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Sample records for ames laboratory

  1. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit`s objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements.

  2. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit's objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES ampersand H/quality assurance program was conducted

  5. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES H/quality assurance program was conducted.

  6. Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: Calendar year 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, M.D.

    1976-04-01

    This is an annual report summarizing the effluent and environmental monitoring program at the Ames Laboratory of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration. An inventory of the radioactive materials and certain chemicals released to the environment is included. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. An estimate of the radiation dose to the public resulting from the operations of the Ames Laboratory is stated. (auth)

  7. Ames Laboratory Site Environmental Report, Calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathison, L.

    1991-12-31

    The summarized data and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring program are presented in this Annual Site Environmental Report. This program is a working requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5484.1, ``Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements`` and Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies several buildings owned by the DOE. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU-owned buildings. Laboratory research activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. Ames Laboratory is responsible for a small chemical burial site, located on ISU property. The site was used for the disposal of chemical and metal slags from thorium and uranium production. Samples of water from existing test wells and upstream and downstream sites on the nearby Squaw Creek show no detectable migration of the contents of the burial site. A Site Assessment plan submitted to the State of Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) was approved. A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study work plan has been completed for additional studies at the site. This has been reviewed and approved by the DOE Chicago Field Office and the DNR. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the site resulted in a categorical exclusion finding which has been approved by the DOE. Ames Laboratory has an area contaminated by diesel fuel at the location of a storage tank which was removed in 1970. Soil corings and groundwater have been analyzed for contamination and an assessment written. Pollution awareness and waste minimization programs and plans were implemented in 1990. Included in this effort was the implementation of a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program.

  8. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, Calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ames Laboratory conducts fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, and mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the vision of DOE and, more specifically, to increase the general levels of knowledge and technical capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for the future, both academia and industry, and to develop new technologies and practical applications from our basic scientific programs that will contribute to a strengthening of the US economy. The Laboratory approaches all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. The Laboratory relies upon its strengths in materials synthesis and processing, materials reliability, chemical analysis, chemical sciences, photosynthesis, materials sciences, metallurgy, high-temperature superconductivity, and applied mathematical sciences to conduct the long term basic and intermediate range applied research needed to solve the complex problems encountered in energy production, and utilization as well as environmental restoration and waste management. Ames Laboratory will continue to maintain a very significant and highly beneficial pre-college math and science education program which currently serves both teachers and students at the middle school and high school levels. Our technology transfer program is aided by joint efforts with ISU's technology development and commercialization enterprise and will sustain concerted efforts to implement Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, industrially sponsored Work for Others projects. and scientific personnel exchanges with our various customers

  9. Making Stuff Outreach at the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ament, Katherine; Karsjen, Steven; Leshem-Ackerman, Adah; King, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa was a coalition partner for outreach activities connected with NOVA's Making Stuff television series on PBS. Volunteers affiliated with the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University, with backgrounds in materials science, took part in activities including a science-themed Family Night at a local mall, Science Cafes at the Science Center of Iowa, teacher workshops, demonstrations at science nights in elementary and middle schools, and various other events. We describe a selection of the activities and present a summary of their outcomes and extent of their impact on Ames, Des Moines and the surrounding communities in Iowa. In Part 2, results of a volunteer attitude survey are presented, which shed some light on the volunteer experience and show how the volunteers participation in outreach activities has affected their views of materials education.

  10. Corrective Action Plan in response to the March 1992 Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 5, 1992, a Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team completed an assessment of the Ames Laboratory, located in Ames, Iowa. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with a report on the status and performance of Environment, Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) programs at Ames Laboratory. Detailed findings of the assessment are presented in the report, DOE/EH-0237, Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory. This document, the Ames Laboratory Corrective Action Plan (ALCAP), presents corrective actions to overcome deficiencies cited in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Tiger Team identified 53 Environmental findings, from which the Team derived four key findings. In the Safety and Health (S ampersand H) area, 126 concerns were identified, eight of which were designated Category 11 (there were no Category I concerns). Seven key concerns were derived from the 126 concerns. The Management Subteam developed 19 findings which have been summarized in four key findings. The eight S ampersand H Category 11 concerns identified in the Tiger Team Assessment were given prompt management attention. Actions to address these deficiencies have been described in individual corrective action plans, which were submitted to DOE Headquarters on March 20, 1992. The ALCAP includes actions described in this early response, as well as a long term strategy and framework for correcting all remaining deficiencies. Accordingly, the ALCAP presents the organizational structure, management systems, and specific responses that are being developed to implement corrective actions and to resolve root causes identified in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Chicago Field Office (CH), IowaState University (ISU), the Institute for Physical Research and Technology (IPRT), and Ames Laboratory prepared the ALCAP with input from the DOE Headquarters, Office of Energy Research (ER)

  11. The viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clipson, Colin

    1994-01-01

    This paper will review and summarize research initiatives conducted between 1987 and 1992 at NASA Ames Research Center by a research team from the University of Michigan Architecture Research Laboratory. These research initiatives, funded by a NASA grant NAG2-635, examined the viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames in California. Collaborative Research Environments are envisioned as a way of enhancing the work of NASA research teams, optimizing the use of shared resources, and providing superior environments for housing research activities. The Integrated Simulation Project at NASA, Ames Human Performance Research Laboratory is one of the current realizations of this initiative.

  12. Determining urine sample mutagenicity ratio using Ames test: Tehran forensic medicine laboratory personnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partoazar A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Cancer prevention besides detection and treatment has a very important role in control of cancer disease. Since some chemical compounds that are used in laboratories, especially in pathology laboratory are potentially mutagens, lab assistances that are working with chemicals such as Benzene, Xylazine and Formaldehyde for long period of time may be exposed to overload of these carcinogens. Therefore, it is necessary to use an indicator for detecting these occupational exposures. Ames test has been recommended in biomonitoring of environment that has high risk carcinogenicity characteristic."n"nMethods: A total of fifty seven urine samples of forensic medicine laboratory personnel's were extracted by C18 column and then tested by TA100 and TA98 standard strains of Ames assay. Each sample was analyzed with and without activator to detect mutagen and promutagen materials."n"nResults: Levels of mutagenicity were found by TA98 strain without activator in one case as well as with activator in two cases of urine samples of pathology laboratory personnel's. These cases were working in laboratory for long time in all of the workdays."n"nConclusion: Personnel's working in pathology laboratories may have

  13. Recent Progress in Planetary Laboratory Astrophysics achieved with NASA Ames' COSmIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-10-01

    We describe the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for "Cosmic Simulation Chamber" and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nanoparticles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate various space environments such as planetary atmospheres. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. The COSmIC experimental setup is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion, that generates a plasma in the stream of a free supersonic jet expansion, coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection [2, 3], and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [4].Recent results obtained using COSmIC will be highlighted. In particular, the progress that has been achieved in an on-going study investigating the formation and the characterization of laboratory analogs of Titan's aerosols generated from gas-phase molecular precursors [5] will be presented. Plans for future laboratory experiments on planetary molecules and aerosols in the growing field of planetary laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed, as well as the implications of studies underway for astronomical observations.References: [1] Salama F., in Organic Matter in Space, IAU S251, Kwok & Sandford eds, CUP, S251, 4, 357 (2008).[2] Biennier L., Salama, F., Allamandola L., & Scherer J., J. Chem. Phys., 118, 7863 (2003)[3] Tan X, & Salama F., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 84318 (2005)[4] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300

  14. Autonomy @ Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dalsem, William; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    This is a powerpoint presentation that highlights autonomy across the 15 NASA technology roadmaps, including specific examples of projects (past and present) at NASA Ames Research Center. The NASA technology roadmaps are located here: http:www.nasa.govofficesocthomeroadmapsindex.html

  15. An Overview of Current Capabilities and Research Activities in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy M.; Palmer, Everett; Callantine, Todd; Lee, Paul; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeff; Martin, Lynne; Brasil, Connie; Cabrall, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames conducts research to provide a better understanding of roles, responsibilities, and requirements for human operators and automation in future air traffic management (ATM) systems. The research encompasses developing, evaluating, and integrating operational concepts and technologies for near-, mid-, and far-term air traffic operations. Current research threads include efficient arrival operations, function allocation in separation assurance and efficient airspace and trajectory management. The AOL has developed powerful air traffic simulation capabilities, most notably the Multi Aircraft Control System (MACS) that is used for many air traffic control simulations at NASA and its partners in government, academia and industry. Several additional NASA technologies have been integrated with the AOL's primary simulation capabilities where appropriate. Using this environment, large and small-scale system-level evaluations can be conducted to help make near-term improvements and transition NASA technologies to the FAA, such as the technologies developed under NASA's Air Traffic Management Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). The AOL's rapid prototyping and flexible simulation capabilities have proven a highly effective environment to progress the initiation of trajectory-based operations and support the mid-term implementation of NextGen. Fundamental questions about accuracy requirements have been investigated as well as realworld problems on how to improve operations in some of the most complex airspaces in the US. This includes using advanced trajectory-based operations and prototype tools for coordinating arrivals to converging runways at Newark airport and coordinating departures and arrivals in the San Francisco and the New York metro areas. Looking beyond NextGen, the AOL has started exploring hybrid human/automation control strategies as well as highly autonomous operations in the air traffic control domain. Initial results

  16. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  17. Atmosphere of Freedom: Sixty Years at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugos, Glenn E.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Throughout Ames History, four themes prevail: a commitment to hiring the best people; cutting-edge research tools; project management that gets things done faster, better and cheaper; and outstanding research efforts that serve the scientific professions and the nation. More than any other NASA Center, Ames remains shaped by its origins in the NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics). Not that its missions remain the same. Sure, Ames still houses the world's greatest collection of wind tunnels and simulation facilities, its aerodynamicists remain among the best in the world, and pilots and engineers still come for advice on how to build better aircraft. But that is increasingly part of Ames' past. Ames people have embraced two other missions for its future. First, intelligent systems and information science will help NASA use new tools in supercomputing, networking, telepresence and robotics. Second, astrobiology will explore lore the prospects for life on Earth and beyond. Both new missions leverage Ames long-standing expertise in computation and in the life sciences, as well as its relations with the computing and biotechnology firms working in the Silicon Valley community that has sprung up around the Center. Rather than the NACA missions, it is the NACA culture that still permeates Ames. The Ames way of research management privileges the scientists and engineers working in the laboratories. They work in an atmosphere of freedom, laced with the expectation of integrity and responsibility. Ames researchers are free to define their research goals and define how they contribute to the national good. They are expected to keep their fingers on the pulse of their disciplines, to be ambitious yet frugal in organizing their efforts, and to always test their theories in the laboratory or in the field. Ames' leadership ranks, traditionally, are cultivated within this scientific community. Rather than manage and supervise these researchers, Ames leadership merely

  18. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  19. Computational Methods Development at Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dochan; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation outlines the development at Ames Research Center of advanced computational methods to provide appropriate fidelity computational analysis/design capabilities. Current thrusts of the Ames research include: 1) methods to enhance/accelerate viscous flow simulation procedures, and the development of hybrid/polyhedral-grid procedures for viscous flow; 2) the development of real time transonic flow simulation procedures for a production wind tunnel, and intelligent data management technology; and 3) the validation of methods and the flow physics study gives historical precedents to above research, and speculates on its future course.

  20. AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    AMED: The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database is a resource from the Health Care Information Service of the British Library. AMED offers access to complementary and alternative medicine topics, such as acupuncture, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy, hospice care, hypnosis, palliative care, physiotherapy, podiatry, and rehabilitation. This column features a sample search to demonstrate the type of information available within AMED. AMED is available through the EBSCOhost and OVID platforms. PMID:27657370

  1. NASA Ames Environmental Sustainability Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Ames Environmental Sustainability Report is the second in a series of reports describing the steps NASA Ames Research Center has taken toward assuring environmental sustainability in NASA Ames programs, projects, and activities. The Report highlights Center contributions toward meeting the Agency-wide goals under the 2011 NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Program.

  2. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  3. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  4. Transformation Systems at NASA Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntine, Wray; Fischer, Bernd; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, TOm; Roach, Steve; Robinson, Peter; VanBaalen, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the experiences of the Automated Software Engineering Group at the NASA Ames Research Center in the development and application of three different transformation systems. The systems span the entire technology range, from deductive synthesis, to logic-based transformation, to almost compiler-like source-to-source transformation. These systems also span a range of NASA applications, including solving solar system geometry problems, generating data analysis software, and analyzing multi-threaded Java code.

  5. Ames Life Science Data Archive: Translational Rodent Research at Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Alan E.; French, Alison J.; Ngaotheppitak, Ratana; Leung, Dorothy M.; Vargas, Roxana S.; Maese, Chris; Stewart, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Life Science Data Archive (LSDA) office at Ames is responsible for collecting, curating, distributing and maintaining information pertaining to animal and plant experiments conducted in low earth orbit aboard various space vehicles from 1965 to present. The LSDA will soon be archiving data and tissues samples collected on the next generation of commercial vehicles; e.g., SpaceX & Cygnus Commercial Cargo Craft. To date over 375 rodent flight experiments with translational application have been archived by the Ames LSDA office. This knowledge base of fundamental research can be used to understand mechanisms that affect higher organisms in microgravity and help define additional research whose results could lead the way to closing gaps identified by the Human Research Program (HRP). This poster will highlight Ames contribution to the existing knowledge base and how the LSDA can be a resource to help answer the questions surrounding human health in long duration space exploration. In addition, it will illustrate how this body of knowledge was utilized to further our understanding of how space flight affects the human system and the ability to develop countermeasures that negate the deleterious effects of space flight. The Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) includes current descriptions of over 700 experiments conducted aboard the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), NASA/MIR, Bion/Cosmos, Gemini, Biosatellites, Apollo, Skylab, Russian Foton, and ground bed rest studies. Research areas cover Behavior and Performance, Bone and Calcium Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chronobiology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental Monitoring, Gastrointestinal Physiology, Hematology, Immunology, Life Support System, Metabolism and Nutrition, Microbiology, Muscle Physiology, Neurophysiology, Pharmacology, Plant Biology, Pulmonary Physiology, Radiation Biology, Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, and Toxicology. These

  6. Ames Research Center Research and Technology 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This report highlights the challenging work accomplished during fiscal year 2000 by Ames research scientists,engineers, and technologists. It discusses research and technologies that enable the Information Age, that expand the frontiers of knowledge for aeronautics and space, and that help to maintain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research and technology development. The accomplishments are grouped into four categories based on four of NASA's Strategic Enterprises: Aerospace Technology, Space Science, Biological and Physical Research, and Earth Science. The primary purpose of this report is to communicate knowledge-to inform our stakeholders, customer, and partners, and the people of the United States about the scope and diversity of Ames' mission,the nature of Ames' research and technolog) activities,and the stimulating challenges ahead. The accomplishments cited illustrate the contributions that Ames is willing to improve the quality of life for our citizens and the economic position of the United States in the world marketplace.

  7. The NASA Ames Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Infrared Spectroscopic Database : The Computed Spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauschlicher, C. W.; Boersma, C.; Ricca, A.; Mattioda, A. L.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; de Armas, F. Sanchez; Saborido, G. Puerta; Hudgins, D. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    The astronomical emission features, formerly known as the unidentified infrared bands, are now commonly ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The laboratory experiments and computational modeling done at the NASA Ames Research Center to create a collection of PAH IR spectra relevant t

  8. Groundwater hydrology study of the Ames Chemical Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ames Laboratory Chemical Disposal Site is located in northwestern Ames, Iowa west of Squaw Creek. From 1957 to 1966, Ames Laboratory conducted research to develop processes to separate uranium and thorium from nuclear power fuel and to separate yttrium from neutron shielding sources. The wastes from these processes, which contained both hazardous and radiological components, were placed into nine burial pits. Metal drums, plywood boxes, and steel pails were used to store the wastes. Uranium was also burned on the ground surface of the site. Monitoring wells were placed around the waste burial pits. Groundwater testing in 1993 revealed elevated levels of Uranium 234, Uranium 238, beta and alpha radiation. The north side of the burial pit had elevated levels of volatile organic compounds. Samples in the East Ravine showed no volatile organics; however, they did contain elevated levels of radionuclides. These analytical results seem to indicate that the groundwater from the burial pit is flowing down hill and causing contamination in the East Ravine. Although there are many avenues for the contamination to spread, the focus of this project is to understand the hydrogeology of the East Ravine and to determine the path of groundwater flow down the East Ravine. The groundwater flow data along with other existing information will be used to assess the threat of chemical migration down the East Ravine and eventually off-site. The primary objectives of the project were as follows: define the geology of the East Ravine; conduct slug tests to determine the hydraulic conductivity of both oxidized and unoxidized till; develop a three-dimensional mathematical model using ModIME and MODFLOW to simulate groundwater flow in the East Ravine

  9. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 3: Angle of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A review of optical sensors that are capable of accurate angle of attack measurements in wind tunnels was conducted. These include sensors being used or being developed at NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers, Boeing Airplane Company, McDonald Aircraft Company, Arnold Engineering Development Center, National Aerospace Laboratory of the Netherlands, National Research Council of Canada, and the Royal Aircraft Establishment of England. Some commercial sensors that may be applicable to accurate angle measurements were also reviewed. It was found that the optical sensor systems were based on interferometers, polarized light detector, linear or area photodiode cameras, position sensing photodetectors, and laser scanners. Several of the optical sensors can meet the requirements of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Two of these, the Boeing interferometer and the Complere lateral effect photodiode sensors are being developed for the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel.

  10. Characterizing the nature of the dusty plasma in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) environment of NASA-Ames' interstellar simulation chamber through laboratory simulations and experimental data. Astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Jérôme; Biennier, Ludovic; Salama, Farid

    Interstellar dust presents a continuous size distribution from large molecules, radicals and ions to nanometer-sized particles to micron-sized grains. The lower end of the dust size distribution is thought to be responsible for the discrete spectral features seen in emission in the IR (UIBs) and in absorption in the visible (DIBs). The higher end of the distribution is thought to be responsible for the continuum emission plateau seen in the IR and for the strong absorption seen in the interstellar UV extinction curve. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar chemistry, little is know on its formation and destruction processes. Recent space observations in the UV (HST) and in the IR (ISO) help place size constraints on the molecular component of carbonaceous IS dust and indicate that small (i.e., subnanometer) PAHs cannot contribute significantly to the IS features in the UV and in the IR. Laboratory studies of large molecular and nano-sized IS dust analogs formed from PAH precursors have been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate diffuse ISM environments (the particles are cold - 100 K vibrational energy, isolated in the gas phase and exposed to a high-energy discharge environment). These studies use a pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) source coupled to a cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) for high sensitivity detection. We will describe the approach that was followed in order to provide a representation of the nature of the plasma generated in the experiments. (J. Remy, L. Biennier and F. Salama, Plasma Sources Science and Technology, submitted). We will also discuss the results derived from the experimental and theoretical study of the electron density and temperature of the dusty plasma providing an insight into the nature of the dusty plasma processes. This information is used to derive information on the nature (size) of interstellar dust particles and IS dust growth and destruction

  11. Direct comparison of the Ames microplate format (MPF) test in liquid medium with the standard Ames pre-incubation assay on agar plates by use of equivocal to weakly positive test compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger-Isler, Sini; Kamber, Markus

    2012-08-30

    The Ames microplate format (MPF™) test, which uses liquid media and in 384-well microplates with a readout based on a colour-change, has been used for over 10 years at several major pharmaceutical companies for screening the genotoxic potential of early drug candidates when compound supply is minimal. Meanwhile, Xenometrix has adapted this screen from the two-strain Ames II test for use with five tester strains, in compliance with OECD Guideline 471. A set of 15 equivocal to weakly positive chemicals selected from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) database was tested simultaneously in the Ames microplate format (MPF) and the standard Ames pre-incubation method on agar plates. Such a direct comparison of the two test methods with the same overnight culture(s), chemicals and S9-mix preparation should exclude external variability factors. Thirteen of the 15 chemicals showed concordant results in both tests despite the choice of chemicals that showed varying inter- and even intra-laboratory results in the NTP studies. These results indicate that the Ames MPF™ assay is a reliable predictive tool that can be used like the regular Ames test to evaluate compounds for mutagenicity. PMID:22579797

  12. A Classroom Modification of the Ames Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavornitzky, Joseph; Trzeciak, Victor

    1979-01-01

    A modification of the Ames test for detecting carcinogens and mutagens using a strain of bacteria is described. A suggestion is given for checking the correctness of procedures by using particular hair dyes which have been shown to be mutogenic. (Author/SA)

  13. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  14. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aviation Systems Division at the NASA Ames Research Center conducts leading edge research in air traffic management concepts and technologies. This overview will present concepts and simulation results for research in traffic flow management, safe and efficient airport surface operations, super density terminal area operations, separation assurance and system wide modeling and simulation. A brief review of the ongoing air traffic management technology demonstration (ATD-1) will also be presented. A panel discussion, with Mr. Davis serving as a panelist, on air traffic research will follow the briefing.

  15. Studies of Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, Clive; Beswick, Robert J; Casassus, Simon; Cleary, Kieran; Draine, Bruce T; Genova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith; Hoang, Thiem C; Lazarian, Alex; Murphy, Eric J; Paladini, Roberta; Peel, Michael W; Perrott, Yvette; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Scaife, Anna; Tibbs, Chris T; Verstraete, Laurent; Vidal, Matias; Watson, Robert A; Ysard, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we will outline the scientific motivation for studying Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA. AME is thought to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains, although thermal fluctuations of magnetic dust grains may also contribute. Studies of this mysterious component would shed light on the emission mechanism, which then opens up a new window onto the interstellar medium (ISM). AME is emitted mostly in the frequency range $\\sim 10$--100\\,GHz, and thus the SKA has the potential of measuring the low frequency side of the AME spectrum, particularly in band 5. Science targets include dense molecular clouds in the Milky Way, as well as extragalactic sources. We also discuss the possibility of detecting rotational line emission from Poly-cyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which could be the main carriers of AME. Detecting PAH lines of a given spacing would allow for a definitive identification of specific PAH species.

  16. Use of the modified Ames test as an indicator of the carcinogenicity of residual aromatic extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boogaard, P.; Hedelin, A.; Riley, A.; Rushton, E.; Vaissiere, M.; Minsavage, G.; Rohde, A.; Dalbey, W.

    2013-01-15

    Existing data demonstrate that residual aromatic extracts (RAEs) can be either carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic. CONCAWE had previously concluded that 'Although limited data available indicate that some RAEs are weakly carcinogenic, it is not possible to provide a general recommendation. Classify on a case-by-case basis' (CONCAWE 2005). Therefore CONCAWE's Health/Toxicology Subgroup (H/TSG) has developed a proposal for the use of the modified Ames test as a short-term predictive screening tool for decisions on the classification of RAEs for carcinogenicity. The relationship between RAE chemistry and carcinogenic potential is not as well understood as it is for some other categories of substances, e.g. Other Lubricant Base Oils (OLBO). However, a correlation has been found between the results of the skin carcinogenicity bioassay and the mutagenicity index (MI) obtained from the modified Ames test. Data supporting this correlation are summarised in this report. The H/TSG confirmed that the modified Ames test can be used as a predictive screening tool and that a cut-off value can be established to make a distinction between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic products. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 demonstrated carcinogenic potential upon dermal application to mouse skin with chronic exposure. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 did not demonstrate a carcinogenic potential. To justify the use of the modified Ames test with RAEs, additional analysis of the repeatability of the test with RAEs was required. With this objective, CONCAWE sponsored a round robin study with different samples of RAEs from member companies, at three different laboratories. The repeatability demonstrated in the round robin study with RAEs support the proposed use of the modified Ames test. As part of the tools available for use by member companies, the H/TSG proposed a standard operating procedure (SOP) (included as an Appendix to this report) on the conduct of the modified Ames test with RAEs. The H

  17. PSP Testing at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. H.; Hand, L. A.; Schairer, E. T.; Mehta, R. D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSPs) are now used routinely for measuring surface pressures on wind tunnel models at transonic and supersonic Mach numbers. The method utilizes a surface coating containing fluorescent or phosphorescent materials, the brightness of which varies with the local air pressure on the surface. The present paper will summarize PSP activities (in progress and planned) at the NASA Ames Research Center. One of the main accomplishments at NASA Ames has been the development of a PSP measurement system that is production testing capable. This system has been integrated successfully into the large-scale wind tunnel facilities at Ames. There are several problems related to PSP testing which are unique to large-scale wind tunnel testing. The hardware is often difficult to set-up and must operate under harsh conditions (e.g. high pressures and low temperatures). The data acquisition and reduction times need to be kept to a minimum so that the overall wind tunnel productivity is not compromised. The pressure sensitive paints needs to be very robust; the paints must readily adhere to different surfaces with varying geometries and remain functional for long running times. The paint must have well understood, and preferably minimal, temperature sensitivity since fine control of the tunnel temperature is not easily achievable in the larger wind tunnels. In an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the PSP technique, we are currently evaluating some referenced pressure sensitive paints which contain a pressure- independent luminophor in addition to the one which is affected by the surface pressure. The two luminophors are chosen so that their emission wavelengths are somewhat different. Then by taking two 'wind-on' images with either two cameras (with different filters) or one camera with a rotating filter system, the need for 'wind-off' images can be eliminated. The ratio of the two wind-on images accounts for nonuniform lighting and model motion problems

  18. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnson's arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  19. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry; Brown, Jeff; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Steve; Brubaker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnsons arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  20. NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW Power Supply Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Yuen Ching; Ilinets, Boris V.; Miller, Ted; Nagel, Kirsten (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW DC Power Supply was built in 1974 to provide controlled DC power for the Thermophysics Facility Arc Jet Laboratory. The Power Supply has gradually losing reliability due to outdated technology and component life limitation. NASA has decided to upgrade the existing rectifier modules with contemporary high-power electronics and control equipment. NASA plans to complete this project in 2001. This project includes a complete replacement of obsolete thyristor stacks in all six rectifier modules and rectifier bridge control system. High power water-cooled thyristors and freewheeling diodes will be used. The rating of each of the six modules will be 4000 A at 5500 V. The control firing angle signal will be sent from the Facility Control System to six modules via fiberoptic cable. The Power Supply control and monitoring system will include a Master PLC in the Facility building and a Slave PLC in each rectifier module. This system will also monitor each thyristor level in each stack and the auxiliary equipment.

  1. Testing of SLA-561V in NASA-Ames' Turbulent Flow Duct with Augmented Radiative Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Kornienko, Robert S.; Radbourne, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of Mars Science Laboratory s (MSL) heatshield development program, SLA-561 was tested in NASA Ames Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD) Facility. For these tests, the TFD facility was modified to include a ceramic plate located in the wall opposite to the test model. Normally the TFD wall opposite to the test model is water-cooled steel. Installing a noncooled ceramic plate allows the ceramic to absorb convective heating and radiate the energy back to the test model as the plate heats up. This work was an effort to increase the severity of TFD test conditions. Presented here are the results from these tests.

  2. AMES: Towards an Agile Method for ERP Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Juell-Skielse, Gustaf; Nilsson, Anders G.; Nordqvist, Andreas; Westergren, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Conventional on-premise installations of ERP are now rapidly being replaced by ERP as service. Although ERP becomes more accessible and no longer requires local infrastructure, current selection methods do not take full advantage of the provided agility. In this paper we present AMES (Agile Method for ERP Selection), a novel method for ERP selection which better utilizes the strengths of service oriented ERP. AMES is designed to shorten lead time for selection, support identification of essen...

  3. Ames life science telescience testbed evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Richard F.; Johnson, Vicki; Vogelsong, Kristofer H.; Froloff, Walt

    1989-01-01

    Eight surrogate spaceflight mission specialists participated in a real-time evaluation of remote coaching using the Ames Life Science Telescience Testbed facility. This facility consisted of three remotely located nodes: (1) a prototype Space Station glovebox; (2) a ground control station; and (3) a principal investigator's (PI) work area. The major objective of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of telescience techniques and hardware to support three realistic remote coaching science procedures: plant seed germinator charging, plant sample acquisition and preservation, and remote plant observation with ground coaching. Each scenario was performed by a subject acting as flight mission specialist, interacting with a payload operations manager and a principal investigator expert. All three groups were physically isolated from each other yet linked by duplex audio and color video communication channels and networked computer workstations. Workload ratings were made by the flight and ground crewpersons immediately after completing their assigned tasks. Time to complete each scientific procedural step was recorded automatically. Two expert observers also made performance ratings and various error assessments. The results are presented and discussed.

  4. PMARC - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel methods are moderate cost tools for solving a wide range of engineering problems. PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) is a potential flow panel code that numerically predicts flow fields around complex three-dimensional geometries. PMARC's predecessor was a panel code named VSAERO which was developed for NASA by Analytical Methods, Inc. PMARC is a new program with many additional subroutines and a well-documented code suitable for powered-lift aerodynamic predictions. The program's open architecture facilitates modifications or additions of new features. Another improvement is the adjustable size code which allows for an optimum match between the computer hardware available to the user and the size of the problem being solved. PMARC can be resized (the maximum number of panels can be changed) in a matter of minutes. Several other state-of-the-art PMARC features include internal flow modeling for ducts and wind tunnel test sections, simple jet plume modeling essential for the analysis and design of powered-lift aircraft, and a time-stepping wake model which allows the study of both steady and unsteady motions. PMARC is a low-order panel method, which means the singularities are distributed with constant strength over each panel. In many cases low-order methods can provide nearly the same accuracy as higher order methods (where the singularities are allowed to vary linearly or quadratically over each panel). Low-order methods have the advantage of a shorter computation time and do not require exact matching between panels. The flow problem is solved by assuming that the body is at rest in a moving flow field. The body is modeled as a closed surface which divides space into two regions -- one region contains the flow field of interest and the other contains a fictitious flow. External flow problems, such as a wing in a uniform stream, have the external region as the flow field of interest and the internal flow as the fictitious flow. This arrangement is

  5. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper will document the latest improvements of the LIF system design and demonstrations of the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems.

  6. A summary of rotorcraft handling qualities research at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of the rotorcraft handling qualities research program at Ames Research Center are twofold: (1) to develop basic handling qualities design criteria to permit cost effective design decisions to be made for helicopters, and (2) to obtain basic handling qualities data for certification of new rotorcraft configurations. The research on the helicopter handling qualities criteria has focused primarily on military nap-of-the-earth (NOE) terrain flying missions, which are flown in day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) and instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), or at night. The Army has recently placed a great deal of emphasis on terrain flying tactics in order to survive and effectively complete the missions in modern and future combat environments. Unfortunately, the existing Military Specification MIL-H 8501A which is a 1961 update of a 1951 document, does not address the handling qualities requirements for terrain flying. The research effort is therefore aimed at filling the void and is being conducted jointly with the Army Aeromechanics Laboratory at Ames. The research on rotorcraft airworthiness standards with respect to flying qualities requirements was conducted to collaboration with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  7. Developing questionnaires for educational research: AMEE Guide No. 87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artino, Anthony R; La Rochelle, Jeffrey S; Dezee, Kent J; Gehlbach, Hunter

    2014-06-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the design and development of self-administered surveys, commonly called questionnaires. Questionnaires are widely employed in medical education research. Unfortunately, the processes used to develop such questionnaires vary in quality and lack consistent, rigorous standards. Consequently, the quality of the questionnaires used in medical education research is highly variable. To address this problem, this AMEE Guide presents a systematic, seven-step process for designing high-quality questionnaires, with particular emphasis on developing survey scales. These seven steps do not address all aspects of survey design, nor do they represent the only way to develop a high-quality questionnaire. Instead, these steps synthesize multiple survey design techniques and organize them into a cohesive process for questionnaire developers of all levels. Addressing each of these steps systematically will improve the probabilities that survey designers will accurately measure what they intend to measure.

  8. Development of Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA AMES RESEARCH CENTER

    OpenAIRE

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1984-01-01

    Ames Research Center has the lead role among NASA centers to conduct research in computational fluid dynamics. The past, the present, and the future prospects in this field are reviewed. Past accomplishments include pioneering computer simulations of fluid dynamics problems that have made computers valuable in complementing wind tunnels for aerodynamics research. The present facilities include the most powerful computers built in the United States. Three examples of viscous flow simulations a...

  9. NASA Ames and Future of Space Exploration, Science, and Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of aeronautics and space exploration presents multiple challenges. NASA Ames Research Center is at the forefront of tackling these issues, conducting cutting edge research in the fields of air traffic management, entry systems, advanced information technology, intelligent human and robotic systems, astrobiology, aeronautics, space, earth and life sciences and small satellites. Knowledge gained from this research helps ensure the success of NASA's missions, leading us closer to a world that was only imagined as science fiction just decades ago.

  10. Is the Moon Illusion a Celestial Ames Demonstration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    To most naked eye observers, the Moon appears larger when seen near the horizon than it does when seen near the zenith. This "Moon Illusion” has been reported from as early as the fourth century BC and has been the subject of hundreds of papers and two books. Its explanation does not lie in the realm of physics (atmospheric refraction) or astronomy (eccentric lunar orbit) but, rather, in the realm of visual perception. Theories for the cause of the effect abound but, at present, there is no universally accepted explanation. Because the effect can be easily observed in many locations and during the course of an academic year, the moon illusion can provide a nice astronomical example that involves both direct observations and theoretical analysis. As part of the NSF funded "Project LITE: Light Inquiry Through Experiments", we have been developing inexpensive experiments and demonstrations that can be done at home. One of these is a miniature version of the classic "Ames Room". The life size version was originally developed by Adelbert Ames, Jr. and can be seen in many science museums. Our "digital” Ames Room has been designed to be printed on heavy paper using an inexpensive inkjet printer from a PDF file that is posted on the Project LITE web site http://lite.bu.edu and then cut and folded to make the room. When viewed through one wall using a commonly available door viewer, it dramatically demonstrates how the eye and brain system assesses the relative size of objects by making comparisons with the surrounding environment in which the objects are placed. In this presentation we will discuss some insights that the Ames Room provides that may offer clues to the correct explanation for the Moon Illusion. Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  11. The Ames Virtual Environment Workstation: Implementation issues and requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Jacoby, R.; Bryson, S.; Stone, P.; Mcdowall, I.; Bolas, M.; Dasaro, D.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Coler, C.; Kerr, D.

    1991-01-01

    This presentation describes recent developments in the implementation of a virtual environment workstation in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division of NASA's Ames Research Center. Introductory discussions are presented on the primary research objectives and applications of the system and on the system's current hardware and software configuration. Principle attention is then focused on unique issues and problems encountered in the workstation's development with emphasis on its ability to meet original design specifications for computational graphics performance and for associated human factors requirements necessary to provide compelling sense of presence and efficient interaction in the virtual environment.

  12. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  13. A Perspective on NASA Ames Air Traffic Management Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jeffery A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes past and present air-traffic-management research at NASA Ames Research Center. The descriptions emerge from the perspective of a technical manager who supervised the majority of this research for the last four years. Past research contributions built a foundation for calculating accurate flight trajectories to enable efficient airspace management in time. That foundation led to two predominant research activities that continue to this day - one in automatically separating aircraft and the other in optimizing traffic flows. Today s national airspace uses many of the applications resulting from research at Ames. These applications include the nationwide deployment of the Traffic Management Advisor, new procedures enabling continuous descent arrivals, cooperation with industry to permit more direct flights to downstream way-points, a surface management system in use by two cargo carriers, and software to evaluate how well flights conform to national traffic management initiatives. The paper concludes with suggestions for prioritized research in the upcoming years. These priorities include: enabling more first-look operational evaluations, improving conflict detection and resolution for climbing or descending aircraft, and focusing additional attention on the underpinning safety critical items such as a reliable datalink.

