung-Joon; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2014-01-30

    To better understand the degradation of cellulose upon the formation of a tideline at the wet-dry interface when paper is suspended in water, the production of chemical species involved in oxidation reactions was studied. The quantitation of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals was carried out in reverse phase chromatography using triphenylphosphine and terephthalic acid, respectively, as chemical probes. Both reactive oxygen species were found in the tideline immediately after its formation, in the range of micromoles and nanomoles per gram of paper, respectively. The results indicate that hydroxyl radicals form for the most part in paper before the tideline experiment, whereas hydroperoxides appear to be produced primarily during tideline formation. Iron sulfate impregnation of the paper raised the production of hydroperoxides. After hygrothermal aging in sealed vials the hydroxyl radical content in paper increased significantly. When aged together in the same vial, tideline samples strongly influenced the degradation of samples from other areas of the paper (multi-sample aging). Different types of antioxidants were added to the paper before the tideline experiment to investigate their effect on the oxidation reactions taking place. In samples treated with iron sulfate or artificially aged, the addition of Irgafos 168 (tris(2,4-ditert-butylphenyl) phosphate) and Tinuvin 292 (bis(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate and methyl 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl sebacate) reduced the concentration of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Tinuvin 292 was also found to considerably lower the rate of cellulose chain scission reactions during hygrothermal aging of the paper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In-depth experimental analysis of pharmaceutical twin-screw wet granulation in view of detailed process understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Maxim; Van Hauwermeiren, Daan; Lee, Kai; Turnbull, Neil; Wilsdon, David; Am Ende, Mary; Doshi, Pankaj; Vervaet, Chris; Brouckaert, Davinia; Mortier, Séverine T F C; Nopens, Ingmar; Beer, Thomas De

    2017-08-30

    Twin-screw wet granulation is gaining increasing interest within the pharmaceutical industry for the continuous manufacturing of solid oral dosage forms. However, limited prior fundamental physical understanding has been generated relating to the granule formation mechanisms and kinetics along the internal compartmental length of a twin-screw granulator barrel, and about how process settings, barrel screw configuration and formulation properties such as particle size, density and surface properties influence these mechanisms. One of the main reasons for this limited understanding is that experimental data is generally only collected at the exit of the twin-screw granulator barrel although the granule formation occurs spatially along the internal length of the barrel. The purpose of this study is to analyze the twin-screw wet granulation process using both hydrophilic and hydrophobic formulations, manufactured under different process settings such as liquid-to-solid ratio, mass throughput and screw speed, in such a way that the mechanisms occurring in the individual granulator barrel compartments (i.e., the wetting and different conveying and kneading compartments) and their impact upon granule formation are understood. To achieve this, a unique experimental setup was developed allowing granule characteristic data-collection such as size, shape, liquid and porosity distribution at the different compartments along the length of the granulator barrel. Moreover, granule characteristic information per granule size class was determined. The experimental results indicated that liquid-to-solid ratio is the most important factor dictating the formation of the granules and their corresponding properties, by regulating the degree of aggregation and breakage in the different compartments along the internal length of the twin-screw granulator barrel. Collecting appropriate and detailed experimental data about granule formation along the internal length of the granulator barrel

  3. Treatment of printing and dyeing wastewater by catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of honeycomb cinder as carrier catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D. H.; Yang, H. M.; Ou, Y. J.; Xu, C.; Gu, J. C.

    2017-06-01

    Under the condition of 35 °C, honeycomb cinder was used as the carrier, nickel as the active ingredient, impregnated for 2h, and calcined at 300 °C for 2h. The catalyst was used to Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation of methylene blue simulated printing and dyeing wastewater. The effect of the amount of catalyst, the amount of catalyst, the reaction temperature and the reaction time on the treatment efficiency and the effect of the self-made catalyst on the simulated wastewater with different concentration gradient were studied in the experiment. The results showed that when the reaction conditions were H2O2 8ml/L, catalyst 12g/L and reaction time 1h, the degradation rate of methylene blue reached more than 77% for the wastewater with concentration ranging from 40 mg/L to 200 mg/L. In addition, at a temperature of 30 DEG C, the wastewater, the concentration was 80mg/L, degradation rate was up to 85.70%.

  4. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1). 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of wet-granulation process parameters on the dissolution and physical stability of a solid dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Ryo; Ohta, Tomoaki; Shiraki, Koji; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2017-05-30

    This study investigated how the process parameters of wet-granulation affect the properties of solid dispersions (SDs), such as dissolution and physical stability. SDs of nilvadipine (NIL) and hypromellose prepared by spray-drying were wet-granulated and dried under various conditions. The NIL concentration at 4h and area under the curve from dissolution tests were taken to indicate dissolution. Then, the NIL crystallinity calculated from powder X-ray diffraction patterns of SD granules stored at 60°C for 3 months was evaluated to indicate physical stability. A statistical analysis revealed that the amount of granulation liquid (w/w%) and the ratio of water to ethanol in the liquid (v/v%) significantly affected the dissolution property, and that the drying temperature had a significant effect on the physical stability. Although exposure to water makes the wet-granulation process seem less suitable for granulating a SD, the results indicated that the process can be used to develop SD granules by selecting appropriate conditions, such as a lower proportion of granulation liquid, a higher water to ethanol ratio in the liquid, and a higher drying temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pilot-Plant Demonstration of Wet Oxidation for Treatment of Shipboard Wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    for the destruction of watery wastes such as slimes and sludges that are costly to incinerate and are often pathogenic. The process is also well...which sewage sludge was heated in an autoclave to de- slime it; William K. Porteous was granted U.S. Patent 2,131,711 in 1939 to conduct basically the same...circuit and described in Section 3.1.1. The continuous-flow test was highly suc:essful; the fears were groundless. The effluent was decidedly

  7. Thermodynamic study contribution of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys by high temperature mass spectroscopy, and of the wetting of yttrium oxide by uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardie, P.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature thermodynamic properties study of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys, and wetting study of yttrium oxide by uranium are presented. High temperature mass spectrometry coupled to a Knudsen effusion multi-cell allows to measure iron activity in U-Fe alloys and of gallium in U-Ga alloys, the U activity is deduced from Gibbs-Duhem equation. Wetting of the system U/Y 2 O 3-x is studied between 1413 K and 1973 K by the put drop method visualized by X-rays. This technique also furnishes density, surface tension of U and of U-Fe alloys put on Y 2 O 3-x . A new model of the interfacial oxygen action on wetting is done for the system U/Y 2 O 3-x . (A.B.)

  8. Bubble-free ozone addition through ceramic membranes for wet-oxidative waste water treatment; Blasenfreier Ozoneintrag durch keramische Membranen zur nassoxidativen Abwasserbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janknecht, P.; Wilderer, P.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Pruefamt fuer Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    A prerequisite for successful wet oxidation is very accurately tuned and carefully monitored process control. In the alternative, a decline in water quality is actually possible. In particular, earlier studies in the ozonification of landfill leachate encountered problems in reducing levels of AOX in the presence of halogenated hydrocarbons. Serious problems in process control may arise when ozone is conventionally added and forms bubbles in the presence of surface-active substances; this foam accumulates and is so persistent as to evade mechanical control. Since the formation of foam is directly due to gas bubbles carried in, bubble-free addition of ozone through a membrane may be a viable approach. (orig.) [German] Voraussetzung fuer den Erfolg einer Nassoxidation ist eine sehr genau eingestellte und sorgfaeltig ueberwachte Prozessfuehrung, da anderenfalls auch eine Verschlechterung der Wasserqualitaet eintreten kann; insbesondere haben sich hier bei frueheren Untersuchungen zur Ozonung von Deponiesickerwaessern Schwierigkeiten bei der Reduzierung des AOX-Wertes in Anwesenheit von halogenierten Kohlenwasserstoffen ergeben. Gravierende Schwierigkeiten in der Prozessfuehrung kann Schaum bereiten, der sich bei konventionellem Blaseneintrag des Ozons in Anwesenheit von oberflaechenaktiven Substanzen bildet, sich in der Anlage ansammelt und dabei so bestaendig ist, dass er auf mechanische Weise nicht zu kontrollieren ist. Da die Schaumbildung direkt auf die eingetragenen Gasblasen zurueckzufuehren ist, stellt der blasenfreie Eintrag von Ozon durch eine Membran einen moeglichen Loesungsansatz dar. (orig.)

  9. Tailoring Wet Explosion Process Parameters for the Pretreatment of Cocksfoot Grass for High Sugar Yields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2013-01-01

    The pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is crucial for efficient subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. In this study, wet explosion (WEx) pretreatment was applied to cocksfoot grass and pretreatment conditions were tailored for maximizing the sugar yields using response su...... when applying less severe pretreatment conditions C (160 °C, 5 min, 0.2 % dilute sulfuric acid). Therefore, the choice of the most suitable pretreatment conditions is depending on the main target product, i.e., hexose or pentose sugars....

  10. Hybrid process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W.R.; Sprague, B.N.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a process for reducing the nitrogen oxide concentration in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing into the effluent a first treatment agent comprising a nitrogenous composition selected from the group consisting of urea, ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, NH{sub 4}-lignosulfonate, fur-furylamine, tetrahydrofurylamine, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1.1{prime}-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, calcium cyanamide, and mixtures thereof under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides concentration and ensure the presence of ammonia in the effluent; introducing into the effluent a second treatment agent comprising an oxygenated hydrocarbon at an effluent temperature of about 500{degrees} F. to about 1600{degrees} F. under conditions effective to oxidize nitric oxide in the effluent to nitrogen dioxide and ensure the presence of ammonia at a weight ratio of ammonia to nitrogen dioxide of about 1:5 to about 5:1; and contacting the effluent with an aqueous scrubbing solution having a pH of 12 or lower under conditions effective to cause nitrogen dioxide to be absorbed therein.

  11. Hybrid process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperly, W.R.; Sprague, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a process for reducing the nitrogen oxide concentration in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing into the effluent a first treatment agent comprising a nitrogenous composition selected from the group consisting of urea, ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, NH 4 -lignosulfonate, fur-furylamine, tetrahydrofurylamine, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1.1'-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, calcium cyanamide, and mixtures thereof under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides concentration and ensure the presence of ammonia in the effluent; introducing into the effluent a second treatment agent comprising an oxygenated hydrocarbon at an effluent temperature of about 500 degrees F. to about 1600 degrees F. under conditions effective to oxidize nitric oxide in the effluent to nitrogen dioxide and ensure the presence of ammonia at a weight ratio of ammonia to nitrogen dioxide of about 1:5 to about 5:1; and contacting the effluent with an aqueous scrubbing solution having a pH of 12 or lower under conditions effective to cause nitrogen dioxide to be absorbed therein

  12. Mitigation of prion infectivity and conversion capacity by a simulated natural process--repeated cycles of drying and wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qi; Eckland, Thomas; Telling, Glenn; Bartz, Jason; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon

    2015-02-01

    Prions enter the environment from infected hosts, bind to a wide range of soil and soil minerals, and remain highly infectious. Environmental sources of prions almost certainly contribute to the transmission of chronic wasting disease in cervids and scrapie in sheep and goats. While much is known about the introduction of prions into the environment and their interaction with soil, relatively little is known about prion degradation and inactivation by natural environmental processes. In this study, we examined the effect of repeated cycles of drying and wetting on prion fitness and determined that 10 cycles of repeated drying and wetting could reduce PrP(Sc) abundance, PMCA amplification efficiency and extend the incubation period of disease. Importantly, prions bound to soil were more susceptible to inactivation by repeated cycles of drying and wetting compared to unbound prions, a result which may be due to conformational changes in soil-bound PrP(Sc) or consolidation of the bonding between PrP(Sc) and soil. This novel finding demonstrates that naturally-occurring environmental process can degrade prions.

  13. NASA Ames Environmental Sustainability Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Ames Environmental Sustainability Report is the second in a series of reports describing the steps NASA Ames Research Center has taken toward assuring environmental sustainability in NASA Ames programs, projects, and activities. The Report highlights Center contributions toward meeting the Agency-wide goals under the 2011 NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Program.

  14. Delay oil oxidation during frying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, N.M.M.; Shams Eldin, N.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Blend oil (mixed of refined sunflower and soy beans oils 1:1 w/w) containing add 200 ppm of rosemary leaves methanolic extract (rosemary extract) (RE) and 3% refined rice bran oil (RRBO), were used in frying process at 1800 degree c for 5 hrs/ day, four consecutive days to delay oil oxidation during frying. Therefore, rosemary extract (methanolic extract) was analyzed by HPLC technique for identification of flavonoids compounds (as a specific active compounds; gives high protection to frying oil). Physical and chemical properties, including refractive index(RI). Red color unit (R), viscosity, acidity (FFA), peroxide value (PV), iodine value (IV) oxidized fatty acid (OFA), polymer content (PC), total polar components (TPC) and trans fatty acid (TFA) as eliadic acid were determined. The results indicated that; rosemary extract contained about eight flavonoids compounds (hypersoid, rutin, 3-OH flavon, luleotin, kempferol, sakarutin, querectrin and apeginin). Addition of RE or RRBO to frying oil caused delay oil oxidation during frying process compared with frying oil without any addition. Also, the results indicated that rosemary extract was more effective in reducing formation of PV, FFA, OFA, PC, TPC and TFA in frying oil than refined rice bran oil

  15. Organic waste processing using molten salt oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M. G., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal means of oxidizing (destroying) the organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. The U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is currently funding research that will identify alternatives to incineration for the treatment of organic-based mixed wastes. (Mixed wastes are defined as waste streams which have both hazardous and radioactive properties.) One such project is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Expedited Technology Demonstration of Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). The goal of this project is to conduct an integrated demonstration of MSO, including off-gas and spent salt treatment, and the preparation of robust solid final forms. Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are presently being performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO process vessel with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. In this paper we describe the integrated system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is to identify the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  16. Catalysed electrolytic metal oxide dissolution processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machuron-Mandard, X.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical processes designed for recovering valuable metals from mineral ores as well as industrial wastes usually require preliminary dissolution of inorganic compounds in aqueous media before extraction and purification steps. Unfortunately, most of the minerals concerned hardly or slowly dissolve in acidic or basic solutions. Metallic oxides, sulfides and silicates are among the materials most difficult to dissolve in aqueous solutions. They are also among the main minerals containing valuable metals. The redox properties of such materials sometimes permit to improve their dissolution by adding oxidizing or reducing species to the leaching solution, which leads to an increase in the dissolution rate. Moreover, limited amounts of redox promoters are required if the redox agent is regenerated continuously thanks to an electrochemical device. Nuclear applications of such concepts have been suggested since the dissolution of many actinide compounds (e.g., UO 2 , AmO 2 , PuC, PuN,...) is mainly based on redox reactions. In the 1980s, improvements of the plutonium dioxide dissolution process have been proposed on the basis of oxidation-reduction principles, which led a few years later to the design of industrial facilities (e.g., at Marcoule or at the french reprocessing plant of La Hague). General concepts and well-established results obtained in France at the Atomic Energy Commission (''Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique'') will be presented and will illustrate applications to industrial as well as analytical problems. (author)

  17. Investigation of the Scanning Microarc Oxidation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingqin Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scanning microarc oxidation (SMAO is a coating process which is based on conventional microarc oxidation (MAO. The key difference is that deposition in SMAO is achieved by using a stainless steel nozzle to spray an electrolyte stream on the substrate surface as opposed to immersing the workpiece in an electrolyzer. In the present study, SMAO discharge characteristics, coating morphology, and properties are analyzed and compared to results obtained from MAO under similar conditions. Results show that MAO and SMAO have comparable spark and microarc lifetimes and sizes, though significant differences in incubation time and discharge distribution were evident. Results also showed that the voltage and current density for MAO and SMAO demonstrate similar behavior but have markedly different transient and steady-state values. Results obtained from coating A356 aluminum sheet show that oxide thickness and growth rate in SMAO are strongly dependent on interelectrode spacing and travel speed. Analysis of the SMAO coating morphology and structure showed that a denser and slightly harder layer was deposited in comparison to MAO and is attributed to reduced porosity and increased formation of α-Al2O3. Preliminary results indicate that SMAO represents a viable process for coating of aluminum surfaces.

  18. Effect of surfactants or a water soluble polymer on the crystal transition of clarithromycin during a wet granulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Kenji; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2015-11-10

    To generate products containing a stable form of clarithromycin (CAM) (form II) regardless of the initial crystal form of CAM or type of granulation solvent, the effects of five surfactants, or a water-soluble polymer (macrogol 400) were determined on the crystal transition of CAM. The metastable form (form I) was kneaded with water, after adding surfactants, or a water-soluble polymer. Form II was also kneaded with ethanol, after adding the same additives. The resulting samples were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction. Form I was completely converted to form II by a wet granulation using water with additives bearing polyoxyethylene chains such as polysorbate 80 (PS80), polyoxyl 40 stearate or macrogol 400. The granulation of the form II using ethanol with these additives did not result in a crystal transition to form I. Furthermore, CAM tablets were manufactured using granules with PS80, and these crystal forms and dissolution behaviors were investigated. As a result, the wet granulation of CAM with PS80 gave CAM tablets containing only form II and PS80 did not have any adverse effects on tablet characteristics. Therefore, these data suggests that the crystal form of CAM can be controlled to be form II using a wet granulation process with additives bearing polyoxyethylene chains regardless of the initial crystal form of CAM or type of granulation solvent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Industrial waste water treatment by advanced oxidation processes; Tratamiento de aguas residuales industriales mediante procesos de oxidacion avanzada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasso, S.; Baldasano, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Advanced Oxidation Technologies have been defined as processes which involve the generation of highly reactive oxy radicals. These systems show promise for the destruction of non biodegradable and hazardous organic substances in industrial wastewater. Two types of advanced oxidation processes are considered in this paper: (1) systems that use high energy oxidants (O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, UV, etc) at ambient temperature to initiate the oxidation reaction, and (2) processes that use molecular oxygen and high temperature and pressure to initiate the reaction (wet oxidation at subcritical and supercritical conditions). The fundamental aspects of these oxidation technologies are discussed, the application framework is defined and the technology development is indicated. (Author) 33 refs.

  20. Mesoporous metal oxides and processes for preparation thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suib, Steven L.; Poyraz, Altug Suleyman

    2018-03-06

    A process for preparing a mesoporous metal oxide, i.e., transition metal oxide. Lanthanide metal oxide, a post-transition metal oxide and metalloid oxide. The process comprises providing an acidic mixture comprising a metal precursor, an interface modifier, a hydrotropic ion precursor, and a surfactant; and heating the acidic mixture at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to form the mesoporous metal oxide. A mesoporous metal oxide prepared by the above process. A method of controlling nano-sized wall crystallinity and mesoporosity in mesoporous metal oxides. The method comprises providing an acidic mixture comprising a metal precursor, an interface modifier, a hydrotropic ion precursor, and a surfactant; and heating the acidic mixture at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to control nano-sized wall crystallinity and mesoporosity in the mesoporous metal oxides. Mesoporous metal oxides and a method of tuning structural properties of mesoporous metal oxides.

  1. The combined effect of wet granulation process parameters and dried granule moisture content on tablet quality attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbott, Ian P; Al Husban, Farhan; Reynolds, Gavin K

    2016-09-01

    A pharmaceutical compound was used to study the effect of batch wet granulation process parameters in combination with the residual moisture content remaining after drying on granule and tablet quality attributes. The effect of three batch wet granulation process parameters was evaluated using a multivariate experimental design, with a novel constrained design space. Batches were characterised for moisture content, granule density, crushing strength, porosity, disintegration time and dissolution. Mechanisms of the effect of the process parameters on the granule and tablet quality attributes are proposed. Water quantity added during granulation showed a significant effect on granule density and tablet dissolution rate. Mixing time showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength, and mixing speed showed a significant effect on the distribution of tablet crushing strengths obtained. The residual moisture content remaining after granule drying showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength. The effect of moisture on tablet tensile strength has been reported before, but not in combination with granulation parameters and granule properties, and the impact on tablet dissolution was not assessed. Correlations between the energy input during granulation, the density of granules produced, and the quality attributes of the final tablets were also identified. Understanding the impact of the granulation and drying process parameters on granule and tablet properties provides a basis for process optimisation and scaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. One-pot wet-chemical co-reduction synthesis of bimetallic gold-platinum nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Jun; Zhang, Qian-Li; Feng, Jin-Xia; Ju, Ke-Jian; Wang, Ai-Jun; Wei, Jie; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a simple, rapid and facile one-pot wet-chemical co-reduction method is developed for synthesis of bimetallic Au-Pt alloyed nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide (Au-Pt NCs/RGO), in which caffeine is acted as a capping agent and a structure-directing agent, while no any seed, template, surfactant or polymer involved. The as-prepared nanocomposites display enlarged electrochemical active surface area, significantly enhanced catalytic activity and better stability for methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation, compared with commercial Pt-C (Pt 50 wt%), PtRu-C (Pt 30 wt% and Ru 15 wt%) and Pt black.

  3. Doxycycline Degradation by the Oxidative Fenton Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A. Borghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxycycline is a broad-spectrum tetracycline occurring in domestic, industrial, and rural effluents, whose main drawback is the increasing emergence of resistant bacteria. This antibiotic could be degraded by the so-called Fenton process, consisting in the oxidation of organic pollutants by oxygen peroxide (H2O2 in the presence of Fe2+. Experiments were performed according to an experimental Rotational Central Composite Design to investigate the influence of temperature (0–40.0°C, H2O2 concentration (100–900 mg/L, and Fe2+ concentration (5–120 mg/L on residual doxycycline and total organic carbon concentrations. Whereas the final residual doxycycline concentration ranged from 0 to 55.8 mg/L, the oxidation process proved unable to reduce the total organic carbon by more than 30%. The best operating conditions were concentrations of H2O2 and Fe2+ of 611 and 25 mg/L, respectively, and temperature of 35.0°C, but the analysis of variance revealed that only the first variable exerted a statistically significant effect on the residual doxycycline concentration. These results suggest possible application of this process in the treatment of doxycycline-containing effluents and may be used as starting basis to treat tetracycline-contaminated effluents.

  4. Isolation, selection and evaluation of yeasts for use in fermentation of coffee beans by the wet process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Pandey, Ashok; Medeiros, Adriane Bianchi Pedroni; Andrade Lara, João Marcos Rodrigues; Gollo, André Luiz; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    During wet processing of coffee, the ripe cherries are pulped, then fermented and dried. This study reports an experimental approach for target identification and selection of indigenous coffee yeasts and their potential use as starter cultures during the fermentation step of wet processing. A total of 144 yeast isolates originating from spontaneously fermenting coffee beans were identified by molecular approaches and screened for their capacity to grow under coffee-associated stress conditions. According to ITS-rRNA gene sequencing, Pichia fermentans and Pichia kluyveri were the most frequent isolates, followed by Candida Candida glabrata, quercitrusa, Saccharomyces sp., Pichia guilliermondii, Pichia caribbica and Hanseniaspora opuntiae. Nine stress-tolerant yeast strains were evaluated for their ability to produce aromatic compounds in a coffee pulp simulation medium and for their pectinolytic activity. P. fermentans YC5.2 produced the highest concentrations of flavor-active ester compounds (viz., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate), while Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 was the best pectinase-producing strain. The potential impact of these selected yeast strains to promote flavor development in coffee beverages was investigated for inoculating coffee beans during wet fermentation trials at laboratory scale. Inoculation of a single culture of P. fermentans YC5.2 and co-culture of P. fermentans YC5.2 and Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 enhanced significantly the formation of volatile aroma compounds during the fermentation process compared to un-inoculated control. The sensory analysis indicated that the flavor of coffee beverages was influenced by the starter cultures, being rated as having the higher sensory scores for fruity, buttery and fermented aroma. This demonstrates a complementary role of yeasts associated with coffee quality through the synthesis of yeast-specific volatile constituents. The yeast strains P. fermentans YC5.2 and Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 have a great

  5. APPLICATION OF MAGNETIC CATALYSTS TO THE CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CWPO OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER CONTAINING NON BIODEGRADABLE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Munoz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new ferromagnetic -Al2O3-supported iron catalyst has been prepared and its activity and stability have been compared with those of a previous iron-based conventional catalyst and with the traditional homogeneous Fenton process in the oxidation of chlorophenols. The use of solid catalysts improved significantly the efficiency on the use of H2O2, achieving higher mineralization degrees. The magnetic catalyst led to significantly higher oxidation rates than the conventional one due to the presence of both Fe (II and Fe (III. On the other hand, the use of a catalyst with magnetic properties is of interest, since it allows rapid recovery after treatment using a magnetic field. Moreover, it showed a high stability with fairly low iron leaching (<1% upon CWPO runs. An additional clear advantage of this new catalyst is its easy separation and recovery from the reaction medium by applying an external magnetic field.

  6. Continuous wet oxidation pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass with subsequent continuous ethanol production; Kontinuerlig vaadoxidationsforbehandling af lignocelluloseholdige biomasser med efterfoelgende kontinuerlig ethanolfremstilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahring, B.K.; Torry-Smith, M.; Loeth, A.H.

    2001-07-01

    In this project the possibility of implementing a UASB-reactor for detoxification of the recirculation water is investigated. Bioethanol- effluent (BEE) made from wet-oxidized wheat straw (60 g-wheat straw/l-water) fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A3M4 is in this project used to simulate the effluent from a commercial bioethanol plant. To investigate the gas potential and conversion of inhibitors, BEE is investigated both in batch and in a laboratory scale UASB reactor. In batch tests the conversion of acetovanillon, 2-furan acid and 4-hydroxyacetophenon was investigated with the substances themselves, as single substrat, and by co-digestion with BEE. The experiments show that the conversion of the three substances together with BEE had a positive influence on the decomposition and the inhibition levels. Tests with conversion of BEE in a laboratory scale UASB-reactor showed that by loading up to 29 g-COD/l it was possible to obtain a COD-reduction at 80% (w/w). At the same time GC-analyses of vanillin acid, homo vanillin acid, aceton vanillon, syringon acid, acetosyringon, syringol, 4-hydroxybenzo acid, 4-hydroxbenzaldenhyde, 2-furan acid, and phenol showed that all these substances were converted in the UASB-reactor. Economical calculations carried out on the basis of the results from the experiments indicate that the implementation of a UASB-cleaning step for cleaning the bioethanol process water can be carried out with a economical profit, which among other means a short payback time on the investment. It is things concluded that the implementation of a UASB-cleaning step is a qualified method to detoxify process water for bioethanol production and thereby reduce the total production costs of the commercial bioethanol production based on lignocelluslose materials. The necessity of tests with repeated recirculations are indicated, because continuous reuse of the process water can result in up-concentration of any inhibitors

  7. Ames Life Science Data Archive: Translational Rodent Research at Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Alan E.; French, Alison J.; Ngaotheppitak, Ratana; Leung, Dorothy M.; Vargas, Roxana S.; Maese, Chris; Stewart, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Life Science Data Archive (LSDA) office at Ames is responsible for collecting, curating, distributing and maintaining information pertaining to animal and plant experiments conducted in low earth orbit aboard various space vehicles from 1965 to present. The LSDA will soon be archiving data and tissues samples collected on the next generation of commercial vehicles; e.g., SpaceX & Cygnus Commercial Cargo Craft. To date over 375 rodent flight experiments with translational application have been archived by the Ames LSDA office. This knowledge base of fundamental research can be used to understand mechanisms that affect higher organisms in microgravity and help define additional research whose results could lead the way to closing gaps identified by the Human Research Program (HRP). This poster will highlight Ames contribution to the existing knowledge base and how the LSDA can be a resource to help answer the questions surrounding human health in long duration space exploration. In addition, it will illustrate how this body of knowledge was utilized to further our understanding of how space flight affects the human system and the ability to develop countermeasures that negate the deleterious effects of space flight. The Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) includes current descriptions of over 700 experiments conducted aboard the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), NASA/MIR, Bion/Cosmos, Gemini, Biosatellites, Apollo, Skylab, Russian Foton, and ground bed rest studies. Research areas cover Behavior and Performance, Bone and Calcium Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chronobiology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental Monitoring, Gastrointestinal Physiology, Hematology, Immunology, Life Support System, Metabolism and Nutrition, Microbiology, Muscle Physiology, Neurophysiology, Pharmacology, Plant Biology, Pulmonary Physiology, Radiation Biology, Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, and Toxicology. These

  8. Density improvement of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles fabricated by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Fuchinoue, K.; Sawada, H.; Watarumi, K.