  14. Evolutionary Ensemble for In Silico Prediction of Ames Test Mutagenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yao, Xin

    Driven by new regulations and animal welfare, the need to develop in silico models has increased recently as alternative approaches to safety assessment of chemicals without animal testing. This paper describes a novel machine learning ensemble approach to building an in silico model for the prediction of the Ames test mutagenicity, one of a battery of the most commonly used experimental in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests for safety evaluation of chemicals. Evolutionary random neural ensemble with negative correlation learning (ERNE) [1] was developed based on neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. ERNE combines the method of bootstrap sampling on training data with the method of random subspace feature selection to ensure diversity in creating individuals within an initial ensemble. Furthermore, while evolving individuals within the ensemble, it makes use of the negative correlation learning, enabling individual NNs to be trained as accurate as possible while still manage to maintain them as diverse as possible. Therefore, the resulting individuals in the final ensemble are capable of cooperating collectively to achieve better generalization of prediction. The empirical experiment suggest that ERNE is an effective ensemble approach for predicting the Ames test mutagenicity of chemicals.

  15. The Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME2012): Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, F. G.; Audi, G.; Wang, M.; Xu, X.; Wapstra, A. H.; MacCormick, M.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2013-10-01

    The atomic mass is a fundamental property of the nucleus that has wide applications in natural sciences and technology. The new evaluated mass table, AME2012, has been recently published as a collaborative effort between scientists from China, Europe and USA, under the leadership of G. Audi. It represents a significant update of the previous AME2003 evaluation by considering a large number of precise experimental results obtained at existing Penning Trap and Storage Ring facilities, thus expending the region of experimentally known masses towards exotic neutron- and proton-rich nuclei. Since the presence of isomers plays an important role in determining the masses of many nuclei, a complementary database, NUBASE2012, that contains the isomer-level properties for all nuclei was also developed. This presentation will briefly review recent achievements of the collaboration, present on-going activities, and reflect on ideas for future developments and challenges in the field of evaluation of atomic masses. The work at ANL was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  17. Development of computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, M.

    1984-01-01

    Ames Research Center has the lead role among NASA centers to conduct research in computational fluid dynamics. The past, the present, and the future prospects in this field are reviewed. Past accomplishments include pioneering computer simulations of fluid dynamics problems that have made computers valuable in complementing wind tunnels for aerodynamic research. The present facilities include the most powerful computers built in the United States. Three examples of viscous flow simulations are presented: an afterbody with an exhaust plume, a blunt fin mounted on a flat plate, and the Space Shuttle. The future prospects include implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Processing System that will provide the capability for solving the viscous flow field around an aircraft in a matter of minutes.

  18. Scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Walatka, Pamela P.; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The visualization methods used in computational fluid dynamics research at the NASA-Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility are examined, including postprocessing, tracking, and steering methods. The visualization requirements of the facility's three-dimensional graphical workstation are outlined and the types hardware and software used to meet these requirements are discussed. The main features of the facility's current and next-generation workstations are listed. Emphasis is given to postprocessing techniques, such as dynamic interactive viewing on the workstation and recording and playback on videodisk, tape, and 16-mm film. Postprocessing software packages are described, including a three-dimensional plotter, a surface modeler, a graphical animation system, a flow analysis software toolkit, and a real-time interactive particle-tracer.

  19. Do Ames dwarf and calorie-restricted mice share common effects on age-related pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ikeno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1996, aging studies using several strains of long-lived mutant mice have been conducted. Among these studies, Ames dwarf mice have been extensively examined to seek clues regarding the role of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis in the aging process. Interestingly, these projects demonstrate that Ames dwarf mice have physiological characteristics that are similar to those seen with calorie restriction, which has been the most effective experimental manipulation capable of extending lifespan in various species. However, this introduces the question of whether Ames dwarf and calorie-restricted (CR mice have an extended lifespan through common or independent pathways. To answer this question, we compared the disease profiles of Ames dwarf mice to their normal siblings fed either ad libitum (AL or a CR diet. Our findings show that the changes in age-related diseases between AL-fed Ames dwarf mice and CR wild-type siblings were similar but not identical. Moreover, the effects of CR on age-related pathology showed similarities and differences between Ames dwarf mice and their normal siblings, indicating that calorie restriction and Ames dwarf mice exhibit their anti-aging effects through both independent and common mechanisms.

  20. Analysis of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and Dipicryethane (DPE) for Mutagenicity by the Ames/Salmonella Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R; Felton, J

    2007-10-12

    The Ames/Salmonella assay, developed by Professor Bruce Ames at the University of California, Berkeley, is a rapid and sensitive assay for detecting mutagenicity of various chemical compounds (Maron and Ames, 1983). It is a widely accepted short-term assay for detecting chemicals that induce mutations in the histidine (his) gene of Salmonella typhimurium. This is a reverse mutation assay that detects the mutational reversion of his-dependent Salmonella to the his-independent counterpart. Thereby, mutagenic compounds will increase the frequency of occurrence of his-independent bacterial colonies. The assay utilizes the specific genetically constructed strains of bacteria either with or without mammalian metabolic activation enzymes (S9), Aroclor induced rat liver homogenate to assess the mutagenicity of different compounds. In this study, we will use the Ames/Salmonella assay to investigate the mutagenicity of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) from both Bofors and Pantex, and Dipicryethane (DPE).

  1. Methionine flux to transsulfuration is enhanced in the long living Ames dwarf mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Uthus, Eric O; Holly M. Brown-Borg

    2006-01-01

    Long-lived Ames dwarf mice lack growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone. Additionally the dwarf mice have enzyme activities and levels that combat oxidative stress more efficiently than those of normal mice. We have shown that methionine metabolism in Ames mice is markedly different than in their wild type littermates. In our previous work we hypothesized that the flux of methionine to the transsulfuration pathway is enhanced in the dwarf mice. The current study was designe...

  2. Thyroxine modifies the effects of growth hormone in Ames dwarf mice

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Andrew; Menon, Vinal; Zhi, Xu; Gesing, Adam; Wiesenborn, Denise S.; Spong, Adam; Sun, Liou; Bartke, Andrzej; Masternak, Michal M.

    2015-01-01

    Ames dwarf (df/df) mice lack growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone and prolactin. Treatment of juvenile df/df mice with GH alone stimulates somatic growth, reduces insulin sensitivity and shortens lifespan. Early‐life treatment with thyroxine (T4) alone produces modest growth stimulation but does not affect longevity. In this study, we examined the effects of treatment of juvenile Ames dwarf mice with a combination of GH + T4 and compared them to the effects of GH alone. Treatment ...

  3. The AME2012 atomic mass evaluation (Ⅰ).Evaluation of input data, adjustment procedures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Audi; M.Wang; A.H.Wapstra; F.G.Kondev; M.MacCormick; X.Xu; B.Pfeiffer

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part Ⅰ and Part Ⅱ) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation,AME2012.It includes complete information on the experimental input data (including not used and rejected ones),as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables with recommended values given in the second part.This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction,decay and mass-spectrometer results.These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment procedure for determining the best values for the atomic masses and their uncertainties.Calculation procedures and particularities of the AME are then described.All accepted and rejected data,including outweighed ones,are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values (obtained using the adjustment procedure).Differences with the previous AME2003 evaluation are also discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to various AME users.The second AME2012 article,the last one in this issue,gives a table with recommended values of atomic masses,as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities,along with the list of references used in both this AME2012 evaluation and the NUBASE2012 one (the first paper in this issue).

  4. Writing competitive research conference abstracts: AMEE Guide no. 108.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; Amiel, Jonathan; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-09-01

    The ability to write a competitive research conference abstract is an important skill for medical educators. A compelling and concise abstract can convince peer reviewers, conference selection committee members, and conference attendees that the research described therein is worthy for inclusion in the conference program and/or for their attendance in the meeting. This AMEE Guide is designed to help medical educators write research conference abstracts that can achieve these outcomes. To do so, this Guide begins by examining the rhetorical context (i.e. the purpose, audience, and structure) of research conference abstracts and then moves on to describe the abstract selection processes common to many medical education conferences. Next, the Guide provides theory-based information and concrete suggestions on how to write persuasively. Finally, the Guide offers some writing tips and some proofreading techniques that all authors can use. By attending to the aspects of the research conference abstract addressed in this Guide, we hope to help medical educators enhance this important text in their writing repertoire.

  5. Neurolab: Final Report for the Ames Research Center Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maese, A. Christopher (Editor); Ostrach, Louis H. (Editor); Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Neurolab, the final Spacelab mission, launched on STS-90 on April 17, 1998, was dedicated to studying the nervous system. NASA cooperated with domestic and international partners to conduct the mission. ARC's (Ames Research Center's) Payload included 15 experiments designed to study the adaptation and development of the nervous system in microgravity. The payload had the largest number of Principal and Co-Investigators, largest complement of habitats and experiment unique equipment flown to date, and most diverse distribution of live specimens ever undertaken by ARC, including rodents, toadfish, swordtail fish, water snails, hornweed and crickets To facilitate tissue sharing and optimization of science objectives, investigators were grouped into four science discipline teams: Neuronal Plasticity, Mammalian Development, Aquatic, and Neurobiology. Several payload development challenges were experienced and required an extraordinary effort, by all involved, to meet the launch schedule. With respect to hardware and the total amount of recovered science, Neurolab was regarded as an overall success. However, a high mortality rate in one rodent group and several hardware anomalies occurred inflight that warranted postflight investigations. Hardware, science, and operations lessons were learned that should be taken into consideration by payload teams developing payloads for future Shuttle missions and the International Space Station.

  6. Mobile technologies in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken; Ellaway, Rachel H; Topps, David; Archibald, Douglas; Hogue, Rebecca J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies (including handheld and wearable devices) have the potential to enhance learning activities from basic medical undergraduate education through residency and beyond. In order to use these technologies successfully, medical educators need to be aware of the underpinning socio-theoretical concepts that influence their usage, the pre-clinical and clinical educational environment in which the educational activities occur, and the practical possibilities and limitations of their usage. This Guide builds upon the previous AMEE Guide to e-Learning in medical education by providing medical teachers with conceptual frameworks and practical examples of using mobile technologies in medical education. The goal is to help medical teachers to use these concepts and technologies at all levels of medical education to improve the education of medical and healthcare personnel, and ultimately contribute to improved patient healthcare. This Guide begins by reviewing some of the technological changes that have occurred in recent years, and then examines the theoretical basis (both social and educational) for understanding mobile technology usage. From there, the Guide progresses through a hierarchy of institutional, teacher and learner needs, identifying issues, problems and solutions for the effective use of mobile technology in medical education. This Guide ends with a brief look to the future. PMID:27010681

  7. Writing competitive research conference abstracts: AMEE Guide no. 108.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; Amiel, Jonathan; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-09-01

    The ability to write a competitive research conference abstract is an important skill for medical educators. A compelling and concise abstract can convince peer reviewers, conference selection committee members, and conference attendees that the research described therein is worthy for inclusion in the conference program and/or for their attendance in the meeting. This AMEE Guide is designed to help medical educators write research conference abstracts that can achieve these outcomes. To do so, this Guide begins by examining the rhetorical context (i.e. the purpose, audience, and structure) of research conference abstracts and then moves on to describe the abstract selection processes common to many medical education conferences. Next, the Guide provides theory-based information and concrete suggestions on how to write persuasively. Finally, the Guide offers some writing tips and some proofreading techniques that all authors can use. By attending to the aspects of the research conference abstract addressed in this Guide, we hope to help medical educators enhance this important text in their writing repertoire. PMID:27597323

  8. Medical education scholarship: an introductory guide: AMEE Guide No. 89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, Gerald E; Gaines, Julie K; Cottrell, Scott; Kalishman, Summers; Gusic, Maryellen; Mavis, Brian; Durning, Steven J

    2014-08-01

    Abstract This AMEE Guide provides an overview of medical education scholarship for early career scholars, based upon a summary of the existing literature and pragmatic advice derived from the experience of its authors. After providing an introduction to the principles of scholarship and describing questions that the Guide addresses, the authors offer a conceptual description of the complementary traditions of teaching and educational discovery, and advocate for the development of educational scholars with both traditions. They then describe the attributes of effective mentor-mentee relationships and how early career scholars can identify potential mentors who can fulfill this role. In the subsequent sections, they describe the appropriate development of scholarly questions and other components of a complete scholarly plan, including how to use conceptual frameworks in guiding such plans. From here, they describe methods that align with both the teaching and discovery traditions and provide concrete examples of each. They then provide guidelines for assessing the impact of scholarship, identify the various opportunities for sharing it, and how to effectively interpret and describe it. Additionally, they provide practical advice on how appropriately to demonstrate the scholarship in a promotional packet, including the principle of reflectivity in scholarship. Finally, they address the principles of applied research ethics for educational scholarship and when to consider soliciting approval for scholarly activities by a human research board.

  9. Evaluation of aromatic amines with different purities and different solvent vehicles in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alexander P; Popelier, Paul L A; Harvey, James; Giddings, Amanda; Foster, Graham; Kranz, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Of all the in vitro mutagenicity assays, the Ames test displays the best correlation with rodent carcinogenicity and therefore carries significant weight with the food and drug regulatory bodies. Aromatic amines (AA) are ubiquitous structural groups in food and drug molecules despite the well-documented mutagenic and carcinogenic propensity for many representatives. Furthermore, recent regulatory guidelines (that is ICH M7) requires the hazard assessment of actual and potential impurities by two complementary (Q)SAR prediction methodologies if no carcinogenicity or bacterial mutagenicity data is available. One methodology should be expert-rule-based and the second should be statistics-based. Having encountered numerous reports of contradictory Ames results for members of this chemotype, we undertook systematic Ames tests on a diverse set of 14 AAs of differing purities in different solvents, and as free bases and their salts. The aim of this work was to investigate the reliability of the Ames test for this chemotype leading to the creation of a reference set of AAs for use by medicinal chemists and in silico modelling. Contrary to previous experience, which led to the investigations reported in this publication, the anticipated transformation from an Ames-positive to an Ames-negative after purification only occurred for one compound. Furthermore, this result proved inconclusive after testing as the HCl salt in DMSO and in water. The anticipated change in class from mutagen to non-mutagen, did not occur and this can be read as evidence for the reliability of the Ames test for AAs. PMID:25542092

  10. Organization Domain Modeling (ODM): Extending systematic D-AME beyond software domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, M.A. [Organon Motives, Inc., Belmont, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The emerging discipline of domain analysis, modeling, and engineering, or D-AME, has received most attention from the field of systematic software reuse, where the term {open_quotes}domain{close_quotes} usually denotes a well-scoped area of functionality within a set or class of software systems. A central challenge in D-AME research has been in defining processes and representations sufficiently general to apply in the diverse organizational and technical environments in which D-AME can make useful contribution. The systematic reuse community has established ambitious goals for what a D-AME process should address, such as the ability to support design for reuse for all products and processes of the software life cycle, and applicability beyond software domains: e.g., to domains such as business processes, product variability models, or more generally, domains of shared knowledge about particular technical areas of expertise. In practice, though, the search for generalized domain analysis processes and methods has been fraught. with difficulties. Obstacles include: adoption of a too-narrow conception of the nature of {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}; tight coupling of D-AME process and methods with software engineering representations; and a consequent lack of understanding of the unique aspects of D-AME as a qualitative process. This paper discusses the goals for the extensibility of D-AME, the primary barriers to achieving these goals, and specific features of the Organization Domain Modeling (ODM) methodology that address these issues. ODM is structured as a core life cycle process model which is broadly applicable to diverse domains and organizational contexts. The core process is augmented by a set of supporting methods which facilitate tailorability, for example, by encapsulating commitments to specific software design representations and processes.

  11. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  12. Flight Test 4 Preliminary Results: NASA Ames SSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Doug; Gong, Chester; Reardon, Scott; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    Realization of the expected proliferation of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) depends on the development and validation of performance standards for UAS Detect and Avoid (DAA) Systems. The RTCA Special Committee 228 is charged with leading the development of draft Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA Systems. NASA, as a participating member of RTCA SC-228 is committed to supporting the development and validation of draft requirements as well as the safety substantiation and end-to-end assessment of DAA system performance. The Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration into the National Airspace System (NAS) Project conducted flight test program, referred to as Flight Test 4, at Armstrong Flight Research Center from April -June 2016. Part of the test flights were dedicated to the NASA Ames-developed Detect and Avoid (DAA) System referred to as JADEM (Java Architecture for DAA Extensibility and Modeling). The encounter scenarios, which involved NASA's Ikhana UAS and a manned intruder aircraft, were designed to collect data on DAA system performance in real-world conditions and uncertainties with four different surveillance sensor systems. Flight test 4 has four objectives: (1) validate DAA requirements in stressing cases that drive MOPS requirements, including: high-speed cooperative intruder, low-speed non-cooperative intruder, high vertical closure rate encounter, and Mode CS-only intruder (i.e. without ADS-B), (2) validate TCASDAA alerting and guidance interoperability concept in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors and in multiple-intruder encounters against both cooperative and non-cooperative intruders, (3) validate Well Clear Recovery guidance in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors, and (4) validate DAA alerting and guidance requirements in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors. The results will be

  13. AMES Stereo Pipeline Derived DEM Accuracy Experiment Using LROC-NAC Stereopairs and Weighted Spatial Dependence Simulation for Lunar Site Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, J. R.; Miller, D.; Paul, M. V.

    2012-03-01

    An accuracy assessment of AMES Stereo Pipeline derived DEMs for lunar site selection using weighted spatial dependence simulation and a call for outside AMES derived DEMs to facilitate a statistical precision analysis.

  14. Recent Geological and Hydrological Activity in Amazonis and Elysium Basins and Their Link, Marte Valles (AME): Prime Target for Future Reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, J. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2012-03-01

    Amazonis and Elysium basins and their link, Marte Vallis (AME), uniquely point to a geologically and hydrologically active Mars. We will present evidence for why AME reconnaissance can help address whether Mars is geologically, hydrologically, and biologically active.

  15. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel, part 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A summary of optical techniques for the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels are discussed. Six optical techniques were studied: Schlieren, light sheet and laser vapor screen, angle of attack, model deformation, infrared imagery, and digital image processing. The study includes surveys and reviews of wind tunnel optical techniques, some conceptual designs, and recommendations for use of optical methods in the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels. Particular emphasis was placed on searching for systems developed for wind tunnel use and on commercial systems which could be readily adapted for wind tunnels. This final report is to summarize the major results and recommendations.

  16. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  17. Processing Earth Observing images with Ames Stereo Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, R. A.; Moratto, Z. M.; Alexandrov, O.; Fong, T.; Shean, D. E.; Smith, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    ICESat with its GLAS instrument provided valuable elevation measurements of glaciers. The loss of this spacecraft caused a demand for alternative elevation sources. In response to that, we have improved our Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) software (version 2.1+) to ingest satellite imagery from Earth satellite sources in addition to its support of planetary missions. This enables the open source community a free method to generate digital elevation models (DEM) from Digital Globe stereo imagery and alternatively other cameras using RPC camera models. Here we present details of the software. ASP is a collection of utilities written in C++ and Python that implement stereogrammetry. It contains utilities to manipulate DEMs, project imagery, create KML image quad-trees, and perform simplistic 3D rendering. However its primary application is the creation of DEMs. This is achieved by matching every pixel between the images of a stereo observation via a hierarchical coarse-to-fine template matching method. Matched pixels between images represent a single feature that is triangulated using each image's camera model. The collection of triangulated features represents a point cloud that is then grid resampled to create a DEM. In order for ASP to match pixels/features between images, it requires a search range defined in pixel units. Total processing time is proportional to the area of the first image being matched multiplied by the area of the search range. An incorrect search range for ASP causes repeated false positive matches at each level of the image pyramid and causes excessive processing times with no valid DEM output. Therefore our system contains automatic methods for deducing what the correct search range should be. In addition, we provide options for reducing the overall search range by applying affine epipolar rectification, homography transform, or by map projecting against a prior existing low resolution DEM. Depending on the size of the images, parallax, and image

  18. Ames collaborative study of cosmic-ray neutrons. II. Low- and mid-latitude flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuing progress of the Ames Collaborative Study of Cosmic Ray Neutrons is described. Data obtained aboard flights from Hawaii at altitudes of 41,000 and 45,000 feet, and in the range of geomagnetic latitude 170N less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 210N are reported. Preliminary estimates of neutron spectra were made

  19. Satellite communications provisions on NASA Ames instrumented aircraft platforms for Earth science research/applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameson, L.; Brass, J. A.; Hanratty, J. J.; Roberts, A. C.; Wegener, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    Earth science activities at NASA Ames are research in atmospheric and ecosystem science, development of remote sensing and in situ sampling instruments, and their integration into scientific research platform aircraft. The use of satellite communications can greatly extend the capability of these agency research platform aircraft. Current projects and plans involve satellite links on the Perseus UAV and the ER-2 via TDRSS and a proposed experiment on the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. Provisions for data links on the Perseus research platform, via TDRSS S-band multiple access service, have been developed and are being tested. Test flights at Dryden are planned to demonstrate successful end-to-end data transfer. A Unisys Corp. airborne satcom STARLink system is being integrated into an Ames ER-2 aircraft. This equipment will support multiple data rates up to 43 Mb/s each via the TDRS S Ku-band single access service. The first flight mission for this high-rate link is planned for August 1995. Ames and JPL have proposed an ACTS experiment to use real-time satellite communications to improve wildfire research campaigns. Researchers and fire management teams making use of instrumented aircraft platforms at a prescribed burn site will be able to communicate with experts at Ames, the U.S. Forest Service, and emergency response agencies.

  20. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of bioflavonoids and structural analogues in the Ames/Salmonella test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn GR; Van der Stel JJ; Stavenuiter JFC; Hamzink MRJ; Kreijl CF; LEO; LBO

    1996-01-01

    The mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of bioflavonoids were determined in the bacterial mutagenicity test of Ames, using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. The decreasing order of mutagenic activity found in both strains was quercetin>myricetin-kaempferol>morin hydrate. The compound

  1. Are effects of common ragwort in the Ames test caused by pyrrolizidine alkaloids?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Helsdingen, R.J.R.; Hoogenboom, R.L.A.P.; Nijs, de M.W.C.M.; Liu, Xiaojie; Vrieling, Klaas; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Mulder, P.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated by others that acetone extracts of Senecio jacobaea (syn. Jacobaea vulgaris, common or tansy ragwort) test positive in the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test (Ames test). Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are thought to be responsible for these mutagenic effect

  2. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of bioflavonoids and structural analogues in the Ames/Salmonella test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn GR; Stel JJ van der; Stavenuiter JFC; Hamzink MRJ; Kreijl CF; LEO; LBO

    1996-01-01

    De mutagene en antimutagene eigenschappen van bioflavonoiden werden in de bacteriele mutageniteitstest van Ames met Salmonella typhimurium stammen TA98 en TA100 onderzocht. De volgorde van mutagene activiteit voor beide stammen in aanwezigheid van metabole activering was quercetine>myricetine

  3. Investigating the Mutagenic Effects of Three Commonly Used Pulpotomy Agents Using the Ames Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Samiei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. Methods: TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the presence and absence of enzymatic system found in rat liver S9 fraction. Negative controls were 1% dimethyl sulfoxide and water. The positive controls were sodium azide and 2-aminoanthracene. The number of colonies per plate was counted. The material was regarded mutagenic if the number of histidine revertant colonies was twice or more than the spontaneous revertant colonies (Ames mutagenicity ratio. Results: Ferric sulfate was found mutagenic in the concentrations prepared by addition of 50 μL of its 1 in 100 and 1 in 1000 times diluted solutions to the culture medium in the absence of S9 fraction (Ames test ratios of 2.8 and 2.2, respectively. Formocresol showed strong toxicity toward TA100 strain of S. typhimurium up to the concentration as low achieved using 1000 times diluted solution of the original preparation, particularly in the presence of S9 fraction. Ames assay failed to detect significant reverse mutations in all the concentrations of CEM cement. Conclusion: In contrast to formocresol and ferric sulfate, CEM cement is a less toxic and non-mutagenic agent.

  4. Ames Research Center Shear Tests of SLA-561V Heat Shield Material for Mars-Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Michael; Tran, Huy; Henline, William; Cartledge, Alan; Hui, Frank; Tran, Duoc; Zimmerman, Norm

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of arc-jet testing at Ames Research Center on behalf of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the development of the Mars-Pathfinder heat shield. The current test series evaluated the performance of the ablating SLA-561V heat shield material under shear conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of several methods of repairing damage to the heat shield were evaluated. A total of 26 tests were performed in March 1994 in the 2 in. X 9 in. arc-heated turbulent Duct Facility, including runs to calibrate the facility to obtain the desired shear stress conditions. A total of eleven models were tested. Three different conditions of shear and heating were used. The non-ablating surface shear stresses and the corresponding, approximate, non-ablating surface heating rates were as follows: Condition 1, 170 N/m(exp 2) and 22 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 2, 240 N/m(exp 2) and 40 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 3, 390 N/m(exp 2) and 51 W/cm(exp 2). The peak shear stress encountered in flight is represented approximately by Condition 1; however, the heating rate was much less than the peak flight value. The peak heating rate that was available in the facility (at Condition 3) was about 30 percent less than the maximum value encountered during flight. Seven standard ablation models were tested, of which three models were instrumented with thermocouples to obtain in-depth temperature profiles and temperature contours. An additional four models contained a variety of repair plugs, gaps, and seams. These models were used to evaluated different repair materials and techniques, and the effect of gaps and construction seams. Mass loss and surface recession measurements were made on all models. The models were visually inspected and photographed before and after each test. The SLA-561 V performed well; even at test Condition 3, the char remained intact. Most of the resins used for repairs and gap fillers performed poorly. However, repair plugs made of SLA-561V performed

  5. PMARC_12 - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER, VERSION 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel method computer programs are software tools of moderate cost used for solving a wide range of engineering problems. The panel code PMARC_12 (Panel Method Ames Research Center, version 12) can compute the potential flow field around complex three-dimensional bodies such as complete aircraft models. PMARC_12 is a well-documented, highly structured code with an open architecture that facilitates modifications and the addition of new features. Adjustable arrays are used throughout the code, with dimensioning controlled by a set of parameter statements contained in an include file; thus, the size of the code (i.e. the number of panels that it can handle) can be changed very quickly. This allows the user to tailor PMARC_12 to specific problems and computer hardware constraints. In addition, PMARC_12 can be configured (through one of the parameter statements in the include file) so that the code's iterative matrix solver is run entirely in RAM, rather than reading a large matrix from disk at each iteration. This significantly increases the execution speed of the code, but it requires a large amount of RAM memory. PMARC_12 contains several advanced features, including internal flow modeling, a time-stepping wake model for simulating either steady or unsteady (including oscillatory) motions, a Trefftz plane induced drag computation, off-body and on-body streamline computations, and computation of boundary layer parameters using a two-dimensional integral boundary layer method along surface streamlines. In a panel method, the surface of the body over which the flow field is to be computed is represented by a set of panels. Singularities are distributed on the panels to perturb the flow field around the body surfaces. PMARC_12 uses constant strength source and doublet distributions over each panel, thus making it a low order panel method. Higher order panel methods allow the singularity strength to vary linearly or quadratically across each panel. Experience has shown

  6. Next Generation Framework for Aquatic Modeling of the Earth System (NextFrAMES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, B. M.; Wollheim, W. M.; Lakhankar, T.; Vorosmarty, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Earth System model development is becoming an increasingly complex task. As scientists attempt to represent the physical and bio-geochemical processes and various feedback mechanisms in unprecedented detail, the models themselves are becoming increasingly complex. At the same time, the surrounding IT infrastructure needed to carry out these detailed model computations is growing increasingly complex as well. To be accurate and useful, Earth System models must manage a vast amount of data in heterogenous computing environments ranging from single CPU systems to Beowulf type computer clusters. Scientists developing Earth System models increasingly confront obstacles associated with IT infrastructure. Numerous development efforts are on the way to ease that burden and offer model development platforms that reduce IT challenges and allow scientists to focus on their science. While these new modeling frameworks (e.g. FMS, ESMF, CCA, OpenMI) do provide solutions to many IT challenges (performing input/output, managing space and time, establishing model coupling, etc.), they are still considerably complex and often have steep learning curves. Over the course of the last fifteen years ,the University of New Hampshire developed several modeling frameworks independently from the above-mentioned efforts (Data Assembler, Frameworks for Aquatic Modeling of the Earth System and NextFrAMES which is continued at CCNY). While the UNH modeling frameworks have numerous similarities to those developed by other teams, these frameworks, in particular the latest NextFrAMES, represent a novel model development paradigm. While other modeling frameworks focus on providing services to modelers to perform various tasks, NextFrAMES strives to hide all of those services and provide a new approach for modelers to express their scientific thoughts. From a scientific perspective, most models have two core elements: the overall model structure (defining the linkages between the simulated processes

  7. Proceedings of the NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Phillippe F. (Editor); Kwong, Victor H. S. (Editor); Salama, Farid (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers presented at the 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics held in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from February 14 to 16, 2006. This workshop brings together producers and users of laboratory astrophysics data so that they can understand each other's needs and limitations in the context of the needs for NASA's missions. The last NASA-sponsored workshop was held in 2002 at Ames Research Center. Recent related meetings include the Topical Session at the AAS meeting and the European workshop at Pillnitz, Germany, both of which were held in June 2005. The former showcased the importance of laboratory astrophysics to the community at large, while the European workshop highlighted a multi-laboratory approach to providing the needed data. The 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics, sponsored by the NASA Astrophysics Division, focused on the current status of the field and its relevance to NASA. This workshop attracted 105 participants and 82 papers of which 19 were invited. A White Paper identifying the key issues in laboratory astrophysics during the break-out sessions was prepared by the Scientific Organizing Committee, and has been forwarded to the Universe Working Group (UWG) at NASA Headquarters. This White Paper, which represented the collective inputs and opinions from experts and stakeholders in the field of astrophysics, should serve as the working document for the future development of NASA's R&A program in laboratory astrophysics.

  8. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  9. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  10. National laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundation of a 'National Laboratory' which would support a Research center in synchrotron radiation applications is proposed. The essential features of such a laboratory differing of others centers in Brazil are presented. (L.C.)

  11. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  12. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  13. Quantitative predictivity of the transformation in vitro assay compared with the Ames test. [Hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parodi, S.; Taningher, M.; Russo, P.; Pala, M.; Vecchio, D.; Fassina, G.; Santi, L.

    For 59 chemical compounds, homogeneous data on transformation in vitro, mutagenicity in the Ames test, and carcinogenicity was reviewed. The potency in inducing transformation in vitro in hamster fibroblast cells was compared with the carcinogenic potency and a modest correlation coefficient was found between the two parameters. For these same 59 compounds it was also possible to compare mutagenic potency in the Ames test with carcinogenic potency. The correlation level was very similar. The predictivity of transformation in vitro increased significantly when only compounds for which some kind of dose-response relationship was available were utilized. This result stresses the importance of the quantitative aspect of the response in predictivity studies. The present study is compared with previous studies on the quantitative predictivity of different short-term tests. The work is not definitive, but gives an idea of the possible type of approach to the problem of comparing quantitative predictivities.

  14. Robust Mosaicking of Stereo Digital Elevation Models from the Ames Stereo Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Min; Moratto, Zachary M.; Nefian, Ara Victor

    2010-01-01

    Robust estimation method is proposed to combine multiple observations and create consistent, accurate, dense Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from lunar orbital imagery. The NASA Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) aims to produce higher-quality terrain reconstructions of the Moon from Apollo Metric Camera (AMC) data than is currently possible. In particular, IRG makes use of a stereo vision process, the Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), to automatically generate DEMs from consecutive AMC image pairs. However, the DEMs currently produced by the ASP often contain errors and inconsistencies due to image noise, shadows, etc. The proposed method addresses this problem by making use of multiple observations and by considering their goodness of fit to improve both the accuracy and robustness of the estimate. The stepwise regression method is applied to estimate the relaxed weight of each observation.

  15. Evaluation of the NASA-Ames panel method (PMARC) for aerodynamic missile design

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center developed panel code (PMARC) is investigated to explore its suitability for aerodynamic missile design. To this end, PMARC is first assessed by applying it to several problems for which other solutions and experimental data are available, i.e., steady flow past a wing-body configuration, delta wings, biplane wings, wings in ground effect, and unsteady flow of pitching and impulsively started wings. Good agreement is found in all cases. PMARC is then applied to tw...

  16. Low-speed wind tunnel testing of the NPS/NASA Ames Mach 6 optimized waverider

    OpenAIRE

    Cedrun, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    Low-speed wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of an optimized supersonic (Mach 6) conical-flow waverider designed for a deck-launched intercept mission. These tests are part of the continuing waverider research being conducted by the Naval Postgraduate School and the NASA Ames Research Center. The tests consisted of performing Alpha and Beta sweeps, at different dynamic pressures, with a 15 inch aluminum waverider model in the NPS low-speed w...

  17. The contribution of visceral fat to improved insulin signaling in Ames dwarf mice

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, Vinal; Zhi, Xu; Hossain, Tanvir; Bartke, Andrzej; Spong, Adam; Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M.

    2014-01-01

    Ames dwarf (Prop1 df, df/df) mice are characterized by growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyrotropin deficiency, remarkable extension of longevity and increased insulin sensitivity with low levels of fasting insulin and glucose. Plasma levels of anti-inflammatory adiponectin are increased in df/df mice, while pro-inflammatory IL-6 is decreased in plasma and epididymal fat. This represents an important shift in the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines in adipose tissue, whic...

  18. A Unique RCM Application at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonagofski, James M.; Machala, Anthony C.; Smith, Anthony M.; Presley, Leroy L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is known internationally as a center of excellence for its capabilities and achievements in the field of developmental aerodynamics. The Center has a variety of aerodynamic test facilities including the largest wind tunnel in the world (with 40 x 80 deg and 80 x 120 deg atmospheric test sections) and the 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel which is the subject of this paper. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Multi-Mission Suitability of the NASA Ames Modular Common Bus

    OpenAIRE

    Tietz, Sascha; Bell, James; Hine, Butler

    2009-01-01

    The obvious advantages of small spacecraft - their lower cost structure and the rapid development schedule - have enabled a large number of missions in the past. However, most of these missions have been focused on Earth observation from low Earth orbits. In 2006, the Small Spacecraft Division at the NASA Ames Research Center began the development of the Modular Common Bus, a spacecraft capable of delivering scientifically and technically useful payloads to a variety of destinations within 0....

  20. Flight researh at NASA Ames Research Center: A test pilot's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1987-01-01

    In 1976 NASA elected to assign responsibility for each of the various flight regimes to individual research centers. The NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California was designated lead center for vertical and short takeoff and landing, V/STOL research. The three most recent flight research airplanes being flown at the center are discussed from the test pilot's perspective: the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft; the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft; and the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

  1. Microplate Ames MPF™ test use in assessment of mutagenic properties of dust pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kozłowska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Highly industrialized Upper Silesia Region is particularly polluted by both anthropogenic and natural airborne particulate matters, which may lead to negative health effects in human. Materials and methods: The aim of the study was to assess the mutagenic properties of dust extracts which were collected in six cities in the Silesian Voivodeship. Dust samples were collected on glass fiber filters by the aspirator with air flow ca. 1 m3/min. Extraction of pollution was carried out using dichlorometane. The extracted samples were dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. The mutagenic properties were assessed using microplate Ames assay MPFTM with the use of bacteria Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 and TA100. Results: In microplate Ames assay MPFTM there was observed a linear dose-response relationship in both metabolic variants of TA98 strain. Similar relationship was observed for TA100 strain with metabolic activation (S9. Mutagenic activity (AM of 100% extracts for TA98 strain in both metabolic variants (S9 exceeded 2, what indicate highly mutagenic effects of dust extracts. There was no mutagenic activity observed in the assay with TA100 (S9, AM 1. In the variant with exogenous metabolic activation (S9 in TA100 strain AM values ranged from AM1,160,15 to AM9,671,02. Mutagenic activity varied between different cities. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that microplate Ames assay MPFTM is fast and complex method of assessing the mutagenic properties of dust pollution, which exert toxic effect on organisms. The use of microplate Ames assay MPFTM together with chemical analyses of air dust pollution may evaluate the level of exposure in the environment and enable to perform health risk assessment in populations exposed to mutagenic, toxic and cytotoxic substances.

  2. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  3. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel. Part 5: Infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of infrared thermography for aerodynamics was made. Particular attention was paid to boundary layer transition detection. IR thermography flow visualization of 2-D and 3-D separation was surveyed. Heat transfer measurements and surface temperature measurements were also covered. Comparisons of several commercial IR cameras were made. The use of a recently purchased IR camera in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels was studied. Optical access for these facilities and the methods to scan typical models was investigated.

  4. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  5. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  6. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  7. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  8. Montlake Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NWFSC conducts critical fisheries science research at its headquarters in Seattle, WA and at five research stations throughout Washington and Oregon. The unique...

  9. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  10. Learning Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  11. Investigating the Source of Planck-Detected AME: High-Resolution Observations at 15 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette C. Perrott

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Planck 28.5 GHz maps were searched for potential Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME regions on the scale of ~3° or smaller, and several new regions of interest were selected. Ancillary data at both lower and higher frequencies were used to construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs, which seem to confirm an excess consistent with spinning dust models. Here we present higher resolution observations of two of these new regions with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Small Array (AMI SA between 14 and 18 GHz to test for the presence of a compact (~10 arcmin or smaller component. For AME-G107.1+5.2, dominated by the Hii region S140, we find evidence for the characteristic rising spectrum associated with either the spinning dust mechanism for AME or an ultra- /hypercompact Hii region across the AMI frequency band; however, for AME-G173.6+208 we find no evidence for AME on scales of ~2–10 arcmin.

  12. Ames 试验与 QSAR 模型结合对芳香胺致癌活性的预测作用%Predictive role of Ames test coupling with QSAR in carcinogenicity prediction of aromatic amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁金涛; 浦跃朴; 尹立红

    2013-01-01

    为探索 Ames 试验结果对预测芳香胺致癌活性的作用,采用芳香胺结构描述符或描述符与 Ames 结果相结合的方法建立了多个线性判别模型,对113个芳香胺的致癌性进行预测,并对各模型预测性能进行了比较.描述符与 Ames 结果相结合的方法分2种进行,一种是将 Ames 结果作为模型的描述符,另一种是先根据 Ames 结果将化合物分为两类,再建立模型.通过比较发现,基于2种方法建立的模型对113个芳香胺的致癌性预测正确率均为80.5%,略高于仅用结构描述符得到的模型的预测准确率77.0%,但预测正确率差异不具统计学意义.仅采用结构描述符的构效关系模型具有较满意结果;将 Ames 结果与 QSAR 模型相结合并不能显著提高芳香胺致癌性预测模型的预测性能.%To explore the role of Ames test results in carcinogenicity prediction of aromatic amines, the carcinogenicity of 113 aromatic amines were predicted by several linear discriminant analysis models with structure descriptors or Ames results coupled with structure descriptors.And the predic-tive abilities of these different models were compared.The methods of combing Ames results with structure descriptors were carried out in two ways.One was that Ames results performed as descrip-tors of models;the other was that models were constructed after compounds were classified into two according to the Ames results.The comparison results show that the accuracies of the two models were both 80.5%,slightly higher than that of the model obtained only with structure descriptors (77.0%).But the accuracy difference of these methods is not statistically significant.The quantita-tive structure-activity relationship (QSAR)model obtained only with structure descriptors exhibits satisfactory results.Combining Ames results with the QSAR model cannot significantly improve the prediction ability of the carcinogenicity prediction

  13. NASA Ames Research Center R and D Services Directorate Biomedical Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, J.; Flynn, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate teams with NASA, other government agencies and/or industry investigators for the development, design, fabrication, manufacturing and qualification testing of space-flight and ground-based experiment hardware for biomedical and general aerospace applications. In recent years, biomedical research hardware and software has been developed to support space-flight and ground-based experiment needs including the E 132 Biotelemetry system for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), E 100 Neurolab neuro-vestibular investigation systems, the Autogenic Feedback Systems, and the Standard Interface Glove Box (SIGB) experiment workstation module. Centrifuges, motion simulators, habitat design, environmental control systems, and other unique experiment modules and fixtures have also been developed. A discussion of engineered systems and capabilities will be provided to promote understanding of possibilities for future system designs in biomedical applications. In addition, an overview of existing engineered products will be shown. Examples of hardware and literature that demonstrate the organization's capabilities will be displayed. The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate is available to support the development of new hardware and software systems or adaptation of existing systems to meet the needs of academic, commercial/industrial, and government research requirements. The Ames R&D Services Directorate can provide specialized support for: System concept definition and feasibility Mathematical modeling and simulation of system performance Prototype hardware development Hardware and software design Data acquisition systems Graphical user interface development Motion control design Hardware fabrication and high-fidelity machining Composite materials development and application design Electronic/electrical system design and fabrication System performance verification testing and qualification.

  14. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  15. Global Biology: An Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, James G.; Colin, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  16. GROWTH HORMONE ABOLISHES BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF CALORIE RESTRICTION IN LONG-LIVED AMES DWARF MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Gesing, Adam; Al-Regaiey, Khalid A.; Bartke, Andrzej; Masternak, Michal M.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the growth hormone (GH) axis promotes longevity and delays aging. In contrast, GH over-expression may lead to accelerated aging and shorter life. Calorie restriction (CR) improves insulin sensitivity and may extend lifespan. Long-lived Ames dwarf (df/df) mice have additional extension of longevity when subjected to 30% CR. The aim of the study was to assess effects of CR or GH replacement therapy separately and as a combined (CR+GH) treatment in GH-deficient df/df and normal mic...

  17. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 4: Model deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of systems capable of model deformation measurements was conducted. The survey included stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers. Moire, holographic, and heterodyne interferometry techniques were also looked at. Stereo-cameras with passive or active targets are currently being deployed for model deformation measurements at NASA Ames and LaRC, Boeing, and ONERA. Scanners and digitizers are widely used in robotics, motion analysis, medicine, etc., and some of the scanner and digitizers can meet the model deformation requirements. Commercial stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers are being improved in accuracy, reliability, and ease of operation. A number of new systems are coming onto the market.

  18. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 1: Schlieren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    Alignment procedures and conceptual designs for the rapid alignment of the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel schlieren systems were devised. The schlieren systems can be aligned by translating the light source, the mirrors, and the knife edge equal distances. One design for rapid alignment consists of a manual pin locking scheme. The other is a motorized electronic position scheme. A study of two optical concepts which can be used with the schlieren system was made. These are the 'point diffraction interferometers' and the 'focus schlieren'. Effects of vibrations were studied.

  19. Dynamic Calibration of the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Randall L.; vanAken, Johannes M.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus was modified to include a Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance. The dynamic calibration procedures and configurations are discussed. Random excitation was applied at the rotor hub, and vibratory force and moment responses were measured on the steady/dynamic rotor balance. Transfer functions were computed using the load cell data and the vibratory force and moment responses from the rotor balance. Calibration results showing the influence of frequency bandwidth, hub mass, rotor RPM, thrust preload, and dynamic loads through the stationary push rods are presented and discussed.

  20. Fluoro-A-85380 demonstrated no mutagenic properties in in vivo rat micronucleus and Ames tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential mutagenic properties (micronucleus and the Ames tests) of fluoro-A-85380 (2-fluoro-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine) were evaluated as a mandatory pre-clinical step. No statistically significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes was found in animals treated at any dose tested. No biologically significant increase in the mean number of revertants was noted in all the Salmonella typhimurium strains tested with fluoro-A-85380. Therefore, fluoro-A-85380 demonstrated no mutagenic properties using these two tests

  1. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... or conditions. What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical procedures that involve testing samples of blood, urine, or other tissues or ...

  2. Measurement of neutron spectra generated by a 62 AMeV carbon-ion beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Amgarou, K.; Domingo, C.; Russo, S.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Pelliccioni, M.; Esposito, A.; Pola, A.; Introini, M. V.; Gentile, A.

    2012-07-01

    Neutrons constitute an important component of the radiation environment in hadron therapy accelerators. Their energy distribution may span from thermal up to hundred of MeV. The characterization of these fields in terms of dosimetric or spectrometric quantities is crucial for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. To date, the Extended Range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. With the aim of providing useful data to the scientific community involved in neutron measurements at hadron therapy facilities, a measurement campaign was carried out at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) of INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud), where a 62 AMeV carbon ion is available. The beam was directed towards a PMMA phantom, simulating the patient, and two neutron measurement points were established at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam-line. The ERBSSs of UAB (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona-Grup de Física de les Radiacions) and INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were used to measure the resulting neutron fields. The two ERBSSs use different detectors and sphere diameters, and have been independently calibrated. The FRUIT code was used to unfold the results.

  3. Investigating the intra-nuclear cascade process using the reaction 136Xe on deuterium at 500 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejmund F.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available More than 600 residual nuclei, formed in the spallation of 136Xe projectiles impinging on deuterium at 500 AMeV of incident energy, have been unambiguously identified and their production cross sections have been determined with high accuracy. By comparing these data to others previously measured for the reactions 136Xe  +  p at 1 AGeV and 136Xe  +  p at 500 AMeV we investigated the role that neutrons play in peripheral collisions and to understand the energy dissipation in frontal collisions in spallation reactions.

  4. Caracterización molecular del germoplasma de ñame colombiano utilizando "dna amplificaron fingerprinting (daf)" en condiciones radiactivas

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante, Silvia L.; Guzmán, Mónica; Buitrago, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Para la realización de este trabajo se utilizaron muestras de la colección de ñame (Dioscorea spp.) de la Universi­dad de Córdoba y algunas muestras provenientes del IITA (International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria), con el fin de caracterizarlas molecularmente y complementar la información que se tiene de ellas. Dada la importancia del cultivo del ñame para los pequeños productores de la costa atlántica, surgió la propuesta de iniciar estudios moleculares en una primera...

  5. Diverse Studies in the Reactivated NASA/Ames Radiation Facility: From Shock Layer Spectroscopy to Thermal Protection System Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert J.; Hartman, G. Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA/Ames' Hypervelocity Free-Flight Radiation Facility has been reactivated after having been decommissioned for some 15 years, first tests beginning in early 1994. This paper discusses two widely different studies from the first series, one involving spectroscopic analysis of model shock-layer radiation, and the other the production of representative impact damage in space shuttle thermal protection tiles for testing in the Ames arc-jet facilities. These studies emphasize the interorganizational and interdisciplinary value of the facility in the newly-developing structure of NASA.

  6. The Use of the Ames Test as a Tool for Addressing Problem-Based Learning in the Microbiology Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our environment is full of potential carcinogens such as UV light, industrial pollutants, pesticides, and food additives, among others. It is estimated that 90% of all carcinogens are also mutagens. The Ames test is one of the most common tests for mutagens. In this problem-based learning activity, undergraduate biology students used the Ames test to screen a substance they provided, to see if it could be considered a mutagen. The idea of surveying substances used in everyday life appealed to our students, and helped engage them in this activity.

  7. Response of a silicon telescope microdosimeter to 400 AMeV carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monolithic silicon telescope consisting of a surface ΔE detector 2 μm in thickness coupled to an E detector about 500 μm in thickness made out of a single silicon wafer was recently proposed for the microdosimetric characterization of hadron beams. This device and its pixelated version are intended to be irradiated at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO, National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy, Pavia, Italy) with a 400 AMeV carbon ion beam. The response of the silicon microdosimeter under these conditions was calculated with Monte Carlo simulations by using the FLUKA code, in order to have reference available for comparison with the experimental results. - Highlights: • FLUKA simulations performed to study the response of silicon telescope to carbon ions. • Energy distribution of ions from carbon fragmentation were calculated. • Microdosimetric spectra corrected for tissue-equivalence were derived. • Feasibility of the ΔE stage telescope in a 400 AMeV carbon beam was demonstrated

  8. The contribution of visceral fat to improved insulin signaling in Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vinal; Zhi, Xu; Hossain, Tanvir; Bartke, Andrzej; Spong, Adam; Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M

    2014-06-01

    Ames dwarf (Prop1(df), df/df) mice are characterized by growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyrotropin deficiency, remarkable extension of longevity and increased insulin sensitivity with low levels of fasting insulin and glucose. Plasma levels of anti-inflammatory adiponectin are increased in df/df mice, while pro-inflammatory IL-6 is decreased in plasma and epididymal fat. This represents an important shift in the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines in adipose tissue, which was not exposed to GH signals during development or adult life. To determine the role of adipose tissue in the control of insulin signaling in these long-living mutants, we examined the effects of surgical removal of visceral (epididymal and perinephric) adipose tissue. Comparison of the results obtained in df/df mice and their normal (N) siblings indicated different effects of visceral fat removal (VFR) on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. The analysis of the expression of genes related to insulin signaling indicated that VFR improved insulin action in skeletal muscle in N mice. Interestingly, this surgical intervention did not improve insulin signaling in df/df mice skeletal muscle but caused suppression of the signal in subcutaneous fat. We conclude that altered profile of adipokines secreted by visceral fat of Ames dwarf mice may act as a key contributor to increased insulin sensitivity and extended longevity of these animals. PMID:24690289

  9. Assessment of diphenylcyclopropenone for photochemically induced mutagenicity in the Ames assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, M.G.; Connor, T.H.; Henkin, J.; Wilkin, J.K.; Matney, T.S.

    1987-10-01

    The photochemical conversion of diphenylcyclopropenone to diphenylacetylene has recently been reported. Diphenylcyclopropenone is used in the treatment of alopecia areata and is nonmutagenic in a limited Ames assay. We examined diphenylcyclopropenone and diphenylacetylene, as well as synthetic precursors of diphenylcyclopropenone--dibenzylketone and alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzylketone--for mutagenicity against TA100, TA98, TA102, UTH8413, and UTH8414. All compounds were nonmutagenic except alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzylketone, which was a potent mutagen in TA100 with and without S-9 activation. The effect of photochemical activation of diphenylcyclopropenone in the presence of bacteria demonstrated mutagenicity in UTH8413 (two times background) at 10 micrograms/plate with S-9 microsomal activation. 8-Methoxypsoralen produces a mutagenic response in TA102 at 0.1 microgram/plate with 60 seconds of exposure to 350 nm light. In vitro photochemically activated Ames assay with S-9 microsomal fraction may enhance the trapping of short-lived photochemically produced high-energy mutagenic intermediates. This technique offers exciting opportunities to trap high-energy intermediates that may play an important role in mutagenesis. This method can be applied to a variety of topically applied dermatologic agents, potentially subjected to photochemical changes in normal use.

  10. Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of the coordination polymers [A(Me3Sn)3Fe(CN)6]x (A=Me3Sn+, Et4N+, Cp2Fe+, etc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural diagnosis and lattice dynamics of the coordination polymers [(Me3Sn)3Fe(CN)6]x and [A(Me3Sn)3Fe(CN)6]x (A=Me3Sn+, Et4N+, Cp2Fe+, etc.) have been carried out by means of 57Fe- and 119Sn-Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques. The 119Sn-Moessbauer parameters for the polymers indicate that all the tin atoms are coordinated to three methyl groups and two cyano groups, having a trigonal-bipyramidal structure. The temperature dependences of the area under the 119Sn-resonance line for [A(Me3Sn)3Fe(CN)6]x were smaller than that for the host polymer [(Me3Sn)3Fe(CN)6]x. The 57Fe-Moessbauer spectra of [A(Me3Sn)3Fe(CN)6]x show that the iron atoms are Fe(II) in a low-spin state. This suggests that the guest ions are intercalated into the host lattice after reduction of its Fe(III) ions. (orig.)

  11. Phenotypic Data Collection and Sample Preparation for Genomics of Wood Formation and Cellulosic Biomass Traits in Sunflower: Ames, IA location.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marek, Laura F.

    2011-06-17

    Three fields were planted in Ames in 2010, two association mapping fields, N3 and A, and a recombinant inbred line field, N13. Phenotype data and images were transferred to UGA to support genetic and genomic analyses of woody biomass-related traits.

  12. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF ACTIVE CHLORINE PRIOR TO DETERMINING AMES MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER (NOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many potable water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that result from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with oxidizing chlorine are known or suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. The Ames assay is routinely used to assess an overall level of mutagenicity for all com...

  13. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  14. Lunar laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  15. Virtual Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  16. Laboratory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our task is to design mined-repository systems that will adequately secure high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 yr and that will be mechanically stable for 50 to 100-yr periods of retrievability during which mistakes could be corrected and a valuable source of energy could be reclaimed, should national policy on the reprocessing of spent fuel ever change. The only credible path for the escape of radionuclides from the repository to the biosphere is through ground-water, and in hard rock, bulk permeability is largely governed by natural and artificial fracture systems. Catastrophic failure of an excavation in hard rock is likely to occur at the weakest links - the discontinuities in the rock mass that is perturbed first by mining and then by radiogenic heating. The laboratory can contribute precise measurements of the pertinent thermomechanical, hydrological and chemical properties and improve our understanding of the fundamental processes through careful experiments under well controlled conditions that simulate the prototype environment. Thus laboratory investigations are necessary, but they are not sufficient, for conventional sample sizes are small relative to natural defects like joints - i.e., the rock mass is not a continuum - and test durations are short compared to those that predictive modeling must take into account. Laboratory investigators can contribute substantially more useful data if they are provided facilities for testing large specimens(say one cubic meter) and for creep testing of all candidate host rocks. Even so, extrapolations of laboratory data to the field in neither space nor time are valid without the firm theoretical foundations yet to be built. Meanwhile in-situ measurements of structure-sensitive physical properties and access to direct observations of rock-mass character will be absolutely necessary

  17. Culham Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains summaries of work carried out under the following headings: fusion research experiments; U.K. contribution to the JET project; supporting studies; theoretical plasma physics, computational physics and computing; fusion reactor studies; engineering and technology; contract research; external relations; staff, finance and services. Appendices cover main characteristics of Culham fusion experiments, staff, extra-mural projects supported by Culham Laboratory, and a list of papers written by Culham staff. (U.K.)

  18. Comparative metabolism and mutagenicity of azo and hydrazone dyes in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De France, B F; Carter, M H; Josephy, P D

    1986-02-01

    Enteric bacterial and hepatic azoreductase enzymes are capable of reducing azo dyes to yield the constituent aromatic amines. Azo dyes based on benzidine and benzidine congeners have received particular attention because of their widespread use and the known carcinogenicity of benzidine to humans. Azo dyes based on beta-diketone coupling components exist preferentially as the tautomeric hydrazones. A series of hydrazone dyes based on benzidine and benzidine congeners was prepared and characterized by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy. These dyes were tested for mutagenicity using a modified Ames assay and, unlike the true azo dyes, showed no significant mutagenic activity. The hydrazone dyes were resistant to enzymatic reduction by FMN-supplemented hamster-liver post-mitochondrial supernatant (S-9); under identical conditions, azo dyes such as trypan blue were rapidly reduced.

  19. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  20. AN INVESTIGATION OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SOME 9- SUBSTITUEDPHENANTHRENE DERIVATIVES WITH AMES / SALMONELLA / MICROSOME TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap KUTLU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three different 9-Substituted phenantrene derivatives that were synthesized to be used as basic matter for drugs were tested for their mutagenic potency in strains TA 98 and TA 100 ofSalmonella typhimurium by using Ames test. Therefore, both strains were tested in the absence or presence of S9 metabolic activation, for five different doses of each test substances in two paralel independent experiments. In the absence of metabolic activation, while only one of the compounds were causing frame-shift mutations, two of them were determined to induce base pair substitution mutations. In the presence of metabolic activation, while two of the compounds were mutagenic for TA 98, base pair substitution mutations were not detected for any of the substances. Each of the compoundstested were found to be mutagenic for at least one strain in the presence or absence of S9.

  1. New Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Models Improve Predictability of Ames Mutagenicity for Aromatic Azo Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganelli, Serena; Benfenati, Emilio; Manganaro, Alberto; Kulkarni, Sunil; Barton-Maclaren, Tara S; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-10-01

    Existing Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have limited predictive capabilities for aromatic azo compounds. In this study, 2 new models were built to predict Ames mutagenicity of this class of compounds. The first one made use of descriptors based on simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES), calculated with the CORAL software. The second model was based on the k-nearest neighbors algorithm. The statistical quality of the predictions from single models was satisfactory. The performance further improved when the predictions from these models were combined. The prediction results from other QSAR models for mutagenicity were also evaluated. Most of the existing models were found to be good at finding toxic compounds but resulted in many false positive predictions. The 2 new models specific for this class of compounds avoid this problem thanks to a larger set of related compounds as training set and improved algorithms.

  2. How to write an educational research grant: AMEE Guide No. 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Maria A; Gruppen, Larry D; Artino, Anthony R; Uijtdehaage, Sebastian; Szauter, Karen; Durning, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Writing an educational research grant in health profession education is challenging, not only for those doing it for the first time but also for more experienced scholars. The intensity of the competition, the peculiarities of the grant format, the risk of rejection, and the time required are among the many obstacles that can prevent educational researchers with interesting and important ideas from writing a grant, that could provide the funding needed to turn their scholarly ideas into reality. The aim of this AMEE Guide is to clarify the grant-writing process by (a) explaining the mechanics and structure of a typical educational research grant proposal, and (b) sharing tips and strategies for making the process more manageable. PMID:26524428

  3. Development of Implicit Methods in CFD NASA Ames Research Center 1970's - 1980's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The focus here is on the early development (mid 1970's-1980's) at NASA Ames Research Center of implicit methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). A class of implicit finite difference schemes of the Beam and Warming approximate factorization type will be addressed. The emphasis will be on the Euler equations. A review of material pertinent to the solution of the Euler equations within the framework of implicit methods will be presented. The eigensystem of the equations will be used extensively in developing a framework for various methods applied to the Euler equations. The development and analysis of various aspects of this class of schemes will be given along with the motivations behind many of the choices. Various acceleration and efficiency modifications such as matrix reduction, diagonalization and flux split schemes will be presented.

  4. Stationary Wave Activity Simulated by the NASA Ames MGCM Incorporating New MOLA Topography Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, A. F. C.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.

    1999-01-01

    Annual simulations of Mars' atmosphere have been conducted with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) using the newly-acquired MOLA topography data. The data is provided at 1 x 1 deg resolution, and is used by the MGCM at 7.5 x 9 deg resolution. The vertical domain in the simulations reported here extends to around 80 km. Simulated stationary wave activity is examined in each hemisphere as a function of season (at every 30 deg of Ls), dust loading (dust visible opacities of 0.3, 1, and 3), and topography (comparing results with MOLA vs. Smith-Zuber topography). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. New Diagnostic, Launch and Model Control Techniques in the NASA Ames HFFAF Ballistic Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents new diagnostic, launch and model control techniques used in the NASA Ames HFFAF ballistic range. High speed movies were used to view the sabot separation process and the passage of the model through the model splap paper. Cavities in the rear of the sabot, to catch the muzzle blast of the gun, were used to control sabot finger separation angles and distances. Inserts were installed in the powder chamber to greatly reduce the ullage volume (empty space) in the chamber. This resulted in much more complete and repeatable combustion of the powder and hence, in much more repeatable muzzle velocities. Sheets of paper or cardstock, impacting one half of the model, were used to control the amplitudes of the model pitch oscillations.

  6. Alveolar macrophages infected with Ames or Sterne strain of Bacillus anthracis elicit differential molecular expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia D Langel

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AMs phagocytose Bacillus anthracis following inhalation and induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to mediate the activation of innate immunity. Ames, the virulent strain of B. anthracis, contains two plasmids that encode the antiphagocytic poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule and the lethal toxin. The attenuated Sterne strain of B. anthracis, which lacks the plasmid encoding capsule, is widely adapted as a vaccine strain. Although differences in the outcome of infection with the two strains may have originated from the presence or absence of an anti-phagocytic capsule, the disease pathogenesis following infection will be manifested via the host responses, which is not well understood. To gain understanding of the host responses at cellular level, a microarray analysis was performed using primary rhesus macaque AMs infected with either Ames or Sterne spores. Notably, 528 human orthologs were identified to be differentially expressed in AMs infected with either strain of the B. anthracis. Meta-analyses revealed genes differentially expressed in response to B. anthracis infection were also induced upon infections with multiple pathogens such as Francisella Novicida or Staphylococcus aureus. This suggests the existence of a common molecular signature in response to pathogen infections. Importantly, the microarray and protein expression data for certain cytokines, chemokines and host factors provide further insights on how cellular processes such as innate immune sensing pathways, anti-apoptosis versus apoptosis may be differentially modulated in response to the virulent or vaccine strain of B. anthracis. The reported differences may account for the marked difference in pathogenicity between these two strains.

  7. Mutagenicity of the cysteine S-conjugate sulfoxides of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Roy M; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2013-04-01

    The nephrotoxicity and nephrocarcinogenicity of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are believed to be mediated primarily through the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase-dependent bioactivation of the corresponding cysteine S-conjugate metabolites S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (TCVC), respectively. DCVC and TCVC have previously been demonstrated to be mutagenic by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, and reduction in mutagenicity was observed upon treatment with the β-lyase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Because DCVC and TCVC can also be bioactivated through sulfoxidation to yield the potent nephrotoxicants S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine sulfoxide (TCVCS), respectively, the mutagenic potential of these two sulfoxides was investigated using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium TA100 mutagenicity assay. The results show both DCVCS and TCVCS were mutagenic, and TCVCS exhibited 3-fold higher mutagenicity than DCVCS. However, DCVCS and TCVCS mutagenic activity was approximately 700-fold and 30-fold lower than DCVC and TCVC, respectively. DCVC and DCVCS appeared to induce toxicity in TA100, as evidenced by increased microcolony formation and decreased mutant frequency above threshold concentrations. TCVC and TCVCS were not toxic in TA100. The toxic effects of DCVC limited the sensitivity of TA100 to DCVC mutagenic effects and rendered it difficult to investigate the effects of AOAA on DCVC mutagenic activity. Collectively, these results suggest that DCVCS and TCVCS exerted a definite but weak mutagenicity in the TA100 strain. Therefore, despite their potent nephrotoxicity, DCVCS and TCVCS are not likely to play a major role in DCVC or TCVC mutagenicity in this strain.

  8. The Ames dwarf mutation attenuates Alzheimer's disease phenotype of APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Kendra L; Kulas, Joshua A; Franklin, Whitney; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Taglialatela, Giulio; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Combs, Colin K

    2016-04-01

    APP/PS1 double transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) demonstrate robust brain amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide containing plaque deposition, increased markers of oxidative stress, behavioral dysfunction, and proinflammatory gliosis. On the other hand, lack of growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone due to a recessive mutation in the Prop 1 gene (Prop1df) in Ames dwarf mice results in a phenotype characterized by potentiated antioxidant mechanisms, improved learning and memory, and significantly increased longevity in homozygous mice. Based on this, we hypothesized that a similar hormone deficiency might attenuate disease changes in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. To test this idea, APP/PS1 mice were crossed to the Ames dwarf mouse line. APP/PS1, wild-type, df/+, df/df, df/+/APP/PS1, and df/df/APP/PS1 mice were compared at 6 months of age through behavioral testing and assessing amyloid burden, reactive gliosis, and brain cytokine levels. df/df mice demonstrated lower brain growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations. This correlated with decreased astrogliosis and microgliosis in the df/df/APP/PS1 mice and, surprisingly, reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 concentrations. The df/df/APP/PS1 mice also demonstrated significantly elevated brain levels of multiple cytokines in spite of the attenuated gliosis. These data indicate that the df/df/APP/PS1 line is a unique resource in which to study aging and resistance to disease and suggest that the affected pituitary hormones may have a role in regulating disease progression. PMID:26973101

  9. An automated calibration laboratory for flight research instrumentation: Requirements and a proposed design approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneill-Rood, Nora; Glover, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (Ames-Dryden), operates a diverse fleet of research aircraft which are heavily instrumented to provide both real time data for in-flight monitoring and recorded data for postflight analysis. Ames-Dryden's existing automated calibration (AUTOCAL) laboratory is a computerized facility which tests aircraft sensors to certify accuracy for anticipated harsh flight environments. Recently, a major AUTOCAL lab upgrade was initiated; the goal of this modernization is to enhance productivity and improve configuration management for both software and test data. The new system will have multiple testing stations employing distributed processing linked by a local area network to a centralized database. The baseline requirements for the new AUTOCAL lab and the design approach being taken for its mechanization are described.

  10. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  11. Prevention of Neuromusculoskeletal Frailty in Slow-Aging Ames Dwarf Mice: Longitudinal Investigation of Interaction of Longevity Genes and Caloric Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Arum, Oge; Rasche, Zachary Andrew; Rickman, Dustin John; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Ames dwarf (Prop1 df/df ) mice are remarkably long-lived and exhibit many characteristics of delayed aging and extended healthspan. Caloric restriction (CR) has similar effects on healthspan and lifespan, and causes an extension of longevity in Ames dwarf mice. Our study objective was to determine whether Ames dwarfism or CR influence neuromusculoskeletal function in middle-aged (82 ± 12 weeks old) or old (128 ± 14 w.o.) mice. At the examined ages, strength was improved by dwarfism, CR, and d...

  12. To other worlds via the laboratory (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary science is fun, largely by virtue of the wide range of disciplines and techniques it embraces. Progress relies not only on spacecraft observation and models, but also on laboratory work to provide reference data with which to interpret observations and to provide quantitative constraints on model parameters. An important distinction should be drawn between two classes of investigation. The most familiar, pursued by those who make laboratory studies the focus of their careers, is the construction of well-controlled experiments, typically to determine the functional dependence of some desired physical property upon one or two controlled parameters such as temperature, pressure or concentration. Another class of experiment is more exploratory - to 'see what happens'. This exercise often reveals that models may be based on entirely false assumptions. In some cases laboratory results also have value as persuasive tools in providing graphic support for unfamiliar properties or processes - the iconic image of 'flaming ice' makes the exotic notion of methane clathrate immediately accessible. This talk will review the role of laboratory work in planetary science and especially the outer solar system. A few of the author's personal forays into laboratory measurements will be discussed in the talk; These include the physical properties of dessicated icy loess in the US Army Permafrost tunnel in Alaska (as a Mars analog), the use of a domestic microwave oven to measure radar absorptivity (in particular of ammonia-rich water ice) and the generation of waves - and ice - on the surface of a liquid by wind with fluid and air parameters appropriate to Mars and Titan rather than Earth using the MARSWIT wind tunnel at NASA Ames.

  13. Formation of the Martian Polar Layered Terrains: Quantifying Polar Water Ice and Dust Surface Deposition During Current and Past Orbital Epochs with the NASA Ames GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, J. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The NASA Ames GCM will be used to quantify net annual polar deposition rates of water ice and dust on Mars during current and past orbital epochs to investigate the formation history, structure, and stratigraphy of the polar layered terrains.

  14. Genotoxicity assessment of low-level doses of gamma radiation with the SOS chromotest and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, A Ya; Sinitsyna, O I; Frolova, T S; Vasyunina, E A; Dementyev, D V

    2016-07-01

    This is the first study to present data on the genotoxicity of low γ-irradiation doses for E. coli and S. typhimurium cells obtained using the SOS chromotest and the Ames test. The most pronounced effect was recorded in the first 24 h of γ-irradiation. After 72 h in the Ames test and after 96 h in the SOS chromotest, a significant effect of γ-irradiation on bacterial cells was detected. The absence of genotoxicity at the later stages can be explained by the adaptation of bacterial cells to the conditions of exposure. The findings allow the bacterial test system to be used for studying the effects of low doses at the early stages of exposure to radiation.

  15. Genotoxicity assessment of low-level doses of gamma radiation with the SOS chromotest and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, A Ya; Sinitsyna, O I; Frolova, T S; Vasyunina, E A; Dementyev, D V

    2016-07-01

    This is the first study to present data on the genotoxicity of low γ-irradiation doses for E. coli and S. typhimurium cells obtained using the SOS chromotest and the Ames test. The most pronounced effect was recorded in the first 24 h of γ-irradiation. After 72 h in the Ames test and after 96 h in the SOS chromotest, a significant effect of γ-irradiation on bacterial cells was detected. The absence of genotoxicity at the later stages can be explained by the adaptation of bacterial cells to the conditions of exposure. The findings allow the bacterial test system to be used for studying the effects of low doses at the early stages of exposure to radiation. PMID:27599519

  16. Long-lived hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice are resistant to the detrimental effects of high-fat diet on metabolic function and energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cristal M; Fang, Yimin; Miquet, Johanna G; Sun, Liou Y; Masternak, Michal M; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) signaling stimulates the production of IGF-1; however, increased GH signaling may induce insulin resistance and can reduce life expectancy in both mice and humans. Interestingly, disruption of GH signaling by reducing plasma GH levels significantly improves health span and extends lifespan in mice, as observed in Ames dwarf mice. In addition, these mice have increased adiposity, yet are more insulin sensitive compared to control mice. Metabolic stressors such as high-fat diet (HFD) promote obesity and may alter longevity through the GH signaling pathway. Therefore, our objective was to investigate the effects of a HFD (metabolic stressor) on genetic mechanisms that regulate metabolism during aging. We show that Ames dwarf mice fed HFD for 12 weeks had an increase in subcutaneous and visceral adiposity as a result of diet-induced obesity, yet are more insulin sensitive and have higher levels of adiponectin compared to control mice fed HFD. Furthermore, energy expenditure was higher in Ames dwarf mice fed HFD than in control mice fed HFD. Additionally, we show that transplant of epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) from Ames dwarf mice fed HFD into control mice fed HFD improves their insulin sensitivity. We conclude that Ames dwarf mice are resistant to the detrimental metabolic effects of HFD and that visceral adipose tissue of Ames dwarf mice improves insulin sensitivity in control mice fed HFD. PMID:26990883

  17. Anthrax Vaccine Antigen-Adjuvant Formulations Completely Protect New Zealand White Rabbits against Challenge with Bacillus anthracis Ames Strain Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Peachman, Kristina K.; Li, Qin; Matyas, Gary R.; Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Lovchik, Julie; Lyons, Rick C.; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rao, Mangala

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop an improved anthrax vaccine that shows high potency, five different anthrax protective antigen (PA)-adjuvant vaccine formulations that were previously found to be efficacious in a nonhuman primate model were evaluated for their efficacy in a rabbit pulmonary challenge model using Bacillus anthracis Ames strain spores. The vaccine formulations include PA adsorbed to Alhydrogel, PA encapsulated in liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A, stable liposomal PA oil-in-wa...

  18. AME News|金秋捷报:CCO成为AME第六本被Scopus收录的期刊

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓曼

    2015-01-01

    金秋十月,作为专注于国际医学类期刊和书籍出版的AME Publishing company再度捷报频传,10月30日,AME编辑部收到消息,Chinese Clinical Oncology(简称CCO)通过美国Content Selection&Advisory Board(CSAB)的审核,

  19. A critical review of the life sciences project management at Ames Research Center for the Spacelab Mission development test 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, R. L.; Wilhelm, J. M.; Tanner, T. A.; Sieber, J. E.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    A management study was initiated by ARC (Ames Research Center) to specify Spacelab Mission Development Test 3 activities and problems. This report documents the problems encountered and provides conclusions and recommendations to project management for current and future ARC life sciences projects. An executive summary of the conclusions and recommendations is provided. The report also addresses broader issues relevant to the conduct of future scientific missions under the constraints imposed by the space environment.