    1998-03-01

    Lithium titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) has attracted the attention of many researchers from a point of tritium recovery at low temperature, chemical stability, etc.. The application of small Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} sphere has been proposed in some designs of fusion blanket. On the other hand, the wet process is most advantageous as the fabrication method of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles from a point of mass production, and of reprocessing necessary for effective use of resources and reduction of radioactive wastes. In the preliminary fabrication test, density of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles was about 40%T.D.. Therefore, in this study, density improvement tests and preliminary characterization of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles by wet process were performed, noting the aging condition and sintering condition in the fabrication process of the gel-spheres. This study yielded Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles in target range of 80-85%T.D.. (author)

  9. Assessment of spatial heterogeneity in continuous twin screw wet granulation process using three-compartmental population balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Galbraith, Shaun C; Park, Seo-Young; Cha, Bumjoon; Huang, Zhuangrong; Meyer, Robert Frederick; Flamm, Matthew H; O'Connor, Thomas; Lee, Sau; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2018-01-25

    In this study, a novel three-compartmental population balance model (PBM) for a continuous twin screw wet granulation process is developed, combining the techniques of PBM and regression process modeling. The developed model links screw configuration, screw speed, and blend throughput with granule properties to predict the granule size distribution (GSD) and volume-average granule diameter. The granulator screw barrel was divided into three compartments along barrel length: wetting compartment, mixing compartment, and steady growth compartment. Different granulation mechanisms are assumed in each compartment. The proposed model therefore considers spatial heterogeneity, improving model prediction accuracy. An industrial data set containing 14 experiments is applied for model development. Three validation experiments show that the three-compartmental PBM can accurately predict granule diameter and size distribution at randomly selected operating conditions. Sixteen combinations of aggregation and breakage kernels are investigated in predicting the experimental GSD to best judge the granulation mechanism. The three-compartmental model is compared with a one-compartmental model in predicting granule diameter at different experimental conditions to demonstrate its advantage. The influence of the screw configuration, screw speed and blend throughput on the volume-average granule diameter is analyzed based on the developed model.

  10. Composite electrolytes of polyethylene oxides/garnets interfacially wetted by ionic liquid for room-temperature solid-state lithium battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hanyu; Zhao, Ning; Sun, Jiyang; Du, Fuming; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin

    2017-12-01

    Paramount attention has been paid on solid polymer electrolytes due to their potential in enhancement of energy density as well as improvement of safety. Herein, the composite electrolytes consisting of Li-salt-free polyethylene oxides and 200 nm-sized Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12 particles interfacially wetted by [BMIM]TF2N of 1.8 μL cm-2 have been prepared. Such wetted ionic liquid remains the solid state of membrane electrolytes and decreases the interface impedance between the electrodes and the electrolytes. There is no release of the liquid phase from the PEO matrix when the pressure of 5.0 × 104 Pa being applied for 24 h. The interfacially wetted membrane electrolytes show the conductivity of 2.2 × 10-4 S cm-1 at 20 °C, which is one order of magnitude greater than that of the membranes without the wetted ionic liquids. The conduction mechanism is related to a large number of lithium ions releasing from Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12 particles and the improved conductive paths along the ion-liquid-wetted interfaces between the polymer matrix and ceramic grains. When the membranes being used in the solid-state LiFePO4/Li and LiFe0.15Mn0.85PO4/Li cells at 25 °C, the excellent rate capability and superior cycle stability has been shown. The results provide a new prospect for solid polymer electrolytes used for room-temperature solid-state lithium batteries.

  11. Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lund, A.L.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1994-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl x , UAl x -Al and U 3 O 8 -Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH x , UErZrH, UO 2 -stainless steel cermet, and U 3 O 8 -stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified

  12. Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R J; Johnson, Jr, A B; Lund, A L; Gilbert, E R [and others

    1996-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

  13. Abatement of phenolic mixtures by catalytic wet oxidation enhanced by Fenton's pretreatment: Effect of H2O2 dosage and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.; Yustos, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Simon, E.; Garcia-Ochoa, F.

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of a phenolic mixture containing phenol, o-cresol and p-cresol (500 mg/L on each pollutant) has been carried out using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst, placed in a continuous three-phase reactor. Total pressure was 16 bar and temperature was 127 deg. C. Pollutant conversion, mineralization, intermediate distribution, and toxicity were measured at the reactor outlet. Under these conditions no detoxification of the inlet effluent was found even at the highest catalyst weight (W) to liquid flow rate (Q L ) ratio used. On the other hand, some Fenton Runs (FR) have been carried out in a batch way using the same phenolic aqueous mixture previously cited. The concentration of Fe 2+ was set to 10 mg/L. The influence of the H 2 O 2 amount (between 10 and 100% of the stoichiometric dose) and temperature (30, 50, and 70 deg. C) on phenols conversion, mineralization, and detoxification have been analyzed. Phenols conversion was near unity at low hydrogen peroxide dosage but mineralization and detoxification achieved an asymptotic value at each temperature conditions. The integration of Fenton reagent as pretreatment of the CWO process remarkably improves the efficiency of the CWO reactor and allows to obtain detoxified effluents at mild temperature conditions and relatively low W/Q L values. For a given phenolic mixture a temperature range of 30-50 deg. C in the Fenton pretreatment with a H 2 O 2 dosage between 20 and 40% of the stoichiometric amount required can be proposed

  14. Simulation of biodiesel production using hydro-esterification process from wet microalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Pradana Yano Surya; Fauzi Ardian; Pratama Sangga Hadi; Sudibyo Hanifrahmawan

    2018-01-01

    Recently, algae have received a lot of attention as a new biomass source for the production of renewable energy, such as biodiesel. Conventionally, biodiesel is made through esterification or transesterification of oils where the process involves a catalyst and alcohol to be reacted in a reactor. However, this process is energy intensive for drying and extraction step. To overcome this situation, we studied simulation of a new route of hydro-esterification process which is combine hydrolysis ...

  15. Carbon isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in fresh and saline (NaCl) water via continuous flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy following wet chemical oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher; Thomas, Randal B.; Saad, Nabil; Thordsen, James J.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the performance and limitations of a wet chemical oxidation carbon analyser interfaced with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (WCO-CRDS) in a continuous flow (CF) configuration for measuring δ13C of dissolved organic carbon (δ13C-DOC) in natural water samples. Low-chloride matrix (22.5 µg C/aliquot) may be analysed. The WCO-CRDS approach requires more total carbon (µg C/aliquot) than conventional CF-isotope ratio mass spectrometer, but is nonetheless applicable to a wide range of DOC concentration and water types, including brackish water, produced water, and basinal brines.

  16. Effects of monensin and tylosin in finishing diets containing corn wet distillers grains with solubles with differing corn processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, N F; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Benton, J R; Luebbe, M K; Laudert, S B

    2013-05-01

    A total of 3,632 crossbred steers were used in 3 separate randomized complete-block designed finishing experiments. Data from Exp. 1 were analyzed separately whereas data were combined for Exp. 2 and 3, based on corn processing method used [Exp.1 = equal combination of dry-rolled and high-moisture (DRC:HMC); Exp. 2 and 3 = steam-flaked (SFC)]. Steers were fed 1 of 5 treatments to evaluate the effects of monensin and tylosin in feedlot diets containing 25% corn wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS; DM basis). Treatments included: 1) corn-based diet (no WDGS) with 360 mg/d monensin and 90 mg/d tylosin (CORN+MT), 2) 25% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS-CON), 3) 25% WDGS with 360 mg/d monensin (WDGS+M), 4) WDGS with monensin and tylosin at same levels as treatment 1, and 5) WDGS with 480 mg/d monensin and 90 mg/d tylosin (WDGS+HIMT). In Exp. 1, WDGS+MT increased (P tylosin in a diet containing WDGS increased G:F (P tylosin were fed in a WDGS diet compared with WDGS-CON. Feeding WDGS+MT reduced total liver abscesses by 79.3% (Exp. 1) and 57.6% (Exp. 2 and 3) compared with WDGS-CON. Compared with WDGS+MT, minimal differences were observed when monensin was fed at 480 mg/steer daily with tylosin in diets containing WDGS. Inclusion of WDGS in finishing steer diets did not alter effectiveness of monensin with tylosin in improving G:F and reducing prevalence of liver abscesses, regardless of corn processing method. Corn processing method appears to be an important factor in performance response to WDGS with feeding value of WDGS, measured as an increase in feed efficiency, being greater in a DRC:HMC-based diet compared with a SFC-based diet.

  17. Inherent health and environmental risk assessment of nanostructured metal oxide production processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabifard, Mina; Arjmandi, Reza; Rashidi, Alimorad; Nouri, Jafar; Mohammadfam, Iraj

    2018-01-10

    The health and environmental effects of chemical processes can be assessed during the initial stage of their production. In this paper, the Chemical Screening Tool for Exposure and Environmental Release (ChemSTEER) software was used to compare the health and environmental risks of spray pyrolysis and wet chemical techniques for the fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide on a semi-industrial scale with a capacity of 300 kg/day in Iran. The pollution sources identified in each production process were pairwise compared in Expert Choice software using indicators including respiratory damage, skin damage, and environmental damages including air, water, and soil pollution. The synthesis of nanostructured zinc oxide using the wet chemical technique (with 0.523 wt%) leads to lower health and environmental risks compared to when spray pyrolysis is used (with 0.477 wt%). The health and environmental risk assessment of nanomaterial production processes can help select safer processes, modify the operation conditions, and select or modify raw materials that can help eliminate the risks.

  18. Size distribution of agglomerates of milk powder in wet granulation process in a vibro-fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Banjac

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of experiments on the influence of technological parameters (intensity of vibration, granulation of the liquid feed, temperature of fluidization agent on the change of size distribution, as well as mass mean diameter of the milk powder particles subjected to the wet granulation process (agglomeration in a vibro-fluidized bed granulator are shown in this paper. Using water as a granulation liquid and air as a fluidization agent, it was found that mass mean diameter increases with increase of water feed, intensity of vibration, and decrease of air temperature. Increasing the intensity of vibration and decreasing the air temperature, primarily induces the increase of the dimensions of the initial nuclei. This can be explained on the basis of different influences that these changes (velocity of particle motion, intensity of particle collision, drying rate have on the coalescence of particles with smaller and/or bigger dimensions.

  19. Magnetic behavior of iron-modified MCM-41 correlated with clustering processes from the wet impregnation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuello, Natalia I.; Elías, Verónica R. [Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Química (CITeQ) (UTN-CONICET), Facultad Regional Córdoba. Maestro López y Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba 5016 (Argentina); Winkler, Elin [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica – CONICET, Avenue Bustillo 9500, San Carlos de Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Pozo-López, Gabriela; Oliva, Marcos I. [Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba – IFEG, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba 5000 (Argentina); Eimer, Griselda A., E-mail: geimer@frc.utn.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Química (CITeQ) (UTN-CONICET), Facultad Regional Córdoba. Maestro López y Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba 5016 (Argentina)

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic MCM-41 type mesoporous silica materials were synthetized and modified with different iron loadings by the wet impregnation method. The evolution of iron speciation, depending on the metal loading and associated with a particular magnetic behavior was investigated by M vs. H curves, FC–ZFC curves, EPR spectroscopy and other complementary techniques such as SEM, TEM, and chemisorption of pyridine followed by FT-IR studies. A superparamagnetic contribution was larger for the lower loadings suggesting the high dispersion of very small sized iron nanospecies. However, this contribution decreased with increasing metal loading due to the growth of magnetically blocked nanoparticles (hematite) on the outer surface. Finally, a bimodal size distribution for the superparamagnetic nanospecies could be inferred; then the anisotropy constant for this phase and the corresponding nanospecies sizes were estimated. - Highlights: • All samples showed a main superparamagnetic contribution. • The oxide particles grow at expense of superparamagnetic nanospecies. • Bimodal distribution of nanospecies in superparamagnetic regime was determined. • The anisotropy constant for superparamagnetic nanospecies was calculated.

  20. Study Of The Wet Multipass Drawing Process Applied On High Strength Thin Steel Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimont, J.; Felder, E.; Bobadilla, C.; Buessler, P.; Persem, N.; Vaubourg, JP.

    2011-05-01

    Many kinds of high strength thin steel wires are involved in so many applications. Most of the time, these wires are made of a pearlitic steel grade. The current developments mainly concern the wire last drawing operation: after a patenting treatment several reduction passes are performed on a slip-type multipass drawing machine. This paper focuses on modeling this multipass drawing process: a constitutive law based on the wire microstructure evolutions is created, a mechanical study is performed, a set of experiments which enables determining the process friction coefficients is suggested and finally the related analytical model is introduced. This model provides several general results about the process and can be used in order to set the drawing machines.

  1. Elaboration and characterisation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide powders by the sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hours, T.

    1988-01-01

    The two classical sol-gel processes, colloidal and polymeric are studied for the preparation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide high performance powders. In the colloidal process, controlled and reproducible conditions for the preparation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide sols from salts or alkoxides are developed and the hydrothermal synthesis monodisperse hafnium oxide colloids is studied. The polymeric process is studied with hafnium ethyl-hexylate, hydrolysis kinetics for controlled preparation of sols and gels is investigated. Each step of preparation is detailed and powders obtained are characterized [fr

  2. Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Wet Biomass Feedstocks and Upgrading – Process Design and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse

    Liquid biofuels will play a major role for a more sustainable energy system of the future. The CatLiq® process is a 2nd generation biomass conversion process that is based on hydrothermal liquefaction. Hydrothermal liquefaction offers a very efficient and feedstock flexible way of converting...... biomass to bio-oil. Bio-oils from hydrothermal liquefaction are characterised by their high feedstock flexibility. Upgrading of complete bio-oils derived from hydrothermal conversion has not yet been extensively studied. Purpose of this work is to reduce the oxygen content of the bio-oil to improve...

  3. Wetting by Liquid Metals—Application in Materials Processing: The Contribution of the Grenoble Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Eustathopoulos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wettability of ceramics by liquid metals is discussed from both the fundamental point of view and the point of view of applications. The role of interfacial reactions (simple dissolution of the solid in the liquid or formation of a layer of a new compound is illustrated and analysed. Several results are presented in order to illustrate the role of wettability in materials processing, namely infiltration processing, joining dissimilar materials by brazing and selecting crucibles for crystallising liquid metals and semiconductors. The review includes results obtained during the last 15 years mainly, but not only, by the Grenoble group.

  4. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by wet-chemical oxidation and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virendra K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    Precision and accuracy results are described for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon (SOC) by silver-filter filtration, wet-chemical oxidation, and infrared determination of hte resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) used at the U.S. Geological Survey's nationalWater Quality Laboratory. An aliquot of raw water isfiltered through a 0.45-micrometer silver filter. The trapped organic material is oxidized using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in a scaled glass ampule,and the rseulting CO2 is measured by an infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO3 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the sample. The SOC method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 milligram per liter. The average percent recovery is 97.1 percent and the average standard deviation is 11 percent.

  5. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES ampersand H/quality assurance program was conducted

  6. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES H/quality assurance program was conducted.

  7. Conversion of a wet waste feedstock to biocrude by hydrothermal processing in a continuous-flow reactor: grape pomace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hart, Todd R.; Billing, Justin M.

    2017-05-13

    Wet waste feedstocks present an apt opportunity for biomass conversion to fuels by hydrothermal processing. In this study, grape pomace slurries from two varieties, Montepulciano and cabernet sauvignon, have been converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) in a bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor system. Carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product up to 56 % was accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa) when using grape pomace feedstock slurry with a 16.8 wt% concentration of dry solids processed at a liquid hourly space velocity of 2.1 h-1. Direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup using a Ru on C catalyst in a fixed bed producing a gas composed of methane and carbon dioxide from water soluble organics. Conversion of 99.8% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) left in the aqueous phase was demonstrated. As a result, high conversion of grape pomace to liquid and gas fuel products was found with residual organic contamination in byproduct water reduced to <150 mg/kg COD.

  8. On the Rust Products Formed on Weathering and Carbon Steels Exposed to Chloride in Dry-Wet Cyclical Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K. E.; Morales, A. L.; Barrero, C. A.; Greneche, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The rust products formed on weathering and carbon steels exposed to dry-wet cyclical processes in different chloride-rich solutions are carefully examined by means of different techniques. Special emphasis is given to the methodology of analysis of the data using 300 K and 77 K Moessbauer spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The rust that is loosely bound to the metal surface and that it is lost during the corrosion process, for both types of steel, was found to be composed of lepidocrocite, superparamagnetic goethite, hematite, and traces of akaganeite. On the other hand, the adherent rust, which is differentiated as scraped and hit according to the way it is obtained, from both steels was found to be composed of akaganeite, spinel phase, goethite exhibiting broad distribution of particle sizes and lepidocrocite. The relative abundances of rust components for both steels were very similar, suggesting similar corrosion processes. Mass loss measurements show that the corrosion rates increases with increasing the chloride concentration. The presence of large quantities of spinel phase and akaganeite are a consequence of a corrosion process under the influence of very high chloride concentrations. Our results are useful for assessing the behavior of weathering steels where the levels of chlorides are high or in contact with sea water.

  9. Photographer: NASA Ames On 20 December 1989, Ames buried a time capsule and unveiled a sculpture at

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Photographer: NASA Ames On 20 December 1989, Ames buried a time capsule and unveiled a sculpture at the spot where, fifty years earlier, Russel Robinson had turned the first spade of dirt for the Ames construction shack: Robinson (left) Ames Director Dale Compton (center) and Ames Deputy Director Sy Syvertson (right)

  10. Characterization of Rio Blanco retort 1 water following treatment by lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis; Residual brine treated by wet-air oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocornik, D.; Renk, R.

    1986-09-01

    Laboratory research has been conducted to evaluate the chemical, physical, and toxicological characteristics of treated and untreated water pumped from the flooded modified in situ retort at lease tract C-a. This wastewater had a total dissolved solids (TDS) content of about 5450 mg/L and a total organic carbon content of about 16 mg/L. Wet chemical analyses, metals analyses, particle-size analyses, and MICROTOX assays were performed on the wastewater before and after treatment by lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The reverse osmosis membrane used in this research was a Filmtec model SW30-2521 spiral-wound polyamide unit. In a short duration test at a TDS of 21,800 mg/L, the reverse osmosis system successfully removed dissolved solids and organics from the wastewater. The water was also much less toxic to the MICROTOX organism after treatment by reverse osmosis. Membrane fouling was observed when water with a TDS of 54,500 mg/L was treated. Treatment of the reverse osmosis residual brine was attempted by subcritical wet-air oxidation. The brine remaining after the 170-hour test on the water with a TDS of 5450 mg/L was subjected to temperatures ranging from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F) and pressures from 500 to 1600 psig for approximately 30 minutes. The waste treated by the higher temperatures and pressures showed good removals of organics, nitrogen compounds, and some metals. The sample treated at 302/sup 0/C (575/sup 0/F) and 1300 psi was assayed for MICROTOX response and no toxicity was measured. The reverse osmosis brine was significantly toxic to the MICROTOX organism before treatment by subcritical wet-air oxidation. 14 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Purification of wet process phosphoric acid by decreasing iron and uranium using white silica sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bayaa, A.A., E-mail: amina.elbayaa@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University (Girls), Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Badawy, N.A.; Gamal, A.M.; Zidan, I.H.; Mowafy, A.R. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University (Girls), Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-06-15

    Natural white silica sand as an adsorbent has been developed to reduce the concentration of iron and uranium ions as inorganic impurities in crude Egyptian phosphoric acid. Several parameters such as adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, volume to weight ratio and temperature, were investigated. Equilibrium isotherm studies were used to evaluate the maximum sorption capacity of adsorbent. Thermodynamic parameters showed the exothermic nature of the process and the negative entropy reflects the affinity of the adsorbent material towards each metal ion.

  12. Characterization of wet granulation process parameters using response surface methodology. 1. Top-spray fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, D M; Sakr, A M

    1994-07-01

    Randomized full-factorial designs (3(2)) were used to investigate the effects of processing conditions in the top-spray fluidized bed (TSFB) on the granulation of acetaminophen powder (USP) using 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (w/w) as the binder. Measured granule properties included the following: mean size and size distribution, specific surface area, bulk density, tapped density, flow rate through an orifice, angle of repose, residual moisture content, and percent overs (> 2 mm). The granules were then compressed (500, 1000, 1500 lbs) into tablets (9-mm shallow concave) using an instrumented rotary press and analyzed for both physical properties and drug-release characteristics. All experimental batches were run in triplicate to reduce the possibility of erroneous results and to increase the confidence in the resulting empirical relationships derived using response-surface methodology. Measured responses were then related to process parameters using two-factor and three-factor linear, interactions, and quadratic regression models. These models were used to generate three-dimensional response surfaces for use in the final analyses. Coefficients of determination (R2) ranging from 0.08 to 0.81 were obtained, indicating that only a portion of the variation in the data could be explained by the changes in process parameter settings during granulation and tableting. The best overall model fits were observed for mean granule size, size distribution, bulk density, tapped density, percent drug dissolution, tablet disintegration time, and tablet friability.

  13. How self-determination theory can assist our understanding of the teaching and learning processes in medical education. AMEE guide No. 59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Th J; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Williams, Geoffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Self-determination Theory (SDT), designed by Edward Deci and Richard Ryan, serves among the current major motivational theories in psychology. SDT research has been conducted in many areas, among which are education and health care, but its applications in medical education are rare. The potential of SDT to help understand processes in medical education justifies this Guide. SDT is explained in seven principles, one of which is the distinction of three innate psychological needs of human beings: for competence, for autonomy and for relatedness. Further, SDT elaborates how humans tend to internalise regulation of behaviour that initially has been external, in order to develop autonomous, self-determined behaviour. Implications of SDT for medical education are discussed with reference to preparation and selection, curriculum structure, classroom teaching, assessments and examinations, self-directed learning, clinical teaching, students as teachers and researchers, continuing professional development, faculty development and stress among trainees.

  14. Campylobacter in Broiler Chicken and Broiler Meat in Sri Lanka : Influence of Semi-Automated vs. Wet Market Processing on Campylobacter Contamination of Broiler Neck Skin Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottawatta, Kottawattage S A; van Bergen, Marcel A P; Abeynayake, Preeni; Wagenaar, Jaap A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126613354; Veldman, Kees T; Kalupahana, Ruwani S

    2017-01-01

    Broiler meat can become contaminated with Campylobacter of intestinal origin during processing. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks and meat contamination at retail shops, and determine the influence of semi-automated and wet market processing on

  15. Focal Plane Shift Imaging for the Analysis of Dynamic Wetting Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Chun, Jae Min; Sotelo, Jesus; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-09-27

    Droplet-surface interactions are common to a plethora of natural and industrial processes due to their ability to rapidly exchange energy, mass, and momentum. Droplets are particularly of interest due to their large surface-to-volume ratios and hence enhanced transport properties. For example, coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces has recently received much attention for its potential to enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance by passively shedding microscale water droplets. To study droplet jumping, researchers typically use a two-camera setup to observe the out-of-plane droplet motion, with limited success due to the inability to resolve the depth dimension using two orthogonal cameras. Here we develop a single-camera technique capable of providing three-dimensional (3D) information through the use of focal plane manipulation, termed "focal plane shift imaging" (FPSI). We used FPSI to study the jumping process on superhydrophobic surfaces having a wide range of structure length scales (10 nm droplet radii (3 μm droplet mismatch, multidroplet coalescence, and multihop coalescence on droplet jumping speed. Furthermore, we were able to resolve the full 3D trajectory of multiple jumping events, to show that, unlike previously theorized, the departure angle during droplet jumping is not a function of droplet mismatch or number of droplets coalescing prior to jumping. Rather, angular deviation arises due to in-plane motion postcoalescence governed by droplet pinning. The outcomes of this work both elucidate key fundamental aspects governing droplet jumping and provide a powerful imaging platform for the study of dynamic droplet processes that result in out-of-plane motion such as sliding, coalescence, or impact.

  16. Phospholipid composition and longevity: lessons from Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencak, Teresa G; Ruf, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Membrane fatty acid (FA) composition is correlated with longevity in mammals. The "membrane pacemaker hypothesis of ageing" proposes that animals which cellular membranes contain high amounts of polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) have shorter life spans because their membranes are more susceptible to peroxidation and further oxidative damage. It remains to be shown, however, that long-lived phenotypes such as the Ames dwarf mouse have membranes containing fewer PUFAs and thus being less prone to peroxidation, as would be predicted from the membrane pacemaker hypothesis of ageing. Here, we show that across four different tissues, i.e., muscle, heart, liver and brain as well as in liver mitochondria, Ames dwarf mice possess membrane phospholipids containing between 30 and 60 % PUFAs (depending on the tissue), which is similar to PUFA contents of their normal-sized, short-lived siblings. However, we found that that Ames dwarf mice membrane phospholipids were significantly poorer in n-3 PUFAs. While lack of a difference in PUFA contents is contradicting the membrane pacemaker hypothesis, the lower n-3 PUFAs content in the long-lived mice provides some support for the membrane pacemaker hypothesis of ageing, as n-3 PUFAs comprise those FAs being blamed most for causing oxidative damage. By comparing tissue composition between 1-, 2- and 6-month-old mice in both phenotypes, we found that membranes differed both in quantity of PUFAs and in the prevalence of certain PUFAs. In sum, membrane composition in the Ames dwarf mouse supports the concept that tissue FA composition is related to longevity.

  17. On the characteristics of the wet deposition process using radon as a tracer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Daisuke, Kondo; Motokiyo, Matsuda; Hirao, Shigekazu; Moriizumi, Jun; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2014-07-01

    A quantitatively characterised atmospheric process can provide important information on a variety of atmospheric models and help one to understand the deposition process in the atmosphere. In this study, the total activity concentrations of 214Pb and 214Bi and the activity ratios of 214Bi/214Pb in collected rain samples were measured by two-inch well-type NaI(Tl) detectors. Observed precipitations were classified by the origins of their air mass (continental/maritime) and their meteorological conditions (cold/warm front, high/low pressure). The result shows that (1) when the air mass passed over the continent of Asia 5 d prior to the precipitation, the activity concentration of radon decay products in the rainwater tended to be higher than when the air mass passed over from the Pacific Ocean; (2) higher activity concentrations were more frequently observed in precipitations accompanied with a cold front than warm/stationary front; (3) in general, the activity ratios of 214Bi/214Pb decrease with increase in rain intensity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei

    2015-04-20

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  19. Polymer-based doping control for performance enhancement of wet-processed short-channel CNTFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Martin; Schubel, René; Claus, Martin; Jordan, Rainer; Schulz, Stefan E.; Hermann, Sascha

    2018-01-01

    The electrical transport properties of short-channel transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) are significantly affected by bundling along with solution processing. We report that especially high off currents of CNT transistors are not only related to the incorporation of metallic CNTs but also to the incorporation of CNT bundles. By applying device passivation with poly(4-vinylpyridine), the impact of CNT bundling on the device performance can be strongly reduced due to increased gate efficiency as well as reduced oxygen and water-induced p-type doping, boosting essential field-effect transistor performance parameters by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, this passivation approach allows the hysteresis and threshold voltage of CNT transistors to be tuned.

  20. Impact of wet-oxidized Al2O3/AlGaN interface on AlGaN/GaN 2-DEGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meer, Mudassar; Majety, Sridhar; Takhar, Kuldeep; Ganguly, Swaroop; Saha, Dipankar

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the impact of wet-oxidation of AlGaN in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure by selectively probing the metal/AlGaN interface. The two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) characteristics show improved mobility with increasing oxidation time and Al2O3 thickness. The change is attributed to an interplay of the interface trap density (D it) and the oxide thickness. D it is found to reduce progressively for thicker gate oxides as determined by selectively probing the Al2O3/AlGaN interface and employing frequency dependent capacitance and conductance spectroscopy on these devices. The energies of the interface traps are found to be in the range of 0.35-0.45 eV below the conduction band edge. The D it is found to reduce from 2 × 1013 cm-2 eV-1 for 2.3 nm of Al2O3 to 5 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 for 16 nm of Al2O3. Contrary to the earlier reports of increased 2-DEG electron density, the primary advantage is found to be a reduction in Dit leading to an increased electron mobility from 1730 to 2800 cm2V-1s-1.

  1. Recent studies of uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.

    1978-01-01

    Commercial OPAP is a complex mixture that contains at least 11 components. Octyl phenol is the principal impurity. Commercial OPAP contains readily-hydrolyzable material. The concentrations of octyl phenol and an unidentified impurity increase in the hydrolyzed product. Uranium extraction power is decreased slightly by hydrolysis of the reagent. Four major problems were encountered in continuous stability tests: (1) Microemulsion or micelle formation--loss of organic phase into phosphoric acid. We do not have a solution to this problem at this time. It could involve alteration of the organic, e.g., adding a modifier, changing the reagent structure, or changing the diluent. (2) Reagent poisoning--reduction of uranium extraction and interference with organic titrations by material extracted from the acid. Additional work is needed to identify the poisoning material or materials. It can then be removed if it originates in the phosphate rock, or avoided if it originates in chemicals added during processing. (3) Crystallization with iron--loss of both major components of the reagent as a complex with ferric iron. We believe this problem can be controlled by controlling the ferric iron concentration in the phosphoric acid. (4) MOPPA distribution loss--a selective loss to the aqueous phase. We believe this can be minimized by controlling the iron concentration of the phosphoric acid. The iron concentration will need to be kept low enough to avoid reagent crystallization and high enough to avoid MOPPA distribution loss. 15 figs

  2. Unexpected 226Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lardinoye, M.H.; Weterings, K.; Berg, W.B. van de

    1982-01-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filters. This higher radiation level is caused by radium which is present in very low concentrations in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works have since been determined. In all factories the filter part and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of barium sulphate and calcium sulphate with a higher radium concentration is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the barium sulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal contamination in cleaning operations by radioactive intake or inhalation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning the equipment in which the radioactive scaling is formed. (author)

  3. Unexpected /sup 226/Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lardinoye, M.H.; Weterings, K. (Stamicarbon B.V., Geleen (Netherlands)); van de Berg, W.B. (Unie van Kunstmestfabrieken, Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1982-04-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filters. This higher radiation level is caused by radium which is present in very low concentrations in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works have since been determined. In all factories the filter part and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of barium sulphate and calcium sulphate with a higher radium concentration is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the barium sulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal contamination in cleaning operations by radioactive intake or inhalation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning the equipment in which the radioactive scaling is formed.

  4. Unexpected 226Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardinoye, M H; Weterings, K; van de Berg, W B

    1982-04-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filtres. This higher radiation level is caused by radium, which, as a decay product in the 238U series, is present in very low concentrations (1-50 pCi 226R/g) in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Specific research later on established that there were detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works as well. It turned out that in all factories the filter part, and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation-level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of bariumsulphate and calciumsulphate with a higher radiumconcentration (+/- 0.1 Ci/g) is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the bariumsulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal pollution, for example in cleaning operations by radio-active intake or inhallation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning (every 1-3 yr) the equipment in which the radio-active scaling is formed.

  5. Unexpected /sup 226/Ra build-up in wet-process phosphoric-acid plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lardinoye, M.H.; Weterings, K.; van de Berg, W.B.

    1982-04-01

    During an investigation of the distribution of radium and uranium over the different process streams in phosphoric-acid production and in the nitrophosphate route, a higher than average radiation level was detected in the vicinity of some piping and vessels near the gypsum filtres. This higher radiation level is caused by radium, which, as a decay product in the /sup 238/U series, is present in very low concentrations (1-50 pCi 226R/g) in the phosphates used for fertilizer production. Specific research later on established that there were detectable radiation levels around vessels and piping in other phosphoric-acid works as well. It turned out that in all factories the filter part, and especially the washing-acid section showed the highest radiation-level. In the piping of the gypsum filter, through which the washing acid is discharged, a scaling of bariumsulfate and calciumsulfate with a higher radium concentration (+/- 0.1 Ci/g) is formed. The radium ions appeared to be incorporated in the bariumsulphate lattice, hence the solubility of the radium precipitate is very low. The danger of internal pollution, for example in cleaning operations by radioactive intake or inhalation of radon is very small in the cases described. The risk of external radiation can be prevented by periodically cleaning (every 1-3 yr) the equipment in which the radioactive scaling is formed.

  6. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  7. Mitochondrial electron transport chain functions in long-lived Ames dwarf mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choksi, Kashyap B.; Nuss, Jonathan E.; DeFord, James H.; Papaconstantinou, John

    2011-01-01

    The age-associated decline in tissue function has been attributed to ROS-mediated oxidative damage due to mitochondrial dysfunction. The long-lived Ames dwarf mouse exhibits resistance to oxidative stress, a physiological characteristic of longevity. It is not known, however, whether there are differences in the electron transport chain (ETC) functions in Ames tissues that are associated with their longevity. In these studies we analyzed enzyme activities of ETC complexes, CI-CV and the coupled CI-CII and CII-CIII activities of mitochondria from several tissues of young, middle aged and old Ames dwarf mice and their corresponding wild type controls to identify potential mitochondrial prolongevity functions. Our studies indicate that post-mitotic heart and skeletal muscle from Ames and wild-type mice show similar changes in ETC complex activities with aging, with the exception of complex IV. Furthermore, the kidney, a slowly proliferating tissue, shows dramatic differences in ETC functions unique to the Ames mice. Our data show that there are tissue specific mitochondrial functions that are characteristic of certain tissues of the long-lived Ames mouse. We propose that this may be a factor in the determination of extended lifespan of dwarf mice. PMID:21934186

  8. Campylobacter in Broiler Chicken and Broiler Meat in Sri Lanka: Influence of Semi-Automated vs. Wet Market Processing on Campylobacter Contamination of Broiler Neck Skin Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottawattage S. A. Kottawatta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Broiler meat can become contaminated with Campylobacter of intestinal origin during processing. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks and meat contamination at retail shops, and determine the influence of semi-automated and wet market processing on Campylobacter contamination of neck skin samples. Samples were collected from semi-automated plants (n = 102 and wet markets (n = 25. From each batch of broilers, pooled caecal samples and neck skin samples were tested for Campylobacter. Broiler meat purchased from retail outlets (n = 37 was also tested. The prevalence of Campylobacter colonized broiler flocks was 67%. The contamination of meat at retail was 59%. Both semi-automated and wet market processing resulted to contaminate the broiler neck skins to the levels of 27.4% and 48%, respectively. When Campylobacter-free broiler flocks were processed in semi-automated facilities 15% (5/33 of neck skin samples became contaminated by the end of processing whereas 25% (2/8 became contaminated after wet market processing. Characterization of isolates revealed a higher proportion of C. coli compared to C. jejuni. Higher proportions of isolates were resistant to important antimicrobials. This study shows the importance of Campylobacter in poultry industry in Sri Lanka and the need for controlling antimicrobial resistance.

  9. Campylobacter in Broiler Chicken and Broiler Meat in Sri Lanka: Influence of Semi-Automated vs. Wet Market Processing on Campylobacter Contamination of Broiler Neck Skin Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottawatta, Kottawattage S A; Van Bergen, Marcel A P; Abeynayake, Preeni; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Veldman, Kees T; Kalupahana, Ruwani S

    2017-11-29

    Broiler meat can become contaminated with Campylobacter of intestinal origin during processing. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks and meat contamination at retail shops, and determine the influence of semi-automated and wet market processing on Campylobacter contamination of neck skin samples. Samples were collected from semi-automated plants ( n = 102) and wet markets ( n = 25). From each batch of broilers, pooled caecal samples and neck skin samples were tested for Campylobacter . Broiler meat purchased from retail outlets ( n = 37) was also tested. The prevalence of Campylobacter colonized broiler flocks was 67%. The contamination of meat at retail was 59%. Both semi-automated and wet market processing resulted to contaminate the broiler neck skins to the levels of 27.4% and 48%, respectively. When Campylobacter -free broiler flocks were processed in semi-automated facilities 15% (5/33) of neck skin samples became contaminated by the end of processing whereas 25% (2/8) became contaminated after wet market processing. Characterization of isolates revealed a higher proportion of C. coli compared to C. jejuni . Higher proportions of isolates were resistant to important antimicrobials. This study shows the importance of Campylobacter in poultry industry in Sri Lanka and the need for controlling antimicrobial resistance.

  10. Campylobacter in Broiler Chicken and Broiler Meat in Sri Lanka: Influence of Semi-Automated vs. Wet Market Processing on Campylobacter Contamination of Broiler Neck Skin Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottawatta, Kottawattage S. A.; Van Bergen, Marcel A. P.; Abeynayake, Preeni; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Veldman, Kees T.; Kalupahana, Ruwani S.

    2017-01-01

    Broiler meat can become contaminated with Campylobacter of intestinal origin during processing. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks and meat contamination at retail shops, and determine the influence of semi-automated and wet market processing on Campylobacter contamination of neck skin samples. Samples were collected from semi-automated plants (n = 102) and wet markets (n = 25). From each batch of broilers, pooled caecal samples and neck skin samples were tested for Campylobacter. Broiler meat purchased from retail outlets (n = 37) was also tested. The prevalence of Campylobacter colonized broiler flocks was 67%. The contamination of meat at retail was 59%. Both semi-automated and wet market processing resulted to contaminate the broiler neck skins to the levels of 27.4% and 48%, respectively. When Campylobacter-free broiler flocks were processed in semi-automated facilities 15% (5/33) of neck skin samples became contaminated by the end of processing whereas 25% (2/8) became contaminated after wet market processing. Characterization of isolates revealed a higher proportion of C. coli compared to C. jejuni. Higher proportions of isolates were resistant to important antimicrobials. This study shows the importance of Campylobacter in poultry industry in Sri Lanka and the need for controlling antimicrobial resistance. PMID:29186018

  11. Wet process of phosphoric acid purification by solvent extraction using tri-n-butyl phosphate and cyclohexanol mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction is an efficient, economical and widely-used technology for the purification of wet process phosphoric acid (WPA. This present work focused on the development of a solvent extraction system, TC, representing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP and cyclohexanol mixtures. The equilibrium phase diagram of the system H3PO4−H2O−TC at 298.2 K and atmospheric pressure was obtained. The effects of extraction time, phosphoric acid concentration, extractant concentration, temperature and phase volume ratio on extraction efficiency were studied. The extracted complexes were estimated to be 1.8H3PO4 2TC. The extraction process of H3PO4 was exothermic and the enthalpy change, ΔH, was obtained. The solvent mixtures had a high efficiency for phosphoric acid purification via multi-stage counter-current extraction from the industrial WPA in a reciprocating plate extraction column with an H3PO4 extraction yield of 85.08 % at 313.2 K. The stability, extraction efficiency and recycling capability of TC for H3PO4 extraction were also estimated.

  12. Oxidative processes in power plant oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forlerer, Elena; Zambrano, Debora N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the chemical properties differences between thermal-oxidation and radioactive-oxidation in turbine oils in order to estimate the oils' Service Life. The oils were Turbine R type, provided by Repsol-YPF with only few additives such as: anti rust, antioxidant, anticorrosion and without viscosity index improvers. The oils were ISO 32 and ISO 68 grade -with viscosity index 95- and API (American Petroleum Institute) group I, due to its viscosity index (95), the percent of paraffinic component ( 0.03%). Different samples from the heavy water main pumps were collected with different service times and radiation fields during an Embalse NPP's outage. For comparison purposes oils from feedwater pumps systems that convey light water to the steam generators in the Turbine building -without radiation- were obtained. The properties studied by ASTM standards were: colour (visual inspection), Viscosity Index VI (ASTM D227/93), viscosity at 40 C degrees (ASTM D445/96) and Total Acid Number, TAN (ASTM D974-97). Oxidative degradation of base oils could be described by two successive mechanisms that allow the definition of two stages: Primary and Secondary Oxidation. Primary oxidation begins with the thermal generation of alkylation's reactions and acid products formation. Radiation damage operates by two mechanisms: scission and cross-linking. The first one generates free radicals of low molecular weight while the other one can build-up complex molecular networks with high or low solubility in the base oil. Moreover, radiation damage destroys additives molecules and generates colour centres different from oxidative colour modification. Due to scission and cross-linking alkyl group substitution in the aromatic rings are formed. Then, radiation acts as a precursor of Primary Oxidation. Both, thermal and radioactive, damage mechanisms can act simultaneously making the isolated analysis for each one very difficult. To manage it, a Relative Damage Index (RDI) has been

  13. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH4)2S2O8 for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yang; Ye, Gang; Chen, Jing; Lv, Dachao; Wang, Jianchen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in C−O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  14. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yang [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Ye, Gang, E-mail: yegang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Waste Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Jing [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Waste Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lv, Dachao [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Wang, Jianchen, E-mail: wangjianchen@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Beijing Key Lab of Radioactive Waste Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in C−O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  15. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting

  16. INVESTIGATIONS ON SEWAGE TREATMENT PROCESS USING COMBINED BIO-OXIDIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Jaromsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on process of aerobic waste water treatment with combined bio-oxidizers at milk processing enterprises. It has been shown that attached biocenosis, free-floating biocenosis and also bio-module rotation frequency  have exerted a significant influence on the process of an aerobic sewage treatment. It has been established that combined bio-oxidizers can be used for cleaning high concentrated waste water at the enterprises of food industry.

  17. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Wang, Guangtao; Møller, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops. The ...... crops competitive to the use of corn and this combination will make the production of biogas from energy crops more sustainable.......Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops....... The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet...

  18. Iron oxides and their applications in catalytic processes: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luiz C. A.; Fabris, José D.; Pereira, Márcio C.

    2013-01-01

    A review of most of the reported studies on the use of iron oxides as catalyst in specific processes, namely Haber-Bosch reaction, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, Fenton oxidation and photolytic molecular splitting of water to produce gaseous hydrogen, was carried out. An essential overview is thus presented, intending to address the fundamental meaning, as well as the corresponding chemical mechanisms, and perspectives on new technological potentialities of natural and synthetic iron oxides, more...

  19. Indium oxide octahedrons based on sol–gel process enhance room temperature gas sensing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Xiaohui; Chen, Changlong; Han, Liuyuan; Shao, Baiqi; Wei, Yuling; Liu, Qinglong; Zhu, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In 2 O 3 octahedron films are prepared based on sol–gel technique for the first time. • The preparation possesses merits of low temperature, catalyst-free and large production. • It was found that the spin-coating process in film fabrication was key to achieve the octahedrons. • The In 2 O 3 octahedrons could significantly enhance room temperature NO 2 gas sensing performance. - Abstract: Indium oxide octahedrons were prepared on glass substrates through a mild route based on sol–gel technique. The preparation possesses characteristics including low temperature, catalyst-free and large production, which is much distinguished from the chemical-vapor-deposition based methods that usually applied to prepare indium oxide octahedrons. Detailed characterization revealed that the indium oxide octahedrons were single crystalline, with {1 1 1} crystal facets exposed. It was found that the spin-coating technique was key for achieving the indium oxide crystals with octahedron morphology. The probable formation mechanism of the indium oxide octahedrons was proposed based on the experiment results. Room temperature NO 2 gas sensing measurements exhibited that the indium oxide octahedrons could significantly enhance the sensing performance in comparison with the plate-like indium oxide particles that prepared from the dip-coated gel films, which was attributed to the abundant sharp edges and tips as well as the special {1 1 1} crystal facets exposed that the former possessed. Such a simple wet-chemical based method to prepare indium oxide octahedrons with large-scale production is promising to provide the advanced materials that can be applied in wide fields like gas sensing, solar energy conversion, field emission, and so on

  20. Highly efficient ultraviolet photodetectors based on TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal-polymer composites via wet processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Yangang; Wu Gang; Li Haiguo; Wang Mang; Chen Hongzheng, E-mail: wmang@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: hzchen@zju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization of Ministry of Education, State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2010-05-07

    Solution-processed inorganic/organic hybrid films based on anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals and poly (9,9-dihexylfluorene) (PFH) are fabricated via a simple spin-coating method and characterized by atomic force microscopy, UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence spectra. The photodetector devices are made from hybrid TiO{sub 2}/PFH bulk heterojunction films sandwiched between poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) pre-coated ITO and Al electrodes. The device characteristics, including current-voltage (I-V) curves under UV illumination, spectral response, response time and bias dependence, are studied. The photovoltaic effect is observed and the photocurrent shows an increase with increasing TiO{sub 2} content from 2.5 to 11 wt%. The high UV photo-to-dark current ratio of 10{sup 3}, fast response time less than 200 ms and a responsivity of 54.6 mA W{sup -1} are obtained for the hybrid photodetector. The fast photoresponse is attributed to the enhanced interfacial dissociation of excitons. The overlap of the spectral response with the UV-A range (320-400 nm) and the low-cost wet fabrication method show their potential for environmental and biological uses.

  1. Preparation of Scandium-Doped, Textured, M-Type Barium Ferrite via a Wet Magnetizing Orientation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Yingli; Zhang, Huaiwu; Li, Jie; Gao, Liwen; Chen, Daming; Chen, Yong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a wet magnetizing orientation process was applied to synthesize c-axis-textured, M-type barium ferrite (BaFe12O19 or BaM), which is widely used to produce hard magnetic materials. To modify the magnetic properties of the BaM ferrite and make it suitable for certain operating frequencies, Sc3+ was substituted into Fe3+ sites of the BaM crystal structure. A BaSc x Fe12- x O19 ferrite with a typical relative density of ˜ 75% was successfully obtained. We used x-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, and a vibrating sample magnetometer to obtain phase information, detail of the microstructure, and magnetic properties of the BaSc x Fe12- x O19, respectively. The composition BaSc x Fe12- x O19 ( x = 0.1) featured a superior squareness ratio of ˜ 67% and a saturation magnetization ( M S) of ˜ 5300 Gauss in magnetic hysteresis loop measurements. These features match well with requirements for self-biased passive devices. Moreover, the site preference of Sc3+ in the hexagonal crystal structure was investigated.

  2. Output-oriented analysis of the wet mechanical processing of polyolefin-rich waste for feedstock recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzinger, Lukas; Pomberger, Roland; Schwabl, Daniel; Flachberger, Helmut; Bauer, Markus; Lehner, Markus; Hofer, Wolfgang

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have revealed that plastics and their components (e.g. plasticisers) pose an environmental risk. However, it is hard to imagine how our industrialised society could do without these materials, since the fields of application are manifold. One possible approach to tackle this mounting problem is the implementation of a comprehensive and well-functioning collection and recycling system. An international comparison shows that only a small proportion of the total plastics in circulation is collected and recycled. The investigations conducted under the present research project, 'Plastic Reborn', focused on both identification and analysis of the discharge paths of polyolefin-rich waste streams, under the Austrian waste management system. Another objective was determining the utilisation potential of the output fractions of these polyolefin-rich waste streams, generated from a wet mechanical processing pilot plant. Experiments have shown that the polyolefins are successfully separated from the waste streams and that a total polyolefin potential of 429,000 t y -1 remains unexploited in the Austrian waste management system. Thus, these separated plastic fractions can make a significant contribution to the implementation of the European Circular Economy Directive. The residual fractions meet the legal and company-specific requirements for their use as solid recovered fuels in co-combustion plants.

  3. Characterization of a calcium phosphate cement based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate obtained by wet precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurmer, M.B.; Diehl, C.E.; Vieira, R.S.; Coelho, W.T.G.; Santos, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    There are several systems of calcium phosphate cements being studied. Those based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate are of particular interest. After setting they produce calcium deficient hydroxyapatite similar to bone like hydroxyapatite. This work aims to obtain alpha-tricalcium phosphate powders by the wet precipitation process, using calcium nitrate and phosphoric acid as reagents. This powder was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. In order to prepare the calcium phosphate cement, the powder was mixed with an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The mechanical properties of the cement were assessed and it was evaluated by means of apparent density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The described method produced crystalline alpha-tricalcium phosphate as the major phase. The calcium phosphate cement showed high values of compression strength (50 MPa). The soaking of the cement in a simulated body fluid (SBF) formed a layer of hydroxyapatite like crystals in the surface of the samples. (author)

  4. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  5. Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yingyu; Ye, Liu; Pan, Yuting; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment plants vary substantially between plants, ranging from negligible to substantial (a few per cent of the total nitrogen load), probably because of different designs and operational conditions. In general, plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen removal emit less N2O, indicating that no compromise is required between high water quality and lower N2O emissions. N2O emissions primarily occur in aerated zones/compartments/periods owing to active stripping, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers, are the main contributors. However, the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, despite strong evidence suggesting that both nitrifier denitrification and the chemical breakdown of intermediates of hydroxylamine oxidation are probably involved. With increased understanding of the fundamental reactions responsible for N2O production in wastewater treatment systems and the conditions that stimulate their occurrence, reduction of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems through improved plant design and operation will be achieved in the near future. PMID:22451112

  6. Recovery of phosphorus and aluminium from sewage sludge ash by a new wet chemical elution process (SESAL-Phos-recovery process).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzet, S; Peplinski, B; Bodkhe, S Y; Cornel, P

    2011-01-01

    The potential of a new wet chemical process for phosphorus and aluminium recovery from sewage sludge ash by sequential elution with acidic and alkaline solutions has been investigated: SESAL-Phos (sequential elution of sewage sludge ash for aluminium and phosphorus recovery). Its most innovative aspect is an acidic pre-treatment step in which calcium is leached from the sewage sludge ash. Thus the percentage of alkaline soluble aluminium phosphates is increased from 20 to 67%. This aluminium phosphate is then dissolved in alkali. Subsequently, the dissolved phosphorus is precipitated as calcium phosphate with low heavy metal content and recovered from the alkaline solution. Dissolved aluminium is recovered and may be reused as a precipitant in wastewater treatment plants.

  7. Ce1-xFexO2 nanocatalysts for priority organic pollutants removal through catalytic wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushree

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of Ce1-xFexO2 nanocatalysts, prepared by co-precipitation method, were applied for the catalytic oxidation of priority organic pollutants present in paper industry wastewater. To investigate the synergic effect of various Fe contents, detailed characterizations of Ce1-xFexO2 were done by Raman, XPS, XRD, TEM and EDX techniques. The addition of Fe to CeO2 lattice increased the amount of oxygen vacancies, which have an efficient role in the oxidation of organic pollutants under oxygen-rich conditions. Ce0.4Fe0.6O2 catalyst showed the highest removal of TOC (72%, AOX (68%, chlorophenols (62% and chloroguaicols (86%. The superior catalytic activity of Ce0.4Fe0.6O2 is ascribed to its higher oxygen vacancy concentration. The presence of two oxidation states of Ce (4+,3+ and Fe (3+,2+ confirmed the role of redox couples in oxidation of organic pollutants.

  8. Do Ames dwarf and calorie-restricted mice share common effects on age-related pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ikeno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1996, aging studies using several strains of long-lived mutant mice have been conducted. Among these studies, Ames dwarf mice have been extensively examined to seek clues regarding the role of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis in the aging process. Interestingly, these projects demonstrate that Ames dwarf mice have physiological characteristics that are similar to those seen with calorie restriction, which has been the most effective experimental manipulation capable of extending lifespan in various species. However, this introduces the question of whether Ames dwarf and calorie-restricted (CR mice have an extended lifespan through common or independent pathways. To answer this question, we compared the disease profiles of Ames dwarf mice to their normal siblings fed either ad libitum (AL or a CR diet. Our findings show that the changes in age-related diseases between AL-fed Ames dwarf mice and CR wild-type siblings were similar but not identical. Moreover, the effects of CR on age-related pathology showed similarities and differences between Ames dwarf mice and their normal siblings, indicating that calorie restriction and Ames dwarf mice exhibit their anti-aging effects through both independent and common mechanisms.

  9. Carbon contaminant in the ion processing of aluminum oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaug, Y.; Roy, N.

    1989-01-01

    Ion processing can induce contamination on the bombarded surface. However, this process is essential for the microelectronics device fabrication. Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to study the simultaneous deposition of carbon impurity during ion bombardment of magnetron rf-sputtering deposited aluminum oxide film. Ion bombardment on aluminum oxide results in a preferential removal of surface oxygen and a formation of a metastable state of aluminum suboxide. Cosputtered implanted carbon contaminant appears to have formed a new state of stoichiometry on the surface of the ion bombarded aluminum oxide and existed as an aluminum carbide. This phase has formed due to the interaction of the implanted carbon and the aluminum suboxide. The Ar + ion sputter etching rate is reduced for the carbon contaminated oxide. The electrical resistance of the aluminum oxide between two gold strips has been measured. It is found that the electrical resistance is also reduced due to the formation of the new stoichiometry on the surface

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of synthetic CoS oxidation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štrbac N.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of kinetics and mechanism for synthetic a-CoS oxidation process are presented in this paper. Based on experimental data obtained using DTA and XRD analysis and constructed PSD diagrams for Co-S-O system, mechanism of synthetic a-CoS oxidation process is suggested. Characteristic kinetic parameters were obtained for experimental isothermal investigations of desulfurization degree using Sharp method.

  11. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus......, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes...... for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission....

  12. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  13. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for "realistic" surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH3-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is - apart from a slight change in surface composition - identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  14. Degradation of cationic red GTL by catalytic wet air oxidation over Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst under room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin; Li, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Xiang; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Xueye

    2012-03-06

    To overcome the drawback of catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with high temperature and high pressure, the catalytic activity of Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst for degradation of cationic red GTL under room temperature and atmospheric pressure was investigated. Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst was prepared by coprecipitation and impregnation. XRD, TG-DTG, and XPS were used to characterize the resulting sample. Central composition design using response surface methodology was employed to optimize correlation of factors on the decolorization of cationic red GTL. The results show that the optimal conditions of pH value, initial concentration of dye and catalyst dosage were found to be 4.0, 85 mg/L and 2.72 g/L, respectively, for maximum decolorization of 80.1% and TOC removal of 50.9%. Furthermore, the reaction on the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst and degradation mechanism of cationic red GTL was studied by Electron spin resonance (ESR) and GC-MS technique. The possible reaction mechanism was that the Mo-Zn-Al-O catalyst can efficiently react with adsorbed oxygen/H(2)O to produce ·OH and (1)O(2) and finally induce the degradation of cationic red GTL. GC-MS analysis of the degradation products indicates that cationic red GTL was initiated by the cleavage of -N ═ N- and the intermediates were further oxidized by ·OH or (1)O(2).

  15. Improved method for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon in natural water by silver filter filtration, wet chemical oxidation, and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Brenton, Ronald W.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virenda K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1999-01-01

    Precision and accuracy are reported for the first time for the analysis of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by silver membrane filtration followed by wet chemical oxidation. A water sample is pressure filtered through a 0.45‐μm‐pore‐size, 47‐mm‐diameter silver membrane filter. The silver membrane filter then is cut into ribbons and placed in a flame‐sealable glass ampule. The organic material trapped on the membrane filter strips is acidified, purged with oxygen to remove inorganic carbonates and volatile organic compounds, and oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in the sealed glass ampule. The resulting CO2 is measured by a nondispersive infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO2 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the environmental water sample. The quantitation and method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 mg/L. The average percent recovery in five representative matrices was 97 ± 11%. The errors associated with sampling and sample preparation of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon are also described.

  16. Development of a process map: A step towards a regime map for steady-state high shear wet twin screw granulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Dhondt, Jens; Vercruysse, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    Twin-screw granulation is an emerging continuous granulation technique in the pharmaceutical industry. The flexibility in process settings such as the binder addition method (wet vs. dry), screw configuration, screw speed and material throughput allows to modify the granule size and shape. However......, twin-screw granulation, being a rather new granulation technique, is not yet as well understood as batch-wise high shear wet granulation. Furthermore, most of the studies performed on twin-screw granulation are limited to a certain design and scale of the twin-screw granulator. In this study, in order...... to improve the understanding about the granulation process and to comprehend the applicability and limits of the process variables in a scale independent manner, the regime theory was applied to one specific twin-screw granulator equipment In this study, a-lactose monohydrate was granulated...