  20. Assessing the mutagenic activities of smoke from different cigarettes in direct exposure experiments using the modified Ames Salmonella assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Kanemaru, Yuki; Nara, Hidenori; Erami, Kazuo; Nagata, Yasufumi

    2016-06-01

    The Ames assay is useful for evaluating the mutagenic potentials of chemicals, and it has been used to evaluate the mutagenic potential of cigarette smoke (CS). In vitro direct exposure systems have been developed to mimic CS exposure in the human respiratory tract, and the Ames assay has been used with such systems. Ames tests were performed using the Vitrocell(®) direct exposure system in this study. The mutagenic potentials of whole mainstream CS and gas/vapor phase fractions produced by conventional combustible cigarettes under two smoking regimens were compared. Salmonella Typhimurium TA98 and TA100 were used with and without metabolic activation, and the number of revertants induced by exposure to each CS was determined. The amount of smoke particles to which cells were exposed were also determined, and dose-response curves describing the relationships between exposure to smoke particles and the number of revertants induced were plotted. The slopes of linear regressions of the dose-response curves were determined, and the slope for each CS was used as a mutagenic activity index for that CS. A new heated cigarette was also tested and smoke from the heated cigarette had a lower mutagenic activity in TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation than did the conventional CS. The results indicate that the direct exposure system and the Ames test can be used to determine the mutagenic potentials of CS produced by different cigarettes under different conditions (i.e., using different Salmonella Typhimurium strains with and without metabolic activation, and using different smoking conditions). PMID:27265375

  1. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  2. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  3. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  4. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  5. Ames expedited site characterization demonstration at the former manufactured gas plant site, Marshalltown, Iowa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the Ames Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) project is to evaluate and promote both innovative technologies (IT) and state-of-the-practice technologies (SOPT) for site characterization and monitoring. In April and May 1994, the ESC project conducted site characterization, technology comparison, and stakeholder demonstration activities at a former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) owned by Iowa Electric Services (IES) Utilities, Inc., in Marshalltown, Iowa. Three areas of technology were fielded at the Marshalltown FMGP site: geophysical, analytical and data integration. The geophysical technologies are designed to assess the subsurface geological conditions so that the location, fate and transport of the target contaminants may be assessed and forecasted. The analytical technologies/methods are designed to detect and quantify the target contaminants. The data integration technology area consists of hardware and software systems designed to integrate all the site information compiled and collected into a conceptual site model on a daily basis at the site; this conceptual model then becomes the decision-support tool. Simultaneous fielding of different methods within each of the three areas of technology provided data for direct comparison of the technologies fielded, both SOPT and IT. This document reports the results of the site characterization, technology comparison, and ESC demonstration activities associated with the Marshalltown FMGP site. 124 figs., 27 tabs

  6. The metabolic activation of 2-naphthylamine to mutagens in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S; Smith, J; Manson, D; Gorrod, J W; Ioannides, C

    1986-01-01

    The mutagenicity of 2-naphthylamine and its major metabolites in the Ames test was determined in the absence and presence of activation systems derived from rats and hamsters. In the absence of an activation system only N-hydroxy-2-naphthylamine and 2-nitrosonaphthalene were mutagenic. In the presence of activation systems derived from control and 3-methylcholanthrene-treated hamsters and Arochlor 1254-treated rats only 2-naphthylamine exhibited a mutagenic response while its hydroxy-derivatives and 2-acetamidonaphthalene were devoid of mutagenicity. Pretreatment of rats with 3-methylcholanthrene or Arochlor 1254 enhanced the mutagenicity of 2-naphthylamine while treatments with phenobarbitone, safrole and clofibrate had no significant effect. In the hamster treatment with only 3-methylcholanthrene increased the mutagenicity of 2-naphthylamine. It is concluded that the metabolic activation of 2-naphthylamine proceeds via N-hydroxylation which is preferentially catalysed by the 3-methylcholanthrene inducible forms of cytochrome P-450, whereas ring-hydroxylation appears to be a deactivation pathway. PMID:3800318

  7. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  8. Evaluation of genotoxicity of Trois through Ames and in vitro chromosomal aberration tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manu Chaudhary; Anurag Payasi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mutagenic potential of Trois using the bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and in vitro chromosomal aberration test.Methods:typhimurium (TA 98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537) and Escherichia coli (WP2 uvrA) with and without metabolic activation system (S9 mix) at the dose range of 313 to 5000 µg/plate. Chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line at the dose levels of 15, 7.5, 3.7, 1.9 and 0.9 mg/mL in the absence and presence of S9 mix.Results:The ability of Trois to induce reverse mutations was evaluated in Salmonella Trois used in the study with and without S9 mix in all tester strains. Trois did not produce any structural aberration in CHL cells in the presence or absence of S9 mix. There were no increases in the number of revertant colonies at any concentrations of Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that Trois is non-mutagenic.

  9. Ames expedited site characterization demonstration at the former manufactured gas plant site, Marshalltown, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevolo, A.J.; Kjartanson, B.H.; Wonder, J.D.

    1996-03-01

    The goal of the Ames Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) project is to evaluate and promote both innovative technologies (IT) and state-of-the-practice technologies (SOPT) for site characterization and monitoring. In April and May 1994, the ESC project conducted site characterization, technology comparison, and stakeholder demonstration activities at a former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) owned by Iowa Electric Services (IES) Utilities, Inc., in Marshalltown, Iowa. Three areas of technology were fielded at the Marshalltown FMGP site: geophysical, analytical and data integration. The geophysical technologies are designed to assess the subsurface geological conditions so that the location, fate and transport of the target contaminants may be assessed and forecasted. The analytical technologies/methods are designed to detect and quantify the target contaminants. The data integration technology area consists of hardware and software systems designed to integrate all the site information compiled and collected into a conceptual site model on a daily basis at the site; this conceptual model then becomes the decision-support tool. Simultaneous fielding of different methods within each of the three areas of technology provided data for direct comparison of the technologies fielded, both SOPT and IT. This document reports the results of the site characterization, technology comparison, and ESC demonstration activities associated with the Marshalltown FMGP site. 124 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  11. Isotherm Sensor Calibration Program for Mars Science Laboratory Heat Shield Flight Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jose A.; Oishi, Tomo; Martinez, Ed R.

    2011-01-01

    Seven instrumented sensor plugs were installed on the Mars Science Laboratory heat shield in December 2008 as part of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) project. These sensor plugs contain four in-depth thermocouples and one Hollow aErothermal Ablation and Temperature (HEAT) sensor. The HEAT sensor follows the time progression of a 700 C isotherm through the thickness of a thermal protection system (TPS) material. The data can be used to infer char depth and, when analyzed in conjunction with the thermocouple data, the thermal gradient through the TPS material can also be determined. However, the uncertainty on the isotherm value is not well defined. To address this uncertainty, a team at NASA Ames Research Center is carrying out a HEAT sensor calibration test program. The scope of this test program is described, and initial results from experiments conducted in the laboratory to study the isotherm temperature of the HEAT sensor are presented. Data from the laboratory tests indicate an isotherm temperature of 720 C 60 C. An overview of near term arc jet testing is also given, including preliminary data from 30.48cm 30.48cm PICA panels instrumented with two MEDLI sensor plugs and tested in the NASA Ames Panel Test Facility. Forward work includes analysis of the arc jet test data, including an evaluation of the isotherm value based on the instant in time when it reaches a thermocouple depth.

  12. Multiyear Simulations of the Martian Water Cycle with the Ames General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J. R.; Nelli, S. M.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Mars atmosphere is carbon dioxide dominated with non-negligible amounts of water vapor and suspended dust particles. The atmospheric dust plays an important role in the heating and cooling of the planet through absorption and emission of radiation. Small dust particles can potentially be carried to great altitudes and affect the temperatures there. Water vapor condensing onto the dust grains can affect the radiative properties of both, as well as their vertical extent. The condensation of water onto a dust grain will change the grain s fall speed and diminish the possibility of dust obtaining high altitudes. In this capacity, water becomes a controlling agent with regard to the vertical distribution of dust. Similarly, the atmosphere s water vapor holding capacity is affected by the amount of dust in the atmosphere. Dust is an excellent green house catalyst; it raises the temperature of the atmosphere, and thus, its water vapor holding capacity. There is, therefore, a potentially significant interplay between the Martian dust and water cycles. Previous research done using global, 3-D computer modeling to better understand the Martian atmosphere treat the dust and the water cycles as two separate and independent processes. The existing Ames numerical model will be employed to simulate the relationship between the Martian dust and water cycles by actually coupling the two cycles. Water will condense onto the dust, allowing the particle's radiative characteristics, fall speeds, and as a result, their vertical distribution to change. Data obtained from the Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and especially the Mars Global Surveyor missions will be used to determine the accuracy of the model results.

  13. 红曲中桔霉素的Ames试验%Ames Test of Citrinin in Monascus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜新芳; 陈运中

    2012-01-01

    Ames test was applied to preliminarily study the mutagenicity of citrinin in monascus by observing the reverse mutation bacteria number of histidine-defective Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100 and TAI02 treated by 0.2、 1.0、 5.0、 25.0 μg/vessel citrinin. Results showed that the reverse mutation bacteria number of treatment groups were less than two times of that in blank control; and no dose-response was presented. The test result was negative, indicating that citrinin had no mutagenicity under the experimental conditions.%采用鼠伤寒沙门氏菌试验(Ames试验),通过观察0.2、1.0、5.0、25.0 μg/皿桔霉素处理对鼠伤寒沙门氏菌组氨酸缺陷型菌株TA97、TA98、TA100、TA102回复突变的影响,检测红曲中桔霉素的致突变性.结果表明,桔霉素受试物组回变菌落数均未超过自发回变菌落数的2倍,亦未呈现剂量反应关系,试验结果为阴性,红曲中桔霉素未表现出致突变性.

  14. General overview of the theories used in assessment: AMEE Guide No. 57.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwirth, Lambert W T; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2011-01-01

    There are no scientific theories that are uniquely related to assessment in medical education. There are many theories in adjacent fields, however, that can be informative for assessment in medical education, and in the recent decades they have proven their value. In this AMEE Guide we discuss theories on expertise development and psychometric theories, and the relatively young and emerging framework of assessment for learning. Expertise theories highlight the multistage processes involved. The transition from novice to expert is characterised by an increase in the aggregation of concepts from isolated facts, through semantic networks to illness scripts and instance scripts. The latter two stages enable the expert to recognise the problem quickly and form a quick and accurate representation of the problem in his/her working memory. Striking differences between experts and novices is not per se the possession of more explicit knowledge but the superior organisation of knowledge in his/her brain and pairing it with multiple real experiences, enabling not only better problem solving but also more efficient problem solving. Psychometric theories focus on the validity of the assessment - does it measure what it purports to measure and reliability - are the outcomes of the assessment reproducible. Validity is currently seen as building a train of arguments of how best observations of behaviour (answering a multiple-choice question is also a behaviour) can be translated into scores and how these can be used at the end to make inferences about the construct of interest. Reliability theories can be categorised into classical test theory, generalisability theory and item response theory. All three approaches have specific advantages and disadvantages and different areas of application. Finally in the Guide, we discuss the phenomenon of assessment for learning as opposed to assessment of learning and its implications for current and future development and research.

  15. Residents as teachers: Near peer learning in clinical work settings: AMEE Guide No. 106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Subha; Mann, Karen; Taylor, David; Thampy, Harish

    2016-07-01

    This AMEE Guide provides a framework to guide medical educators engaged in the design and implementation of "Resident as Teacher" programs. The suggested approaches are based on established models of program development: the Program Logic model to guide program design, the Dundee three-circle model to inform a systematic approach to planning educational content and the Kirkpatrick pyramid, which forms the backbone of program evaluation. The Guide provides an overview of Resident as Teacher curricula, their benefits and impact, from existing literature supplemented by insights from the authors' own experiences, all of whom are engaged in teaching initiatives at their own institutions. A conceptual description of the Program Logic model is provided, a model that highlights an outcomes-based curricular design. Examples of activities under each step of this model are described, which would allow educational leaders to structure their own program based on the scope, context, institutional needs and resources available. Emphasis is placed on a modular curricular format to not only enhance the teaching skills of residents, but also enable development of future career educators, scholars and leaders. Application of the Dundee three-circle model is illustrated to allow for a flexible curricular design that can cater to varying levels of educational needs and interests. In addition, practical advice is provided on robust assessment of outcomes, both assessment of participants and program evaluation. Finally, the authors highlight the need for congruence between the formal and hidden curriculum through explicit recognition of the value of teaching by institutions, support for development of teaching programs, encouragement of evidence-based approach to education and rewards for all levels of teachers. PMID:27071739

  16. Mutagenicity of automobile workshop soil leachate and tobacco industry wastewater using the Ames Salmonella fluctuation and the SOS chromotests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunola, Alabi A; Babatunde, Esan E; Chinwe, Duru; Pelumi, Oyedele; Ramatu, Salihu G

    2016-06-01

    Environmental management of industrial solid wastes and wastewater is an important economic and environmental health problem globally. This study evaluated the mutagenic potential of automobile workshop soil-simulated leachate and tobacco wastewater using the SOS chromotest on Escherichia coli PQ37 and the Ames Salmonella fluctuation test on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 without metabolic activation. Physicochemical parameters of the samples were also analyzed. The result of the Ames test showed mutagenicity of the test samples. However, the TA100 was the more responsive strain for both the simulated leachate and tobacco wastewater in terms of mutagenic index in the absence of metabolic activation. The SOS chromotest results were in agreement with those of the Ames Salmonella fluctuation test. Nevertheless, the E. coli PQ37 system was slightly more sensitive than the Salmonella assay for detecting genotoxins in the tested samples. Iron, cadmium, manganese, copper, nickel, chromium, arsenic, zinc, and lead contents analyzed in the samples were believed to play significant role in the observed mutagenicity in the microbial assays. The results of this study showed that the simulated leachate and tobacco wastewater showed strong indication of a genotoxic risk. Further studies would be required in the analytical field in order to identify and quantify other compounds not analyzed for in this study, some of which could be responsible for the observed genotoxicity. This will be necessary in order to identify the sources of toxicants and thus to take preventive and/or curative measures to limit the toxicity of these types of wastes.

  17. Mutagenicity of automobile workshop soil leachate and tobacco industry wastewater using the Ames Salmonella fluctuation and the SOS chromotests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunola, Alabi A; Babatunde, Esan E; Chinwe, Duru; Pelumi, Oyedele; Ramatu, Salihu G

    2016-06-01

    Environmental management of industrial solid wastes and wastewater is an important economic and environmental health problem globally. This study evaluated the mutagenic potential of automobile workshop soil-simulated leachate and tobacco wastewater using the SOS chromotest on Escherichia coli PQ37 and the Ames Salmonella fluctuation test on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 without metabolic activation. Physicochemical parameters of the samples were also analyzed. The result of the Ames test showed mutagenicity of the test samples. However, the TA100 was the more responsive strain for both the simulated leachate and tobacco wastewater in terms of mutagenic index in the absence of metabolic activation. The SOS chromotest results were in agreement with those of the Ames Salmonella fluctuation test. Nevertheless, the E. coli PQ37 system was slightly more sensitive than the Salmonella assay for detecting genotoxins in the tested samples. Iron, cadmium, manganese, copper, nickel, chromium, arsenic, zinc, and lead contents analyzed in the samples were believed to play significant role in the observed mutagenicity in the microbial assays. The results of this study showed that the simulated leachate and tobacco wastewater showed strong indication of a genotoxic risk. Further studies would be required in the analytical field in order to identify and quantify other compounds not analyzed for in this study, some of which could be responsible for the observed genotoxicity. This will be necessary in order to identify the sources of toxicants and thus to take preventive and/or curative measures to limit the toxicity of these types of wastes. PMID:25187319

  18. Freeze-out configuration properties in the 197Au + 197Au reaction at 23 AMeV

    CERN Document Server

    Najman, R; Sochocka, A; Amorini, F; Auditore, L; Cap, T; Cardella, G; De Filippo, E; Geraci, E; Grzeszczuk, A; Kowalski, S; Kozik, T; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I; Majka, Z; Nicolis, N G; Pagano, A; Piasecki, E; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Rizzo, F; Russotto, P; Siwek-Wilczynska, K; Skwira-Chalot, I; Trifiro, A; Trimarchi, M; Wilczynski, J; Zipper, W

    2015-01-01

    Data from the experiment on the 197Au + 197Au reaction at 23 AMeV are analyzed with an aim to find signatures of exotic nuclear configurations such as toroid-shaped objects. The experimental data are compared with predictions of the ETNA code dedicated to look for such configurations and with the QMD model. A novel criterion of selecting events possibly resulting from the formation of exotic freeze-out configurations, "the efficiency factor", is tested. Comparison between experimental data and model predictions may indicate for the formation of flat/toroidal nuclear systems.

  19. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 2: Light sheet and vapor screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    Light sheet and vapor screen methods have been studied with particular emphasis on those systems that have been used in large transonic and supersonic wind tunnels. The various fluids and solids used as tracers or light scatters and the methods for tracing generation have been studied. Light sources from high intensity lamps and various lasers have been surveyed. Light sheet generation and projection methods were considered. Detectors and location of detectors were briefly studied. A vapor screen system and a technique for location injection of tracers for the NASA Ames 9 by 7 foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel were proposed.

  20. Evaluación del D-004 en el Ensayo de Ames por incorporación directa a placa

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Martínez, A.; Marrero Cofiño, G.; Gámez Menéndez, R.; I. Fernández; Curveco Sánchez, D.; H García Cambián

    2005-01-01

    El D-004 es un extracto lipídico obtenido del fruto de la palma real (Roystonea regia) (Arecaceae) que consiste en una mezcla reproducible de ácidos grasos, en la cual el ácido oleico, el laurico y el palmítico son los más abundantes. El tratamiento oral con D-004 inhibe significativamente la hiperplasia prostática (HP) inducida por testosterona en roedores. El objetivo de este trabajo fue investigar si el D-004 induce mutaciones génicas puntuales en el ensayo de Ames por incorporación direct...

  1. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  2. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  3. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  4. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  5. Embedded Processor Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Embedded Processor Laboratory provides the means to design, develop, fabricate, and test embedded computers for missile guidance electronics systems in support...

  6. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  7. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  8. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  9. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  10. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  11. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  12. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  13. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  14. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  15. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  16. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  17. Composites Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose of the Composites Characterization Laboratory is to investigate new and/or modified matrix materials and fibers for advanced composite applications both...

  18. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  19. Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — With its pressure vessels that simulate the pressures and temperatures found deep underground, NETL’s Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory in Pittsburgh, PA, gives...

  20. [Theme: Using Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Jack; Braker, Clifton

    1982-01-01

    Pritchard discusses the opportunities for applied learning afforded by laboratories. Braker describes the evaluation of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. (SK)

  1. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems. DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  2. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  3. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  4. AMEE Guide 32: e-Learning in medical education Part 1: Learning, teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel; Masters, Ken

    2008-06-01

    In just a few years, e-learning has become part of the mainstream in medical education. While e-learning means many things to many people, at its heart it is concerned with the educational uses of technology. For the purposes of this guide, we consider the many ways that the information revolution has affected and remediated the practice of healthcare teaching and learning. Deploying new technologies usually introduces tensions, and e-learning is no exception. Some wish to use it merely to perform pre-existing activities more efficiently or faster. Others pursue new ways of thinking and working that the use of such technology affords them. Simultaneously, while education, not technology, is the prime goal (and for healthcare, better patient outcomes), we are also aware that we cannot always predict outcomes. Sometimes, we have to take risks, and 'see what happens.' Serendipity often adds to the excitement of teaching. It certainly adds to the excitement of learning. The use of technology in support of education is not, therefore, a causal or engineered set of practices; rather, it requires creativity and adaptability in response to the specific and changing contexts in which it is used. Medical Education, as with most fields, is grappling with these tensions; the AMEE Guide to e-Learning in Medical Education hopes to help the reader, whether novice or expert, navigate them. This Guide is presented both as an introduction to the novice, and as a resource to more experienced practitioners. It covers a wide range of topics, some in broad outline, and others in more detail. Each section is concluded with a brief 'Take Home Message' which serves as a short summary of the section. The Guide is divided into two parts. The first part introduces the basic concepts of e-learning, e-teaching, and e-assessment, and then focuses on the day-to-day issues of e-learning, looking both at theoretical concepts and practical implementation issues. The second part examines technical

  5. 苍术苷的致突变AMES试验研究%Ames Test of Atractyloside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨桂蓉; 喻凯; 陆彩鹏; 周蓉; 邓喜; 王明奎

    2013-01-01

    目的:应用Ames试验检测系统检测苍术苷的致突变活性.方法:采用组氨酸营养缺陷型鼠伤寒沙门杆菌TA97,TA98,Tal00,Tal02标准测试菌株,在有和无代谢活化剂下对受试药品0.8 ~250 μg·皿-1共5个浓度组进行测试.结果:无S9活化系统条件下,各菌株回复突变菌落数未见明显增多.有S9活化系统条件下,4~250 μg·皿-1测试浓度范围内,苍术苷对TA98测试菌株诱发产生的回变菌落数与空白对照组相比均达到两倍以上.结论:苍术苷4 ~ 250 μg·皿-1测试浓度范围内,对TA98有间接致突变活性.%Objective: To study the mutagenic effects of atractyloside by Ames assay in vitro. Methods :In the presence and absence of S9 activator,the mutagenic activities of atractyloside at the concentrations within 0. 8~250 μg/mL were observed in the TA series of typhoid salmonella bacillus strains TA97 ,TA98 ,Tal00 and Tal02. Results: All kinds of series colnies were not increased in absence of S9 activator. The mutated clump count of atractyloside at the concentrations within 4 ~250 μg/mL about TA98 were above double compared with that in negative control. Conclusion: The mutagenic activities of atractyloside at the concentrations within 4 ~ 250 μg/mL about TA98 were observed indirectly.

  6. An investigation into pharmaceutically relevant mutagenicity data and the influence on Ames predictive potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarren Patrick

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In drug discovery, a positive Ames test for bacterial mutation presents a significant hurdle to advancing a drug to clinical trials. In a previous paper, we discussed success in predicting the genotoxicity of reagent-sized aryl-amines (ArNH2, a structure frequently found in marketed drugs and in drug discovery, using quantum mechanics calculations of the energy required to generate the DNA-reactive nitrenium intermediate (ArNH:+. In this paper we approach the question of what molecular descriptors could improve these predictions and whether external data sets are appropriate for further training. Results In trying to extend and improve this model beyond this quantum mechanical reaction energy, we faced considerable difficulty, which was surprising considering the long history and success of QSAR model development for this test. Other quantum mechanics descriptors were compared to this reaction energy including AM1 semi-empirical orbital energies, nitrenium formation with alternative leaving groups, nitrenium charge, and aryl-amine anion formation energy. Nitrenium formation energy, regardless of the starting species, was found to be the most useful single descriptor. External sets used in other QSAR investigations did not present the same difficulty using the same methods and descriptors. When considering all substructures rather than just aryl-amines, we also noted a significantly lower performance for the Novartis set. The performance gap between Novartis and external sets persists across different descriptors and learning methods. The profiles of the Novartis and external data are significantly different both in aryl-amines and considering all substructures. The Novartis and external data sets are easily separated in an unsupervised clustering using chemical fingerprints. The chemical differences are discussed and visualized using Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps trained on chemical fingerprints, mutagenic substructure

  7. Genotoxic evaluation of aspirin eugenol ester using the Ames test and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyong; Kong, Xiaojun; Li, Xiwang; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Jiyu

    2013-12-01

    Aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) is a promising drug candidate for treatment of inflammation, pain and fever and prevention of cardiovascular diseases with less side effects and it is important to characterize its genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxicity of AEE was assessed with two standard genotoxicity assays of the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102 and TA1535 were treated with or without the metabolic activation with a S9 fraction from Acroclor-induced rat liver. The doses of AEE were 5 mg/plate, 2.5 mg/plate, 1.25 mg/plate, 0.625 mg/plate and 0.3125 mg/plate, respectively. In the above tested strains, mutagenicity with or without the S-9 mixture was not detected. In the mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus assay, fifty mice were divided into five groups evenly and the AEE dose at 5000 mg/kg, 2500 mg/kg and 1250 mg/kg and the cyclophosphamide dose at 40 mg/kg as a positive control, the 0.5% of CMC-Na as negative control were administered. The results showed that AEE did not induce any significant increase in micronucleated erythrocytes after 24 h (p<0.01). Our results suggested that AEE was non-genotoxic in vivo or in vitro.

  8. Measurement of 100 B. anthracis Ames spores within 15 minutes by SERS at the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Ctr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Huang, Hermes; Sperry, Jay; Sickler, Todd; Prugh, Amber; Guicheteau, Jason

    2014-05-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis-Ames spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. While there has been substantial effort since the anthrax attack of 2001 to develop analyzers to detect this and other biological warfare agents, the analyzers remain either too slow, lack sensitivity, produce high false-positive rates, or cannot be fielded. In an effort to overcome these limitations we have been developing a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy system. Here we describe the use of silver nanoparticles functionalized with a short peptide to selectively capture Bacillus anthracis spores and produce SER scattering. Specifically, measurements of 100 B. anthracis-Ames spores/mL in ~25 minutes performed at the US Army's Edgewood Chemical Biological Center are presented. The measurements provide a basis for the development of systems that can detect spores collected from the air or water supplies with the potential of saving lives during a biological warfare attack.

  9. Determination of mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of Limonium globuliferum aqueous extracts by Allium, Ames, and MTT tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin Eren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of roots, stems and leaves of Limonium globuliferum Kuntze, Plumbaginaceae, aqueous extracts were studied by Allium, Ames, and MTT tests. These are plant, bacterial and mammalian cell assays, respectively. The Allium test analyses showed that aqueous extracts of this species have dose-dependent toxicity and induce chromosomal anomalies based on defects in the spindle fibers. EC50 values of root stem and leaf aqueous extracts were 32.5, 50, and 50 g/l, respectively. It was observed that there was an inverse correlation between root growth and extract concentration. The lowest mitotic index value (22.72 % was found in L. globuliferum root extract. As a result of the chromosome aberrations test, sticky chromosomes, anaphase bridges, laggard chromosomes, and anaphase-telophase disorders were highly detected especially in high concentration of the extract. In the Ames test, mutagenic effects were determined at all concentrations of stem and leaf aqueous extracts and only two concentrations of root extracts of L. globuliferum. Most of the extracts induced cytotoxic effects by the MTT test based on mitochondrial activity. Nevertheless, some of the extracts induced t cell proliferation.

  10. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  11. Study of the mechanism of carcinogenesis by carcinogens which are negative in the Ames test. Progress report, April 1-September 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Carcinogens ethionine, thioacetamide, and actinomycin D, all of which are negative in the Ames test and all of which raise the progesterone level in the chicken, were tested to determine their physiological role in carcinogenesis. The optimization of the carcinogenesis model also included evaluation of the chicken as the biological indicator of physiological changes relative to the above compounds. (PCS)

  12. In vitro mutagenicity testing. II. Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, mixture of Sylgard 184 with Encapsulating Resin and Curing Agent, and dimethylbenzanthracene. [Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.Y.; Smith, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    Four materials, Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, Sylgard 184 with Encapsulating Resin and Curing Agent, and 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), were tested for in vitro mutagenicity by the Ames Salmonella assay method. Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, and Sylgard 184 Encapsulating Resin with Curing Agent were not mutagenic; the mutagenicity of DMBA was corroborated.

  13. In vitro mutagenicity testing. I. Kermide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, and Sylgard 184 curing agent. [Ames Salmonella assay system used

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.Y.; Smith, D.M.

    1978-08-01

    Five compounds, Kerimide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, Sylgard 184 curing agent, benzo(a)pyrene, and acridine orange were tested for in vitro mutagenicity using the Ames Salmonella assay system. Kerimide 601 resin, Sylgard 184 encapsulating resin, and Sylgard 184 curing agent were not mutagenic under the described experimental conditions, while benzo(a)pyrene and acridine orange were both mutagenic.

  14. AMES, NESC and ENIQ: European networks in the field of structural integrity involving NDE and inspection effectiveness assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three European networks on structural integrity aspects of ageing nuclear components are presently managed by the Institute for Advanced Materials of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission: AMES (Ageing Materials Evaluation and Studies), ENIQ (European Network for Inspection Qualification) and NESC (Network for Evaluating Steel Components). All three networks involve actions, which aim at the effectiveness and reliability assessment of NDE techniques and of inspection procedures: Either for materials damage detection and characterisation or for defect detection and evaluation. This paper is describing very generally the objectives of the three networks and is then concentrating on the results obtained in ENIQ, which are relevant with ISI and regulatory issues. (orig./DGE)

  15. Differential effects of chronic alcohol administration to rats on the activation of aromatic amines to mutagens in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C M; Ioannides, C

    1986-05-01

    Male Wistar albino rats were maintained on alcohol-containing liquid diets for 4 weeks. Hepatic post-mitochondrial preparations derived from these animals were more efficient than control in activating 4-aminobiphenyl and 2-aminofluorene to mutagens in the Ames test. The alcohol-induced enhancement in mutagenicity was not inhibited by dimethylsulphoxide indicating that the generation of hydroxyl radicals is not involved. The activation of 2-naphthylamine was not affected by the treatment with alcohol but the mutagenicities of 2-aminoanthracene, benzo[a]pyrene and 3-methylcholanthrene were inhibited. The same treatment markedly increased hepatic microsomal aniline p-hydroxylase and ethoxyresorufin O-de-ethylase activities and to a lesser extent benzphetamine N-demethylase and microsomal levels of total cytochromes P-450. It is concluded that chronic alcohol administration to rats modulates the metabolic activation of pre-carcinogens to their reactive intermediates presumably by causing the redistribution of cytochrome P-450 isozymes. PMID:3009048

  16. Preliminary Computational Study for Future Tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot' x 7 foot Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Jason M.; Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; WInski, Courtney S.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Commercial Supersonics Technology Project seeks to advance tools and techniques to make over-land supersonic flight feasible. In this study, preliminary computational results are presented for future tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot x 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel to be conducted in early 2016. Shock-plume interactions and their effect on pressure signature are examined for six model geometries. Near- field pressure signatures are assessed using the CFD code USM3D to model the proposed test geometries in free-air. Additionally, results obtained using the commercial grid generation software Pointwise Reigistered Trademark are compared to results using VGRID, the NASA Langley Research Center in-house mesh generation program.

  17. Genotoxic, Cytotoxic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Effects of Sulfonamide Chalcone Using the Ames Test and the Mouse Bone Marrow Micronucleus Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ribeiro E Silva

    Full Text Available Chalcones present several biological activities and sulfonamide chalcone derivatives have shown important biological applications, including antitumor activity. In this study, genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities of the sulfonamide chalcone N-{4-[3-(4-nitrophenylprop-2-enoyl]phenyl} benzenesulfonamide (CPN were assessed using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test (Ames test and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The results showed that CPN caused a small increase in the number of histidine revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05. The antimutagenicity test showed that CPN significantly decreased the number of His+ revertants in strain TA98 at all doses tested (p 0.05. Additionally, CPN co-administered with MMC significantly increased PCE/NCE ratio at all doses tested, demonstrating its anticytotoxic effect. In summary, CPN presented genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic properties.

  18. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems. The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  19. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  20. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to...

  1. Laboratory Demographics Lookup Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This website provides demographic information about laboratories, including CLIA number, facility name and address, where the laboratory testing is performed, the...

  2. Building the Korogwe Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Richard, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania.......An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania....

  3. Geological Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Researchers use computed tomography (CT) scanners at NETL’s Geological Services Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, to peer into geologic core samples to determine how...

  4. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  5. Electro-Deposition Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The electro-deposition laboratory can electro-deposit various coatings onto small test samples and bench level prototypes. This facility provides the foundation for...

  6. Protective Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a 40 by 28 by 9 foot facility that is equipped with tools for the development of various items of control technology related to the transmission...

  7. Moriah Wind System Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Moriah Wind System Laboratory provides in-service support for the more than 50 U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Military Sealift Command ships on which...

  8. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  9. FLEXIBLE FOOD PACKAGING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment to fabricate and test prototype packages of many types and sizes (e.g., bags, pouches, trays, cartons, etc.). This equipment can...

  10. Mechanical Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Mechanical Testing Laboratory in Albany, OR, helps researchers investigate materials that can withstand the heat and pressure commonly found in fossil energy...

  11. High Bay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a specially constructed facility with elevated (37 feet) ceilings and an overhead catwalk, and which is dedicated to research efforts in reducing...

  12. Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) is part of the Aerospace Engineering Department and A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland in College...

  13. Laboratory Calibration Studies in Support of ORGANICS on the International Space Station: Evolution of Organic Matter in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiterkamp, R.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Halasinski, T.; Salama, F.; Foing, B.; Schmidt, W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific overview and current status of ORGANICS an exposure experiment performed on the International Space Station (ISS) to study the evolution of organic matter in space (PI: P. Ehrenfreund), with supporting laboratory experiments performed at NASA Ames. ORGANICS investigates the chemical evolution of samples submitted to long-duration exposure to space environment in near-Earth orbit. This experiment will provide information on the nature, evolution, and survival of carbon species in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in solar system targets.

  14. Diagnóstico molecular diferencial Colletotrichum gloeosporioides y Fusarium oxysporum en ñame (Dioscorea sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeimy Alexandra Pinzón Gutiérrez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Título en ingles: Differential molecular diagnosis Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Fusarium oxysporum in yam (Dioscorea sp..Título corto:  Diagnóstico molecular en ñameResumen: Las enfermedades de origen fúngico son responsables de las mayores pérdidas reportadas en los cultivos de ñame colombianos, entre ellas la antracnosis causada por Colletotrichum spp. se destaca por ser la más devastadora.  En los últimos años, hongos con baja prevalencia pero con alto poder de diseminación como Fusarium spp., han ampliado su presencia en los cultivos de ñame favoreciendo el desarrollo de enfermedades como la pudrición del tubérculo en postcosecha. A pesar de la importancia del cultivo de ñame en las regiones de la Costa Atlántica colombiana, el Pacífico y la Amazonia, este es considerado un cultivo huérfano en razón a que son pocos los esfuerzos que en investigación se realizan a nivel mundial y particularmente en Colombia.  Con el propósito de aportar al diagnóstico correcto y oportuno de fitopatógenos que afectan el cultivo de ñame, se obtuvieron aislamientos fúngicos a partir de hojas con manchas necróticas. De los aislamientos obtenidos, cinco presentaron morfología propia del género Colletotrichum y tres de Fusarium.  La identidad de las especies implicadas se determinó por secuenciación de los ITS del ADNr, correspondiendo a Colletotrichum gloeosporioides y Fusarium oxysporum.  La evaluación de marcadores moleculares para la detección de forma diferencial y simultánea de estos patógenos, permitió seleccionar la amplificación del factor de elongación alpha (EF-α como la mejor prueba de diagnosis. Las pruebas de patogenicidad confirmaron la capacidad de los aislados de C. gloeosporioides para causar sintomatología de antracnosis en foliolos y de los aislados de F. oxysporum para desencadenar pudrición en tubérculo, la presencia de este último en hojas se podría asociar a su fácil y rápida dispersi

  15. Experiences with Remote Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Nafalski; Ozdemir Gol; Zorica Nedic; Jan Machotka; José M. M. Ferreira; Ingvar Gustavsson

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports on experiences of academics and students involved in using remote engineering laboratories both when students work individually or collaboratively with others on the experiments. Positives and negatives are highlighted and are contrasted with expectations of what the remote laboratories can bring into pedagogical environments. Recommendations and conclusions follow on how to better use the remote laboratories in teaching.

  16. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  17. Good Laboratory Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjicostas, Evsevios

    The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

  18. An integrated user-oriented laboratory for verification of digital flight control systems: Features and capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeo, P.; Doane, D.; Saito, J.