  17. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  18. Costs of the electrochemical oxidation of wastewaters: a comparison with ozonation and Fenton oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañizares, Pablo; Paz, Rubén; Sáez, Cristina; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2009-01-01

    In the work described here the technical and economic feasibilities of three Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) have been studied: Conductive-Diamond Electrochemical Oxidation (CDEO), Ozonation and Fenton oxidation. The comparison was made by assessing the three technologies with synthetic wastewaters polluted with different types of organic compounds and also with actual wastes (from olive oil mills and from a fine-chemical manufacturing plant). All three technologies were able to treat the wastes, but very different results were obtained in terms of efficiency and mineralization. Only CDEO could achieve complete mineralization of the pollutants for all the wastes. However, the efficiencies were found to depend on the concentration of pollutant (mass transfer control of the oxidation rate). Results obtained in the oxidation with ozone (at pH 12) or by Fenton's reagent were found to depend on the nature of the pollutants, and significant concentrations of oxidation-refractory compounds were usually accumulated during the treatment. Within the discharge limits that all of the technologies can reach, the economic analysis shows that the operating cost of Fenton oxidation is lower than either CDEO or ozonation, although CD\\EO can compete satisfactorily with the Fenton process in the treatment of several kinds of wastes. Likewise, the investment cost for the ozonation process seems to be higher than either CDEO or Fenton oxidation, regardless of the pollutant treated.

  19. Recovery of polypropylene and polyethylene from packaging plastic wastes without contamination of chlorinated plastic films by the combination process of wet gravity separation and ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Mallampati Srinivasa; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2011-08-01

    Wet gravity separation technique has been regularly practiced to separate the polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) (light plastic films) from chlorinated plastic films (CP films) (heavy plastic films). The CP films including poly vinyl chloride (PVC) and poly vinylidene chloride (PVDC) would float in water even though its density is more than 1.0g/cm(3). This is because films are twisted in which air is sometimes entrapped inside the twisted CP films in real existing recycling plant. The present research improves the current process in separating the PP and PE from plastic packaging waste (PPW), by reducing entrapped air and by increasing the hydrophilicity of the CP films surface with ozonation. The present research also measures the hydrophilicity of the CP films. In ozonation process mixing of artificial films up to 10min reduces the contact angle from 78° to 62°, and also increases the hydrophilicity of CP films. The previous studies also performed show that the artificial PVDC films easily settle down by the same. The effect of ozonation after the wet gravity separation on light PPW films obtained from an actual PPW recycling plant was also evaluated. Although actual light PPW films contained 1.3% of CP films however in present case all the CP films were removed from the PPW films as a settled fraction in the combination process of ozonation and wet gravity separation. The combination process of ozonation and wet gravity separation is the more beneficial process in recovering of high purity PP and PE films from the PPW films. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Unexpected toxicity to aquatic organisms of some aqueous bisphenol A samples treated by advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišler, Tatjana; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Şenilă, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, photocatalytic and catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) processes were used to examine removal efficiency of bisphenol A from aqueous samples over several titanate nanotube-based catalysts. Unexpected toxicity of bisphenol A (BPA) samples treated by means of the CWAO process to some tested species was determined. In addition, the CWAO effluent was recycled five- or 10-fold in order to increase the number of interactions between the liquid phase and catalyst. Consequently, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis indicated higher concentrations of some toxic metals like chromium, nickel, molybdenum, silver, and zinc in the recycled samples in comparison to both the single-pass sample and the photocatalytically treated solution. The highest toxicity of five- and 10-fold recycled solutions in the CWAO process was observed in water fleas, which could be correlated to high concentrations of chromium, nickel, and silver detected in tested samples. The obtained results clearly demonstrated that aqueous samples treated by means of advanced oxidation processes should always be analyzed using (i) chemical analyses to assess removal of BPA and total organic carbon from treated aqueous samples, as well as (ii) a battery of aquatic organisms from different taxonomic groups to determine possible toxicity.

  1. Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zhao Yimin; Xia Yongde; Zhu Yanqiu; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-thin W 18 O 49 nanowires were initially obtained by a simple solvothermal method using tungsten chloride and cyclohexanol as precursors. Thermal processing of the resulting bundled nanowires has been carried out in air in a tube furnace. The morphology and phase transformation behavior of the as-synthesized nanowires as a function of annealing temperature have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The nanostructured bundles underwent a series of morphological evolution with increased annealing temperature, becoming straighter, larger in diameter, and smaller in aspect ratio, eventually becoming irregular particles with size up to 5 μm. At 500 deg. C, the monoclinic W 18 O 49 was completely transformed to monoclinic WO 3 phase, which remains stable at high processing temperature. After thermal processing at 400 deg. C and 450 deg. C, the specific surface areas of the resulting nanowires dropped to 110 m 2 g -1 and 66 m 2 g -1 respectively, compared with that of 151 m 2 g -1 for the as-prepared sample. This study may shed light on the understanding of the geometrical and structural evolution occurring in nanowires whose working environment may involve severe temperature variations

  2. Oxidizing attack process of uranium ore by a carbonated liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Pierre; Nicolas, Francois.

    1981-01-01

    A continuous process for digesting a uraniferous ore by oxidation with a recycling aqueous liquor containing alkaline carbonates and bicarbonates in solution as well as uranium in a concentration close to its solubility limit at digestion temperature, and of recuperation of the precipitated uranium within the solid phase remaining after digestion. The digestion is carried out by spraying oxygen into the hot reactional medium in order not only to permit oxidation of the uranium and its solubilization but also to ensure that the sulphides of impurities and organic substances present in the ore are oxidized [fr

  3. The granule porosity controls the loss of compactibility for both dry- and wet-processed cellulose granules but at different rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Josefina; Alderborn, Göran

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of porosity on the compression behavior and tablet tensile strength for granules produced by a dry granulation procedure. Microcrystalline cellulose was used as a typical pharmaceutical excipient and a comparison was made with the effect of granule porosity on the compression behavior and tablet tensile strength of wet-processed granules of the same composition. Both the wet and dry granulation process caused a loss in compactibility of the material that was controlled by the granule porosity up to a critical point of porosity and friability. Above this threshold value of porosity, the granules nearly collapsed completely into primary particles during compression. In these cases, the micro-structure and tensile strength of the formed tablets resembled that of tablets formed from the original ungranulated powder. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. Characterization of wet pad surface in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process with full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Jung, Sung Pyo; Shin, Jun Geun; Yang, Danning; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2011-07-04

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a key process for global planarization of silicon wafers for semiconductors and AlTiC wafers for magnetic heads. Removal rate of wafer material is directly dependent on the surface roughness of a CMP pad, thus the structure of the pad surface has been evaluated with variable techniques. However, under in situ CMP process, the measurements have been severely limited due to the existence of polishing fluids including the slurry on the pad surface. In here, we newly introduce ultra-high resolution full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) to investigate the surface of wet pads. With FF-OCT, the wet pad surface could be quantitatively characterized in terms of the polishing pad lifetime, and also be three-dimensionally visualized. We found that reasonable polishing span could be evaluated from the surface roughness measurement and the groove depth measurement made by FF-OCT.

  5. Development and Optimization of a Wet Granulation Process at Elevated Temperature for a Poorly Compactible Drug Using Twin Screw Extruder for Continuous Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Anuprabha K; Desai, Divyakant; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance tabletability of a poorly compactible drug, acetaminophen, by wet granulation using twin screw extruder at high temperature. It was desired that there would be minimum amounts of excipients used and the granules obtained after extrusion would be dry and fall within a size range suitable for tableting without any further processing. Mixtures of acetaminophen (95%) with binders (5% povidone or partially pregelatinized starch) were wet granulated through twin screw extruder at 70°C by adding 7% w/w water. The process had a short granulation time (90% granules in the size range of 125 to 1000 μm (granules were compressed by adding 1% disintegrant and 0.5% lubricant extragranularly, tablets produced (93.6% drug load) had good mechanical strength having hardness >1.7 MPa, which was superior to that of tablets prepared by conventional high shear wet granulation. As the granules could be extruded continuously and did not require drying and milling, the method was amenable to continuous processing. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pretreatment of wheat straw using combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis resulting in convertible cellulose and hemicellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Bjerring Olesen, A.; Fernqvist, T.

    1996-01-01

    to 10 min) gave about 85% w/w yield of converting cellulose to glucose. The process water, containing dissolved hemicellulose and carboxylic acids, has proven to be a direct nutrient source for the fungus Aspergillus niger producing exo-beta-xylosidase. Furfural and hydroxymethyl-furfural, known...

  7. Commercial development of a new process of uraniferous ore sintering by pelletizing before dump leaching (wet process) application to a very clayey ore of Nord-Aquitaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videau, G.; Roche, M.

    1990-01-01

    Much of the French uranium ore contains clay of sedimentary origin or derived from the alteration of rocks of the granite type. During a dump leaching operation by a wet process, these clays reduce the percolation rates and sometimes the percolation rates are so low that the very essence of the dump leaching operation can be called in question. This problem arises particularly for the treatment of the ore of Nord-Aquitaine. The results of tests, carried out at the SEPA in Bessines, have shown that after pelletizing clayey ores with sodium silicate in the presence of sulphuric acid for the polymerization of the silicate, the percolation rates were much increased. This new method was successfully applied, from a laboratory column to a pilot dump of 500 tonnes for the very clayey ore of Nord-Aquitaine. This ore of low grade (approx. 1000 ppm of U) seems to be difficult to upgrade by any other method of treatment in the present economic context [fr

  8. Thermal processing and native oxidation of silicon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, Brandon J.; Holm, Jason; Roberts, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to investigate in-air oxidation of silicon nanoparticles ca. 11 nm in diameter. Particle samples were prepared first by extracting them from an RF plasma synthesis reactor, and then heating them in an inert carrier gas stream. The resulting particles had varying surface hydrogen coverages and relative amounts of SiH x (x = 1, 2, and 3), depending on the temperature to which they had been heated. The particles were allowed to oxidize in-air for several weeks. FTIR, XPS, and EELS analyses that were performed during this period clearly establish that adsorbed hydrogen retards oxidation, although in complex ways. In particular, particles that have been heated to intermediate hydrogen coverages oxidize more slowly in air than do freshly generated particles that have a much higher hydrogen content. In addition, the loss of surface hydride species at high processing temperatures results in fast initial oxidation and the formation of a self-limiting oxide layer. Analogous measurements made on deuterium-covered particles show broadly similar behavior; i.e., that oxidation is the slowest at some intermediate coverage of adsorbed deuterium.

  9. Process for removal of sulfur oxides from hot gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauerle, G. L.; Kohl, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from two gas streams containing the same. One gas stream is introduced into a spray dryer zone and contacted with a finely dispersed spray of an aqueous medium containing an absorbent for sulfur oxides. The aqueous medium is introduced at a controlled rate so as to provide water to the gas in an amount to produce a cooled product gas having a temperature at least 7 0 C. above its adiabatic saturation temperature and from about 125-300% of the stoichiometric amount of absorbent required to react with the sulfur oxides to be removed from the gas stream. The effluent from the spray dryer zone comprises a gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and contains entrained dry particulate reaction products including unreacted absorbent. This gas stream is then introduced into a particulate removal zone from which is withdrawn a gas stream substantially free of particles and having a reduced sulfur oxide content. the dry particulate reaction products are collected and utilized as a source of absorbent for a second aqueous scrubbing medium containing unreacted absorbent for the sulfur oxides. An effluent gas stream is withdrawn from the aqueous scrubbing zone and comprises a water-saturated gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and substantially free of particles. The effluent gas streams from the particulate removal zone and the aqueous scrubbing zone are combined in such proportions that the combined gas stream has a temperature above its adiabatic saturation temperature

  10. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  11. Process for the fabrication of nuclear fuel oxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Bernard; Paradis, Yves.

    1977-01-01

    Process for the fabrication of nuclear fuel oxide pellets of the type for which particles charged with an organic binder -selected from the group that includes polyvinyl alcohol, carboxymethyl cellulose, polyvinyl compounds and methyl cellulose- are prepared from a powder of such an oxide, for instance uranium dioxide. These particles are then compressed into pellets which are then sintered. Under this process the binder charged particles are prepared by stirring the powder with a gas, spraying on to the stirred powder a solution or a suspension in a liquid of this organic binder in order to obtain these particles and then drying the particles so obtained with this gas [fr

  12. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND VASCULAR DAMAGE IN HYPOXIA PROCESSES. MALONDIALDEHYDE (MDA AS BIOMARKER FOR OXIDATIVE DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñiz P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the levels oxidative stress biomarkers are related with different diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion, cardiovascular, renal, aging, etc. One of these biomarkers is the malondialdehyde (MDA generated as resulted of the process of lipid peroxidation. This biomarker is increased under conditions of the oxidative stress. Their levels, have been frequently used to measure plasma oxidative damage to lipids by their atherogenic potential. Its half-life high and their reactivity allows it to act both inside and outside of cells and interaction with proteins and DNA involve their role in different pathophysiological processes. This paper presents an analysis of the use of MDA as a biomarker of oxidative stress and its implications associated pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases ago.

  13. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  14. Dynamics of Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Emission during Nitrogen Conversion Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kampschreur, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be a serious threat to the environment. Rising levels of N2O in the atmosphere contribute to global warming and destruction of the ozone layer. This thesis describes an investigation on the emission of NO and N2O during nitrogen conversion processes. Emissions were measured at wastewater treatment plants and at lab-scale reactors to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Metabolic and kinetic models were used to identify pathways leading...

  15. Application of In-line Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement to Brivanib Alaninate Wet Granulation Process to Enable Scale-up and Attribute-based Monitoring and Control Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ajit S; Stevens, Timothy; Macias, Kevin; Paruchuri, Srinivasa; Gao, Zhihui; Badawy, Sherif

    2017-01-01

    Application of in-line real-time process monitoring using a process analytical technology for granule size distribution can enable quality-by-design development of a drug product and enable attribute-based monitoring and control strategies. In this study, an in-line laser focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) C35 probe was used to investigate the effect of formulation and process parameters on the granule growth profile over time during the high shear wet granulation of a high drug load formulation of brivanib alaninate. The probe quantitatively captured changes in the granule chord length distribution (CLD) with the progress of granulation and delineated the impact of water concentration used during granulation. The results correlated well with offline particle size distribution measured by nested sieve analyses. An end point indication algorithm was developed that was able to successfully track the process time needed to reach the target CLD. Testing of the brivanib alaninate granulation through 25-fold scale-up of the batch process indicated that the FBRM CLD profile can provide a scale-independent granule attribute-based process fingerprint. These studies highlight the ability of FBRM to quantitate a granule attribute of interest during wet granulation that can be used as an attribute-based scale-up and process monitoring and control parameter. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved Aeration Process - Catalytic Role Of The Iron Oxides In Arsenic Oxidation And Coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    Demands for a better drinking water quality, especially concerning arsenic, a compound with many adverse health effects, put a pressure on the utilities to ensure the best treatment technologies that meet nowadays and possible future quality standards. The aim of this paper is to introduce...... an improved aeration process that can also help in developing better arsenic removal treatment. The results present advantages of arsenic oxidation in an aeration process in the presence of ferrihydrite surface that have been shown to adsorb arsenic simultaneously to its oxidation. The presence...... of precipitated (ferrihydrite surface) and dissolved iron enhanced arsenic oxidation in comparison to solution with absence of precipitated iron in laboratory scale experiments. However, in the pilot scale studies the adsorption of arsenite on ferrihydrite was found to be the main process occurring during...

  17. Ion Exchange Processed CdS Nanorods in Powder Form Using Cadmium Hydroxide Nanowires By Wet Chemical Route

    OpenAIRE

    Savita L. Patil; Rupali S. chaudhari; Ravindra D. Ladhe; Prashant K. Baviskar; Babasaheb R. Sankapal

    2010-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive and soft chemical route (wet chemical method) was employed for the synthesis of bulk forms of cadmium hydroxide [Cd(OH)2] nanowires bundles and their conversion to cadmium sulphide [CdS] nanorods at room temperature by simple anion exchange route. Due to difference in solubility product and diffusion rates of the Cd(OH)2 and CdS, the anion exchange reaction was taken place and CdS nanorods were formed. CdS nanorods were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scannin...

  18. Aerosol and Photo-Oxidant Processes in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lazaridis, M.; Spyridaki, A.; Solberg, S.; Smolík, Jiří; Ždímal, Vladimír; Eleftheriadis, K.; Aleksandropoulos, V.; Hov, O.; Georgopoulos, P. G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2004), s. 5455-5514 ISSN 1680-7367 Grant - others:ENVK2(XE) 1999-00052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : aerosol * mesoscale modeling * photo-oxidant processes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  19. A PROCESS FOR THE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A process for producing an alcohol from a gaseous hydrocarbon, e.g. a lower alkane such as methane, via oxidative reaction of the hydrocarbon in a concentrated sulfuric acid medium in the presence of a catalyst employs an added catalyst comprising a substance selected from iodine, iodine compounds...

  20. Automation of the micro-arc oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubkov, P. E.; Pecherskaya, E. A.; Karpanin, O. V.; Shepeleva, Y. V.; Zinchenko, T. O.; Artamonov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    At present the significantly increased interest in micro-arc oxidation (MAO) encourages scientists to look for the solution of the problem of this technological process controllability. To solve this problem an automated technological installation MAO was developed, its structure and control principles are presented in this article. This device will allow to provide the controlled synthesis of MAO coatings and to identify MAO process patterns which contributes to commercialization of this technology.

  1. In Situ Densification Utilizing a Low-Viscosity Wetting Impregnant that Greating Reduces Processing Time to Produce Uniform Density Carbon-Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Wesley

    2002-01-01

    ... (the process of graphitization). Despite these properties, however, the use of carbon-carbon composites has been limited both because of their high cost and their oxidation at elevated temperatures...

  2. Converting SDAP into gypsum in a wet limestone scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, F. [Faelleskemikerne, Elsamprojekt A/S, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The ELSAM power pool has an installed electrical capacity of approx. 5 GW{sub e}, mainly firing import coal. The major base load units are equipped with desulphurization units and three different desulphurization technologies are used: the wet limestone gypsum process, the spray dry absorption process and a sulphuric acid process. Gypsum and sulphuric acid are commercialized, whereas it has been difficult to utilize the spray dry absorption product (SDAP). The main constituents of SDAP are calcium sulphide, calcium chloride, hydrated lime and impurities mainly originating from fly ash. Sulphide can be oxidized into sulphate in acidic solution - the reaction is utilized in the wet limestone gypsum process - and the possibility of using any spare capacity in the wet limestone gypsum units to oxidize the sulphide content of SDAP into sulphate and produce usable gypsum has been investigated in the laboratory and in a 400 MW{sub e} equivalent wet limestone unit. The limestone inhibition effect of the addition of SDAP is currently being studied in the laboratory in order to determine the effect of different SDAP types (plant/coal sources) on limestone reactivity before further long-term full-scale tests are performed and permanent use of the process planned. (EG)

  3. Degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid by advanced oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. P. S. Zanta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs such as the UV/H2O2 and Fenton processes were investigated for the degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (2-HBA in lab-scale experiments. Different [H2O2]/[2-HBA] molar ratios and pH values were used in order to establish the most favorable experimental conditions for the Fenton process. For comparison purposes, degradation of 2-HBA was carried out by the UV/H2O2 process under Fenton experimental conditions. The study showed that the Fenton process (a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and Fe2+ ion was the most effective under acidic conditions, leading to the highest rate of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid degradation in a very short time interval. This same process led to a six-fold acceleration of the oxidation rate compared with the UV/H2O2 process. The degradation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid was found to follow first-order kinetics and to be influenced by the type of process and the experimental conditions. The experimental results showed that the most favorable conditions for 2-HBA degradation by the Fenton process are pH around 4-5, [Fe2+] = 0.6 mmol.L-1, and [H2O2]/[2-HBA] molar ratio = 7. The hydroxylation route is explained here for the two processes, and the results are discussed in the light of literature information.

  4. Controlling granule size through breakage in a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process: the effect of impeller speed and binder liquid viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2015-01-30

    The feasibility of a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process has been established previously highlighting several potential advantages over the conventional wet granulation process and making recommendations for further development of the approach. The feasibility study showed that in the reverse-phase process granule formation proceeds via a controlled breakage mechanism. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of impeller speeds and binder liquid viscosity on the size distribution and intragranular porosity of granules using this novel process. Impeller tip speed was found to have different effects on the granules produced by a conventional as opposed to a reverse-phase granulation process. For the conventional process, an increase in impeller speed from 1.57 to 3.14 ms(-1) had minimal effect on granule size distribution. However, a further increase in impeller tip speed to 3.93 and 4.71 ms(-1) resulted in a decrease in intragranular porosity and a corresponding increase in mean granule size. In contrast when the reverse-phase process was used, an increase in impeller speed from 1.57 to 4.71 ms(-1) resulted in increased granule breakage and a decrease in the mean granule size. This was postulated to be due to the fact that the granulation process begins with fully saturated pores. Under these conditions further consolidation of granules at increased impeller tip speeds is limited and rebound or breakage occurs. Based on these results and analysis of the modified capillary number the conventional process appears to be driven by viscous forces whereas the reverse-phase process appears to be driven by capillary forces. Additionally, in the reverse-phase process a critical impeller speed, represented by the equilibrium between centrifugal and gravitational forces, appears to represent the point above which breakage of large wet agglomerates and mechanical dispersion of binder liquid take place. In contrast the conventional process

  5. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  6. Integrated catalytic wet air oxidation and aerobic biological treatment in a municipal WWTP of a high-strength o-cresol wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan A; Fabregat, Azael; Stüber, Frank; Fortuny, Agustí; Font, Josep; Carrera, Julián

    2007-02-01

    This study examines the feasibility of coupling a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO), with activated carbon (AC) as catalyst, and an aerobic biological treatment to treat a high-strength o-cresol wastewater. Two goals are pursued: (a) To determine the effect of the main AC/CWAO intermediates on the activated sludge of a municipal WasteWater Treatment Plant (WWTP) and (b) To demonstrate the feasibility of coupling the AC/CWAO effluent as a part of the influent of a municipal WWTP. In a previous study, a high-strength o-cresol wastewater was treated by AC/CWAO aiming to establish the distribution of intermediates and the biodegradability enhancement. In this work, the biodegradability, toxicity and inhibition of the most relevant intermediates detected in the AC/CWAO effluent were determined by respirometry. Also, the results of a pilot scale municipal WWTP study for an integrated AC/CWAO-aerobic biological treatment of this effluent are presented. The biodegradation parameters (i.e. maximum oxygen uptake rate and oxygen consumption) of main AC/CWAO intermediates allowed the classification of the intermediates into readily biodegradable, inert or toxic/inhibitory compounds. This detailed study, allowed to understand the biodegradability enhancement exhibited by an AC/CWAO effluent and to achieve a successful strategy for coupling the AC/CWAO step with an aerobic biological treatment for a high-strength o-cresol wastewater. Using 30%, as COD, of AC/CWAO effluent in the inlet to the pilot scale WWTP, the integrated AC/CWAO-biological treatment achieved a 98% of total COD removal and, particularly, a 91% of AC/CWAO effluent COD removal without any undesirable effect on the biomass.

  7. Companions of Bright Barred Shapley Ames Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Barreto, J. Antonio; Carrillo, Rene; Vera-Villamizar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    Companion galaxy environment for a subset of 78 bright and nearby barred galaxies from the Shapley Ames Catalog is presented. Among spiral barred galaxies there are Seyfert galaxies, galaxies with circumnuclear structures, galaxies not associated with any large scale galaxy cloud structure, galaxies with peculiar disk morphology (crooked arms) and galaxies with normal disk morphology; the list includes all Hubble types. The companion galaxy list includes number of companion galaxies within 20...

  8. The processing of a practical oxide superconductor wire or tape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    There has been substantial progress in recent months in the realization of attractive current density in bulk oxide superconductors. Silver sheathed Bi oxide wire or tape has been produced in a number of laboratories with impressive current density exceeding 10 4 A/cm 2 at 4.2 K in magnetic fields as high as 30 T. This result easily eclipses the performance of conventional 4.2K conductors such as Nb-Ti and Nb 3 Sn, which presents a promise for using oxide conductors for high field magnets. At 77 K similar success have been achieved for Y-Ba-Cu-O bulk materials following various melt processing procedures with the observation of current density near 10 4 A/cm 2 at useful magnetic fields of 1-4 T. There is some question as to whether any of these materials can be formed in long lengths with sufficient mechanical strength and stability to allow operation at high fields in magnet applications. This paper reviews the current progress in producing oxide superconductor wire or tape and a prognosis as to when a practical oxide conductor is realized

  9. Study of the pelletizing process zirconium oxide and zircon sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, E.S.M.; Paschoal, J.O.A.; Acevedo, M.T.P.

    1990-12-01

    The study of the process to obtain zirconium tetrachloride under development at IPEN, can be divide into two steps: pelletizing and chlorination. Pelletizing is an important step in the overall process as it facilitates greater contact between the particles and permits the production of pellets with dimensional uniformity and mechanical strength. In this paper, the results of the study of pelletizing zirconium oxide and zircon sand are presented. The influence of some variables related to the process and the equipment on the physical characteristics of the pellets are discussed. (author)

  10. High-density carbon nanotube wet-laid buckypapers with enhanced strength and conductivity using a high-pressure homogenization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jun; Jang, Si Hoon; Park, No Hyung; Jeong, Won Young; Lim, Dae Young [Human and Culture Convergence Technology Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jun Young; Yang, Seung Jae [Dept. of Applied Organic Materials Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this work, we prepared homogeneously dispersed carbon nanotubes in water using a high-pressure homogenizer, while high-density carbon nanotube buckypapers were prepared by wet-laid process. The strength and conductivity of the buckypaper were increased dramatically after the high-pressure homogenization because of the increased density and uniformity of the paper. In addition, the buckypapers containing various additives and treated with SOCl{sub 2} exhibited further increase of strength and conductivity resulting from the binding and the p-type doping effect. The buckypapers with high electrical conductivity exhibited superior electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness that could be applied for structural shielding materials.

  11. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  12. Controlling sludge settleability in the oxidation ditch process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, K J

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation aimed at developing an operating technique for controlling sludge settleability in the oxidation ditch form of the nitrification denitrification activated sludge process. It was hypothesized that specific sludge volume index (SSVI) is lowest at an optimum process anoxic fraction and increases at higher and lower fractions. Using effluent ammonia:nitrate ratio as a surrogate for anoxic fraction, it was found that a simple empirical model based on a three solids retention time moving average nitrogen ratio was able to replicate the long-term SSVI variations in two independent oxidation ditches at a full-scale plant. Operating data from a second oxidation ditch plant during periods when a prefermenter was on- or off-line showed that SSVI also varies with RBCOD, greater RBCOD giving lower SSVI. It was concluded that best settleability occurs at about the same anoxic fraction as lowest effluent total nitrogen concentration, with an ammonia:nitrate ratio of about 1. An operating rule of thumb is to use dissolved oxygen control to maintain effluent ammonia and nitrate nitrogen concentrations about equal. A third oxidation ditch plant deliberately operated in this manner achieved 15-month median operating values for SSVI of 60mL/g and for effluent ammonia, nitrate and total N, respectively, of 0.2, 0.3 and 2.0mgN/L.

  13. Feasibility of electrochemical oxidation process for treatment of saline wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavoos Dindarloo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: High concentration of salt makes biological treatment impossible due to bacterial plasmolysis. The present research studies the process of electrochemical oxidation efficiency and optimal levels as important factors affecting pH, salt concentration, reaction time and applied voltage. Methods: The sample included graphite electrodes with specifications of 2.5 cm diameter and 15 cm height using a reactor with an optimum capacity of 1 L. Sixty samples were obtained with the aid of the experiments carried out in triplicates for each factor at 5 different levels. The entire experiments were performed based on standard methods for water and waste water treatments. Results: Analysis of variance carried out on effect of pH, salt concentration, reaction time and flow intensity in elimination of chemical oxygen demand (COD showed that they are significant factors affecting this process and reduce COD with a coefficient interval of 95% and test power of 80%. Scheffe test showed that at optimal level, a reaction time of 1 hour, 10 g/L concentration, pH = 9 and 15 V electrical potential difference were obtained. Conclusion: Waste waters containing salt may contribute to the electro-oxidation process due to its cations and anions. Therefore, the process of electrochemical oxidation with graphite electrodes could be a proper strategy for the treatment of saline wastewater where biological treatment is not possible.

  14. Effect of vegetable oil oxidation on the hydrogenation reaction process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantari, Faranak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenation has been carried out in a batch reactor with three different oxidized bleached oils in order to discover the effect of oxidation on the hydrogenation reaction process. Specifications of hydrogenated oils such as melting point, Iodine value, solid fat content and fatty acid composition of the oxidized oils were compared with their un-oxidized reference oils. Oxidized bleached sunflower oil was hydrogenated to target melting points (34, 39 and 42°C at higher iodine values vs. its reference oil with the same reaction time. Oxidized bleached soybean and canola oils were hydrogenated to target melting points (34, 39 and 42°C at higher iodine values as well, but reaction times were longer than their reference oils. The resulting solid fat content and total trans fatty acids of all hydrogenated oils were less than their references. A peroxide value above 0.5meq O2/kg for non auto-oxidized oils and above 5meq O2/kg for auto-oxidized oils will significantly change the hydrogenation process.

    La hidrogenación fue llevada cabo en un reactor discontinuo con tres aceites decoloradas y oxidadas con objeto de estudiar el efecto de la oxidación en el proceso de hidrogenación. Las especificaciones de los aceites hidrogenados tales como el punto de fusión, índice de yodo, contenido de grasa sólida y composición de ácidos grasos de los aceites oxidados fueron comparados con sus correspondientes aceites de referencia sin oxidar. El aceite de girasol decolorado y oxidado fue hidrogenado hasta alcanzar un punto de fusión (34, 39 and 42°C con altos índices de yodo versus su aceite de referencia con el mismo tiempo de reacción. Aceites decolorado y oxidado de soja y de canola fueron hidrogenados hasta alcanzar puntos de fusión (34,39 y 42°C con altos valores de yodo, pero los tiempo de reacción fueron más largos que en sus aceites de referencia. Los resultados del contenido de grasa sólida y ácidos grasos

  15. Development and Processing of p-type Oxide Thermoelectric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, NingYu; Van Nong, Ngo

    The main aim of this research is to investigate and develop well-performing p-type thermoelectric oxide materials that are sufficiently stable at high temperatures for power generating applications involving industrial processes. Presently, the challenges facing the widespread implementation...... of thermoelectric power generation technology lie in the high cost and low efficiency of thermoelectric systems. Scalable and practical applications, including commercialization based on the currently used materials are subject to environmental and cost issues, and thus are difficult to be realized. Metal oxides......, followed by the use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) processing with different conditions such as sintering temperatures, applied pressures and ramping rates. With characterization of the microstructure, bulk density and thermoelectric transport properties, Ca3Co4O9+δ synthesized by sol–gel reaction...

  16. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1988-09-13

    A process is described for reducing the concentration of nitrogen oxides in an effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel, which process comprises injecting into the effluent ammonia and an enhancer selected from the group consisting of hexamethylenetetramine, a lower carbon alcohol, a hydroxyl amino hydrocarbon, sugar, furfural, furfural derivatives, an amino acid, a protein-containing composition, mixtures of ortho-, meta-, and para-methyl phenols, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, calcium cyanamide, biuret, 1,1'-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, and mixtures thereof, at an effluent temperature above about 1300/sup 0/F and a molar ratio of nitrogen in the ammonia and enhancer to the baseline nitrogen oxides level of about 1:5 to about 6:1 wherein the excess of oxygen in the effluent is no greater than about 6%.

  17. Process for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: a) directing a vapor stream containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; b) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent; c) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; d) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrate form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; e) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; f) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level of hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1 % by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; g) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and h) removing said solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  18. Engineering application of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Nianjia; Ren, Hongqiang; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2017-08-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox), a promising biological nitrogen removal process, has been verified as an efficient, sustainable and cost-effective alternative to conventional nitrification and denitrification processes. To date, more than 110 full-scale anammox plants have been installed and are in operation, treating industrial NH 4 + -rich wastewater worldwide, and anammox-based technologies are flourishing. This review the current state of the art for engineering applications of the anammox process, including various anammox-based technologies, reactor selection and attempts to apply it at different wastewater plants. Process control and implementation for stable performance are discussed as well as some remaining issues concerning engineering application are exposed, including the start-up period, process disturbances, greenhouse gas emissions and especially mainstream anammox applications. Finally, further development of the anammox engineering application is proposed in this review.

  19. Aerial radiological survey of US Department of Energy sites in Ames, Iowa. Date of survey: May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over five areas totaling 10 km 2 within the town of Ames, Iowa. Gamma ray data were measured over Ames Laboratory, several sections of downtown Ames, and the surrounding area. This was accomplished by flying parallel east-west lines 61 m apart. Processed data indicated that three areas showed increased activity levels of at least twice average background: the reactor, the waste treatment area, and a small area near the airport runway

  20. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.; Sprague, B.N.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. The process comprises introducing a treatment agent which comprises a composition selected from the group consisting of NH/sub 4/-lignosulfonate, calcium lignosulfonate, 2-furoic acid, 1,3 dioxolane, tetrahydrofuran, furfurylamine, furfurylalcohol, gluconic acid, citric acid, n-butyl acetate, 1,3 butylene glycol, methylal, tetrahydrofuryl alcohol, furan, fish oil, coumalic acid, furfuryl acetate, tetrahydrofuran 2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid, tetrahydrofurylamine, furylacrylic acid, tetrahydropyran, 2,5-furandimethanol, mannitol, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, acetic anhydride, oxalic acid, mucic acid and d-galactose.

  1. Improvement in lipids extraction processes for biodiesel production from wet microalgal pellets grown on diammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Hasnain; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmed; Mahmood, Qaisar; Pervez, Arshid

    2016-08-01

    Biomass productivity and growth kinetics for microalgae grown on sodium bicarbonate and diammonium phosphate were investigated. Different carbon and nitrogen ratios have shown different growth rates and biomass productivity and C:N ratio 50:10 as mgL(-1) has shown the best production than all. For effective lipids extraction from biomass thermolysis and sonolysis were carried out from wet biomass. Sonolysis at 2.3W intensity for 5min has released 8.58mg at neutral pH. More quantity of lipids was extracted when extraction was made at pH 4 and 10 which resulted 9mg and 9.28mg lipids respectively. Thermal treatment at 100°C for 10min has released 12.82mg lipid at neutral pH. In the same thermolysis at pH 4 and 10 more quantity of lipids was extracted which were 15.16mg and 14.81mg respectively. Finally transesterified lipids were analyzed through GC-MS for FAME composition analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Experimental Study on Fabricating an Inverted Mesa-Type Quartz Crystal Resonator Using a Cheap Wet Etching Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a miniaturized high fundamental frequency quartz crystal microbalance (QCM is fabricated for sensor applications using a wet etching technique. The vibration area is reduced in the fabrication of the high frequency QCM with an inverted mesa structure. To reduce the complexity of the side wall profile that results from anisotropic quartz etching, a rectangular vibration area is used instead of the conventional circular structure. QCMs with high Q values exceeding 25,000 at 47 MHz, 27,000 at 60 MHz, 24,000 at 73 MHz and 25,000 at 84 MHz are fabricated on 4 × 4 mm2 chips with small vibration areas of 1.2 × 1.4 mm2. A PMMA-based flow cell is designed and manufactured to characterize the behavior of the fabricated QCM chip in a liquid. Q values as high as 1,006 at 47 MHz, 904 at 62 MHz, 867 at 71 MHz and 747 at 84 MHz are obtained when one side of the chip is exposed to pure water. These results show that fabricated QCM chips can be used for bio- and chemical sensor applications in liquids.

  3. Wetting process and interfacial characteristic of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu on different substrates at temperatures ranging from 503 K to 673 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Likun; Yuan, Zhangfu; Xu, Hongyan; Xu, Bingsheng

    2011-03-01

    Wetting process and interfacial characteristic of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu have been investigated at temperatures ranging from 503 K to 673 K on Cu, Ni, stainless steel and quartz, respectively. The reactive wetting behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu melt alloy on Cu and Ni substrates were investigated. Contact angles decrease as exponential decay and equilibrium contact angles decrease between the solder and Cu, Ni substrates monotonously with the temperature increasing. The configuration of the triple line of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu is discussed by the description of equilibrium. The calculated results based on experimental values of tension balances along each of the three interfaces at this final state show good agreement with theoretical analysis. Intermetallics of the Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Ni interface are identified as (Cu, Ni) 6Sn 5 adjacent to the solder and Ni 3Sn 4 adjacent to the Ni substrate, respectively. The contact angles between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu and quartz, stainless steel substrates were measured to be greater than 90°, which means non-wetting, in the temperature range from 503 K to 673 K. Liquid-solid interfacial energy between the solder and different substrates are obtained based on the surface tension of molten solder and equilibrium contact angles at different temperatures. These results are of practical interest for composite lead-free solders preparations and joining of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu to various substrates.

  4. Wet impregnation of silver oxide on Lampung natural zeolite as an adsorbent to produce oxygen-enriched air using PSA technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianty Adenia Gita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High purity oxygen can be used for various things. Oxygen purification method to be applied on this research is the Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA technique. The adsorbent that would be used is a natural zeolite, namely ZAL (Zeolite Alam Lampung. Natural zeolite has non-polar properties, so it will adsorb gas with high quadruple moment, which is nitrogen. The varied variable is the size of adsorbent and the concentration of H2SO4. The sizes are 18-35 mesh, 35-60 mesh, and 60-100 mesh. While the H2SO4 concentration are 1M, 2M and 3M. Size of ZAL, and the concentration of sulfuric acid (H2SO4 were varied to get the optimum value. The adsorbent will be activated in aqua demine, H2SO4, NaOH, and through a calcination process. The purpose of this pre-treatment was to remove the impurities and to increase the specific surface area of zeolite. Moreover, ZAL will also be modified by wet impregnation technique using AgNO3 solution with 1%-wt loading nominal. The morphology, composition, and crystal phase were characterized by BET, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. The result of the adsorption process was analyzed by using GC (Gas Chromatograph. ZAL 35-60 mesh 1M showed the best performance on adsorbing nitrogen, with its lowest peak at 60356 μV. The result of this research suggested that ZAL itself has the main role on adsorbing nitrogen, while AgxO did not give any significant effect

  5. The optimization, kinetics and mechanism of m-cresol degradation via catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with sludge-derived carbon catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yamin [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wei, Huangzhao; Zhao, Ying [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Wenjing [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Chenglin, E-mail: clsun@dicp.ac.cn [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The sludge derived carbon modified with 0 °C acid was used as catalyst in CWPO. • RSM was used to optimize CWPO reaction conditions of m-cresol for the first time. • The kinetic model was disclosed to be correlated with residue target concentration. • The proposed degradation pathways of m-cresol were well proven by DFT method. - Abstract: The sludge-derived carbon catalyst modified with 0 °C HNO{sub 3} solution was tested in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of m-cresol (100 mg L{sup −1}) with systematical mathematical models and theoretical calculation for the first time. The reaction conditions were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) as T = 60 °C, initial pH = 3.0, C{sub 0,H2O2(30%)} = 1.20 g L{sup −1} (lower than the stoichiometric amount of 1.80 g L{sup −1}) and C{sub cat} = 0.80 g L{sup −1}, with 96% of m-cresol and 47% of TOC converted after 16 min and 120 min of reaction, respectively, and ξ (mg TOC/g H{sub 2}O{sub 2} fed) = 83.6 mg/g. The end time of the first kinetic period in m-cresol model was disclosed to be correlated with the fixed residue m-cresol concentration of about 33%. Furthermore, the kinetic constants in models of TOC and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exactly provide convincing proof of three-dimensional response surfaces analysis by RSM, which showed the influence of the interaction between organics and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on effective H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilization. The reaction intermediates over time were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometer based on kinetics analysis. Four degradation pathways for m-cresol were proposed, of which the possibility and feasibility were well proven by frontier molecule orbital theory and atomic charge distribution via density functional theory method.

  6. Processing and Characterization of Sol-Gel Cerium Oxide Microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Zachary D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Padilla Cintron, Cristina [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Of interest to space exploration and power generation, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) can provide long-term power to remote electronic systems without the need for refueling or replacement. Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) remains one of the more promising materials for thermoelectric power generation due to its high power density, long half-life, and low gamma emissions. Traditional methods for processing Pu-238 include ball milling irregular precipitated powders before pressing and sintering into a dense pellet. The resulting submicron particulates of Pu-238 quickly accumulate and contaminate glove boxes. An alternative and dust-free method for Pu-238 processing is internal gelation via sol-gel techniques. Sol-gel methodology creates monodisperse and uniform microspheres that can be packed and pressed into a pellet. For this study cerium oxide microspheres were produced as a surrogate to Pu-238. The similar electronic orbitals between cerium and plutonium make cerium an ideal choice for non-radioactive work. Before the microspheres can be sintered and pressed they must be washed to remove the processing oil and any unreacted substituents. An investigation was performed on the washing step to find an appropriate wash solution that reduced waste and flammable risk. Cerium oxide microspheres were processed, washed, and characterized to determine the effectiveness of the new wash solution.

  7. Thermal oxidation and electrical properties of silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Rys, A.

    1993-02-01

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on n-type, Si-face 6H-SiC is described for both wet and dry oxidation processes, and the effect of thermal oxidation conditions on the electrical properties of MOS capacitors are investigated. The values of the oxide thickness were obtained as a function of the oxidation time at various oxidation temperatures (which were kept between 1150 and 1250 C). It was found that samples prepared by both dry and wet oxidation showed accumulation, depletion, and inversion regions under illumination, while inversion did not occur under dark conditions. The C-V characteristics of oxidized samples were improved after the oxidized samples were annealed in argon for 30 min. The relation between the oxide thickness and the oxidation time could be expressed by parabolic law, which is also used for thermal oxidation of Si.

  8. Oxidative removal of implanted photoresists and barrier metals in semiconductor processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Rajkumar

    Chemical systems containing oxidants are widely used at various stages in semiconductor processing, particularly for wet cleaning and polishing applications. This dissertation presents a series of studies related to oxidative removal of materials in the Front-End-Of-Line (FEOL) and Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) processes during IC fabrication. In the first part of this study, stripping of photoresists exposed to high dose of ions (1E16 As/cm2) was investigated in activated hydrogen peroxide systems. Stripping of photoresists (PR) exposed to high dose (>1E15/cm2) ion beams is one of the most challenging steps in FEOL processing. This is due to unreactive crust layer that forms on the resist surface during ion implantation. The use of hydrogen peroxide systems activated by metal ion or UV light, for disrupting crust formed on deep UV resist to enable complete removal of crust as well as underlying photoresist was investigated. A systematic evaluation of variables such as hydrogen peroxide and metal ion concentration, UV intensity, temperature and time was conducted and an optimal formulation capable of attacking the crust was developed. A two step process involving pretreatment with activated hydrogen peroxide solution, followed by treatment with sulfuric acid-hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) was developed for complete removal of crusted resist films. In the second part of this study, electrochemically enhanced abrasive removal of Ta/TaN films was investigated in solutions containing 2,5 dihydroxy benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) and potassium iodate (KIO3). This method known as Electrically-assisted Chemical Mechanical Planarization (ECMP) is generating a lot of interest in IC manufacturing. Ta/TaN films were abraded at low pressures (polyurethane pad under galvanostatic conditions. The effect of variables including pH, KIO3 concentration, and current density has been explored. In the optimized formulation, tantalum and tantalum nitride removal rates of ˜170 A

  9. Microstructure Sensitive Design and Processing in Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Hamid Garmestani; Dr. Stephen Herring

    2009-06-12

    The aim of this study was to develop and inexpensive manufacturing process for deposition of functionally graded thin films of LSM oxides with porosity graded microstructures for use as IT-SOFCs cathode. The spray pyrolysis method was chosen as a low-temperature processing technique for deposition of porous LSM films onto dense YXZ substrates. The effort was directed toward the optimization of the processing conditions for deposition of high quality LSM films with variety of morphologies in the range of dense to porous microstructures. Results of optimization studies of spray parameters revealed that the substrate surface temperature is the most critical parameter influencing the roughness and morphology, porosity, cracking and crystallinity of the film.

  10. Investigation of solid organic waste processing by oxidative pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolibaba, O. B.; Sokolsky, A. I.; Gabitov, R. N.

    2017-11-01

    A thermal analysis of a mixture of municipal solid waste (MSW) of the average morphological composition and its individual components was carried out in order to develop ways to improve the efficiency of its utilization for energy production in thermal reactors. Experimental studies were performed on a synchronous thermal analyzer NETZSCH STA 449 F3 Jupiter combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer QMC 403. Based on the results of the experiments, the temperature ranges of the pyrolysis process were determined as well as the rate of decrease of the mass of the sample of solid waste during the drying and oxidative pyrolysis processes, the thermal effects accompanying these processes, as well as the composition and volumes of gases produced during oxidative pyrolysis of solid waste and its components in an atmosphere with oxygen content of 1%, 5%, and 10%. On the basis of experimental data the dependences of the yield of gas on the moisture content of MSW were obtained under different pyrolysis conditions under which a gas of various calorific values was produced.

  11. Process integration and optimization of a solid oxide fuel cell – Gas turbine hybrid cycle fueled with hydrothermally gasified waste biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchinetti, Emanuele; Gassner, Martin; D’Amelio, Matilde; Marechal, François; Favrat, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Due to its suitability for using wet biomass, hydrothermal gasification is a promising process for the valorization of otherwise unused waste biomass to synthesis gas and biofuels. Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) based hybrid cycles are considered as the best candidate for a more efficient and clean conversion of (bio) fuels. A significant potential for the integration of the two technologies is expected since hydrothermal gasification requires heat at 673–773 K, whereas SOFC is characterized by heat excess at high temperature due to the limited electrochemical fuel conversion. This work presents a systematic process integration and optimization of a SOFC-gas turbine (GT) hybrid cycle fueled with hydrothermally gasified waste biomass. Several design options are systematically developed and compared through a thermodynamic optimization approach based on First Law and exergy analysis. The work demonstrates the considerable potential of the system that allows for converting wet waste biomass into electricity at a First Law efficiency of up to 63%, while simultaneously enabling the separation of biogenic carbon dioxide for further use or sequestration. -- Highlights: ► Hydrothermal gasification is a promising process for the valorization of waste wet biomass. ► Solid Oxide Fuel Cell – Gas Turbine hybrid cycle emerges as the best candidates for conversion of biofuels. ► A systematic process integration and optimization of a SOFC-GT hybrid cycle fuelled with hydrothermally gasified biomass is presented. ► The system may convert wet waste biomass to electricity at a First Law efficiency of 63% while separating the biogenic carbon dioxide. ► The process integration enables to improve the First Law efficiency of around 4% with respect to a non-integrated system.

  12. Modification of Semiconductor Surfaces through Si-N Linkages by Wet-Chemistry Approaches and Modular Functionalization of Zinc Oxide Surfaces for Chemical Protection of Material Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei

    Semiconductor substrates are widely used in many applications. Multiple practical uses involving these materials require the ability to tune their physical and chemical properties to adjust those to a specific application. In recent years, surface and interface reactions have affected dramatically device fabrication and material design. Novel surface functionalization techniques with diverse chemical approaches make the desired physical, thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties attainable. Meanwhile, the modified surface can serve as one of the most important key steps for further assembly process in order to make novel devices and materials. In the following chapters, novel chemical approaches to the functionalization of silicon and zinc oxide substrates will be reviewed and discussed. The specific functionalities including amines, azides, and alkynes on surfaces of different materials will be applied to address subsequent attachment of large molecules and assembly processes. This research is aimed to develop new strategies for manipulating the surface properties of semiconductor materials in a controlled way. The findings of these investigations will be relevant for future applications in molecular and nanoelectronics, sensing, and solar energy conversion. The ultimate goals of the projects are: 1) Preparation of an oxygen-and carbon-free silicon surface based exclusively on Si-N linkages for further modification protocols.. This project involves designing the surface reaction of hydrazine on chlorine-terminated silicon surface, introduction of additional functional group through dehydrohalogenation condensation reaction and direct covalent attachment of C60. 2) Demonstrating alternative method to anchor carbon nanotubes to solid substrates directly through the carbon cage.. This project targets surface modification of silicon and gold substrates with amine-terminated organic monolayers and the covalent attachment of nonfunctionalized and carboxylic acid

  13. Optical wet steam monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  14. Wet flue gas desulphurization and new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Michelsen, M.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FDG plants is presented. The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grained limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish limestones of different origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was developed to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical correlations for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling-film column) were determined. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15%, though the effect could not be correlated. A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup -}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH-profiles, solids contents of slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No effects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory experiments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale experiments showed a decrease in limestone reactivity. (EG) EFP-95. 45 refs.; Also ph.d. thesis of Soeren Kiil

  15. Continuous wet-process growth of ZnO nanoarrays for wire-shaped photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pan; Guo, Wanwan; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan; Qing, Shenglan; Fan, Xing

    2016-09-15

    Well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays have been grown on metal-plated polymer fiber via a mild wet process in a newly-designed continuous reactor, aiming to provide wire-shaped photoanodes for wearable dye-sensitized solar cells. The growth conditions were systematically optimized with the help of computational flow-field simulation. The flow field in the reactor will not only affect the morphology of the ZnO nanorod⧹nanowire but also affect the pattern distribution of nanoarray on the electrode surface. Unlike the sectional structure from the traditional batch-type reactor, ZnO nanorods with finely-controlled length and uniform morphology could be grown from the continuous reactor. After optimization, the wire-shaped ZnO-type photoanode grown from the continuous reactor exhibited better photovoltaic performance than that from the traditional batch-type reactor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Design and application of a metal wet-etching post-process for the improvement of CMOS-MEMS capacitive sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Ming-Han; Sun, Chih-Ming; Liu, Yu-Chia; Fang, Weileun; Wang, Chuanwei

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a process design methodology to improve the performance of a CMOS-MEMS gap-closing capacitive sensor. In addition to the standard CMOS process, the metal wet-etching approach is employed as the post-CMOS process to realize the present design. The dielectric layers of the CMOS process are exploited to form the main micro mechanical structures of the sensor. The metal layers of the CMOS process are used as the sensing electrodes and sacrificial layers. The advantages of the sensor design are as follows: (1) the parasitic capacitance is significantly reduced by the dielectric structure, (2) in-plane and out-of-plane sensing gaps can be reduced to increase the sensitivity, and (3) plate-type instead of comb-type out-of-plane sensing electrodes are available to increase the sensing electrode area. To demonstrate the feasibility of the present design, a three-axis capacitive CMOS-MEMS accelerometers chip is implemented and characterized. Measurements show that the sensitivities of accelerometers reach 11.5 mV G −1 (in the X-, Y-axes) and 7.8 mV G −1 (in the Z-axis), respectively, which are nearly one order larger than existing designs. Moreover, the detection of 10 mG excitation using the three-axis accelerometer is demonstrated for both in-plane and out-of-plane directions

  17. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.

    1999-01-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible 238 Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na 2 SO 4 , Na 3 PO 4 and NaAsO 2 or Na 3 AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the 238 Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox

  18. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (United States). Indian Head Div.; Wernly, K. [Molten Salt Oxidation Corp. (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  19. Process for producing metal oxide kernels and kernels so obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelievre, Bernard; Feugier, Andre.

    1974-01-01

    The process desbribed is for producing fissile or fertile metal oxide kernels used in the fabrication of fuels for high temperature nuclear reactors. This process consists in adding to an aqueous solution of at least one metallic salt, particularly actinide nitrates, at least one chemical compound capable of releasing ammonia, in dispersing drop by drop the solution thus obtained into a hot organic phase to gel the drops and transform them into solid particles. These particles are then washed, dried and treated to turn them into oxide kernels. The organic phase used for the gel reaction is formed of a mixture composed of two organic liquids, one acting as solvent and the other being a product capable of extracting the anions from the metallic salt of the drop at the time of gelling. Preferably an amine is used as product capable of extracting the anions. Additionally, an alcohol that causes a part dehydration of the drops can be employed as solvent, thus helping to increase the resistance of the particles [fr

  20. Application of advanced oxidative process in treatment radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Catia; Sakata, Solange K.; Ferreira, Rafael V.P.; Marumo, Julio T.

    2009-01-01

    The ion exchange resin is used in the water purification system in both nuclear research and power reactors. Combined with active carbon, the resin removes dissolved elements from water when the nuclear reactor is operating. After its consumption, it becomes a special type of radioactive waste. The usual treatment to this type of waste is the immobilization with Portland cement, which is simple and low cost. However, its low capacity of immobilization and the increase volume of waste have been the challenges. The development of new technologies capable of destroying this waste completely by increasing its solidification is the main target due to the possibility of both volume and cost reduction. The objective of this work was to evaluate ion exchange resin degradation by Advanced Oxidative Process using Fenton's Reagent (H 2 O 2 / Fe +2 ) in different concentration and temperatures. One advantage of this process is that all additional organic compounds or inorganic solids produced are oxidized easily. The degradation experiments were conducted with IRA-400 resin and Fenton's Reagents, varying the H 2O 2 concentration (30% e 50%) and heat temperature (25, 60 and 100 deg C). The resin degradation was confirmed by the presence of BaCO 3 as a white precipitate resulting from the reaction between the Ba(OH) 2 and the CO 2 from the resin degradation. All experiments run in duplicate. Higher degradation was observed with Fenton's Reagent (Fe +2 /H 2 O 2 30%) at 100 deg C after 2 hours. (author)

  1. Advanced treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater by Fenton reagent oxidation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan YANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Avermectin-salinomycin waster is hard to be further biodegraded after treated by anaerobic-aerobiotic process, so Fenton oxidation process is studied for its advanced treatment. Influencing factors of pH, reaction time, H2O2 dosage and H2O2/Fe2+ on COD removal are investigated, respectively. When pH value is 3.0, the dosage of H2O2 is 1.5 mL/L, and the mole ratio of H2O2/Fe2+ is 5∶1, the effluent COD mass concentrations decreases from 224 to 64.3 mg/L, namely the COD removal efficiency reaches 71.3%.

  2. Use of advanced oxidation processes for removal of micropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    One of the big challenges of modern water treatment is the handling of micropollutants. These are compounds found in very low concentrations, often at ppt or ppb level, but are still capable of having a potent effect on the environment, and possibly humans as well. One of the emerging technologies...... for removal of micropollutants is the use of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). AOPs use highly reactive hydroxyl radicals to degrade the micropollutants, but the processes are very energy intensive, which may limit their applications. To investigate the feasibility of introducing AOPs in the Danish water...... to determine the effect of the modification of the UV system on its original purpose. The degradation experiments were carried out at pilot scale in the laboratory, and then compared to data collected at the WWTP. TiO2 was found to improve the rate of degradation of EE2 by 66 % compared to the photolytic...