    1982-01-01

    A Digital Flight Control Systems Verification Laboratory (DFCSVL) has been established at NASA Ames Research Center. This report describes the major elements of the laboratory, the research activities that can be supported in the area of verification and validation of digital flight control systems (DFCS), and the operating scenarios within which these activities can be carried out. The DFCSVL consists of a palletized dual-dual flight-control system linked to a dedicated PDP-11/60 processor. Major software support programs are hosted in a remotely located UNIVAC 1100 accessible from the PDP-11/60 through a modem link. Important features of the DFCSVL include extensive hardware and software fault insertion capabilities, a real-time closed loop environment to exercise the DFCS, an integrated set of software verification tools, and a user-oriented interface to all the resources and capabilities.

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  3. Skylab mobile laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  4. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.;

    2015-01-01

    diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...... that Laboratory Medicine should play a key role to support the implementation of Personalized Medicine in the clinical settings, the participants of this survey think that the current organization of the Laboratory Medicine needs additional/relevant implementations such as: 1. New technological Facilities...

  5. Exobiology in Earth orbit: The results of science workshops held at NASA, Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, D. (Editor); Brownlee, D. (Editor); Tarter, J. (Editor); Usher, D. (Editor); Irvine, W. (Editor); Klein, H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Workshops on Exobiology in Earth Orbit were held to explore concepts for orbital experiments of exobiological interest and make recommendations on which classes of experiments should be carried out. Various observational and experimental opportunities in Earth orbit are described including those associated with the Space Shuttle laboratories, spacecraft deployed from the Space Shuttle and expendable launch vehicles, the Space Station, and lunar bases. Specific science issues and technology needs are summarized. Finally, a list of recommended experiments in the areas of observational exobiology, cosmic dust collection, and in situ experiments is presented.

  6. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  7. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  8. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  9. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  10. Materials Behavior Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to evaluate mechanical properties of materials including metals, intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites under typical...

  11. Metallurgical Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to increase basic knowledge of metallurgical processing for controlling the microstructure and mechanical properties of metallic aerospace alloys and...

  12. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Federman, Steve; Kwong, Victor; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel; Stancil, Phillip; Weingartner, Joe; Ziurys, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomical and planetary research and will remain so for many generations to come. From the level of scientific conception to that of the scientific return, it is our understanding of the underlying processes that allows us to address fundamental questions regarding the origins and evolution of galaxies, stars, planetary systems, and life in the cosmos. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA and NSF; these efforts are necessary for the astronomical research being funded by the agencies. The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop met at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from 14-16 February, 2006 to identify the current laboratory data needed to support existing and future NASA missions and programs in the Astrophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD). Here we refer to both laboratory and theoretical work as laboratory astrophysics unless a distinction is necessary. The format for the Workshop involved invited talks by users of laboratory data, shorter contributed talks and poster presentations by both users and providers that highlighted exciting developments in laboratory astrophysics, and breakout sessions where users and providers discussed each others' needs and limitations. We also note that the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee are users as well as providers of laboratory data. As in previous workshops, the focus was on atomic, molecular, and solid state physics.

  13. Flying Electronic Warfare Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides NP-3D aircraft host platforms for Effectiveness of Navy Electronic Warfare Systems (ENEWS) Program antiship missile (ASM) seeker simulators used...

  14. High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The High Temperature Materials Lab provides the Navy and industry with affordable high temperature materials for advanced propulsion systems. Asset List: Arc Melter...

  15. Free Surface Hydrodynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Investigates processes and interactions at the air-sea interface, and compares measurements to numerical simulations and field data. Typical phenomena of...

  16. Biochemical Neuroscience Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This biochemistry lab is set up for protein analysis using Western blot, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, and bead-based immunoassays. The...

  17. Applied Neuroscience Laboratory Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located at WPAFB, Ohio, the Applied Neuroscience lab researches and develops technologies to optimize Airmen individual and team performance across all AF domains....

  18. Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs basic and applied research in interactive 3D computer graphics, including visual analytics, virtual environments, and augmented reality (AR). The...

  19. Laboratory-scale bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil of Kuwait with soil amendment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B H; Chino, H; Tsuji, H; Kunito, T; Nagaoka, K; Otsuka, S; Yamashita, K; Matsumoto, S; Oyaizu, H

    1997-10-01

    A huge amount of oil-contaminated soil remains unremediated in the Kuwait desert. The contaminated oil has the potentiality to cause pollution of underground water and to effect the health of people in the neighborhood. In this study, laboratory scale bioremediation experiments were carried out. Hyponex (Hyponex, Inc.) and bark manure were added as basic nutrients for microorganisms, and twelve kinds of materials (baked diatomite, microporous glass, coconut charcoal, an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture (Formula X from Oppenheimer, Inc.), and eight kinds of surfactants) were applied to accelerate the biodegradation of oil hydrocarbons. 15% to 33% of the contaminated oil was decomposed during 43 weeks' incubation. Among the materials tested, coconut charcoal enhanced the biodegradation. On the contrary, the addition of an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture impeded the biodegradation. The effects of the other materials were very slight. The toxicity of the biodegraded compounds was estimated by the Ames test and the tea pollen tube growth test. Both of the hydrophobic (dichloromethane extracts) and hydrophilic (methanol extracts) fractions showed a very slight toxicity in the Ames test. In the tea pollen tube growth test, the hydrophobic fraction was not toxic and enhanced the growth of pollen tubes.

  20. Absence of genotoxicity of potato alkaloids alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine and solanidine in the Ames Salmonella and adult and foetal erythrocyte micronucleus assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M; Henika, P R

    1992-08-01

    To assess whether reported toxicities of potato-derived glycoalkaloids could be the result of interactions with cellular DNA, the genotoxic effects of alpha-solanine, alpha-chaconine and solanidine were studied, using the Ames test (Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100), the mouse peripheral blood micronucleus test and the mouse transplacental micronucleus test. The Ames test for mutagenicity with alpha-solanine was weakly positive in TA100 with S-9 activation (29 revertants per millimole per plate). However, pooled data from duplicate tests gave a negative effect. Pooled data from two experiments with alpha-chaconine gave a weak positive response in TA98 without microsomes (17 revertants per millimole per plate). The micronucleus tests for clastogenicity using male mouse and foetal blood were negative. The absence of mutagenicity and clastogenicity suggests lack of damage to intracellular DNA for potato alkaloid toxicity.

  1. Ames试验及其在自来水检测中的运用%Ames Test and Its Application in Water Examen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋增辉

    2001-01-01

    以美国生物化学家Bruce Ame s的姓来命名的Ames试验法是一个已被广泛应用的致癌物质标准检验方法.它不仅能对单独的化学物质进行致突变评价,还能对许多化学混合物的联合作用作出较为灵敏和准确的检测.文中介绍Ame s试验的概述、基本原理、菌株、特点和在自来水检测中的使用等.

  2. Almacenamiento de Trozos de Ñame (Dioscorea rotundata Poir) en Atmósferas Modificadas Modified Atmosphere Packaging of Chunks Yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir)

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo D Andrade; Juan C Palacio; Waldir A Pacheco; Robert A Betin

    2012-01-01

    En este trabajo se analizan las condiciones de conservación de trozos de ñame en empaques de películas poliméricas, bajo condiciones de atmósfera modificada. Se determina la tasa de respiración de trozos de ñame a temperatura de refrigeración (5 ± 1°C) y temperatura ambiente (27 ± 1°C) y se evalúan diferentes películas plásticas con atmosfera modificada. La tasa de respiración a temperatura de refrigeración fue de 2.9 ± 0.9 mlCO2/Kg-h (gráficamente) y 3.2 ± 1.0 mlC0(2)/Kg-h (analíticamente), ...

  3. Forgotten marginalia and the French and Latin manuscript tradition in Le Mirouer des simples ames by Marguerite Porete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Acosta, Pablo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article advocates a fresh critical study of the manuscripts of the “heretical” book, Le Mirouer des simples ames by Marguerite dicta Porete, and an examination of codicological evidence which neither the standard editions nor the modern translations take into account. It argues for analysis of the codex traditionally known as the Chantilly manuscript (Musée Condé, ms. F xiv 26, cat. 157 and of the manuscripts of the Latin branch preserved in the Vatican Library (Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Vat. Lat. 4355; Cod. Rossianus 4; Cod. Chigianus B IV 41; Cod. Chigianus C IV 85 and Vat. Lat. 4953. The analysis focuses on the marginal marks (maniculae, nota bene and iconography which demonstrate that those books were used by active readers. The article also highlights the way in which the marginal marks provide us with information about the transmission and reception of the Mirror, and classifi es them according to function, depending on whether they facilitate access to, evaluate or even contribute to the meaning of the text of the Mirror itself.En las páginas siguientes reivindicamos un retorno crítico al estudio de los manuscritos del libro “herético” escrito por Marguerite dicta Porete (Le Mirouer des simples ames para estudiar aspectos codicológicos que ni las ediciones estándar ni las traducciones modernas han tenido en cuenta. Para ello, proponemos una serie de análisis del llamado “manuscrito de Chantilly” (Musée Condé, ms. F xiv 26, cat. 157 y de los manuscritos de la tradición latina de la Biblioteca Vaticana (Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Vat. Lat. 4355; Cod. Rossianus 4; Cod. Chigianus B IV 41; Cod. Chigianus C IV 85 y Vat. Lat. 4953 basados en las anotaciones marginales (manículas, nota bene e iconografía que identifican estos libros más como dispositivos de lectura que como meros soportes materiales de un texto. Mostraremos cómo tales elementos nos dotan de información sobre la transmisión del texto y

  4. Desarrollo y productividad de ñame (Dioscorea trifida y Dioscorea esculenta en diferentes condiciones hídricas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Nelly Acevedo Mercado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En la región Montes de María (9° 24' 56,33" N y 75° 23' 04,19" O, departamento de Sucre, Colombia, en zonas de clima cálido (26 °C y 30 °C y de clima medio (20 °C y 24 °C, humedad relativa entre 75 y 85% y precipitación de 750 mm durante el ensayo se estudió el efecto del riego en el desarrollo y productividad de dos especies de ñame en peligro de extinción (Dioscorea trifida y Dioscorea esculenta en un diseño experimental de parcelas subdivididas, donde las variables fueron tres condiciones hídricas: riego de 888 mm durante la etapa crítica del cultivo, riego de 944 mm durante todo el ciclo del cultivo, y ausencia de riego con una oferta de agua de 750 mm provenientes de precipitación. La densidad de siembra fue de 10,000 plantas/ha, labranza tradicional con arado de discos y cosecha 8 meses después de la siembra. Como variables se midieron rendimiento de ñame, contenido de almidón, longitud y diámetro de tubérculos y biomasa aérea. Dioscorea trifida presentó un rendimiento promedio de 30.6 t/ha y D. esculenta de 27 t/ha, con contenidos de almidón de 21.3 y 21.6% en base húmeda, respectivamente; la longitud promedio de tubérculos para D. trifida fue de 17.4 cm y para D. esculenta de 11.4 cm; los diámetros promedio fueron 14.4 cm y 10.5 cm y la biomasa aérea 1.1 kg/planta y 0.67 kg/planta, respectivamente. La aplicación de riego al cultivo produjo un incremento en la producción con respecto al cultivo sin riego, para Dioscorea trifida este incremento fue de 78.9% y para Dioscorea esculenta de 92.9%.

  5. Inhalational anthrax (Ames aerosol) in naive and vaccinated New Zealand rabbits: characterizing the spread of bacteria from lung deposition to bacteremia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford eGutting; Tonya L Nichols; Channel, Stephen R.; Gearhart, Jeffery M.; Andrews, George A.; Berger, Alan E.; Mackie, Ryan S.; Brent J Watson; Taft, Sarah C.; Overheim, Katie A.; Robert L Sherwood

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to better understand inhalational anthrax in relevant animal models. This understanding could aid risk assessment, help define therapeutic windows, and provide a better understanding of disease. The aim here was to characterize and quantify bacterial deposition and dissemination in rabbits following exposure to single high aerosol dose (>100LD50) of Bacillus anthracis (Ames) spores immediately following exposure through 36 hours. The primary goal of collecting the data w...

  6. Prevention of neuromusculoskeletal frailty in slow-aging ames dwarf mice: longitudinal investigation of interaction of longevity genes and caloric restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oge Arum

    Full Text Available Ames dwarf (Prop1 (df/df mice are remarkably long-lived and exhibit many characteristics of delayed aging and extended healthspan. Caloric restriction (CR has similar effects on healthspan and lifespan, and causes an extension of longevity in Ames dwarf mice. Our study objective was to determine whether Ames dwarfism or CR influence neuromusculoskeletal function in middle-aged (82 ± 12 weeks old or old (128 ± 14 w.o. mice. At the examined ages, strength was improved by dwarfism, CR, and dwarfism plus CR in male mice; balance/ motor coordination was improved by CR in old animals and in middle-aged females; and agility/ motor coordination was improved by a combination of dwarfism and CR in both genders of middle-aged mice and in old females. Therefore, extension of longevity by congenital hypopituitarism is associated with improved maintenance of the examined measures of strength, agility, and motor coordination, key elements of frailty during human aging, into advanced age. This study serves as a particularly important example of knowledge related to addressing aging-associated diseases and disorders that results from studies in long-lived mammals.

  7. THE NASA AMES PAH IR SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE VERSION 2.00: UPDATED CONTENT, WEB SITE, AND ON(OFF)LINE TOOLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significantly updated version of the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database, the first major revision since its release in 2010, is presented. The current version, version 2.00, contains 700 computational and 75 experimental spectra compared, respectively, with 583 and 60 in the initial release. The spectra span the 2.5-4000 μm (4000-2.5 cm-1) range. New tools are available on the site that allow one to analyze spectra in the database and compare them with imported astronomical spectra as well as a suite of IDL object classes (a collection of programs utilizing IDL's object-oriented programming capabilities) that permit offline analysis called the AmesPAHdbIDLSuite. Most noteworthy among the additions are the extension of the computational spectroscopic database to include a number of significantly larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the ability to visualize the molecular atomic motions corresponding to each vibrational mode, and a new tool that allows one to perform a non-negative least-squares fit of an imported astronomical spectrum with PAH spectra in the computational database. Finally, a methodology is described in the Appendix, and implemented using the AmesPAHdbIDLSuite, that allows the user to enforce charge balance during the fitting procedure

  8. Distance and virtual laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, P.; Fedak, V.; Hajek, V.

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with basic philosophy and structure of a remote controlled laboratory for experimentation in Electrical Engineering. The laboratory collects experiments from fields of Power Electronics, Electrical Machines, Electro-Mechanical and Motion Control Systems. The workbenches in the real l

  9. ELECTROPNEUMATIC AUTOMATION EDUCATIONAL LABORATORY

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgorukov, S. O.; National Aviation University; Roman, B. V.; National Aviation University

    2013-01-01

    The article reflects current situation in education regarding mechatronics learning difficulties. Com-plex of laboratory test benches on electropneumatic automation are considered as a tool in advancing through technical science. Course of laboratory works developed to meet the requirement of efficient and reliable way of practical skills acquisition is regarded the simplest way for students to learn the ba-sics of mechatronics.

  10. Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream processing-bioseparations.…

  11. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-09-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  12. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations

  13. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  14. Quality in Teaching Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubington, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a Japanese process-oriented approach called KAIZEN for improving the quality of existing teaching laboratories. It provides relevant quality measurements and indicates how quality can be improved. Use of process criteria sidesteps the difficulty of defining quality for laboratory experiments and allows separation of student assessment…

  15. Evaluation of 4-methylimidazole, in the Ames/Salmonella test using induced rodent liver and lung S9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Carol; Adamson, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    4-methylimidazole (4-MeI) is formed by the interaction of ammonia with reducing sugars and low levels have been identified as a by-product in coffee, soy sauce, wine, dark beers, soft drinks, and caramel colors. The 4-MeI has been reported to induce alveolar/bronchiolar tumors in mice but not rats. Its mechanism of action is unlikely to be due to genotoxicity as 4-MeI does not induce mutation in Salmonella typhimurium and does not induce micronuclei in rodent peripheral erythrocytes or bone marrow cells. However, the question of whether genetically reactive intermediates could be formed via lung-specific metabolism has not previously been addressed. The 4-MeI was tested for its ability to induce mutation in five standard Ames strains of S. typhimurium using induced rat (F344/N) and mouse (B6C3F1) liver and lung S9 as a source of exogenous metabolism. The chemicals were tested in an OECD 471-compliant bacterial reverse mutation assay, using both plate-incorporation and pre-incubation methodologies, together with 10% S-9 metabolic activation. No induction of mutation (as measured by an increase in revertant colonies) was observed and it was concluded that 4-MeI was not mutagenic in S. typhimurium using either rodent liver or lung S9 for exogenous metabolism.

  16. Studies on Ames Test of Echinacea purpurea Extract%紫锥菊提取物的Ames试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹; 陈秀云; 卜仕金

    2010-01-01

    通过对紫锥菊提取物进行昆明种小鼠伤寒沙门氏菌回复突变试验,评价该材料的潜在致突变性.用紫锥菊提取物制备混悬液进行Ames(致突变)试验,采用平板掺入法,计数TA97、TA98、TA100、TA102标准测试菌株在4个不同浓度下,于37℃培养48 h后的回复突变菌落数.结果显示无论在+S9和-S9的情况下,各剂量组均未引起测试菌株回变菌落数的明显增加,Ames试验结果为阴性.说明紫锥菊提取物不引起鼠伤寒沙门氏菌的回复突变数增加,无致基因突变性.

  17. Prevalência de práticas educativas acerca do aleitamento materno exclusivo (AME em Cuiabá - MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luma Natalia Barbosa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Descrever a prevalência das práticas educativas em saúde sobre o aleitamento materno exclusivo (AME no Município de Cuiabá - MT nos meses de julho a dezembro de 2012. Métodos: Trata-se de um estudo descritivo transversal, realizado junto a mulheres internadas em um hospital. A amostra foi composta por 306 mulheres no período pós-parto imediato. Os dados foram coletados por meio de um questionário semiestruturado. Resultados: Ter oito anos ou mais de estudo (RP = 1,77; ter renda até dois salários mínimos (RP = 1,22; ter planejado a gravidez (RP = 1,31; ter iniciado o atendimento no serviço de pré-natal no primeiro trimestre (RP = 1,65 e serem primíparas (RP = 1,21 são características que aparecem associadas com uma maior chance de receber orientações sobre aleitamento materno do que as demais mulheres. Conclusão: Faz-se necessário repensar mudanças dessas práticas, a fim de se realizar ações educativas que busquem efetivar transformações na relação profissional/usuário, visando o acolhimento das gestantes.

  18. Exploring reaction mechanisms and their competition in 58Ni+48Ca collisions at E = 25 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francalanza L.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Latest results concerning the study of central collisions in 58Ni+48Ca reactions at Elab(Ni=25 AMeV are presented. The experimental data, collected with the CHIMERA 4π device, have been analyzed in order to investigate the competition among different reaction mechanisms for central collisions in the Fermi energy domain. The method adopted to perform the centrality selection refers to the global variable “flow angle”, that is related to the event shape in momentum space, as it is determined by the eigenvectors of the experimental kinetic-energy tensor. The main features of the reaction products were explored by using different constraints on some of the relevant observables, such as mass and velocity distributions and their correlations. Much emphasis was devoted to the competition between fusion-evaporation processes with subsequent identification of a heavy residue and a prompt multifragmentation mechanism. The reaction mechanism was simulated in the framework of transport theories (dynamical stochastic BNV calculations, followed by sequential SIMON code and further comparison with dynamical calculations from transport model (QMD, CoMD are in progress. Moreover, an extension of this study taking into account for the light particles has been envisaged.

  19. Building bridges between theory and practice in medical education using a design-based research approach: AMEE Guide No. 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H J M; Tigelaar, D

    2012-01-01

    Medical education research has grown enormously over the past 20 years, but it does not sufficiently make use of theories, according to influential leaders and researchers in this field. In this AMEE Guide, it is argued that design-based research (DBR) studies should be conducted much more in medical education design research because these studies both advance the testing and refinement of theories and advance educational practice. In this Guide, the essential characteristics of DBR as well as how DBR differs from other approach such as formative evaluation are explained. It is also explained what the pitfalls and challenges of DBR are. The main challenges deal with how to insure that DBR studies reveal findings that are of a broader relevance than the local situation and how to insure that DBR contributes toward theory testing and refinement. An example of a series of DBR studies on the design of a teaching portfolio in higher education that is aimed at stimulating a teacher's professional development is described, to illustrate how DBR studies actually work in practice. Finally, it is argued that DBR-studies could play an important role in the advancement of theory and practice in the two broad domains of designing or redesigning work-based learning environments and assessment programs.

  20. Exploring reaction mechanisms and their competition in 58Ni+48Ca collisions at E = 25 AMeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francalanza, L.; Abbondanno, U.; Amorini, F.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Bougault, R.; Bruno, M.; Cardella, G.; Casini, G.; Colonna, M.; D'Agostino, M.; De Filippo, E.; De Sanctis, J.; Geraci, E.; Giussani, A.; Gramegna, F.; Guiot, B.; Kravchuk, V.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Le Neindre, N.; Maiolino, C.; Marini, P.; Morelli, L.; Olmi, A.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Piantelli, S.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Poggi, G.; Porto, F.; Russotto, P.; Rizzo, F.; Vannini, G.; Vannucci, L.

    2014-03-01

    Latest results concerning the study of central collisions in 58Ni+48Ca reactions at Elab(Ni)=25 AMeV are presented. The experimental data, collected with the CHIMERA 4π device, have been analyzed in order to investigate the competition among different reaction mechanisms for central collisions in the Fermi energy domain. The method adopted to perform the centrality selection refers to the global variable "flow angle", that is related to the event shape in momentum space, as it is determined by the eigenvectors of the experimental kinetic-energy tensor. The main features of the reaction products were explored by using different constraints on some of the relevant observables, such as mass and velocity distributions and their correlations. Much emphasis was devoted to the competition between fusion-evaporation processes with subsequent identification of a heavy residue and a prompt multifragmentation mechanism. The reaction mechanism was simulated in the framework of transport theories (dynamical stochastic BNV calculations, followed by sequential SIMON code) and further comparison with dynamical calculations from transport model (QMD, CoMD) are in progress. Moreover, an extension of this study taking into account for the light particles has been envisaged.

  1. A Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic atlas of early-type galaxies in the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Rampazzo, R; Vega, O; Marino, A; Bressan, A; Clemens, M S

    2013-01-01

    We produce an atlas of homogeneously reduced and calibrated low resolution IRS spectra of the nuclear regions of nearby early-type galaxies (i.e. Es and S0s, ETGs), in order to build a reference sample in the mid-infrared window. From the Spitzer Heritage Archive we extract ETGs in the "Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog of Bright Galaxies" having an IRS SL and/or LL spectrum. We recover 91 spectra out of 363 galaxies classified as ETGs in the catalog: 56 E (E0-E6), 8 mixed E/S0+S0/E, 27 S0 (both normal and barred - SB0) plus mixed types SB0/Sa+SB0/SBa. For each galaxy, we provide the fully reduced and calibrated spectrum, the intensity of nebular and molecular emission lines as well as of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) after a template spectrum of a passively evolving ETG has been subtracted. Spectra are classified into five mid-infrared classes, ranging from AGN (class-4) and star forming nuclei (class-3), transition class-2 (with PAHs) and class-1 (no-PAHs) to passively evolving nuclei (class-0). A ...

  2. A three-dimensional orthogonal laser velocimeter for the NASA Ames 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Cooper, Donald L.

    1995-01-01

    A three-component dual-beam laser-velocimeter system has been designed, fabricated, and implemented in the 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The instrument utilizes optical access from both sides and the top of the test section, and is configured for uncoupled orthogonal measurements of the three Cartesian coordinates of velocity. Bragg cell optics are used to provide fringe velocity bias. Modular system design provides great flexibility in the location of sending and receiving optics to adapt to specific experimental requirements. Near-focus Schmidt-Cassegrain optic modules may be positioned for collection of forward or backward scattered light over a large solid angle, and may be clustered to further increase collection solid angle. Multimode fiber optics transmit collected light to the photomultiplier tubes for processing. Counters are used to process the photomultiplier signals and transfer the processed data digitally via buffered interface controller to the host MS-DOS computer. Considerable data reduction and graphical display programming permit on-line control of data acquisition and evaluation of the incoming data. This paper describes this system in detail and presents sample data illustrating the system's capability.

  3. Exploring reaction mechanisms and their competition in 58Ni + 48Ca collisions at E=25 AMeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latest results concerning the study of central collisions in 58Ni+48Ca reactions at Elab(Ni)=25 AMeV are presented. The experimental data, collected with the CHIMERA 4π device, have been analyzed in order to investigate the competition among different reaction mechanisms for central collisions in the Fermi energy domain. The method adopted to perform the centrality selection refers to the global variable 'flow angle', that is related to the event shape in momentum space, as it is determined by the eigenvectors of the experimental kinetic-energy tensor. The main features of the reaction products were explored by using different constraints on some of the relevant observables, such as mass and velocity distributions and their correlations. Much emphasis was devoted to the competition between fusion-evaporation processes with subsequent identification of a heavy residue and a prompt multifragmentation mechanism. The reaction mechanism was simulated in the framework of transport theories (dynamical stochastic BNV calculations, followed by sequential SIMON code) and further comparison with dynamical calculations from transport model (QMD, CoMD) are in progress. Moreover, an extension of this study taking into account for the light particles has been envisaged. (authors)

  4. [Accreditation of medical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Andrea Rita; Ring, Rózsa; Fehér, Miklós; Mikó, Tivadar

    2003-07-27

    In Hungary, the National Accreditation Body was established by government in 1995 as an independent, non-profit organization, and has exclusive rights to accredit, amongst others, medical laboratories. The National Accreditation Body has two Specialist Advisory Committees in the health care sector. One is the Health Care Specialist Advisory Committee that accredits certifying bodies, which deal with certification of hospitals. The other Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is directly involved in accrediting medical laboratory services of health care institutions. The Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is a multidisciplinary peer review group of experts from all disciplines of in vitro diagnostics, i.e. laboratory medicine, microbiology, histopathology and blood banking. At present, the only published International Standard applicable to laboratories is ISO/IEC 17025:1999. Work has been in progress on the official approval of the new ISO 15189 standard, specific to medical laboratories. Until the official approval of the International Standard ISO 15189, as accreditation standard, the Hungarian National Accreditation Body has decided to progress with accreditation by formulating explanatory notes to the ISO/IEC 17025:1999 document, using ISO/FDIS 15189:2000, the European EC4 criteria and CPA (UK) Ltd accreditation standards as guidelines. This harmonized guideline provides 'explanations' that facilitate the application of ISO/IEC 17025:1999 to medical laboratories, and can be used as a checklist for the verification of compliance during the onsite assessment of the laboratory. The harmonized guideline adapted the process model of ISO 9001:2000 to rearrange the main clauses of ISO/IEC 17025:1999. This rearrangement does not only make the guideline compliant with ISO 9001:2000 but also improves understanding for those working in medical laboratories, and facilitates the training and education of laboratory staff. With the

  5. The Gran Sasso Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votano, L.

    2012-09-01

    The Gran Sasso underground laboratory is one of the four national laboratories run by the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). It is located under the Gran Sasso massif, in central Italy, between the cities of L'Aquila and Teramo, 120 km far from Rome. It is the largest underground laboratory for astroparticle physics in the world and the most advanced in terms of complexity and completeness of its infrastructures. The scientific program at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, LNGS)is mainly focused on astroparticle, particle and nuclear physics. The laboratory presently hosts many experiments as well as R&D activities, including world-leading research in the fields of solar neutrinos, accelerator neutrinos (CNGS neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso), dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay and nuclear cross-section of astrophysical interest. Associate sciences like earth physics, biology and fundamental physics complement the activities. The laboratory is operated as an international science facility and hosts experiments whose scientific merit is assessed by an international advisory Scientific Committee. A review of the main experiments carried out at LNGS will be given, together with the most recent and relevant scientific results achieved.

  6. Simula Research Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tveito, Aslak

    2010-01-01

    The Simula Research Laboratory, located just outside Oslo in Norway, is rightly famed as a highly successful research facility, despite being, at only eight years old, a very young institution. This fascinating book tells the history of Simula, detailing the culture and values that have been the guiding principles of the laboratory throughout its existence. Dedicated to tackling scientific challenges of genuine social importance, the laboratory undertakes important research with long-term implications in networks, computing and software engineering, including specialist work in biomedical comp

  7. Digital signal processing laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B Preetham

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING Brief Theory of DSP ConceptsProblem SolvingComputer Laboratory: Introduction to MATLAB®/SIMULINK®Hardware Laboratory: Working with Oscilloscopes, Spectrum Analyzers, Signal SourcesDigital Signal Processors (DSPs)ReferencesDISCRETE-TIME LTI SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS Brief Theory of Discrete-Time Signals and SystemsProblem SolvingComputer Laboratory: Simulation of Continuous Time and Discrete-Time Signals and Systems ReferencesTIME AND FREQUENCY ANALYSIS OF COMMUNICATION SIGNALS Brief Theory of Discrete-Time Fourier Transform (DTFT), Discrete Fourier Transform

  8. Specialized Laboratory Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangott, Bryan

    2016-03-01

    Some laboratories or laboratory sections have unique needs that traditional anatomic and clinical pathology systems may not address. A specialized laboratory information system (LIS), which is designed to perform a limited number of functions, may perform well in areas where a traditional LIS falls short. Opportunities for specialized LISs continue to evolve with the introduction of new testing methodologies. These systems may take many forms, including stand-alone architecture, a module integrated with an existing LIS, a separate vendor-supplied module, and customized software. This article addresses the concepts underlying specialized LISs, their characteristics, and in what settings they are found. PMID:26851663

  9. Rethinking Laboratory Notebooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2010-01-01

    We take digitalization of laboratory work practice as a challenging design domain to explore. There are obvious drawbacks with the use of paper instead of ICT in the collaborative writing that takes place in laboratory notebooks; yet paper persist in being the most common solution. The ultimate aim...... with our study is to produce design relevant knowledge that can envisage an ICT solution that keeps as many advantages of paper as possible, but with the strength of electronic laboratory notebooks as well. Rather than assuming that users are technophobic and unable to appropriate state of the art...

  10. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...

  11. The Microscale Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipp, Arden P., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are two microscale chemistry laboratory experiments including "Microscale Syntheses of Heterocyclic Compounds," and "Microscale Acid-Base Extraction--A Colorful Introduction." Materials, procedures and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  12. Physics Laboratory in UEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Tohru; Nakamura, Jin; Suzuki, Masaru

    All the first-year students in the University of Electro-Communications (UEC) take "Basic Physics I", "Basic Physics II" and "Physics Laboratory" as required subjects; Basic Physics I and Basic Physics II are calculus-based physics of mechanics, wave and oscillation, thermal physics and electromagnetics. Physics Laboratory is designed mainly aiming at learning the skill of basic experimental technique and technical writing. Although 95% students have taken physics in the senior high school, they poorly understand it by connecting with experience, and it is difficult to learn Physics Laboratory in the university. For this reason, we introduced two ICT (Information and Communication Technology) systems of Physics Laboratory to support students'learning and staff's teaching. By using quantitative data obtained from the ICT systems, we can easily check understanding of physics contents in students, and can improve physics education.

  13. GSPEL - Calorimeter Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Testing performance claims on heat transfer components The Calorimeter Lab, located in the Ground Systems Power and Energy Lab (GSPEL), is one of the largest in the...

  14. Key Management Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a secure environment to research and develop advanced electronic key management and networked key distribution technologies for the Navy and DoD....

  15. Understanding Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the development and marketing of all laboratory tests that use test kits ... at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT ...

  16. Structural Static Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural testing is performed to verify the structural integrity of space flight and ground test hardware. Testing is also performed to verify the finite element...

  17. Inorganic Coatings Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The inorganic Coatings Lab provides expertise to Navy and Joint Service platforms acquisition IPTs to aid in materials and processing choices which balance up-front...

  18. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  19. Immersive Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Develops and tests novel user interfaces for 3D virtual simulators and first-person shooter games that make user interaction more like natural interaction...

  20. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL) Provides testing for technology readiness of fuel cell systems The FCL investigates, tests and verifies the performance of fuel-cell systems...

  1. European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    On 10 May an Agreement was signed at CERN setting up a new European Laboratory. It will be concerned with research in molecularbiology and will be located at Heidelberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  2. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements....

  3. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Initiative uses multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. The resources of the Frederick National Lab allocated to the RAS Hub are organized into seven laboratory groups, each contributing to the collaborative effort.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 60 years, Sandia has delivered essential science and technology to resolve the nation[HTML_REMOVED]s most challenging security issues. Sandia National...

  5. Laboratory animal allergy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hollander, A

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of the study presented in this thesis was to estimate the prevalence rate of laboratory animal allergy and to determine its association with risk factors, like allergen exposure level, atopy, gender and other host factors. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken among 540 workers at 8 laboratory animal facilities. All participants completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick testing with common and occupational allergens. Total and specific IgE measures were obtained....

  6. Lighting – laboratory practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Борис Васильевич Дзюндзюк

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article discussed one of the possible variants of the building study bench for laboratory work and practical lessons on the basic parameters of the study of artificial and natural lighting in the labour protection in accordance with the DBN V.2.5-28-2006. The model is on the latest LED components, which has high reliability, maintainability and eliminates the disadvantages of the existing laboratory stands.

  7. An in silico method for predicting Ames activities of primary aromatic amines by calculating the stabilities of nitrenium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzien, Jörg; Hickey, Eugene R; Kemper, Raymond A; Brewer, Mark L; Dyekjaer, Jane D; East, Stephen P; Whittaker, Mark

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, we describe an in silico first principal approach to predict the mutagenic potential of primary aromatic amines. This approach is based on the so-called "nitrenium hypothesis", which was developed by Ford et al. in the early 1990s. This hypothesis asserts that the mutagenic effect for this class of molecules is mediated through the transient formation of a nitrenium ion and that the stability of this cation is correlated with the mutagenic potential. Here we use quantum mechanical calculations at different levels of theory (semiempirical AM1, ab initio HF/3-21G, HF/6-311G(d,p), and DFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) to compute the stability of nitrenium ions. When applied to a test set of 257 primary aromatic amines, we show that this method can correctly differentiate between Ames active and inactive compounds, and furthermore that it is able to rationalize and predict SAR trends within structurally related chemical series. For this test set, the AM1 nitrenium stability calculations are found to provide a good balance between speed and accuracy, resulting in an overall accuracy of 85%, and sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 72%, respectively. The nitrenium-based predictions are also compared to the commercial software packages DEREK, MULTICASE, and the MOE-Toxicophore descriptor. One advantage of the approach presented here is that the calculation of relative stabilities results in a continuous spectrum of activities and not a simple yes/no answer. This allows us to observe and rationalize subtle trends due to the different electrostatic properties of the organic molecules. Our results strongly indicate that nitrenium ion stability calculations should be used as a complementary approach to assist the medicinal chemist in prioritizing and selecting nonmutagenic primary aromatic amines during preclinical drug discovery programs. PMID:20078034

  8. Piloted Evaluation of Modernized Limited Authority Control Laws in the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Vineet; Melkers, Edgar; Faynberg, Alexander; Blanken, Chris L.