  3. Remediation of a winery wastewater combining aerobic biological oxidation and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Francisca C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-05-15

    Apart from a high biodegradable fraction consisting of organic acids, sugars and alcohols, winery wastewaters exhibit a recalcitrant fraction containing high-molecular-weight compounds as polyphenols, tannins and lignins. In this context, a winery wastewater was firstly subjected to a biological oxidation to mineralize the biodegradable fraction and afterwards an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) was applied in order to mineralize the refractory molecules or transform them into simpler ones that can be further biodegraded. The biological oxidation led to above 97% removals of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), but was inefficient on the degradation of a bioresistant fraction corresponding to 130 mg L(-1) of DOC, 380 mg O2 L(-1) of COD and 8.2 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) of total dissolved polyphenols. Various EAOPs such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar PEF (SPEF) were then applied to the recalcitrant effluent fraction using a 2.2 L lab-scale flow plant containing an electrochemical cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-PTFE air-diffusion cathode and coupled to a photoreactor with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs). The influence of initial Fe(2+) concentration and current density on the PEF process was evaluated. The relative oxidative ability of EAOPs increased in the order AO-H2O2 effluent, along with energy consumptions of 45 kWh (kg DOC)(-1) and 5.1 kWh m(-3). After this coupled treatment, color, odor, COD, BOD5, NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) parameters complied with the legislation targets and, in addition, a total dissolved polyphenols content of 0.35 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) was found. Respirometry tests revealed low biodegradability enhancement along the SPEF process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Model-based analysis of high shear wet granulation from batch to continuous processes in pharmaceutical production--a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2013-11-01

    The manufacturing of pharmaceutical dosage forms, which has traditionally been a batch-wise process, is now also transformed into a series of continuous operations. Some operations such as tabletting and milling are already performed in continuous mode, while the adaptation towards a complete continuous production line is still hampered by complex steps such as granulation and drying which are considered to be too inflexible to handle potential product change-overs. Granulation is necessary in order to achieve good flowability properties and better control of drug content uniformity. This paper reviews modelling and supporting measurement tools for the high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process, which is an important granulation technique due to the inherent benefits and the suitability of this unit operation for the desired switch to continuous mode. For gaining improved insight into the complete system, particle-level mechanisms are required to be better understood, and linked with an appropriate meso- or macro-scale model. A brief review has been provided to understand the mechanisms of the granulation process at micro- or particle-level such as those involving wetting and nucleation, aggregation, breakage and consolidation. Further, population balance modelling (PBM) and the discrete element method (DEM), which are the current state-of-the-art methods for granulation modelling at micro- to meso-scale, are discussed. The DEM approach has a major role to play in future research as it bridges the gap between micro- and meso-scales. Furthermore, interesting developments in the measurement technologies are discussed with a focus towards inline measurements of the granulation process to obtain experimental data which are required for developing good models. Based on the current state of the developments, the review focuses on the twin-screw granulator as a device for continuous HSWG and attempts to critically evaluate the current process. As a result, a set of open

  5. Treatment of petroleum refinery sourwater by advanced oxidation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Alessandra; Castro, Antonio V.; Dezotti, Marcia; Sant'Anna, G.L.

    2006-01-01

    The performance of several oxidation processes to remove organic pollutants from sourwater was investigated. Sourwater is a specific stream of petroleum refineries, which contains slowly biodegradable compounds and toxic substances that impair the industrial biological wastewater treatment system. Preliminary experiments were conducted, using the following processes: H 2 O 2 , H 2 O 2 /UV, UV, photocatalysis, ozonation, Fenton and photo-Fenton. All processes, except Fenton and photo-Fenton, did not lead to satisfactory results, reducing at most 35% of the sourwater dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Thus, further experiments were performed with these two techniques to evaluate process conditions and organic matter removal kinetics. Batch experiments revealed that the Fenton reaction is very fast and reaches, in a few minutes, an ultimate DOC removal of 13-27%, due to the formation of iron complexes. Radiation for an additional period of 60 min can increase DOC removal up to 87%. Experiments were also conducted in a continuous mode, operating one 0.4 L Fenton stirred reactor and one 1.6 L photo-Fenton reactor in series. DOC removals above 75% were reached, when the reaction system was operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT) higher than 85 min. An empirical mathematical model was proposed to represent the DOC removal kinetics, allowing predicting process performance quite satisfactorily

  6. In situ investigation of wet chemical processes for chalcopyrite solar cells by L-edge XAS under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, Stefanie M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lauermann, Iver, E-mail: Iver.lauermann@helmholtz-berlin.d [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Ennaoui, Ahmed; Kropp, Timo; Lange, Kathrin M.; Weber, Matthieu [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Aziz, Emad F., E-mail: Emad.Aziz@helmholtz-berlin.d [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Two instrumental setups for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in liquid systems are demonstrated in this work. One for investigating chemical reactions in solutions and a new one for the solid component of a liquid / (as in both / absorber) solid interface. We used these setups for investigating two production processes for chalcopyrite solar cells under ambient conditions, probing the L-edge of Zn and Cu. The first one is a flow cell with a silicon nitride membrane to study the chemical bath deposition process for Cd-free buffer layers. Examining the electronic structure of involved Zn complexes allows to determine the exact reaction mechanism taking place during this process. The second setup is a rotating disk for investigating the bath/absorber interface upon the etching process of superficial binary copper compounds of the absorber as a function of time. The time resolution of the chemical reaction demonstrated in this study ranges from the second to minute time scale.

  7. In situ investigation of wet chemical processes for chalcopyrite solar cells by L-edge XAS under ambient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greil, Stefanie M.; Lauermann, Iver; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Kropp, Timo; Lange, Kathrin M.; Weber, Matthieu; Aziz, Emad F.

    2010-01-01

    Two instrumental setups for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in liquid systems are demonstrated in this work. One for investigating chemical reactions in solutions and a new one for the solid component of a liquid / (as in both / absorber) solid interface. We used these setups for investigating two production processes for chalcopyrite solar cells under ambient conditions, probing the L-edge of Zn and Cu. The first one is a flow cell with a silicon nitride membrane to study the chemical bath deposition process for Cd-free buffer layers. Examining the electronic structure of involved Zn complexes allows to determine the exact reaction mechanism taking place during this process. The second setup is a rotating disk for investigating the bath/absorber interface upon the etching process of superficial binary copper compounds of the absorber as a function of time. The time resolution of the chemical reaction demonstrated in this study ranges from the second to minute time scale.

  8. In situ investigation of wet chemical processes for chalcopyrite solar cells by L-edge XAS under ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greil, Stefanie M.; Lauermann, Iver; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Kropp, Timo; Lange, Kathrin M.; Weber, Matthieu; Aziz, Emad F.

    2010-02-01

    Two instrumental setups for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in liquid systems are demonstrated in this work. One for investigating chemical reactions in solutions and a new one for the solid component of a liquid / (as in both / absorber) solid interface. We used these setups for investigating two production processes for chalcopyrite solar cells under ambient conditions, probing the L-edge of Zn and Cu. The first one is a flow cell with a silicon nitride membrane to study the chemical bath deposition process for Cd-free buffer layers. Examining the electronic structure of involved Zn complexes allows to determine the exact reaction mechanism taking place during this process. The second setup is a rotating disk for investigating the bath/absorber interface upon the etching process of superficial binary copper compounds of the absorber as a function of time. The time resolution of the chemical reaction demonstrated in this study ranges from the second to minute time scale.

  9. Evapotranspiration and land surface process responses to afforestation in western Taiwan: A comparison between dry and wet weather conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqiang Liu; L.B. Zhang; L. Hao; Ge Sun; S.-C. Liu

    2016-01-01

    An afforestation project was initiated in the western plain of Taiwan to convert abandoned farming lands into forests to improve the ecological and environmental conditions. This study was conducted to understand the potential impacts of this land cover change on evapotranspiration (ET) and other land surface processes and the...

  10. Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation process for chromium oxidation at graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yudong; Zheng, Shili; Sun, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation processes for chromium oxidation and Cr-contaminated waste disposal were reported in this study. The highly graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes g-MWCNTs modified electrode was prepared for the in-situ electrochemical generation of HO 2 - . RRDE test results illustrated that g-MWCNTs exhibited much higher two-electron oxygen reduction activity than other nanocarbon materials with peak current density of 1.24 mA cm -2 , %HO 2 - of 77.0% and onset potential of -0.15 V (vs. Hg/HgO). It was originated from the highly graphitized structure and good electrical conductivity as illustrated from the Raman, XRD and EIS characterizations, respectively. Large amount of reactive oxygen species (HO 2 - and ·OH) were in-situ electro-generated from the two-electron oxygen reduction and chromium-induced alkaline electro-Fenton-like reaction. The oxidation of Cr(III) was efficiently achieved within 90 min and the conversion ratio maintained more than 95% of the original value after stability test, offering an efficient and green approach for the utilization of Cr-containing wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transformation of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL3) compounds during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes in drinking water: Assessment of biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestankova, Hana; Parker, Austa M; Bramaz, Nadine; Canonica, Silvio; Schirmer, Kristin; von Gunten, Urs; Linden, Karl G

    2016-04-15

    The removal of emerging contaminants during water treatment is a current issue and various technologies are being explored. These include UV- and ozone-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In this study, AOPs were explored for their degradation capabilities of 25 chemical contaminants on the US Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List 3 (CCL3) in drinking water. Twenty-three of these were found to be amenable to hydroxyl radical-based treatment, with second-order rate constants for their reactions with hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the range of 3-8 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The development of biological activity of the contaminants, focusing on mutagenicity and estrogenicity, was followed in parallel with their degradation using the Ames and YES bioassays to detect potential changes in biological effects during oxidative treatment. The majority of treatment cases resulted in a loss of biological activity upon oxidation of the parent compounds without generation of any form of estrogenicity or mutagenicity. However, an increase in mutagenic activity was detected by oxidative transformation of the following CCL3 parent compounds: nitrobenzene (OH, UV photolysis), quinoline (OH, ozone), methamidophos (OH), N-nitrosopyrolidine (OH), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (OH), aniline (UV photolysis), and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (UV photolysis). Only one case of formation of estrogenic activity was observed, namely, for the oxidation of quinoline by OH. Overall, this study provides fundamental and practical information on AOP-based treatment of specific compounds of concern and represents a framework for evaluating the performance of transformation-based treatment processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Liquid‐to‐solid ratio control as an advanced process control solution for continuous twin‐screw wet granulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaï, Niels; Leersnyder, Fien De; Copot, Dana

    2018-01-01

    for the dynamic behavior of the granule liquid‐to‐solid ratio (w) at the end of the granulation unit of a commercial ConsiGmaTM‐25 production line. Near‐infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the granule composition in‐line. The outcome for both the tracking and regulator problem using either conventional......, and the limited flexibility of the automation software. Applying the proposed advanced process control solution offers an answer to upstream material flow rate deviations....

  13. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  14. Center Overview and UAV Highlights at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Deborah; Yan, Jerry Chi Yiu

    2017-01-01

    The PowerPoint presentation gives an overview of NASA Ames Research Center and its core competencies, as well as some of the highlights of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) accomplishments and innovations by researchers at Ames.

  15. Examining Dynamical Processes of Tropical Mountain Hydroclimate, Particularly During the Wet Season, Through Integration of Autonomous Sensor Observations and Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstrom, R. A.; Fernandez, A.; Mark, B. G.; Covert, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Peru is facing imminent water resource issues as glaciers retreat and demand increases, yet limited observations and model resolution hamper understanding of hydrometerological processes on local to regional scales. Much of current global and regional climate studies neglect the meteorological forcing of lapse rates (LRs) and valley and slope wind dynamics on critical components of the Peruvian Andes' water-cycle, and herein we emphasize the wet season. In 2004 and 2005 we installed an autonomous sensor network (ASN) within the glacierized Llanganuco Valley, Cordillera Blanca (9°S), consisting of discrete, cost-effective, automatic temperature loggers located along the valley axis and anchored by two automatic weather stations. Comparisons of these embedded hydrometeorological measurements from the ASN and climate modeling by dynamical downscaling using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) elucidate distinct diurnal and seasonal characteristics of the mountain wind regime and LRs. Wind, temperature, humidity, and cloud simulations suggest that thermally driven up-valley and slope winds converging with easterly flow aloft enhance late afternoon and evening cloud development which helps explain nocturnal wet season precipitation maxima measured by the ASN. Furthermore, the extreme diurnal variability of along-valley-axis LR, and valley wind detected from ground observations and confirmed by dynamical downscaling demonstrate the importance of realistic scale parameterizations of the atmospheric boundary layer to improve regional climate model projections in mountainous regions. We are currently considering to use intermediate climate models such as ICAR to reduce computing cost and we continue to maintain the ASN in the Cordillera Blanca.

  16. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Crystallization process and magnetic properties of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phu, N D; Luong, N H; Chau, N; Hai, N H; Ngo, D T; Hoang, L H

    2011-01-01

    This paper studied the crystallization process, phase transition and magnetic properties of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by the microwave heating technique. Thermal analysis and magnetodynamics studies revealed many interesting aspects of the amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles. The as-prepared sample was amorphous. Crystallization of the maghemite γ-Fe 2 O 3 (with an activation energy of 0.71 eV) and the hematite α-Fe 2 O 3 (with an activation energy of 0.97 eV) phase occurred at around 300 deg. C and 350 deg. C, respectively. A transition from the maghemite to the hematite occurred at 500 deg. C with an activation energy of 1.32 eV. A study of the temperature dependence of magnetization supported the crystallization and the phase transformation. Raman shift at 660 cm -1 and absorption band in the infrared spectra at 690 cm -1 showed the presence of disorder in the hematite phase on the nanoscale which is supposed to be the origin of the ferromagnetic behaviour of that antiferromagnetic phase.

  18. Understanding the formation process of the liquid slug in a hilly-terrain wet natural gas pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Li, Jingbo; Wang, Shuli

    2017-01-01

    condition on the liquid slug formation is discussed including pipe diameter, inclination angle, gas superficial velocity and liquid holdup. The results show that the pipe is blocked by the liquid slug at the moment of slug formed. The pipe pressure suddenly increases, and then decreases gradually...... in the process of liquid slug formation and motion. The pipe pressure drop and liquid holdup decrease along with the increasing inclination angle of ascending pipe. On the contrary, they rise with the increase of the inclination angle of descending pipe. Higher gas superficial velocity and liquid holdup result...

  19. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent

  20. Is Validation of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge a Disrespectful Process? A Case Study of Traditional Fishing Poisons and Invasive Fish Management from the Wet Tropics, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Gratani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing recognition of the contribution that indigenous ecological knowledge (IEK can make to contemporary 'western' science-based natural resource management (NRM, integration of the two knowledge systems has not reached its full potential in Australia. One explanation is that there is an implicit requirement for IEK to be validated by western scientific knowledge (SK, which has stalled its application and perpetuated the primacy of SK over IEK. Consequently, there is little experience of IEK validation, indigenous peoples' perspectives of the process, and no formal frameworks to achieve mutual and equitable validation of both IEK and SK. In this paper we assess the opportunities and limitations of validation processes using a case study of traditional fishing poisons for invasive fish management in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area of Australia. The study was conducted within a coresearch approach between the Aboriginal holders of the IEK, who are among the paper's authors, and science-based biologists. We jointly carried out scientific laboratory trials that demonstrated that fishing poisons are effective at immobilizing invasive tilapia. Retrospective interviews with indigenous coresearchers showed that they did not find the experience of validation disrespectful, but instead empowering and necessary for their IEK to be understood and appreciated by scientists and included in NRM. Based on our experiences and knowledge of socialization theory we present a framework for the potential future design of collaborative validation processes to facilitate the integration of IEK into mainstream NRM, and the acceptance of SK within indigenous communities in Australia.

  1. Effect of Heat Drawing Process on Mechanical Properties of Dry-Jet Wet Spun Fiber of Linear Low Density Polyethylene/Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene is one of the most commonly used polymer materials. Even though linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE has better mechanical properties than other kinds of polyethylene, it is not used as a textile material because of its plastic behavior that is easy to break at the die during melt spinning. In this study, LLDPE fibers were successfully produced with a new approach using a dry-jet wet spinning and a heat drawing process. The fibers were filled with carbon nanotubes (CNTs to improve the strength and reduce plastic deformation. The crystallinity, degree of orientation, mechanical properties (strength to yield, strength to break, elongation at break, and initial modulus, electrical conductivity, and thermal properties of LLDPE fibers were studied. The results show that the addition of CNTs improved the tensile strength and the degree of crystallinity. The heat drawing process resulted in a significant increase in the tensile strength and the orientation of the CNTs and polymer chains. In addition, this study demonstrates that the heat drawing process effectively decreases the plastic deformation of LLDPE.

  2. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Wetting and homogenization processes in backfill materials. Laboratory tests for evaluating modeling parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann

    2008-12-01

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and implementing similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. A co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The backfill materials investigated where: Asha 230B and Friedland for use as block materials and Cebogel QSE, MX-80, Minelco and Friedland for use as pellets material. The issues investigated were: 1. Homogenization processes of highly compacted backfill blocks and pellet filling during saturation. The influence of different materials and water salinity was studied. 2. Water uptake processes for different materials and different water types. Clay specimens were put in contact with water at one end and after a certain time the tests were terminated and the water content distribution determined. 3. The water retention curve was determined for the two block materials. The results of these investigations will be used for modeling purposes either directly (retention curve) or indirectly by modeling of the tests

  3. Reactor modeling and process analysis for partial oxidation of natural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis analyses a novel process of partial oxidation of natural gas and develops a numerical tool for the partial oxidation reactor modeling. The proposed process generates syngas in an integrated plant of a partial oxidation reactor, a syngas turbine and an air separation unit. This is called

  4. Pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes in aquatic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Most aquatic organisms behave as conformers with respect to environmental variables, including changes in O2 availability. Aquatic species that show tolerance to hypoxia/anoxia or hyperoxia can be excellent models for investigating physiological and biochemical adaptations that deal with changing O2 and consequent changes in metabolic rate and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, I summarize selected data on ROS production and antioxidant defenses in a model marine invertebrate, the bivalve Mytilus, under different environmental and physiological conditions. An example of other bivalves adapted to particular environments (the Antarctic Sea) is also reported. These studies contributed to the knowledge on pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes in aquatic invertebrates from comparative and environmental perspectives. A common role for metallothioneins in antioxidant protection in mammals and aquatic invertebrates is underlined in different conditions, from human disease to responses to environmental exposure to heavy metals. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Oxidative catalytic dimerization of methane: Syngas process alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvi, G.

    1991-01-01

    A review of research progress relative to the direct conversion of methane into liquid hydrocarbons through oxidative catalytic dimerization indicates that high carbon (C 2 ) yields can be obtained in experimental conditions in which there is a high linear gas velocity, i.e., velocities greater than 0.45 m/s, at temperatures ranging between 800 and 850 degrees C, and with volumetric methane/oxygen ratios of 2 to 10. The high linear velocities have the function of preventing back-mixing phenomena and consequent product degradation. The suitable integration of dimerization (exothermic) with cracking (endothermic) of ethane to ethylene and higher olefins, as well as, oligomerization of the olefins to liquid hydrocarbons (synthesis fuels) can allow for the development of an very interesting process from both technical and economic points of view, especially for those countries with a mix of abundant natural gas reserves and scarce petroleum resources

  6. Long-lived ames dwarf mice are resistant to chemical stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokov, Alex F; Lindsey, Merry L; Khodr, Christina; Sabia, Marian R; Richardson, Arlan

    2009-08-01

    To probe the connection between longevity and stress resistance, we compared the sensitivity of Ames long-lived dwarf mice and control littermates with paraquat, diquat, and dobutamine. In young adult animals, 95% of male and 39% of female controls died after paraquat administration, but no dwarf animals died. When the experiment was repeated at an older age or a higher dosage of paraquat, dwarf mice still showed greater resistance. Dwarf mice also were more resistant to diquat; 80% of male and 60% of female controls died compared with 40% and 20% of dwarf mice, despite greater sensitivity of dwarf liver to diquat. Dwarf mice were also less sensitive to dobutamine-induced cardiac stress and had lower levels of liver and lung F(2)-isoprostanes. This is the first direct in vivo evidence that long-lived Ames dwarf mice have enhanced resistance to chemical insult, particularly oxidative stressors.

  7. Development of multilayer imprint process for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumaru, Kazuki; Tsumori, Fujio; Kudo, Kentaro; Osada, Toshiko; Shinagawa, Kazunari

    2017-06-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are fuel cells made of ceramics. To increase the SOFC energy density, we developed an SOFC with a wavy electrolyte layer. As a wavy electrolyte has a larger reaction surface area than a flat electrolyte, a higher energy density could be obtained. Our proposed process is named micro-powder imprint (µPI) with a multilayer imprint process that is useful for fabricating a microscale pattern on a ceramic sheet such as an SOFC electrolyte layer. µPI is based on nanoimprint lithography; therefore, it also exhibits the same advantages of high resolution and mass productivity. The starting material for µPI is a compound sheet containing ceramic powder and binder materials consisting of thermoplastic resin. In this study, two different sheets were stacked into one sheet as a multilayer sheet for the µPI process to form a wavy compound sheet. As the initial state of the stacked sheet, including the mechanical properties of each layer, affects the final wavy shape, we changed the material composition. As a result, the SOFCs unit cell with a wavy electrolyte was fabricated. Note that the anode layer was formed at the same time. After adding the cathode layer, we succeeded in preparing a complete cell for testing power generation.

  8. A nanogravimmetric investigation of the charging processes on ruthenium oxide thin films and their effect on methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, M.C.; Cogo, L.; Tanimoto, S.T.; Calegaro, M.L.; Bulhoes, L.O.S

    2006-01-01

    The charging processes and methanol oxidation that occur during the oxidation-reduction cycles in a ruthenium oxide thin film electrode (deposited by the sol-gel method on Pt covered quartz crystals) were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance techniques. The ruthenium oxide rutile phase structure was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained during the charging of rutile ruthenium oxide films indicate that in the anodic sweep the transition from Ru(II) to Ru(VI) occurs followed by proton de-intercalation. In the cathodic sweep, electron injection occurs followed by proton intercalation, leading to Ru(II). The proton intercalation/de-intercalation processes can be inferred from the mass/charge relationship which gives a slope close to 1 g mol -1 (multiplied by the Faraday constant) corresponding to the molar mass of hydrogen. From the chronoamperometric measurements, charge and mass saturation of the RuO 2 thin films was observed (440 ng cm -2 ) during the charging processes, which is related to the total number of active sites in these films. Using the electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance technique to study the methanol oxidation reaction at these films was possible to demonstrate that bulk oxidation occurs without the formation of strongly adsorbed intermediates such as CO ads , demonstrating that Pt electrodes modified by ruthenium oxide particles can be promising catalysts for the methanol oxidation as already shown in the literature

  9. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  10. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, Calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Laboratory conducts fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, and mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the vision of DOE and, more specifically, to increase the general levels of knowledge and technical capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for the future, both academia and industry, and to develop new technologies and practical applications from our basic scientific programs that will contribute to a strengthening of the US economy. The Laboratory approaches all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. The Laboratory relies upon its strengths in materials synthesis and processing, materials reliability, chemical analysis, chemical sciences, photosynthesis, materials sciences, metallurgy, high-temperature superconductivity, and applied mathematical sciences to conduct the long term basic and intermediate range applied research needed to solve the complex problems encountered in energy production, and utilization as well as environmental restoration and waste management. Ames Laboratory will continue to maintain a very significant and highly beneficial pre-college math and science education program which currently serves both teachers and students at the middle school and high school levels. Our technology transfer program is aided by joint efforts with ISU's technology development and commercialization enterprise and will sustain concerted efforts to implement Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, industrially sponsored Work for Others projects. and scientific personnel exchanges with our various customers

  11. Conducting starter culture-controlled fermentations of coffee beans during on-farm wet processing: Growth, metabolic analyses and sensorial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Neto, Ensei; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Medeiros, Adriane Bianchi Pedroni; Woiciechowski, Adenise Lorenci; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the potential use of Pichia fermentans YC5.2 as a starter culture to conduct controlled coffee bean fermentations during on-farm wet processing was investigated. Inoculated fermentations were conducted with or without the addition of 2% (w/v) sucrose, and the resultant microbial growth and metabolism, bean chemistry and beverage quality were compared with spontaneous (control) fermentation. In both inoculated treatments, P. fermentans prevailed over indigenous microbiota and a restricted microbial composition was observed at the end of fermentation process. The inoculation also increased the production of specific volatile aroma compounds (e.g., ethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate) and decreased the production of lactic acid during the fermentation process. Sucrose supplementation did not significantly interfere with the growth and frequency of P. fermentans YC5.2 inoculum but maintained high levels of wild bacteria population and lactic acid production similar to the spontaneous process. In roasted beans, the content of sugars and organic acids were statistically (pcoffee beans by increasing the concentration of yeast-derived metabolites compared to control. Sensory analysis of coffee beverages demonstrated that the use of the YC5.2 strain was favorable for the production of high-quality coffees with distinctive characteristics, e.g., intense perception of 'vanilla' taste and 'floral' aromas. In conclusion, the use of P. fermentans YC5.2 in coffee processing was shown to be a viable alternative to control the fermentation step and to ensure consistent quality of finished products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of effect-directed analysis to identify mutagenic nitrogenous disinfection by-products of advanced oxidation drinking water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vughs, D.; Baken, K.A.; Kolkman, A.; Martijn, A.J.; de Voogt, P.

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants in (drinking) water treatment. It is however known that medium pressure UV/H2O2 treatment may lead to mutagenicity in the Ames test, which is no longer present after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Many

  13. Identifying overarching excipient properties towards an in-depth understanding of process and product performance for continuous twin-screw wet granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willecke, N; Szepes, A; Wunderlich, M; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C; De Beer, T

    2017-04-30

    The overall objective of this work is to understand how excipient characteristics influence the process and product performance for a continuous twin-screw wet granulation process. The knowledge gained through this study is intended to be used for a Quality by Design (QbD)-based formulation design approach and formulation optimization. A total of 9 preferred fillers and 9 preferred binders were selected for this study. The selected fillers and binders were extensively characterized regarding their physico-chemical and solid state properties using 21 material characterization techniques. Subsequently, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the data sets of filler and binder characteristics in order to reduce the variety of single characteristics to a limited number of overarching properties. Four principal components (PC) explained 98.4% of the overall variability in the fillers data set, while three principal components explained 93.4% of the overall variability in the data set of binders. Both PCA models allowed in-depth evaluation of similarities and differences in the excipient properties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Research on the Effects of Process Parameters on Surface Roughness in Wet-Activated Silicon Direct Bonding Base on Orthogonal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei NIE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness is a very important index in silicon direct bonding and it is affected by processing parameters in the wet-activated process. These parameters include the concentration of activation solution, holding time and treatment temperature. The effects of these parameters were investigated by means of orthogonal experiments. In order to analyze the wafer roughness more accurately, the bear ratio of the surface was used as the evaluation index. From the results of the experiments, it could be concluded that the concentration of the activation solution affected the roughness directly and the higher the concentration, the lower the roughness. Holding time did not affect the roughness as acutely as that of the concentration, but a reduced activation time decreased the roughness perceptibly. It was also discovered that the treatment temperature had a weak correlation with the surface roughness. Based on these conclusions, the parameters of concentration, temperature and holding time were optimized respectively as NH4OH:H2O2=1:1 (without water, 70 °C and 5 min. The results of bonding experiments proved the validity of the conclusions of orthogonal experiments.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9711

  15. Physico-chemical Processes on the Heterogeneous Boundary of Oxides Melts and Molten Iron with the Sacrificed Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalov, Yu.P.; Lavrov, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of oxides melts and iron with iron oxide (the main component of sacrificial materials) is studied. The interaction on the boundary of Fe 2 O 3 and melts of PbO, Pb 2 SiO 4 , PbSiO 3 , Na 2 SiO 3 , Na 4 SiO 4 , Na 2 Si2O 5 , iron melt is considered. Comparison is given of the results obtained with data acquired in investigating the interaction on the boundary of Fe 2 O 3 and corium. Ablation for all the types of melts is found to get started with diffusion dissolution of Fe 2 O 3 in the melt followed by redox reaction accompanied by evolution of molecular oxygen. The molecular oxygen disconnects SM grains in the zone of the reaction and due to it the ablation is displaced from diffusion range to kinetic range and becomes pulsating. The rate of the redox reaction is dependent on the oxygen ion concentration (the higher concentration of oxygen ions in melt the higher speed of molecular oxygen evolution is). It is shown that molten Fe does not wet Fe 2 O 3 at 1600-1800 deg C that makes the ablation process slow. To accelerate the Fe 2 O 3 interaction with the iron melt it is necessary to add oxides of 3d- elements (CuO, MnO, NiO, CoO ) into Fe 2 O 3 . (authors)

  16. Cultivating a Grassroots Aerospace Innovation Culture at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Sarah; Sanchez, Hugo; Lewis, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the adaptation of specific 'knowledge production' methods to implement a first of its kind, grassroots event that provokes a cultural change in how the NASA Ames civil servant community engages in the creation and selection of innovative ideas. Historically, selection of innovative proposals at NASA Ames Research Center is done at the highest levels of management, isolating the views and perspectives of the larger civil servant community. Additionally, NASA innovation programs are typically open to technical organizations and do not engage non-technical organizations to bring forward innovative processes/business practices. Finally, collaboration on innovative ideas and associated solutions tend to be isolated to organizational silos. In this environment, not all Ames employees feel empowered to innovate and opportunities for employee collaboration are limited. In order to address these issues, the 'innovation contest' method was adapted to create the NASA Ames Innovation Fair, a unique, grassroots innovation opportunity for the civil servant community. The Innovation Fair consisted of a physical event with a virtual component. The physical event provided innovators the opportunity to collaborate and pitch their innovations to the NASA Ames community. The civil servant community then voted for the projects that they viewed as innovative and would contribute to NASA's core mission, making this event a truly grassroots effort. The Innovation Fair website provided a location for additional knowledge sharing, discussion, and voting. On March 3rd, 2016, the 'First Annual NASA Ames Innovation Fair' was held with 49 innovators and more than 300 participants collaborating and/or voting for the best innovations. Based on the voting results, seven projects were awarded seed funding for projects ranging from innovative cost models to innovations in aerospace technology. Surveys of both innovators and Fair participants show the Innovation Fair was successful

  17. Nitric oxide protects carbon assimilation process of watermelon from boron-induced oxidative injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed; Najeeb, Ullah; Yang, Jinghua; Hu, Zhongyuan; Fang, Zhang Ming

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates plant response to a variety of abiotic stresses; however, limited information is available on its effect on boron (B)-stressed watermelon plants. The present study investigates the mechanism through which NO protects watermelon seedlings from B deficiency and toxicity stresses. Five days old watermelon seedlings were exposed to B (0, 0.5 and 10 mg L -1 ) alone or with 75 μmole of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for 30 days. Both low and high B concentrations in the media altered nutrient accumulation and impaired various physiological processes of watermelon seedlings, leading to a significant reduction in biomass production. The plants exposed to B deficient or toxic concentrations had 66 and 69% lower shoot dry weight, respectively compared with optimum B levels. B toxicity-induced growth inhibition of watermelon seedlings was associated with high B translocation to shoot tissues, which caused lipid membrane peroxidation (12% increase) and chlorophyll destruction (25% reduction). In contrast, B deficiency accelerated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically OH -1 and induced cellular oxidative injury. Exogenously applied SNP promoted leaf chlorophyll, photosynthesis and consequently biomass production in B-stressed watermelon seedlings by reducing B accumulation, lipid membrane peroxidation and ROS generation. It also activated antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, POD and APX, and protected the seedlings from ROS-induced cellular burst. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Removal of organic pollutants in tannery wastewater from wet-blue fur processing by integrated Anoxic/Oxic (A/O) and Fenton: Process optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yong; Li, Weiguang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    performance than anaerobic degradation. Effect of hydraulic retention time on A/O performance in terms of COD removal efficiency was evaluated, excess HRT like 60h would reduce the effluent quality, and the appropriate organic load rate was at least up to 0.8kgCODm-3d-1 with corresponding COD removal of about...... the highest COD removal of 55.87%. GC-MS analysis was carried out to observe the change of organic composition during Fenton oxidation, and most of the residual organic pollutants resistant to Fenton treatment belonged to organosilanes and saturated alkanes. This study will provide useful information...

  19. NASA Ames UV-LED Poster Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroux, Belgacem Amar

    2015-01-01

    UV-LED is a small satellite technology demonstration payload being flown on the Saudisat-4 spacecraft that is demonstrating non-contacting charge control of an isolated or floating mass using new solid-state ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). Integrated to the rest of the spacecraft and launched on a Dnepr in June 19, 2014, the project is a collaboration between the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Stanford University, and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Beginning with its commissioning in December, 2015, the data collected by UV-LED have validated a novel method of charge control that will improve the performance of drag-free spacecraft allowing for concurrent science collection during charge management operations as well as reduce the mass, power and volume required while increasing lifetime and reliability of a charge management subsystem. UV-LED continues to operate, exploring new concepts in non-contacting charge control and collecting data crucial to understanding the lifetime of ultra-violet light emitting diodes in space. These improvements are crucial to the success of ground breaking missions such as LISA and BBO, and demonstrates the ability of low cost small satellite missions to provide technological advances that far exceed mission costs.

  20. The evolution of granule fracture strength as a function of impeller tip speed and granule size for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2015-07-05

    The feasibility of a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process has been established previously and several potential advantages over the conventional process have been highlighted (Wade et al., 2014a,b,b). Due to fundamental differences in the growth mechanism and granule consolidation behaviour between the two processes the reverse-phase approach generally formed granules with a greater mass mean diameter and a lower intragranular porosity than those formed by the conventional granulation process under the same liquid saturation and impeller tip speed conditions. The lower intragranular porosity was hypothesised to result in an increase in the granule strength and subsequent decrease in tablet tensile strength. Consequently, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of impeller tip speed and granule size on the strength and compaction properties of granules prepared using both the reverse-phase and conventional granulation processes. For the conventional granulation process an increase in the impeller tip speed from 1.57 to 4.71 ms(-1) (200-600 RPM) resulted in an increase in the mean granule strength (pgranule size fractions and as the granule size fraction increased from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm the mean fracture strength decreased (p0.05) on mean granule strength whereas, like the conventional process, an increase in granule size fraction from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm resulted in a decrease (pgranule fracture strength and the tablet tensile strength (p>0.05) for either granulation approach. These data support the rejection of the original hypothesis which stated that an increase in granule strength may result in a decrease in the tablet tensile strength. The similar tablet tensile strength observed between the conventional and reverse-phase granulation processes indicated that while mechanistic differences exist in the formation of the granules, which resulted in significant granule-scale fracture strength differences, the granule compaction properties

  1. Wetting and evaporation of binary mixture drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiane, Khellil; David, Samuel; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2008-09-11

    Experimental results on the wetting behavior of water, methanol, and binary mixture sessile drops on a smooth, polymer-coated substrate are reported. The wetting behavior of evaporating water/methanol drops was also studied in a water-saturated environment. Drop parameters (contact angle, shape, and volume) were monitored in time. The effects of the initial relative concentrations on subsequent evaporation and wetting dynamics were investigated. Physical mechanisms responsible for the various types of wetting behavior during different stages are proposed and discussed. Competition between evaporation and hydrodynamic flow are evoked. Using an environment saturated with water vapor allowed further exploration of the controlling mechanisms and underlying processes. Wetting stages attributed to differential evaporation of methanol were identified. Methanol, the more volatile component, evaporates predominantly in the initial stage. The data, however, suggest that a small proportion of methanol remained in the drop after the first stage of evaporation. This residual methanol within the drop seems to influence subsequent wetting behavior strongly.

  2. Processing, characterization and properties of oxide based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Sutapa

    The synthesis, characterization and mechanical properties of oxide based nanocomposites are reported in this dissertation. Two binary systems are studied: Alsb2Osb3-MgO and Alsb2Osb3-ZrOsb2. Alsb2Osb3-MgO was chosen because of its relatively large field of solid solubilities at a moderate temperature. On the other hand, Alsb2Osb3-ZrOsb2 was chosen because it shows minimal solid solubility of the constituents. A novel "Auto Ignition" process using suitable fuels and oxidizers was utilized in the synthesis of nanocomposites and solid solutions. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out in predicting end point adiabatic temperatures (Tsbad) for each composition in both systems. Combustion temperatures were experimentally measured by means of a data acquisition system. Characterizations of the powders were carried out by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive analysis (EDAX) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Heat treatment experiments were carried out to study the grain growth behavior. A hot isostatic pressing (HIP) model was developed for the present nanoceramics. Input parameters were carefully chosen for such nanomaterials. The as-synthesized nanocrystalline powders were consolidated to near theoretical density by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) while retaining fine grain size. The experimental results were compared with the predictions of the model. Mechanical properties, such as room temperature toughness, low temperatures well as high temperature hardness, were determined for both systems. Room temperature hardness values were (2.89-7.79) GPa and fracture toughness was between 2.7 and 5.82 MPa.msp{1/2} for various compositions in the Alsb2Osb3-MgO system. Room temperature hardness values were between 5.33 and 8.71 GPa and fracture toughness values ranged from (5.3-9.62) MPa.msp{1/2} for various compositions in the Alsb2Osb3-ZrOsb2 system. Nanoindentation experiments were carried out to further explore the room

  3. Separation And Purification Of Radioiodine 131I by Means of wet Distillation Method From By-Product of U-235 Fission Produced 99Mo Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiawan, Duyeh; Soenarjo, Soenarhadijoso

    2000-01-01

    The production of 99 Mo from 235 U fission also produces radioiodine fraction as by product. The radioiodine fraction can be expected to be a complement for radioiodine 131 I produced by neutron activation on TeO 2 target. Separation and purification were therefore carried out from radioiodine fraction obtained from production process of 99 Mo fission product. The radioiodine 131 I fraction was separated and purified by means of wet distillation method that is often used for separating 131 I from post-neutron activated TeO 2 . The quality control of the resulting products indicates that the resulting radioiodine 131 I solution was suitable to be used for labelling or synthesis of 131 I labelled compounds. Although the efficiencies of separation and purification were found to be low ranging between 25 to 37%, the result of the presented experiment generally affirm the consideration to exploit the 131 I fission product for labelling or synthesis of 131 I radiopharmaceuticals. Key word : distillation, radioiodine 131 I , 235 U

  4. Process for electroforming nickel containing dispersed thorium oxide particles therein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Nickel electroforming is effected by passing a direct current through a bath containing a dissolved nickel salt or a mixture of such salts, such as those present in sulfamate or Watts baths, and finely divided sol-derived thorium oxide particles of 75 to 300 angstroms, preferably 100 to 200 angstroms diameters therein, at a pH in the range of 0.4 to 1.9, preferably 0.8 to 1.3. The nickel so deposited, as on a pre-shaped stainless steel cathode, may be produced in desired shape and may be removed from the cathode and upon removal, without additional working, possesses desirable engineering properties at elevated temperatures, e.g., 1,500 to 2,200 0 F. Although the material produced is of improved high temperature stability, hardness, and ductility, compared with nickel alone, it is still ductile at room temperature and has properties equivalent or superior to nickel at room temperatures up to 1,500 0 F. Further improvements in mechanical properties of the material may be obtained by working. Also disclosed are electrodeposition baths, methods for their manufacture, and products resulting from the electrodeposition process. (U.S.)

  5. Pengolahan Limbah Cair Pabrik Pupuk Urea Menggunakan Advanced Oxidation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmadi Darmadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Limbah cair pabrik pupuk urea terdiri dari urea dan amonium yang masing-masing mempunyai konsentrasi berkisar antara 1500-10000 ppm dan 400-3000 ppm. Konsentrasi urea yang tinggi di dalam badan air dapat menyebabkan blooming algae dalam ekosistem tersebut yang dapat mengakibatkan kehidupan biota air lain terserang penyakit. Peristiwa ini terjadi karena kurangnya nutrisi bagi biota air dan sedikitnya sinar matahari yang dapat menembusi permukaan air. Disamping kedua hal tersebut di atas, algae juga dapat memproduksi senyawa beracun bagi biota air dan manusia. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengolah urea menggunakan oksidasi konvensional (H2O2 dan Advanced Oxidation Processes (kombinasi H2O2-Fe2+ pada pH 5 dengan parameter yang digunakan adalah variasi konsen-trasi awal H2O2  dan konsentrasi Fe2+. Hasil percobaan menunjukkan bahwa penurunan konsentrasi urea tertinggi diperoleh pada penggunaan reagen fenton (8000 ppm H2O2 dan 500 ppm Fe2+, yaitu dapat menurunkan urea dari konsentrasi awal urea 2566,145 ppm menjadi 0 ppm. Kinetika reaksi dekomposisi urea menjadi amonium dan amonium menjadi nitrit dan nitrat yang diuji mengikuti laju kinetika reaksi orde 1 (satu terhadap urea dan orde satu terhadap amonium dengan konstanta laju reaksi masing-masing k1 = 0,019 dan k2 = 0,022 min-1.

  6. Next Generation Framework for Aquatic Modeling of the Earth System (NextFrAMES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, B. M.; Wollheim, W. M.; Lakhankar, T.; Vorosmarty, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Earth System model development is becoming an increasingly complex task. As scientists attempt to represent the physical and bio-geochemical processes and various feedback mechanisms in unprecedented detail, the models themselves are becoming increasingly complex. At the same time, the surrounding IT infrastructure needed to carry out these detailed model computations is growing increasingly complex as well. To be accurate and useful, Earth System models must manage a vast amount of data in heterogenous computing environments ranging from single CPU systems to Beowulf type computer clusters. Scientists developing Earth System models increasingly confront obstacles associated with IT infrastructure. Numerous development efforts are on the way to ease that burden and offer model development platforms that reduce IT challenges and allow scientists to focus on their science. While these new modeling frameworks (e.g. FMS, ESMF, CCA, OpenMI) do provide solutions to many IT challenges (performing input/output, managing space and time, establishing model coupling, etc.), they are still considerably complex and often have steep learning curves. Over the course of the last fifteen years ,the University of New Hampshire developed several modeling frameworks independently from the above-mentioned efforts (Data Assembler, Frameworks for Aquatic Modeling of the Earth System and NextFrAMES which is continued at CCNY). While the UNH modeling frameworks have numerous similarities to those developed by other teams, these frameworks, in particular the latest NextFrAMES, represent a novel model development paradigm. While other modeling frameworks focus on providing services to modelers to perform various tasks, NextFrAMES strives to hide all of those services and provide a new approach for modelers to express their scientific thoughts. From a scientific perspective, most models have two core elements: the overall model structure (defining the linkages between the simulated processes

  7. Oxidation and diffusion process in the ferrous iron-bearing glass fibres near glass temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Korsgaard, Martin; Kirkegaard, Lise

    2004-01-01

    modifier diffusion; 2) between the oxidation process and the glass transition. Based on these couplings, a phenomenological equation is proposed, which describes both kinetics and dynamics of the oxidation process of the Fe2+-bearing glass fibers. The equation can be used to predict the degree of oxidation......The Fe2+ oxidation and the network modifier diffusion in the Fe2+-bearing glass fibers are studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TG), and secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS). The results show two couplings: 1) between the Fe2+ oxidation and the network...

  8. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Robert D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  9. Optimizing and developing a continuous separation system for the wet process separation of aluminum and polyethylene in aseptic composite packaging waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dahai; Peng, Zheng; Liu, Yuqiang; Li, Li; Huang, Qifei; Xie, Minghui; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of milk in China is increasing as living standards rapidly improve, and huge amounts of aseptic composite milk packaging waste are being generated. Aseptic composite packaging is composed of paper, polyethylene, and aluminum. It is difficult to separate the polyethylene and aluminum, so most of the waste is currently sent to landfill or incinerated with other municipal solid waste, meaning that enormous amounts of resources are wasted. A wet process technique for separating the aluminum and polyethylene from the composite materials after the paper had been removed from the original packaging waste was studied. The separation efficiency achieved using different separation reagents was compared, different separation mechanisms were explored, and the impacts of a range of parameters, such as the reagent concentration, temperature, and liquid-solid ratio, on the separation time and aluminum loss ratio were studied. Methanoic acid was found to be the optimal separation reagent, and the suitable conditions were a reagent concentration of 2-4 mol/L, a temperature of 60-80°C, and a liquid-solid ratio of 30 L/kg. These conditions allowed aluminum and polyethylene to be separated in less than 30 min, with an aluminum loss ratio of less than 3%. A mass balance was produced for the aluminum-polyethylene separation system, and control technique was developed to keep the ion concentrations in the reaction system stable. This allowed a continuous industrial-scale process for separating aluminum and polyethylene to be developed, and a demonstration facility with a capacity of 50t/d was built. The demonstration facility gave polyethylene and aluminum recovery rates of more than 98% and more than 72%, respectively. Separating 1t of aluminum-polyethylene composite packaging material gave a profit of 1769 Yuan, meaning that an effective method for recycling aseptic composite packaging waste was achieved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. AME position statement on adrenal incidentaloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzolo, M; Stigliano, A; Chiodini, I; Loli, P; Furlani, L; Arnaldi, G; Reimondo, G; Pia, A; Toscano, V; Zini, M; Borretta, G; Papini, E; Garofalo, P; Allolio, B; Dupas, B; Mantero, F; Tabarin, A

    2011-06-01

    To assess currently available evidence on adrenal incidentaloma and provide recommendations for clinical practice. A panel of experts (appointed by the Italian Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AME)) appraised the methodological quality of the relevant studies, summarized their results, and discussed the evidence reports to find consensus. Unenhanced computed tomography (CT) is recommended as the initial test with the use of an attenuation value of ≤10 Hounsfield units (HU) to differentiate between adenomas and non-adenomas. For tumors with a higher baseline attenuation value, we suggest considering delayed contrast-enhanced CT studies. Positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/CT should be considered when CT is inconclusive, whereas fine needle aspiration biopsy may be used only in selected cases suspicious of metastases (after biochemical exclusion of pheochromocytoma). HORMONAL ASSESSMENT: Pheochromocytoma and excessive overt cortisol should be ruled out in all patients, whereas primary aldosteronism has to be considered in hypertensive and/or hypokalemic patients. The 1 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test is the test recommended for screening of subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS) with a threshold at 138 nmol/l for considering this condition. A value of 50 nmol/l virtually excludes SCS with an area of uncertainty between 50 and 138 nmol/l. Surgery is recommended for masses with suspicious radiological aspects and masses causing overt catecholamine or steroid excess. Data are insufficient to make firm recommendations for or against surgery in patients with SCS. However, adrenalectomy may be considered when an adequate medical therapy does not reach the treatment goals of associated diseases potentially linked to hypercortisolism.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy as alternative to wet chemical analysis to characterize Eucalyptus globulus pulps and predict their ethanol yield for a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Rosario Del P; Baeza, Jaime; Rubilar, Joselyn; Rivera, Alvaro; Freer, Juanita

    2012-12-01

    Bioethanol can be obtained from wood by simultaneous enzymatic saccharification and fermentation step (SSF). However, for enzymatic process to be effective, a pretreatment is needed to break the wood structure and to remove lignin to expose the carbohydrates components. Evaluation of these processes requires characterization of the materials generated in the different stages. The traditional analytical methods of wood, pretreated materials (pulps), monosaccharides in the hydrolyzated pulps, and ethanol involve laborious and destructive methodologies. This, together with the high cost of enzymes and the possibility to obtain low ethanol yields from some pulps, makes it suitable to have rapid, nondestructive, less expensive, and quantitative methods to monitoring the processes to obtain ethanol from wood. In this work, infrared spectroscopy (IR) accompanied with multivariate analysis is used to characterize chemically organosolv pretreated Eucalyptus globulus pulps (glucans, lignin, and hemicellulosic sugars), as well as to predict the ethanol yield after a SSF process. Mid (4,000-400 cm(-1)) and near-infrared (12,500-4,000 cm(-1)) spectra of pulps were used in order to obtain calibration models through of partial least squares regression (PLS). The obtained multivariate models were validated by cross validation and by external validation. Mid-infrared (mid-IR)/NIR PLS models to quantify ethanol concentration were also compared with a mathematical approach to predict ethanol yield estimated from the chemical composition of the pulps determined by wet chemical methods (discrete chemical data). Results show the high ability of the infrared spectra in both regions, mid-IR and NIR, to calibrate and predict the ethanol yield and the chemical components of pulps, with low values of standard calibration and validation errors (root mean square error of calibration, root mean square error of validation (RMSEV), and root mean square error of prediction), high correlation

  12. Screw calciner mechanical direct denitration process for plutonium nitrate to oxide conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souply, K.R.; Sperry, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a screw calciner direct-denitration process for converting plutonium nitrate to plutonium oxide. The information should be used when making comparisons of alternative plutonium nitrate-to-oxide conversion processes or as a basis for further detailed studies. The report contains process flow sheets with a material balance; a process description; and a discussion of the process including history, advantages and disadvantages, and additional research required

  13. Application of Advanced Oxidation Processes to Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Marco Paulo Gomes de Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Química This research contributes to the study and development of advanced oxidation technologies applied to two different problematic wastewaters: textile and winery wastewaters. In this dissertation the factors that influence the oxidation of the model compound of textile wastewaters, the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5), and of the winery wastewaters were investigated. The first part of the thesis experimental work is dedicated to the decolorization of RB5 solut...

  14. Kinetic modeling of nitric oxide removal by ultraviolet/H2O2 advanced oxidation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Moheb Shahrestani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In present study, the mass transfer-reaction kinetic parameters of nitric oxide (NO removal by ultraviolet (UV/H 2 O 2 process in a bubble column reactor in the presence of SO 2 are calculated. Materials and Methods: The mass balance equation for NO through a layer thickness of δ, under the steady state condition is solved, and NO absorption rate is calculated. The value of rate constants and Ha numbers are obtained based on experimental data under different conditions. Results: The calculations indicate that the values of Ha number are >3. The values of rate constants (k obs are fitted to some empirical equations for different operating conditions. It is observed that the value of k obs increases with an increase in H 2 O 2 concentration and UV radiation intensity while it decreases with an increase in NO and SO 2 inlet concentrations. The values of rate constants are in order of 10−5 , expect for SO 2 , which are in order of 10−7 . The results reveal that there is a good agreement between calculated and experimental values where the maximum absolute error is 16.18% related to UV light intensities between 0 and 0.012 W/m 3 . Conclusion: The obtained values of Ha numbers under different condition confirm that the absorption process of gas in the liquid phase is a fast reaction. The maximum error values resulted from a comparison between the calculated NO absorption rates and the experimental ones are acceptable.

  15. Dynamics of Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Emission during Nitrogen Conversion Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be a serious threat to the environment. Rising levels of N2O in the atmosphere contribute to global warming and destruction of the ozone layer. This thesis describes an investigation on the emission of NO and N2O during nitrogen conversion

  16. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  17. Electrospinning of nickel oxide nanofibers: Process parameters and morphology control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Abdullah; Hashaikeh, Raed

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology (diameter and roughness) were fabricated via electrospinning technique using a precursor composed of nickel acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. It was found that the diameter and surface roughness of individual nickel oxide nanofibers are strongly dependent upon nickel acetate concentration in the precursor. With increasing nickel acetate concentration, the diameter of nanofibers increased and the roughness decreased. An optimum concentration of nickel acetate in the precursor resulted in the formation of smooth and continuous nickel oxide nanofibers whose diameter can be further controlled via electrospinning voltage. Beyond an optimum concentration of nickel acetate, the resulting nanofibers were found to be ‘flattened’ and ‘wavy’ with occasional cracking across their length. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the obtained nanofibers are polycrystalline in nature. These nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology have potential applications in various engineering domains. - Highlights: • Nickel oxide nanofibers were synthesized via electrospinning. • Fiber diameter and roughness depend on nickel acetate concentration used. • With increasing nickel acetate concentration the roughness of nanofibers decreased. • XRD and TEM revealed a polycrystalline structure of the nanofibers

  18. CHEMISTRY OF SO2 AND DESOX PROCESSES ON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2006-06-30

    On bulk stoichiometric oxides, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers to form SO{sub 3} or SO{sub 4} species that decompose at elevated temperatures. Adsorption on the metal cations occurs below 300 K and does not lead to cleavage of the S-O bonds. In bulk oxides, the occupied cation bands are too stable for effective bonding interactions with the LUMO of SO{sub 2}. The effects of quantum confinement on the electronic properties of oxide nanoparticles and the structural defects that usually accompany these systems in general favor the bonding and dissociation of SO{sub 2}. Thus, nanoparticles of MgO, CaO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} are all more efficient for sequestering SO{sub 2} than the corresponding bulk oxides. Structural imperfections in pure or metal-doped ceria nanoparticles accelerate the reduction of SO{sub 2} by CO by facilitating the formation and migration of O vacancies in the oxide surface.

  19. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  20. Effect of corn processing and wet distiller’s grains with solubles on odorous volatile organic compound emissions from urine and feces of beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wet distiller’s grains with solubles (WDGS) are a common feed ingredient in beef feedlot diets, but the excess nitrogen in these diets creates air quality issues, primarily due to the aromatic compounds emitted during fermentation of excreted protein. Use of high-moisture corn (HMC) instead of dry-r...

  1. Microstructure and optical appearance of anodized friction stir processed Al - Metal oxide surface composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Bordo, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate Ti, Y and Ce oxide powders into the surface of an Aluminium alloy. The FSP processed surface composite was subsequently anodized with an aim to develop optical effects in the anodized layer owing to the presence of incorporated...... oxide particles which will influence the scattering of light. This paper presents the investigations on relation between microstructure of the FSP zone and optical appearance of the anodized layer due to incorporation of metal oxide particles and modification of the oxide particles due to the anodizing...

  2. Iron Oxide Films Prepared by Rapid Thermal Processing for Solar Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickman, B.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Burrows, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Hematite is a promising and extensively investigated material for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes for energy conversion and storage, in particular for oxidation reactions. Thermal treatments during synthesis of hematite are found to affect the performance of hematite electrodes...... considerably. Herein, we present hematite thin films fabricated via one-step oxidation of Fe by rapid thermal processing (RTP). In particular, we investigate the effect of oxidation temperature on the PEC properties of hematite. Films prepared at 750 °C show the highest activity towards water oxidation...

  3. Pulse plating of Pt on n-GaAs (1 0 0) wafer surfaces: Synchrotron induced photoelectron spectroscopy and XPS of wet fabrication processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensling, D.; Hunger, R.; Kraft, D.; Mayer, Th.; Jaegermann, W.; Rodriguez-Girones, M.; Ichizli, V.; Hartnagel, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    Preparation steps of Pt/n-GaAs Schottky contacts as applied in the fabrication process of varactor diode arrays for THz applications are analysed by photoelectron spectroscopy. Pulsed cathodic deposition of Pt onto GaAs (1 0 0) wafer surfaces from acidic solution has been studied by core level photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies. A laboratory AlKα source as well as synchrotron radiation of hν=130 and 645 eV at BESSY was used. Chemical analyses and semiquantitative estimates of layer thickness are given for the natural oxide of an untreated wafer surface, a surface conditioning NH 3 etching step, and stepwise pulse plating of Pt. The structural arrangement of the detected species and interface potentials are considered

  4. Kinetic studies on the degradation of crystal violet by the Fenton oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Fan, M M; Li, C F; Peng, M; Sheng, L J; Pan, Q; Song, G W

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of dye crystal violet (CV) by Fenton oxidation process was investigated. The UV-Vis spectrogram has shown that CV can be degraded effectively by Fenton oxidation process. Different system variables namely initial H(2)O(2) concentration, initial Fe(2 + ) concentration and reaction temperature, which have effect on the degradation of CV by Fenton oxidation process, have been studied systematically. The degradation kinetics of CV was also elucidated based on the experimental data. The degradation of CV obeys the first-order reaction kinetics. The kinetic model can be described as k=1.5 exp(-(7.5)/(RT))[H(2)O(2)](0)(0.8718)[Fe(2+)](0)(0.5062). According to the IR spectrogram, it is concluded that the benzene ring of crystal violet has been destroyed by Fenton oxidation. The result will be useful in treating dyeing wastewater containing CV by Fenton oxidation process.

  5. Functionally enhanced brown adipose tissue in Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Justin; Bartke, Andrzej

    2017-01-02

    Reduced insulin-like growth factor 1/insulin signaling (IIS) has been linked to extended longevity in species ranging from yeast to mammals. In mammals, this is exemplified in Ames dwarf (Prop1 df/df ) mice, which have a 40%-60% increase in longevity (males and females, respectively) due to their recessive Prop1 loss-of-function mutation that results in lack of growth hormone (GH), thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin. Our laboratory has previously shown that Ames dwarf mice have functionally unique white adipose tissue (WAT) that improves, rather than impairs, insulin sensitivity. Because GH and thyroid hormone are integral to adipose tissue development and function, we hypothesized that brown adipose tissue (BAT) in Ames dwarf mice may also be functionally unique and/or enhanced. Here, we elaborate on our recent findings, which demonstrate that BAT is functionally enhanced in Ames dwarf mice, and suggest that BAT removal in these mice results in utilization of WAT depots as an energy source. We also discuss how our findings compare to those in other long-lived dwarf mice with altered IIS, which unlike Ames dwarf mice, are essentially euthyroid. Lastly, we provide some insights into the implications of these findings and discuss some of the necessary future work in this area.