    2003-01-01

    The UH-60 BLACK HAWK was designed in the 1970s, when the US Army primarily operated during the day in good visual conditions. Subsequently, the introduction of night-vision goggles increased the BLACK HAWK'S mission effectiveness, but the accident rate also increased. The increased accident rate is strongly tied to increased pilot workload as a result of a degradation in visual cues. Over twenty years of research in helicopter flight control and handling qualities has shown that these degraded handling qualities can be recovered by modifying the response type of the helicopter in low speed flight. Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation initiated a project under the National Rotorcraft Technology Center (NRTC) to develop modern flight control laws while utilizing the existing partial authority Stability Augmentation System (SAS) of the BLACK HAWK. This effort resulted in a set of Modernized Control Laws (MCLAWS) that incorporate rate command and attitude command response types. Sikorsky and the US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) conducted a piloted simulation on the NASA-Ames Vertical h4otion Simulator, to assess potential handling qualities and to reduce the risk of subsequent implementation and flight test of these modern control laws on AFDD's EH-60L helicopter. The simulation showed that Attitude Command Attitude Hold control laws in pitch and roll improve handling qualities in the low speed flight regime. These improvements are consistent across a range of mission task elements and for both good and degraded visual environments. The MCLAWS perform better than the baseline UH-60A control laws in the presence of wind and turbulence. Finally, while the improved handling qualities in the pitch and roll axis allow the pilot to pay more attention to the vertical axis and hence altitude performance also improves, it is clear from pilot comments and altitude excursions that the addition of an Altitude Hold function would further reduce workload and improve overall

  9. Decay of excited nuclei produced in 78,82Kr+40Ca reactions at 5.5 AMeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we study the decay modes of excited nuclei formed in 78,82Kr+40Ca reactions at 5.5 AMeV. The 4π INDRA array was used to measure light charged particles, evaporation residues and fragments with atomic number 3≤Z≤28. In both reactions, fragment characteristics are compatible with a fission like phenomenon. Persistence of structure effects is evidenced from a strong odd-even staggering of the light-fragment (6≤Z≤11) yields. The magnitude of the staggering does not significantly depend on the neutron content of the system. Light particle-fragment coincidences suggest that those fragments are excited below the particle emission thresholds. For the neutron-poor system, the evaporation residue cross-section is slightly higher and the fission-like component is larger by ∼ 25%. These features were confronted to the predictions of statistical and dynamical models. For both reactions, the transition-state formalism reasonably reproduces the Z-distribution around the symmetry but strongly overestimates the light-fragment cross-sections and failed to explain the staggering of their yields. The Z-distribution shape and the staggering of the light-fragment yields are satisfactorily reproduced within the dinuclear system framework which associates the heavy fragments to quasi-fission while light fragments are predominantly populated by fusion. However, none of the models are able to reproduce the characteristics of the kinetic energy spectra. This would indicate the need to improve the description of large deformation experienced by the system at the separation phase. (author)

  10. San Juan District Laboratory (SJN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program Capabilities SJN-DO Pharmaceutical Laboratory is an A2LA/ISO/IEC 17025 accredited National Servicing Laboratory specialized in Drug Analysis, is a member of...

  11. Physics laboratory 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers the research activities of the Physics laboratory of H.C. Oersted Institute, University of Copenhagen in the period January 1, 1976 - January 1, 1979. It gives also an idea about the teaching carried out by yhe laboratory. The research - broadly speaking - deals mainly with the interaction of particles (ions, electrons and neutrons) and electromagnetic radiation (X-rays) with matter. Use is made in studies of: atomic physics, radiation effects, surface physics, the electronic and crystallographic structure of matter and some biological problems. The research is carried out partly in the laboratory itself and partly at and in collaboration with other institutes in this country (H.C. Oersted Institute, Chemical Laboratories, Denmark's Technical University, Aarhus University, Institute of Physics and Risoe National Laboratory) and abroad (Federal Republic of Germany, France, India, Sweden, U.K., U.S.A. and U.S.S.R.). All these institutes are listed in the abstract titles. Bibliography comprehends 94 publications. A substantial part of the research is supported by the Danish Natural Sciences Research Council. (author)

  12. [Laboratory medicine in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J S

    1998-07-01

    Laboratory medicine and hospital central laboratory system were adopted in Taiwan after World War II. In medical schools, laboratory medicine or clinical pathology teaching is allocated to junior students. Three years of clinical pathology or four years of anatomical pathology training is required for pathology resident. Recent trend indicates that both the hospitals and the young doctors favor the five years combined C.P. (two-years) and A.P. (three years) training program. At present, 75 clinical pathologists and 213 anatomical pathologists are qualified. Approximately 70% of them work in medical centers and medical schools. Consequently, the medium and small size hospitals suffer from serious shortage of pathologist. Studies during the part 50 years indicate substantial difference in the improvement of laboratory medicine and central laboratory before and after 1975. Significant improvement in the working space, facility, equipment, staff, quality control and productivity was evident after 1975. The three health care policies contributing to the overall improvement are: 1. hospital accreditation project, 2. medical care network plan, and 3. medical specialist system.

  13. Sandia Laboratories energy programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.; Gillespie, R.S. (eds.)

    1977-03-01

    As one of the multiprogram laboratories of the Energy Research and Development Administration, Sandia Laboratories applies its resources to a number of nationally important programs. About 75 percent of these resources are applied to research and development for national security programs having to do primarily with nuclear weapons--the principal responsibility of the Laboratories. The remaining 25 percent are applied to energy programs and energy-related activities, particularly those requiring resources that are also used in nuclear weapon and other national security programs. Examples of such energy programs and activities are research into nuclear fusion, protection of nuclear materials from theft or diversion, and the disposal of radioactive waste. A number of technologies and disciplines developed for the weapon program are immediately applicable for the development of various energy sources. Instruments developed to detect, measure, and record the detonation of nuclear devices underground, now being used to support the development of in-situ processing of coal and oil shale, are examples. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of these and other energy programs being conducted by these laboratories in the development of economical and environmentally acceptable alternative energy sources. Energy programs are undertaken when they require capabilities used at the Laboratories for the weapon program, and when they have no adverse effect upon that primary mission. The parallel operation of weapon and energy activities allows optimum use of facilities and other resources.

  14. Laboratory medicine education in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Bartlingas, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    In Lithuania there are two types of specialists working in medical laboratories and having a university degree: laboratory medicine physicians and medical biologists. Both types of specialists are officially being recognized and regulated by the Ministry of Health of Lithuania. Laboratory medicine physicians become specialists in laboratory medicine after an accredited 4-year multidisciplinary residency study program in Laboratory Medicine. The residency program curriculum for laboratory m...

  15. Space Food Systems Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, Michele; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Food Systems Laboratory (SFSL) is a multipurpose laboratory responsible for space food and package research and development. It is located on-site at Johnson Space Center in Building 17. The facility supports the development of flight food, menus, packaging and food related hardware for Shuttle, International Space Station, and Advanced Life Support food systems. All foods used to support NASA ground tests and/or missions must meet the highest standards before they are 'accepted' for use on actual space flights. The foods are evaluated for nutritional content, sensory acceptability, safety, storage and shelf life, and suitability for use in micro-gravity. The food packaging is also tested to determine its functionality and suitability for use in space. Food Scientist, Registered Dieticians, Packaging Engineers, Food Systems Engineers, and Technicians staff the Space Food Systems Laboratory.

  16. Laboratory Accreditation in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, María Amelia; Collino, Cesar; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory accreditation is an essential element in the healthcare system since it contributes substantially to decision-making, in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the health status of the patients, as well as in the organization and management of public healthcare. Therefore, the clinical biochemistry professional works continuously to provide reliable results and contributes to the optimization of operational logistics and integration of a laboratory into the health system. ISO 15189 accreditation, ensures compliance of the laboratory to minimize instances of error through the planning, prevention, implementation, evaluation and improvement of its procedures, which provides skill areas that involve both training undergraduate and graduate professionals in clinical biochemistry. PMID:27683497

  17. INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (ISTL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Background: The Naval Automated Information Laboratory (NAIL), consisting of Navy legacy and transitional systems, was established to emulate a typical command for...

  18. San Francisco District Laboratory (SAN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program Capabilities Food Analysis SAN-DO Laboratory has an expert in elemental analysis who frequently performs field inspections of materials. A recently acquired...

  19. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  20. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  1. Underground laboratories in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep underground laboratories in Asia have been making huge progress recently because underground sites provide unique opportunities to explore the rare-event phenomena for the study of dark matter searches, neutrino physics and nuclear astrophysics as well as the multi-disciplinary researches based on the low radioactive environments. The status and perspectives of Kamioda underground observatories in Japan, the existing Y2L and the planned CUP in Korea, India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) in India and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China will be surveyed

  2. Underground laboratories in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shin Ted, E-mail: linst@mails.phys.sinica.edu.tw [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 China (China); Yue, Qian, E-mail: yueq@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging (Ministry of Education) and Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 China (China)

    2015-08-17

    Deep underground laboratories in Asia have been making huge progress recently because underground sites provide unique opportunities to explore the rare-event phenomena for the study of dark matter searches, neutrino physics and nuclear astrophysics as well as the multi-disciplinary researches based on the low radioactive environments. The status and perspectives of Kamioda underground observatories in Japan, the existing Y2L and the planned CUP in Korea, India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) in India and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China will be surveyed.

  3. Study of the heavy ions (Au+Au at 150 AMeV) collisions with the FOPI detector. Comparison with the Landau-Vlasov model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, heavy ions (Au+Au) collisions experiments are made at 150 AMeV.In the first part, a general study of the nuclear matter equation is presented. Then the used Landau-Vlasov theoretical model is describe. The third part presents the FOPI experience and the details of how to obtain this theoretical predictions (filter, cuts, corrections, possible centrality selections).At the end, experimental results and comparisons with the Landau-Vlasov model are presented. (TEC). 105 refs., 96 figs., 14 tabs

  4. A New Way of Doing Business: Reusable Launch Vehicle Advanced Thermal Protection Systems Technology Development: NASA Ames and Rockwell International Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Carol W.; Fleming, Mary; Hogenson, Pete; Green, Michael J.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and Rockwell International are partners in a Cooperative Agreement (CA) for the development of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Technology Program. This Cooperative Agreement is a 30 month effort focused on transferring NASA innovations to Rockwell and working as partners to advance the state-of-the-art in several TPS areas. The use of a Cooperative Agreement is a new way of doing business for NASA and Industry which eliminates the traditional customer/contractor relationship and replaces it with a NASA/Industry partnership.

  5. Multiplicación y tuberización in vitro de ñame (dioscorea alata l.) en sistema de inmersión temporal.

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar Díaz, Robinson; Hoyos Sánchez, Rodrigo Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Se realizó la estandarización de la multiplicación y tuberización in vitro de ñame (Dioscorea alata L.) utilizando el sistema de inmersión temporal conocido como RITA®. Se evaluó inicialmente el porcentaje de brotación de segmentos nodales en medio de cultivo semisólido utilizando dos tipos de citoquininas (BAP y Kinetina). Las plantas obtenidas fueron subcultivadas cada cuatro semanas y luego utilizadas para la obtención de meristemos y plántulas para llevar a cabo los diferentes experimento...

  6. Isospin transport phenomena and odd-even staggering in 84Kr+112,124Sn collisions at 35 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piantelli S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results concerning isospin transport phenomena and odd-even staggering in Z and N distributions are presented. Data refer to 84Kr+112,124Sn collisions at 35AMeV and they were collected with a high resolution FAZIA telescope, able to isotopically resolve ions up to Z ∼ 20. Evidences of isospin diffusion and drift obtained from the /Z behaviour of the detected fragments are discussed. The odd-even staggering both in Z and N is compared with experimental data available in literature, finding that it shows a common trend in different reaction types.

  7. Heavy Residues with A<90 in the Asymmetric Reaction of 20 AMeV 124Sn+27Al as a Sensitive Probe of the Onset of Multifragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Veselsky, M; Souliotis, G. A.; Chubarian, G.; Trache, L.; Keksis, A.; martin, E.; Ruangma, A.; Winchester, E; Yennello, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    The cross sections and velocity distributions of heavy residues from the reaction of 20 AMeV 124Sn + 27Al have been measured at forward angles using the MARS recoil separator at Texas A&M in a wide mass range. A consistent overall description of the measured cross sections and velocity distributions was achieved using a model calculation employing the concept of deep-inelastic transfer for the primary stage of peripheral collisions, pre-equilibrium emission and incomplete fusion for the prima...

  8. Evaluación de métodos para la conservación de hongos fitopatógenos del ñame (dioscorea sp).

    OpenAIRE

    Yeimy Alexandra Pinzón Gutiérrez

    2009-01-01

    Un elemento esencial en la investigación con microorganismos fitopatógenos es su conservación y uso seguro. Desde este punto de vista, en este estudio se evaluaron métodos de conservación de hongos que atacan el ñame, empleando como factores de respuesta el potencial de viabilidad, y la estabilidad y presencia o ausencia de cambios en las características macro y microscópicas. Como resultado del trabajo se proponen los métodos más adecuados para los géneros Colletotrichum y Fusarium, hongos c...

  9. Laboratory analysis of stardust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Ernst

    2013-02-01

    Tiny dust grains extracted from primitive meteorites are identified to have originated in the atmospheres of stars on the basis of their anomalous isotopic compositions. Although isotopic analysis with the ion microprobe plays a major role in the laboratory analysis of these stardust grains, many other microanalytical techniques are applied to extract the maximum amount of information.

  10. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  11. Personnel Scheduling in Laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franses, Philip; Post, Gerhard; Burke, Edmund; De Causmaecker, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    We describe an assignment problem particular to the personnel scheduling of organisations such as laboratories. Here we have to assign tasks to employees. We focus on the situation where this assignment problem reduces to constructing maximal matchings in a set of interrelated bipartite graphs. We d

  12. Laboratories: Integrating Services

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-04

    This podcast highlights the importance of integrating laboratory services to maximize service delivery to patients.  Created: 4/4/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 4/7/2011.

  13. Revitalizing chemistry laboratory instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Phil Blake

    This dissertation involves research in three major domains of chemical education as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. program in chemistry at Miami University with a major emphasis on chemical education, and concurrent study in organic chemistry. Unit I, Development and Assessment of a Column Chromatography Laboratory Activity, addresses the domain of Instructional Materials Development and Testing. This unit outlines the process of developing a publishable laboratory activity, testing and revising that activity, and subsequently sharing that activity with the chemical education community. A laboratory activity focusing on the separation of methylene blue and sodium fluorescein was developed to demonstrate the effects of both the stationary and mobile phase in conducting a separation. Unit II, Bringing Industry to the Laboratory, addresses the domain of Curriculum Development and Testing. This unit outlines the development of the Chemistry of Copper Mining module, which is intended for use in high school or undergraduate college chemistry. The module uses the learning cycle approach to present the chemistry of the industrial processes of mining copper to the students. The module includes thirteen investigations (three of which are web-based and ten which are laboratory experiments) and an accompanying interactive CD-ROM, which provides an explanation of the chemistry used in copper mining with a virtual tour of an operational copper mine. Unit III, An Alternative Method of Teaching Chemistry. Integrating Lecture and the Laboratory, is a project that addresses the domain of Research in Student Learning. Fundamental Chemistry was taught at Eastern Arizona College as an integrated lecture/laboratory course that met in two-hour blocks on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The students taking this integrated course were compared with students taking the traditional 1-hour lectures held on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, with accompanying 3-hour lab on

  14. International atomic laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some thirty kilometers to the south-east of Vienna, in the village of Seibersdorf, the International Atomic Energy Agency will have its functional laboratory, the first atomic laboratory to be built by peaceful world-wide co-operation. The building is expected to be completed around the middle of 1960 and the scientific installations will start immediately thereafter. The staff (14 Professional and 24 of the General Service category) for the laboratory are also expected to be engaged at that time and it should be possible to start operating the laboratory in the last quarter of 1960. It is estimated that the construction work will cost about US $400 000 and the total equipment will be worth between $200 000 and $300 000. The United States Government is donating $600 000 for this purpose. The operating costs during 1961, the first full year of operation, will be a little over $240 000. The scope of the laboratory should be limited to certain broad functions. The maximum functions envisaged were: (a) standardization of isotopes and preparation of radioactive standards; (b) calibration and adaptation of measuring equipment; (c) quality control of special materials for nuclear technology; (d) measurements and analysis in connexion with the Agency's safeguards and health and safety programme; and (e) services for Member States which can be undertaken with the facilities needed for the former activities. The idea behind this recommendation will be clear if it is remembered that the research functions of the Agency are governed mostly by its other activities, by its Statutory obligation to encourage and assist peaceful atomic energy work in Member States and establish standards for health and safety and for safeguards against military use

  15. Reflections About the Role of Intellectuals in Latin America Reflexiones acerca del rol de los intelectuales en América Latina Reflexões sobre o papel dos intelectuais na América Latina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Naidorf

    2010-10-01

    intellectual debate but to contribute to a not new but always applicable, which should be a breakthrough for each of our practices in the different social areas in which we daily work.

    En este trabajo nos proponemos abordar algunos aspectos teórico - conceptuales que contribuyan a la reflexión sobre la especificidad del papel del intelectual latinoamericano actual. Los aportes de diversos autores nos ayudarán a caracterizar un rol que se encuentra en permanente reformulación, análisis y discusión. La propuesta es retomar los desarrollos teóricos de la categoría de intelectual, desde Antonio Gramsci e Immanuel Wallerstein principalmente, pasando por sus momentos más intensos en la década del 60-70 con Sartre y Foucault en Europa. También se rescatan las contribuciones realizadas por Pierre Bourdieu, Sousa Santos y los aportes para América Latina de Fals Borda, Florestán Fernández, Octavio Ianni y Eliseo Verón, entre otros. Además se incluyen como ejemplos declaraciones del subcomandante Marcos para el EZLN y se hace referencia a los análisis realizados por Julio Gambina y Daniel Campione para el caso argentino. No es interés de este trabajo arribar a definiciones acabadas acerca de la función social del intelectual sino aportar a un debate no nuevo pero siempre vigente. Neste trabalho pretendemos abordar alguns aspectos teóricos-conceituais que contribuem para a reflexão sobre especificidade do papel do intelectual latino-americano atual. As contribuições de diferentes autores nos ajudam a caracterizar um papel que está constantemente sendo repensado, a análisado e discutido. A proposta é revisitar aos desenvolvimentos teóricos sobre o "intelectual" de Antonio Gramsci e Emanuel Wallerstein principalmente através dos debates mais intensos na década de 60-70 com Sartre e Foucault na Europa. Também se destacam as contribuições feitas por Pierre Bourdieu, Sousa Santos e contribuições desde América Latina de

  16. NASA Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) Tests of a 10 deg Cone at Mach 1.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.

    1997-01-01

    This work is part of the ongoing qualification of the NASA Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) as a low-disturbance (quiet) facility suitable for transition research. A 10 deg cone was tested over a range of unit Reynolds numbers (Re = 2.8 to 3.8 million per foot (9.2 to 12.5 million per meter)) and angles of incidence (O deg to 10 deg) at Mach 1.6. The location of boundary layer transition along the cone was measured primarily from surface temperature distributions, with oil flow interferometry and Schlieren flow visualization providing confirmation measurements. With the LFSWT in its normal quiet operating mode, no transition was detected on the cone in the test core, over the Reynolds number range tested at zero incidence and yaw. Increasing the pressure disturbance levels in the LFSWT test section by a factor of five caused transition onset on the cone within the test core, at zero incidence and yaw. When operating the LFSWT in its normal quiet mode, transition could only be detected in the test core when high angles of incidence (greater than 5 deg) for cones were set. Transition due to elevated pressure disturbances (Tollmien-Schlichting) and surface trips produced a skin temperature rise of order 4 F (2.2 C). Transition due to cross flows on the leeward side of the cone at incidence produced a smaller initial temperature rise of only order 2.5 F (1.4 C), which indicates a slower transition process. We can conclude that these cone tests add further proof that the LFSWT test core is normally low-disturbance (pressure fluctuations greater than 0.1%), as found by associated direct flow quality measurements discussed in this report. Furthermore, in a quiet test environment, the skin temperature rise is sensitive to the type of dominant instability causing transition. The testing of a cone in the LFSWT provides an excellent experiment for the development of advanced transition detection techniques.

  17. Laboratory Waste Management. A Guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    A primary goal of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Laboratory Waste Management is to provide laboratories with the information necessary to develop effective strategies and training programs for managing laboratory wastes. This book is intended to present a fresh look at waste management from the laboratory perspective, considering both…

  18. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxell, Wade [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2011-12-22

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSU's overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory's focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3

  19. Students' laboratory work performance assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Achumba, Ifeyinwa; Azzi, Djamel; Williams, Roy

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory activities are very important in engineering education. Performance assessment of students’ laboratory work is time consuming and an ongoing challenge for teachers. Laboratory work performance assessment is traditionally done by the teacher grading students’ written report of the laboratory activity, despite the fact that the report is often 'doctored'. Assessment of laboratory work based solely on students’ reports has been criticized as failing to address espoused aims. The asses...

  20. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  1. Genotoxicity assessment of NIM-76 and its formulation (pessary) in an in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vinod; Meshram, Ghansham P

    2013-10-01

    The possible genotoxic potential of NIM-76, a volatile fraction obtained from neem oil, having promising contraceptive activity, as well as its formulation product, called pessary (7.5% NIM-76 in polyethylene glycol), were evaluated in the Ames assay and mouse bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay. Genotoxicity of NIM-76 (0.1-1000 µg/plate) and pessary (0.1-10,000 µg/plate) were studied using the liquid preincubation protocol of the Ames assay both in the presence and absence of S9. Likewise, the ability of NIM-76 [1-1000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)] and its formulation product (18.75-300 mg/kg b.w.) to induce clastogenic effects were studied in the female mouse bone marrow MN test by using a two-dose intraperitoneal treatment protocol. There was no increase in the number of revertant colonies resulting from NIM-76 or pessary at any of their doses over the respective negative control plates, either in the presence or absence of S9. Similarly, in the MN assay, neither of them showed any clastogenic activity because there was no significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes, over the negative control group of animals. The use of this compound in humans is therefore not likely to have mutagenic effects and may be considered as safe with regard to genotoxic potential. PMID:23527474

  2. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns Collaborate with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project to Monitor and Study Restoration Efforts using NASA's Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Kuss, Amber Jean; Nguyen, Andrew; Schmidt, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the past, natural tidal marshes in the south bay were segmented by levees and converted into ponds for use in salt production. In an effort to provide habitat for migratory birds and other native plants and animals, as well as to rebuild natural capital, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) is focused on restoring a portion of the over 15,000 acres of wetlands in California's South San Francisco Bay. The process of restoration begins when a levee is breached; the bay water and sediment flow into the ponds and eventually restore natural tidal marshes. Since the spring of 2010 the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) DEVELOP student internship program has collaborated with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) to study the effects of these restoration efforts and to provide valuable information to assist in habitat management and ecological forecasting. All of the studies were based on remote sensing techniques -- NASA's area of expertise in the field of Earth Science, and used various analytical techniques such as predictive modeling, flora and fauna classification, and spectral detection, to name a few. Each study was conducted by a team of aspiring scientists as a part of the DEVELOP program at Ames.

  3. EL ÑAME (DIOSCOREA SPP.. CARACTERÍSTICAS, USOS Y VALOR MEDICINAL. ASPECTOS DE IMPORTANCIA EN EL DESARROLLO DE SU CULTIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. González Vega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años se ha alcanzado un incremento considerable en el cultivo del ñame; se observa que ocupa una nueva dimensión en la cadena alimentaria y está presente en el desarrollo de la agricultura familiar. En el presente trabajo se hace una amplia revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de dar a conocer las potencialidades de este cultivo, así como recopilar información que pueda resultar de interés a especialistas que se inicien en el cultivo, y a productores motivados en el mismo. Dentro de los aspectos relacionados con el cultivo del ñame (Dioscorea spp., se destacan sus características generales, aspectos etnobotánicos, distribución geográfica, usos más frecuentes, propagación; así como la importancia socioeconómica para países en vías de desarrollo, tanto desde el punto de vista alimentario como medicinal e industrial.

  4. Health Physics Laboratory - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The activities of the Health Physics Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ) in Cracow are principally research in the general area of radiation physics, dosimetry and radiation protection of the employees of the Institute. Theoretical research concerns modelling of radiation effects in radiation detectors and studies of concepts in radiation protection. Experimental research, in the general area of solid state dosimetry, is primarily concerned with thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry, and more specifically: development of LiF:Mg, Ti, CaF2:Tm and CVD diamond detectors for medical applications in conventional and hadron radiotherapy and of LiF:Mg, Cu, P and LiF:Mg, Cu, Si, Na for low-level natural external ionising radiation. Environmental radiation measurements (cosmic-rays on aircraft and radon in dwellings and soil) are also performed using track CR-39 and TLD detectors. The Laboratory provides expert advice on radiation protection regulations at national and international levels. Routine work of the Health Physics Laboratory involves design and maintenance of an in-house developed TL-based personnel dosimetry system for over 200 radiation workers at the INP, supervision of radiation safety on IFJ premises, and advising other INP laboratories on all matters pertaining to radiation safety. We provide personal and environmental TLD dosimetry services for several customers outside the IFJ, mainly in hospitals and nuclear research institutes in Poland. We also calibrate radiation protection instruments (400 per year) for customers in the southern region of Poland. The year 2001 was another eventful year for the Health Physics Laboratory. M. Waligorski has received his Professor of Physics state nomination from A. Kwasniewski, the President of Poland. P. Bilski and M. Budzanowski were granted their Ph.D. degrees by the Scientific Council of the Institute of Nuclear Physics. We continued several national and international research projects. Dr

  5. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), described in this document, supports a wide variety of projects. Each year more than 1000 scientists and engineers visit RAL to use its world-class laser and neutron-scattering facilities. RAL staff design and build instruments which circle the Earth in satellites, increasing our understanding of ozone depletion and global warming, of the life cycles of stars and galaxies and, indeed, of the origin of the Universe itself. They work with their academic colleagues at international laboratories such as European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, where massive underground machines probe the microstructure of the atomic nucleus. Vastly complex calculations are carried out on the design of anti-cancer drugs, for example, using supercomputers at RAL. (author)

  6. Process innovation laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Most organizations today are required not only to operate effective business processes but also to allow for changing business conditions at an increasing rate. Today nearly every business relies on their enterprise information systems (EIS) for process integration and future generations of EIS...... will increasingly be driven by business process models. Consequently business process modelling and improvement is becoming a serious challenge. The aim of this paper is to establish a conceptual framework for business process innovation (BPI) in the supply chain based on advanced EIS. The challenge is thus...... to create a new methodology for developing and exploring process models and applications. The paper outlines the process innovation laboratory as a new approach to BPI. The process innovation laboratory is a comprehensive framework and a collaborative workspace for experimenting with process models...

  7. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brünken, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limita...

  8. Health Physic Laboratory - overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waligorski, M.P.R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The activities of the Health Physics Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Krakow are principally research in the general area of radiation physics, and radiation protection of the employees of the Institute of Nuclear Physics. Theoretical research concerns radiation detectors, radiation protection (modelling of radiation effects in biological and physical systems) and studies of concepts in radiation protection. Experimental research concerns solid state dosimetry mainly thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry (present thrust: development of thin TL detectors for beta-ray and mixed neutron field dosimetry, development of ultra-sensitive LiF; Mg,Cu,P phosphors) and environmental radiation measurements (radon in dwellings, low-level natural radiation. The Laboratory provides expert advice on radiation protection regulations at national and international levels).

  9. Application of satellite data to the studies of agricultural meteorology: Relationship between ground temperature from GMS IR data and AMeDAS air temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study is to estimate air temperature in areas where there is no meteorological observation site, using satellite thermal IR data. Surface temperature from GMS IR data derived by eq. (1) was compared with AMeDAS (meteorological observation site) air temperature. The results are summarized as follows: 1) The maximum correlation coefficients between AMeDAS air temperature and surface temperature from GMS IR data is 0.90, the minimum is 0.30 and the mean is 0.60±0.15. 2) The correlation coefficients are affected by the precipitable water and decrease with increasing precipitable Water as shown in Fig. 2. 3) The correlation coefficients for each GMS observed time are better at night and in the morning than during the day (Table 2). 4) Also, the small values of the regression coefficients appear during the day and the large values at night and in the morning (Table 2). 5) The standard deviations which indicated scattering around the regression line are large at 12:00 and 15:00, but small at 06:00 and 09:00 (Table 2). The reason that correlation coefficients, regression coefficients and standard deviations between AMeDAS air temperature and surface temperature from GMS IR data are less during the day than at night and in the morning, is caused by ground conditions because the effects of solar radiation on surface temperature depend on ground surface conditions: plant cover, incline of slope etc. The hourly mean deviation from the regression line for surface temperature was calculated to investigate the characteristic of ground surface conditions for each AMeDAS observation site. AMeDAS observation sites were classified into four types according to the patterns of the hourly mean deviation as shown in Fig. 5. Most of type I were distributed in the plain regions: Ishikari, Konsen and Tokachi. Type II appears in the basin regions and type III on the coast of the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Okhotsuk. The remaining areas are type IV. The standard

  10. Hanford cultural resources laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M.K.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) which was established by the Richland Operations Office in 1987 as part of PNL.The HCRL provides support for the management of the archaeological, historical, and traditional cultural resources of the site in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

  11. Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wallerstein, Ralph O.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particul...

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations

  13. Remote Laboratory in Photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Samoila

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new concept of studying, understanding and teaching the performance of solar cells. Using NI ELVIS allows the realization of eight laboratory experiments which study all the important parameters of the solar cells. The model used for the equivalent circuit of the solar cell was the “one diode” model. For the realization of control, data acquisition and processing, a complex program was created, with a friendly interface, using the graphical programming language LabVIEW.

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  15. Cleanroom laboratory challenge overcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Ronan

    2010-10-01

    Ronan Quinn, managing director of interior construction specialist Ardmac, describes the challenges of building and fitting out a new cleanroom laboratory for blood and bone marrow therapeutic treatment at Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin in Dublin. The "state-of-the-art" facility, which fully complies with the recent EU Directive concerning human tissues and cells, has been well received by the client and end-users alike, but, as he explains, there were many obstacles to overcome during its completion.

  16. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options; the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase II study are described in the present report

  17. Exploration Laboratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, M.; Ronzano, K.; Shaw, T.

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability for manned exploration missions. Since a single, compact space-ready laboratory analysis capability to perform all exploration clinical measurements is not commercially available, the ELA project objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of emerging operational and analytical capability as a biomedical diagnostics precursor to long duration manned exploration missions. The initial step towards ground and flight demonstrations in fiscal year (FY) 2015 was the down selection of platform technologies for demonstrations in the space environment. The technologies selected included two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) performers: DNA Medicine Institutes rHEALTH X and Intelligent Optical Systems later flow assays combined with Holomics smartphone analyzer. The selection of these technologies were based on their compact size, breadth of analytical capability and favorable ability to process fluids in a space environment, among several factors. These two technologies will be advanced to meet ground and flight demonstration success criteria and requirements that will be finalized in FY16. Also, the down selected performers will continue the technology development phase towards meeting prototype deliverables in either late 2016 or 2017.

  18. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  19. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  20. Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study

  1. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 September 12-14, 2006 NASA Ames Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mambretti Richard desJardins

    2006-05-01

    A new generation of optical networking services and technologies is rapidly changing the world of communications. National and international networks are implementing optical services to supplement traditional packet routed services. On September 12-14, 2005, the Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), an invitation-only forum hosted by the NASA Research and Engineering Network (NREN) and co-sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), was held at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. The aim of ONT2 was to help the Federal Large Scale Networking Coordination Group (LSN) and its Joint Engineering Team (JET) to coordinate testbed and network roadmaps describing agency and partner organization views and activities for moving toward next generation communication services based on leading edge optical networks in the 3-5 year time frame. ONT2 was conceived and organized as a sequel to the first Optical Network Testbeds Workshop (ONT1, August 2004, www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). ONT1 resulted in a series of recommendations to LSN. ONT2 was designed to move beyond recommendations to agree on a series of “actionable objectives” that would proactively help federal and partner optical network testbeds and advanced research and education (R&E) networks to begin incorporating technologies and services representing the next generation of advanced optical networks in the next 1-3 years. Participants in ONT2 included representatives from innovative prototype networks (Panel A), basic optical network research testbeds (Panel B), and production R&D networks (Panels C and D), including “JETnets,” selected regional optical networks (RONs), international R&D networks, commercial network technology and service providers (Panel F), and senior engineering and R&D managers from LSN agencies and partner organizations. The overall goal of ONT2 was to identify and coordinate short and medium term activities and milestones for researching, developing, identifying

  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990

  3. [Accreditation of forensic laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sołtyszewski, Ireneusz

    2010-01-01

    According to the framework decision of the European Union Council, genetic laboratories which perform tests for the benefit of the law enforcement agencies and the administration of justice are required to obtain a certificate of accreditation testifying to compliance with the PN EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard. The certificate is the official confirmation of the competence to perform research, an acknowledgement of credibility, impartiality and professional independence. It is also the proof of establishment, implementation and maintenance of an appropriate management system. The article presents the legal basis for accreditation, the procedure of obtaining the certificate of accreditation and selected elements of the management system. PMID:21863740

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  5. Materials Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  6. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  7. Propulsion Systems Laboratory, Bldg. 125

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is NASAs only ground test facility capable of providing true altitude and flight speed simulation for testing full scale gas...

  8. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  9. Metallurgical Laboratory and Components Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In the field of metallurgy, TTC is equipped to run laboratory tests on track and rolling stock components and materials. The testing lab contains scanning-electron,...

  10. The National Fire Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Fire Research Laboratory (NFRL) is adding a unique facility that will serve as a center of excellence for fireperformance of structures ranging in size...

  11. Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science (TLAS), located in Cortland, New York, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). TLAS was established...

  12. High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The six user centers in the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML), a DOE User Facility, are dedicated to solving materials problems that limit the efficiency...

  13. How Reliable Is Laboratory Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... commonly used to determine the reliability of a clinical laboratory test. Two of these, accuracy and precision, reflect ... confidence your healthcare provider has in using the clinical laboratory. Accuracy and Precision Statistical measurements of accuracy and ...

  14. Almacenamiento de Trozos de Ñame (Dioscorea rotundata Poir en Atmósferas Modificadas Modified Atmosphere Packaging of Chunks Yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analizan las condiciones de conservación de trozos de ñame en empaques de películas poliméricas, bajo condiciones de atmósfera modificada. Se determina la tasa de respiración de trozos de ñame a temperatura de refrigeración (5 ± 1°C y temperatura ambiente (27 ± 1°C y se evalúan diferentes películas plásticas con atmosfera modificada. La tasa de respiración a temperatura de refrigeración fue de 2.9 ± 0.9 mlCO2/Kg-h (gráficamente y 3.2 ± 1.0 mlC0(2/Kg-h (analíticamente, y a temperatura ambiente de 20.1 ± 0.8 mlCO2/Kg-h (gráficamente y 22.4 ± 0.9 mlC0(2/Kg-h (analíticamente. El empacado en atmósfera modificada de los trozos de ñame mínimamente procesado, no resulta una buena alternativa, debido a que las condiciones de calidad del producto se ven afectadas, presentando un tiempo de vida útil corto entre 6-10 días.In this work storage conditions of chunks yam packed in polymer films with modified atmosphere are analyzed. Respiration rate of chunks yam at refrigeration temperature (5 ± 1°C and room temperature (27 ± 1°C and different films with modified atmosphere were evaluated. Respiration rate at refrigeration temperature was 2.9 ± 0.9 mlC0(2/Kg-h (graphically and 3.2 ± 1.0 mlC0(2/Kg-h (analytically, and room temperature of 20.1 ± 0.8 mlCO2/Kg-h (graphically and 22.4 ± 0.9 mlC0(2/Kg-h (analytically. Modified atmosphere packaging of minimally processed chunks yam is not a good alternative. This because the product quality is affected, with shelf life between 6 and10 days.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Biochemical Changes in Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Infected by Alternaria alternata and Its Toxic Metabolites (TeA, AOH, and AME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Mukesh; Zehra, Andleeb; Dubey, Manish K.; Aamir, Mohd; Gupta, Vijai K.; Upadhyay, Ram S.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated the comparative biochemical defense response generated against Alternaria alternata and its purified toxins viz. alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), and tenuazonic acid (TeA). The necrotic lesions developed due to treatment with toxins were almost similar as those produced by the pathogen, indicating the crucial role of these toxins in plant pathogenesis. An oxidative burst reaction characterized by the rapid and transient production of a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs following the pathogen infection/toxin exposure. The maximum concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced was reported in the pathogen infected samples (22.2-fold) at 24 h post inoculation followed by TeA (18.2-fold), AOH (15.9-fold), and AME (14.1-fold) in treated tissues. 3,3′- Diaminobenzidine staining predicted the possible sites of H2O2 accumulation while the extent of cell death was measured by Evans blue dye. The extent of lipid peroxidation and malondialdehyde (MDA) content was higher (15.8-fold) at 48 h in the sample of inoculated leaves of the pathogen when compared to control. The cellular damages were observed as increased MDA content and reduced chlorophyll. The activities of antioxidative defense enzymes increased in both the pathogen infected as well as toxin treated samples. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was 5.9-fold higher at 24 h post inoculation in leaves followed by TeA (5.0-fold), AOH (4.1-fold) and AME (2.3-fold) treated leaves than control. Catalase (CAT) activity was found to be increased upto 48 h post inoculation and maximum in the pathogen challenged samples followed by other toxins. The native PAGE results showed the variations in the intensities of isozyme (SOD and CAT) bands in the pathogen infected and toxin treated samples. Ascorbate peroxidase (APx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities followed the similar trend to scavenge the excess H2O2. The reduction in CAT

  16. Remote Electro-Analytical Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnanjali Gandhi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote Laboratories are web based distance learning laboratories that have immense potential to disseminate technology in the area of practical science. These laboratories can be accessed through Internet. In the present paper, we will be discussing our experiences in setting up a remote analytical laboratory at our center. Further, we will discuss remote experiments in the area of electro-analytical chemistry & colorimetry and their role in strengthening the system of science education.