  6. Flexible substrate compatible solution processed P-N heterojunction diodes with indium-gallium-zinc oxide and copper oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Ishan; Deepak, E-mail: saboo@iitk.ac.in

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Both n and p-type semiconductors are solution processed. • Temperature compatibility with flexible substrates such as polyimide. • Compatibility of p-type film (CuO) on n-type film (IZO). • Diode with rectification ratio of 10{sup 4} and operating voltage <1.5 V. • Construction of band alignment using XPS. - Abstract: Printed electronics on flexible substrates requires low temperature and solution processed active inks. With n-type indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) based electronics maturing for thin film transistor (TFT), we here demonstrate its heterojunction diode with p-copper oxide, prepared by sol-gel method and processed at temperatures compatible with polyimide substrates. The phase obtained for copper oxide is CuO. When coated on n-type oxide, it is prone to develop morphological features, which are minimized by annealing treatment. Diodes of p-CuO films with IGZO are of poor quality due to its high resistivity while, conducting indium-zinc oxide (IZO) films yielded good diode with rectification ratio of 10{sup 4} and operating voltage <1.5 V. A detailed measurement at the interface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical absorption ascertained the band alignment to be of staggered type. Consistently, the current in the diode is established to be due to electrons tunnelling from n-IZO to p-CuO.

  7. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alloys and Steels Volume 25 Issue 5 October 2002 pp 371-373 ... The influence of heavy metal oxides on the chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete was studied. ... Institute of Construction and Architecture of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 842 20 Bratislava, Slovak Republic ...

  8. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... Abstract. The influence of heavy metal oxides on the chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete was studied. Significant inhibition and stimulation of chloride induced corrosion have been observed. Basicity and acidity of the relevant metal ions, and their ability to form complexes are ...

  9. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... The influence of heavy metal oxides on the chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete was studied. ... Basicity and acidity of the relevant metal ions, and their ability to form complexes are considered as the main factors of the .... niobium, tantalum, protactinium, and uranium. However,.

  10. Single-photon imaging in complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charbon, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the basics of single-photon counting in complementary metal oxide semiconductors, through single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), and the making of miniaturized pixels with photon-counting capability based on SPADs. Some applications, which may take advantage of SPAD image

  11. Evaluatie Wet openbare manifestaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berend; Brouwer, Jan; Schilder, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Het rapport betreft een uitgebreide evaluatie van de Wet openbare manifestaties (Wom) in opdracht van het Ministerie van Binnenlandse Zaken en Koninkrijksrelaties. Op grond van onderzoek naar de parlementaire geschiedenis van de Wom, de literatuur, de jurisprudentie, gesprekken met beleidsadviseurs

  12. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms of enuresis Enuresis is when an older child (age 7 or older) wets the bed at night ... feel guilt and embarrassment. It’s true that your child should take responsibility for bedwetting. He or she could do this ...

  13. Ames Stereo Pipeline for Operation IceBridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, R. A.; Alexandrov, O.; McMichael, S.; Fong, T.

    2017-12-01

    We are using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline to process Operation IceBridge Digital Mapping System (DMS) images into terrain models and to align them with the simultaneously acquired LIDAR data (ATM and LVIS). The expected outcome is to create a contiguous, high resolution terrain model for each flight that Operation IceBridge has flown during its eight year history of Arctic and Antarctic flights. There are some existing terrain models in the NSIDC repository that cover 2011 and 2012 (out of the total period of 2009 to 2017), which were made with the Agisoft Photoscan commercial software. Our open-source stereo suite has been verified to create terrains of similar quality. The total number of images we expect to process is around 5 million. There are numerous challenges with these data: accurate determination and refinement of camera pose when the images were acquired based on data logged during the flights and/or using information from existing orthoimages, aligning terrains with little or no features, images containing clouds, JPEG artifacts in input imagery, inconsistencies in how data was acquired/archived over the entire period, not fully reliable camera calibration files, and the sheer amount of data. We will create the majority of terrain models at 40 cm/pixel with a vertical precision of 10 to 20 cm. In some circumstances when the aircraft was flying higher than usual, those values will get coarser. We will create orthoimages at 10 cm/pixel (with the same caveat that some flights are at higher altitudes). These will differ from existing orthoimages by using the underlying terrain we generate rather than some pre-existing very low-resolution terrain model that may differ significantly from what is on the ground at the time of IceBridge acquisition.The results of this massive processing will be submitted to the NSIDC so that cryosphere researchers will be able to use these data for their investigations.

  14. Evaluation of pretreatment processes for supercritical water oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report evaluates processes to chemically treat US Department of Energy wastes to remove organic halogens, phosphorus, and sulfur. Chemical equilibrium calculations, process simulations, and responses from developers and licensors form the basis for comparisons. Gas-phase catalytic hydrogenation processes, strong base and base catalyzed processes, high pressure hydrolysis, and other emerging or commercial dehalogenation processes (both liquid and mixed phase) were considered. Cost estimates for full-scale processes and demonstration testing are given. Based on the evaluation, testing of a hydrogenation process and a strong base process are recommended

  15. Evaluation of pretreatment processes for supercritical water oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report evaluates processes to chemically treat US Department of Energy wastes to remove organic halogens, phosphorus, and sulfur. Chemical equilibrium calculations, process simulations, and responses from developers and licensors form the basis for comparisons. Gas-phase catalytic hydrogenation processes, strong base and base catalyzed processes, high pressure hydrolysis, and other emerging or commercial dehalogenation processes (both liquid and mixed phase) were considered. Cost estimates for full-scale processes and demonstration testing are given. Based on the evaluation, testing of a hydrogenation process and a strong base process are recommended.

  16. Microphysical and Chemical Processes Affecting Wet Removal of Soluble Trace Gases in Deep Convection Observed over the Central U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bela, M.; Barth, M. C.; Toon, O. B.; Fried, A.; Homeyer, C. R.; Morrison, H.; Cummings, K.; Li, Y.; Pickering, K. E.; Allen, D. J.; Yang, Q.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J.; St Clair, J. M.; Teng, A.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Huey, L. G.; Chen, D.; Liu, X.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Flocke, F. M.; Campos, T. L.; Diskin, G. S.; Mecikalski, R.; Carey, L. D.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Betten, D.; Alford, A. A.; Ziegler, C.

    2016-12-01

    Improved understanding of processes affecting net deep convective transport of CH2O, peroxides, and other soluble trace gases is important to predicting the production of ozone (O3) in the upper troposphere, where ozone affects radiative flux and downwind air quality. We examine wet scavenging and ice retention of soluble trace gases in storms observed during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. We perform high-resolution simulations (dx = 600m-3km) with the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) of a severe storm in Oklahoma, an airmass storm in Alabama, and a mesoscale convective system (MCS) over Arkansas/Missouri/Illinois/Mississippi. Sensitivity simulations are conducted varying the fractions of soluble gases retained in ice (rf) when liquid water is transformed into frozen precipitation. Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) are calculated from the model and aircraft observations. Observed scavenging efficiencies for CH3OOH, SO2, CH2O, H2O2, and HNO3 do not differ much among the storms, despite observed liquid water contact times spanning 5-30 minutes. In the severe and MCS storms, more CH3OOH than CH2O is removed, despite the lower Henry's Law solubility of CH3OOH. WRF-Chem trajectories are utilized to examine the relative impacts of aqueous and gas phase chemistry and microphysical scavenging on soluble species removal. HNO3 removal was more sensitive to the rf value in the airmass than severe and MCS storm simulations. Similar rf values were required in all three storm simulations for CH3OOH (rf = 0.5-1) and CH2O and H2O2 (rf = 0-0.25) to produce SEs consistent with observations. However, twice as much surface precipitation was produced in the severe and MCS storm simulations than observed, and graupel volume was overestimated in the airmass and MCS storm simulations. Thus, the rf values may be higher for the airmass and MCS storms if the simulations produced the correct amount of mixed-phase precipitation. The

  17. Calcium phosphate bioceramics prepared from wet chemically precipitated powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Salma

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work calcium phosphates were synthesized by modified wet chemical precipitation route. Contrary to the conventional chemical precipitation route calcium hydroxide was homogenized with planetary mill. Milling calcium oxide and water in planetary ball mill as a first step of synthesis provides a highly dispersed calcium hydroxide suspension. The aim of this work was to study the influence of main processing parameters of wet chemical precipitation synthesis product and to control the morphology, phase and functional group composition and, consequently, thermal stability and microstructure of calcium phosphate bioceramics after thermal treatment. The results showed that it is possible to obtain calcium phosphates with different and reproducible phase compositions after thermal processing (hydroxyapatite [HAp], β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP] and HAp/β-TCP by modified wet-chemical precipitation route. The β-TCP phase content in sintered bioceramics samples is found to be highly dependent on the changes in technological parameters and it can be controlled with ending pH, synthesis temperature and thermal treatment. Pure, crystalline and highly thermally stable (up to 1300°C HAp bioceramics with homogenous grainy microstructure, grain size up to 200–250 nm and high open porosity can be successfully obtained by powder synthesized at elevated synthesis temperature of 70°C and stabilizing ending pH at 9.

  18. Solution-Processed Gallium–Tin-Based Oxide Semiconductors for Thin-Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of gallium (Ga and tin (Sn compositions on the structural and chemical properties of Ga–Sn-mixed (Ga:Sn oxide films and the electrical properties of Ga:Sn oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs. The thermogravimetric analysis results indicate that solution-processed oxide films can be produced via thermal annealing at 500 °C. The oxygen deficiency ratio in the Ga:Sn oxide film increased from 0.18 (Ga oxide and 0.30 (Sn oxide to 0.36, while the X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to Sn oxide significantly reduced. The Ga:Sn oxide film exhibited smaller grains compared to the nanocrystalline Sn oxide film, while the Ga oxide film exhibited an amorphous morphology. We found that the electrical properties of TFTs significantly improve by mixing Ga and Sn. Here, the optimum weight ratio of the constituents in the mixture of Ga and Sn precursor sols was determined to be 1.0:0.9 (Ga precursor sol:Sn precursor sol for application in the solution-processed Ga:Sn oxide TFTs. In addition, when the Ga(1.0:Sn(0.9 oxide film was thermally annealed at 900 °C, the field-effect mobility of the TFT was notably enhanced from 0.02 to 1.03 cm2/Vs. Therefore, the mixing concentration ratio and annealing temperature are crucial for the chemical and morphological properties of solution-processed Ga:Sn oxide films and for the TFT performance.

  19. Wet-Chemical Synthesis of 3D Stacked Thin Film Metal-Oxides for All-Solid-State Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert Jonathan van den Ham

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available By ultrasonic spray deposition of precursors, conformal deposition on 3D surfaces of tungsten oxide (WO3 negative electrode and amorphous lithium lanthanum titanium oxide (LLT solid-electrolyte has been achieved as well as an all-solid-state half-cell. Electrochemical activity was achieved of the WO3 layers, annealed at temperatures of 500 °C. Galvanostatic measurements show a volumetric capacity (415 mAh·cm−3 of the deposited electrode material. In addition, electrochemical activity was shown for half-cells, created by coating WO3 with LLT as the solid-state electrolyte. The electron blocking properties of the LLT solid-electrolyte was shown by ferrocene reduction. 3D depositions were done on various micro-sized Si template structures, showing fully covering coatings of both WO3 and LLT. Finally, the thermal budget required for WO3 layer deposition was minimized, which enabled attaining active WO3 on 3D TiN/Si micro-cylinders. A 2.6-fold capacity increase for the 3D-structured WO3 was shown, with the same current density per coated area.

  20. Measurements of processes in ruthenium oxide film electrodes with the quartz-crystal microbalance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttry, D.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe the first application of the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique for monitoring electrochemical processes in oxide film electrodes. They have investigated a film of ruthenium oxide, applied by the thermal decomposition of ruthenium chloride onto one side of the quartz-crystal. The quartz-crystal was precoated with gold keyhole patterns on both sides for inducing the 5 MHz resonance, followed by a thin Ti layer to ensure good adherence of the ruthenium oxide. Ruthenium oxide films are being investigated at Los Alamos for potential use in electrochemical capacitors. The material exhibits large charge capacity per geometric area and fast charge-discharge rates. Different possible processes can be responsible for charge compensation in such oxide materials, including those associated with simple double-layer charging, with pseudocapacitance, and with ion insertion into the small grains of the high-surface-area oxide material. The dynamics of such processes are determined, for a given oxide film, by the nature of the electrolyte and the resulting mechanism of charge-compensation. The QCM technique provides interesting information on these processes, as well as on film hydration and film dissolution process. The authors' initial results are presented in this paper. The results demonstrate the QCM as a sensitive tool for following not only ionic insertion processes during potential modulation, but also processes of film swelling and film dissolution

  1. Treatment of aqueous wastes contaminated with Congo Red dye by electrochemical oxidation and ozonation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faouzi Elahmadi, Mohammed; Bensalah, Nasr; Gadri, Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic aqueous wastes polluted with Congo Red (CR) have been treated by two advanced oxidation processes: electrochemical oxidation on boron doped diamond anodes (BDD-EO) and ozonation under alkaline conditions. For same concentrations, galvanostatic electrolyses have led to total COD and TOC removals but ozonation process can reach only 85% and 81% of COD and TOC removals, respectively. UV-vis qualitative analyses have shown different behaviors of CR molecules towards ozonation and electrochemical oxidation. Rapid discoloration has been observed during ozonation, whereas color persistence till the end of galvanostatic electrolyses has been seen during BDD-EO process. It seems that the oxidation mechanisms involved in the two processes are different: simultaneous destruction of azoic groups is suggested during ozonation process but consecutive destruction of these groups is proposed during BDD-EO. However, energetic study has evidenced that BDD-EO appears more efficient and more economic than ozonation in terms of TOC removals. These results have been explained by the fact that during BDD-EO, other strong oxidants electrogenerated from the electrolyte oxidation such as persulfates and direct-oxidation of CR and its byproducts on BDD anodes complement the hydroxyl radicals mediated oxidation to accomplish the total mineralization of organics.

  2. Comparative Batch and Column Evaluation of Thermal and Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    batch adsorption experiments and continous flow (fixed bed) column experiment to study the mechanism of dye removal by the commercial ... compared with those obtained for thermal regeneration method (qmax = 61.73mgg-1) and wet oxidative method (qmax .... Carbon hardness was determined using a wet attrition test ...

  3. Volcano Relation for the Deacon Process over Transition-Metal Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Hansen, Heine Anton

    2010-01-01

    We establish an activity relation for the heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of HCI (the Deacon Process) over rutile transition-metal oxide catalysts by combining density functional theory calculations (DFT) with microkinetic modeling. Linear energy relations for the elementary reaction steps...... for improvements. The analysis suggests that oxide surfaces which offer slightly weaker bonding of oxygen should exhibit a superior activity to that of RuO2....

  4. Application of solution-processed metal oxide layers as charge transport layers for CdSe/ZnS quantum-dot LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huu Tuan; Nguyen, Nang Dinh; Lee, Soonil

    2013-03-22

    We fabricated and characterized quantum-dot light emitting devices (QLEDs) that consisted of a CdSe/ZnS quantum-dot (QD) emitting layer, a hole-transporting nickel oxide (NiO) layer and/or an electron-transporting zinc oxide (ZnO) layer. Both the p-type NiO and n-type ZnO layers were formed by using sol-gel processes. All the fabricated CdSe/ZnS QLEDs showed similar electroluminescence spectra that originated from the green CdSe/ZnS QDs. However, different combinations of hole- and electron-transporting layers resulted in efficiency variations. In addition to the control of the respective concentrations of holes and electrons within a multilayer device structure, which determines the luminance and efficiency of QLEDs, the use of metal oxide layers is advantageous for long-term stability of QLEDs because they are air stable and can block the permeation of water vapor and oxygen in ambient air to a QD emitting layer. Moreover, the wet chemistry processing for their formation makes metal oxide layers attractive for low cost and/or large area manufacture of QLEDs.

  5. Influence of Process Parameters on Nitrogen Oxide Formation in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of burner operating conditions, burner geometry and fuel parameters on the formation of nitrogen oxide during combustion of pulverized coal. Main attention has been paid to combustion test facilities with self-sustaining flames, while extensions have been made...... to full scale boilers and furnace modeling. Since coal combustion and flame aerodynamics have been reviewed earlier, these phenomena are only treated briefly....

  6. Chlorine gas processing of oxide nuclear fuel particles containing thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotik, K.; Bildstein, H.; Falta, G.; Wagner, H.

    Experimental studies on the chloride extraction and separation of U and Th from coated Th--U oxide particles are reported. After a description of the chlorination equipment and the experimental procedures, the results are discussed. The yield of U is determined as a function of the reaction temperature. The results of a thermogravimetric analysis of the chlorination of uranium carbide and thorium carbides are reported and used to establish the reaction mechanism for the chlorination

  7. Oak kombucha protects against oxidative stress and inflammatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Cabral, B D; Larrosa-Pérez, M; Gallegos-Infante, J A; Moreno-Jiménez, M R; González-Laredo, R F; Rutiaga-Quiñones, J G; Gamboa-Gómez, C I; Rocha-Guzmán, N E

    2017-06-25

    Black tea infusion is the common substrate for preparing kombucha; however other sources such as oak leaves infusions can be used for the same purpose. Almost any white oak species have been used for medicinal applications by some ethnic groups in Mexico and could be also suitable for preparing kombucha analogues from oak (KAO). The objective of this research was to investigate the antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory effects of KAO by examining its modulation ability on macrophage-derived TNF-alpha and IL-6. Herbal infusions from oak and black tea were fermented by kombucha consortium during seven days at 28 °C. Chemical composition was determined by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The antioxidant activity of samples against oxidative damage caused by H 2 O 2 in monocytes activated (macrophages) was explored. Additionally, it was determined the anti-inflammatory activity using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated macrophages; in particular, the nitric oxide (NO), TNF-alpha, and IL-6 production was assessed. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha were significantly reduced by the sample treatment. Likewise, NO production was lower in treatment with kombucha and KAO compared with LPS-stimulated macrophages. Fermented beverages of oak effectively down-regulated the production of NO, while pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-6) in macrophages were stimulated with LPS. Additionally, phytochemical compounds present in KAO decrease oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Process for producing uranium oxide rich compositions from uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHollander, W.R.; Fenimore, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of gaseous uranium hexafluoride to a uranium dioxide rich composition in the presence of an active flame in a reactor defining a reaction zone is achieved by separately introducing a first gaseous reactant comprising a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and a reducing carrier gas, and a second gaseous reactant comprising an oxygen-containing gas. The reactants are separated by a shielding gas as they are introduced to the reaction zone. The shielding gas temporarily separates the gaseous reactants and temporarily prevents substantial mixing and reacting of the gaseous reactants. The flame occurring in the reaction zone is maintained away from contact with the inlet introducing the mixture to the reaction zone. After suitable treatment, the uranium dioxide rich composition is capable of being fabricated into bodies of desired configuration for loading into nuclear fuel rods. Alternatively, an oxygen-containing gas as a third gaseous reactant is introduced when the uranium hexafluoride conversion to the uranium dioxide rich composition is substantially complete. This results in oxidizing the uranium dioxide rich composition to a higher oxide of uranium with conversion of any residual reducing gas to its oxidized form

  9. A review on the recent developments of solution processes for oxide thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Ahn, Byung; Jeon, Hye-Ji; Sheng, Jiazhen; Park, Jozeph; Park, Jin-Seong

    2015-06-01

    This review article introduces the recent advances in the development of oxide semiconductor materials based on solution processes and their potential applications. In the early stage, thin film transistors based on oxide semiconductors fabricated by solution processes used to face critical problems such as high annealing temperatures (>400 °C) required to obtain reasonable film quality, and the relatively low field effect mobility (biosensors, and non-volatile memory devices. As such, further innovations in the solution process methods of oxide semiconductor devices are anticipated to allow the realization of cost effective, large area electronics in the near future.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic performance of ZnO-CeO2 nanoparticles in wet oxidation of wastewater containing chlorinated compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anushree; Kumar, S.; Sharma, C.

    2017-11-01

    Here we report the catalytic property of ZnO-CeO2 nanoparticles towards oxidative degradation of organic pollutants present in industrial wastewater. The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method without using any surfactant. The physicochemical properties of catalysts were studied by XRD, Raman, XPS, N2-sorption, FE-SEM, TEM and EDX techniques. The characterization results confirmed the formation of porous ZnO-CeO2 nanocatalysts with high surface area, pore volume and oxygen vacancies. ZnO-CeO2 nanocatalysts exhibited appreciable efficiency in CWAO of industrial wastewater under mild conditions. The Ce40Zn60 catalyst was found to be most efficient with 72% color, 64% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 63% total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Efficient removal of chlorophenolics (CHPs, 59%) and adsorbable organic halides (AOX, 54%) indicated the feasibility of using ZnO-CeO2 nanocatalysts in degradation of non-biodegradable and toxic chlorinated compounds.

  11. Mathematical Modelling to Predict Oxidative Behaviour of Conjugated Linoleic Acid in the Food Processing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitziber Ojanguren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial processes that apply high temperatures in the presence of oxygen may compromise the stability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA bioactive isomers. Statistical techniques are used in this study to model and predict, on a laboratory scale, the oxidative behaviour of oil with high CLA content, controlling the limiting factors of food processing. This modelling aims to estimate the impact of an industrial frying process (140 °C, 7 L/h air on the oxidation of CLA oil for use as frying oil instead of sunflower oil. A factorial design was constructed within a temperature (80–200 °C and air flow (7–20 L/h range. Oil stability index (Rancimat method was used as a measure of oxidation. Three-level full factorial design was used to obtain a quadratic model for CLA oil, enabling the oxidative behaviour to be predicted under predetermined process conditions (temperature and air flow. It is deduced that temperatures applied in food processes affect the oxidation of CLA to a greater extent than air flow. As a result, it is estimated that the oxidative stability of CLA oil is less resistant to industrial frying than sunflower oil. In conclusion, thanks to the mathematical model, a good choice of the appropriate industrial food process can be selected to avoid the oxidation of the bioactive isomers of CLA, ensuring its functionality in novel applications.

  12. Thermal oxidation of reactively sputtered amorphous W80N20 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, Q.T.; Pokela, P.J.; Garden, C.L.; Kolawa, E.; Raud, S.; Nicolet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of reactively sputtered amorphous tungsten nitride of composition W 80 N 20 was investigated in dry and wet oxidizing ambient in the temperature range of 450 degree C--575 degree C. A single WO 3 oxide phase is observed. The growth of the oxide follows a parabolic time dependence which is attributed to a process controlled by the diffusivity of the oxidant in the oxide. The oxidation process is thermally activated with an activation energy of 2.5±0.05 eV for dry ambient and 2.35±0.05 eV for wet ambient. The pre-exponential factor of the reaction constant for dry ambient is 1.1x10 21 A 2 /min; that for wet ambient is only about 10 times less and is equal to 1.3x10 20 A 2 /min

  13. Building Climate Resilience at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraci, L. T.; Mueller, C.; Podolske, J. R.; Milesi, C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Ames Research Center, located at the southern end of the San Francisco Bay (SFB) estuary, has identified three primary vulnerabilities to changes in climate. The Ames Climate Adaptation Science Investigator (CASI) workgroup has studied each of these challenges to operations and the potential exposure of infrastructure and employees to an increased frequency of hazards. Sea level rise inundation scenarios for the SFB Area generally refer to projected scenarios in mean sea level rather than changes in extreme tides that could occur during future storm conditions. In the summer of 2014, high resolution 3-D mapping of the low-lying portion of Ames was performed. Those data are integrated with improved sea level inundation scenarios to identify the buildings, basements and drainage systems potentially affected. We will also identify the impacts of sea level and storm surge effects on transportation to and from the Center. This information will help Center management develop future master plans. Climate change will also lead to changes in temperature, storm frequency and intensity. These changes have potential impacts on localized floods and ecosystems, as well as on electricity and water availability. Over the coming decades, these changes will be imposed on top of ongoing land use and land cover changes, especially those deriving from continued urbanization and increase in impervious surface areas. These coupled changes have the potential to create a series of cascading impacts on ecosystems, including changes in primary productivity and disturbance of hydrological properties and increased flood risk. The majority of the electricity used at Ames is supplied by hydroelectric dams, which will be influenced by reductions in precipitation or changes in the timing or phase of precipitation which reduces snow pack. Coupled with increased demand for summertime air conditioning and other cooling needs, NASA Ames is at risk for electricity shortfalls. To assess the

  14. General Reevaluation Report, Upper Skunk River Basin, Iowa (Ames Lake).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    February 1985, Corps representatives ’-nade presentations on the reevaluation study to the American Society of Civil Kog ineer , Water Resources Design...SCS near County Line Site S36, T8N, R25W Boone County A-17 SECTION 8 - LOCAL FLOOD PROTECCIoN - AMES, IOWA GENERAL The project area for this flood...CentraltDivision ATTN: NCDPO 1. We approve your recommendation to reclassify the Ames lake, Iowa, project from the "inactive" to "active" category of Civil

  15. Ames and other European networks in integrity of ageing structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.M.; Von Estorff, U.; Crutzen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Several European institutions and organisations and the Joint Research Centre have developed co-operative programmes now organised into Networks for mutual benefit. They include utilities, engineering companies, Research and Development laboratories and regulatory bodies. Networks are organised and managed like the successful Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC). The JRC's Institute for Advanced Materials of the European Commission plays the role of Operating Agent and manager of these Networks: ENIQ. AMES, NESC, each of them dealing with specific aspect of fitness for purpose of materials in structural components. This paper describes the structure and the objectives of these networks. Particular emphasis is given to the network AMES

  16. Biomembrane oxidizing tank used in the process of bacterial heap leaching of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yunsheng; Fan Baotuan; Liu Jian; Zheng Ying; Liu Chao

    2004-01-01

    The construction characteristic of biomembrane oxidizing tank and specialty of packing material used in the process of bacterial heap leaching of uranium ore are introduced in this paper. Method for designing biomembrane oxidizing tank, layout principle of aeration system and measurements on running management are summarized

  17. Deactivation of iron oxide used in the steam-iron process to produce hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.F.; Veringa, H.J.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the steam-iron process pure hydrogen can be produced from any hydrocarbon feedstock by using a redox cycle of iron oxide. One of the main problems connected to the use of the iron oxide is the inherent structural changes that take place during oxygen loading and unloading leading to severe

  18. Oxidative treatment characteristics of biotreated textile-dyeing wastewater and chemical agents used in a textile-dyeing process by advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, B R; Hu, H Y; Ahn, K H; Fujie, K

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative treatment characteristics of biotreated textile-dyeing wastewater and typical chemicals such as desizing, scouring, dispersing and swelling agents used in the textile-dyeing process by advanced oxidation process were experimentally studied. The refractory organic matters remained in the effluent of biological treatment process without degradation may be suitable for the improvement of biodegradability and mineralized to CO2 by combined ozonation with and without hydrogen peroxide. On the other hand, the refractory chemicals contained in the scouring agent A and swelling agent may not be mineralized and their biodegradability may not be improved by ozonation. However, the BOD/DOC ratio of scouring agent B increased from 0.3 to 0.45 after ozonation. Based on the results described above, advanced treatment process involving the ozonation without and with the addition of hydrogen peroxide, followed by biological treatment was proposed for the treatment of refractory wastewater discharged from the textile-dyeing process.

  19. Literature review on the properties of cuprous oxide Cu{sub 2}O and the process of copper oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhavyi, P. A.; Johansson, B. (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of the present review is to provide a reference guide to the most recent data on the properties of copper(I) oxide as well as on the atomic processes involved in the initial stages of oxidation of copper. The data on the structure of surfaces, as obtained from atomic-resolution microscopy studies (for example, STM) or from first-principles calculations, are reviewed. Information of this kind may be useful for understanding the atomic mechanisms of corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking of copper

  20. Literature review on the properties of cuprous oxide Cu2O and the process of copper oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzhavyi, P. A.; Johansson, B.

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present review is to provide a reference guide to the most recent data on the properties of copper(I) oxide as well as on the atomic processes involved in the initial stages of oxidation of copper. The data on the structure of surfaces, as obtained from atomic-resolution microscopy studies (for example, STM) or from first-principles calculations, are reviewed. Information of this kind may be useful for understanding the atomic mechanisms of corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking of copper