  17. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  18. Handbook of laboratory techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority in Argentina have laboratories of support to regulations functions on radiological and nuclear safety, safeguards and physical protection, that have a surface of 2950 m2 in the Ezeiza Atomic Center. The manual describes in seven chapters the different techniques developed and applied in the laboratories along four decades of existence. The chapter 1: Dedicated to the treatment of environmental samples, described the procedures associated with the different types of samples: deposits, waters, sediments, vegetables, milk, fish and diet. The chapter 2: Details 48 radiochemical techniques associated to the measurements of americium 241, carbon 16, strontium 90, iodine 129, plutonium, radium 226, radon, uranium, nickel and actinides. The chapter 3: Describes the measurements techniques of alpha and gamma spectrometry. The different techniques of biological and physical dosimetry are described in the chapters 5 and 6 respectively. The final chapter is dedicated the techniques of external and internal contamination. It s important to emphasize that this manual contains the standardized technologies that the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina submits regularly to international comparisons

  19. Laboratory Materials: Affordances or Constraints?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rebecca C.; Ruibal-Villasenor, Maria; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory instruction is critical to the understanding of biology and is a central piece of biological sciences instruction. Although much investigation has focused on the content of biology laboratory exercises, we contend that understanding the extent to which the laboratory materials can aid or limit experimental investigation is of equal…

  20. Study of two- and multi-particle correlations in 12C+24Mg and 12C+208Pb reactions at E=35 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quattrocchi L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two and multi particle correlations from the decay of sources produced in 12C+24Mg and 12C+208Pb collisions at E=35 AMeV have been studied by using the forward part (1° < θlab < 30° of the CHIMERA multi-detector. Correlations and invariant mass spectroscopy are used to explore simultaneous and sequential decays of resonances in light isotopes with Z∼3-6, produced in peripheral collisions via the break-up of excited quasi-projectiles. Among them we mention 5Li, 6Li, 6Be, 8Be and the astrophysically important state in 12C decaying into three alpha particles. Results and future perspectives at the INFN-LNS will be presented.

  1. A Tale of Two Small Business Grants: The Best of Times, the Worst of Times from the NASA Ames Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Lee, Geoffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of the SBIR Program are to: stimulate technological innovation in the private sector; strengthen the role of Small Business Concerns (SBCs) in meeting Federal research and development needs; increase the commercial application of these research results; and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged persons and women-owned small businesses. The process can be highly rewarding, providing the small business with resources to pursue research and development with a focus on providing NASA with new and advanced capabilities. We present two examples of how the NASA Ames SBIR Program has addressed these purposes, nurturing innovative ideas from small, businesses into commercially viable products that also address analytical needs in space research. These examples, from the Science Instruments for Conducting Solar System Exploration Subtopic, describe the journey from innovative concept to analytical instrument, one successful and one hampered by numerous roadblocks (including some international intrigue}.

  2. 苯酚类化合物致突变Ames试验研究%Study on the mutagenicity of phenolic compounds by the Ames test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽; 徐镜波; 刘征涛

    2003-01-01

    采用鼠伤寒沙门氏菌体外回复突变试验(Ames test),对12种苯酚类化合物(5种烷基酚、6种氯酚、1种硝基酚)的致突变性进行了分析.研究结果表明除2,4-二氯苯酚外,其他11种苯酚类化合物对TA98菌株均具有直接致变作用,突变机理可能是移码突变.除此之外,对壬基苯酚对TA97和TA100,4-辛基苯酚对TA97也分别具有阳性诱导作用.

  3. ISODEC Experiment: study and comparison of the decay mode of 78Kr+40Ca and 86Kr+48Ca systems at 10 AMeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first results of the ISODEC experiment, performed at the INFN-LNS with the CHIMERA device, in order to study the competition between the various disintegration modes of 118,134Ba compound nuclei produced by bombarding 40,48Ca targets with beams of 78,86Kr at 10 AMeV. This work aims thus to explore the isospin dependence of the decay modes of medium mass compound nuclei formed by fusion processes. The experiment complements data already obtained at 5.5 MeV/A for 78,82Kr+40Ca reactions, studied by Ademard et al. with beams delivered by GANIL facility and by using the INDRA detector. (authors)

  4. Thermal modeling of the NASA-Ames Research Center Cryogenic Optical Test Facility and a single-arch, fused-natural-quartz mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y. S.; Augason, Gordon C.; Young, Jeffrey A.; Howard, Steven D.; Melugin, Ramsey K.

    1990-01-01

    A thermal model of the dewar and optical system of the Cryogenic Optical Test Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center was developed using the computer codes SINDA and MONTE CARLO. The model was based on the geometry, boundary conditions, and physical properties of the test facility and was developed to investigate heat transfer mechanisms and temperatures in the facility and in test mirrors during cryogenic optical tests. A single-arch, fused-natural-quartz mirror was the first mirror whose thermal loads and temperature distributions were modeled. From the temperature distribution, the thermal gradients in the mirror were obtained. The model predicted that a small gradient should exist for the single arch mirror. This was later verified by the measurement of mirror temperatures. The temperatures, predicted by the model at various locations within the dewar, were in relatively good agreement with the measured temperatures. The model is applicable to both steady-state and transient cooldown operations.

  5. Wind-tunnel investigation of a large-scale VTOL aircraft model with wing root and wing thrust augmentors. [Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, K.; Aiken, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale V/STOL aircraft model with thrust augmentors. The model had a double-delta wing of aspect ratio 1.65 with augmentors located in the wing root and the wing trailing edge. The supply air for the augmentor primary nozzles was provided by the YJ-97 turbojet engine. The airflow was apportioned approximately 74 percent to the wing root augmentor and 24 percent to wing augmentor. Results were obtained at several trailing-edge flap deflections with the nozzle jet-momentum coefficients ranging from 0 to 7.9. Three-component longitudinal data are presented with the agumentor operating with and without the horizontal tail. A limited amount of six component data are also presented.

  6. An Organoleptic Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, John M.

    1996-12-01

    Flavorings in foods and fragrances in personal care products is a topic often discussed in chemistry classes designed for the general education of non-science majors. A laboratory experiment has been designed to accompany the lecture topic. Compounds in ten different classes of organic molecules that are used in the fragrance and food industry are provided to students. Students whiff the vapors of each compound and describe the organoleptic properties using a set of terms utilized in the fragrance and food industry. A set of questions guides students to an understanding of the relationship between structure of molecules and smell. Students are permitted to create their own fragrance based on the results of the experiment. Student response has been favorable. The experiment rectifies misconceptions students have about structure and odor, and gives positive reinforcement to the lecture material.

  7. FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

  8. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Bailey, K.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Zappala, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport processes in the terrestrial environment, the long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr (half-life = 230 kyr) is the ideal tracer for studying old water and ice in the age range of 10^5-10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr dating, a concept pursued in the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of ATTA-3 (Jiang et al., GCA 91, 1-6; 2012), an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis method (Chen et al., Science 286, 1139-1141; 1999). The instrument is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10^-14-10^-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 - 1,500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 - 10 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 - 200 kg of water or 40 - 80 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the required sample size is generally smaller by an order of magnitude because of the isotope's higher initial abundance in the atmosphere. The Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is currently equipped to analyze up to 120 samples per year. With future equipment upgrades, this limit can be increased as demand grows. In the period since November 2011, the Laboratory has measured both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios in over 50 samples that had been extracted by collaborators from six different continents. The samples were from groundwater wells in the Great Artesian Basin (Australia), Guarani Aquifer (Brazil), and Locust Grove (Maryland); from brine wells of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (New Mexico); from geothermal steam vents in Yellowstone National Park; from near-surface ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica; and from deep mines in South Africa. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Illinois at Chicago, University

  9. CLOSTRIDIA IN LABORATORY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali P.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : The significance of anaerobic bacteria as human pathogens is well documented. We undertook this preliminary study to detect anaerobic clostridial infections from clinical samples. MATERIAL AND METHODS : 58 clinical samples from various sites were obtained d epending upon diverse manifestations during five consecutive years. They were subjected to direct smears using Gram stain and cultured anaerobically using Robertson’s cooked meat broth. Culture smears were read after incubation from 48 hours to 5 days. RES ULTS: Out of the 58 samples only 18 samples (25.86% grew Gram positive spore bearing bacilli. Most of the samples showed polymicrobial flora. There was a preponderance of Gram positive bacilli with subterminal and central spores (55.55%. CONCLUSION: Alth ough diagnostic anaerobiasis is tedious and time consuming all clinical microbiology laboratories should start the work in view of the significance of anaerobic infections. KEYWORDS: Anaerobes, Clostridia, Gram stain, Robertson’s cooked meat broth.

  10. [ISO 15189 medical laboratory accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tsutomu

    2004-10-01

    This International Standard, based upon ISO/IEC 17025 and ISO 9001, provides requirements for competence and quality that are particular to medical laboratories. While this International Standard is intended for use throughout the currently recognized disciplines of medical laboratory services, those working in other services and disciplines will also find it useful and appropriate. In addition, bodies engaged in the recognition of the competence of medical laboratories will be able to use this International Standard as the basis for their activities. The Japan Accreditation Board for Conformity Assessment (AB) and the Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (CCLS) are jointly developing the program of accreditation of medical laboratories. ISO 15189 requirements consist of two parts, one is management requirements and the other is technical requirements. The former includes the requirements of all parts of ISO 9001, moreover it includes the requirement of conformity assessment body, for example, impartiality and independence from any other party. The latter includes the requirements of laboratory competence (e.g. personnel, facility, instrument, and examination methods), moreover it requires that laboratories shall participate proficiency testing(s) and laboratories' examination results shall have traceability of measurements and implement uncertainty of measurement. Implementation of ISO 15189 will result in a significant improvement in medical laboratories management system and their technical competence. The accreditation of medical laboratory will improve medical laboratory service and be useful for patients. PMID:15624503

  11. [ISO 15189 medical laboratory accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tsutomu

    2004-10-01

    This International Standard, based upon ISO/IEC 17025 and ISO 9001, provides requirements for competence and quality that are particular to medical laboratories. While this International Standard is intended for use throughout the currently recognized disciplines of medical laboratory services, those working in other services and disciplines will also find it useful and appropriate. In addition, bodies engaged in the recognition of the competence of medical laboratories will be able to use this International Standard as the basis for their activities. The Japan Accreditation Board for Conformity Assessment (AB) and the Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (CCLS) are jointly developing the program of accreditation of medical laboratories. ISO 15189 requirements consist of two parts, one is management requirements and the other is technical requirements. The former includes the requirements of all parts of ISO 9001, moreover it includes the requirement of conformity assessment body, for example, impartiality and independence from any other party. The latter includes the requirements of laboratory competence (e.g. personnel, facility, instrument, and examination methods), moreover it requires that laboratories shall participate proficiency testing(s) and laboratories' examination results shall have traceability of measurements and implement uncertainty of measurement. Implementation of ISO 15189 will result in a significant improvement in medical laboratories management system and their technical competence. The accreditation of medical laboratory will improve medical laboratory service and be useful for patients.

  12. The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

  13. Human Monoclonal Antibody AVP-21D9 to Protective Antigen Reduces Dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames Strain from the Lungs in a Rabbit Model▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Baze, Wallace B.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-01-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  14. Human monoclonal antibody AVP-21D9 to protective antigen reduces dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain from the lungs in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W; Comer, Jason E; Baze, Wallace B; Noffsinger, David M; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-07-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  15. Die aktive Beteiligung deutschsprachiger Länder an den Konferenzen der Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE zwischen 2005 und 2013: Spiegelbild der Entwicklung der medizinischen Ausbildungsforschung?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raes, Patricia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objectives: Medical education is gaining in significance internationally. A growing interest in the field has been observed in German-speaking countries (Austria, Germany, Switzerland since the early 2000s. This interest is not, however, reflected in an increase in the number of publications on medical education of German-speaking authors in international professional journals. The following investigation examines the potential use of active participant numbers of German-speaking researchers at AMEE conferences as a means of measuring said development. Methods: The AMEE conference proceedings from the categories and from the years 2005-2013 were examined for evidence of Austrian, German and Swiss participation. The abstracts were subsequently analysed in terms of content and categorised according to , and .Results: Of the 9,446 analysed abstracts, 549 contributions show at least one first, last or co-author from Austria, Germany or Switzerland. The absolute number of contributions per conference varied between 44 in 2010 and 77 in 2013. The percentage fluctuated between 10% in 2005 and 4.1% in 2010. From the year 2010 onwards, however, participation increased continually. The research was predominantly descriptive (62.7%. Studies on fundamental questions of teaching and learning ( were less frequent (4.0%. For the most part, quantitative methods (51.9% were implemented in addressing subjects such as (33%, (22.4% or (14.4%. The study population was usually comprised of students (52.5%.Conclusions: The number of contributions from Austria, Germany and Switzerland peak at the beginning and at the end of the evaluated period of time. A continual increase in active participation since 2005 was not observed. These observations do not reflect the actual increase of interest in medical education research in German-speaking countries.

  16. Results from the EPL monkey-pod flight experiments conducted aboard the NASA/Ames CV-990, May 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlmann, D. F.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Pace, N.

    1976-01-01

    The participation of the Environmental Physiology Laboratory (EPL) in the general purpose laboratory concept verification test 3 is documented. The EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment was designed to incorporate a 10-12 kg, pig tailed monkey, Macaca nemestrina, into the pod and measure the physiological responses of the animal continously. Four major elements comprise the EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment System: (1) a fiberglass pod containing the instrumented monkey plus feeder and watering devices, (2) an inner console containing the SKYLAB mass spectrometer with its associated valving and electronic controls, sensing, control and monitoring units for lower body negative pressure, feeder activity, waterer activity, temperatures, and gas metabolism calibration, (3) an umbilical complex comprising gas flow lines and electrical cabling between the inner and outer console and (4) an outer console in principle representing the experiment support to be provided from general space craft sources.

  17. Results from the EPL monkey-pod experiment conducted as part of the 1974 NASA/Ames shuttle CVT-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlmann, D. F.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Pace, N.

    1974-01-01

    The participation of the Environmental Physiology Laboratory (EPL) in the general purpose laboratory concept verification test 3 is documented. The EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment was designed to incorporate a 10-12 kg, pig tailed monkey, Macaca nemestrina, into the pod and measure the physiological responses of the animal continuously. Four major elements comprise the EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment System: (1) a fiberglass pod containing the instrumented monkey plus feeder and watering devices, (2) an inner console containing the SKYLAB mass spectrometer with its associated valving and electronic controls, sensing, control and monitoring units for lower body negative pressure, feeder activity, waterer activity, temperatures, and gas metabolism calibration, (3) an umbilical complex comprising gas flow lines and electrical cabling between the inner and outer console and (4) an outer console in principle representing the experiment support to be provided from general spacecraft sources.

  18. Director, Laboratory Animal Care and Use Section

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIAMS Laboratory Animal Care and Use Section (LACU) provides support to all NIAMS Intramural Research Program (IRP) Branches and Laboratories using animals. The...

  19. Communications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheCommunications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory is a Public Safety interoperable communications technology laboratory with analog and digital radios, and...

  20. Laboratory instruction and subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Barolli

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific aspects which determined the way some groups of students conducted their work in a university laboratory, made us understand the articulation of these groups´s dynamics, from elements that were beyond the reach of cognition. In more specific terms the conduction and the maintenance of the groups student´s dynamics were explicited based on a intergame between the non conscious strategies, shared anonymously, and the efforts of the individuals in working based on their most objective task. The results and issues we have reached so far, using a reference the work developed by W.R.Bion, with therapeutical groups, gave us the possibility for understanding the dynamics of the student´s experimental work through a new approach that approximates the fields of cognition and subjectivity. This approximation led us to a deeper reflection about the issues which may be involved in the teaching process, particularly in situations which the teacher deals with the class, organised in groups.

  1. NSLS source development laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Blum, E.; Johnson, E.D. [and others

    1995-09-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) has initiated an ambitious project to develop fourth generation radiation sources. To achieve this goal, the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) builds on the experience gained at the NSLS, and at the highly successful BNL Accelerator Test Facility. The SDL accelerator system will consist of a high brightness short pulse linac, a station for coherent synchrotron and transition radiation experiments, a short bunch storage ring, and an ultra-violet free electron laser utilizing the NISUS wiggler. The electrons will be provided by a laser photocathode gun feeding a 210 MeV S-band electron linac, with magnetic bunch compression at 80 MeV. Electron bunches as short as 100 {mu}m with 1 nC charge will be used for pump-probe experiments utilizing coherent transition radiation. Beam will also be injected into a compact storage ring which will be a source of millimeter wave coherent synchrotron radiation. The linac will also serve as the driver for an FEL designed to allow the study of various aspects of single pass amplifiers. The first FEL configuration will be as a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL at 900 nm. Seeded beam and sub-harmonic seeded beam operations will push the output wavelength below 200 nm. Chirped pulse amplification (CPA) operation will also be possible, and a planned energy upgrade (by powering a fifth linac section) to 310 MeV will extend the wavelength range of the FEL to below 100 nm.

  2. Remote Microelectronics Fabrication Laboratory MEFLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Machotka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, there has been a move towards using remote laboratories in engineering education. The majority of these laboratories are static, involving limited user-controlled mechanical movements. The University of South Australia has developed such a laboratory, called NetLab that has been successfully utilized for teaching both on-campus and transnational programs in electrical and electronics engineering. Following this success, we are now developing a remote laboratory for microelectronic fabrication, MEFLab. The first stage of the development is a remote laboratory for visual inspection and testing of electronic circuits directly on the silicon wafer under a microscope which is normally conducted in a cleanroom. The major challenge of this project is the accurate positioning of micro-probes remotely over the internet. This paper presents the details of the setup of this new remote laboratory, with a particular emphasis on the development of the hardware, software and graphical user interface.

  3. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-03-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data from the whole class. This pedagogical method was reported earlier, and the present article offers a few more examples of such "whole class" laboratories.

  4. User facilities at federal laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, S.; Marcuse, W.

    1988-04-01

    Recent initiatives by the Congress and the Administration have been directed to improving American industrial competitiveness. One of these initiatives is directed to encouraging industrial users to avail themselves of special facilities existent at federal laboratories. The facilities available at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and seven Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories are presented here. One facility at each Laboratory is described in detail, the remainder are listed with the names and telephone numbers of individuals to contact for further information.

  5. Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory Makes Multi-Tasking Look Easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Carol Anne

    2009-01-01

    If it is one thing that Florida has in abundance, it is sunshine and with that sunshine heat and humidity. For workers at the Kennedy Space Center that have to work outside in the heat and humidity, heat exhaustion/stroke is a real possibility. It might help people to know that Kennedy's Biomedical Laboratory has been testing some new Koolvests(Trademark) that can be worn underneath SCAPE suits. They have also been working on how to block out high noise levels; in fact, Don Doerr, chief of the Biomedical Lab, says, "The most enjoyable aspect is knowing that the Biomedical Lab and the skills of its employees have been used to support safe space flight, not only for the astronaut flight crew, but just as important for the ground processing personnel as well." The NASA Biomedical Laboratory has existed in the John F. Kennedy's Operations and Checkout Building since the Apollo Program. The primary mission of this laboratory has been the biomedical support to major, manned space programs that have included Apollo, Apollo-Soyuz, Skylab, and Shuttle. In this mission, the laboratory has been responsible in accomplishing much of the technical design, planning, provision, fabrication, and maintenance of flight and ground biomedical monitoring instrumentation. This includes the electronics in the launch flight suit and similar instrumentation systems in the spacecraft. (Note: The Lab checked out the system for STS-128 at Pad A using Firing room 4 and ground support equipment in the lab.) During Apollo, there were six engineers and ten technicians in the facility. This has evolved today to two NASA engineers and two NASA technicians, a Life Science Support contract physiologist and part-time support from an LSSC nurse and physician. Over the years, the lab has enjoyed collaboration with outside agencies and investigators. These have included on-site support to the Ames Research Center bed rest studies (seven years) and the European Space Agency studies in Toulouse, France (two

  6. [Laboratory accreditation and proficiency testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwa, Katsuhiko

    2003-05-01

    ISO/TC 212 covering clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems will issue the international standard for medical laboratory quality and competence requirements, ISO 15189. This standard is based on the ISO/IEC 17025, general requirements for competence of testing and calibration laboratories and ISO 9001, quality management systems-requirements. Clinical laboratory services are essential to patient care and therefore should be available to meet the needs of all patients and clinical personnel responsible for human health care. If a laboratory seeks accreditation, it should select an accreditation body that operates according to this international standard and in a manner which takes into account the particular requirements of clinical laboratories. Proficiency testing should be available to evaluate the calibration laboratories and reference measurement laboratories in clinical medicine. Reference measurement procedures should be of precise and the analytical principle of measurement applied should ensure reliability. We should be prepared to establish a quality management system and proficiency testing in clinical laboratories. PMID:12806918

  7. Ethical Inspection about laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nai-bin; Pan, Xiao-jun; Cheng, Jing-jing; Lin, Jia-qiang; Zhu, Jia-yin

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory animals and animal experiments are foundations and important support conditions for life sciences, especially for medical research. The animal experiments have drawn extensive attention from the society because of the ethical issue. This paper takes Wenzhou Medical University as an example to give a brief introduction to the ethical review about laboratory animals in the university so as to further draw attention and concerns from the public about the ethical issue of laboratory animals. We successively introduce its scientific projects, nurturing environment and ethical review of laboratory animals. PMID:27215017

  8. Ground Systems Concepts Laboratory (GSCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — GSCL consists of high-performance CAD stations and associated software located in a secure facility. Capabilities: The GSCL provides infrastructure that allows the...

  9. Communication Systems Analysis Laboratory (CSAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CSAL conducts electronic warfare investigations of radio frequency communication systems with respect to current and emerging electronic warfare threats. CSAL uses...

  10. Space Solar Cell Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Measures, characterizes, and analyzes photovoltaic materials and devices. The primary focus is the measurement and characterization of solar cell response...

  11. Survivability Armor Ballistic Laboratory (SABL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SABL provides independent analysis, ballistic testing, data collection, data reduction and qualification of current and advanced armors. Capabilities: The SABL...

  12. Ethical Inspection about laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nai-bin; Pan, Xiao-jun; Cheng, Jing-jing; Lin, Jia-qiang; Zhu, Jia-yin

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory animals and animal experiments are foundations and important support conditions for life sciences, especially for medical research. The animal experiments have drawn extensive attention from the society because of the ethical issue. This paper takes Wenzhou Medical University as an example to give a brief introduction to the ethical review about laboratory animals in the university so as to further draw attention and concerns from the public about the ethical issue of laboratory animals. We successively introduce its scientific projects, nurturing environment and ethical review of laboratory animals.

  13. Thermal Manikins & Clothing Biophysics Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Five biophysical evaluation chambers containing fully sensored, articulated, moveable copper manikins, and other metallic models of feet and hands are available for...

  14. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappala, J. C.; Jiang, W.; Bailey, K. G.; Lu, Z. T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport in the terrestrial environment, 81Kr (half-life = 230,000 yr) is the ideal tracer for old water and ice with mean residence times in the range of 105-106 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating is now available to the earth science community at large thanks to the development of an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method. ATTA is a laser-based atom counting method where individual neutral atoms of the desired isotope are selectively captured by laser beams, and their fluorescence detected via a CCD camera. ATTA is unique among trace analysis techniques in that it is free of interferences from any other isotopes, isobars, atomic or molecular species. The ATTA instrument at Argonne's Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10-14-10-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 kyr - 1500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 kg of water or 40 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the sample size can be smaller by an order of magnitude. We are continually developing the method towards higher counting efficiency, smaller sample sizes requirements, and higher sample throughput rates. In the past four years, we have performed radiokrypton analysis of over 150 groundwater and ice samples extracted by collaborators from all seven continents. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Bern, and the International Atomic Energy Agency. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Laboratory diagnosis of thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaleoni, V; Di Pierro, E; Motta, I; Cappellini, M D

    2016-05-01

    The thalassemias can be defined as α- or β-thalassemias depending on the defective globin chain and on the underlying molecular defects. The recognition of carriers is possible by hematological tests. Both α- and β-thalassemia carriers (heterozygotes) present with microcytic hypochromic parameters with or without mild anemia. Red cell indices and morphology followed by separation and measurement of Hb fractions are the basis for identification of carriers. In addition, iron status should be ascertained by ferritin or zinc protoporphyrin measurements and the iron/total iron-binding capacity/saturation index. Mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin are markedly reduced (mean corpuscular volume: 60-70 fl; MCH: 19-23 pg) in β-thalassemia carriers, whereas a slight to relevant reduction is usually observed in α-carriers. HbA2 determination is the most decisive test for β-carrier detection although it can be disturbed by the presence of δ-thalassemia defects. In α-thalassemia, HbA2 can be lower than normal and it assumes significant value when iron deficiency is excluded. Several algorithms have been introduced to discriminate from thalassemia carriers and subjects with iron-deficient anemia; because the only discriminating parameter is the red cell counts, these formulas must be used consciously. Molecular analysis is not required to confirm the diagnosis of β-carrier, but it is necessary to confirm the α-thalassemia carrier status. The molecular diagnosis is essential to predict severe transfusion-dependent and intermediate-to-mild non-transfusion-dependent cases. DNA analysis on chorionic villi is the approach for prenatal diagnosis and the methods are the same used for mutations detection, according to the laboratory facilities and expertise. PMID:27183541

  16. Australia's marine virtual laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Roger; Gillibrand, Philip; Oke, Peter; Rosebrock, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    In all modelling studies of realistic scenarios, a researcher has to go through a number of steps to set up a model in order to produce a model simulation of value. The steps are generally the same, independent of the modelling system chosen. These steps include determining the time and space scales and processes of the required simulation; obtaining data for the initial set up and for input during the simulation time; obtaining observation data for validation or data assimilation; implementing scripts to run the simulation(s); and running utilities or custom-built software to extract results. These steps are time consuming and resource hungry, and have to be done every time irrespective of the simulation - the more complex the processes, the more effort is required to set up the simulation. The Australian Marine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) is a new development in modelling frameworks for researchers in Australia. MARVL uses the TRIKE framework, a java-based control system developed by CSIRO that allows a non-specialist user configure and run a model, to automate many of the modelling preparation steps needed to bring the researcher faster to the stage of simulation and analysis. The tool is seen as enhancing the efficiency of researchers and marine managers, and is being considered as an educational aid in teaching. In MARVL we are developing a web-based open source application which provides a number of model choices and provides search and recovery of relevant observations, allowing researchers to: a) efficiently configure a range of different community ocean and wave models for any region, for any historical time period, with model specifications of their choice, through a user-friendly web application, b) access data sets to force a model and nest a model into, c) discover and assemble ocean observations from the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au/webportal/) in a format that is suitable for model evaluation or data assimilation, and

  17. The direction of the laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of the presentation of the 1988 Polytechnic School (France) research programs, the activities concerning each laboratory, are summarized. Several aspects of the programs are considered: the main projects, the results, the planned researches and the technical means. The personnel of the laboratory, their number in the different categories, the published papers, the patents and the thesis are included

  18. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-01-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data…

  19. Laboratory solvent reuse -- Liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlin, W.T.; Schaffer, C.L.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a method for reduction of waste solvent in the Process Engineering Chemistry Laboratory. The liquid chromatographs are the largest generators of explosive-contaminated waste in the laboratory. We developed a successful process for the reuse of solvents from the liquid chromatographs and demonstrated the utility of the process in the assay of hexanitrostilbene.

  20. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations

  1. A laboratory animal science pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostomitsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-11-01

    Nikolaos Kostomitsopoulos, DVM, PhD, is Head of Laboratory Animal Facilities and Designated Veterinarian, Center of Clinical, Experimental Surgery and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Dr. Kostomitsopoulos discusses his successes in implementing laboratory animal science legislation and fostering collaboration among scientists in Greece.

  2. Comparative genotoxicity testing of Rhine river sediment extracts using the comet assay with permanent fish cell lines (RTG-2 and RTL-W1) and the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosmehl, T.; Braunbeck, T.; Hollert, H. [Dept. of Zoology, Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Section, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Krebs, F.; Manz, W. [German Federal Inst. of Hydrology, Koblenz (Germany); Erdinger, L. [Dept. for Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Inst. for Hygiene, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Whilst at least in Germany assessment strategies on the basis of chemical analysis and acute toxicity data dominated the last decades, the development of more specific biological endpoints and biomarkers in ecotoxicology is required in order to arrive at a good ecological potential and good chemical status of surface waters in the European river basins until the year 2015, as required by the European Water Framework Directive. Since sediments have for long been known to function both as a sink and as a source of pollutants in aquatic systems, and since part of the particle-associated substances have frequently been demonstrated to cause mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in aquatic organisms, particularly in fish, there is, among other requirements, an urgent need to develop, standardize and implement integrated vertebrate-based test systems addressing genotoxicity into recent sediment investigation strategies. Thus, the present study was designed to compare the suitability of two commonly used test systems, the comet assay and the Ames test, for the evaluation of the ecotoxicological burden of surface and core sediment samples from the river Rhine. Methods (or main features). In order to determine the importance of inherent enzymatic activities, two permanent fish cell lines with different biotransformation capacities, RTL-W1 and RTG-2, were compared with respect to their capability of detecting genotoxic effects in 18 surface and core sediment samples from 9 locations along the river Rhine in the comet assay with and without exogenous bioactivation. For further comparison, as a prokaryotic mutagenicity assay, the Salmonella plate incorporation assay (Ames test) with the test strains TA98 and TA100 with and without exogenous metabolic activation was used. Results and discussion. Whereas all sediment extracts induced genotoxic effects in the comet assay with RTL-W1 cells, only 12 out of 18 sediment extracts revealed significant genotoxicity in the tests with the

  3. Virtual robotics laboratory for research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Gerard T.

    1995-09-01

    We report on work currently underway to put a robotics laboratory onto the Internet in support of teaching and research in robotics and artificial intelligence in higher education institutions in the UK. The project is called Netrolab. The robotics laboratory comprises a set of robotics resources including a manipulator, a mobile robot with an on-board monocular active vision head and a set of sonar sensing modules, and a set of laboratory cameras to allow the user to see into the laboratory. The paper will report on key aspect of the project aimed at using multimedia tools and object-oriented techniques to network the robotics resources and to allow them to be configured into complex teaching and experimental modules. The paper will outline both the current developments of Netrolab and provide a perspective on the future development of networked virtual laboratories for research.

  4. 白眉蝮蛇毒精氨酸酯酶Ames试验%Evaluation of arginine esterase from Agkistrodon halys ussuriensis venom for gene mutation in Ames test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦传宝; 徐建芬

    2003-01-01

    目的研究白眉蝮蛇(Agkistrodon halys ussuriensis)毒中精氨酸酯酶的致突变作用.方法用鼠伤寒沙门细菌营养缺陷型突变株TA97 ,TA98,TA100和 TA102,采用平皿掺入法进行Ames试验,将实验分为加和不加代谢激活系统S9 2组平行试验.精氨酸酯酶设6个浓度:10.0×10-3, 5.0×10-3, 2.5×10-3, 1.25×10-3, 0.625×10-3和0.312×10-3 U/mL.结果加和不加代谢激活系统S9两种条件下,精氨酸酯酶不诱发鼠伤寒沙门细菌营养缺陷型突株的回复突变.Ames试验结果为阴性.结论从致突变角度考虑,精氨酸酯酶在高于"蝮蛇清栓酶"(主要成分为精氨酸酯酶)临床治疗剂量约1000倍的条件下仍然较安全.%OBJECTIVE To investigate the gene mutagenesis of arginine esterase from Agkistrodon halys ussuriensis venom. METHOD The Salmaonella typhimurium/mammalian microsomal test (Ames Test) was conducted using histidine requiring Salmonella typhimurium indicator strains TA97,TA98,TA100 and TA102.The arginine esterase was tested by the plate incorporation assay with and without metabolic activation system S9 mixture at six concentrations, namely,10.0×10-3, 5.0×10-3, 2.5×10-3, 1.25×10-3, 0.625×10-3 and 0.312×10-3U/mL.RESULTS The result demonstrated that either in the presence or absence of metabolic activation system S9 mixture, arginine esterase was unable to induce gene mutation in these strains at above concentrations and its Ames test result was negative.CONCLUSION If its gene mutagenesis is considered as an important factor, arginine esterase is still safe at the dosage of about 1000 times higher than clinical used dosage of the drug "Qingshuanmei" whose main component is arginie esterase.

  5. Inhalational anthrax (Ames aerosol) in naïve and vaccinated New Zealand rabbits: characterizing the spread of bacteria from lung deposition to bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutting, Bradford W; Nichols, Tonya L; Channel, Stephen R; Gearhart, Jeffery M; Andrews, George A; Berger, Alan E; Mackie, Ryan S; Watson, Brent J; Taft, Sarah C; Overheim, Katie A; Sherwood, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to better understand inhalational anthrax in relevant animal models. This understanding could aid risk assessment, help define therapeutic windows, and provide a better understanding of disease. The aim here was to characterize and quantify bacterial deposition and dissemination in rabbits following exposure to single high aerosol dose (> 100 LD(50)) of Bacillus anthracis (Ames) spores immediately following exposure through 36 h. The primary goal of collecting the data was to support investigators in developing computational models of inhalational anthrax disease. Rabbits were vaccinated prior to exposure with the human vaccine (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA) or were sham-vaccinated, and were then exposed in pairs (one sham and one AVA) so disease kinetics could be characterized in equally-dosed hosts where one group is fully protected and is able to clear the infection (AVA-vaccinated), while the other is susceptible to disease, in which case the bacteria are able to escape containment and replicate uncontrolled (sham-vaccinated rabbits). Between 4-5% of the presented aerosol dose was retained in the lung of sham- and AVA-vaccinated rabbits as measured by dilution plate analysis of homogenized lung tissue or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. After 6 and 36 h, >80% and >96%, respectively, of the deposited spores were no longer detected in BAL, with no detectable difference between sham- or AVA-vaccinated rabbits. Thereafter, differences between the two groups became noticeable. In sham-vaccinated rabbits the bacteria were detected in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) 12 h post-exposure and in the circulation at 24 h, a time point which was also associated with dramatic increases in vegetative CFU in the lung tissue of some animals. In all sham-vaccinated rabbits, bacteria increased in both TBLN and blood through 36 h at which point in time some rabbits succumbed to disease. In contrast, AVA-vaccinated rabbits showed small numbers of CFU in

  6. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain mostly

  7. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  8. Can in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity test results be used to complement positive results in the Ames test and help predict carcinogenic or in vivo genotoxic activity?: I. Reports of individual databases presented at an EURL ECVAM Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    KIRKLAND David; Zeiger, Errol; MADIA FEDERICA; Gooderham, Nigel; Kasper, Peter; Lynch, Anthony; Morita, Takeshi(Department of Physics, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka, 422-8529, Japan); OUEDRAOGO G; PARRA MORTE Juan Manuel; Pfuhler, Stefan; Rogiers, Vera; Schulz, Markus; THYBAUD Veronique; Benthem, Jan Van; Vanparys, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Positive results in the Ames test correlate well with carcinogenic potential, at least in rodents. However, the correlation is not perfect because mutagenesis is not carcinogenesis, and mutations are only one of many stages in tumour development. Also, situations can be envisaged where the mutagenic response may be specific to the bacteria or the test protocol, for example bacterial-specific metabolism, exceeding a detoxification threshold or the induction of oxidative damage to which bacteri...

  9. Recent Progresses in Laboratory Astrophysics with Ames’ COSmIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-06-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) [3] and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [4] and planetary atmospheres [5]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References: [1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Salama F., Galazutdinov G., Krelowski J

  10. Laboratory Astrophysics Studies with the COSmIC Facility: Interstellar and Planetary Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar S.; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2015-08-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory astrophysics results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [3] and planetary atmospheres [4]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References:[1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Cesar Contreras and Farid Salama, The

  11. 75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ..., 1978 (43 FR 60013). As stated in its scope (Sec. 58.1), this regulation prescribes good laboratory... CONTACT: C. T. Viswanathan, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration,...

  12. Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

  13. OSHA Laboratory Standard: Driving Force for Laboratory Safety!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Laboratory Safety Standards as the major driving force in establishing and maintaining a safe working environment for teachers and students. (Author)

  14. Clinical laboratory accreditation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoo, Anil; Sood, Swaroop Krishan

    2012-06-01

    Test results from clinical laboratories must ensure accuracy, as these are crucial in several areas of health care. It is necessary that the laboratory implements quality assurance to achieve this goal. The implementation of quality should be audited by independent bodies,referred to as accreditation bodies. Accreditation is a third-party attestation by an authoritative body, which certifies that the applicant laboratory meets quality requirements of accreditation body and has demonstrated its competence to carry out specific tasks. Although in most of the countries,accreditation is mandatory, in India it is voluntary. The quality requirements are described in standards developed by many accreditation organizations. The internationally acceptable standard for clinical laboratories is ISO15189, which is based on ISO/IEC standard 17025. The accreditation body in India is the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories, which has signed Mutual Recognition Agreement with the regional cooperation the Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and with the apex cooperation the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation. PMID:22727005

  15. Ames Imaging Library System- A Source of NASA's Images & Photos%艾姆斯图像数字图书馆:带你寻找太空的奥秘

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕权; 杨皓东; 江凌; 迟凯; 赵锐

    2011-01-01

    艾姆斯(Ames)图像数字图书馆旨在记录并提供美国航天局(NASA)艾姆斯研究中心在众多开发项目和活动中所拍摄的照片和图像.作为NASA资助的数字图书馆项目之一,该馆面向学生、教育工作者、科学家等广大用户,使其成为他们学习研究有关宇航影像的信息资源中心.文章从资源组织、服务特征、界面设计等方面对AILS作了概要评述,同时给出了笔者的评价与建议.%Ames Imaging Library System (AILS) is a living collection of still images that chronicles the projects and activities of the US NASA's Ames Research Center, intending to be a source for students, educators, scientists and interesting parties to learn/retrieve related image & photo objects. This paper provides an overview of the major development of its digital collection and organization, service provided and interface designed Authors' comments and suggestions are also given.

  16. Identificación, establecimiento in vitro y análisis fitoquímico preliminar de especies silvestres de ñame (Dioscorea spp. empleadas con fines medicinales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Andrés Ramos Duarte

    2015-05-01

    ás avanzados de los compuestos presentes y plantear su propagación masiva en condiciones in vitro. Palabras clave: diosgenina, micropropagación, ñame silvestre, cultivo de tejidos vegetales, saponinas, fitoquímica.Abstract:  Wild tubers of the genus Dioscorea sold for medicinal use were collected for the purpose of achieving its establishment under in vitro conditions. First we taxonomically identified the species and through phytochemical analysis demonstrated pharmaceutical potential. The material collected was identified as Dioscorea coriacea, D. lehmannii, D. meridensis, D. polygonoides and the edible species D. trifida. Tubers collected from wholesale distributors and from the field were washed, disinfected, sprayed with Gibberellic Acid (GA3 and planted in substrate BM-2®, in a greenhouse at 18 ° C during the day and 10 ° C overnight. Whole tubers or sections thereof were stored in sealed bags at room temperature. Subsequently plant material of the species D. coriacea, D. lehmannii, D. meridensis and D. polygonoides was disinfected and healthy buds (D. coriacea / laboratory were selected for in vitro establishment. Three different culture media were evaluated for establishment; that which presented the best results was the Murashige & Skoog (1962 medium, supplemented with BAP 1 mL / L, GA3 1 mL / L and Putrescin 2 mL / L. For the collection and analysis of secondary metabolites, tubers of D. coriacea, D. lehmannii and D. polygonoides were used, using methanol as the extraction solvent. The highest concentration of plant extract, 54%, was found in D. coriacea, a higher value than that of D. polygonoides, which had been reported previously; the presence of saponins was confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC. These results will enable more advanced analysis of the present compounds and enhance their mass propagation under in vitro conditions.Key words: diosgenin, micropropagation, wild yam, tissue culture, saponins, phitochemistry.Recibido: agosto 20 de 2014

  17. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity studies of DRDE-07 and its analogs against sulfur mustard in the in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vinod; Pathak, Uma; Meshram, Ghansham Pundilikji

    2014-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM), a chemical warfare agent, is classified as a class I human carcinogen by IARC. No effective antidote against this agent is available. The synthetic aminothiol, amifostine, earlier known as WR-2721, has been extensively used as a chemical radioprotector for normal tissues in cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy. SM is a radiomimetic agent; this prompted us to evaluate the protective efficacy of amifostine and three of its analogs, DRDE-07 [S-2(2-aminoethylamino) ethyl phenyl sulphide], DRDE-30 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl propyl sulphide] and DRDE-35 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl butyl sulphide], against sulfur mustard-induced mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay. The antidotes were also evaluated for possible mutagenic activity. DRDE-07 was mutagenic in strain TA104 in the absence of S9; DRDE-30 was mutagenic in strain TA100; amifostine and DRDE-35 did not show mutagenic activity in any of the five tester strains used. SM is mutagenic in strains TA97a and TA102, with or without S9 activation. In the antimutagenicity studies, DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 showed promising antimutagenic activity against SM in the absence of S9, in comparison to amifostine. DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 are promising protective agents against SM-induced mutagenicity.

  18. Graphene for Preconcentration of Trace Amounts of Ni in Water and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues from Liver Loggerhead Turtles Specimens Prior to flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanie Arbabi Rashid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new sensitive and simple method was developed for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Ni using 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol (PAN as chelating reagent prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method is based on the uti- lization of a column packed with graphene as sorbent. Several effective parameters on the extraction and complex formation were selected and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the concentration range of 5.0–240.0 µg L-1 with a detection limit of 0.36 µg L-1. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 20.0 and 100.0 µg L-1 of Ni were 3.45 and 3.18%, respectively. Comparative studies showed that graphene is superior to other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, and single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of Ni. In the present study, we report the application of preconcentration techniques still continues increasingly for trace metal determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS for quantification of Ni in Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues from Liver loggerhead turtles. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of four real environmental water samples. Good spiked recoveries over the range of 95.8–102.6% were obtained.

  19. Control-value theory: using achievement emotions to improve understanding of motivation, learning, and performance in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artino, Anthony R; Holmboe, Eric S; Durning, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the emergent theoretical and empirical work on human emotion and how this work can inform the theory, research, and practice of medical education. In the Guide, we define emotion, in general, and achievement emotions, more specifically. We describe one of the leading contemporary theories of achievement emotions, control-value theory (Pekrun 2006), and we distinguish between different types of achievement emotions, their proximal antecedents, and their consequences for motivation, learning, and performance. Next, we review the empirical support for control-value theory from non-medical fields and suggest several important implications for educational practice. In this section, we highlight the importance of designing learning environments that foster a high degree of control and value for students. Finally, we end with a discussion of the need for more research on achievement emotions in medical education, and we propose several key research questions we believe will facilitate our understanding of achievement emotions and their impact on important educational outcomes.

  20. Proposed Use of the NASA Ames Nebula Cloud Computing Platform for Numerical Weather Prediction and the Distribution of High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at NASA Ames Research Center provides an open-source solution for the deployment of scalable computing and storage capabilities relevant to the execution of real-time weather forecasts and the distribution of high resolution satellite data to the operational weather community. Two projects at Marshall Space Flight Center may benefit from use of the Nebula system. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center facilitates the use of unique NASA satellite data and research capabilities in the operational weather community by providing datasets relevant to numerical weather prediction, and satellite data sets useful in weather analysis. SERVIR provides satellite data products for decision support, emphasizing environmental threats such as wildfires, floods, landslides, and other hazards, with interests in numerical weather prediction in support of disaster response. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) has been configured for Nebula cloud computing use via the creation of a disk image and deployment of repeated instances. Given the available infrastructure within Nebula and the "infrastructure as a service" concept, the system appears well-suited for the rapid deployment of additional forecast models over different domains, in response to real-time research applications or disaster response. Future investigations into Nebula capabilities will focus on the development of a web mapping server and load balancing configuration to support the distribution of high resolution satellite data sets to users within the National Weather Service and international partners of SERVIR.

  1. Understanding transport simulations of heavy-ion collisions at 100 and 400 AMeV: Comparison of heavy ion transport codes under controlled conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jun; Tsang, ManYee Betty; Wolter, Hermann; Zhang, Ying-Xun; Aichelin, Joerg; Colonna, Maria; Cozma, Dan; Danielewicz, Pawel; Feng, Zhao-Qing; Fevre, Arnaud Le; Gaitanos, Theodoros; Hartnack, Christoph; Kim, Kyungil; Kim, Youngman; Ko, Che-Ming; Li, Bao-An; Li, Qing-Feng; Li, Zhu-Xia; Napolitani, Paolo; Ono, Akira; Papa, Massimo; Song, Taesoo; Su, Jun; Tian, Jun-Long; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yong-Jia; Weil, Janus; Xie, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Transport simulations are very valuable for extracting physics information from heavy-ion collision experiments. With the emergence of many different transport codes in recent years, it becomes important to estimate their robustness in extracting physics information from experiments. We report on the results of a transport code comparison project. 18 commonly used transport codes were included in this comparison: 9 Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck-type codes and 9 Quantum-Molecular-Dynamics-type codes. These codes have been required to simulate Au+Au collisions using the same physics input for mean fields and for in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, as well as the same initialization set-up, the impact parameter, and other calculational parameters at 100 and 400 AMeV incident energy. Among the codes we compare one-body observables such as rapidity and transverse flow distributions. We also monitor non-observables such as the initialization of the internal states of colliding nuclei and their stability, the co...

  2. Antimutagenic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Activities of Silybum Marianum [L.] Gaertn Assessed by the Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay (Ames Test) and the Micronucleus Test in Mice Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Flávio Fernandes Veloso; Silva, Carolina Ribeiroe; Véras, Jefferson Hollanda; Cardoso, Clever Gomes; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Chen, Lee Chen

    2016-07-01

    Silymarin (SM), a standardized extract from Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn., is composed mainly of flavonolignans, and silibinin (SB) is its major active constituent. The present study aimed to evaluate the antimutagenic activities of SM and SB using the Ames mutagenicity test in Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as their anticytotoxic and antigenotoxic activities using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. To assess antimutagenicity, Salmonella Typhimurium strains were treated with different concentrations of SM or SB and the appropriate positive control for each strain. To assess antigenotoxicity and anticytotoxicity, Swiss mice were treated with different concentrations of SM or SB and mitomycin C (MMC). The results showed that SM was not significantly effective in reducing the number of frameshift mutations in strain TA98, while SB demonstrated significant protection at higher doses (P < 0.05). Regarding strain TA 100, SM and SB significantly decreased mutagenicity (point mutations) (P < 0.05). The results of the antigenotoxic evaluation demonstrated that SM and SB significantly reduced the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) (P < 0.05). The results also indicated that SM and SB significantly attenuated MMC-induced cytotoxicity (P < 0.05). Based on these results, both SM and SB presented antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic actions.

  3. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  4. Laboratory Techniques for the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombaugh, Dorothy

    1972-01-01

    Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

  5. Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, H. John

    2004-01-01

    The topics addressed in this viewgraph presentation include information on 1) Historic instruments at Goddard; 2) Integrated Design Capability at Goddard; 3) The Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL).

  6. Geoacoustic Physical Model Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Fabricates three-dimensional rough surfaces (e.g., fractals, ripples) out of materials such as PVC or wax to simulate the roughness properties associated...

  7. Research laboratories annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1990-1991 activities, of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission's research laboratories, are presented in this report. The main fields of interest are chemistry and material sciences, life and environmental sciences, nuclear physics and technology

  8. Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The SARL is a unique high contraction, open circuit subsonic wind tunnel providing a test velocity up to 436 mph (0.5 Mach number) and a high quality,...

  9. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing capabilities at Sandia Laboratories are characterized. Selected applications of these capabilities are presented to illustrate the extent to which they can be applied in research and development programs

  10. [Quality management in medical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzer-Szekeres, M

    2010-05-01

    During the 20th century understanding for quality has changed and international and national requirements for quality have been published. Therefore also medical branches started to establish quality management systems. Quality assurance has always been important for medical laboratories. Certification according to the standard ISO 9001 and accreditation according to the standard ISO 17025 have been the proof of fulfilling quality requirements. The relatively new standard ISO 15189 is the first standard for medical laboratories. This standard includes technical and management requirements for the medical laboratory. The main focus is the proof of competence within the personnel. As this standard is accepted throughout the European Union an increase in accreditations of medical laboratories is predictable. PMID:20454753

  11. Renowned European Laboratory turns 50

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A European Laboratory that was the birthplace of the World Wide Web and home of Nobel prize-winning developments in the quest to understand the makeup of matter wished itself a happy 50th birtheday on Tuesday

  12. Research System Integration Laboratory (SIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The VEA Research SIL (VRS) is essential to the success of the TARDEC 30-Year Strategy. The vast majority of the TARDEC Capability Sets face challenging electronics...

  13. Certificate of Waiver Laboratory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CLIA requires all laboratories that examine materials derived from the human body for diagnosis, prevention, or treatment purposes to be certified by the Secretary...

  14. Small Sat Analysis Laboratory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop Small Satellite Analysis Laboratory (SatLab): A simulation-of-simulations framework to integrate component and engineering simulations into a single larger...

  15. Metallurgical Laboratory (MET-LAB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MET-LAB can perform materials characterization for all types of metallic components and systems to any industry-specific or military standard. Capabilities: The...

  16. Biometrics Research and Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As the Department of Defense moves forward in its pursuit of integrating biometrics technology into facility access control, the Global War on Terrorism and weapon...

  17. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NOAA-GLERL and its partners conduct innovative research on the dynamic environments and ecosystems of the Great Lakes and coastal regions to provide information for...

  18. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  19. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2003-06-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  20. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002

  1. Linking Laboratories to the Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles

    1997-04-01

    Most introductory physics courses include both laboratory experiments and lecture. However, the two are often taught as separate courses with little coordination of their curricula. We have addressed this problem by developing laboratory exercises which support, and are supported by, learning in other parts of the course. An example will show how the curriculum in different segments of our course reinforce each other in an attempt to increase student learning.

  2. Real Laboratories for Distance Education

    OpenAIRE

    McCracken, Stuart; Zilic, Zeljko; Chan, Henry

    2003-01-01

    Providing distance laboratory-based courses is becoming critical for distance technical education. In this work, we describe remote laboratories in digital system courses. While the hardware is based on widely used programmable logic, the Internet interfaces include those for remote development, testing and debugging as well as the cooperative work environment. Special attention has been paid to the objectivity of evaluating the remote cooperative work. The web tools for project progress eval...

  3. The role of big laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the role of big laboratories in their function as research infrastructures. Starting from the general definition and features of big laboratories, the paper goes on to present the key ingredients and issues, based on scientific excellence, for the successful realization of large-scale science projects at such facilities. The paper concludes by taking the example of scientific research in the field of particle physics and describing the structures and methods required to be implemented for the way forward.

  4. 吐温80作为Ames试验中样品溶剂的可行性研究%Feasibility studies on Tween 80 used as sample solvent in Ames test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林春芳; 陈明中

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨吐温80作为Ames试验中样品溶剂的可行性.方法:分别以二甲基亚砜和含25%吐温80的水溶液为溶剂,进行蜂胶类、鱼油类、辅酶Q10类产品的溶解度试验和Ames试验.结果:蜂胶类、鱼油类、辅酶Q10类产品在二甲基亚砜中的溶解度分别为在含25%吐温80的水溶液中溶解度的23.30%、37.26%和26.73%.两种溶剂对TA97、TA98、TA100和TA102菌株均无毒性;同一样品5个剂量组在不同溶剂条件下的实验结果均无显著性差别;三种样品的Ames试验结果均为阴性.结论:吐温80是一种较为理想的Ames试验样品溶剂.%Objective:To investigate the feasibility of Tween 80 used as a sample solvent in Ames test. Methods: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 25% Tween 80 aqueous solution were used to solve propolis, fish oil and coenzyme Q10 to make solubility tests and Ames tests. Results: The solubilities of propolis, fish oil and coenzyme Q10 in DMSO were only 23.30% ,37.26% and 26.73% of those in 25% Tween 80 aqueous solution. Both solvents were nontoxic for TA97 ,TA98,TA100 and TA102 Salmonella bacteria strains. In all 5 dosage groups, the Ames test results for every sample solved in 25% Tween 80 aqueous solution were the same as those solved in DMSO. The Ames test results of 3 samples were all negative. Conclusion: Tween 80 is an ideal sample solvent in Ames test.

  5. The Accreditation of Laboratories Proficiency and Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recently, China National Accreditation Board for Laboratories (CNAL) has released CNAL/AC23:2004 Medical Laboratories: Accreditation Criteria For Quality and Proficiency, and meanwhile GB 19489 Laboratories: General Requirements For Biosafety and ISO 15190 Medical Laboratories-Requirements For Safetywill be adopted by CNAL as the accreditation criteria for laboratories safety.

  6. CAECC Software Testing Laboratory Accredited by CNAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Software Testing Laboratory of China Aerospace Engineering and Consultation Center (CAECC) is accredited by China National Accreditation Board for Laboratories (CNAL) as the first such laboratory in domestic space industry. Since CNAL is a member of International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC),software testing reports certificated to CAECC are recognized by 45 laboratory accreditation organizations in AsiaPacific region, Europe and America.

  7. Commercialization of a DOE Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 1, 1998, Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc) began business as an employee-owned, commercial, applied research laboratory offering services to both government and commercial clients. The laboratory had previously been a support laboratory to DoE's gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge (K-25). When uranium enrichment was halted at the site, the laboratory was expanded to as an environmental demonstration center and served from 1992 until 1997 as a DOE Environmental User Facility. In 1997, after the laboratory was declared surplus, it was made available to the employee group who operated the laboratory for DOE as a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. This paper describes briefly the process of establishing the business. Attributes that contributed to the success of MCLinc are described. Some attention is given to lessons learned and to changes that could facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. Lessons learnt: as with any business venture, operation over time has revealed that some actions taken by the laboratory founders have contributed to its successful operation while others were not so successful. Observations are offered in hopes that lessons learned may suggest actions that will facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. First, the decision to vest significant ownership of the business in the core group of professionals operating the business is key to its success. Employee-owners of the laboratory have consistently provided a high level of service to its customers while conducting business in a cost-efficient manner. Secondly, an early decision to provide business support services in-house rather than purchasing them from support contractors on site have proven cost-effective. Laboratory employees do multiple tasks and perform overhead tasks in addition to their chargeable technical responsibilities. Thirdly, assessment of technical capabilities in view of market needs and a decision to offer these

  8. Radioactive Standards Laboratory ININ as a reference laboratory in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GarcíaDíaz, O; MartínezAyala, L; HerreraValadez, L; TovarM, V; Karam, L

    2016-03-01

    The Radioactive Standards Laboratory of the National Institute of Nuclear Research is the National reference laboratory for the measurement of radioactivity in Mexico. It has a gamma-ray spectrometry system with a high-purity Ge-detector for measurements from 50 keV to 2000 keV, and develops standardized radioactive (beta-particle and gamma-ray emitting) sources in different geometries with uncertainties less than or equal to 5% for applications such as the calibration of radionuclide calibrators (clinically used dose calibrators), Ge-detectors and NaI(Tl) detectors. PMID:27358942

  9. An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory for the Space Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.; Anderson, J.; Schrick, B.; Ellsworth, C.; Davis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Results of research and engineering analyses to date show that it is feasible to develop and fly on the first Spacelab mission a multipurpose laboratory in which experiments can be performed on the microphysical processes in atmospheric clouds. The paper presents a series of tables on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory, with attention given to experiment classes, the preliminary equipment list (particle generators, optical and imaging devices, particle detectors and characterizers, etc.), initial equipment (scientific equipment subsystems and flight support subsystems), and scientific functional requirements (the expansion chamber, the continuous flow diffusion chamber, the static diffusion chamber, the humidifier, and particle generators).

  10. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Among the many cancer research laboratories operated by NCI, the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research(FNLCR) is unique in that it is a Federally Funded...

  11. Virtual Laboratories and Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Piet

    2008-05-01

    Since we cannot put stars in a laboratory, astrophysicists had to wait till the invention of computers before becoming laboratory scientists. For half a century now, we have been conducting experiments in our virtual laboratories. However, we ourselves have remained behind the keyboard, with the screen of the monitor separating us from the world we are simulating. Recently, 3D on-line technology, developed first for games but now deployed in virtual worlds like Second Life, is beginning to make it possible for astrophysicists to enter their virtual labs themselves, in virtual form as avatars. This has several advantages, from new possibilities to explore the results of the simulations to a shared presence in a virtual lab with remote collaborators on different continents. I will report my experiences with the use of Qwaq Forums, a virtual world developed by a new company (see http://www.qwaq.com).

  12. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  13. Neutron Stars in the Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Graber, Vanessa; Hogg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neutron stars are astrophysical laboratories of many extremes of physics. Their rich phenomenology provides insights into the state and composition of matter at densities which cannot be reached in terrestrial experiments. Since the core of a mature neutron star is expected to be dominated by superfluid and superconducting components, observations also probe the dynamics of large-scale quantum condensates. The testing and understanding of the relevant theory tends to focus on the interface between the astrophysics phenomenology and nuclear physics. The connections with low-temperature experiments tend to be ignored. However, there has been dramatic progress in understanding laboratory condensates (from the different phases of superfluid helium to the entire range of superconductors and cold atom condensates). In this review, we provide an overview of these developments, compare and contrast the mathematical descriptions of laboratory condensates and neutron stars and summarise the current experimental state-o...

  14. Virtual Laboratories and Virtual Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, Piet

    2007-01-01

    Since we cannot put stars in a laboratory, astrophysicists had to wait till the invention of computers before becoming laboratory scientists. For half a century now, we have been conducting experiments in our virtual laboratories. However, we ourselves have remained behind the keyboard, with the screen of the monitor separating us from the world we are simulating. Recently, 3D on-line technology, developed first for games but now deployed in virtual worlds like Second Life, is beginning to make it possible for astrophysicists to enter their virtual labs themselves, in virtual form as avatars. This has several advantages, from new possibilities to explore the results of the simulations to a shared presence in a virtual lab with remote collaborators on different continents. I will report my experiences with the use of Qwaq Forums, a virtual world developed by a new company (see http://www.qwaq.com)

  15. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology investigates the organization, compartmentalization, and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and the pathology associated...

  16. Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities, Equipment, and Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The following facilities, equipment, and capabilities are available in the Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities and Equipment (1) Subsonic, open-jet wind tunnel with...

  17. Missile Electro-Optical Countermeasures Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory comprises several hardware-in-the-loop missile flight simulations designed specifically to evaluate the effectiveness of electro-optical air defense...

  18. Electro-Optics/Low Observables Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electro-Optics/Low Observables Laboratory supports graduate instruction for students enrolled in the Low Observables program. Its purpose is to introduce these...

  19. Aircraft Wiring Support Equipment Integration Laboratory (AWSEIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Aircraft Wiring Support Equipment Integration Laboratory (AWSEIL) provides a variety of research, design engineering and prototype fabrication services...

  20. High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory, researchers characterize and model devices operating at terahertz (THz) and millimeter-wave frequencies. The...

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, Mark B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-20

    Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

  2. Evaluación de métodos para la conservación de hongos fitopatógenos del ñame (Dioscorea sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeimy Alexandra Pinzón Gutiérrez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Un elemento esencial en la investigación con microorganismos fitopatógenos es su conservación y uso seguro. Desde este punto de vista, en este estudio se evaluaron métodos de conservación de hongos que atacan el ñame, empleando como factores de respuesta el potencial de viabilidad, y la estabilidad y presencia o ausencia de cambios en las características macro y microscópicas. Como resultado del trabajo se proponen los métodos más adecuados para los géneros Colletotrichum y Fusarium, hongos causantes de las mayores pérdidas en las plantaciones de ñame en la Costa Caribe colombiana. Las cepas utilizadas en este estudio provienen de las colecciones de la Universidad de Sucre, del Instituto de Biotecnología de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia (IBUN y de una donación de la doctora Lucía Afanador de la Universidad Nacional, Sede Medellín. Estas fueron sometidas a diferentes métodos de conservación, entre ellos criopreservación, liofilización y cultivo periódico con y sin aceite mineral. Los resultados obtenidos permitieron elegir la criopreservación como el método más eficiente para la conservación de la colección, y el cultivo periódico con aceite mineral como método alternativo y complementario. Estos minimizan el riesgo de pérdida del material biológico y brindan condiciones de manejo que conservan las características biológicas bajo estudio desde campos como la microbiología, la bioquímica y la biología molecular, entre otros. Palabras clave: criopreservación; liofilización; cultivo periódico; Colletotrichum sp.; Fusarium sp. Abstract: An essential element in phytopathogenic microorganism research is their preservation and safe use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate methods for preserving fungi producing diseases in yam, using potential viability, stability and the presence or absence of macro- and microscopic characteristic changes as response factors. More suitable methods for Colletotrichum and

  3. Laboratory Studies of Astrophysical Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Jets and outflows produced during star-formation are observed on many scales: from the "micro-jets" extending a few hundred Astronomical Units to the "super-jets" propagating to parsecs distances. Recently, a new "class" of short-lived (hundreds of nano-seconds) centimetre-long jets has emerged in the laboratory as a complementary tool to study these complex astrophysical flows. Here I will discuss and review the recent work done on "simulating" protostellar jets in the laboratory using z-pinch machines.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A. (ED.); Hale, M.R. (comp.)

    1987-08-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index.

  5. [Laboratory diagnosis of growth hormone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, V; Mariano, A

    1993-09-01

    The role of Clinical Pathology Laboratory in normal and altered growth hormone secretion is discussed. In particular, it is reported that the normal GH secretion can be studied by serum and urine GH determinations whereas the diagnosis of GH deficiency rests upon the demonstration of an inadequate rise serum GH after provocative stimuli and serum measurement of somatomedins (IGF-I) by radioimmunoassay method. As it concerns increase GH secretion the diagnosis is clinically made (acromegaly and gigantism) and the laboratory has only the role to confirm it by the assessment of basal and stimulated GH secretion. PMID:7910655

  6. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index

  7. Assessment by Ames test and comet assay of toxicity potential of polymer used to develop field-capable rapid-detection device to analyze environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Amanda; Bishop, Michelle; Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Gleason, Karen; Torosian, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    There is need for devices that decrease detection time of food-borne pathogens from days to real-time. In this study, a rapid-detection device is being developed and assessed for potential cytotoxicity. The device is comprised of melt-spun polypropylene coupons coated via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) with 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT), for conductivity and 3-Thiopheneethanol (3TE), allowing antibody attachment. The Ames test and comet assay have been used in this study to examine the toxicity potentials of EDOT, 3TE, and polymerized EDOT-co-3TE. For this study, Salmonella typhimurium strain TA1535 was used to assess the mutagenic potential of EDOT, 3TE and the copolymer. The average mutagenic potential of EDOT, 3TE and copolymer was calculated to be 0.86, 0.56, and 0.92, respectively. For mutagenic potential, on a scale from 0 to 1, close to 1 indicates low potential for toxicity, whereas a value of 0 indicates a high potential for toxicity. The comet assay is a single-cell gel electrophoresis technique that is widely used for this purpose. This assay measures toxicity based on the area or intensity of the comet-like shape that DNA fragments produce when DNA damage has occurred. Three cell lines were assessed; FRhK-4, BHK-21, and Vero cells. After averaging the results of all three strains, the tail intensity of the copolymer was 8.8 % and tail moment was 3.0, and is most similar to the untreated control, with average tail intensity of 5.7 % and tail moment of 1.7. The assays conducted in this study provide evidence that the copolymer is non-toxic to humans.

  8. Inhalational anthrax (Ames aerosol in naive and vaccinated New Zealand rabbits: characterizing the spread of bacteria from lung deposition to bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford eGutting

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to better understand inhalational anthrax in relevant animal models. This understanding could aid risk assessment, help define therapeutic windows, and provide a better understanding of disease. The aim here was to characterize and quantify bacterial deposition and dissemination in rabbits following exposure to single high aerosol dose (>100LD50 of Bacillus anthracis (Ames spores immediately following exposure through 36 hours. The primary goal of collecting the data was to support investigators in developing computational models of inhalational anthrax disease. Rabbits were vaccinated prior to exposure with the human vaccine (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA or were sham-vaccinated, and were then exposed in pairs (1 sham and 1 AVA so disease kinetics could be characterized in equally-dosed hosts where one group is fully protected and is able to clear the infection (AVA-vaccinated, while the other is susceptible to disease, in which case the bacteria are able to escape containment and replicate uncontrolled (sham-vaccinated rabbits. Between 4-5% of the presented aerosol dose was retained in the lung of sham- and AVA-vaccinated rabbits as measured by dilution plate analysis of homogenized lung tissue or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. After 6 and 36 hours, >80% and >96%, respectively, of the deposited spores were no longer detected in BAL, with no detectable difference between sham- or AVA-vaccinated rabbits. Thereafter, differences between the two groups became noticeable. In sham-vaccinated rabbits the bacteria were detected in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN 12 hours post exposure and in the circulation at 24 hours, a time point which was also associated with dramatic increases in vegetative CFU in the lung tissue of some animals. In all sham-vaccinated rabbits, bacteria increased in both TBLN and blood through 36 hours at which point in time some rabbits succumbed to disease. In contrast, AVA-vaccinated rabbits showed

  9. Full-scale S-76 rotor performance and loads at low speeds in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Vol. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Patrick M.

    1996-01-01

    A full-scale helicopter rotor test was conducted in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel with a four-bladed S-76 rotor system. Rotor performance and loads data were obtained over a wide range of rotor shaft angles-of-attack and thrust conditions at tunnel speeds ranging from 0 to 100 kt. The primary objectives of this test were (1) to acquire forward flight rotor performance and loads data for comparison with analytical results; (2) to acquire S-76 forward flight rotor performance data in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel to compare with existing full-scale 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test data that were acquired in 1977; (3) to evaluate the acoustic capability of the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel for acquiring blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise in the low speed range and compare BVI noise with in-flight test data; and (4) to evaluate the capability of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel test section as a hover facility. The secondary objectives were (1) to evaluate rotor inflow and wake effects (variations in tunnel speed, shaft angle, and thrust condition) on wind tunnel test section wall and floor pressures; (2) to establish the criteria for the definition of flow breakdown (condition where wall corrections are no longer valid) for this size rotor and wind tunnel cross-sectional area; and (3) to evaluate the wide-field shadowgraph technique for visualizing full-scale rotor wakes. This data base of rotor performance and loads can be used for analytical and experimental comparison studies for full-scale, four-bladed, fully articulated rotor systems. Rotor performance and structural loads data are presented in this report.

  10. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  11. Federal laboratories for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

  12. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  13. Laboratory directed research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  14. Enteric parasitology. Interpreting laboratory reports.

    OpenAIRE

    MacPherson, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Intestinal parasites are common in the stools of human beings. With care and due attention to the techniques of testing, they are relatively easy to find. Unfortunately, deciding on the clinical importance of stool findings is often difficult. This article is an introduction and guide to interpreting enteric parasitology laboratory reports.

  15. Hand hygiene among laboratory workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alp, E.; Haverkate, D.; Voss, A.

    2006-01-01

    We performed a study to measure the compliance of laboratory personnel with different components of hand hygiene. The level of compliance at the end of duty was 100%; however, 36.7% of subjects wore a ring, 46.9% wore a watch, and 6.1% wore a bracelet. Pathogenic microorganisms were exclusively foun

  16. Particle physics laboratory turns 50

    CERN Multimedia

    Berdik, Chris

    2004-01-01

    For a half-century, physicists from all over the world have sought out the most fundamental structures of the universe from deep beneath the mountains of Switzerland. On Saturday, the laboratory in which they did their work, CERN, capped off a year of celebrations for its 50th annviersary (½ page)

  17. Guide for Science Laboratory Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, John J.

    General and specific safety procedures and recommendations for secondary school science laboratories are provided in this guide. Areas of concern include: (1) chemicals (storage, disposal, toxicity, unstable and incompatible chemicals); (2) microorganisms; (3) plants; (4) animals; (5) electricity; (6) lasers; (7) rockets; (8) eye safety and…

  18. Death in a catheterization laboratory.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, B C; Higginson, L A; Beanlands, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess current rates of death from diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization as well as changes in the rates, if any, from 1977 to 1991. DESIGN: A prospective descriptive study. SETTING: Catheterization laboratory, University of Ottawa Heart Institute. PATIENTS: Consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures from 1977 to 1991. Those undergoing endomyocardial biopsy or electrophysiologic study were excluded. INTERVENTIONS: Cardiac catheterization w...

  19. Biological Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, James W.

    1963-01-01

    This laboratory located about 40 miles west of Detroit, near the intersection of highways I-94 and US-23, can be reached by bus, railroad, or via commercial airlines to Detroit Willow Run or Metropolitan airports. Field biological stations are located in Wisconsin at Ashland; in Ohio at Sandusky; and in Michigan at Ludington, Marquette, Millersburg, and Northville.

  20. In-Flight Laboratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, David; Perusek, Gail; Nelson, Emily; Krihak, Michael; Brown, Dan

    2012-01-01

    One-year study objectives align with HRP requirements. HRP requirements include measurement panels for research and medical operations - These measurement panels are distinctly different. Instrument requirements are defined - Power, volume and mass not quite a critical limitation as for medical operations (deep space exploration missions). One-year evaluation goals will lead HHC towards in-flight laboratory analysis capability.